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Sample records for cardiac output measurements

  1. Cardiac output measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Möller Petrun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, developments in the measuring of cardiac output and other haemodynamic variables are focused on the so-called minimally invasive methods. The aim of these methods is to simplify the management of high-risk and haemodynamically unstable patients. Due to the need of invasive approach and the possibility of serious complications the use of pulmonary artery catheter has decreased. This article describes the methods for measuring cardiac output, which are based on volume measurement (Fick method, indicator dilution method, pulse wave analysis, Doppler effect, and electrical bioimpedance.

  2. Comparison of cardiac output measurement techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, K; Jensen, E W; Rosenborg, D;

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneously measured cardiac output obtained by thermodilution (TD), transcutaneous suprasternal ultrasonic Doppler (DOP), CO2-rebreathing (CR) and the direct Fick method (FI) were compared in eleven healthy subjects in a supine position (SU), a sitting position (SI), and during sitting exercise...... at a workload of 50 W (EX). The agreements between the techniques, two by two, were expressed as the bias calculated as the averaged differences between the techniques. Precision was expressed as the standard deviation of the bias. The overall agreement (bias +/- precision) between TD, DOP and CR respectively...... and CR, respectively, and TD were 2.5 +/- 2.2 and 2.6 +/- 1.6 l/min. The overall agreement between DOP and CR was 0.1 +/- 1.6 l/min. In conclusion, TD overestimated cardiac output compared to the other techniques and the poor agreement has to be taken into consideration especially in measures of low...

  3. Videodensitometric Methods for Cardiac Output Measurements

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    Massimo Mischi

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac output is often measured by indicator dilution techniques, usually based on dye or cold saline injections. Developments of more stable ultrasound contrast agents (UCA are leading to new noninvasive indicator dilution methods. However, several problems concerning the interpretation of dilution curves as detected by ultrasound transducers have arisen. This paper presents a method for blood flow measurements based on UCA dilution. Dilution curves are determined by real-time densitometric analysis of the video output of an ultrasound scanner and are automatically fitted by the Local Density Random Walk model. A new fitting algorithm based on multiple linear regression is developed. Calibration, that is, the relation between videodensity and UCA concentration, is modelled by in vitro experimentation. The flow measurement system is validated by in vitro perfusion of SonoVue contrast agent. The results show an accurate dilution curve fit and flow estimation with determination coefficient larger than 0.95 and 0.99, respectively.

  4. Invasive and non-invasive methods for cardiac output measurement

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    Lavdaniti M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemodynamic status monitoring of high-risk surgical patients and critically ill patients inIntensive Care Units is one of the main objectives of their therapeutic management. Cardiac output is one of the mostimportant parameters for cardiac function monitoring, providing an estimate of whole body perfusion oxygen deliveryand allowing for an understanding of the causes of high blood pressure. The purpose of the present review is thedescription of cardiac output measurement methods as presented in the international literature. The articles documentthat there are many methods of monitoring the hemodynamic status of patients, both invasive and non-invasive, themost popular of which is thermodilution. The invasive methods are the Fick method and thermodilution, whereasthe non-invasive methods are oeshophaegeal Doppler, transoesophageal echocardiography, lithium dilution, pulsecontour, partial CO2 rebreathing and thoracic electrical bioimpedance. All of them have their advantages and disadvantages,but thermodilution is the golden standard for critical patients, although it does entail many risks. The idealsystem for cardiac output monitoring would be non-invasive, easy to use, reliable and compatible in patients. A numberof research studies have been carried out in clinical care settings, by nurses as well as other health professionals, for thepurpose of finding a method of measurement that would have the least disadvantages. Nevertheless, the thermodilutiontechnique remains the most common approach in use today.

  5. Validation of transpulmonary thermodilution cardiac output measurement in a pediatric animal model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemson, J.; Boode, W.P. de; Hopman, J.C.W.; Singh, S.K.; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to validate the transpulmonary thermodilution cardiac output measurement (CO(TPTD)) in a controlled newborn animal model under various hemodynamic conditions with special emphasis on low cardiac output. DESIGN: Prospective, experimental, pediatric animal study. S

  6. Cardiac output measurement using a modified carbon dioxide Fick method: a validation study in ventilated lambs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boode, W.P. de; Hopman, J.C.W.; Daniels, O.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Liem, K.D.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac output can be measured using a modified carbon dioxide Fick (mCO2F) method. A validation study was performed comparing mCO2F method-derived cardiac output (Q(mCO2F)) with invasively measured pulmonary blood flow. In seven randomly bred ventilated newborn lambs, cardiac output was manipulated

  7. EVALUATION OF CONTINUOUS THERMODILUTION METHOD FOR CARDIAC OUTPUT MEASUREMENT

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    Roman Parežnik

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Continuous monitoring of haemodynamic variables is often necessary for detection of rapid changes in critically ill patients. In our patients recently introduced continuous thermodilution technique (CTD for cardiac output measurement was compared to bolus thermodilution technique (BTD which is a »golden standard« method for cardiac output (CO measurement in intensive care medicine.Methods. Ten critically ill patients were included in a retrospective observational study. Using CTD method cardiac output was measured continuously. BTD measurements using the same equipment were performed intermittently. The data obtained by BTD were compared to those obtained by CTD just before the BTD (CTD-before and 2–3 minutes after the BTD (CTD-after. The CO values were divided into three groups: all CO values, CO > 4.5 L/min, CO < 4.5 L/min. The bias (mean difference between values obtained by two methods, standard deviation, 95% confidence limits and relative error were calculated and the linear regression analysis was performed. t-test for pared data was used to compare the biases for CTD-before and CTD-after for an individual group. The p value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results. A total of 60 data triplets were obtained. CTD-before ranged from 1.9 L/min to 12.6 L/min, CTD-after from 2.0 to 13.2 L/min and BTD from 1.9 to 12.0 L/min. For all CO values the bias for CTD-before was 0.13 ± 0.52 L/min (95% confidence limits 1.17–0.91 L/min, relative error was 3.52 ± 15.20%, linear regression equation was CTD-before = 0.96 × BTD + 0.01 and Pearson’s correlation coefficient was 0.95. The values for CTD-after were 0.08 ± 0.46 L/min (1.0–0.84 L/min, 2.22 ± 9.05%, CTD-after = 0.98 × BTD + 0.01 and 0.98 respectively. For all CO values there was no statistically significant difference between biases for CTD-before and CTD-after (p = 0,51. There was no statistically significant difference between biases for CTD

  8. Continuous measurement of cardiac output using stochastic system identification techniques.

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    Yelderman, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Indicator dilutions techniques offer the most reliable methods of determining clinical cardiac output because of the elastic nature of the cardiac vessels. A catheter-mounted beating filament affords a simple means of supplying "heat" indicator, but is power and temperature limited because of possible patient injury. A stochastic signal processing method using pseudorandom binary infusion of heat offers a process of enhancing the signal to noise sufficiently to facilitate a computation of cardiac output over a reasonable time period (5 min) with a clinically acceptable error.

  9. A computerised dichromatic earpiece densitometer for the measurement of cardiac output.

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    Robinson, P S; Crowther, A; Jenkins, B S; Webb-Peploe, M M; Coltart, D J

    1979-07-01

    This study assesses a precalibrated dichromatic earpiece densitometer and microprocessor for the measurement of cardiac output by indocyanine green dye dilution. The measured cardiac output is compared with values of cardiac output simultaneously determined using a cuvette densitometer. The microprocessor computation of cardiac output agreed very closely with the cardiac output determined by manual calculation from the same dye dilution curves (standard deviation +/- 1.47%). The reproducibility of the earpiece densitometer (standard deviation +/- 5.2%) was virtually identical to that of the cuvette densitometer (+/- 5.3%). In a comparison of earpiece and cuvette densitometers for 60 measurements of cardiac output following pulmonary arterial injection of dye and for 50 measurements following femoral venous injection of dye, correlation coefficients were 0.83 and 0.78 and the standard deviations of the differences of simultaneous measurements were 7.2% and 8.3% respectively. The instrument offers an accurate reproducible and relatively noninvasive technique for measuring cardiac output.

  10. Measurement of cardiac output from dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT

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    Yee, Seonghwan, E-mail: Seonghwan.Yee@Beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States); Scalzetti, Ernest M. [Department of Radiology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York 13210 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To introduce a method of estimating cardiac output from the dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT that is primarily used to determine the optimal time window of CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA). Methods: Dynamic pulmonary circulation time CT series, acquired for eight patients, were retrospectively analyzed. The dynamic CT series was acquired, prior to the main CTPA, in cine mode (1 frame/s) for a single slice at the level of the main pulmonary artery covering the cross sections of ascending aorta (AA) and descending aorta (DA) during the infusion of iodinated contrast. The time series of contrast changes obtained for DA, which is the downstream of AA, was assumed to be related to the time series for AA by the convolution with a delay function. The delay time constant in the delay function, representing the average time interval between the cross sections of AA and DA, was determined by least square error fitting between the convoluted AA time series and the DA time series. The cardiac output was then calculated by dividing the volume of the aortic arch between the cross sections of AA and DA (estimated from the single slice CT image) by the average time interval, and multiplying the result by a correction factor. Results: The mean cardiac output value for the six patients was 5.11 (l/min) (with a standard deviation of 1.57 l/min), which is in good agreement with the literature value; the data for the other two patients were too noisy for processing. Conclusions: The dynamic single-slice pulmonary circulation time CT series also can be used to estimate cardiac output.

  11. Validation of a continuous, arterial pressure-based cardiac output measurement: a multicenter, prospective clinical trial.

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    McGee, William T; Horswell, Jeffrey L; Calderon, Joachim; Janvier, Gerard; Van Severen, Tom; Van den Berghe, Greet; Kozikowski, Lori

    2007-01-01

    The present study compared measurements of cardiac output by an arterial pressure-based cardiac output (APCO) analysis method with measurement by intermittent thermodilution cardiac output (ICO) via pulmonary artery catheter in a clinical setting. The multicenter, prospective clinical investigation enrolled patients with a clinical indication for cardiac output monitoring requiring pulmonary artery and radial artery catheters at two hospitals in the United States, one hospital in France, and one hospital in Belgium. In 84 patients (69 surgical patients), the cardiac output was measured by analysis of the arterial pulse using APCO and was measured via pulmonary artery catheter by ICO; to establish a reference comparison, the cardiac output was measured by continuous cardiac output (CCO). Data were collected continuously by the APCO and CCO technologies, and at least every 4 hours by ICO. No clinical interventions were made as part of the study. For APCO compared with ICO, the bias was 0.20 l/min, the precision was +/- 1.28 l/min, and the limits of agreement were -2.36 l/m to 2.75 l/m. For CCO compared with ICO, the bias was 0.66 l/min, the precision was +/- 1.05 l/min, and the limits of agreement were -1.43 l/m to 2.76 l/m. The ability of APCO and CCO to assess changes in cardiac output was compared with that of ICO. In 96% of comparisons, APCO tracked the change in cardiac output in the same direction as ICO. The magnitude of change was comparable 59% of the time. For CCO, 95% of comparisons were in the same direction, with 58% of those changes being of similar magnitude. In critically ill patients in the intensive care unit, continuous measurement of cardiac output using either APCO or CCO is comparable with ICO. Further study in more homogeneous populations may refine specific situations where APCO reliability is strongest.

  12. Measurement of cardiac output in adult and newborn animals by ascorbic acid dilution.

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    Smallwood, J K; Haselby, K A; Paradise, R R

    1984-05-01

    We have developed an ascorbic acid-dilution method for measuring cardiac output which requires minimal blood withdrawal. Ascorbate is injected into a central venous catheter. The indicator-dilution curve is obtained by drawing blood from an arterial catheter through an amperometric cell at 0.96 ml/min for 35 s. The current is measured by a picoammeter . A calibration curve is obtained in 15 s prior to each indicator-dilution curve. An on-line digital computer measures the curve areas and calculates the cardiac output. Cardiac outputs of heparinized dogs anesthetized with pentobarbital and halothane measured by this method (AA) compared closely to cardiac outputs measured by the dye-dilution method (CG) (AA = 0.96 CG + 20 ml/min, r = 0.98). Both the cardiac output and the arterial blood pressure remained stable during replicate measurements of the cardiac output of 1-day-old piglets. This system allows cardiac output determinations of neonatal subjects without excessive blood removal and, with further development, should be practical in human neonates.

  13. Continuous cardiac output measurement - Aspects of Doppler frequency analysis

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    Mackay, R. S.; Hechtman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    From the suprasternal notch blood flow velocity in the aorta can be measured non-invasively by a Doppler probe. Integration over systole after frequency analysis gives a measure of stroke volume if a separate diameter observation is incorporated. Frequency analysis by a zero crossing counter or by a set of parallel phaselock loops was less effective than a set of bandpass filters. Observations on dogs, baboons and humans before and after exercise or surgery suggest the indications to be useful. Application to judging heart failure by the effect of introducing a volume load is indicated. Changes in output also are measured in freely moving subjects.

  14. The value of arterial pressure waveform cardiac output measurements in the radial and femoral artery in major cardiac surgery patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Drumpt, A.; J. van Bommel (Jasper); S.E. Hoeks (Sanne); F. Grüne (Frank); T. Wolvetang (Timothy); J.A. Bekkers (Jos); M. Horst, ter (Maarten)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: A relatively new uncalibrated arterial pressure waveform cardiac output (CO) measurement technique is the Pulsioflex-ProAQT® system. Aim of this study was to validate this system in cardiac surgery patients with a specific focus on the evaluation of a difference in the radial

  15. Cardiac output measurement : evaluation of methods in ICU patients

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    Wilde, Robert Bernard Pieter de

    2009-01-01

    Accurate clinical assessment of the circulatory status is particular desirable in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) and patients undergoing cardiac, thoracic, or vascular interventions. As the patient’s haemodynamic status may change rapidly, continuous monitoring of cardiac o

  16. Evaluation of transpulmonary thermodilution as a method to measure cardiac output in anesthetized cats.

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    Beaulieu, Kim E; Kerr, Carolyn L; McDonell, Wayne N

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of a transpulmonary thermodilution (Trans) technique for the measurement of cardiac output, and to determine the agreement between Trans and conventional thermodilution (TD) in anesthetized cats. Using each technique, cardiac output was measured in 5 mature cats (weights 2.4 to 5.6 kg) anesthetized with isoflurane. To induce different levels of cardiac output in each cat, anesthesia was maintained at > 1.5x end-tidal minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane, and at 1.3x end-tidal isoflurane MAC with and without administration of dobutamine. At least 2 comparisons between TD and Trans values were made at each cardiac output rate. Thirty-two of the 42 recorded comparisons were analyzed. Linear regression analysis (TD vs Trans) yielded an r(2) value of 0.83. The mean bias (TD-Trans) was -3.7 mL/kg/min with limits of agreement of -35.9 to 28.5 mL/kg/min. The concordance coefficient was 0.91. The Trans method showed good relationship and good agreement with TD in anesthetized cats. The Trans method is a relatively noninvasive, practical, and safe method to measure cardiac output in anesthetized cats.

  17. Cardiac output measurement in newborn infants using the ultrasonic cardiac output monitor: an assessment of agreement with conventional echocardiography, repeatability and new user experience.

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    Patel, Neil; Dodsworth, Melissa; Mills, John F

    2011-05-01

    To assess (1) agreement between the ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM) 1A device for measurement of cardiac output in newborn infants and conventional echocardiography (ECHO), (2) repeatability of USCOM measurements and (3) agreement between novice and expert users of the USCOM. A prospective observational study. The Neonatal Unit at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia. 56 term and near-term infants, with no evidence of structural or functional cardiovascular disease, or haemodynamic shunts. Agreement between ECHO and USCOM was assessed by paired measurements of ventricular outputs by a single experienced user. Repeatability was assessed using five repeated measurements in 10 infants. Agreement between five novices and one expert user was assessed by paired USCOM measurements over 30 training measurements. Agreement between USCOM and ECHO for left ventricular output (LVO) was (bias, ±limits of agreement, mean % error): 14, ±108 ml/kg/min, 43%, and for right ventricular output (RVO): -59, ±160, ml/kg/min, 57%. Intra-observer repeatability was 6.7% for USCOM LVO and 3.6% for ECHO LVO. After five training measurements, the mean difference between USCOM measures of LVO by novice and expert users was less than 50 ml/kg/min, but with variability. Repeatability of USCOM measures is high in newborn infants. New users can be trained quickly, but with high inter-user variability. Agreement between USCOM and conventional ECHO is broad, and worse for RVO and LVO. Further studies are required to assess the ability of the device to detect clinically significant changes in infant cardiac output.

  18. Continuous measurement of cardiac output with the use of stochastic system identification techniques.

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    Yelderman, M

    1990-10-01

    The limitations of developing a technique to measure cardiac output continuously are given. Logical explanations are provided for the economic, technical, and physiologic benefits of a stochastic system identification technique for measuring cardiac output. Heat is supplied by a catheter-mounted filament driven according to a pseudorandom binary sequence. Volumetric fluid flow is derived by a cross-correlation algorithm written in the C language. In vitro validation is performed with water in a flow bench. The computed flow (y) compared with the in-line-measured flow (x) yields the linear regression y = 1.024x - 0.157 (r = 0.99). The average coefficient of variation is less than 2% over a volumetric fluid flow range of 2 to 10 L/min.

  19. Cardiac output measurement by bioimpedance and noninvasive pulse contour analysis compared with the continuous pulmonary artery thermodilution technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maass, Saskia W. M. C.; Roekaerts, Paul M. H. J.; Lance, Marcus D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare 2 noninvasive cardiac output measurement methods with the continuous cardiac output thermodilution (CCO-TD) method. Design: A single-center prospective design. Setting: A university hospital. Participants: Fifty-three consecutive patients schedu

  20. [Ethrane in anaesthesia for children--measurement of cardiac output by impedance-cardiography (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottermann, U; Prister, Z

    1976-12-01

    Ethrane permits a very smooth and quick introduction of anaesthesia per inhalationem without signs of any excitation due to its physical properties. Because of its low analgesic property it was necessary to administer nitrous oxide. After the interruption of Tthrane--administration our patients awoke without any nausea or vomiting. In our study we measured stroke-volume and cardiac output during and after Ethrane anaesthesia using the IFM-Minnesota Impedance Cardiograph 304 A. In the first ten minutes of anaesthesia we found a 23 per cent-decrease of strokevolume, a 19 per cent cardiac output-decrease whereas the heartrate rose slightly. Any further significant changes of these parameters up to the end of anaesthesia were not detectable. Already two minutes after the end of Ethrane-administration all parameters had reached their initial values.

  1. Cardiac output during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, C; Rasmussen, P.; Sørensen, H.

    2015-01-01

    Several techniques assessing cardiac output (Q) during exercise are available. The extent to which the measurements obtained from each respective technique compares to one another, however, is unclear. We quantified Q simultaneously using four methods: the Fick method with blood obtained from...... the right atrium (Q(Fick-M)), Innocor (inert gas rebreathing; Q(Inn)), Physioflow (impedance cardiography; Q(Phys)), and Nexfin (pulse contour analysis; Q(Pulse)) in 12 male subjects during incremental cycling exercise to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (FiO2  = 12%). While all four methods reported...... a progressive increase in Q with exercise intensity, the slopes of the Q/oxygen uptake (VO2) relationship differed by up to 50% between methods in both normoxia [4.9 ± 0.3, 3.9 ± 0.2, 6.0 ± 0.4, 4.8 ± 0.2 L/min per L/min (mean ± SE) for Q(Fick-M), Q(Inn), QP hys and Q(Pulse), respectively; P = 0...

  2. Cardiac output monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathews Lailu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive and non-invasive methods of estimation of cardiac output (CO were developed to overcome the limitations of invasive nature of pulmonary artery catheterization (PAC and direct Fick method used for the measurement of stroke volume (SV. The important minimally invasive techniques available are: oesophageal Doppler monitoring (ODM, the derivative Fick method (using partial carbon dioxide (CO 2 breathing, transpulmonary thermodilution, lithium indicator dilution, pulse contour and pulse power analysis. Impedance cardiography is probably the only non-invasive technique in true sense. It provides information about haemodynamic status without the risk, cost and skill associated with the other invasive or minimally invasive techniques. It is important to understand what is really being measured and what assumptions and calculations have been incorporated with respect to a monitoring device. Understanding the basic principles of the above techniques as well as their advantages and limitations may be useful. In addition, the clinical validation of new techniques is necessary to convince that these new tools provide reliable measurements. In this review the physics behind the working of ODM, partial CO 2 breathing, transpulmonary thermodilution and lithium dilution techniques are dealt with. The physical and the physiological aspects underlying the pulse contour and pulse power analyses, various pulse contour techniques, their development, advantages and limitations are also covered. The principle of thoracic bioimpedance along with computation of CO from changes in thoracic impedance is explained. The purpose of the review is to help us minimize the dogmatic nature of practice favouring one technique or the other.

  3. Non-invasive measurements of cardiac output in atrial fibrillation: Inert gas rebreathing and impedance cardiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osbak, Philip S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To test the effect of interventions, knowledge of cardiac output (CO) is important. However, the irregular heart rate might cause some methods for determination of CO to have inherent weaknesses....... Objective. To assess the validity of these methods in AF, a new inert gas rebreathing device and impedance cardiography was tested with echocardiography as reference. Methods. Using a cross-sectional design, 127 patients with AF and 24 in SR were consecutively recruited. Resting CO was measured using inert...

  4. Non-invasive measurement of cardiac output in heart failure patients using a new foreign gas rebreathing technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabrielsen, Anders; Videbaek, Regitze; Schou, Morten

    2002-01-01

    Values of effective pulmonary blood flow (Q(EP)) and cardiac output, determined by a non-invasive foreign gas rebreathing method (CO(RB)) using a new infrared photoacoustic gas analysing system, were compared with measurements of cardiac output obtained by the direct Fick (CO(FICK)) and thermodil......Values of effective pulmonary blood flow (Q(EP)) and cardiac output, determined by a non-invasive foreign gas rebreathing method (CO(RB)) using a new infrared photoacoustic gas analysing system, were compared with measurements of cardiac output obtained by the direct Fick (CO...... with significant shunt flow. In the eight patients without significant shunt flow, the agreement between Q(EP) and CO(FICK) was 0.3 +/- 0.9 litre x min(-1). In conclusion, a foreign gas rebreathing method with a new infrared photoacoustic gas analyser provided at least as reliable a measure of cardiac output...... as did thermodilution. In the absence of significant shunt flow, measurement of Q(EP) itself provides a reliable estimate of cardiac output in heart failure patients. The infrared photoacoustic gas analyser markedly facilitates clinical use of the rebreathing method in general, which makes the method...

  5. Chronic measurement of cardiac output in unanesthetized rats using miniature thermocouples.

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    Osborn, J W; Barber, B J; Quillen, E W; Abram, R J; Cowley, A W

    1986-12-01

    A thermodilution technique is described for measuring steady-state cardiac output (CO) in conscious rats for periods of 2-3 wk. The method utilizes small implantable aortic thermocouples inserted via the femoral artery at the time of placement of other chronic indwelling catheters. Data are presented to validate the accuracy and reproducibility of the technique by acute in situ comparison with electromagnetic flowmeter measurements. Responses in chronically instrumented rats were tested with hemorrhage and infusions of vasodilator and vasoconstrictor agents administered repeatedly over a period of 9 days. The results show that the system is capable of measuring CO chronically and provides reproducible responses for periods of at least several weeks. We conclude that these methods provide a single, inexpensive, and accurate way to measure steady-state CO in conscious, unrestrained rats.

  6. Hybrid measurement to achieve satisfactory precision in perioperative cardiac output monitoring.

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    Peyton, P

    2014-05-01

    Advanced haemodynamic monitoring employing minimally invasive cardiac output measurement may lead to significant improvements in patient outcomes in major surgery. However, the precision (scatter) of measurement of available generic technologies has been shown to be unsatisfactory with percentage error of agreement with bolus thermodilution (% error) of 40% to 50%. Simultaneous measurement and averaging by two or more technologies may reduce random measurement scatter and improve precision. This concept, called the hybrid method, was tested by comparing accuracy and precision of measurement relative to bolus thermodilution using combinations of three component methods. Thirty patients scheduled for either elective cardiac surgery or liver transplantation were studied. Agreement with simultaneous bolus thermodilution of hybrid combinations of continuous thermodilution (QtCCO) or Vigeleo™/FloTrac™ pulse contour measurement (QtFT) with pulmonary Capnotracking (QtCO2) was assessed pre- and post-cardiopulmonary bypass or pre- and post-reperfusion of the donor liver and compared with that of the component methods alone. Hybridisation of QtCO2 (% error 42.2) and QtCCO (% error 51.3) achieved significantly better precision (% error 31.3) than the component methods (P=0.0004) and (P=0.0195). Due to poor inherent precision of QtFT (% error 82.8), hybrid combination of QtFT with QtCO2 did not result in better precision than QtCO2 alone. Hybrid measurement can approach a 30% error, which is recommended as the upper limit for acceptability. This is a practical option where at least one component method, such as Capnotracking, is automated and does not increase the cost or complexity of the measurement process.

  7. Differences between directly measured and calculated values for cardiac output in the dogfish: a criticism of the Fick method.

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    Metcalfe, J D; Butler, P J

    1982-08-01

    Cardiac output has been measured directly, and calculated by the Fick method, during normoxia and hypoxia in six artificially perfused dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula) in an attempt to estimate the accuracy of this method in fish. The construction and operation of a simple extra-corporeal cardiac bypass pump is described. This pump closely mimics the flow pulse profiles of the fish's own heart and allows complete control of both cardiac stroke volume and systolic and diastolic periods. During normoxia (PO2 = 21 kPa) there was no significant difference between directly measured and calculated values for cardiac output. However, some shunting of blood past the respiratory surface of the gills may have been obscured by cutaneous oxygen uptake. In response to hypoxia (PO2 = 8.6 kPa) there is either a decrease in the amount of blood being shunted past the respiratory surface of the gills and/or an increase in cutaneous oxygen uptake such that the Fick calculated value for cardiac output is on average 38% greater than the measured value. It is proposed that the increase in the levels of circulating catecholamines that is reported to occur in response to hypoxia in this species may play an important role in the observed response to hypoxia. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for the calculation of cardiac output by the Fick principle in fish.

  8. Influence of lung injury on cardiac output measurement using transpulmonary ultrasound dilution: a validation study in neonatal lambs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrancken, S.L.A.G.; Boode, W.P. de; Hopman, J.C.W.; Looijen-Salamon, M.G.; Liem, K.D.; Heijst, A.F. van

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: /st> Transpulmonary ultrasound dilution (TPUD) is a promising method for cardiac output (CO) measurement in severely ill neonates. The incidence of lung injury in this population is high, which might influence CO measurement using TPUD because of altered lung perfusion. We evaluated t

  9. Cardiac Output Measurements in Septic Patients: Comparing the Accuracy of USCOM to PiCCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Horster

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available USCOM is an ultrasound-based method which has been accepted for noninvasive hemodynamic monitoring in various clinical conditions (USCOM, Ultrasonic cardiac output monitoring. The present study aimed at comparing the accuracy of the USCOM device with that of the thermodilution technique in patients with septicemia. We conducted a prospective observational study in a medical but noncardiological ICU of a university hospital. Septic adult patients (median age 55 years, median SAPS-II-Score 43 points on mechanical ventilation and catecholamine support were monitored with USCOM and PiCCO (=70. Seventy paired left-sided CO measurements (transaortic access = COUS-A were obtained. The mean COUS-A were 6.55 l/min (±2.19 versus COPiCCO 6.5 l/min (±2.18. The correlation coefficient was =0.89. Comparison by Bland-Altman analysis revealed a bias of −0.36 l/min (±0.99 l/min leading to a mean percentage error of 29%. USCOM is a feasible and rapid method to evaluate CO in septic patients. USCOM does reliably represent CO values as compared to the reference technique based on thermodilution (PiCCO. It seems to be appropriate in situations where CO measurements are most pertinent to patient management.

  10. The ability of the Vigileo-FloTrac system to measure cardiac output and track cardiac output changes during one-lung ventilation.

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    Suehiro, Koichi; Tanaka, Katsuaki; Yamada, Tokuhiro; Matsuura, Tadashi; Mori, Takashi; Funao, Tomoharu; Nishikawa, Kiyonobu

    2015-06-01

    This study was aimed at comparing the cardiac output (CO) measured by the Vigileo™-FloTrac™ system with that estimated by the thermodilution pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) during one-lung ventilation (OLV) and determining the reliability of this system in tracking phenylephrine-induced CO changes during OLV. Sixteen patients scheduled for descending aorta replacement were enrolled. The study was performed 30 min after starting OLV under stable hemodynamic conditions. We recorded hemodynamic variables, CO measured by PAC thermodilution (ICO), CO measured by Vigileo™-FloTrac™ system (Version 3.02, Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) (APCO), and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) before (T0) and after (T1) phenylephrine (100 μg) administration. We used Bland-Altman analysis to compare ICO and APCO. Polar plot and four-quadrant plot were used to assess the tracking ability of the Vigileo™-FloTrac™ system against ICO after administration of phenylephrine. Ninety hemodynamic interventions were performed. Bland-Altman analysis revealed that the mean bias between APCO and ICO was 0.05 L/min and the percentage error, 46.9 %. Four-quadrant plot analysis showed a concordance rate of 24.7 %, while polar plot analysis showed that the concordance rate was 13.3 %; the angular bias, -45.9°; radial limit of agreement, 85.3°. The bias between APCO and ICO was significantly correlated with the SVRI value (p < 0.001, r(2) = 0.822). The reliability of the Vigileo™-FloTrac™ system during OLV to estimate CO and track phenylephrine-induced CO changes was not acceptable.

  11. Non-invasive measurement of cardiac output in heart failure patients using a new foreign gas rebreathing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, Anders; Videbaek, Regitze; Schou, Morten; Damgaard, Morten; Kastrup, Jens; Norsk, Peter

    2002-02-01

    Values of effective pulmonary blood flow (Q(EP)) and cardiac output, determined by a non-invasive foreign gas rebreathing method (CO(RB)) using a new infrared photoacoustic gas analysing system, were compared with measurements of cardiac output obtained by the direct Fick (CO(FICK)) and thermodilution (CO(TD)) methods in patients with heart failure or pulmonary hypertension. In 11 patients, of which three had shunt flow through areas without significant gas exchange, the mean difference (bias) and limits of agreement (+/- 2 S.D.) were 0.6 +/- 1.2 litre x min(-1) when comparing CO(FICK) and Q(EP), and -0.8 +/- 1.3 litre x min(-1) when comparing CO(FICK) and CO(TD). When correction for intrapulmonary shunt flow was applied (i.e. calculation of CO(RB)) in all 11 patients, the bias between CO(FICK) and CO(RB) was 0.1 +/- 0.9 litre x min(-1), primarily because agreement improved in the three patients with significant shunt flow. In the eight patients without significant shunt flow, the agreement between Q(EP) and CO(FICK) was 0.3 +/- 0.9 litre x min(-1). In conclusion, a foreign gas rebreathing method with a new infrared photoacoustic gas analyser provided at least as reliable a measure of cardiac output as did thermodilution. In the absence of significant shunt flow, measurement of Q(EP) itself provides a reliable estimate of cardiac output in heart failure patients. The infrared photoacoustic gas analyser markedly facilitates clinical use of the rebreathing method in general, which makes the method available to a larger group of clinicians working with patients with cardiovascular diseases.

  12. William Harvey, Peter Lauremberg and cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, G

    1992-11-01

    In 1636, the Rostock professor of medicine and the art of poetry, Peter Lauremberg (1585-1639), was one of the earliest to mention circulation which had been discovered by William Harvey and documented in his anatomical manual. In 1628 William Harvey proved the existence of the blood circulation by calculating the "cardiac output in a half an hour (semihora)". The answer to the question why Harvey chose half an hour as the time range can be found in the way of measuring time usual at that period. The sandglasses were turned half-hourly in maritime navigation and the wheel-clocks on shore had only the hour-hand. Improved chronometry was one of the prerequisites for measuring cardiac output. The minute-hand became usual after 1700 and the second-hand later on. Taking into consideration the alterations of cardiac output made the latter one of the most important circulation parameters in diagnostics, prognostication and therapeutics.

  13. Authentication of Radial Versus Femoral Arterial Pressure Waveform-Derived Cardiac Output With Transesophageal Echocardiography-Derived Cardiac Output Measurements in Patients Undergoing On-Pump Coronary Bypass Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddali, Madan Mohan; Waje, Niranjan Dilip; Sathiya, Panchatcharam Murthi

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain if arterial waveform-derived cardiac output measurements from radial and femoral cannulation sites were reliable as compared with transesophageal echocardiography (TEE)-derived cardiac output (CO) values, and which of the CO measurements derived from radial and the femoral arterial pressure waveforms closely tracked simultaneously measured TEE-derived CO values. This study also aimed to ascertain if cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) would impact the accuracy of arterial pressure-derived CO values from either of the 2 sites. A prospective observational study. Tertiary care cardiac center. Cardiac surgical patients undergoing on-pump primary coronary artery bypass surgery. Waveform-derived CO monitoring through radial and femoral artery cannulation using a FloTrac/Vigileo system. Twenty-seven consecutive cardiac surgical patients undergoing on-pump primary coronary artery bypass surgery were included in the study. Cardiac output was measured sequentially by the arterial pressure waveform analysis method from radial and femoral arterial sites and compared with simultaneously measured TEE-derived CO. Cardiac output data were obtained in triplicate at 6 predefined time intervals: before and after sternotomy, 5, 15, and 30 minutes after separation from CPB and prior to shifting the patient out of the operating room. The overall bias of the study was 0.11 and 0.27, the percentage error was 19.31 and 18.45, respectively, for radial and femoral arterial waveform-derived CO values as compared with TEE-derived CO measurements. The overall precision as compared with the TEE-derived CO values was 16.94 and 15.95 for the radial and femoral cannulation sites, respectively. The bias calculated by the Bland-Altman method suggested that CO measurements from the radial arterial site were in closer agreement with TEE-derived CO values at all time periods, and the relation was not affected by CPB. However, percentage error and precision calculations

  14. Cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance: Clinical assessment compared with a noninvasive objective measurement in children with shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Asma; Newth, Christopher J L; Khemani, Robinder G; Beltramo, Fernando; Ross, Patrick A

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate physician assessment of cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance in patients with shock compared with an ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM). To explore potential changes in therapy decisions if USCOM data were available using physician intervention answers. Double-blinded, prospective, observational study in a tertiary hospital pediatric intensive care unit. Forty children (resistance, categorizing them as high, normal, or low. An investigator simultaneously measured cardiac index (CI) and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) with USCOM categorized as high, normal, or low. Overall agreement between physician and USCOM for CI (48.5% [κ = 0.18]) and SVRI (45.9% [κ = 0.16]) was poor. Interobserver agreement was also poor for CI (58.7% [κ = 0.33]) and SVRI (52.3% [κ = 0.28]). Comparing theoretical physician interventions to "acceptable" or "unacceptable" clinical interventions, based on USCOM measurement, 56 (21%) physician interventions were found to be "unacceptable." There is poor agreement between physician-assessed CI and SVRI and USCOM, with significant interobserver variability among physicians. Objective measurement of CI and SVRI may reduce variability and improve diagnostic accuracy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Uncalibrated continuous cardiac output measurement in liver transplant patients: LiDCOrapid™ system versus pulmonary artery catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Maria Gabriella; Chiarandini, Paolo; Scudeller, Luigia; Vetrugno, Luigi; Pompei, Livia; Serena, Giovanni; Buttera, Stefania; Della Rocca, Giorgio

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the level of agreement between continuous cardiac output estimated by uncalibrated pulse-power analysis (PulseCOLiR) and intermittent (ICO) and continuous cardiac output (CCO) obtained using a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC). Prospective cohort study. University hospital intensive care unit. Twenty patients after liver transplantation. Pulmonary artery catheters were placed in all patients, and ICO and CCO were determined using thermodilution. PulseCOLiR measurements were made using a LiDCOrapid(TM) (LiDCO Ltd, Cambridge, UK). ICO data were determined after intensive care unit admission and every 8 hours until the 48th postoperative hour. CCO and PulseCOLiR measurements were recorded simultaneously at these same time intervals as well as hourly. For the 8-hour data set (140 data pairs), the mean bias and percentage errors (PE) were, respectively,-0.10 L/min and 39.2% for ICO versus PulseCOLiR and 0.79 L/min and 34.6% for CCO versus PulseCOLiR. For the hourly comparison of CCO versus PulseCOLiR (980 data pairs), the bias was 0.75 L/min and the PE 37%. To assess the ability to measure change, a 4-quadrant plot was produced for each pair of methods. The performance of PulseCOLiR was moderate in detecting changes in ICO. In conclusion, the uncalibrated PulseCOLir method should not be used as a substitute for the thermodilution technique for the monitoring of cardiac output in liver transplant patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Ladislav; Vondra, Vlastimil; Viščor, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2013-04-01

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  17. Minimally invasive measurement of cardiac output during surgery and critical care: a meta-analysis of accuracy and precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyton, Philip J; Chong, Simon W

    2010-11-01

    When assessing the accuracy and precision of a new technique for cardiac output measurement, the commonly quoted criterion for acceptability of agreement with a reference standard is that the percentage error (95% limits of agreement/mean cardiac output) should be 30% or less. We reviewed published data on four different minimally invasive methods adapted for use during surgery and critical care: pulse contour techniques, esophageal Doppler, partial carbon dioxide rebreathing, and transthoracic bioimpedance, to assess their bias, precision, and percentage error in agreement with thermodilution. An English language literature search identified published papers since 2000 which examined the agreement in adult patients between bolus thermodilution and each method. For each method a meta-analysis was done using studies in which the first measurement point for each patient could be identified, to obtain a pooled mean bias, precision, and percentage error weighted according to the number of measurements in each study. Forty-seven studies were identified as suitable for inclusion: N studies, n measurements: mean weighted bias [precision, percentage error] were: pulse contour N = 24, n = 714: -0.00 l/min [1.22 l/min, 41.3%]; esophageal Doppler N = 2, n = 57: -0.77 l/min [1.07 l/min, 42.1%]; partial carbon dioxide rebreathing N = 8, n = 167: -0.05 l/min [1.12 l/min, 44.5%]; transthoracic bioimpedance N = 13, n = 435: -0.10 l/min [1.14 l/min, 42.9%]. None of the four methods has achieved agreement with bolus thermodilution which meets the expected 30% limits. The relevance in clinical practice of these arbitrary limits should be reassessed.

  18. Methods and apparatus for determining cardiac output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Richard J. (Inventor); Mukkamala, Ramakrishna (Inventor); Sherman, Derin A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for determining a dynamical property of the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree using long time scale information, i.e., information obtained from measurements over time scales greater than a single cardiac cycle. In one aspect, the invention provides a method and apparatus for monitoring cardiac output (CO) from a single blood pressure signal measurement obtained at any site in the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree or from any related measurement including, for example, fingertip photoplethysmography.According to the method the time constant of the arterial tree, defined to be the product of the total peripheral resistance (TPR) and the nearly constant arterial compliance, is determined by analyzing the long time scale variations (greater than a single cardiac cycle) in any of these blood pressure signals. Then, according to Ohm's law, a value proportional to CO may be determined from the ratio of the blood pressure signal to the estimated time constant. The proportional CO values derived from this method may be calibrated to absolute CO, if desired, with a single, absolute measure of CO (e.g., thermodilution). The present invention may be applied to invasive radial arterial blood pressure or pulmonary arterial blood pressure signals which are routinely measured in intensive care units and surgical suites or to noninvasively measured peripheral arterial blood pressure signals or related noninvasively measured signals in order to facilitate the clinical monitoring of CO as well as TPR.

  19. Measurements of cardiac output obtained with transesophageal echocardiography and pulmonary artery thermodilution are not interchangeable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Sørensen, H; Graeser, K; Hansen, K L

    2014-01-01

    was placed in the following successive positions: supine, head-down tilt, head-up tilt, supine, supine with phenylephrine administration, pace heart rate 80 beats per minute (bpm), pace heart rate 110 bpm. TEE CO and PAC CO were measured simultaneously. The agreement was analysed by Bland-Altman plots...

  20. Cardiac output measured by electrical velocimetry in the CT suite correlates with coronary artery enhancement: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flinck, Marianne; Graden, Aasa; Milde, Helen; Flinck, Agneta; Hellstroem, Mikael (Dept. of Radiology, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital and Sahlgrenska Academy at Goetenborg Univ., Goeteborg (Sweden)); Bjoerk, Jonas (Competence Centre for Clinical Research, Lund Univ. Hospital, Lund (Sweden)); Nyman, Ulf (Dept. of Radiology, Lasarettet Trelleborg, Univ. of Lund, Trelleborg (Sweden)), e-mail: ulf.nyman@skane.se

    2010-10-15

    Background: Cardiac output (CO) is inversely related to vascular contrast medium (CM) enhancement during computed tomography (CT). Impedance cardiography with a new technique, electrical velocimetry (EV), may create opportunities to measure CO pre-examination for adaptation of CM injection parameters. Purpose: To relate COEV measured by radiology staff to aortic attenuation as a measure of coronary artery attenuation during CT coronary angiography (CTCA), and to formulate a tentative statistical model to adapt CM injection parameters to CO. Material and Methods: COEV was measured immediately before 100 kVp CTCA (64-multirow detector) in 27 patients with presumed coronary artery disease. For CTCA, 260 mg I/kg (maximum dosage weight: 80/90 kg for women/men) was injected intravenously during 12 s. Simple linear regression analysis was performed to explore the correlation between aortic attenuation (Hounsfield units, HU) and body weight, the influence of COEV on aortic attenuation adjusted to injected CM dose rate (HU per mg I/kg/s), and to establish a tentative formula on how to adapt CM injection parameters to COEV and desired aortic attenuation. Results: The correlation between aortic attenuation and body weight was weak and non-significant (r=-0.14 after outlier exclusion). A significant negative correlation (r=-0.63) was found between aortic attenuation adjusted to injected CM dose rate (HU per mg I/kg/s) and COEV. The resulting formula, CM dose rate=COEVx(aortic attenuation-240)/55, made it possible to calculate CM volumes and injection rates at various COs and, for example, the present mean aortic attenuation (438 HU), injection time (12 s), CM concentration (320 mg I/ml), and a certain body weight. Conclusion: EV makes it possible to measure CO in the CT suite before vascular examinations. Hence, CM doses may be decreased in low CO states to reduce the risk of CM-induced nephropathy without jeopardizing diagnostic quality and may be increased in high CO states

  1. Comparison of transthoracic electrical bioimpedance cardiac output measurement with thermodilution method in post coronary artery bypass graft patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Ajmer; Kansara, Bhuvnesh; Karlekar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    Transthoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB) has been proposed as a non-invasive, continuous, and cost-effective method of cardiac output (CO) measurement. In this prospective, non-randomized, clinical study, we measured CO with NICOMON (Larsen and Toubro Ltd., Mysore, India) and compared it with thermodilution (TD) method in patients after off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) graft surgery. We also evaluated the effect of ventilation (mechanical and spontaneous) on the measurement of CO by the two methods. Forty-six post-OPCAB patients were studied at five predefined time points during controlled ventilation and at five time points when breathing spontaneously. A total of 230 data pairs of CO were obtained. During controlled ventilation, TD CO values ranged from 2.29 to 6.74 L/min (mean 4.45 ± 0.85 L/min), while TEB CO values ranged from 1.70 to 6.90 L/min (mean 4.43 ± 0.94 L/min). The average correlation (r) was 0.548 (P = 0.0002), accompanied by a bias of 0.015 L/min and precision of 0.859 L/min. In spontaneously breathing patients, TD CO values ranged from 2.66 to 6.92 L/min (mean 4.66 ± 0.76 L/min), while TEB CO values ranged from 3.08 to 6.90 L/min (mean 4.72 ± 0.82 L/min). Their average correlation was relatively poor (r = 0.469, P= 0.002), accompanied by a bias of -0.059 L/min and precision of 0.818 L/min. The overall percent errors between TD CO and TEB CO were 19.3% (during controlled ventilation) and 17.4% (during spontaneous breathing), respectively. To conclude, a fair correlation was found between TD CO and TEB CO measurements among post-OPCAB patients during controlled ventilation. However, the correlation was weak in spontaneously breathing patients.

  2. Comparison of transthoracic electrical bioimpedance cardiac output measurement with thermodilution method in post coronary artery bypass graft patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Vikas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transthoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB has been proposed as a non-invasive, continuous, and cost-effective method of cardiac output (CO measurement. In this prospective, non-randomized, clinical study, we measured CO with NICOMON (Larsen and Toubro Ltd., Mysore, India and compared it with thermodilution (TD method in patients after off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB graft surgery. We also evaluated the effect of ventilation (mechanical and spontaneous on the measurement of CO by the two methods. Forty-six post-OPCAB patients were studied at five predefined time points during controlled ventilation and at five time points when breathing spontaneously. A total of 230 data pairs of CO were obtained. During controlled ventilation, TD CO values ranged from 2.29 to 6.74 L/min (mean 4.45 ± 0.85 L/min, while TEB CO values ranged from 1.70 to 6.90 L/min (mean 4.43 ± 0.94 L/min. The average correlation (r was 0.548 (P = 0.0002, accompanied by a bias of 0.015 L/min and precision of 0.859 L/min. In spontaneously breathing patients, TD CO values ranged from 2.66 to 6.92 L/min (mean 4.66 ± 0.76 L/min, while TEB CO values ranged from 3.08 to 6.90 L/min (mean 4.72 ± 0.82 L/min. Their average correlation was relatively poor (r = 0.469, P= 0.002, accompanied by a bias of −0.059 L/min and precision of 0.818 L/min. The overall percent errors between TD CO and TEB CO were 19.3% (during controlled ventilation and 17.4% (during spontaneous breathing, respectively. To conclude, a fair correlation was found between TD CO and TEB CO measurements among post-OPCAB patients during controlled ventilation. However, the correlation was weak in spontaneously breathing patients.

  3. Newer methods of cardiac output monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yatin; Mehta; Dheeraj; Arora

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac output(CO) is the volume of blood ejected by each ventricle per minute and is the product of stroke volume and heart rate. CO can thus be manipulated by alteration in heart rate or rhythm, preload, contractility and afterload. Moreover it gives important information about tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery. CO can be measured by various methods and thermodilution method using pulmonary artery catheter(PAC) is till date considered as gold standard method. Complications associated with PAC led to development of newer methods which are minimally or non-invasive. Newer methods fulfil other properties like continuous and reproducible reading, cost effective, reliable during various physiological states and have fast response time. These methods are validated against the gold standard with good level agreement. In this review we have discussed various newer methods of CO monitoring and their effectiveness in clinical use.

  4. Importance of re-calibration time on pulse contour analysis agreement with thermodilution measurements of cardiac output: a retrospective analysis of intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Christopher G; Gomatam, Shanti; Forrest, Shawn; Strauss, David G

    2016-10-01

    We assessed the effect of re-calibration time on cardiac output estimation and trending performance in a retrospective analysis of an intensive care unit patient population using error grid analyses. Paired thermodilution and arterial blood pressure waveform measurements (N = 2141) from 222 patient records were extracted from the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II database. Pulse contour analysis was performed by implementing a previously reported algorithm at calibration times of 1, 2, 8 and 24 h. Cardiac output estimation agreement was assessed using Bland-Altman and error grid analyses. Trending was assessed by concordance and a 4-Quadrant error grid analysis. Error between pulse contour and thermodilution increased with longer calibration times. Limits of agreement were -1.85 to 1.66 L/min for 1 h maximum calibration time compared to -2.70 to 2.41 L/min for 24 h. Error grid analysis resulted in 74.2 % of points bounded by 20 % error limits of thermodilution measurements for 1 h calibration time compared to 65 % for 24 h. 4-Quadrant error grid analysis showed analysis method and thermodilution showed poor agreement to monitor changes in cardiac output.

  5. Differences of cardiac output measurements by open-circuit acetylene uptake in pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwaiblmair Martin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As differences in gas exchange between pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH have been demonstrated, we asked if cardiac output measurements determined by acetylene (C2H2 uptake significantly differed in these diseases when compared to the thermodilution technique. Method Single-breath open-circuit C2H2 uptake, thermodilution, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing were performed in 72 PAH and 32 CTEPH patients. Results In PAH patients the results for cardiac output obtained by the two methods showed an acceptable agreement with a mean difference of -0.16 L/min (95% CI -2.64 to 2.32 L/min. In contrast, the agreement was poorer in the CTEPH group with the difference being -0.56 L/min (95% CI -4.96 to 3.84 L/min. Functional dead space ventilation (44.5 ± 1.6 vs. 32.2 ± 1.4%, p 2 gradient (9.9 ± 0.8 vs. 4.1 ± 0.5 mmHg, p Conclusion Cardiac output evaluation by the C2H2 technique should be interpreted with caution in CTEPH, as ventilation to perfusion mismatching might be more relevant than in PAH.

  6. Pulse contour-derived cardiac output in hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Joakim; Ladefoged, Soeren D

    2010-01-01

    Reliable methods for cardiac output determination are essential for studying the pathophysiology of intradialytic hypotension. Use of the current gold standard, the Transonic monitor, requires an arteriovenous fistula. We wished to verify the accuracy of a method based on finger pulse contour...... analysis, namely the Finometer monitor (FNM) for further use on patients dialyzing on a central vascular catheter. Fifty simultaneous cardiac output measurements were obtained during hemodialysis sessions in 25 patients. The internal variability of the FNM measurements was assessed by comparing 24 pairs...

  7. Impact of changes in systemic vascular resistance on a novel non-invasive continuous cardiac output measurement system based on pulse wave transit time: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Hironori; Tsutsui, Masato

    2014-08-01

    The inaccuracy of arterial waveform analysis for measuring continuos cardiac output (CCO) associated with changes in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) has been well documented. A new non-invasive continuous cardiac output monitoring system (esCCO) mainly utilizing pulse wave transit time (PWTT) in place of arterial waveform analysis has been developed. However, the trending ability of esCCO to measure cardiac output during changes in SVR remains unclear. After a previous multicenter study on esCCO measurement, we retrospectively identified two cases in which apparent changes in SVR developed in a short period during data collection. In each case, the trending ability of esCCO to measure cardiac output and time component of PWTT were analyzed. Recorded data suggest that the time component of PWTT may have a significant impact on the accuracy of estimating stroke volume during changes in SVR. However, further prospective clinical studies are required to test this hypothesis.

  8. Estimation of cardiac output and pulmonary vascular resistance by contrast echocardiography transit time measurement: a prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Brian G; Sanai, Reza; Yang, Benjamin; Young, Heather A; Mazhari, Ramesh; Reiner, Jonathan S; Lewis, Jannet F

    2014-10-31

    Studies with other imaging modalities have demonstrated a relationship between contrast transit and cardiac output (CO) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). We tested the hypothesis that the transit time during contrast echocardiography could accurately estimate both CO and PVR compared to right heart catheterization (RHC). 27 patients scheduled for RHC had 2D-echocardiogram immediately prior to RHC. 3 ml of DEFINITY contrast followed by a 10 ml saline flush was injected, and a multi-cycle echo clip was acquired from the beginning of injection to opacification of the left ventricle. 2D-echo based calculations of CO and PVR along with the DEFINITY-based transit time calculations were subsequently correlated with the RHC-determined CO and PVR. The transit time from full opacification of the right ventricle to full opacification of the left ventricle inversely correlated with CO (r=-0.61, p<0.001). The transit time from peak opacification of the right ventricle to first appearance in the left ventricle moderately correlated with PVR (r=0.46, p<0.01). Previously described echocardiographic methods for the determination of CO (Huntsman method) and PVR (Abbas and Haddad methods) did not correlate with RHC-determined values (p = 0.20 for CO, p = 0.18 and p = 0.22 for PVR, respectively). The contrast transit time method demonstrated reliable intra- (p<0.0001) and inter-observer correlation (p<0.001). We describe a novel method for the quantification of CO and estimation of PVR using contrast echocardiography transit time. This technique adds to the methodologies used for noninvasive hemodynamic assessment, but requires further validation to determine overall applicability.

  9. Evaluation of noninvasive cardiac output methods during exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alan D.; Barrows, Linda H.; Rashid, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.

    1992-01-01

    Noninvasive techniques to estimate cardiac output (Qc) will be used during future space flight. This retrospective literature survey compared the Qc techniques of carbon dioxide rebreathing (CO2-R), CO2 single breath (CO2-S), Doppler (DOP), impedance (IM), and inert gas (IG: acetylene or nitrous oxide) to direct (DIR) assessments measured at rest and during exercise.

  10. Peripheral vasodilatation determines cardiac output in exercising humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bada, A A; Svendsen, J H; Secher, N H

    2012-01-01

    conditions, because of a parallel decrease in stroke volume (P exercise. Atrial pacing lowered central venous pressure (P ...In dogs, manipulation of heart rate has no effect on the exercise-induced increase in cardiac output. Whether these findings apply to humans remain uncertain, because of the large differences in cardiovascular anatomy and regulation. To investigate the role of heart rate and peripheral...... vasodilatation in the regulation of cardiac output during steady-state exercise, we measured central and peripheral haemodynamics in 10 healthy male subjects, with and without atrial pacing (100–150 beats min(−1)) during: (i) resting conditions, (ii) one-legged knee extensor exercise (24 W) and (iii) femoral...

  11. Kredsløbsmonitorering med lithium dilution cardiac output-systemet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian; Hostrup, Anette; Tønnesen, Else

    2008-01-01

    The lithium dilution cardiac output (LiDCO) system measures cardiac output beat-to-beat with high precision. The system is based on an arterial pulse power analysis which is calibrated every eight hours with a small non-pharmacological dose of lithium. The system is minimally invasive; it requires...

  12. Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring in neonates using bioreactance: a comparison with echocardiography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Weisz, Dany E

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring is a potentially useful clinical tool in the neonatal setting. Our aim was to evaluate a new method of non-invasive continuous cardiac output (CO) measurement (NICOM™) based on the principle of bioreactance in neonates.

  13. Modelflow underestimates cardiac output in heat-stressed individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Wilson, Thad E; Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    An estimation of cardiac output can be obtained from arterial pressure waveforms using the Modelflow method. However, whether the assumptions associated with Modelflow calculations are accurate during whole body heating is unknown. This project tested the hypothesis that cardiac output obtained v...

  14. Validation of Fick cardiac output calculated with assumed oxygen consumption : a study of cardiac output during epoprostenol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, A; van den Heuvel, A F M; Zijlstra, F; Berger, R M F; Mook, G A; van Veldhuisen, D J

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the validity of using assumed oxygen consumption for Fick cardiac output during administration of epoprostenol. METHODS: In 24 consecutive patients Fick cardiac output calculated with assumed oxygen consumption according to LaFarge and Miettinen (COLM) and according to Bergstra et

  15. Lack of agreement and trending ability of the endotracheal cardiac output monitor compared with thermodilution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Sørensen, H; Hansen, K L; Ostergaard, M

    2012-01-01

    cardiac output (CO) during steady state and with induced haemodynamic changes in patients scheduled for elective cardiac surgery. METHODS: Twenty-five patients were enrolled. After induction of anaesthesia, endotracheal intubation using a dedicated ECOM tube, and insertion of the pulmonary artery catheter......BACKGROUND: Minimally invasive monitoring systems of central haemodynamics are gaining increasing popularity. The present study investigated the precision of the endotracheal cardiac output monitor (ECOM) system and its agreement with pulmonary artery catheter thermodilution (PAC TD) for measuring...

  16. Reproducibility of cardiac power output and other cardiopulmonary exercise indices in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Seferovic, Petar M; Nunan, David; Donovan, Gay; Trenell, Michael I; Grocott-Mason, Richard; Brodie, David A

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac power output is a direct measure of overall cardiac function that integrates both flow- and pressure-generating capacities of the heart. The present study assessed the reproducibility of cardiac power output and other more commonly reported cardiopulmonary exercise variables in patients with chronic heart failure. Metabolic, ventilatory and non-invasive (inert gas re-breathing) central haemodynamic measurements were undertaken at rest and near-maximal exercise of the modified Bruce protocol in 19 patients with stable chronic heart failure. The same procedure was repeated 7 days later to assess reproducibility. Cardiac power output was calculated as the product of cardiac output and mean arterial pressure. Resting central haemodynamic variables demonstrate low CV (coefficient of variation) (ranging from 3.4% for cardiac output and 5.6% for heart rate). The CV for resting metabolic and ventilatory measurements ranged from 8.2% for respiratory exchange ratio and 14.2% for absolute values of oxygen consumption. The CV of anaerobic threshold, peak oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production and respiratory exchange ratio ranged from 3.8% (for anaerobic threshold) to 6.4% (for relative peak oxygen consumption), with minute ventilation having a CV of 11.1%. Near-maximal exercise cardiac power output and cardiac output had CVs of 4.1 and 2.2%, respectively. Cardiac power output demonstrates good reproducibility suggesting that there is no need for performing more than one cardiopulmonary exercise test. As a direct measure of cardiac function (dysfunction) and an excellent prognostic marker, it is strongly advised in the assessment of patients with chronic heart failure undergoing cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

  17. Mini invasive hemodynamic monitoring: from arterial pressure to cardiac output

    OpenAIRE

    Della Rocca, Giorgio; Cecconi, Maurizio; Costa, Maria Gabriella

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the Cardiac Output (CO) the standard invasive pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) is considered today the gold standard. The major criticism to the PAC is that its level of invasiveness is not supported by an improvement in patient's outcome. The interest to lesser and lesser invasive techniques is high. Therefore, the alternative techniques have been recently developed.Cardiac Output can be monitored continuously by different devices that analyze the arterial waveform to track change...

  18. Assessment of cardiac output changes using a modified FloTrac/Vigileo algorithm in cardiac surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, Alban; Button, Danny; Zollinger, Andreas; Hofer, Christoph K

    2009-01-01

    The FloTrac/Vigileo (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) allows pulse pressure-derived cardiac output measurement without external calibration. Software modifications were performed in order to eliminate initially observed deficits. The aim of this study was to assess changes in cardiac output determined by the FloTrac/Vigileo system (FCO) with an initially released (FCOA) and a modified (FCOB) software version, as well as changes in cardiac output from the PiCCOplus system (PCO; Pulsion Medical Systems, Munich, Germany). Both devices were compared with cardiac output measured by intermittent thermodilution (ICO). Cardiac output measurements were performed in patients after elective cardiac surgery. Two sets of data (A and B) were obtained using FCOA and FCOB in 50 patients. After calibration of the PiCCOplus system, triplicate FCO and PCO values were recorded and ICO was determined in the supine position and cardiac output changes due to body positioning were recorded 15 minutes later (30 degrees head-up, 30 degrees head-down, supine). Student's t test, analysis of variance and Bland-Altman analysis were calculated. Significant changes of FCO, PCO and ICO induced by body positioning were observed in both data sets. For set A, DeltaFCOA was significantly larger than DeltaICO induced by positioning the head down. For set B, there were no significant differences between DeltaFCOB and DeltaICO. For set A, increased limits of agreement were found for FCOA-ICO when compared with PCO-ICO. For set B, mean bias and limits of agreement were comparable for FCOB-ICO and PCO-ICO. The modification of the FloTrac/Vigileo system resulted in an improved performance in order to reliably assess cardiac output and track the related changes in patients after cardiac surgery.

  19. Predictors of low cardiac output in decompensated severe heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Eidi Ochiai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify predictors of low cardiac output and mortality in decompensated heart failure. INTRODUCTION: Introduction: Patients with decompensated heart failure have a high mortality rate, especially those patients with low cardiac output. However, this clinical presentation is uncommon, and its management is controversial. METHODS: We studied a cohort of 452 patients hospitalized with decompensated heart failure with an ejection fraction of 60 years, and 64.6% were men. Low cardiac output was present in 281 (63% patients on admission. Chagas disease was the cause of heart failure in 92 (20.4% patients who had higher B type natriuretic peptide levels (1,978.38 vs. 1,697.64 pg/mL; P = 0.015. Predictors of low cardiac output were Chagas disease (RR: 3.655, P<0.001, lower ejection fraction (RR: 2.414, P<0.001, hyponatremia (RR: 1.618, P = 0.036, and renal dysfunction (RR: 1.916, P = 0.007. Elderly patients were inversely associated with low cardiac output (RR: 0.436, P = 0.001. Predictors of mortality were Chagas disease (RR: 2.286, P<0.001, ischemic etiology (RR: 1.449, P = 0.035, and low cardiac output (RR: 1.419, P = 0.047. CONCLUSIONS: In severe decompensated heart failure, predictors of low cardiac output are Chagas disease, lower ejection fraction, hyponatremia, and renal dysfunction. Additionally, Chagas disease patients have higher B type natriuretic peptide levels and a worse prognosis independent of lower ejection fraction.

  20. Kredsløbsmonitorering af kritisk syge patienter med "pulse contour cardiac output"-systemet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Perner, Anders; Bonde, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The Pulse Contour Cardiac Output (PiCCO) monitoring system measures cardiac output with high precision and accuracy. The system may replace the pulmonary artery catheter in most critically ill patients because the rate of serious complications may be lower. Whether the use of dynamic or static fl...... fluid monitoring by PiCCO will result in better outcomes should be assessed by studies using clinically relevant end points....

  1. Cardiac output estimation using pulmonary mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hann Christopher E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP in mechanically ventilated (MV patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS decreases cardiac output (CO. Accurate measurement of CO is highly invasive and is not ideal for all MV critically ill patients. However, the link between the PEEP used in MV, and CO provides an opportunity to assess CO via MV therapy and other existing measurements, creating a CO measure without further invasiveness. This paper examines combining models of diffusion resistance and lung mechanics, to help predict CO changes due to PEEP. The CO estimator uses an initial measurement of pulmonary shunt, and estimations of shunt changes due to PEEP to predict CO at different levels of PEEP. Inputs to the cardiac model are the PV loops from the ventilator, as well as the oxygen saturation values using known respiratory inspired oxygen content. The outputs are estimates of pulmonary shunt and CO changes due to changes in applied PEEP. Data from two published studies are used to assess and initially validate this model. The model shows the effect on oxygenation due to decreased CO and decreased shunt, resulting from increased PEEP. It concludes that there is a trade off on oxygenation parameters. More clinically importantly, the model also examines how the rate of CO drop with increased PEEP can be used as a method to determine optimal PEEP, which may be used to optimise MV therapy with respect to the gas exchange achieved, as well as accounting for the impact on the cardiovascular system and its management.

  2. Comparison of cardiac output determined by bioimpedance and bioreactance methods at rest and during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Moore, Sarah; Hallsworth, Kate; Fattakhova, Gulnar; Thoma, Christian; Trenell, Michael I

    2012-04-01

    Bioreactance is a novel non-invasive method for cardiac output measurement that involves the analysis of blood flow-dependent changes in the phase shifts of electrical currents applied across the chest. The present study (1) compared resting and exercise cardiac outputs determined by bioreactance and bioimpedance methods and those estimated from measured oxygen consumption, (2) determined the relationship between cardiac output and oxygen consumption, and (3) assessed the agreement between the bioreactance and bioimpedance methods. Twelve healthy subjects (aged 30 ± 4 years) performed graded cardiopulmonary exercise test on a recumbent cycle ergometer on two occasions, 1 week apart. Cardiac output was monitored at rest, at 30, 50, 70, 90, 150 W and at peak exercise intensity by bioreactance and bioimpedance and expired gases collected. Resting cardiac output was not significantly different between the bioreactance and bioimpedance methods (6.2 ± 1.4 vs. 6.5 ± 1.4 l min(-1), P = 0.42). During exercise cardiac outputs were correlated with oxygen uptake for both bioreactance (r = 0.84, P bioimpedance techniques (r = 0.82, P bioimpedance estimated significantly lower cardiac outputs than both bioreactance and theoretically calculated cardiac output (14.3 ± 2.6 vs. 17.5 ± 5.2 vs. 16.9 ± 4.9 l min(-1), P bioimpedance method reported ~1.5 l min(-1) lower cardiac output than bioreactance with lower and upper limits of agreement of -2.98 to 5.98 l min(-1). Bioimpedance and bioreactance methods provide different cardiac output estimates, particularly at high exercise intensity, and therefore the two methods cannot be used interchangeably. In contrast with bioimpedance, bioreactance cardiac outputs are similar to those estimated from measured oxygen consumption.

  3. Volume and its relationship to cardiac output and venous return.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magder, S

    2016-09-10

    Volume infusions are one of the commonest clinical interventions in critically ill patients yet the relationship of volume to cardiac output is not well understood. Blood volume has a stressed and unstressed component but only the stressed component determines flow. It is usually about 30 % of total volume. Stressed volume is relatively constant under steady state conditions. It creates an elastic recoil pressure that is an important factor in the generation of blood flow. The heart creates circulatory flow by lowering the right atrial pressure and allowing the recoil pressure in veins and venules to drain blood back to the heart. The heart then puts the volume back into the systemic circulation so that stroke return equals stroke volume. The heart cannot pump out more volume than comes back. Changes in cardiac output without changes in stressed volume occur because of changes in arterial and venous resistances which redistribute blood volume and change pressure gradients throughout the vasculature. Stressed volume also can be increased by decreasing vascular capacitance, which means recruiting unstressed volume into stressed volume. This is the equivalent of an auto-transfusion. It is worth noting that during exercise in normal young males, cardiac output can increase five-fold with only small changes in stressed blood volume. The mechanical characteristics of the cardiac chambers and the circulation thus ultimately determine the relationship between volume and cardiac output and are the subject of this review.

  4. Metabolic regulation of cardiac output during inhalation anaesthesia in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheeren, T W; Schwarte, L A; Arndt, J O

    1999-04-01

    The metabolic regulation of tissue blood flow manifests itself in a linear relation between blood flow and oxygen consumption, the latter being the independent variable. It is unknown, however, if this fundamental physiological principle operates also during inhalation anaesthesia known to be associated with decreases in both cardiac output (Q) and oxygen consumption (VO2). Seven dogs (23-32 kg) with chronically implanted flow probes around the pulmonary artery were repeatedly anaesthetized with halothane, enflurane, isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane at increasing minimum alveolar concentrations (1-3 MAC). Cardiac output (ultrasound transit-time flowmeter) and VO2 (indirect calorimetry) were measured continuously. We also imposed selective changes in Q, and thus of O2 supply, to see if and to what extent this would alter VO2 during anaesthesia (1.5 MAC). In awake dogs under basal metabolic conditions, VO2 was 4.6 +/- 0.1 ml.kg-1.min-1 and Q 105 +/- 3 ml.kg-1.min-1 (mean +/- SEM). During inhalation anaesthesia, VO2 and Q decreased by approximately 30% and 60%, respectively. The concentration-effect relations of both variables did not differ between anaesthetics, yielding a uniform Q/VO2 relation, which was nearly linear in the range (0-2 MAC) with an average slope of 39 +/- 1 (range 30-55). Above 2 MAC, Q decreased more for a given change in VO2, and O2 extraction increased by 50%, indicating compromised oxygen delivery (DO2). Imposed changes in Q, both in awake and anaesthetized dogs, yielded Q/VO2 relations which were notably steeper (slopes 114 to 187) than those observed during inhalation anaesthesia. More important, imposed increases in Q and thus DO2 during anaesthesia (1.5 MAC) to rates comparable to that in the awake state produced a much less than proportional increase in VO2 without restoring it to baseline. Inhalation anaesthesia is characterized by a uniform Q/VO2 relation with an almost linear course at an anaesthetic concentration up to 2 MAC

  5. Reference Values for Peak Exercise Cardiac Output in Healthy Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Vignati, Carlo; Gentile, Piero; Boiti, Costanza; Farina, Stefania; Salvioni, Elisabetta; Mapelli, Massimo; Magrì, Damiano; Paolillo, Stefania; Corrieri, Nicoletta; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Cattadori, Gaia

    2017-06-01

    Cardiac output (Q˙) is a key parameter in the assessment of cardiac function, its measurement being crucial for the diagnosis, treatment, and prognostic evaluation of all heart diseases. Until recently, Q˙ determination at peak exercise has been possible through invasive methods, so that normal values were obtained in studies based on small populations. Nowadays, peak Q˙ can be measured noninvasively by means of the inert gas rebreathing (IGR) technique. The present study was undertaken to provide reference values for peak Q˙ in the normal general population and to obtain a formula able to estimate peak exercise Q˙ from measured peak oxygen uptake (V˙o2). We studied 500 normal subjects (age, 44.9 ± 1.5 years; range, 18-77 years; 260 men, 240 women) who underwent a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test with peak Q˙ measurement by IGR. In the overall study sample, peak Q˙ was 13.2 ± 3.5 L/min (men, 15.3 ± 3.3 L/min; women, 11.0 ± 2.0 L/min; P exercise was (4.4 × peak V˙o2) + 4.3 in the overall study cohort, (4.3 × peak V˙o2) + 4.5 in men, and (4.9 × peak V˙o2) + 3.6 in women. The simultaneous measurement of Q˙ and V˙o2 at peak exercise in a large sample of healthy subjects provided an equation to predict peak Q˙ from peak V˙o2 values. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pulse contour-derived cardiac output in hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Joakim; Ladefoged, Soeren D

    2010-01-01

    Reliable methods for cardiac output determination are essential for studying the pathophysiology of intradialytic hypotension. Use of the current gold standard, the Transonic monitor, requires an arteriovenous fistula. We wished to verify the accuracy of a method based on finger pulse contour...

  7. Cardiac output and vasodilation in the vasovagal response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieling, Wouter; Jardine, David L.; de Lange, Frederik J

    2016-01-01

    The simple faint is secondary to hypotension and bradycardia resulting in transient loss of consciousness. According to Ohm's law applied to the circulation, BP = SVR × CO, hypotension can result from a decrease in systemic vascular resistance (SVR), cardiac output (CO), or both. It is important ...

  8. Validation of noninvasive pulse contour cardiac output using finger arterial pressure in cardiac surgery patients requiring fluid therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofhuizen, C.M.; Lansdorp, B.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Scheffer, G.J.; Lemson, J.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Nexfin (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) allows for noninvasive continuous monitoring of blood pressure (ABPNI) and cardiac output (CONI) by measuring finger arterial pressure (FAP). To evaluate the accuracy of FAP in measuring ABPNI and CONI as well as the adequacy of detecting

  9. Validation of noninvasive pulse contour cardiac output using finger arterial pressure in cardiac surgery patients requiring fluid therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofhuizen, Charlotte; Lansdorp, Benno; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.; Scheffer, Gert-Jan; Lemson, Joris

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nexfin (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) allows for noninvasive continuous monitoring of blood pressure (ABPNI) and cardiac output (CONI) by measuring finger arterial pressure (FAP). To evaluate the accuracy of FAP in measuring ABPNI and CONI as well as the adequacy of detecting

  10. A model to calculate cardiac output in hemodialysis patients by thermodilution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alayoud Ahmed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Blood Temperature Monitor module (BTM is used to measure recirculation by thermodilution in dialysis. Numerous studies have confirmed its interest in the measuring of the vascular access flow. In this letter we describe a model to calculate cardiac output in dialysis by the BTM.

  11. [Arterial pressure-based cardiac output monitoring: 1. FloTrac sensor and SVV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Katsuhiro

    2009-07-01

    FloTrac is a recently introduced semi-invasive arterial pressure-based cardiac output (APCO) monitoring device. The accuracy of a new device is usually evaluated by Bland-Altman method, which shows graphically the mean value of differences between a new method and the reference method (bias), standard deviation of the differences (precision) and limits of agreement or 2 standard deviations. Critchley et al calculated the percentage errors which are two standard deviations divided by mean cardiac output, and proposed that percentage error should be less than 30% as a reliable new method. Cardiac output was measured by FloTrac (APCO) and pulmonary arterial catheter-based thermodilution method (ICO) during off-pump coronary artery bypass and resection of pheochromocytoma, procedures associated with hemodynamically unstable conditions. As algorithm is renewed in a new version of the device, the accuracy of the device is improved; bias, precision and limits of agreement decreased; correlation coefficient increased, and percentage error was assessed to be around 30%. On the other hand, there was a tendency for increased negative bias as cardiac output increased, implying APCO tends to underestimate ICO in high CO ranges. APCO is less invasive and could rapidly respond to fast changes of hemodynamic state. FloTrac is expected to become a reliable cardiac output monitoring device even under hemodynamically unstable conditions. Further improvement of the algorithm is anticipated.

  12. Risk factors for decreased cardiac output after coronary artery bypass grafting: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Eduarda Ribeiro; Lopes, Camila Takao; Maria, Vera Lucia Regina; de Barros, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite

    2017-04-01

    No previous study has investigated the predictive risk factors of the nursing diagnosis of risk for decreased cardiac output after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). This study aimed to identify the predictive risk factors of the nursing diagnosis of risk for decreased cardiac output after CABG. This was a prospective cohort study performed at a cardiac university hospital in São Paulo, Brazil and 257 adult patients undergoing CABG were included. Potential risk factors for low cardiac output in the immediate post-operative period were investigated using the patients' medical records. Univariate analysis and logistic regression were used to identify the predictive risk factors of decreased cardiac output. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was calculated as a measure of accuracy. The variables that could not be analysed through logistic regression were analysed through Fisher's exact test. One hundred and ninety-five patients had low cardiac output in the immediate post-operative period. The predictive risk factors included age ⩾60 years, decreased left ventricle ejection fraction, not using the radial artery graft, positive fluid balance and post-operative arrhythmia that differed from the pre-operative arrhythmia. This model predicted the outcome with a sensitivity of 62.9%, a specificity of 87.2% and an accuracy of 81.5%. The variables analysed through Fisher's exact test included heart failure, re-exploration and bleeding-related re-exploration. The predictive risk factors for the nursing diagnosis of risk for decreased cardiac output after CABG were found. These results can be used to direct nurses in patient monitoring, staff training and nursing team staffing.

  13. Volume loading augments cutaneous vasodilatation and cardiac output of heat stressed older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Daniel; Romero, Steven A; Ngo, Hai; Sarma, Satyam; Cornwell, William K; Poh, Paula Y S; Stoller, Douglas; Levine, Benjamin D; Crandall, Craig G

    2017-08-21

    Age-related changes in cutaneous microvascular and cardiac functions limit the extent of cutaneous vasodilatation and the increase in cardiac output that healthy older adults can achieve during passive heat stress. However, it is unclear if these age-related changes in microvascular and cardiac functions maximally restrain the levels of cutaneous vasodilatation and cardiac output that healthy older adults can achieve during heat stress. We observed that rapid volume loading, performed during passive heat stress, augments both cutaneous vasodilatation and cardiac output in healthy older humans. These findings demonstrate that the microcirculation of healthy aged skin can further dilate during passive heat exposure, despite peripheral limitations to vasodilatation. Furthermore, healthy older humans can augment cardiac output when cardiac pre-load is increased during heat stress. Primary ageing markedly attenuates cutaneous vasodilatation and the increase in cardiac output during passive heating. However, it remains unclear if these responses are maximally restrained by age-related changes in cutaneous microvascular and cardiac functions. We hypothesized that rapid volume loading performed during heat stress would increase cardiac output in older adults without parallel increases in cutaneous vasodilatation. Twelve young (Y: 26 ± 5 years) and ten older (O: 69 ± 3 years) healthy adults were passively heated until core temperature increased by 1.5°C. Cardiac output (thermodilution), forearm vascular conductance (FVC, venous occlusion plethysmography) and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC, laser-Doppler) were measured before and after rapid infusion of warmed saline (15 mL kg(-1) , ∼7 min). While heat stressed, but prior to saline infusion, cardiac output (O: 6.8 ± 0.4 vs. Y: 9.4 ± 0.6 L min(-1) ), FVC (O: 0.08 ± 0.01 vs. Y: 0.17 ± 0.02 mL (100 mL min(-1)  mmHg(-1) )(-1) ), and CVC (O: 1.29 ± 0.34 vs. Y: 1.93 ± 0.30

  14. Biphasic cardiac output changes during onset of spinal anaesthesia in elderly patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyhoff, C S; Hesselbjerg, L; Koscielniak-Nielsen, Z

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: In most studies of cardiac output changes after spinal anaesthesia, the time-resolution is limited. The aim of this study was to demonstrate cardiac output changes with high time-resolution during onset of spinal anaesthesia in elderly patients. METHODS: We investigated 32...... changes in cardiac output during onset of spinal anaesthesia. Initially, cardiac output increased. Subsequently, it was significantly reduced from baseline, although this decrease was of minor clinical importance....

  15. IMPROVING AGREEMENT BETWEEN THORACIC BIOIMPEDANCE AND DYE DILUTION CARDIAC-OUTPUT ESTIMATION IN CHILDREN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OCONNELL, AJ; TIBBALLS, J; COULTHARD, M

    1991-01-01

    The measurement of thoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB) offers a continuous, non-invasive method for monitoring cardiac output (CO). For clinical use, agreement with a current standard should be demonstrated. We describe a modification to the manufacturer's suggested data entry into the NCCOM3-R6

  16. Use of thermodilution cardiac output overestimates diagnoses of exercise-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Steven; Brusca, Samuel B; Rhodes, Parker S; Kolb, Todd M; Mathai, Stephen C; Tedford, Ryan J

    2017-03-01

    Two new definitions of exercise-induced pulmonary hypertension (EIPH) have emerged. Both rely on measuring cardiac output (CO), yet this remains unstandardized. In our cohort of patients undergoing invasive cardiopulmonary exercise testing, we found that using thermodilution CO rather than direct Fick CO led to a significant excess of EIPH diagnoses.

  17. The decrease of cardiac chamber volumes and output during positive-pressure ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper Kyhl; Ahtarovski, Kiril Aleksov; Iversen, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    the effect of PPV on the central circulation by studying cardiac chamber volumes with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). We hypothesized that PPV lowers cardiac output (CO) mainly via the Frank-Starling relationship. In 18 healthy volunteers, cardiac chamber volumes and flow in aorta and the pulmonary...

  18. Output Measures and Library Space Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushington, Nolan

    1987-01-01

    Draws some initial connections between library performance measures and library space planning and collection management. Output measure surveys are suggested for establishing hierarchies of use and appropriate design of environments for housing the collection. Four references are listed. (MES)

  19. Bioreactance is a reliable method for estimating cardiac output at rest and during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T W; Houghton, D; Cassidy, S; MacGowan, G A; Trenell, M I; Jakovljevic, D G

    2015-09-01

    Bioreactance is a novel noninvasive method for cardiac output measurement that involves analysis of blood flow-dependent changes in phase shifts of electrical currents applied across the thorax. The present study evaluated the test-retest reliability of bioreactance for assessing haemodynamic variables at rest and during exercise. 22 healthy subjects (26 (4) yrs) performed an incremental cycle ergometer exercise protocol relative to their individual power output at maximal O2 consumption (Wmax) on two separate occasions (trials 1 and 2). Participants cycled for five 3 min stages at 20, 40, 60, 80 and 90% Wmax. Haemodynamic and cardiorespiratory variables were assessed at rest and continuously during the exercise protocol. Cardiac output was not significantly different between trials at rest (P=0.948), or between trials at any stage of the exercise protocol (all P>0.30). There was a strong relationship between cardiac output estimates between the trials (ICC=0.95, Prest (P=0.989) or during exercise (all P>0.15), and strong relationships between trials were found (ICC=0.83, Prest and during different stages of graded exercise testing including maximal exertion. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The relationship between the flow of arteriovenous fistula and cardiac output in haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Carlo; Lomonte, Carlo; Vernaglione, Luigi; Casucci, Francesco; Antonelli, Maurizio; Losurdo, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    Satisfactory haemodialysis (HD) vascular access flow (Qa) is necessary for dialysis adequacy. High Qa is postulated to increase cardiac output (CO) and cause high-output cardiac failure. Aim of the present prospective study was to evaluate the relationship between Qa of arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) and CO in order to have a closer insight into this scarcely explored aspect of HD pathophysiology. Ninety-six patients bearing an AVF entered the study. All were evaluated a priori for the existence of cardiac failure according to the functional classification of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association task force. Qa and CO were measured by means of the ultrasound dilution Transonic Hemodialysis Monitor HD02. The mean Qa of the 65 lower arm AVFs was 0.948+/-0.428 SD l/min, whereas that of the 31 upper arm AVFs was 1.58+/-0.553 l/min. The difference was statistically significant (Ppolynomial regression model best fitted the relationship between Qa and CO. The analysis of the regression equation identified 0.95 and 2.2 l/min as Qa cut-off points. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that Qa values >or= 2.0 l/min predicted the occurrence of high-output cardiac failure more accurately than two other Qa values (sensitivity 89%, specificity 100%, curve area 0.99) and three Qa/CO ratio values (cardio-pulmonary recirculation-CPR). The better performance among the latter was that of CPR values >or= 20% (sensitivity 100%, specificity 74.7%, curve area 0.92). Our prospective study shows that the relationship between Qa of AVFs and CO is complex and a third-order polynomial regression model best fits this relationship. Furthermore, it is the first study to clearly show the high predictive power for high-output cardiac failure occurrence of Qa cut-off values >or= 2.0 l/min.

  1. Evaluation of Resting Cardiac Power Output as a Prognostic Factor in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Omer; Aslan, Gamze; Demirozu, Zumrut T; Yenigun, Cemal Deniz; Yazicioglu, Nuran

    2017-09-15

    If the heart is represented by a hydraulic pump, cardiac power represents the hydraulic function of the heart. Cardiac pump function is frequently determined through left ventricular ejection fraction using imaging. This study aims to validate resting cardiac power output (CPO) as a predictive biomarker in patients with advanced heart failure (HF). One hundred and seventy-two patients with HF severe enough to warrant cardiac transplantation were retrospectively reviewed at a single tertiary care institution between September 2010 and July 2013. Patients were initially evaluated with simultaneous right-sided and left-sided cardiac catheter-based hemodynamic measurements, followed by longitudinal follow-up (median of 52 months) for adverse events (cardiac mortality, cardiac transplantation, or ventricular assist device placement). Median resting CPO was 0.54 W (long rank chi-square = 33.6; p < 0.0001). Decreased resting CPO (<0.54 W) predicted increased risk for adverse outcomes. Fifty cardiac deaths, 10 cardiac transplants, and 12 ventricular assist device placements were documented. The prognostic relevance of resting CPO remained significant after adjustment for age, gender, left ventricular ejection fraction, mean arterial pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance, right atrial pressure, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (HR, 3.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.66 to 6.77; p = 0.0007). In conclusion, lower resting CPO supplies independent prediction of adverse outcomes. Thus, it could be effectively used for risk stratification in patients with advanced HF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. ASSUMED OXYGEN-CONSUMPTION BASED ON CALCULATION FROM DYE DILUTION CARDIAC-OUTPUT - AN IMPROVED FORMULA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BERGSTRA, A; VANDIJK, RB; HILLEGE, HL; LIE, KI; MOOK, GA

    1995-01-01

    This study was performed because of observed differences between dye dilution cardiac output and the Fick cardiac output, calculated from estimated oxygen consumption according to LaFarge and Miettinen, and to find a better formula for assumed oxygen consumption. In 250 patients who underwent left a

  3. Arterial pressure allows monitoring the changes in cardiac output induced by volume expansion but not by norepinephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnet, Xavier; Letierce, Alexia; Hamzaoui, Olfa; Chemla, Denis; Anguel, Nadia; Osman, David; Richard, Christian; Teboul, Jean-Louis

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate to which extent the systemic arterial pulse pressure could be used as a surrogate of cardiac output for assessing the effects of a fluid challenge and of norepinephrine. Observational study. Medical intensive care unit. Patients with an acute circulatory failure who received a fluid challenge (228 patients, group 1) or in whom norepinephrine was introduced or increased (145 patients, group 2). We measured the systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure, and the transpulmonary thermodilution cardiac output before and after the therapeutic interventions. In group 1, the fluid challenge significantly increased cardiac output by 24% ± 25%. It significantly increased cardiac output by ≥15% (+35% ± 27%) in 142 patients ("responders"). The fluid-induced changes in cardiac output were correlated with the changes in pulse pressure (r = .56, p arterial pressure (r = .55, p arterial pressure (r = .37, p arterial pressure (r = .52, p pressure were significantly related to changes in stroke volume (multiple r = .52) and to age (r = .12). A fluid-induced increase in pulse pressure of ≥17% allowed detecting a fluid-induced increase in cardiac output of ≥15% with a sensitivity of 65[56-72]% and a specificity of 85[76-92]%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curves for the fluid-induced changes in mean arterial pressure and in diastolic arterial pressure was significantly lower than for pulse pressure. In group 2, the introduction/increase of norepinephrine significantly increased cardiac output by 14% ± 18%. The changes in cardiac output induced by the introduction/increase in the dose of norepinephrine were correlated with the changes in pulse pressure and systolic arterial pressure (r = .21 and .29, respectively, p = .001) but to a significantly lesser extent than in group 1. Pulse pressure and systolic arterial pressure could be used for detecting the fluid-induced changes in cardiac output, in spite of a significant

  4. Comparison of an advanced minimally invasive cardiac output monitoring with a continuous invasive cardiac output monitoring during lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Roland; Prueckner, Stephan; Czerner, Stephan; Schramm, Renè; Preissler, Gerhard; Zwißler, Bernhard; von Dossow-Hanfstingl, Vera

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a continuous non-calibrated left heart cardiac index (CI) measurement by arterial waveform analysis (FloTrac(®)/Vigileo(®)) with a continuous calibrated right heart CI measurement by pulmonary artery thermodilution (CCOmbo-PAC(®)/Vigilance II(®)) for hemodynamic monitoring during lung transplantation. CI was measured simultaneously by both techniques in 13 consecutive lung transplants (n = 4 single-lung transplants, n = 9 sequential double-lung transplants) at distinct time points perioperatively. Linear regression analysis and Bland-Altman analysis with percentage error calculation were used for statistical comparison of CI measurements by both techniques. In this study the FloTrac(®) system underestimated the CI in comparison with the continuous pulmonary arterial thermodilution (p waveform and continuous pulmonary artery thermodilution are, therefore, not interchangeable during these complex operations.

  5. Residual gravimetric method to measure nebulizer output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecellio None, Laurent; Grimbert, Daniel; Bordenave, Joelle; Benoit, Guy; Furet, Yves; Fauroux, Brigitte; Boissinot, Eric; De Monte, Michele; Lemarié, Etienne; Diot, Patrice

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess a residual gravimetric method based on weighing dry filters to measure the aerosol output of nebulizers. This residual gravimetric method was compared to assay methods based on spectrophotometric measurement of terbutaline (Bricanyl, Astra Zeneca, France), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurement of tobramycin (Tobi, Chiron, U.S.A.), and electrochemical measurements of NaF (as defined by the European standard). Two breath-enhanced jet nebulizers, one standard jet nebulizer, and one ultrasonic nebulizer were tested. Output produced by the residual gravimetric method was calculated by weighing the filters both before and after aerosol collection and by filter drying corrected by the proportion of drug contained in total solute mass. Output produced by the electrochemical, spectrophotometric, and HPLC methods was determined after assaying the drug extraction filter. The results demonstrated a strong correlation between the residual gravimetric method (x axis) and assay methods (y axis) in terms of drug mass output (y = 1.00 x -0.02, r(2) = 0.99, n = 27). We conclude that a residual gravimetric method based on dry filters, when validated for a particular agent, is an accurate way of measuring aerosol output.

  6. The influence of hemoglobin concentration on exercise cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedson, P S

    1981-05-01

    Two experiments were performed to study the cardiac output (Q) vs. hemoglobin concentration (Hb) relationship during constant load submaximum eexercise. The first experiment examined the relationship between submaximum exercise Q and Hb in 28 females. A correlation of r = -0.83 (P less than 0.05) was observed between Q and Hb during xercise at 88 W (mean Q = 11.04 l . min-1) and 118 W (mean Q = 13.10 l . min-1) (mean steady rate VO2 = 1.40 l . min-1 and 1.79 l . min-1, respectively). By removing the influence of stroke volume (SV) from Q (part correlation analyses), the relationship between Q and Hb is compromised (r = -0.29, P greater than 0.05, 88 W and r = -0.33, P greater than 0.05, 118 W). The second experiment compared the VO2 max and submaximum exercise (118 W) Q responses in six males before and after blood donation. Experimentally reducing Hb 18.6% (P less than 0.05) caused a 6.2% decrease (P less than 0.05) in VO2 max. Additionally, submaximum exercise Q increased 12% (P less than 0.05) 6 days following hemodilution., The Q remained elevated 11 days (10% higher, P less than 0.05) and 16 days (9% higher, P less than 0.05) post-blood donation and progressively returned to pre-donation levels by 21 days post-withdrawal. The higher Q's during submaximum exercise were ascribed primarily to an 8% (P less than 0.05) higher SV in comparison to pre-donation levels. collectively, the data from the two experiments indicate that individual differences in submaximum exercise Q are due, in part, to individual differences in Hb concentration. Furthermore, it is suggested that the stimulus for the SV-induced Q vs. Hb association is related to maintaining maximal myocardial efficiency.

  7. Cardiac output assessment using oxygen consumption estimated from the left ventricular pressure-volume area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negroni, Jorge A; Lascano, Elena C; Bertolotti, Alejandro M; Gómez, Carmen B; Rodríguez Correa, Carlos A; Favaloro, Roberto R

    2010-01-01

    Use of a majority of structural variables (age, sex, height) to estimate oxygen consumption in the calculation of cardiac output (CO) by the Fick principle does not account for changes in physiological conditions. To improve this limitation, oxygen consumption was estimated based on the left ventricular pressure-volume area. A pilot study with 10 patients undergoing right cardiac catheterization showed that this approach was successful to estimate CO (r=0,73, vs. thermodilution measured CO). Further essays changing end-diastolic-volume in the pressure-volume area formula by body weight or body surface area showed that this last yielded the best correlation with the thermodilution measured CO (slope=1, ordinate =0.01 and r=0.93). These preliminary results indicate that use of a formula originated from the pressure-volume-area concept is a good alternative to estimate oxygen consumption for CO calculation.

  8. Arterial pulse cardiac output agreement with thermodilution in patients in hyperdynamic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Rocca, Giorgio; Costa, Maria Gabriella; Chiarandini, Paolo; Bertossi, Gaia; Lugano, Manuela; Pompei, Livia; Coccia, Cecilia; Sainz-Barriga, Mauricio; Pietropaoli, Paolo

    2008-10-01

    This study aimed to compare continuous cardiac output (CCO) obtained using the arterial pulse wave (APCO) measurement with a simultaneous measurement of the intermittent cardiac output (ICO) and CCO obtained with a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) in liver transplant patients. A prospective, single-center evaluation. A university hospital intensive care unit. Eighteen patients after liver transplantation. Pulmonary artery catheters were placed in all patients, and ICO and CCO were determined using thermodilution. APCO measurements were made with the Vigileo System (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA). The authors obtained 126 data pairs of ICO and APCO and 864 pairs of CCO and APCO. ICO data were collected after intensive care unit admission and every 8 hours until the 48th postoperative hour. CCO and APCO data were collected every hour from admission until the 48th postoperative hour. Bias and precision were 0.95 +/- 1.41 L/min for ICO versus APCO and 1.29 +/- 1.28 L/min for CCO and APCO. Bias and precision for cardiac output (CO) data pairs less than 8 L/min were 0.32 +/- 1.14 L/min between ICO and APCO and 0.71 +/- 0.98 L/min between CCO and APCO. For CO data pairs higher than 8 L/min, bias and precision were 1.79 +/- 1.54 L/min between ICO and APCO and 2.25 +/- 1.14 L/min between CCO and APCO. APCO enables the assessment of CO with clinically acceptable bias and precision. At higher CO levels, APCO underestimates PAC measurements and it is not as reliable as thermodilution in hyperdynamic liver transplant patients.

  9. Evaluation of cardiac output from a tidally ventilated homogeneous lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benallal, Habib; Beck, Kenneth C; Johnson, Bruce D; Busso, Thierry

    2005-10-01

    We used the direct Fick measurements to validate a method for estimating cardiac output by iteratively fitting VCO(2) at the mouth to lung model values. This model was run using a series of 50, 30 and 10 breaths to test sensitivity to number of breaths used for fitting. The lung was treated as a catenary two-compartment lung model consisting of a dead space compartment connected with a single alveolar space compartment, perfused with constant pulmonary blood flow. The implemented mathematical modeling described variations in O(2) and CO(2) compartmental fractions and alveolar volume. This model also included pulmonary capillary gas exchange. Experimental data were collected from measurements performed on six healthy subjects at rest and during 20, 40, 60 and 85-90% of peak V(O)(2). The correlation between the two methods was highest and the average agreement between the methods was best using 50 breaths R = 095; P model) = 1.1Q(Fick) - 2.3). The mean difference and lower to upper limits of agreement between measured and estimated data were 0.7 l/min (-2.7 to 4.1 l/min) for cardiac output; -0.9 ml/100 ml (-1.3 to -0.5 ml/100 ml) for arterial O(2) content; -0.8 ml/100 ml (-3.8 to 2.2 ml/100 ml) for mixed venous O(2) content and -0.1 ml/100 ml (-2.9 to 2.7 ml/100 ml) for arteriovenous difference O(2) content. The cardiac output estimated by the lung model was in good agreement with the direct Fick measurements in young healthy subjects.

  10. Effect of heat stress on cardiac output and systemic vascular conductance during simulated hemorrhage to presyncope in young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganio, Matthew S; Overgaard, Morten; Seifert, Thomas;

    2012-01-01

    During moderate actual or simulated hemorrhage, as cardiac output decreases, reductions in systemic vascular conductance (SVC) maintain mean arterial pressure (MAP). Heat stress, however, compromises the control of MAP during simulated hemorrhage, and it remains unknown whether this response is due...... to a persistently high SVC and/or a low cardiac output. This study tested the hypothesis that an inadequate decrease in SVC is the primary contributing mechanism by which heat stress compromises blood pressure control during simulated hemorrhage. Simulated hemorrhage was imposed via lower body negative pressure...... (LBNP) to presyncope in 11 passively heat-stressed subjects (increase core temperature: 1.2 ± 0.2°C; means ± SD). Cardiac output was measured via thermodilution, and SVC was calculated while subjects were normothermic, heat stressed, and throughout subsequent LBNP. MAP was not changed by heat stress...

  11. High flow variant postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome amplifies the cardiac output response to exercise in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianosi, Paolo T; Goodloe, Adele H; Soma, David; Parker, Ken O; Brands, Chad K; Fischer, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is characterized by chronic fatigue and dizziness and affected individuals by definition have orthostatic intolerance and tachycardia. There is considerable overlap of symptoms in patients with POTS and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), prompting speculation that POTS is akin to a deconditioned state. We previously showed that adolescents with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) have excessive heart rate (HR) during, and slower HR recovery after, exercise - hallmarks of deconditioning. We also noted exaggerated cardiac output during exercise which led us to hypothesize that tachycardia could be a manifestation of a high output state rather than a consequence of deconditioning. We audited records of adolescents presenting with long-standing history of any mix of fatigue, dizziness, nausea, who underwent both head-up tilt table test and maximal exercise testing with measurement of cardiac output at rest plus 2-3 levels of exercise, and determined the cardiac output () versus oxygen uptake () relationship. Subjects with chronic fatigue were diagnosed with POTS if their HR rose ≥40 beat·min(-1) with head-up tilt. Among 107 POTS patients the distribution of slopes for the , relationship was skewed toward higher slopes but showed two peaks with a split at ~7.0 L·min(-1) per L·min(-1), designated as normal (5.08 ± 1.17, N = 66) and hyperkinetic (8.99 ± 1.31, N = 41) subgroups. In contrast, cardiac output rose appropriately with in 141 patients with chronic fatigue but without POTS, exhibiting a normal distribution and an average slope of 6.10 ± 2.09 L·min(-1) per L·min(-1). Mean arterial blood pressure and pulse pressure from rest to exercise rose similarly in both groups. We conclude that 40% of POTS adolescents demonstrate a hyperkinetic circulation during exercise. We attribute this to failure of normal regional vasoconstriction during exercise, such that patients must increase flow through an

  12. Optimisation of atrioventricular delay during exercise improves cardiac output in patients stabilised with cardiac resynchronisation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing Ping; Lee, Alex Pui-Wai; Grimm, Richard A; Hung, Ming-Jui; Yang, Xing Sheng; Delurgio, David; Leon, Angel R; Merlino, John D; Yu, Cheuk-Man

    2012-01-01

    Atrioventricular (AV) delay in cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) recipients are typically optimised at rest. However, there are limited data on the impact of exercise-induced changes in heart rate on the optimal AV delay and left ventricular function. The authors serially programmed AV delays in 41 CRT patients with intrinsic sinus rhythm at rest and during two stages of supine bicycle exercise with heart rates at 20 bpm (stage I) and 40 bpm (stage II) above baseline. The optimal AV delay during exercise was determined by the iterative method to maximise cardiac output using Doppler echocardiography. Results were compared to physiological change in PR intervals in 56 normal controls during treadmill exercise. The optimal AV delay was progressively shortened (pexercise level (baseline: 123±26 ms vs. stage I: 102±24 ms vs stage II: 70±22 ms, pexercise. A linear inverse relationship existed between optimal AV delays and heart rates in CRT patients (AV delay=241-1.61×heart rate, R2=0.639, pheart rate during exercise, which suggests the need for programming of rate-adaptive AV delay in CRT recipients.

  13. Improvements in determination of cardiac output with a Swan-Ganz catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakagami, M; Kuwana, K; Nakanishi, H; Sakai, K

    1990-01-01

    The time constant for heat transfer may affect exact determination of cardiac output with Swan-Ganz catheters. Commercially available Swan-Ganz catheters are provided with thermistors with varying time constants. Current monitoring of cardiac output is not corrected for these time constants, so the conventional method of determining cardiac output using the equation of Stewart-Hamilton produces marked errors. The authors propose a new method of determining cardiac output with Swan-Ganz catheters with varying time constants from thermal dilution curve data based on Newton's cooling law. Values for blood flow rate determined by the new method using a completely stirred tank of original design, mimicking the natural heart and using bovine blood, are almost the same as values observed at varying saline infusion volumes, saline temperatures, and saline infusion times.

  14. Cardiac output and vasodilation in the vasovagal response: An analysis of the classic papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieling, Wouter; Jardine, David L; de Lange, Frederik J; Brignole, Michele; Nielsen, Henning B; Stewart, Julian; Sutton, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The simple faint is secondary to hypotension and bradycardia resulting in transient loss of consciousness. According to Ohm's law applied to the circulation, BP = SVR × CO, hypotension can result from a decrease in systemic vascular resistance (SVR), cardiac output (CO), or both. It is important to understand that when blood pressure (BP) is falling, SVR and CO do not change reciprocally as they do in the steady state. In 1932, Lewis, assuming that decreased SVR alone accounted for hypotension, defined "the vasovagal response" along pathophysiologic lines to denote the association of vasodilation with vagal-induced bradycardia in simple faint. Studies performed by Barcroft and Sharpey-Schafer between 1940 and 1950 used volume-based plethysmography to demonstrate major forearm vasodilation during extreme hypotension and concluded that the main mechanism for hypotension was vasodilation. Plethysmographic measurements were intermittent and not frequent enough to capture rapid changes in blood flow during progressive hypotension. However, later investigations by Weissler, Murray, and Stevens performed between 1950 and 1970 used invasive beat-to-beat BP measurements and more frequent measurements of CO using the Fick principle. They demonstrated that CO significantly fell before syncope, and little vasodilation occurred until very late in the vasovagal reaction Thus, since the 1970s, decreasing cardiac output rather than vasodilation has been regarded as the principal mechanism for the hypotension of vasovagal syncope.

  15. Impact of pacing modality and biventricular pacing on cardiac output and coronary conduit flow in the post-cardiotomy patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Healy, David G

    2012-02-03

    We have previously demonstrated the role of univentricular pacing modalities in influencing coronary conduit flow in the immediate post-operative period in the cardiac surgery patient. We wanted to determine the mechanism of this improved coronary conduit and, in addition, to explore the possible benefits with biventricular pacing. Sixteen patients undergoing first time elective coronary artery bypass grafting who required pacing following surgery were recruited. Comparison of cardiac output and coronary conduit flow was performed between VVI and DDD pacing with a single right ventricular lead and biventricular pacing lead placement. Cardiac output was measured using arterial pulse waveform analysis while conduit flow was measured using ultrasonic transit time methodology. Cardiac output was greatest with DDD pacing using right ventricular lead placement only [DDD-univentricular 5.42 l (0.7), DDD-biventricular 5.33 l (0.8), VVI-univentricular 4.71 l (0.8), VVI-biventricular 4.68 l (0.6)]. DDD-univentricular pacing was significantly better than VVI-univentricular (P=0.023) and VVI-biventricular pacing (P=0.001) but there was no significant advantage to DDD-biventricular pacing (P=0.45). In relation to coronary conduit flow, DDD pacing again had the highest flow [DDD-univentricular 55 ml\\/min (24), DDD-biventricular 52 ml\\/min (25), VVI-univentricular 47 ml\\/min (23), VVI-biventricular 50 ml\\/min (26)]. DDD-univentricular pacing was significantly better than VVI-univentricular (P=0.006) pacing but not significantly different to VVI-biventricular pacing (P=0.109) or DDD-biventricular pacing (P=0.171). Pacing with a DDD modality offers the optimal coronary conduit flow by maximising cardiac output. Biventricular lead placement offered no significant benefit to coronary conduit flow or cardiac output.

  16. Cerebral oxygen saturation and cardiac output during anaesthesia in sitting position for neurosurgical procedures: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, P; Tzanova, I; Hagen, F; Berres, M; Closhen, D; Pestel, G; Engelhard, K

    2016-10-01

    Neurosurgical operations in the dorsal cranium often require the patient to be positioned in a sitting position. This can be associated with decreased cardiac output and cerebral hypoperfusion, and possibly, inadequate cerebral oxygenation. In the present study, cerebral oxygen saturation was measured during neurosurgery in the sitting position and correlated with cardiac output. Perioperative cerebral oxygen saturation was measured continuously with two different monitors, INVOS(®) and FORE-SIGHT(®). Cardiac output was measured at eight predefined time points using transoesophageal echocardiography. Forty patients were enrolled, but only 35 (20 female) were eventually operated on in the sitting position. At the first time point, the regional cerebral oxygen saturation measured with INVOS(®) was 70 (sd 9)%; thereafter, it increased by 0.0187% min(-1) (P<0.01). The cerebral tissue oxygen saturation measured with FORE-SIGHT(®) started at 68 (sd 13)% and increased by 0.0142% min(-1) (P<0.01). The mean arterial blood pressure did not change. Cardiac output was between 6.3 (sd 1.3) and 7.2 (1.8) litre min(-1) at the predefined time points. Cardiac output, but not mean arterial blood pressure, showed a positive and significant correlation with cerebral oxygen saturation. During neurosurgery in the sitting position, the cerebral oxygen saturation slowly increases and, therefore, this position seems to be safe with regard to cerebral oxygen saturation. Cerebral oxygen saturation is stable because of constant CO and MAP, while the influence of CO on cerebral oxygen saturation seems to be more relevant. NCT01275898. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. NOTE: Increasing cardiac output and decreasing oxygenation sequence in pump twins of acardiac twin pregnancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Umur, Asli; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Van Bavel, Ed; Vandenbussche, Frank P. H. A.; Nikkels, Peter G. J.

    2005-02-01

    An acardiac twin pregnancy is a rare but serious complication of monochorionic twinning and consists of an acardiac twin and a pump twin. The acardiac twin is a severely malformed fetus that lacks most organs, particularly a heart, but grows during pregnancy because it is perfused by the developmentally normal pump twin via a set of arterioarterial and venovenous placental anastomoses. Pump twins die intrauterine or neonatally in about 50% of the cases. Because the effects of an acardiac mass on the pump twin's development are incompletely known, methods for outcome prognosis are currently not available. We sought to derive simple relations for the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decreased oxygenation and to use available clinical cases for a preliminary test of the model. As a method, we used a theoretical flow model to represent the fetoplacental circulation of an acardiac twin pregnancy and estimated blood deoxygenation and reoxygenation following perfusion of the two bodies and placentas, respectively. The results show the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decrease of venous oxygen saturation to depend on the ratio of pump twin to acardiac twin umbilical blood flow, whose ratio can be measured by ultrasonography. The clinical cases show a decreasing umbilical flow ratio with gestation. In conclusion, prospective serial study is necessary to test whether measurement of umbilical flow ratios allows monitoring the pump twin's pathophysiologic development, possibly resulting in a guideline for prognosis of pump twin survival.

  18. Increasing cardiac output and decreasing oxygenation sequence in pump twins of acardiac twin pregnancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemert, Martin J C van [Laser Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Umur, Asli [Laser Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M van den [Laser Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VanBavel, Ed [Department of Medical Physics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vandenbussche, Frank P H A [Department of Obstetrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Nikkels, Peter G J [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2005-02-07

    An acardiac twin pregnancy is a rare but serious complication of monochorionic twinning and consists of an acardiac twin and a pump twin. The acardiac twin is a severely malformed fetus that lacks most organs, particularly a heart, but grows during pregnancy because it is perfused by the developmentally normal pump twin via a set of arterioarterial and venovenous placental anastomoses. Pump twins die intrauterine or neonatally in about 50% of the cases. Because the effects of an acardiac mass on the pump twin's development are incompletely known, methods for outcome prognosis are currently not available. We sought to derive simple relations for the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decreased oxygenation and to use available clinical cases for a preliminary test of the model. As a method, we used a theoretical flow model to represent the fetoplacental circulation of an acardiac twin pregnancy and estimated blood deoxygenation and reoxygenation following perfusion of the two bodies and placentas, respectively. The results show the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decrease of venous oxygen saturation to depend on the ratio of pump twin to acardiac twin umbilical blood flow, whose ratio can be measured by ultrasonography. The clinical cases show a decreasing umbilical flow ratio with gestation. In conclusion, prospective serial study is necessary to test whether measurement of umbilical flow ratios allows monitoring the pump twin's pathophysiologic development, possibly resulting in a guideline for prognosis of pump twin survival. (note)

  19. Cardiac Output and Performance during a Marathon Race in Middle-Aged Recreational Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique L. Billat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Despite the increasing popularity of marathon running, there are no data on the responses of stroke volume (SV and cardiac output (CO to exercise in this context. We sought to establish whether marathon performance is associated with the ability to sustain high fractional use of maximal SV and CO (i.e, cardiac endurance and/or CO, per meter (i.e., cardiac cost. Methods. We measured the SV, heart rate (HR, CO, and running speed of 14 recreational runners in an incremental, maximal laboratory test and then during a real marathon race (mean performance: 3 hr 30 min ± 45 min. Results. Our data revealed that HR, SV and CO were all in a high but submaximal steady state during the marathon (87.0 ± 1.6%, 77.2 ± 2.6%, and 68.7 ± 2.8% of maximal values, respectively. Marathon performance was inversely correlated with an upward drift in the CO/speed ratio (mL of CO×m−1 (r=−0.65, P<0.01 and positively correlated with the runner’s ability to complete the race at a high percentage of the speed at maximal SV (r=0.83, P<0.0002. Conclusion. Our results showed that marathon performance is inversely correlated with cardiac cost and positively correlated with cardiac endurance. The CO response could be a benchmark for race performance in recreational marathon runners.

  20. Application of bioreactance for cardiac output assessment during exercise in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Adrian; Hull, James H; Nunan, David; Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Brodie, David; Ansley, Lesley

    2010-07-01

    In patients with cardiac failure, bioreactance-based cardiac output (CO) monitoring provides a valid non-invasive method for assessing cardiac performance during exercise. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of this technique during strenuous exercise in healthy, trained individuals. Fourteen recreational cyclists, mean (SD) age of 34 (8) years and relative peak oxygen uptake of (VO(2)) 56 (6) ml kg(-1) min(-1), underwent incremental maximal exercise testing, whilst CO was recorded continuously using a novel bioreactance-based device (CO(bio)). The CO(bio) was evaluated against relationship with VO(2), theoretical calculation of arterial-venous oxygen difference (C(a - v) O(2)) and level of agreement with an inert gas rebreathing method (CO(rb)) using a Bland-Altman plot. Bioreactance-based CO measurement was practical and straightforward in application, although there was intermittent loss of electrocardiograph signal at high-intensity exercise. At rest and during exercise, CO(bio) was strongly correlated with VO(2) (r = 0.84; P < 0.001), however, there was evidence of systematic bias with CO(bio) providing lower values than CO(rb); mean bias (limits of agreement) -19% (14.6 to -53%). Likewise, calculated (C(a - v) O(2)) was greater when determined using CO(bio) than CO(rb) (P < 0.001), although both devices provided values in excess of those reported in invasive studies. Bioreactance-based determination of CO provides a pragmatic approach to the continuous assessment of cardiac performance during strenuous exercise in trained individuals. Our findings, however, suggest that further work is needed to refine the key measurement determinants of CO using this device to improve measurement accuracy in this setting.

  1. Evaluation of a new arterial pressure-based cardiac output device requiring no external calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amann Matthias

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several techniques have been discussed as alternatives to the intermittent bolus thermodilution cardiac output (COPAC measurement by the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC. However, these techniques usually require a central venous line, an additional catheter, or a special calibration procedure. A new arterial pressure-based cardiac output (COAP device (FloTrac™, Vigileo™; Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA only requires access to the radial or femoral artery using a standard arterial catheter and does not need an external calibration. We validated this technique in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU using COPAC as the method of reference. Methods We studied 20 critically ill patients, aged 16 to 74 years (mean, 55.5 ± 18.8 years, who required both arterial and pulmonary artery pressure monitoring. COPAC measurements were performed at least every 4 hours and calculated as the average of 3 measurements, while COAP values were taken immediately at the end of bolus determinations. Accuracy of measurements was assessed by calculating the bias and limits of agreement using the method described by Bland and Altman. Results A total of 164 coupled measurements were obtained. Absolute values of COPAC ranged from 2.80 to 10.80 l/min (mean 5.93 ± 1.55 l/min. The bias and limits of agreement between COPAC and COAP for unequal numbers of replicates was 0.02 ± 2.92 l/min. The percentage error between COPAC and COAP was 49.3%. The bias between percentage changes in COPAC (ΔCOPAC and percentage changes in COAP (ΔCOAP for consecutive measurements was -0.70% ± 32.28%. COPAC and COAP showed a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.58 (p PAC and ΔCOAP was 0.46 (p Conclusion Although the COAP algorithm shows a minimal bias with COPAC over a wide range of values in an inhomogeneous group of critically ill patients, the scattering of the data remains relative wide. Therefore, the used algorithm (V 1.03 failed to

  2. Validation of the use of foreign gas rebreathing method for non-invasive determination of cardiac output in heart disease patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Liang; WANG Jian-an; JIANG Chen-yang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare a new device (Innocor) for non-invasive measurement of cardiac output (CO) by foreign gas rebreathing method with conventional techniques used in the measurements of cardiac function. Methods: Cardiac outputs measured by Innocor (CORB) were compared with CO obtained by echocardiography (COEC), Swan-Ganz thermodilution (COTD),and left ventricle radiography (COLVR) in 34 patients subjected to cardiac catheterization. Values obtained from the four methods were analyzed by linear regression and paired values were compared by the method of Bland and Altman in SPSS. Results: There was strong positive correlation (r=0.94) between Innocor cardiac output values and the corresponding values obtained by thermodilution and between COEC and COLVR values. Thermodilution appears to overestimate cardiac output when compared to the values obtained with Innocor by (0.66±0.22) L/min (P<0.0001). There was no correlation between data obtained by Innocor and the corresponding COEC and COLVR values. Conclusion: Innocor CORB is an easy, safe and well established method for non-invasive measurement of cardiac output with good prospects for clinical application in heart disease patients.

  3. Reference values for total blood volume and cardiac output in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, L.R. [Indiana Univ., South Bend, IN (United States). Division of Liberal Arts and Sciences

    1994-09-01

    Much research has been devoted to measurement of total blood volume (TBV) and cardiac output (CO) in humans but not enough effort has been devoted to collection and reduction of results for the purpose of deriving typical or {open_quotes}reference{close_quotes} values. Identification of normal values for TBV and CO is needed not only for clinical evaluations but also for the development of biokinetic models for ultra-short-lived radionuclides used in nuclear medicine (Leggett and Williams 1989). The purpose of this report is to offer reference values for TBV and CO, along with estimates of the associated uncertainties that arise from intra- and inter-subject variation, errors in measurement techniques, and other sources. Reference values are derived for basal supine CO and TBV in reference adult humans, and differences associated with age, sex, body size, body position, exercise, and other circumstances are discussed.

  4. Temporary epicardial left ventricular and biventricular pacing improves cardiac output after cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Bengochea Jose B

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate, with different pacing modes, acute changes in left ventricular systolic function, obtained by continuous cardiac output thermodilution in various subsets of patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Increments of mean arterial pressure and cardiac output were considered the end point. Methods Fifty cases electively submitted to cardiac surgery were analyzed. Isolated valve surgery 62%, coronary revascularization 30% and 8% mixed disease. Left ventricular ejection fraction was preserved in 50%,36% had moderate depression,(EF 36%-50% whereas 14% had severe depression (EF  Results Right atrium-right ventricular pacing, decreased significantly mean arterial pressure and cardiac output (2.3% in the overall population and in the subgroups studied. Right atrium-left ventricle, increased mean arterial pressure and cardiac output in 79% of patients and yielded cardiac output increments of 7.5% (0.40 l/m in the low ejection fraction subgroup and 7.3% (0.43 l/m in the left bundle branch block subset. In atrial fibrillation patients, left ventricular and biventricular pacing produced a significant increase in cardiac output 8.5% (0.39 l/min and 11.6% (0.53 l/min respectively. The dP/dt max increased significantly with both modes (p = 0.021,p = 0.028. Conclusion Right atrial-right ventricular pacing generated adverse hemodynamic effects. Right atrium-left ventricular pacing produced significant CO improvement particularly in cases with depressed ventricular function and left bundle branch block. The greatest increments were observed with left ventricular or biventricular pacing in atrial fibrillation with depressed ejection fraction.

  5. Indirect calorimetry can be used to measure cardiac output in septic patients? A calorimetria indireta pode ser utilizada para medir o débito cardíaco em pacientes sépticos?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Auxiliadora Martins

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to compare two different cardiac output (CO monitoring systems based on the thermodilution principle (Thermo-CO and indirect calorimetry (Fick mixed-CO in septic patients. METHODS: Prospective study in septic patients admitted in an intensive care unit of a university hospital. Nineteen patients aged on average 45.4 ± 21.5 years were enrolled in the study. Four series of hourly measurements by the two techniques were carried out simultaneously. RESULTS: No significant differences were observed between Thermo-CO and Fick mixed-CO (7.0 ± 1.8 L.min-1 and 6.4 ± 1.7 L.min-1.. Parallel analysis of Fick mixed-CO and Fick atrial-CO was performed introducing a correction factor for the eight atrial samples in order to adjust the values of oxygen saturation obtained from atrial blood (Fick corrected atrial-CO to those obtained from mixed venous blood. No significant differences could be detected between Fick mixed-CO and Fick corrected atrial-CO. The correlation coefficients of Thermo CO/Fick mixed-CO and Fick mixed-CO/Fick corrected atrial-CO were 0.84 and 0.94, respectively. CONCLUSION: We observed that the agreement between the two methods was satisfactory on the basis of the decisions made for treatment. Indirect calorimetry is useful to measure CO in patients with septic shock.OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar as medidas do débito cardíaco (DC obtidas pela termodiluição (DC-termo e pela calorimetria indireta (DC-Fick misto em pacientes com choque séptico. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo em pacientes sépticos internados em unidade de terapia intensiva de um hospital universitário. Foram estudados 19 pacientes (45,4 ± 21,5 anos. Foram realizadas quatro séries de medidas do DC pelos dois métodos, simultaneamente. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferenças significativas entre os valores do DC-termo e DC-Fick misto (7,0 ± 1,8 L.min-1 e 6,4 ± 1,7 L.min-1, respectivamente. Na avaliação dos oito casos

  6. Impedance cardiography for estimating cardiac output during submaximal and maximal work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Y; Andoh, Y; Fujinami, T; Nakayama, K; Takada, K; Takeuchi, T; Okamoto, M

    1978-09-01

    Impedance cardiography was used to estimate cardiac output in 10 men during rest and within 5 s after exercise on a bicycle ergometer, including work up to and including maximal aerobic capacity. An indwelling venous catheter permitted simultaneous sampling of venous blood for observing changes in hematocrit associated with each exercise level. Cardiac output, calculated from a standard equation which assumes a constant value of 150 omega.cm for the electrical resistivity of blood, was compared with corresponding calculations in which blood resistivity was individually determined as a function of hematocrit. It is concluded that many of the discrepancies in the literature related to values for cardiac output obtained during exercise by the impedance method may be inherent in calculations that do not consider the changing electrical resistivity of the blood with a changing hematocrit.

  7. Rowing increases stroke volume and cardiac output to a greater extent than cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, P; Ostadal, P; Ostadal, B

    2015-01-01

    Exercise stimulates increases in heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO). These adaptive mechanisms are strongly dependent on the type of exercise. Both rowing and cycling are widely used for physical training worldwide; however, evidence regarding the differences in major hemodynamic parameters during rowing and cycling remains insufficient. Ten healthy male volunteers were randomly assigned to perform either a rowing or cycling exercise. After 20 min rest, the group who had rowed first performed the cycling exercise and vice versa. Exercise was performed at a power-to-weight ratio of 2 W/kg for 2 min. HR, SV, CO and blood pressure (BP) were measured noninvasively using pulse-wave analysis at baseline and immediately after each exercise. HR, SV and CO were significantly higher after exercise than at rest. Whereas HR was comparable between rowing and cycling, SV and CO were significantly higher after rowing than after cycling. BP was comparable among all three measurements. Rowing increased SV and CO to a greater extent than cycling, whereas HR and BP were not influenced by the type of exercise. Our data suggest that rowing leads to more extensive stimulation of cardiac contractility and/or decreases in peripheral vascular resistance compared with cycling.

  8. Pacing to treat low cardiac output syndrome following elective aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ishaq

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of low cardiac output syndrome caused by dynamic left ventricular (LV outflow obstruction after aortic valve replacement (AVR. This recognized phenomenon probably occurs more frequently than appreciated, and the author suggests that this should be considered when managing patients with severe hemodynamic instability after AVR. In addition, we also focus on the fact that invasive pacemaker systems have significant effects on cardiac output augmentation postoperatively and in long-term management of patients with LV outflow tract (LVOT obstruction following AVR. The possible mechanisms and subsequent treatments are discussed.

  9. Clinical review: Guyton - the role of mean circulatory filling pressure and right atrial pressure in controlling cardiac output

    OpenAIRE

    William R Henderson; Griesdale, Donald EG; Walley, Keith R; Sheel, A. William

    2010-01-01

    Arthur Guyton's concepts of the determinative role of right heart filling in cardiac output continue to be controversial. This paper reviews his seminal experiments in detail and clarifies the often confusing concepts underpinning his model. One primary criticism of Guyton's model is that the parameters describing venous return had not been measured in a functioning cardiovascular system in humans. Thus, concerns have been expressed in regard to the ability of Guyton's simplistic model, with ...

  10. In vivo validation of cardiac output assessment in non-standard 3D echocardiographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nillesen, M M; Lopata, R G P; Gerrits, I H; Thijssen, J M; De Korte, C L [Clinical Physics Laboratory-833, Department of Pediatrics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); De Boode, W P [Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Huisman, H J [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kapusta, L [Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.m.nillesen@cukz.umcn.nl

    2009-04-07

    Automatic segmentation of the endocardial surface in three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic images is an important tool to assess left ventricular (LV) geometry and cardiac output (CO). The presence of speckle noise as well as the nonisotropic characteristics of the myocardium impose strong demands on the segmentation algorithm. In the analysis of normal heart geometries of standardized (apical) views, it is advantageous to incorporate a priori knowledge about the shape and appearance of the heart. In contrast, when analyzing abnormal heart geometries, for example in children with congenital malformations, this a priori knowledge about the shape and anatomy of the LV might induce erroneous segmentation results. This study describes a fully automated segmentation method for the analysis of non-standard echocardiographic images, without making strong assumptions on the shape and appearance of the heart. The method was validated in vivo in a piglet model. Real-time 3D echocardiographic image sequences of five piglets were acquired in radiofrequency (rf) format. These ECG-gated full volume images were acquired intra-operatively in a non-standard view. Cardiac blood flow was measured simultaneously by an ultrasound transit time flow probe positioned around the common pulmonary artery. Three-dimensional adaptive filtering using the characteristics of speckle was performed on the demodulated rf data to reduce the influence of speckle noise and to optimize the distinction between blood and myocardium. A gradient-based 3D deformable simplex mesh was then used to segment the endocardial surface. A gradient and a speed force were included as external forces of the model. To balance data fitting and mesh regularity, one fixed set of weighting parameters of internal, gradient and speed forces was used for all data sets. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were computed from the segmented endocardial surface. The cardiac output derived from this automatic segmentation was

  11. In vivo validation of cardiac output assessment in non-standard 3D echocardiographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nillesen, M. M.; Lopata, R. G. P.; de Boode, W. P.; Gerrits, I. H.; Huisman, H. J.; Thijssen, J. M.; Kapusta, L.; de Korte, C. L.

    2009-04-01

    Automatic segmentation of the endocardial surface in three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic images is an important tool to assess left ventricular (LV) geometry and cardiac output (CO). The presence of speckle noise as well as the nonisotropic characteristics of the myocardium impose strong demands on the segmentation algorithm. In the analysis of normal heart geometries of standardized (apical) views, it is advantageous to incorporate a priori knowledge about the shape and appearance of the heart. In contrast, when analyzing abnormal heart geometries, for example in children with congenital malformations, this a priori knowledge about the shape and anatomy of the LV might induce erroneous segmentation results. This study describes a fully automated segmentation method for the analysis of non-standard echocardiographic images, without making strong assumptions on the shape and appearance of the heart. The method was validated in vivo in a piglet model. Real-time 3D echocardiographic image sequences of five piglets were acquired in radiofrequency (rf) format. These ECG-gated full volume images were acquired intra-operatively in a non-standard view. Cardiac blood flow was measured simultaneously by an ultrasound transit time flow probe positioned around the common pulmonary artery. Three-dimensional adaptive filtering using the characteristics of speckle was performed on the demodulated rf data to reduce the influence of speckle noise and to optimize the distinction between blood and myocardium. A gradient-based 3D deformable simplex mesh was then used to segment the endocardial surface. A gradient and a speed force were included as external forces of the model. To balance data fitting and mesh regularity, one fixed set of weighting parameters of internal, gradient and speed forces was used for all data sets. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were computed from the segmented endocardial surface. The cardiac output derived from this automatic segmentation was

  12. Pilot Study: Estimation of Stroke Volume and Cardiac Output from Pulse Wave Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Yurie; Mizogami, Maki; Nyhan, Daniel; Berkowitz, Dan E; Steppan, Jochen; Barodka, Viachaslau

    2017-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is increasingly replacing thermodilution pulmonary artery catheters to assess hemodynamics in patients at high risk for cardiovascular morbidity. However, one of the drawbacks of TEE compared to pulmonary artery catheters is the inability to measure real time stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) continuously. The aim of the present proof of concept study was to validate a novel method of SV estimation, based on pulse wave velocity (PWV) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. This is a retrospective observational study. We measured pulse transit time by superimposing the radial arterial waveform onto the continuous wave Doppler waveform of the left ventricular outflow tract, and calculated SV (SVPWV) using the transformed Bramwell-Hill equation. The SV measured by TEE (SVTEE) was used as a reference. A total of 190 paired SV were measured from 28 patients. A strong correlation was observed between SVPWV and SVTEE with the coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.71. A mean difference between the two (bias) was 3.70 ml with the limits of agreement ranging from -20.33 to 27.73 ml and a percentage error of 27.4% based on a Bland-Altman analysis. The concordance rate of two methods was 85.0% based on a four-quadrant plot. The angular concordance rate was 85.9% with radial limits of agreement (the radial sector that contained 95% of the data points) of ± 41.5 degrees based on a polar plot. PWV based SV estimation yields reasonable agreement with SV measured by TEE. Further studies are required to assess its utility in different clinical situations.

  13. Assessment of cardiac output with transpulmonary thermodilution during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, José A L; Boushel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy and reproducibility of transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTd) to assess cardiac output (Q̇) in exercising men was determined using indocyanine green (ICG) dilution as a reference method. TPTd has been utilized for the assessment of Q̇ and preload indexes of global end-diastolic volume...

  14. Effect of Hemorrhage on Cardiac Output, PVP, Alodosterone and Diuresis during Immersion in Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanonok, K.; Greenleaf, John E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Wade, C. E.; Keil, L. C.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a reduction in blood volume would attenuate or eliminate immersion-induced increases in cardiac output (Q (sup dot) sub co)) and urine excretion, and to investigate accompanying vasoactive and fluid-electrolyte hormonal responses.

  15. Accuracy of Cardiac Output by Nine Different Pulse Contour Algorithms in Cardiac Surgery Patients: A Comparison with Transpulmonary Thermodilution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bein, Berthold; Gruenewald, Matthias; Masing, Sarah; Huenges, Katharina; Haneya, Assad; Steinfath, Markus; Renner, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Today, there exist several different pulse contour algorithms for calculation of cardiac output (CO). The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of nine different pulse contour algorithms with transpulmonary thermodilution before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods. Thirty patients scheduled for elective coronary surgery were studied before and after CPB. A passive leg raising maneuver was also performed. Measurements included CO obtained by transpulmonary thermodilution (COTPTD) and by nine pulse contour algorithms (COX1–9). Calibration of pulse contour algorithms was performed by esophageal Doppler ultrasound after induction of anesthesia and 15 min after CPB. Correlations, Bland-Altman analysis, four-quadrant, and polar analysis were also calculated. Results. There was only a poor correlation between COTPTD and COX1–9 during passive leg raising and in the period before and after CPB. Percentage error exceeded the required 30% limit. Four-quadrant and polar analysis revealed poor trending ability for most algorithms before and after CPB. The Liljestrand-Zander algorithm revealed the best reliability. Conclusions. Estimation of CO by nine different pulse contour algorithms revealed poor accuracy compared with transpulmonary thermodilution. Furthermore, the less-invasive algorithms showed an insufficient capability for trending hemodynamic changes before and after CPB. The Liljestrand-Zander algorithm demonstrated the highest reliability. This trial is registered with NCT02438228 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

  16. Dynamic vs. fixed bag filling: impact on cardiac output rebreathing protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavorsky, Gerald S; Beck, Kenneth C; Cass, Lauren M; Artal, Raul; Wagner, Peter D

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare the repeatability (2.77 multiplied by the within-subject SD)between two different rebreathing protocols on cardiac output ( ˙Q ), pulmonary diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) and nitric oxide (DLNO), and pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc). This study compared two bag volume protocols [Fixed Bag Volume (FBV) = bag volume fixed at 60% of forced vital capacity; Dynamic Bag Volume (DBV) = bag volume matched to tidal volume at each stage of exercise].Ten females (age = 27±8 yrs; ˙VO2, (peak)=2.5±0.6 L/min had measurements at rest (12%), 52%, 88%, and 100% of ˙VO2, (peak) on two study days. Neither the slope nor intercept of ˙Q vs. ˙VO2 were different between either bag volume protocols. The slope of DLCO vs. ˙Q was the same but the intercept was higher for the FBV protocol. The bag volume affected the slope and the intercept between DLNO vs. ˙Q (p DLNO (p ≤ 0.06). Measurement error was lower for Vc when using the FBV protocol (p = 0.02). Also, the pattern of bag volume used during rebreathing maneuvers affected the relation between DLNO vs. ˙Q more than it affected DLCO vs. ˙Q , or Vc vs. ˙Q. Additionally, the FBV protocol provided less measurement error for Vc compared to the DBV protocol [corrected].

  17. Pulmonary Artery Catheter (PAC Accuracy and Efficacy Compared with Flow Probe and Transcutaneous Doppler (USCOM: An Ovine Cardiac Output Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Phillips

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC is an accepted clinical method of measuring cardiac output (CO despite no prior validation. The ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM is a noninvasive alternative to PAC using Doppler ultrasound (CW. We compared PAC and USCOM CO measurements against a gold standard, the aortic flow probe (FP, in sheep at varying outputs. Methods. Ten conscious sheep, with implanted FPs, had measurements of CO by FP, USCOM, and PAC, at rest and during intervention with inotropes and vasopressors. Results. CO measurements by FP, PAC, and USCOM were 4.0±1.2 L/min, 4.8±1.5 L/min, and 4.0±1.4 L/min, respectively, (=280, range 1.9 L/min to 11.7 L/min. Percentage bias and precision between FP and PAC, and FP and USCOM was −17 and 47%, and 1 and 36%, respectively. PAC under-measured Dobutamine-induced CO changes by 20% (relative 66% compared with FP, while USCOM measures varied from FP by 3% (relative 10%. PAC reliably detected −30% but not +40% CO changes, as measured by receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC, while USCOM reliably detected ±5% changes in CO (AUC>0.70. Conclusions. PAC demonstrated poor accuracy and sensitivity as a measure of CO. USCOM provided equivalent measurements to FP across a sixfold range of outputs, reliably detecting ±5% changes.

  18. Clinical usefulness of the definitions for defining characteristics of activity intolerance, excess fluid volume and decreased cardiac output in decompensated heart failure: a descriptive exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Vanessa; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum; Lopes, Camila Takao; de Oliveira, Ana Paula Dias; Lopes, Juliana de Lima; de Barros, Alba Lucia Bottura Leite

    2015-09-01

    To assess the clinical usefulness of the operational definitions for the defining characteristics of the NANDA International nursing diagnoses, activity intolerance, decreased cardiac output and excess fluid volume, and the concomitant presence of those diagnoses in patients with decompensated heart failure. Content validity of the operational definitions for the defining characteristics of activity intolerance, excess fluid volume and decreased cardiac output have been previously validated by experts. Their clinical usefulness requires clinical validation. This was a descriptive exploratory study. Two expert nurses independently assessed 25 patients with decompensated heart failure for the presence or absence of 29 defining characteristics. Interrater reliability was analysed using the Kappa coefficient as a measure of clinical usefulness. The Fisher's exact test was used to test the association of the defining characteristics of activity intolerance and excess fluid volume in the presence of decreased cardiac output, and the correlation between the three diagnoses. Assessments regarding the presence of all defining characteristics reached 100% agreement, except with anxiety. Five defining characteristics of excess fluid volume were significantly associated with the presence of decreased cardiac output. Concomitant presence of the three diagnoses occurred in 80% of the patients. However, there was no significant correlation between the three diagnoses. The operational definitions for the diagnoses had strong interrater reliability, therefore they were considered clinically useful. Only five defining characteristics were representative of the association between excess fluid volume and decreased cardiac output. Therefore, excess fluid volume is related to decreased cardiac output, although these diagnoses are not necessarily associated with activity intolerance. The operational definitions may favour early recognition of the sequence of responses to decompensation

  19. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: postpartum decompensation and use of non-invasive cardiac output monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorello, G; Cubillos, J; McDonald, M; Balki, M

    2014-02-01

    The utility of a non-invasive cardiac output monitor (NICOM™) in guiding the peripartum management and identification of postpartum complications in a patient with severe peripartum cardiomyopathy is reported. A 31-year-old nulliparous woman at 35 weeks of gestation presented with a three-week history of worsening dyspnea and progressive functional deterioration. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction with an ejection fraction peripartum cardiomyopathy. We suggest that use of NICOM™ be extended into the postpartum period to detect signs of cardiac decompensation in such patients.

  20. Clinical review: Guyton--the role of mean circulatory filling pressure and right atrial pressure in controlling cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, William R; Griesdale, Donald E G; Walley, Keith R; Sheel, A William

    2010-01-01

    Arthur Guyton's concepts of the determinative role of right heart filling in cardiac output continue to be controversial. This paper reviews his seminal experiments in detail and clarifies the often confusing concepts underpinning his model. One primary criticism of Guyton's model is that the parameters describing venous return had not been measured in a functioning cardiovascular system in humans. Thus, concerns have been expressed in regard to the ability of Guyton's simplistic model, with few parameters, to model the complex human circulation. Further concerns have been raised in regard to the artificial experimental preparations that Guyton used. Recently reported measurements in humans support Guyton's theoretical and animal work.

  1. Estimating changes in cardiac output using an implanted hemodynamic monitor in heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ståhlberg, Marcus; Damgaard, Morten; Ersgård, David;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate an algorithm that estimates changes in cardiac output (CO) from right ventricular (RV) pressure waveforms derived from an implantable hemodynamic monitor (IHM) in heart failure patients. DESIGN: Twelve heart failure patients (NYHA II-III, EF 32......%) with an implantable hemodynamic monitor (Chronicle) were included in this study. Changes in cardiac output were provoked by body position change at rest (left lateral supine, horizontal supine, sitting, and standing) and a steady state bicycle exercise at 20 watts. Estimated CO derived from the IHM (CO...... was -0.39 L/min (11%). Limits of agreement were +/-1.56 L/min and relative error was 21%. CONCLUSIONS: A simple algorithm based on RV pressure wave form characteristics derived from an IHM can be used to estimate changes in CO in heart failure patients. These findings encourage further research aiming...

  2. Levosimendan in a neonate with severe coarctation of aorta and low cardiac output syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Olivier Boegli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report successful use of levosimendan after failed balloon angioplasty in a critically ill neonate with coarctation of aorta (CoA and severe low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS. Treatment with levosimendan improved left heart function, and decreased lactate and brain natriuretic peptide levels. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the safe and successful use of levosimendan in the management of LCOS due to severe CoA in a neonate awaiting surgical repair.

  3. Estimation of cardiac output in patients with congestive heart failure by analysis of right ventricular pressure waveforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linde Cecilia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac output (CO is an important determinant of the hemodynamic state in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF. We tested the hypothesis that CO can be estimated from the right ventricular (RV pressure waveform in CHF patients using a pulse contour cardiac output algorithm that considers constant but patient specific RV outflow tract characteristic impedance. Method In 12 patients with CHF, breath-by-breath Fick CO and RV pressure waveforms were recorded utilizing an implantable hemodynamic monitor during a bicycle exercise protocol. These data were analyzed retrospectively to assess changes in characteristic impedance of the RV outflow tract during exercise. Four patients that were implanted with an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD implementing the algorithm were studied prospectively. During a two staged sub-maximal bicycle exercise test conducted at 4 and 16 weeks of implant, COs measured by direct Fick technique and estimated by the ICD were recorded and compared. Results At rest the total pulmonary arterial resistance and the characteristic impedance were 675 ± 345 and 48 ± 18 dyn.s.cm-5, respectively. During sub-maximal exercise, the total pulmonary arterial resistance decreased (Δ 91 ± 159 dyn.s.cm-5, p -5, NS. The algorithm derived cardiac output estimates correlated with Fick CO (7.6 ± 2.5 L/min, R2 = 0.92 with a limit of agreement of 1.7 L/min and tracked changes in Fick CO (R2 = 0.73. Conclusions The analysis of right ventricular pressure waveforms continuously recorded by an implantable hemodynamic monitor provides an estimate of CO and may prove useful in guiding treatment in patients with CHF.

  4. Comparison of cardiac output determined by different rebreathing methods at rest and at peak exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Nunan, David; Donovan, Gay; Hodges, Lynette D; Sandercock, Gavin R H; Brodie, David A

    2008-03-01

    Several rebreathing methods are available for cardiac output (Q (T)) measurement. The aims of this study were threefold: first, to compare values for resting Q (T) produced by the equilibrium-CO(2), exponential-CO(2) and inert gas-N(2)O rebreathing methods and, second, to evaluate the reproducibility of these three methods at rest. The third aim was to assess the agreement between estimates of peak exercise Q (T) derived from the exponential and inert gas rebreathing methods. A total of 18 healthy subjects visited the exercise laboratory on different days. Repeated measures of Q (T), measured in a seated position, were separated by a 5 min rest period. Twelve participants performed an incremental exercise test to determine peak oxygen consumption. Two more exercise tests were used to measure Q (T) at peak exercise using the exponential and inert gas rebreathing methods. The exponential method produced significantly higher estimates at rest (averaging 10.9 l min(-1)) compared with the equilibrium method (averaging 6.6 l min(-1)) and the inert gas rebreathing method (averaging 5.1 l min(-1); P < 0.01). All methods were highly reproducible with the exponential method having the largest coefficient of variation (5.3%). At peak exercise, there were non-significant differences between the exponential and inert gas rebreathing methods (P = 0.14). The limits of agreement were -0.49 to 0.79 l min(-1). Due to the ability to evaluate the degree of gas mixing and to estimate intra-pulmonary shunt, we believe that the inert gas rebreathing method has the potential to measure Q (T) more precisely than either of the CO(2) rebreathing methods used in this study. At peak exercise, the exponential and inert gas rebreathing methods both showed acceptable limits of agreement.

  5. Cardiac output response to changes of the atrioventricular delay in different body positions and during exercise in patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ståhlberg, Marcus; Damgaard, Morten; Norsk, Peter

    2009-01-01

    , the estimated pulmonary artery diastolic pressure (ePAD) was analysed. RESULTS: The magnitude of CO response to AVD changes was greater in CRT patients than in controls (0.25 vs. 0.20 L/min, P... and prolonged by 40 ms in 27 CRT patients and 9 controls without heart failure. Cardiac output (CO) was measured by inert gas rebreathing (Innocor) as the average over different body positions (left-lateral, supine, sitting, standing, and exercise). In eight CRT patients with an implantable haemodynamic monitor...

  6. Estimation of cardiac output and peripheral resistance using square-wave-approximated aortic flow signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima eFazeli

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model-based approach to estimation of cardiac output (CO and total peripheral resistance (TPR. In the proposed approach, the response of cardiovascular system (CVS, described by the windkessel model, is tuned to the measurements of systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressures (BP so as to yield optimal individual- and time-specific system time constant that is used to estimate CO and TPR. Unique aspects of the proposed approach are that it approximates the aortic flow as a train of square waves, and that it also assumes pressure-dependent arterial compliance, as opposed to the traditional windkessel model in which aortic flow is approximated as a train of impulses and constant arterial compliance is assumed. It was shown that the proposed model encompasses the standard windkessel model as a limiting case, and that it also yields more realistic BP waveform response than the standard windkessel model. The proposed approach has potential to outperform its standard counterpart by treating systolic, diastolic and mean BP as independent features in estimating CO and TPR, rather than solely resorting to pulse pressure as in the case of the standard windkessel model. Experimental results from in-vivo data collected from a number of animal subjects supports the viability of the proposed approach in that it could achieve approximately 29% and 24% reduction in CO and TPR errors when compared with its standard counterpart.

  7. Resistance reconstructed estimation of total peripheral resistance from computationally derived cardiac output - biomed 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Labarron K; Sollers Iii, John J; Thayer, Julian F

    2013-01-01

    Efficient functioning of the peripheral vasculature is an essential component in healthy cardiovascular regulation. Alterations in this functioning have been linked to the etiology and pathophysiological course of cardiovascular disease (CVD), especially hypertension. Given its significant role in the maintenance of both healthy and pathological blood pressure, total peripheral resistance (TPR), an index of the vasoconstrictive and elastic properties of the peripheral vasculature, has received much attention in this regard. However, obtaining a reliable estimate of TPR remains a complex and costly endeavor, primarily due to the necessity for sophisticated instrumentation as well as associated limitations in deriving cardiac output (CO). We have previously described a simple estimation method for CO using only arterial blood pressure and heart rate (Hill et al, 2012). In the present study we extend this technique to the estimation of TPR using beat-to-beat blood pressure data from the same sample of 67 young (mean age = 20.04± 2.8), healthy men (n = 30) and women (n = 37). Estimated TPR (TPRest) was calculated from the computationally-derived estimate of CO and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Correlation between TPR obtained via the validated Model-Flow technique and TPRest was moderate (r =.73, p <. 000) and stronger in men (r =.78, p <. 000) compared to women (r =.66, p <. 001). These data further suggest that reconstructed measures of hemodynamic functioning may be validly and adequately estimated from limited data sources.

  8. Characteristics of cardiac troponin measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Eric; Christenson, Robert H

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and T (cTnT) have displaced myoglobin and creatine kinase-MB as the preferred markers of myocardial injury and have become the cornerstones for diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI). Current guidelines for MI diagnosis give specific recommendations for cTnI and cTnT assays including instructions to reliably measure values in the range of the 99th percentile of a normal reference cohort with good precision, for example, 10% total coefficient of variation. Unfortunately, the nomenclature system that has evolved for cTnI and cTnT is haphazard and unsystematic. It is key to recognize that not all cTnI and cTnT measurement methods are equivalent; hence, knowledge of local measurements is essential for effective evaluation of patients presenting with suspected non-ST elevation MI. For cTnI, the amino acid sequences frequently targeted for effective measurement include residues 41-49 and 83-93 because these regions of the molecule are stable, helping make the assays reproducible. Use of the recommended cutoff at the 99th percentile of a normal cohort is related to improved patient outcomes. Therefore, use of a troponin assay with good measurement characteristics at the 99th percentile, often referred to as 'sensitive assays', is important for patient outcomes. cTnI and cTnT assays with higher sensitivity are becoming available, and their utilization for measurement in asymptomatic populations may be useful for risk assessment and management in the future. However there is currently no evidence that these high-sensitivity assays confer an advantage in the context of MI diagnosis. Currently cTnI assays are not standardized; thus, there can be a substantial difference in values depending on the assay used. An international effort toward standardization is ongoing, but is not anticipated to be completed and implemented for a few years. Our purpose here is to add insight to important characteristics of troponin measurement techniques and how these

  9. Multisite Tissue Oxygenation Monitoring Indicates Organ-Specific Flow Distribution and Oxygen Delivery Related to Low Cardiac Output in Preterm Infants With Clinical Sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Michelle E.; Roofthooft, Marcus T. R.; Fries, Marian W. A.; Schat, Trijntje E.; Bos, Arend F.; Berger, Rolf M. F.; Kooi, Elisabeth M. W.

    Objectives: Cardiac output may be compromised in preterm infants with sepsis. Whether low cardiac output is associated with low tissue oxygen supply in these patients is unclear. The aim of the current study was to assess the association between cardiac output, assessed by echocardiography, and

  10. Multisite Tissue Oxygenation Monitoring Indicates Organ-Specific Flow Distribution and Oxygen Delivery Related to Low Cardiac Output in Preterm Infants With Clinical Sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Michelle E.; Roofthooft, Marcus T. R.; Fries, Marian W. A.; Schat, Trijntje E.; Bos, Arend F.; Berger, Rolf M. F.; Kooi, Elisabeth M. W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Cardiac output may be compromised in preterm infants with sepsis. Whether low cardiac output is associated with low tissue oxygen supply in these patients is unclear. The aim of the current study was to assess the association between cardiac output, assessed by echocardiography, and tiss

  11. Cooperative linear output regulation for networked systems by dynamic measurement output feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaobao; Feng, Gang; Wang, Juan; Luo, Xiaoyuan; Guan, Xinping

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the cooperative linear output regulation problem of a class of heterogeneous networked systems with a common reference input but with different disturbances for individual nodes. A novel distributed control law is presented based on dynamic measurement output feedback. It is shown that the overall networked closed-loop control system is asymptotically stable and the output regulation errors asymptotically approach zero as time goes to infinity under a sufficient and necessary condition. Finally, a numerical example is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control law.

  12. [Echocardiographic evaluation of cardiac output in patients with acute myocardial infarction (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nador, F; De Martini, M; Binda, A; Salmaso, G C; Radrizzani, D; Lotto, A

    1980-01-01

    Echocardiography is a non invasive technique particularly useful to assess both hemodynamics and left ventricular performances; different methods have been proposed to evaluate echocardiographically the cardiac output. The aim of this work is to suggest a new method (planimetry of the area enclosed by echoes from the mitral valve) stating its advantages and limits and to test three already known methods (cubes method, method of Lalani and Lee, method of Rasmussen and coll.) comparing them to thermodilution. In 24 patients admitted in our Coronary Care Unit for acute myocardial infarction 30 measurements have been performed simultaneously with echocardiography and thermodilution. Statistical analysis (correlation coefficient with the method of the square minimums and Student's 't') of the results has shown that the cubes method is unprecise (P = NS) and unbiased (d = 0.97 +/- 15.46); Lalani-Lee method is unprecise (P = NS) and biased (d = 9.64 +/- 21.36) by a systematic underestimate error concealed by the poor precision; Rasmussen and coll. method is precise (P < 0.01) but biased (d = --3.03 +/- 5.5), the systematic mistake being entirely due to the group of patients with abnormal hemodynamics. Our method is precise (P < 0.01) and unbiased (d = --0.04 +/- 9.62) in patients both with normal and abnormal hemodynamics. Therefore this method offers the following advantages: 1) it is unbiased, even in the presence of abnormal left ventricular performance; 2) it is sufficiently precise, having a correlation coefficient with thermodilution of r = 0.80; 3) it measures directly the amount of flow due to the atrial systole; 4) the measurement is rapid and hardly biased by the reader.

  13. The effects of long-term aerobic exercise on cardiac structure, stroke volume of the left ventricle, and cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo-Ae; Oh, Deuk-Ja

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the long-term aerobic exercises on cardiac structure, left ventricular stroke volume, and cardiac output. To achieve the purpose of the study, a total of 22 volunteers-including 10 people who have continued regular exercises and 12 people as the control group-were selected as subjects. With regard to data processing, the IBM SPSS Statistics ver. 21.0 was used to calculate the mean and standard deviation, and the difference of the means between the groups was verified through an independent t-test. As a result, there were significant differences between groups in the left ventricular end-diastolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-systolic internal dimension, left ventricular end-diastolic septum thickness. There were significant differences between groups in left ventricular end-diastolic volume, left ventricular mass, and left ventricular mass index per body surface area. However, in cardiac function, only left ventricular stroke volume showed a significant difference between groups.

  14. On output measurements via radiation pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeman, S.; Healey, A.J.; Forsberg, F.;

    1990-01-01

    It is shown, by simple physical argument, that measurements of intensity with a radiation pressure balance should not agree with those based on calorimetric techniques. The conclusion is ultimately a consequence of the circumstance that radiation pressure measurements relate to wave momentum, whi...

  15. Serum cortisol concentration with exploratory cut-off values do not predict the effects of hydrocortisone administration in children with low cardiac output after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, E J; Hogenbirk, Karin; Roest, Arno A W; van Brempt, Ronald; Hazekamp, Mark G; de Jonge, Evert

    2012-10-01

    Low cardiac output syndrome is common after paediatric cardiac surgery. Previous studies suggested that hydrocortisone administration may improve haemodynamic stability in case of resistant low cardiac output syndrome in critically ill children. This study was set up to test the hypothesis that the effects of hydrocortisone on haemodynamics in children with low cardiac output syndrome depend on the presence of (relative) adrenal insufficiency. A retrospective study was done on paediatric patients who received hydrocortisone when diagnosed with resistant low cardiac output syndrome after paediatric cardiac surgery in the period from 1 November 2005 to 31 December 2008. We studied the difference in effects of treatment with hydrocortisone administration between patients with adrenal insufficiency defined as an exploratory cut-off value of total cortisol of cortisol of ≥ 100 nmol/l. A total of 62 of patients were enrolled, meeting the inclusion criteria for low cardiac output syndrome. Thirty-two patients were assigned to Group 1 (cortisol concentration and those with normal baseline cortisol levels. A cortisol value using an exploratory cut-off value of 100 nmol/l for adrenal insufficiency should not be used as a criterion to treat these patients with hydrocortisone.

  16. Noninvasive measurement of cardiac performance in recovery from exercise in heart failure patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan N Myers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between cardiac performance during recovery and the severity of heart failure, as determined by clinical and cardiopulmonary exercise test responses. METHODS: As part of a retrospective cohort study, 46 heart failure patients and 13 normal subjects underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing while cardiac output was measured using a noninvasive device. Cardiac output in recovery was expressed as the slope of a single exponential relationship between cardiac output and time; the recovery-time constant was assessed in relation to indices of cardiac function, along with clinical, functional, and cardiopulmonary exercise responses. RESULTS: The recovery time constant was delayed in patients with heart failure compared with normal subjects (296.7 + 238 vs. 110.1 +27 seconds, p <0.01, and the slope of the decline of cardiac output in recovery was steeper in normal subjects compared with heart failure patients (p,0.001. The slope of the decline in cardiac output recovery was inversely related to peak VO2 (r = -0.72, p<0.001 and directly related to the VE/VCO2 slope (r = 0.57, p,0.001. Heart failure patients with abnormal recovery time constants had lower peak VO2, lower VO2 at the ventilatory threshold, lower peak cardiac output, and a heightened VE/VCO2 slope during exercise. CONCLUSIONS: Impaired cardiac output recovery kinetics can identify heart failure patients with more severe disease, lower exercise capacity, and inefficient ventilation. Estimating cardiac output in recovery from exercise may provide added insight into the cardiovascular status of patients with heart failure.

  17. Calibrated versus uncalibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis in monitoring cardiac output with transpulmonary thermodilution in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock: an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagt, C.; Helmi, M.; Malagon, I.; Groeneveld, A.B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac output (CO) measurement is often required in critically ill patients. The performances of newer, less invasive techniques require evaluation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. OBJECTIVES: To compare calibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis-derived CO (COap, Vo

  18. Calibrated versus uncalibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis in monitoring cardiac output with transpulmonary thermodilution in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock: an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagt, C.; Helmi, M.; Malagon, I.; Groeneveld, A.B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac output (CO) measurement is often required in critically ill patients. The performances of newer, less invasive techniques require evaluation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. OBJECTIVES: To compare calibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis-derived CO (COap,

  19. Calibrated versus uncalibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis in monitoring cardiac output with transpulmonary thermodilution in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock: an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagt, C.; Helmi, M.; Malagon, I.; Groeneveld, A.B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac output (CO) measurement is often required in critically ill patients. The performances of newer, less invasive techniques require evaluation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. OBJECTIVES: To compare calibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis-derived CO (COap, Vo

  20. The measurement of retail output and the retail revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard I. Nakamura

    1999-01-01

    The computerization of retailing has made price dispersion a norm in the United States, so that any given list price or transactions price is an increasingly imperfect measure of a product's resource cost. As a consequence, measuring the real output of retailers has become increasingly difficult. Food retailing is used as a case study to examine data problems in retail productivity measurement. Crude direct measures of grocery store output suggest that the CPI for food-at-home may have been o...

  1. Measurement of retail output and the retail revolution

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard I. Nakamura

    1998-01-01

    The computerization of retailing has made price dispersion a norm in the United States, so that any given list price or transactions price is an increasingly imperfect measure of a product's resource cost. As a consequence, measuring the real output of retailers has become increasingly difficult. Food retailing is used as a case study to examine data problems in retail productivity measurement. Crude direct measures of grocery store output suggest that the CPI for food-at-home may have been o...

  2. Improved hepatic arterial fraction estimation using cardiac output correction of arterial input functions for liver DCE MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhan, Manil D.; Bainbridge, Alan; Atkinson, David; Punwani, Shonit; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P.; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Taylor, Stuart A.

    2017-02-01

    Liver dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI pharmacokinetic modelling could be useful in the assessment of diffuse liver disease and focal liver lesions, but is compromised by errors in arterial input function (AIF) sampling. In this study, we apply cardiac output correction to arterial input functions (AIFs) for liver DCE MRI and investigate the effect on dual-input single compartment hepatic perfusion parameter estimation and reproducibility. Thirteen healthy volunteers (28.7  ±  1.94 years, seven males) underwent liver DCE MRI and cardiac output measurement using aortic root phase contrast MRI (PCMRI), with reproducibility (n  =  9) measured at 7 d. Cardiac output AIF correction was undertaken by constraining the first pass AIF enhancement curve using the indicator-dilution principle. Hepatic perfusion parameters with and without cardiac output AIF correction were compared and 7 d reproducibility assessed. Differences between cardiac output corrected and uncorrected liver DCE MRI portal venous (PV) perfusion (p  =  0.066), total liver blood flow (TLBF) (p  =  0.101), hepatic arterial (HA) fraction (p  =  0.895), mean transit time (MTT) (p  =  0.646), distribution volume (DV) (p  =  0.890) were not significantly different. Seven day corrected HA fraction reproducibility was improved (mean difference 0.3%, Bland–Altman 95% limits-of-agreement (BA95%LoA)  ±27.9%, coefficient of variation (CoV) 61.4% versus 9.3%, ±35.5%, 81.7% respectively without correction). Seven day uncorrected PV perfusion was also improved (mean difference 9.3 ml min‑1/100 g, BA95%LoA  ±506.1 ml min‑1/100 g, CoV 64.1% versus 0.9 ml min‑1/100 g, ±562.8 ml min‑1/100 g, 65.1% respectively with correction) as was uncorrected TLBF (mean difference 43.8 ml min‑1/100 g, BA95%LoA  ±586.7 ml min‑1/ 100 g, CoV 58.3% versus 13.3 ml min‑1/100 g, ±661.5 ml min‑1/100 g, 60

  3. Fission neutron output measurements at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Ronald Owen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Devlin, Matthew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fotiadis, Nikolaos [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laptev, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Donnell, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taddeucci, Terry N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tovesson, Fredrik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ullmann, J L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wender, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bredeweg, T A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jandel, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vieira, D J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wu, Ching - Yen [LLNL; Becker, J A [LLNL; Stoyer, M A [LLNL; Henderson, R [LLNL; Sutton, M [LLNL; Belier, Gilbert [BRUYERES-LE-CHATEL, FRANCE; Chatillon, A [BRUYERES-LE-CHATEL, FRANCE; Granier, Thierry [CEA, BRUYERES-LE-CHATEL, FRANCE; Laurent, Benoit [CEA, BRUYERES-LE-CHATEL, FRANCE; Taieb, Julien [CEA, BRUYERES-LE-CHATEL, FRANCE

    2010-01-01

    Accurate data for both physical properties and fission properties of materials are necessary to properly model dynamic fissioning systems. To address the need for accurate data on fission neutron energy spectra, especially at outgoing neutron energies below about 200 keV and at energies above 8 MeV, ongoing work at LANSCE involving collaborators from LANL, LLNL and CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel is extending the energy range, efficiency and accuracy beyond previous measurements. Initial work in the outgoing neutron energy range from 1 to 7 MeV is consistent with current evaluations and provides a foundation for extended measurements. As part of these efforts, a new fission fragment detector that reduces backgrounds and improves timing has been designed fabricated and tested, and new neutron detectors are being assessed for optimal characteristics. Simulations of experimental designs are in progress to ensure that accuracy goals are met. Results of these measurements will be incorporated into evaluations and data libraries as they become available.

  4. Low Cardiac Output Leads Hepatic Fibrosis in Right Heart Failure Model Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Fujimoto

    Full Text Available Hepatic fibrosis progresses with right heart failure, and becomes cardiac cirrhosis in a severe case. Although its causal factor still remains unclear. Here we evaluated the progression of hepatic fibrosis using a pulmonary artery banding (PAB-induced right heart failure model and investigated whether cardiac output (CO is responsible for the progression of hepatic fibrosis.Five-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats divided into the PAB and sham-operated control groups. After 4 weeks from operation, we measured CO by echocardiography, and hepatic fibrosis ratio by pathological examination using a color analyzer. In the PAB group, CO was significantly lower by 48% than that in the control group (78.2±27.6 and 150.1±31.2 ml/min, P<0.01. Hepatic fibrosis ratio and serum hyaluronic acid, an index of hepatic fibrosis, were significantly increased in the PAB group than those in the control group (7.8±1.7 and 1.0±0.2%, P<0.01, 76.2±27.5 and 32.7±7.5 ng/ml, P<0.01. Notably, the degree of hepatic fibrosis significantly correlated a decrease in CO. Immunohistological analysis revealed that hepatic stellate cells were markedly activated in hypoxic areas, and HIF-1α positive hepatic cells were increased in the PAB group. Furthermore, by real-time PCR analyses, transcripts of profibrotic and fibrotic factors (TGF-β1, CTGF, procollargen I, procollargen III, MMP 2, MMP 9, TIMP 1, TIMP 2 were significantly increased in the PAB group. In addition, western blot analyses revealed that the protein level of HIF-1α was significantly increased in the PAB group than that in the control group (2.31±0.84 and 1.0±0.18 arbitrary units, P<0.05.Our study demonstrated that low CO and tissue hypoxia were responsible for hepatic fibrosis in right failure heart model rats.

  5. Against Journal Articles for Measuring Value in University Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbali, C.

    2010-01-01

    The following lines of arguments against the metrics of journal articles is developed: (1) Textual output should no longer be main valued output; (2) Digitalization enables other ways of advancing knowledge; (3) Measures by journal article favours the disciplines of Natural Science and Engineering (NSE) and moulds other disciplines of Social…

  6. Are output measurements always necessary after CT tube replacement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Stauduhar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: TX regulations and the ACR require that CT radiation output be measured within 30 days of major service. The most common major service is tube replacement. We hypothesized that historical QC data could be used instead to determine if output measurements are necessary, reducing the need for costly output measurements.Methods: We reviewed 66 records of tube replacements to determine with what frequency output falls outside specifications. We also conducted an experiment to verify that clinically significant output changes could be identified by comparing image noise in historical QC data with the same data after tube replacement. We used 30 days of historical QC data to establish a baseline noise level and 95% confidence interval (CI for individual noise measurements. To simulate output changes, we acquired phantom images with our QC protocol while manually changing output (mA. We acquired 10 images using the baseline output and 10 images at each different “output”. We evaluated individual images and subsets of images at each “output” to determine if the system was within the manufacturer’s specifications.Results: None of the 66 tube replacements resulted in an output change that exceeded specifications. Analysis of 30 days of historic QC data for our experimental system indicated a mean noise of 5.4 HU with 95% CI of 5.1 ‒ 5.7 HU. When using the mean noise of 10 images acquired at each of the varying outputs, we were able to identify, with 100% accuracy, images acquired at outputs outside manufacturer’s specifications.Conclusion: The results of our review of historical tube replacement data indicated the likelihood of output falling outside manufacturer’s specifications is low. Considering this, it is likely that by using QC data from programs required by regulation and the ACR physicists can reliably verify radiation output stability remotely instead of making physical measurements.--------------------Cite this article

  7. Reduced peripheral arterial blood flow with preserved cardiac output during submaximal bicycle exercise in elderly heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leng Xiaoyan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older heart failure (HF patients exhibit exercise intolerance during activities of daily living. We hypothesized that reduced lower extremity blood flow (LBF due to reduced forward cardiac output would contribute to submaximal exercise intolerance in older HF patients. Methods and Results Twelve HF patients both with preserved and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF (aged 68 ± 10 years without large (aorta or medium sized (iliac or femoral artery vessel atherosclerosis, and 13 age and gender matched healthy volunteers underwent a sophisticated battery of assessments including a peak exercise oxygen consumption (peak VO2, b physical function, c cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR submaximal exercise measures of aortic and femoral arterial blood flow, and d determination of thigh muscle area. Peak VO2 was reduced in HF subjects (14 ± 3 ml/kg/min compared to healthy elderly subjects (20 ± 6 ml/kg/min (p = 0.01. Four-meter walk speed was 1.35 ± 0.24 m/sec in healthy elderly verses 0.98 ± 0.15 m/sec in HF subjects (p p ≤ 0.03. Conclusion During CMR submaximal bike exercise in the elderly with heart failure, mechanisms other than low cardiac output are responsible for reduced lower extremity blood flow.

  8. Noninvasive cardiac output determination using applanation tonometry-derived radial artery pulse contour analysis in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Compton, Friederike; Wittrock, Marc; Schaefer, Juergen-Heiner

    2008-01-01

    Conventional thermodilution cardiac output (CO) monitoring is limited mainly to intensive care units and operating rooms because it requires the use of invasive techniques. To reduce the potential for complications and to broaden the applicability of hemodynamic monitoring, noninvasive methods...... for CO determination are being sought. Applanation tonometry allows noninvasive CO estimation through pulse contour analysis, but the method has not been evaluated in critically ill patients. We therefore performed noninvasive radial artery applanation tonometry in 49 critically ill medical intensive...... care unit patients and compared CO estimates to invasive CO measurements obtained using a pulmonary artery catheter or the PiCCO transpulmonary thermodilution system. One-hundred-sixteen measurements were performed, and patients were receiving vasopressor support during 78 measurements. When the data...

  9. Beat-by-beat analysis of cardiac output and blood pressure responses to short-term barostimulation in different body positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Wulf; Schütze, Harald; Stegemann, J.

    Rapid quantification of the human baro-reflex control of heart rate has been achieved on a beat-by-beat basis using a neck-chamber with quick ECG-triggered pressure changes. Referring to recent findings on heart rate and stroke volume, the present study uses this technique to compare cardiac output as well as blood pressure changes in supine and upright position to investigate feedback effects and to confirm postural reflex modifications not revealed by RR-interval changes. A suction profile starting at +40 mmHg and running 7 steps of pressure decrease down to -65 mmHg was examined in 0° and 90° tilting position while beat-by-beat recordings were done of heart rate, stroke volume (impedance-cardiography) and blood pressure (Finapres tm) (n=16). The percentual heart rate decrease failed to be significantly different between positions. A suction-induced stroke volume increase led to a cardiac output almost maintained when supine and significantly increased when upright. A decrease in all blood pressure values was found during suction, except for systolic values in upright position which increased. Conclusively, (a) it is confirmed that different inotropy accounts for the seen gravitational effect on the cardiac output not represented by heart rate; (b) identical suction levels in different positions lead to different stimuli at the carotid receptor. This interference has to be considered in microgravity studies by beat-by-beat measurement of cardiac output and blood pressure.

  10. PP097. Cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance in normal pregnancy and in control non-pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, A; Goodyear, Gemma; Joseph, Ehizele; Khalil, Asma

    2012-07-01

    Changes in cardiac output (CO) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) have been shown to precede the clinical onset of pregnancy complications, such as pre-eclampsia and fetal growth restriction. CO and SVR undergo major changes during normal pregnancy. However, assessment of these vascular parameters requires intensive training and expensive techniques, so currently can be performed only in specialised centres. The aim of this study was to investigate maternal cardiovascular function measured using an ultrasonic cardiac output monitor (USCOM), a simple non-invasive continuous wave Doppler device, in a cohort of pregnant women and non-pregnant controls. This was a cross sectional study including 185 women with normal singleton pregnancies at 11-40weeks of gestation and 49 non-pregnant controls. Stroke volume (SV), CO and SVR were measured using the USCOM device. All measurements were performed with the patients in supine position. All women with a gestational age of >20weeks were in a left lateral position by placing a wedge-shaped pillow under their right side to prevent vena cava compression. In a group of 25 pregnant women, each measurement was repeated three times to evaluate the reproducibility of this technique. Cardiac index (CI), SV index (SVI) and SVR index (SVRI) relate CO, SV and SVR to the body surface area. The data were normally distributed after logarithmic transformation. Comparisons between pregnant and non-pregnant women were performed using Studentt-test, Chi-Square test or multiple regression analysis, when adjustment for potential confounders was necessary. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 16.0. In the first trimester, all of the following vascular parameters were higher in pregnant women compared to non-pregnant controls: CO [median (IQR): 4.86 (4.45-5.57) vs 5.57 (4.76-6.52)L/min, PPregnant women had significantly lower SVR [median (IQR): 1458 (1261-1649) vs 1165 (1023-1406)sec/cm(-5), P<0.001] and SVRI [median (IQR): 2646 (2307

  11. Femoral Blood Flow and Cardiac Output During Blood Flow Restricted Leg Press Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M. E.; Hackney, K.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2011-01-01

    Low load blood flow restricted resistance exercise (LBFR) causes muscle hypertrophy that may be stimulated by the local ischemic environment created by the cuff pressure. However, local blood flow (BF) during such exercise is not well understood. PURPOSE: To characterize femoral artery BF and cardiac output (CO) during leg press exercise (LP) performed at a high load (HL) and low load (LL) with different levels of cuff pressure. METHODS: Eleven subjects (men/women 4/7, age 31.4+/-12.8 y, weight 68.9+/-13.2 kg, mean+/-SD) performed 3 sets of supine left LP to fatigue with 90 s of rest in 4 conditions: HL (%1-RM/cuff pressure: 80%/0); LL (20%/0); LBFR(sub DBP) (20%/1.3 x diastolic blood pressure, BP); LBFR(sub SBP) (20%/1.3 x supine systolic BP). The cuff remained inflated throughout the LBFR exercise sessions. Artery diameter, velocity time integral (VTI), and stroke volume (SV) were measured using Doppler ultrasound at rest and immediately after each set of exercise. Heart rate (HR) was monitored using a 3-lead ECG. BF was calculated as VTI x vessel cross-sectional area. CO was calculated as HR x SV. The data obtained after each set of exercise were averaged and used for analyses. Multi-level modeling was used to determine the effect of exercise condition on dependent variables. Statistical significance was set a priori at p LL (9.92+/-0.82 cm3) > LBFR(sub dBP)(6.47+/-0.79 cm3) > LBFR(sub SBP) (3.51+/-0.59 cm3). Blunted exercise induced increases occurred in HR, SV, and CO after LBFR compared to HL and LL. HR increased 45% after HL and LL and 28% after LBFR (p<0.05), but SV increased (p<0.05) only after HL. Consequently, the increase (p<0.05) in CO was greater in HL and LL (approximately 3 L/min) than in LBFR (approximately 1 L/min). CONCLUSION: BF during LBFR(sub SBP) was 1/3 of that observed in LL, which supports the hypothesis that local ischemia stimulates the LBFR hypertrophic response. As the cuff did not compress the artery, the ischemia may have occurred

  12. Non-Invasive Determination of Cardiac Output in Pre-Capillary Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Lador

    Full Text Available Cardiac output (CO is a major diagnostic and prognostic factor in pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension (PH. Reference methods for CO determination, like thermodilution (TD, require invasive procedures and allow only steady-state measurements. The Modelflow (MF method is an appealing technique for this purpose as it allows non-invasive and beat-by-beat determination of CO.We aimed to compare CO values obtained simultaneously from non-invasive pulse wave analysis by MF (COMF and by TD (COTD to determine its precision and accuracy in pre-capillary PH. The study was performed on 50 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH or chronic thrombo-embolic PH (CTEPH. CO was determined at rest in all patients (n = 50 and during nitric oxide vasoreactivity test, fluid challenge or exercise (n = 48.Baseline COMF and COTD were 6.18 ± 1.95 and 5.46 ± 1.95 L·min-1, respectively. Accuracy and precision were 0.72 and 1.04 L·min-1, respectively. Limits of agreement (LoA ranged from -1.32 to 2.76 L·min-1. Percentage error (PE was ±35.7%. Overall sensitivity and specificity of COMF for directional change were 95.2% and 82.4%, (n = 48 and 93.3% and 100% for directional changes during exercise (n = 16, respectively. After application of a correction factor (1.17 ± 0.25, neither proportional nor fixed bias was found for subsequent CO determination (n = 48. Accuracy was -0.03 L·min-1 and precision 0.61 L·min-1. LoA ranged from -1.23 to 1.17 L·min-1 and PE was ±19.8%.After correction against a reference method, MF is precise and accurate enough to determine absolute values and beat-by-beat relative changes of CO in pre-capillary PH.

  13. Acupuncture Effects on Cardiac Functions Measured by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Feline Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Hsou Lin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The usefulness of acupuncture (AP as a complementary and/or alternative therapy in animals is well established but more research is needed on its clinical efficacy relative to conventional therapy, and on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of AP. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI, an important tool in monitoring cardiovascular diseases, provides a reliable method to monitor the effects of AP on the cardiovascular system. This controlled experiment monitored the effect electro-acupuncture (EA at bilateral acupoint Neiguan (PC6 on recovery time after ketamine/xylazine cocktail anesthesia in healthy cats. The CMRI data established the basic feline cardiac function index (CFI, including cardiac output and major vessel velocity. To evaluate the effect of EA on the functions of the autonomic nervous and cardiovascular systems, heart rate, respiration rate, electrocardiogram and pulse rate were also measured. Ketamine/xylazine cocktail anesthesia caused a transient hypertension in the cats; EA inhibited this anesthetic-induced hypertension and shortened the post-anesthesia recovery time. Our data support existing knowledge on the cardiovascular benefits of EA at PC6, and also provide strong evidence for the combination of anesthesia and EA to shorten post-anesthesia recovery time and counter the negative effects of anesthetics on cardiac physiology.

  14. QUALITATIVE DATA AND ERROR MEASUREMENT IN INPUT-OUTPUT-ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NIJKAMP, P; OOSTERHAVEN, J; OUWERSLOOT, H; RIETVELD, P

    1992-01-01

    This paper is a contribution to the rapidly emerging field of qualitative data analysis in economics. Ordinal data techniques and error measurement in input-output analysis are here combined in order to test the reliability of a low level of measurement and precision of data by means of a stochastic

  15. Application of intraoperative arterial pressure-based cardiac output monitoring for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jia-kai; ZHU Chen; JING He; WANG Yi-jun; QING En-ming

    2012-01-01

    Background For patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (OPCABG),it is important to establish a hemodynamic monitoring system to obtain powerful parameters for better intraoperative treatment.This study aimed to observe the clinical feasibility of artedal pressure-based cardiac output (APCO) for cardiac output (CO) monitoring and to evaluate the correlation between APCO and pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) for CO measurement for patients undergoing OPCABG intraoperatively.Methods Fifty patients of Amedcan Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) classification Ⅱ-Ⅲ,undergoing elective OPCABG at Beijing Anzhen Hospital were randomly enrolled into this study.All patients were assigned to CO monitoring by PAC and APCO simultaneously.Patients with pacemaker,severe valvular heart disease,left ventdcular ejection fraction (EF) <40%,cardiac arrhythmias,peripheral vascular disease,application of intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP) and emergent diversion to cardiac pulmonary bypass were excluded.The radial artery wavaform was analyzed to estimate the stroke volume (SV) and heart rate (HR) continuously.CO was calculated as SV x HR; other derived parameters were cardiac index (CI),stroke volume index (SVI),systemic vascular resistance (SVR),and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI).PAC was placed via right internal jugular vein and the correct position was confirmed by PAC waveforms.Continuous cardiac output (CCO),CI and other hemodynamic parameters were monitored at following 5 time points:immediate after anesthesia induction (baseline value),anastomosis of left intemal mammary artery to left anterior descending artery (LAD),anastomosis of left circumflex (LCX),anastomosis of posterior descending artery (PDA) and immediate after sternal closure.Results In the 50 patients,preoperative echocardiography measured left ventricular EF was (52.8±11.5)%,and 35 patients (70%) showed regional wall motion abnormalities.The correlation coefficient of CO

  16. Measuring cardiac efficiency using PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullberg, Grand [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Aparici, Carina Mari; Brooks, Gabriel [University of California San Francisco (United States); Liu, Jing; Guccione, Julius; Saloner, David; Seo, Adam Youngho; Ordovas, Karen Gomes [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex syndrome that is projected by the American Heart Association to cost $160 billion by 2030. In HF, significant metabolic changes and structural remodeling lead to reduced cardiac efficiency. A normal heart is approximately 20-25% efficient measured by the ratio of work to oxygen utilization (1 ml oxygen = 21 joules). The heart requires rapid production of ATP where there is complete turnover of ATP every 10 seconds with 90% of ATP produced by mitochondrial oxidative metabolism requiring substrates of approximately 30% glucose and 65% fatty acids. In our preclinical PET/MRI studies in normal rats, we showed a negative correlation between work and the influx rate constant for 18FDG, confirming that glucose is not the preferred substrate at rest. However, even though fatty acid provides 9 kcal/gram compared to 4 kcal/gram for glucose, in HF the preferred energy source is glucose. PET/MRI offers the potential to study this maladapted mechanism of metabolism by measuring work in a region of myocardial tissue simultaneously with the measure of oxygen utilization, glucose, and fatty acid metabolism and to study cardiac efficiency in the etiology of and therapies for HF. MRI is used to measure strain and a finite element mechanical model using pressure measurements is used to estimate myofiber stress. The integral of strain times stress provides a measure of work which divided by energy utilization, estimated by the production of 11CO2 from intravenous injection of 11C-acetate, provides a measure of cardiac efficiency. Our project involves translating our preclinical research to the clinical application of measuring cardiac efficiency in patients. Using PET/MRI to develop technologies for studying myocardial efficiency in patients, provides an opportunity to relate cardiac work of specific tissue regions to metabolic substrates, and measure the heterogeneity of LV efficiency.

  17. Transthoracic echocardiography: an accurate and precise method for estimating cardiac output in the critically ill patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Pablo; Maizel, Julien; Beyls, Christophe; Titeca-Beauport, Dimitri; Joris, Magalie; Kontar, Loay; Riviere, Antoine; Bonef, Olivier; Soupison, Thierry; Tribouilloy, Christophe; de Cagny, Bertrand; Slama, Michel

    2017-06-09

    Cardiac output (CO) monitoring is a valuable tool for the diagnosis and management of critically ill patients. In the critical care setting, few studies have evaluated the level of agreement between CO estimated by transthoracic echocardiography (CO-TTE) and that measured by the reference method, pulmonary artery catheter (CO-PAC). The objective of the present study was to evaluate the precision and accuracy of CO-TTE relative to CO-PAC and the ability of transthoracic echocardiography to track variations in CO, in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. Thirty-eight mechanically ventilated patients fitted with a PAC were included in a prospective observational study performed in a 16-bed university hospital ICU. CO-PAC was measured via intermittent thermodilution. Simultaneously, a second investigator used standard-view TTE to estimate CO-TTE as the product of stroke volume and the heart rate obtained during the measurement of the subaortic velocity time integral. Sixty-four pairs of CO-PAC and CO-TTE measurements were compared. The two measurements were significantly correlated (r = 0.95; p < 0.0001). The median bias was 0.2 L/min, the limits of agreement (LOAs) were -1.3 and 1.8 L/min, and the percentage error was 25%. The precision was 8% for CO-PAC and 9% for CO-TTE. Twenty-six pairs of ΔCO measurements were compared. There was a significant correlation between ΔCO-PAC and ΔCO-TTE (r = 0.92; p < 0.0001). The median bias was -0.1 L/min and the LOAs were -1.3 and +1.2 L/min. With a 15% exclusion zone, the four-quadrant plot had a concordance rate of 94%. With a 0.5 L/min exclusion zone, the polar plot had a mean polar angle of 1.0° and a percentage error LOAs of -26.8 to 28.8°. The concordance rate was 100% between 30 and -30°. When using CO-TTE to detect an increase in ΔCO-PAC of more than 10%, the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (95% CI) was 0.82 (0.62-0.94) (p < 0.001). A ΔCO-TTE of more than 8

  18. Phlebotomy eliminates the maximal cardiac output response to six weeks of exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonne, Thomas Christian; Doucende, Gregory; Flück, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    -breathing) was re-established to pre-training values by phlebotomy and Qmax was quantified again. Resting echography revealed no structural heart adaptations as a consequence of the training intervention. Following the training period, plasma volume (PV), red blood cell volume (RBCV) and BV increased (p......With this study we tested the hypothesis that six weeks of endurance training increases maximal cardiac output (Qmax) relatively more by elevating blood volume (BV) than by inducing structural and functional changes within the heart. Nine healthy but untrained volunteers (VO2max 47 ± 5 ml.min(-1......).kg(-1)) underwent supervised training (60 min; 4 times weekly at 65% VO2max for six weeks) and Qmax was determined by inert gas re-breathing during cycle ergometer exercise before and after the training period. After the training period, blood volume (determined in duplicates by CO re...

  19. Correlation of cardiac output and sevoflurane required to maintain anesthetic depth targeted with entropy index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei E Bautin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: We investigated the correlation of reduced cardiac output on required sevoflurane to maintain targeted anesthesia depth. Materials and Methods: 36 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass were prospectively included in the study. Inspired sevoflurane concentration was adjusted to ensure state entropy index 2.2 l/min/m 2 (1.37% ± 0.31%, P = 0.01. Conclusion: Relationship between CI and ETsev required for maintaining target level of anesthesia is non-linear. Patients with CI ≤ 2.2 l/min/m 2 need lower levels of the ETsev for maintenance of the target anesthesia at an entropy index < 40.

  20. Low Cardiac Output Secondary to a Malpositioned Umbilical Venous Catheter: Value of Targeted Neonatal Echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dany E. Weisz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Systemic hypotension is common in very low birthweight preterm infants but the nature of the precipitating cause may be unclear. Targeted neonatal echocardiography (TnEcho is being increasingly used to support hemodynamic decisions in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, including identifying impairments in the transitional circulation of preterm infants, providing timely re-evaluation after institution of therapies and evaluating the placement of indwelling catheters. We present a case of a preterm infant with systemic hypotension and low cardiac output secondary to a large transatrial shunt induced by a malpositioned umbilical venous catheter. Repositioning of the line led to resolution of the hemodynamic disturbance and clinical instability, highlighting the utility of TnEcho in the NICU.

  1. Cardiac output in exercise by impedance cardiography during breath holding and normal breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Quesnay, M C; Stoute, G J; Hughson, R L

    1987-01-01

    Estimation of cardiac output by impedance cardiography (QZ) in exercise during normal breathing (NB) has been limited by motion artifact. Our objective was to obtain readable impedance cardiograms on five subjects during upright cycle exercise at 0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 W to permit comparisons of QZ during NB, expiratory breath hold (EXP) and inspiratory breath hold (INSP). Q was also determined using an equilibration CO2 rebreathing method [Q(RB)]. QZ during NB exceeded EXP QZ at 100, 150, and 200 W, and exceeded INSP QZ at 100 W (P less than 0.05). The low EXP QZ values were due to a significantly lower stroke volume at 100, 150, and 200 W (P less than 0.05). For the INSP QZ at 100 W, heart rate was lower than during EXP (P less than 0.05). Regression of QZ (NB) against Q(RB) resulted in a linear relationship (r = 0.93) over the range of Q = 7-26 1/min. The slope of the regression differed significantly from 1.0 (P less than 0.05). We conclude that QZ values obtained during EXP or INSP should not be assumed to represent QZ during NB, at least at work rates greater than 50 W. A consequence of the linear relationship between QZ(NB) and Q(RB) over the range of 0-200 W is that estimates of CO2 rebreathing cardiac output can be obtained by impedance cardiography if QZ is adjusted using an appropriate empirical factor.

  2. Measuring temporal resolution of cardiac CT reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, David; Heuscher, Dominic

    2005-04-01

    Multi-slice CT today is capable of imaging the heart with excellent temporal resolution. Algorithms have been developed to perform reconstructions combining data from multiple cardiac cycles. This paper presents a simulation phantom that enables a direct measurement of the actual temporal resolution achieved by these algorithms. This is not only useful for assessing the temporal resolution but also for validating the algorithms themselves. A simulation phantom was developed that consists of a 20 cm. diameter water phantom containing an array of cylinders whose intensities are pulsed for various durations ranging from 10 msec. to 250 msec. The intensity varied between the background value of water (0 HU) and 800 HU. By measuring the nominal attenuation value at the center of each cylinder, a curve can be derived representing the response over the given temporal range. A temporal resolution representing the FWHM value is determined based on the half-max value of this curve. Reconstructions were performed using a multi-cycle cardiac algorithm described previously in the literature. The measured FWHM values agree quite well to the temporal resolution predicted by the cardiac algorithm itself. Even the variation along the longitudinal axis can be accounted for by the predicted values. A simulated phantom can be used to accurately assess the temporal resolution of cardiac reconstruction algorithms. Excellent agreement was achieved between the predicted and measured temporal resolution values for the multi-cycle algorithm used in this study.

  3. Left ventricular atrioventricular plane displacement is preserved with lifelong endurance training and is the main determinant of maximal cardiac output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina; Boushel, Robert C; Calbet, José A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Age-related decline in cardiac function can be prevented or postponed by lifelong endurance training. However, effects of normal ageing as well as of lifelong endurance exercise on longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine...... subjects (29 ± 4 years) underwent cardiac MR. All subjects underwent maximal exercise testing and for elderly subjects maximal cardiac output during cycling was determined using dye dilution technique. RESULTS: Longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume did not differ between groups...... and exercise capacity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  4. Blood pressure reduction after gastric bypass surgery is explained by a decrease in cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Brussel, Peter M; van den Bogaard, Bas; de Weijer, Barbara A; Truijen, Jasper; Krediet, C T Paul; Janssen, Ignace M; van de Laar, Arnold; Kaasjager, Karin; Fliers, Eric; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Serlie, Mireille J; van den Born, Bert-Jan H

    2017-02-01

    Blood pressure (BP) decreases in the first weeks after Roux-and-Y gastric bypass surgery. Yet the pathophysiology of the BP-lowering effects observed after gastric bypass surgery is incompletely understood. We evaluated BP, systemic hemodynamics, and baroreflex sensitivity in 15 obese women[mean age 42 ± 7 standard deviation (SD) yr, body mass index 45 ± 6 kg/m(2)] 2 wk before and 6 wk following Roux-and-Y gastric bypass surgery. Six weeks after gastric bypass surgery, mean body weight decreased by 13 ± 5 kg (10%, P decreased from 137 ± 10/86 ± 6 to 128 ± 12/81 ± 9 mmHg (P decreased from 128 ± 14/80 ± 9 to 114 ± 10/73 ± 6 mmHg (P = 0.01, P = 0.05), whereas nighttime BP decreased from 111 ± 13/66 ± 7 to 102 ± 9/62 ± 7 mmHg (P = 0.04, P decrease in BP was associated with a 1.6 ± 1.2 l/min (20%, P decrease in cardiac output (CO), while systemic vascular resistance increased (153 ± 189 dyn·s·cm(-5), 15%, P decreased (192 mmHg/s, 19%, P = 0.01), suggesting a reduction in left ventricular contractility. Baroreflex sensitivity increased from 9.0 [6.4-14.3] to 13.8 [8.5-19.0] ms/mmHg (median [interquartile range]; P decrease in CO independent of changes in body weight. The contribution of heart rate to the reduction in CO together with enhanced baroreflex sensitivity suggests a shift toward increased parasympathetic cardiovascular control. The reason for the decrease in blood pressure (BP) in the first weeks after gastric bypass surgery remains to be elucidated. We show that the reduction in BP following surgery is caused by a decrease in cardiac output. In addition, the maximal ascending slope in systolic blood pressure decreased suggesting a reduction in left ventricular contractility and cardiac workload. These findings help to understand the physiological changes following gastric bypass surgery and are relevant in light of the increased risk of heart failure in these patients. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Novel Techniques and New Advances of Measures of cardiac output during Maximal Aerobic Exercise%最大有氧运动中心输出量测定的新技术和新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张清华; 王蕴红

    2001-01-01

    一般来说,一些用于运动状况下心输出量 (Q)测定的技术能精确、可取地测定亚极量运动状况下的 Q,而在极量运动过程中的运用则受到限制。过去通常用的非损伤性的方法中只有 C2H2(乙炔 )重呼吸法适用于极量运动中,它完全无损伤性、简便易行、切实有效。近年来,运动状况下叠的测定的新方法已经发展,且在运动生理学和运动心脏学上已逐渐受到育踩。除阻抗心动描记器外,这些方法中的大部分理论上可以精确、可靠地田定 Q。然而,它们在极量运动中的使用费用和技术限制阻碍了它们取代常规方法。多普勒超声波技术和修正过的 C2H2法有望用于极量运动状况下 Q的预定,随着这些技术的进一步发展,它们在运动生理学和运动心脏病学方面的应用将会更普遍。%There are several techniques available to measure Q during exercise conditions. These procedures generally provide accurate and reliable determination of Q during Submaxtmal exercise, but may be limited during maximal exercise conditions. In the mostCommenly used noninvasine measures, only the acetylene(C2H2) rebreathe methods meetsa11 of the criteria of being noninvasive, easy to use, reliable and valid for use during maximalexercise. New methodlogies have recently been developed to measure Q during exerciseConditions, these methods have increasingly gained favour in exercise physiology and sportcardiology settings. The majority of these measures with the exception of impedanceCardiography, provide reasonably accurate and reliable determination of Q. However, theCost of usage and technologica1 limitations during maximel exercise have prevented thesetechniques from replacing the conventional measures of Q during exercise conditions. Doppler echocardiography alld the modified C2H2 methods hold promise for the assessment ofQ druing maximal exercise. With further advances

  6. Cardiac Aging Detection Using Complexity Measures

    CERN Document Server

    Balasubramanian, Karthi

    2016-01-01

    As we age, our hearts undergo changes which result in reduction in complexity of physiological interactions between different control mechanisms. This results in a potential risk of cardiovascular diseases which are the number one cause of death globally. Since cardiac signals are nonstationary and nonlinear in nature, complexity measures are better suited to handle such data. In this study, non-invasive methods for detection of cardiac aging using complexity measures are explored. Lempel-Ziv (LZ) complexity, Approximate Entropy (ApEn) and Effort-to-Compress (ETC) measures are used to differentiate between healthy young and old subjects using heartbeat interval data. We show that both LZ and ETC complexity measures are able to differentiate between young and old subjects with only 10 data samples while ApEn requires at least 15 data samples.

  7. 应用Swan-Ganz导管测定肺动脉高压犬模型肺循环阻力及心输出量的实验研究%Application of Swan-Ganz catheter to measure pulmonary vascular resistance and cardiac output of canine model with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林约瑟; 李淑娟; 李轩狄; 李运泉; 王慧深

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo explore the value of Swan-Ganz catheter to measure pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and cardiac output (CO) of canine model with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).MethodsSixteen Beagle dogs were randomly divided into two groups, the control group(n=8) and the pulmonary arterial hypertension group (n=8). Arterial blood was obtained to test arterial oxygen saturation. A Swan-Ganz catheter was advanced through the the right jugular vein way to the pulmonary artery and the pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) were measured. Blood was obtained to test the pulmonary arterial oxygen saturation and plasma concentration of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). Cardiac output and pulmonary vascular resistance were then calculated according to formula. The pulmonary arterial hypertension group were injected dehydromonocrataline 2.5 mg/kgto set up pulmonary arterial hypertension model. Hemodynamic measure was repeated after eight weeks.ResultsEight weeks after injection of dehydromonocrotaline, the pulmonary arterial systolic pressure, mean pulmonary arterial pressure of the pulmonary arterial hypertension group were significantly increased from (20.33±1.86) mmHg to (50.10±3.72) mmHg, (10.42±1.48) mmHg to (34.30±2.35) mmHg, the pulmonary arterial resistance, pulmonary vascular resistance were significantly increased from (1.10±0.24) Wood to (12.60±0.29) Wood, (2.34±0.33) Wood to (15.68±0.68) Wood, respectively, cardiac output was significantly decreased from (4.60±0.64) L/min to (2.30±0.35) L/min (P<0.05).ConclusionIt is an accurate, stable and repeatable method to apply Swan-Ganz catheter for measuring pulmonary vascular resistance and cardiac output in Beagle models with pulmonary arterial hypertension.%目的:探讨Swan-Ganz导管在肺动脉高压犬模型肺循环阻力及心输出量测定中的应用价值。方法16只比格犬随机分为2组,正常对照组(n=8)、肺动脉高压组(n=8)。穿刺动脉取血检测血氧饱和度。

  8. Finger arterial versus intrabrachial pressure and continuous cardiac output during head-up tilt testing in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, W.T.; Imholz, B.P.M.; Goudoever, J. van; Wesseling, K.H.; Lieshout, J.J. van

    1996-01-01

    1. The aims of this study were to determine the clinical feasibility of continuous, non-invasive Finapres recordings as a replacement for intrabrachial pressure during a 30 min head-up tilt, and the reliability of continuous cardiac output computation by pulse contour analysis from the finger arteri

  9. [Anesthesia management of geriatric patients with arterial pressure-based cardiac output monitoring FloTrac sensor for emergency surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Goto, Koji; Yasuda, Norihisa; Kusaka, Junya; Hidaka, Seigo; Miyakawa, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Takayuki

    2009-06-01

    In cases of emergency surgery for geriatric patients, immediate anesthesia induction and careful intraoperative management is necessary without sufficient preoperative information. We report anesthesia management of a 96-year and a 90-year old patients with FloTrac sensor which is an arterial pressure-based cardiac output monitoring device and is able to manage critical patients effectively and safely during anesthesia.

  10. ADRB2 gly16gly Genotype, Cardiac Output, and Cerebral Oxygenation in Patients Undergoing Anesthesia for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalso, Jonatan Myrup; Rokamp, Kim Zillo; Olesen, Niels D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gly16arg polymorphism of the adrenergic [beta]2-receptor is associated with the elevated cardiac output (Q) in healthy gly16-homozygotic subjects. We questioned whether this polymorphism also affects Q and regional cerebral oxygen saturation (SCO2) during anesthesia in vascular surgic...

  11. Use of electroconvulsive therapy in an elderly after 5 weeks of myocardial infraction with 30% cardiac output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Grover

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is limited literature on the use of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT in patients with recent myocardial infarction and in those with reduced cardiac output. In this report, we describe the safe use of ECT in a 70-year-male suffering from severe depressive episode with psychotic symptoms. He had a history of poor response to adequate pharmacotherapy and had suffered from myocardial infraction (MI, about 3 weeks prior to admission to the psychiatric unit. In view of severe depression associated with marked anxiety, agitation, psychotic symptoms, and poor food intake he was started on ECT after 5 weeks of MI when his cardiac output was only 30%. He received nine sessions of ECT without any cardiac complications and his depression remitted with ECT.

  12. Acoustic output of multi-line transmit beamforming for fast cardiac imaging: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Pedro; Tong, Ling; Ortega, Alejandra; Løvstakken, Lasse; Samset, Eigil; D'hooge, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Achieving higher frame rates in cardiac ultrasound could unveil short-lived myocardial events and lead to new insights on cardiac function. Multi-line transmit (MLT) beamforming (i.e., simultaneously transmitting multiple focused beams) is a potential approach to achieve this. However, two challenges come with it: first, it leads to cross-talk between the MLT beams, appearing as imaging artifacts, and second, it presents acoustic summation in the near field, where multiple MLT beams overlap. Although several studies have focused on the former, no studies have looked into the implications of the latter on acoustic safety. In this paper, the acoustic field of 4-MLT was simulated and compared with single-line transmit (SLT). The findings suggest that standard MLT does present potential concerns. Compared with SLT, it shows a 2-fold increase in mechanical index (MI) (from 1.0 to 2.3), a 6-fold increase in spatial-peak pulse-average intensity (I(sppa)) (from 99 to 576 W∙cm(-2)) and a 12-fold increase in spatial-peak temporalaverage intensity (I(spta)) (from 119 to 1407 mW∙cm(-2)). Subsequently, modifications of the transmit pulse and delay line of MLT were studied. These modifications allowed for a change in the spatio-temporal distribution of the acoustic output, thereby significantly decreasing the safety indices (MI = 1.2, I(sppa) = 92 W∙cm(-2) and I(spta) = 366 mW∙cm(-2)). Accordingly, they help mitigate the concerns around MLT, reducing potential tradeoffs between acoustic safety and image quality.

  13. Early predictors of acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis and bacterial infection: urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and cardiac output as reliable tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ximenes, Rafael O.; Farias, Alberto Q.; Helou, Claudia M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hemodynamic abnormalities and acute kidney injury (AKI) are often present in infected cirrhotic patients. Hence, an early diagnosis of AKI is necessary, which might require the validation of new predictors as the determinations of urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) and cardiac output. Methods We evaluated 18 infected cirrhotic patients subdivided into two groups at admission (0 hours). In Group I, we collected urine samples at 0 hours, 6 hours, 24 hours, and 48 hours for uNGAL and fractional excretion of sodium determinations. In Group II, we measured cardiac output using echocardiography. Results The age of patients was 55.0±1.9 years, and 11 patients were males. The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score was 21±1, whereas the Child–Pugh score was C in 11 patients and B in 7 patients. Both patients in Group I and Group II showed similar baseline characteristics. In Group I, we diagnosed AKI in 5 of 9 patients, and the mean time to this diagnosis by measuring serum creatinine was 5.4 days. Patients with AKI showed higher uNGAL levels than those without AKI from 6 hours to 48 hours. The best accuracy using the cutoff values of 68 ng uNGAL/mg creatinine was achieved at 48 hours when we distinguished patients with and without AKI in all cases. In Group II, we diagnosed AKI in 4 of 9 patients, and cardiac output was significantly higher in patients who developed AKI at 0 hours. Conclusion Both uNGAL and cardiac output determinations allow the prediction of AKI in infected cirrhotic patients earlier than increments in serum creatinine. PMID:26484038

  14. Arterial pressure-based cardiac output monitoring: a multicenter validation of the third-generation software in septic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, Daniel; Marx, Gernot; Tan, Andrew; Junker, Christopher; Van Nuffelen, Marc; Hüter, Lars; Ching, Willy; Michard, Frédéric; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2011-02-01

    Second-generation FloTrac software has been shown to reliably measure cardiac output (CO) in cardiac surgical patients. However, concerns have been raised regarding its accuracy in vasoplegic states. The aim of the present multicenter study was to investigate the accuracy of the third-generation software in patients with sepsis, particularly when total systemic vascular resistance (TSVR) is low. Fifty-eight septic patients were included in this prospective observational study in four university-affiliated ICUs. Reference CO was measured by bolus pulmonary thermodilution (iCO) using 3-5 cold saline boluses. Simultaneously, CO was computed from the arterial pressure curve recorded on a computer using the second-generation (CO(G2)) and third-generation (CO(G3)) FloTrac software. CO was also measured by semi-continuous pulmonary thermodilution (CCO). A total of 401 simultaneous measurements of iCO, CO(G2), CO(G3), and CCO were recorded. The mean (95%CI) biases between CO(G2) and iCO, CO(G3) and iCO, and CCO and iCO were -10 (-15 to -5)% [-0.8 (-1.1 to -0.4) L/min], 0 (-4 to 4)% [0 (-0.3 to 0.3) L/min], and 9 (6-13)% [0.7 (0.5-1.0) L/min], respectively. The percentage errors were 29 (20-37)% for CO(G2), 30 (24-37)% for CO(G3), and 28 (22-34)% for CCO. The difference between iCO and CO(G2) was significantly correlated with TSVR (r(2) = 0.37, p iCO and CO(G3). In patients with sepsis, the third-generation FloTrac software is more accurate, as precise, and less influenced by TSVR than the second-generation software.

  15. Left ventricular atrioventricular plane displacement is preserved with lifelong endurance training and is the main determinant of maximal cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina; Boushel, Robert C; Calbet, José A; Åkeson, Per; Mortensen, Stefan P

    2015-12-01

    Age-related decline in cardiac function can be prevented or postponed by lifelong endurance training. However, effects of normal ageing as well as of lifelong endurance exercise on longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine resting longitudinal and radial pumping in elderly athletes, sedentary elderly and young sedentary subjects. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate determinants of maximal cardiac output in elderly. Eight elderly athletes (63 ± 4 years), seven elderly sedentary (66 ± 4 years) and ten young sedentary subjects (29 ± 4 years) underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. All subjects underwent maximal exercise testing and for elderly subjects maximal cardiac output during cycling was determined using a dye dilution technique. Longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume did not differ between groups (longitudinal left ventricle (LV) 52-65%, P = 0.12, right ventricle (RV) 77-87%, P = 0.16, radial 7.9-8.6%, P = 1.0). Left ventricular atrioventricular plane displacement (LVAVPD) was higher in elderly athletes and young sedentary compared with elderly sedentary subjects (14 ± 3, 15 ± 2 and 11 ± 1 mm, respectively, P cardiac output (R(2) = 0.61, P Longitudinal and radial contributions to stroke volume did not differ between groups. However, how longitudinal pumping was achieved differed; elderly athletes and young sedentary subjects showed similar AVPD whereas this was significantly lower in elderly sedentary subjects. Elderly sedentary subjects achieved longitudinal pumping through increased short-axis area of the ventricle. Large AVPD was a determinant of maximal cardiac output and exercise capacity.

  16. Influence of water immersion, water gymnastics and swimming on cardiac output in patients with heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Jean‐Paul; Noveanu, Markus; Morger, Cyrill; Gaillet, Raymond; Capoferri, Mauro; Anderegg, Matthias; Saner, Hugo

    2007-01-01

    Background Whole‐body water immersion leads to a significant shift of blood from the periphery to the intrathoracic circulation, followed by an increase in central venous pressure and heart volume. In patients with severely reduced left ventricular function, this hydrostatically induced volume shift might overstrain the cardiovascular adaptive mechanisms and lead to cardiac decompensation. Aim To assess the haemodynamic response to water immersion, gymnastics and swimming in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods 10 patients with compensated CHF (62.9 (6.3) years, ejection fraction 31.5% (4.1%), peak oxygen consumption (V̇o2) 19.4 (2.8) ml/kg/min), 10 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) but preserved left ventricular function (57.2 (5.6) years, ejection fraction 63.9% (5.5%), peak V̇o2 28 (6.3) ml/kg/min), and 10 healthy controls (32.8 (7.2) years, peak V̇o2 45.6 (6) ml/kg/min) were examined. Haemodynamic response to thermoneutral (32°C) water immersion and exercise was measured using a non‐invasive foreign gas rebreathing method during stepwise water immersion, water gymnastics and swimming. Results Water immersion up to the chest increased cardiac index by 19% in controls, by 21% in patients with CAD and by 16% in patients with CHF. Although some patients with CHF showed a decrease of stroke volume during immersion, all subjects were able to increase cardiac index (by 87% in healthy subjects, by 77% in patients with CAD and by 53% in patients with CHF). V̇o2 during swimming was 9.7 (3.3) ml/kg/min in patients with CHF, 12.4 (3.5) ml/kg/min in patients with CAD and 13.9 (4) ml/kg/min in controls. Conclusions Patients with severely reduced left ventricular function but stable clinical conditions and a minimal peak V̇o2 of at least 15 ml/kg/min during a symptom‐limited exercise stress test tolerate water immersion and swimming in thermoneutral water well. Although cardiac index and V̇o2 are lower than in patients

  17. Measuring fluid flow and heat output in seafloor hydrothermal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanovich, Leonid N.; Hurt, Robert S.; Smith, Joshua E.; Genc, Gence; Lowell, Robert P.

    2015-12-01

    We review techniques for measuring fluid flow and advective heat output from seafloor hydrothermal systems and describe new anemometer and turbine flowmeter devices we have designed, built, calibrated, and tested. These devices allow measuring fluid velocity at high- and low-temperature focused and diffuse discharge sites at oceanic spreading centers. The devices perform at ocean floor depths and black smoker temperatures and can be used to measure flow rates ranging over 2 orders of magnitude. Flow velocity is determined from the rotation rate of the rotor blades or paddle assembly. These devices have an open bearing design that eliminates clogging by particles or chemical precipitates as the fluid passes by the rotors. The devices are compact and lightweight enough for deployment from either an occupied or remotely operated submersible. The measured flow rates can be used in conjunction with vent temperature or geochemical measurements to obtain heat outputs or geochemical fluxes from both vent chimneys and diffuse flow regions. The devices have been tested on 30 Alvin dives on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and 3 Jason dives on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). We measured an anomalously low entrainment coefficient (0.064) and report 104 new measurements over a wide range of discharge temperatures (5°-363°C), velocities (2-199 cm/s), and depths (1517-2511 m). These include the first advective heat output measurements at the High Rise vent field and the first direct fluid flow measurement at Middle Valley. Our data suggest that black smoker heat output at the Main Endeavour vent field may have declined since 1994 and that after the 2005-2006 eruption, the high-temperature advective flow at the EPR 9°50'N field may have become more channelized, predominately discharging through the Bio 9 structure. We also report 16 measurements on 10 Alvin dives and 2 Jason dives with flow meters that predate devices described in this work and were used in the process of their development

  18. Cardiac output method comparison studies: the relation of the precision of agreement and the precision of method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Cecconi, Maurizio; Saugel, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac output (CO) plays a crucial role in the hemodynamic management of critically ill patients treated in the intensive care unit and in surgical patients undergoing major surgery. In the field of cardiovascular dynamics, innovative techniques for CO determination are increasingly available. Therefore, the number of studies comparing these techniques with a reference, such as pulmonary artery thermodilution, is rapidly growing. There are mainly two outcomes of such method comparison studies: (1) the accuracy of agreement and (2) the precision of agreement. The precision of agreement depends on the precision of each method, i.e., the precision that the studied and the reference technique are able to achieve. We call this "precision of method". A decomposition of variance shows that method agreement does not only depend on the precision of method but also on another important source of variability, i.e., the method's general variability about the true values. Ignorance of that fact leads to falsified conclusions about the precision of method of the studied technique. In CO studies, serial measurements are frequently confused with repeated measurements. But as the actual CO of a subject changes from assessment to assessment, there is no real repetition of a measurement. This situation equals a scenario in which single measurements are given for multiple true values per subject. In such a case it is not possible to assess the precision of method.

  19. Cardiac output and associated left ventricular hypertrophy in pediatric chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Donald J; Kimball, Thomas R; Koury, Phillip R; Mitsnefes, Mark M

    2009-03-01

    A significant number of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), suggesting the role of preload overload. Therefore, we hypothesized that increased cardiac output (CO) might be a contributing factor for increased left ventricular mass index (LVMI) in these children. Patients aged 6-20 years with CKD stages 2-4 were enrolled. Echocardiograms were performed to assess LV function and geometry at rest and during exercise. Heart rate, stroke volume, and CO were also assessed at rest and during exercise. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure (AMBP) monitoring was performed. Of the patients enrolled in this study, 17% had LVH. Increased stroke volume and CO were observed in patients with LVH compared to patients without LVH. Univariate analysis revealed significant positive associations between LVMI and CO, stroke volume, body mass index, pulse pressure from mean 24-h AMBP, and mean 24-h systolic BP load. No association with heart rate, age, parathyroid hormone, glomerular filtration rate, or anemia was observed. Only CO (beta = 1.98, p = 0.0005) was independently associated with increased LVMI in multivariate modeling (model R (2) = 0.25). The results of this study suggest that increased CO might predispose to increased LVMI in pediatric patients with CKD. Adaptations may be required to meet increased metabolic demand in these patients.

  20. High Output Cardiac Failure Resolving after Repair of AV Fistula in a Six-Month-Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uygar Teomete

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acquired AVF in pediatrics are commonly caused by iatrogenic means, including arterial or venous punctures. These fistulae can cause great hemodynamic stress on the heart as soon as they are created. Case. A six-month-old 25-week gestation infant was referred for respiratory distress. Initial exam revealed tachypnea, tachycardia, and hypertension. There was a bruit noted on her left arm. An ultrasound showed an arteriovenous fistula. Its location, however, precluded intervention because of the high risk for limb-loss. An echocardiogram showed evidence of pulmonary hypertension that was treated with sildenafil and furosemide. However, no improvement was seen. On temporary manual occlusion of the fistula, the patient was noted to have increased her blood pressure and decreased her heart rate, suggesting significant hemodynamic effect of the fistula. The fistula was subsequently ligated and the patient clinically and echocardiographically improved. Conclusion. A patient in high output cardiac failure or pulmonary artery hypertension, especially prematüre patients with preexisting lung disease, should be probed for history of multiple punctures, trauma, or surgery and should have prompt evaluation for AVF. If it can be diagnosed and repaired, most of the cases have been shown to decrease the stress on the heart and reverse the pathologic hemodynamics.

  1. High Output Cardiac Failure Resolving after Repair of AV Fistula in a Six-Month-Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teomete, Uygar; Gugol, Rubee Anne; Neville, Holly; Dandin, Ozgur; Young, Ming-Lon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acquired AVF in pediatrics are commonly caused by iatrogenic means, including arterial or venous punctures. These fistulae can cause great hemodynamic stress on the heart as soon as they are created. Case. A six-month-old 25-week gestation infant was referred for respiratory distress. Initial exam revealed tachypnea, tachycardia, and hypertension. There was a bruit noted on her left arm. An ultrasound showed an arteriovenous fistula. Its location, however, precluded intervention because of the high risk for limb-loss. An echocardiogram showed evidence of pulmonary hypertension that was treated with sildenafil and furosemide. However, no improvement was seen. On temporary manual occlusion of the fistula, the patient was noted to have increased her blood pressure and decreased her heart rate, suggesting significant hemodynamic effect of the fistula. The fistula was subsequently ligated and the patient clinically and echocardiographically improved. Conclusion. A patient in high output cardiac failure or pulmonary artery hypertension, especially prematüre patients with preexisting lung disease, should be probed for history of multiple punctures, trauma, or surgery and should have prompt evaluation for AVF. If it can be diagnosed and repaired, most of the cases have been shown to decrease the stress on the heart and reverse the pathologic hemodynamics. PMID:26885434

  2. High Output Cardiac Failure Resolving after Repair of AV Fistula in a Six-Month-Old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teomete, Uygar; Gugol, Rubee Anne; Neville, Holly; Dandin, Ozgur; Young, Ming-Lon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acquired AVF in pediatrics are commonly caused by iatrogenic means, including arterial or venous punctures. These fistulae can cause great hemodynamic stress on the heart as soon as they are created. Case. A six-month-old 25-week gestation infant was referred for respiratory distress. Initial exam revealed tachypnea, tachycardia, and hypertension. There was a bruit noted on her left arm. An ultrasound showed an arteriovenous fistula. Its location, however, precluded intervention because of the high risk for limb-loss. An echocardiogram showed evidence of pulmonary hypertension that was treated with sildenafil and furosemide. However, no improvement was seen. On temporary manual occlusion of the fistula, the patient was noted to have increased her blood pressure and decreased her heart rate, suggesting significant hemodynamic effect of the fistula. The fistula was subsequently ligated and the patient clinically and echocardiographically improved. Conclusion. A patient in high output cardiac failure or pulmonary artery hypertension, especially prematüre patients with preexisting lung disease, should be probed for history of multiple punctures, trauma, or surgery and should have prompt evaluation for AVF. If it can be diagnosed and repaired, most of the cases have been shown to decrease the stress on the heart and reverse the pathologic hemodynamics.

  3. Kinetics of Cardiac Output at the Onset of Exercise in Precapillary Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengueddache, Samir; Ferretti, Guido; Soccal, Paola M.; Noble, Stéphane; Beghetti, Maurice; Chemla, Denis; Hervé, Philippe; Sitbon, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Cardiac output (CO) is a cornerstone parameter in precapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH). The Modelflow (MF) method offers a reliable noninvasive determination of its beat-by-beat changes. So MF allows exploration of CO adjustment with the best temporal resolution. Methods. Fifteen subjects (5 PH patients, 10 healthy controls) performed a submaximal supine exercise on a cycle ergometer after 5 min of rest. CO was continuously determined by MF (COMF). Kinetics of heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), and CO were determined with 3 monoexponential models. Results. In PH patients, we observed a sudden and transitory drop of SV upon exercise onset. This implied a transitory drop of CO whose adjustment to a new steady state depended on HR increase. The kinetics of HR and CO for PH patients was slower than that of controls for all models and for SV in model 1. SV kinetics was faster for PH patients in models 2 and 3. Conclusion. This is the first description of beat-by-beat cardiovascular adjustments upon exercise onset in PH. The kinetics of HR and CO appeared slower than those of healthy controls and there was a transitory drop of CO upon exercise onset in PH due to a sudden drop of SV. PMID:27990432

  4. Kinetics of Cardiac Output at the Onset of Exercise in Precapillary Pulmonary Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Lador

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Cardiac output (CO is a cornerstone parameter in precapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH. The Modelflow (MF method offers a reliable noninvasive determination of its beat-by-beat changes. So MF allows exploration of CO adjustment with the best temporal resolution. Methods. Fifteen subjects (5 PH patients, 10 healthy controls performed a submaximal supine exercise on a cycle ergometer after 5 min of rest. CO was continuously determined by MF (COMF. Kinetics of heart rate (HR, stroke volume (SV, and CO were determined with 3 monoexponential models. Results. In PH patients, we observed a sudden and transitory drop of SV upon exercise onset. This implied a transitory drop of CO whose adjustment to a new steady state depended on HR increase. The kinetics of HR and CO for PH patients was slower than that of controls for all models and for SV in model 1. SV kinetics was faster for PH patients in models 2 and 3. Conclusion. This is the first description of beat-by-beat cardiovascular adjustments upon exercise onset in PH. The kinetics of HR and CO appeared slower than those of healthy controls and there was a transitory drop of CO upon exercise onset in PH due to a sudden drop of SV.

  5. A computational model-based validation of Guyton's analysis of cardiac output and venous return curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, R.; Cohen, R. J.; Mark, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Guyton developed a popular approach for understanding the factors responsible for cardiac output (CO) regulation in which 1) the heart-lung unit and systemic circulation are independently characterized via CO and venous return (VR) curves, and 2) average CO and right atrial pressure (RAP) of the intact circulation are predicted by graphically intersecting the curves. However, this approach is virtually impossible to verify experimentally. We theoretically evaluated the approach with respect to a nonlinear, computational model of the pulsatile heart and circulation. We developed two sets of open circulation models to generate CO and VR curves, differing by the manner in which average RAP was varied. One set applied constant RAPs, while the other set applied pulsatile RAPs. Accurate prediction of intact, average CO and RAP was achieved only by intersecting the CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs because of the pulsatility and nonlinearity (e.g., systemic venous collapse) of the intact model. The CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs were also practically independent. This theoretical study therefore supports the validity of Guyton's graphical analysis.

  6. A computational model-based validation of Guyton's analysis of cardiac output and venous return curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, R.; Cohen, R. J.; Mark, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Guyton developed a popular approach for understanding the factors responsible for cardiac output (CO) regulation in which 1) the heart-lung unit and systemic circulation are independently characterized via CO and venous return (VR) curves, and 2) average CO and right atrial pressure (RAP) of the intact circulation are predicted by graphically intersecting the curves. However, this approach is virtually impossible to verify experimentally. We theoretically evaluated the approach with respect to a nonlinear, computational model of the pulsatile heart and circulation. We developed two sets of open circulation models to generate CO and VR curves, differing by the manner in which average RAP was varied. One set applied constant RAPs, while the other set applied pulsatile RAPs. Accurate prediction of intact, average CO and RAP was achieved only by intersecting the CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs because of the pulsatility and nonlinearity (e.g., systemic venous collapse) of the intact model. The CO and VR curves generated with pulsatile RAPs were also practically independent. This theoretical study therefore supports the validity of Guyton's graphical analysis.

  7. Corporate Social Performance: From Output Measurement to Impact Measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.E.H. Maas (Karen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAll organisations have social, environmental and economic impacts that effect people, their communities and the natural environment. Impacts include intended as well as unintended effects and negative as well as positive effects. Current practice in performance measurement tends to focus

  8. Corporate Social Performance: From Output Measurement to Impact Measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.E.H. Maas (Karen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAll organisations have social, environmental and economic impacts that effect people, their communities and the natural environment. Impacts include intended as well as unintended effects and negative as well as positive effects. Current practice in performance measurement tends to focus

  9. Compressive Phase Retrieval From Squared Output Measurements Via Semidefinite Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Ohlsson, Henrik; Dong, Roy; Sastry, S Shankar

    2011-01-01

    Given a linear system in a real or complex domain, linear regression aims to recover the model parameters from a set of observations. Recent studies in compressive sensing have successfully shown that under certain conditions, a linear program, namely, l1-minimization, guarantees recovery of sparse parameter signals even when the system is underdetermined. In this paper, we consider a more challenging problem: when the phase of the output measurements from a linear system is omitted. Using a lifting technique, we show that even though the phase information is missing, the sparse signal can be recovered exactly by solving a simple semidefinite program when the sampling rate is sufficiently high. This is an interesting finding since the exact solutions to both sparse signal recovery and phase retrieval are combinatorial. Besides, this also extends the type of applications that compressive sensing can be applied to those where only output magnitudes can be observed. We demonstrate the accuracy of the algorithms ...

  10. Adrenomedullin-epinephrine cotreatment enhances cardiac output and left ventricular function by energetically neutral mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Thor Allan; Kildal, Anders Benjamin; How, Ole-Jakob; Myrmel, Truls

    2012-04-15

    Adrenomedullin (AM) used therapeutically reduces mortality in the acute phase of experimental myocardial infarction. However, AM is potentially deleterious in acute heart failure as it is vasodilative and inotropically neutral. AM and epinephrine (EPI) are cosecreted from chromaffin cells, indicating a physiological interaction. We assessed the hemodynamic and energetic profile of AM-EPI cotreatment, exploring whether drug interaction improves cardiac function. Left ventricular (LV) mechanoenergetics were evaluated in 14 open-chest pigs using pressure-volume analysis and the pressure-volume area-myocardial O(2) consumption (PVA-MVo(2)) framework. AM (15 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1), n = 8) or saline (controls, n = 6) was infused for 120 min. Subsequently, a concurrent infusion of EPI (50 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1)) was added in both groups (AM-EPI vs. EPI). AM increased cardiac output (CO) and coronary blood flow by 20 ± 10% and 39 ± 14% (means ± SD, P < 0.05 vs. baseline), whereas controls were unaffected. AM-EPI increased CO and coronary blood flow by 55 ± 17% and 75 ± 16% (P < 0.05, AM-EPI interaction) compared with 13 ± 12% (P < 0.05 vs. baseline) and 18 ± 31% (P = not significant) with EPI. LV systolic capacitance decreased by -37 ± 22% and peak positive derivative of LV pressure (dP/dt(max)) increased by 32 ± 7% with AM-EPI (P < 0.05, AM-EPI interaction), whereas no significant effects were observed with EPI. Mean arterial pressure was maintained by AM-EPI and tended to decrease with EPI (+2 ± 13% vs. -11 ± 10%, P = not significant). PVA-MVo(2) relationships were unaffected by all treatments. In conclusion, AM-EPI cotreatment has an inodilator profile with CO and LV function augmented beyond individual drug effects and is not associated with relative increases in energetic cost. This can possibly take the inodilator treatment strategy beyond hemodynamic goals and exploit the cardioprotective effects of AM in acute heart failure.

  11. Effects of water immersion on cardiac output of lean and fat male subjects at rest and during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haffor, A S; Mohler, J G; Harrison, A C

    1991-02-01

    To investigate the combined effect of water immersion (WI) and lean body mass on cardiac output (Q), 12 healthy young men, 6 lean (fat less than 9%) and 6 fat (fat greater than 18%), were studied at rest and during steady state exercise approximating 30-40% Vo2 max under three experimental conditions. There were on land at 24 degrees C (LND), and immersed in water at 33-34 degrees C to hip level (HIP), and to the xiphoid (XIP). Metabolic measures were determined during 30-s periods from the average breath measurements. Mixed venous PCO2 (PVCO2) was estimated using rebreathing equilibration technique. Cardiac output was calculated by the indirect Fick's principle. In the lean individuals the average Q rose from a resting value of 5.43 +/- 0.43 (LND) to an exercise value of 7.25 +/- 0.40 L/min (XIP), and from resting value of 5.62 +/- 0.40 to an exercise 6.47 +/- 0.5 L/min in the fat individuals. During exercise, the associated increase in Q with increasing WI was significantly (p less than 0.05) higher compared with the land experiments. Inspection of the mean profile corresponding to this increase indicated that an increase in the level of immersion results in a significant (p less than 0.05) increase in the average Q for the lean group. For the fat group, the average Q was significantly (p less than 0.05) larger only at XIP level. At rest, heart rate dropped from 67 +/- 3.36 (LND) to 60 +/- 4.13 (XIP), and from 79 +/- 3.73 to 73 +/- 4.10 BPM for the lean and fat group, respectively. MANOVA analysis showed a significant (p less than 0.05) interaction between WI and group membership, indicating that the effect of WI is significantly different between the two groups. These data indicate that the change in central blood volume with WI depends, in part, on the lean mass of the body.

  12. Predictors of Post Pericardiotomy Low Cardiac Output Syndrome in Patients With Pericardial Effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabzi Feridoun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pathological involvement of pericardium by any disease that resulting in effusion may require decompression and pericardiectomy. The current article describes rare patients with effusion who after pericadiectomy and transient hemodynamic improvement rapidly developed progressive heart failure and subsequent multi organ failure.Methods: During periods of five years, 423 patients in our hospital underwent pericardiotomy for decompression of effusion. The clinical characteristics of those patient with postoperative low cardiac output (B group (14 cases recorded and compared with other patients without this postoperative complication (A group by test and X2. Significant variables in invariables (P≤0.1 entered in logistic regression analysis and odd ratio of these significant variables obtained. Results: Idiopathic pericardial effusion, malignancy, renal failure, connective tissue disease, viral pericarditis was found in 125 patients (27%, 105 patients (25.4%, 65 patients (15.6%, 50 (17.1% and 10 (2.4% of patients subsequently. The factors that predict post-operative death in logistic regression analysis were malignancy, radiotherapy, constrictive pericarditis inotropic drug using IABP using, pre-operative EF and pericardial calcification.Conclusion: Certain preoperative variables such as malignancy, radiotherapy, low EF, calcified pericardium and connective tissue disease are associated with POLCOS and post-operative risk of death. This paradoxical response to pericardial decompression may be more frequent than currently appreciated. Its cause may relate to the sudden removal of the chronic external ventricular support from the effusion or thicken pericardium resulting in ventricular dilatation and failure or intra operative myocardial injury due to pericardiectomy of calcified pericardium, radiation and cardiomyopathy.

  13. The thick left ventricular wall of the giraffe heart normalises wall tension, but limits stroke volume and cardiac output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smerup, Morten Holdgaard; Damkjær, Mads; Brøndum, Emil

    2016-01-01

    to calculate left ventricular wall stress. Cardiac output was also determined by inert gas rebreathing to provide an additional and independent estimate of stroke volume. Echocardiography and inert gas-rebreathing yielded similar cardiac outputs of 16.1±2.5 and 16.4±1.4 l min(-1), respectively. End......-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 521±61 ml and 228±42 ml, respectively, yielding an ejection fraction of 56±4% and a stroke volume of 0.59 ml kg(-1). Left ventricular circumferential wall stress was 7.83±1.76 kPa. We conclude that, relative to body mass, a small left ventricular cavity and a low stroke...

  14. Combined use of phenoxybenzamine and dopamine for low cardiac output syndrome in children at withdrawal from cardiopulmonary bypass.

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamura, M.; Minamikawa, O; Yokochi, H; Maki, S.; Yasuda, T.; Mizukawa, Y

    1980-01-01

    The combined use of phenoxybenzamine and dopamine was applied in infants and children when it was difficult to come off cardiopulmonary bypass for low cardiac output. The rationale of this method is to prevent the alpha-adrenergic action of dopamine by phenoxybenzamine and to encourage the beta-adrenergic and direct specific action of dopamine. Dopamine was used in dosage of 10 to 30 micrograms/kg per min after the additional administration of a half of the initial dosage of phenoxybenzamine;...

  15. 连续多普勒无创血液动力学监测仪(USCOM)在危重患者中的运用%The Application of Ultrasonic Cardiac Output Monitor In the Critically Ill Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨勤; 向明芳

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the cardiac output detected by ultrasonic cardiac output monitor(USCOM) and Thoracic Electrical Bioimpedance(TEB). Methods: The cardiac outputs of 40 critically ill patients were detected by USCOM and TEB simultaneously. Results: There was no significant difference of the cardiac output detected by USCOM and TEB(P>0.10), the correlation analysis showed a positive correlation between cardiac output measured with USCOM and TEB(correlation coefficient of CO: r=0.8427, correlation coefficient of SV: r=0.8392, P0.10);且两种监测方法测得的结果具有正相关性(CO相关系数 r=0.8427,SV相关系数 r=0.8392,P均<0.01).结论采用USCOM技术监测危重患者的心输出量具有无创、连续、简便、准确的特点.

  16. Low cardiac output predicts development of hepatorenal syndrome and survival in patients with cirrhosis and ascites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, A; Bendtsen, F; Henriksen, J H;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recent studies suggest that cardiac dysfunction precedes development of the hepatorenal syndrome. In this follow-up study, we aimed to investigate the relation between cardiac and renal function in patients with cirrhosis and ascites and the impact of cardiac systolic function...... on survival. Patients and DESIGN: Twenty-four patients with cirrhosis and ascites were included. Cardiac function was investigated by gated myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) for assessment of cardiac index (CI) and cardiac volumes. The renal function was assessed by determination of glomerular filtration...... (130 (SD 46) vs 78 (SD 29) mumol/l, pdeveloped hepatorenal syndrome type 1 within 3 months was higher in the group with low CI than in the high CI group (43% vs 5%, p = 0.04). Patients with the lowest CI (N = 8) had significantly poorer survival at 3, 9, and 12 months...

  17. Left ventricular outflow tract velocity time integral outperforms ejection fraction and Doppler-derived cardiac output for predicting outcomes in a select advanced heart failure cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Christina; Rubenson, David; Srivastava, Ajay; Mohan, Rajeev; Smith, Michael R; Billick, Kristen; Bardarian, Samuel; Thomas Heywood, J

    2017-07-03

    Left ventricular outflow tract velocity time integral (LVOT VTI) is a measure of cardiac systolic function and cardiac output. Heart failure patients with low cardiac output are known to have poor cardiovascular outcomes. Thus, extremely low LVOT VTI may predict heart failure patients at highest risk for mortality. Patients with heart failure and extremely low LVOT VTI were identified from a single-center database. Baseline characteristics and heart failure related clinical outcomes (death, LVAD) were obtained at 12 months. Correlation between clinical endpoints and the following variables were analyzed: ejection fraction (EF), pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP), NYHA class, renal function, Doppler cardiac output (CO), and LVOT VTI. Study cohort consisted of 100 patients. At the 12-month follow up period, 30 events (28 deaths, 2 LVADs) were identified. Occurrence of death and LVAD implantation was statistically associated with a lower LVOT VTI (p = 0.039) but not EF (p = 0.169) or CO (p = 0.217). In multivariate analysis, LVOT VTI (p = 0.003) remained statistically significant, other significant variables were age (p = 0.033) and PASP (p = 0.022). Survival analysis by LVOT VTI tertile demonstrated an unadjusted hazard ratio of 4.755 (CI 1.576-14.348, p = 0.006) for combined LVAD and mortality at one year. Extremely low LVOT VTI strongly predicts adverse outcomes and identifies patients who may benefit most from advanced heart failure therapies.

  18. Signal processing technique for non-invasive real-time estimation of cardiac output by inductance cardiography (thoracocardiography).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucklar, G B; Kaplan, V; Bloch, K E

    2003-05-01

    Inductance cardiography (thoracocardiography) non-invasively monitors changes in stroke volume by recording ventricular volume curves with an inductive plethysmographic transducer encircling the chest at the level of the heart. Clinical application of this method has been hampered, as data analysis has not been feasible in real time. Therefore a novel, real-time signal processing technique for inductance cardiography has been developed. Its essential concept consists in performance of multiple tasks by several, logically linked signal processing modules that have access to common databases. Based on these principles, a software application was designed that performs acquisition, display, filtering and ECG-triggered ensemble averaging of inductance signals and separates cardiogenic waveforms from noise related to respiration and other sources. The resulting ventricular volume curves are automatically analysed. Performance of the technique for monitoring cardiac output in real time was compared with thermodilution in four patients in an intensive care unit. The bias (mean difference) among 76 paired thoracocardiographic and thermodilution derived changes in cardiac output was 0%; limits of agreement (+/- 2 SD of the bias) were +/- 25%. It is concluded that the proposed signal processing technique for inductance cardiography holds promise for non-invasive, real-time estimation of changes in cardiac output.

  19. Blood-Pressure Measuring System Gives Accurate Graphic Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    The problem: To develop an instrument that will provide an external (indirect) measurement of arterial blood pressure in the form of an easily interpreted graphic trace that can be correlated with standard clinical blood-pressure measurements. From sphygmograms produced by conventional sphygmographs, it is very difficult to differentiate the systolic and diastolic blood-pressure pulses and to correlate these indices with the standard clinical values. It is nearly impossible to determine these indices when the subject is under physical or emotional stress. The solution: An electronic blood-pressure system, basically similar to conventional ausculatory sphygmomanometers, employing a standard occluding cuff, a gas-pressure source, and a gas-pressure regulator and valve. An electrical output transducer senses cuff pressure, and a microphone positioned on the brachial artery under the occluding cuff monitors the Korotkoff sounds from this artery. The output signals present the conventional systolic and diastolic indices in a clear, graphical display. The complete system also includes an electronic timer and cycle-control circuit.

  20. Cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography in the premature baboon: comparison with radiolabeled microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, J P; Morrow, W R; Gerstmann, D R; Taylor, A F; deLemos, R A

    1991-04-01

    Pulsed-Doppler echocardiography (PDE) is a useful noninvasive method for determining left ventricular output (LVO). However, despite increasingly widespread use in neonatal intensive care units, validation studies in prematures with cardiopulmonary disease are lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare radiolabeled microsphere (RLM) and PDE measurements of LVO, using the critically ill premature baboon as a model of the human neonate. Twenty-two paired RLM and PDE measurements of LVO were obtained in 14 animals between 3 and 24 h of age. Average PDE LVO was 152 ml/min/kg (range, 40-258 ml/min/kg) compared to 158 ml/min/kg (range, 67-278 ml/min/kg) measured by RLM. Linear regression analysis of the paired measurements showed good correlation with a slope near unity (gamma = 0.94x + 4.20, r = 0.91, SEE = 25.7 ml). We conclude that PDE determinations of LVO compare well with those measured by RLM in the premature baboon. PDE appears to provide a valid estimate of LVO and should be useful in human prematures with cardiopulmonary distress.

  1. Effect of hemorrhage on cardiac output, vasopressin, aldosterone, and diuresis during immersion in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Simanonok, K.; Bernauer, E. M.; Wade, C. E.; Keil, L. C.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to test the hypotesis that a reduction in blood volume would attenuate or eliminate immersion-induced increases in cardiac output (Q(sub co)) and urine excretion, and to investigate accompanying vasoactive and fluid-electrolyte hormonal responses. Eight men (19-23 yr) were supine during a 2-hr control period in air, and then sat for 5-hr test periods in air at 20 C (dry control, DC); water at 34.5 C (wet control, WC); and water (34.5 C) after hemorrhage (WH) of 14.8 plus or minus 0.3 percent of their blood volume. Blood volume was -11.6 plus or minus 0.6 percent at immersion (time 0). Mean (bar-X hrs 1-5) Q(sub co) was unchanged in WC (5.3 plus or minus 0.01 l/min) and in WH (4.5 plus or minus 0.1 l/min), but decreased (P less than 0.05) in DC to 3.6 plus or minus 0.1 l/min. Mean urine excretion rates were 1.0 plus or minus 0.2 ml/min for DC and 1.1 plus or minus 0.2 ml/min for WH; both were lower (P less than 0.05) than that for WC of 2.0 plus or minus 0.4 ml/min. Plasma (Na+) and (Osm) were unchanged in all experiments. Mean plasma vasopressin (PVP) (bar-X hrs 1-5) was 1.1 plus or minus 0.1 pg/ml in WC, and higher (P less than 0.05) in DC (2.1 plus or minus 0.2 pg/ml)and WH (2.1 plus or minus 0.1 pg/ml); it was unchanged during air and water test periods. Thus, hemorrhage attenuated the immersion-induced increase in Q(sub co), eliminated the WC diuresis, maintained plasma renin activity and PVP at DC levels and did not change immersion-induced aldosterone suppression; the osmotic diuresis during control immersion is apparently not due to either aldosterone suppression or vasopressin suppression.

  2. 脉搏指示连续心排血量监测技术救治重症胰腺炎并发急性呼吸窘迫综合征患儿二例%Pulse indicator continuous cardiac output measurement-guided treatment aids two pediatric patients with severe acute pancreatitis complicated with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜卫源; 王丽杰

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical value of the pulse indicator continuous cardiac output (PiCCO) system in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) complicated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).Method Two cases of SAP with ARDS were monitored using PiCCO during comprehensive management in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of Shengjing Hospital,China Medical University.To guide fluid management,the cardiac index (CI) was measured to assess cardiac function,the global end-diastolic volume index (GEDVI) was used to evaluate cardiac preload,and the extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) was used to evaluate the pulmonary edema.Result Case 1 was diagnosed with type L2 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (intermediate risk) and received the sixth maintenance phases of chemotherapy this time.After a 1-week dosage of chemotherapeutic drugs (pegaspargase and mitoxantrone),he suffered SAP combined with ARDS.Except comprehensive treatment (life supporting,antibiotic,etc.) and applying continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) to remove inflammatory mediators.PiCCO monitor was utilized to guide fluid management.During the early stage of PiCCO monitoring,the patient showed no significant manifestations of pulmonary edema in the bedside chest X-ray (bedside ultrasound showed left pleural effusion),and had an oxygenation index 223 mmHg (1 mmHg =0.133 kPa),GEDVI 450 ml/m2,and ELVWI 7 ml/kg.We increased cardiac output to increase tissue perfusion and dehydration speed of CVVHDF was set at 70 ml/h.Two hours later,GEDVI significantly increased to 600 ml/m2 and ELVWI significantly increased to 10 ml/kg,the oxygenation index declined to 155 mmHg,the bedside chest X-ray showed a significant decrease of permeability (right lung) and PEEP was adjusted to 5 cmH2O (1 cmH2O =0.098 kPa),indicating circulating overload.ARDS subsequently occurred,upon which the fluid infusion was halted,the dehydration rate of CVVHDF raised (adjusted to 100-200 ml/h).On day 3 in the

  3. Scalp congenital hemangioma with associated high-output cardiac failure in a premature infant: Case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sumedh S; Snelling, Brian M; Sur, Samir; Ramnath, Alexandra R; Bandstra, Emmalee S; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2017-02-01

    Introduction Scalp congenital hemangiomas (CHs) are rare vascular malformations among infants; they can be associated with an array of complications, including cardiac and cosmetic issues. Here, we report the endovascular treatment of a premature infant with a suspected large right parietal scalp hemangioma and associated high-output cardiac failure. Case description A two-day-old female premature infant (29 weeks gestational age; 1330 g birth weight) was referred by the neonatologists to our department for consultation and potential treatment of a large right parietal CH causing abrupt hypotension and high-output cardiac failure. Doppler ultrasound imaging at bedside revealed areas of arterial-venous shunting from the scalp and the presence of a superior sagittal sinus waveform, consistent with intracranial venous drainage. To alleviate cardiac dysfunction secondary to this lesion, trans-arterial embolization via n-butyl cyanoacrylate (nBCA) glue and deployment of detachable coils was performed via umbilical artery to occlude the right superficial temporal and occipital artery branches supplying the CH. Following treatment, the infant continued to require ventilator management, vasopressor support, and correction of coagulopathy, but by post-operative day two, her condition improved remarkably and the mass size began decreasing. The patient was discharged after a relatively uncomplicated subsequent 2½-month course in the neonatal intensive care unit. Conclusion Endovascular therapy proved effective and safe in treating cardiac failure associated with scalp CH, despite potential complications associated with neuro-interventional surgery in premature infants. Appropriate consideration in this patient population should be given to factors including blood loss, contrast use, radiation exposure, operative time, and possible intra-/post-operative complications.

  4. Effect of increased cardiac output on hepatic and intestinal microcirculatory blood flow, oxygenation, and metabolism in hyperdynamic murine septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuszies, Gerd; Radermacher, Peter; Vogt, Josef; Wachter, Ulrich; Weber, Sandra; Schoaff, Michael; Georgieff, Michael; Barth, Eberhard

    2005-10-01

    Septic shock-associated organ dysfunction is attributed to derangements of microcirculatory perfusion and/or impaired cellular oxygen utilization. The hepatosplanchnic organs are regarded to play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of sepsis-related organ failure. In a murine model of septic shock, we tested the hypothesis whether achieving normotensive, hyperdynamic hemodynamics characterized by a sustained increase in cardiac output would allow maintenance of regional microvascular perfusion and oxygenation and, thus, hepatic metabolic capacity. Prospective, controlled, randomized animal study. University animal research laboratory. Male C57Bl/6 mice. Fifteen hours after sham operation (n = 11) or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) (n = 9), mice were anesthetized, mechanically ventilated, and instrumented (central venous and left ventricular pressure-conductance catheter, portal vein and superior mesenteric artery ultrasound flow probes). Animals received continuous intravenous hydroxyethylstarch and norepinephrine to achieve normotensive and hyperdynamic hemodynamics, and glucose was infused to maintain normoglycemia. Measurements were recorded 18, 21, and 24 hrs post-CLP. In CLP mice, titration of hemodynamic targets were affiliated superior mesenteric artery and portal vein flow. Using a combined laser-Doppler flowmetry and remission spectrophotometry probe, we found well-maintained gut and liver capillary perfusion as well as intestinal microcirculatory hemoglobin oxygen saturation, whereas hepatic microcirculatory hemoglobin oxygen saturation was even increased. At 24 hrs post-CLP, the rate of de novo gluconeogenesis as derived from hepatic C-glucose isotope enrichment after continuous intravenous 1,2,3,4,5,6-C6-glucose infusion (condensation biosynthesis modeling after gas chromatography-mass spectrometry isotope measurements) was similar in the two experimental groups. During murine septic shock achieving normotensive hyperdynamic hemodynamics with fluid

  5. Accuracy and precision of minimally-invasive cardiac output monitoring in children: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suehiro, Koichi; Joosten, Alexandre; Murphy, Linda Suk-Ling; Desebbe, Olivier; Alexander, Brenton; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Cannesson, Maxime

    2016-10-01

    Several minimally-invasive technologies are available for cardiac output (CO) measurement in children, but the accuracy and precision of these devices have not yet been evaluated in a systematic review and meta-analysis. We conducted a comprehensive search of the medical literature in PubMed, Cochrane Library of Clinical Trials, Scopus, and Web of Science from its inception to June 2014 assessing the accuracy and precision of all minimally-invasive CO monitoring systems used in children when compared with CO monitoring reference methods. Pooled mean bias, standard deviation, and mean percentage error of included studies were calculated using a random-effects model. The inter-study heterogeneity was also assessed using an I(2) statistic. A total of 20 studies (624 patients) were included. The overall random-effects pooled bias, and mean percentage error were 0.13 ± 0.44 l min(-1) and 29.1 %, respectively. Significant inter-study heterogeneity was detected (P error (23.6 %). Significant residual heterogeneity remained after conducting sensitivity and subgroup analyses based on the various study characteristics. By meta-regression analysis, we found no independent effects of study characteristics on weighted mean difference between reference and tested methods. Although the pooled bias was small, the mean pooled percentage error was in the gray zone of clinical applicability. In the sub-group analysis, electrical cardiometry was the device that provided the most accurate measurement. However, a high heterogeneity between studies was found, likely due to a wide range of study characteristics.

  6. Protection of the ischaemic myocardium by L-propionylcarnitine: effects on the recovery of cardiac output after ischaemia and reperfusion, carnitine transport, and fatty acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, D J; Traxler, J; Schmidt, M; Noonan, J; Shug, A L

    1986-07-01

    The effects of L-propionylcarnitine on the recovery of cardiac contractile performance after global ischaemia and reperfusion were studied in isolated perfused rat hearts. The addition of either 5.5 or 11 mmol X litre-1 L-propionylcarnitine significantly improved the recovery of cardiac output, left ventricular pressure, and dP/dt after 90 min of ischaemia and 15 min of reperfusion. Myocardial adenosine triphosphate and creatine phosphate concentrations were significantly higher in the L-propionylcarnitine treated hearts than in controls, but the concentrations of long chain acyl carnitine and coenzyme A were unaffected. The protecting effects of L-propionylcarnitine were compared with those of L-carnitine and L-acetylcarnitine. A 11 mmol X litre-1 dose of L-propionylcarnitine and L-acetylcarnitine significantly improved the recovery of cardiac output after 90 min of ischaemia and 15 min of reperfusion, but L-carnitine did not. L-Propionylcarnitine was the most protective agent. The effects of these derivatives on L-3H-carnitine transport and 14C-palmitate oxidation were also measured. All of these derivatives competitively inhibited L-3H-carnitine transport in isolated cardiac myocytes, but L-propionylcarnitine was the most potent. Carnitine and L-propionylcarnitine stimulated palmitate oxidation in the homogenate, whereas L-acetylcarnitine inhibited it. In myocytes only L-propionylcarnitine affected palmitate oxidation. These data show that L-propionylcarnitine protects the ischaemic myocardium. Its protection is greater than that for L-carnitine or L-acetylcarnitine, and the difference in effectiveness may relate to the rate of transport into the cells and the effects on fatty acid utilisation.

  7. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36) but not (9-36) augments cardiac output during myocardial ischemia via a Frank-Starling mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwill, Adam G; Tune, Johnathan D; Noblet, Jillian N; Conteh, Abass M; Sassoon, Daniel; Casalini, Eli D; Mather, Kieren J

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the cardiovascular effects of GLP-1 (7-36) or (9-36) on myocardial oxygen consumption, function and systemic hemodynamics in vivo during normal perfusion and during acute, regional myocardial ischemia. Lean Ossabaw swine received systemic infusions of saline vehicle or GLP-1 (7-36 or 9-36) at 1.5, 3.0, and 10.0 pmol/kg/min in sequence for 30 min at each dose, followed by ligation of the left circumflex artery during continued infusion at 10.0 pmol/kg/min. Systemic GLP-1 (9-36) had no effect on coronary flow, blood pressure, heart rate or indices of cardiac function before or during regional myocardial ischemia. Systemic GLP-1 (7-36) exerted no cardiometabolic or hemodynamic effects prior to ischemia. During ischemia, GLP-1 (7-36) increased cardiac output by approximately 2 L/min relative to vehicle-controls (p = 0.003). This response was not diminished by treatment with the non-depolarizing ganglionic blocker hexamethonium. Left ventricular pressure-volume loops measured during steady-state conditions with graded occlusion of the inferior vena cava to assess load-independent contractility revealed that GLP-1 (7-36) produced marked increases in end-diastolic volume (74 ± 1 to 92 ± 5 ml; p = 0.03) and volume axis intercept (8 ± 2 to 26 ± 8; p = 0.05), without any change in the slope of the end-systolic pressure-volume relationship vs. vehicle during regional ischemia. GLP-1 (9-36) produced no changes in any of these parameters compared to vehicle. These findings indicate that short-term systemic treatment with GLP-1 (7-36) but not GLP-1 (9-36) significantly augments cardiac output during regional myocardial ischemia, via increases in ventricular preload without changes in cardiac inotropy.

  8. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac output from arterial pressure profiles during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonutto, G; Girardis, M; Tuniz, D; di Prampero, P E

    1995-01-01

    , MAPin, HR, PP, MAP are the above parameters at rest and during exercise, respectively. Also in this case, the coefficients f to 1 were determined by a computerized statistical method using Z* as the experimental reference. The values of Zcor so obtained allowed us to calculate SV from arterial pulse contour analysis as SVF = As.Z-1cor. The mean percentage error between the SVF obtained and the values simultaneously determined by PDE, was 10.0 (SD 8.7)%. It is concluded that the SV of the left ventricle, and hence cardiac output, can be determined during exercise from photoplethysmograph tracings with reasonable accuracy, provided that an initial estimate of SV at rest is made by means an independent high quality reference method.

  9. Evaluation of a novel integrated sensor system for synchronous measurement of cardiac vibrations and cardiac potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuo, Yindar; Tavakolian, Kouhyar; Kaminska, Bozena

    2011-08-01

    The measurement of human body vibrations as a result of heart beating, simultaneously with cardiac potentials have been demonstrated in past studies to bring additional value to diagnostic cardiology through the detection of irregularities in the mechanical movement of the heart. The equipment currently available to the medical community is either large and bulky or difficult to synchronize. To address this problem, a novel integrated sensor system has been developed to record cardiac vibration and cardiac potential simultaneously and synchronously from a single compact site on the chest. The developed sensor system is lightweight, small in size, and suitable for mounting on active moving patients. The sensor is evaluated for its adequacy in measuring cardiac vibrations and potentials. In this evaluation, 45 independent signal recording are studied from 15 volunteers, and the morphology of the recorded signals are analyzed qualitatively (by visual inspection) and quantitatively (by computational methods) against larger devices used in established cardiac vibration studies (reference devices). It is found that the cardiac vibration signals acquired by the integrated sensor has 92.37% and 81.76% identically identifiable systolic and diastolic cardiac complexes, respectively, when compared to the cardiac vibration signals recorded simultaneously from the reference device. Further, the cardiac potential signals acquired by the integrated sensor show a high correlation coefficient of 0.8912 and a high estimated signal-to-noise-ratio of 22.00 dB when compared to the reference electrocardiograph (non-standard leads) acquired through a common clinical machine. The results suggest that the tiny, wearable, integrated sensor system that synchronously measures cardiac vibrations and cardiac potentials may be practical for use as an alternative or assistive cardiac diagnostic tool.

  10. Low cardiac output syndrome in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery. Profile, differences in clinical course and prognosis. The ESBAGA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Vela, J L; Jiménez Rivera, J J; Alcalá Llorente, M Á; González de Marcos, B; Torrado, H; García Laborda, C; Fernández Zamora, M D; González Fernández, F J; Martín Benítez, J C

    2017-07-20

    An analysis is made of the clinical profile, evolution and differences in morbidity and mortality of low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery, according to the 3 diagnostic subgroups defined by the SEMICYUC Consensus 2012. A multicenter, prospective cohort study was carried out. ICUs of Spanish hospitals with cardiac surgery. A consecutive sample of 2,070 cardiac surgery patients was included, with the analysis of 137 patients with LCOS. No intervention was carried out. The mean patient age was 68.3±9.3 years (65.2% males), with a EuroSCORE II of 9.99±13. NYHA functional class III-IV (52.9%), left ventricular ejection fraction<35% (33.6%), AMI (31.9%), severe PHT (21.7%), critical preoperative condition (18.8%), prior cardiac surgery (18.1%), PTCA/stent placement (16.7%). According to subgroups, 46 patients fulfilled hemodynamic criteria of LCOS (group A), 50 clinical criteria (group B), and the rest (n=41) presented cardiogenic shock (group C). Significant differences were observed over the evolutive course between the subgroups in terms of time subjected to mechanical ventilation (114.4, 135.4 and 180.3min in groups A, B and C, respectively; P<.001), renal replacement requirements (11.4, 14.6 and 36.6%; P=.007), multiorgan failure (16.7, 13 and 47.5%), and mortality (13.6, 12.5 and 35.9%; P=.01). The mean maximum lactate concentration was higher in cardiogenic shock patients (P=.002). The clinical evolution of these patients leads to high morbidity and mortality. We found differences between the subgroups in terms of the postoperative clinical course and mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  11. The thick left ventricular wall of the giraffe heart normalises wall tension, but limits stroke volume and cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerup, Morten; Damkjær, Mads; Brøndum, Emil; Baandrup, Ulrik T; Kristiansen, Steen Buus; Nygaard, Hans; Funder, Jonas; Aalkjær, Christian; Sauer, Cathrine; Buchanan, Rasmus; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Østergaard, Kristine; Grøndahl, Carsten; Candy, Geoffrey; Hasenkam, J Michael; Secher, Niels H; Bie, Peter; Wang, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    Giraffes--the tallest extant animals on Earth--are renowned for their high central arterial blood pressure, which is necessary to secure brain perfusion. Arterial pressure may exceed 300 mmHg and has historically been attributed to an exceptionally large heart. Recently, this has been refuted by several studies demonstrating that the mass of giraffe heart is similar to that of other mammals when expressed relative to body mass. It thus remains unexplained how the normal-sized giraffe heart generates such massive arterial pressures. We hypothesized that giraffe hearts have a small intraventricular cavity and a relatively thick ventricular wall, allowing for generation of high arterial pressures at normal left ventricular wall tension. In nine anaesthetized giraffes (495±38 kg), we determined in vivo ventricular dimensions using echocardiography along with intraventricular and aortic pressures to calculate left ventricular wall stress. Cardiac output was also determined by inert gas rebreathing to provide an additional and independent estimate of stroke volume. Echocardiography and inert gas-rebreathing yielded similar cardiac outputs of 16.1±2.5 and 16.4±1.4 l min(-1), respectively. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 521±61 ml and 228±42 ml, respectively, yielding an ejection fraction of 56±4% and a stroke volume of 0.59 ml kg(-1). Left ventricular circumferential wall stress was 7.83±1.76 kPa. We conclude that, relative to body mass, a small left ventricular cavity and a low stroke volume characterizes the giraffe heart. The adaptations result in typical mammalian left ventricular wall tensions, but produce a lowered cardiac output.

  12. A minimally invasive monitoring system of cardiac output using aortic flow velocity and peripheral arterial pressure profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Kazunori; Kawada, Toru; Inagaki, Masashi; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2013-05-01

    In managing patients with unstable hemodynamics, monitoring cardiac output (CO) can provide critical diagnostic data. However, conventional CO measurements are invasive, intermittent, and/or inaccurate. The purpose of this study was to validate our newly developed CO monitoring system. This system automatically determines peak velocity of the ascending aortic flow using continuous-wave Doppler transthoracic echocardiography and estimates cardiac ejection time and aortic cross-sectional area using the pulse contour of the radial arterial pressure. These parameters are continuously processed to estimate CO (CO(est)). In 10 anesthetized closed-chest dogs instrumented with an aortic flowprobe to measure reference CO (CO(ref)), hemodynamic conditions were varied over wide ranges by infusing cardiovascular drugs or by random atrial pacing. Under each condition, CO(ref) and CO(est) were determined. Absolute changes of CO(ref) (ΔCOref) and CO(est) (ΔCO(est)), and relative changes of CO(ref) (%ΔCO(ref)) and CO(est) (%ΔCO(est)) from the corresponding baseline values were determined in each animal. We calibrated CO(est) against CO(ref) to obtain proportionally scaled CO(est) (CO(est)(N)). A total of 1335 datasets of CO(ref) and CO(est) were obtained, in which CO(ref) ranged from 0.17 to 5.34 L/min. Bland-Altman analysis between CO(ref) and CO(est) indicated that the limits of agreement (the bias ± 1.96 × SD of the difference) and the percentage error (1.96 × [SD of the difference]/[mean CO] × 100) were from -1.01 to 1.13 L/min (95% confidence interval, -1.76 to 1.88 L/min) and 43%, respectively. The agreement between CO(ref) and CO(est)(N) was improved, with limits of agreement from -0.53 to 0.49 L/min (95% confidence interval, -0.62 to 0.59 L/min) and the percentage error of 20%. Polar plot analysis between ΔCO(ref) and ΔCO(est) indicated that mean ± 1.96 × SD of polar angle was -2° ± 22°. Four quadrant plot analysis indicated that %ΔCO(est) correlated

  13. Noninvasive cardiac output monitoring during exercise testing: Nexfin pulse contour analysis compared to an inert gas rebreathing method and respired gas analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Sebastiaan A; Stok, Wim J; Bezemer, Rick; Boksem, Remco J; van Goudoever, Jeroen; Cherpanath, Thomas G V; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Westerhof, Berend E; Karemaker, John M; Ince, Can

    2011-10-01

    Exercise testing is often used to assess cardiac function during physical exertion to obtain diagnostic information. However, this procedure is limited to measuring the electrical activity of the heart using electrocardiography and intermittent blood pressure (BP) measurements and does not involve the continuous assessment of heart functioning. In this study, we compared continuous beat-to-beat pulse contour analysis to monitor noninvasive cardiac output (CO) during exercise with inert gas rebreathing and respired gas analysis. Nineteen healthy male volunteers were subjected to bicycle ergometry testing with increasing workloads. Cardiac output was deter- mined noninvasively by continuous beat-to-beat pulse contour analysis (Nexfin) and by inert gas rebreathing, and estimated using the respired gas analysis method. The effects of the rebreathing maneuver on heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), and CO were evaluated. The CO values derived from the Nexfin- and inert gas rebreathing methods were well correlated (r = 0.88, P gas analysis-derived CO values correlated even better (r = 0.94, P < 0.01) and the limits of agreement were 21.5% with a measurement bias of -0.70 ± 1.6 L/min. At rest, the rebreathing maneuver increased HR by 13 beats/min (P < 0.01), SV remained unaffected (P = 0.7), while CO increased by 1.0 L/min (P < 0.01). Rebreathing did not affect these parameters during exercise. Nexfin continuous beat-to-beat pulse contour analysis is an appropriate method for noninvasive assessment of CO during exercise.

  14. Combined use of phenoxybenzamine and dopamine for low cardiac output syndrome in children at withdrawal from cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, M; Minamikawa, O; Yokochi, H; Maki, S; Yasuda, T; Mizukawa, Y

    1980-04-01

    The combined use of phenoxybenzamine and dopamine was applied in infants and children when it was difficult to come off cardiopulmonary bypass for low cardiac output. The rationale of this method is to prevent the alpha-adrenergic action of dopamine by phenoxybenzamine and to encourage the beta-adrenergic and direct specific action of dopamine. Dopamine was used in dosage of 10 to 30 micrograms/kg per min after the additional administration of a half of the initial dosage of phenoxybenzamine; this was infused by drip always in a dosage of 0.5 to 1.0 mg/kg during the first half of cardiopulmonary bypass. It was possible to come off cardiopulmonary bypass with a stable haemodynamic state (mean arterial pressure more than 60 mmHg and total peripheral vascular resistance less than 2000 bynes s cm-5) and a good urinary output.

  15. Measuring coherence of output gaps with an application to the Euro area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mink, M.; Jacobs, J.P.A.M.; de Haan, J.

    2012-01-01

    If output gaps in a currency union are not sufficiently coherent, the common monetary policy will not be optimal for all countries or regions in the union. It is common practice to measure coherence of output gaps by a correlation coefficient. We propose new measures of output gap coherence, which t

  16. Distance measurements in cardiac troponin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C L; Leavis, P C

    1990-01-01

    Intramolecular distance measurements were made in cardiac troponin C (cTnC) by fluorescence energy transfer using Eu3+ or Tb3+ as energy donors and Nd3+ or an organic chromophore as acceptors. The laser-induced luminescence of bound Eu3+ is quenched in Eu1Nd1cTnC with a lifetime of 0.328 ms, compared with 0.43 ms for Eu2cTnC. The enhanced decay corresponds to an energy transfer efficiency of 0.25, or a distance of 1.1 nm between the two high affinity sites. We have also labeled cTnC with 4-dimethylaminophenylazophenyl-4'-maleimide (DAB-Mal) at the two cysteine residues (Cys-35 and Cys-84). Energy transfer measurements were carried out between Tb3+ bound to the high affinity sites and the labels attached to the domain containing the low affinity site. Upon uv irradiation at pH 6.7, Tb1cTnCDAB emits tyrosine-sensitized Tb3+ luminescence that decays bioexponentially with lifetimes of 1.29 and 0.76 ms. The shorter lifetime is ascribed to energy transfer from Tb3+ to the DAB labels, yielding an average distance of 3.4 nm between the donor and the acceptors. At pH 5.0, however, the luminescence decays exclusively with a single lifetime of 1.31 ms, suggesting that under these conditions all Tb3+ ions are more than 5.2 nm away from the label. Thus cTnC, like skeletal TnC, undergoes a pH-dependent conformational transition which converts an elongated structure at lower pH's to a rather compact conformation in a more physiological medium.

  17. GASTO CARDÍACO MATERNO COMO PREDICTOR DEL SÍNDROME DE PREECLAMPSIA-ECLAMPSIA / Maternal cardiac output as a predictor of preeclampsia-eclampsia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. Díaz Moreno

    2012-03-01

    approximately 30% of systolic volume. The research objective was to predict the onset of preeclampsia-eclampsia syndrome by identifying alterations in cardiac output. Methods: An observational, descriptive, longitudinal, analytical study of prospective cohort was performed, in which by echocardiography, the cardiac output in 31 pregnant women between weeks 11 and 13.6 of gestation was determined as the only value, and through prenatal monitoring, the presence or absence of preeclampsia-eclampsia syndrome was observed. Results: The follow-up of 31 pregnant women was achieved, to whom cardiac output was measured, with the following findings: a prevalence of disease of 12.9% with 64.5% of patients correctly diagnosed, with a sensitivity of 75%, positive predictive value of 23%, specificity of 62% and negative predictive value of 94% with a relative risk of 4.1 (95% confidence interval, 0.48 to 35.6. Conclusions: It is possible to establish cardiac output measurement as screening study to predict the onset of preeclampsia syndrome from prenatal care, thus contributing to the decline in maternal death.

  18. Output trends, characteristics, and measurements of three megavoltage radiotherapy linear accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Murshed

    2014-07-08

    The purpose of this study is to characterize and understand the long-term behavior of the output from megavoltage radiotherapy linear accelerators. Output trends of nine beams from three linear accelerators over a period of more than three years are reported and analyzed. Output, taken during daily warm-up, forms the basis of this study. The output is measured using devices having ion chambers. These are not calibrated by accredited dosimetry laboratory, but are baseline-compared against monthly output which is measured using calibrated ion chambers. We consider the output from the daily check devices as it is, and sometimes normalized it by the actual output measured during the monthly calibration of the linacs. The data show noisy quasi-periodic behavior. The output variation, if normalized by monthly measured "real' output, is bounded between ± 3%. Beams of different energies from the same linac are correlated with a correlation coefficient as high as 0.97, for one particular linac, and as low as 0.44 for another. These maximum and minimum correlations drop to 0.78 and 0.25 when daily output is normalized by the monthly measurements. These results suggest that the origin of these correlations is both the linacs and the daily output check devices. Beams from different linacs, independent of their energies, have lower correlation coefficient, with a maximum of about 0.50 and a minimum of almost zero. The maximum correlation drops to almost zero if the output is normalized by the monthly measured output. Some scatter plots of pairs of beam output from the same linac show band-like structures. These structures are blurred when the output is normalized by the monthly calibrated output. Fourier decomposition of the quasi-periodic output is consistent with a 1/f power law. The output variation appears to come from a distorted normal distribution with a mean of slightly greater than unity. The quasi-periodic behavior is manifested in the seasonally averaged output

  19. Bank output measurement in the euro area : A modified approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colangelo, A.; Inklaar, R.

    Banks do not charge explicit fees for many of the services they provide, bundling the service payment with the offered interest rates. This output therefore has to be imputed using estimates of the opportunity cost of funds. We argue that rather than using the single short-term, low-risk interest

  20. Prediction of Betavoltaic Battery Output Parameters Based on SEM Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.B. Yakimov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The approach for the prediction of betavoltaic battery output parameters based on EBIC investigations of semiconductor converters of beta-radiation energy into electric power is presented. Using this approach the parameters of battery based on porous Si are calculated. These parameters are compared with those of battery based on a planar Si p-n junction.

  1. Bank output measurement in the euro area : A modified approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colangelo, A.; Inklaar, R.

    2012-01-01

    Banks do not charge explicit fees for many of the services they provide, bundling the service payment with the offered interest rates. This output therefore has to be imputed using estimates of the opportunity cost of funds. We argue that rather than using the single short-term, low-risk interest ra

  2. Cardiac output, pulmonary artery pressure, and patent ductus arteriosus during therapeutic cooling after global hypoxia-ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugelseth, D; Satas, S; Steen, P A; Thoresen, M

    2003-05-01

    To assess by Doppler echocardiography the effects of 24 hours of whole body mild hypothermia compared with normothermia on cardiac output (CO), pulmonary artery pressure (PAP), and the presence of a persistent ductus arteriosus (PDA) after a global hypoxic-ischaemic insult in unsedated newborn animals. Thirty five pigs (mean (SD) age 26.6 (12.1) hours and weight 1.6 (0.3) kg) were anaesthetised with halothane, mechanically ventilated, and subjected to a 45 minute global hypoxic-ischaemic insult. At the end of hypoxia, halothane was stopped; the pigs were randomised to either normathermia (39 degrees C) or hypothermia (35 degrees C) for 24 hours. Rewarming was carried out for 24-30 hours followed by 42 hours of normothermia. Unanaesthetised pigs were examined with a VingMed CFM 750 ultrasound scanner before and 3, 24, 30, and 48 hours after the hypoxic-ischaemic insult. Aortic valve diameter, forward peak flow velocities across the four valves, and the occurrence of a PDA were measured. Tricuspid regurgitation (TR) velocity was used to estimate the PAP. Stroke volume was calculated from the aortic flow. Twelve animals (seven normothermic, five hypothermic) had a PDA on one or more examinations, which showed no association with cooling or severity of insult. There were no differences in stroke volume or TR velocity between the hypothermic and normothermic animals at any time point after the insult. CO was, however, 45% lower at the end of cooling in the subgroup of hypothermic pigs that had received a severe insult compared with the pigs with mild and moderate insults. CO and TR velocity were transiently increased three hours after the insult: 0.38 (0.08) v 0.42 (0.08) litres/min/kg (p = 0.007) for CO; 3.0 (0.42) v 3.4 (0.43) m/s (p Global hypoxia-ischaemia leads to similar transient increases in CO and estimated PAP in unsedated normothermic and hypothermic pigs. There were no signs of metabolic compromise in any subgroup, suggesting that 24 hours of mild

  3. Comparison of cardiac power output and exercise performance in patients with left ventricular assist devices, explanted (recovered) patients, and those with moderate to severe heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; George, Robert S; Donovan, Gay; Nunan, David; Henderson, Keiran; Bougard, Robert S; Yacoub, Magdi H; Birks, Emma J; Brodie, David A

    2010-06-15

    Peak cardiac power output (CPO), as a direct measurement of overall cardiac function, has been shown to be a most powerful predictor of prognosis for patients with chronic heart failure. The present study assessed CPO and exercise performance in patients implanted with a left ventricular assist device (LVAD), those explanted due to myocardial recovery, and those with moderate to severe heart failure. Hemodynamic and respiratory gas exchange measurements were undertaken at rest and at peak graded exercise. These were performed in 54 patients-20 with moderate to severe heart failure, 18 with implanted LVADs, and 16 with explanted LVADs. At rest there was a nonsignificant difference in CPO among groups (p >0.05). Peak CPO was significantly higher in the explanted LVAD than in the heart failure and implanted LVAD groups (heart failure 1.90 +/- 0.45 W, implanted LVAD 2.37 +/- 0.55 W, explanted LVAD 3.39 +/- 0.61 W, p <0.01) as was peak cardiac output (heart failure 9.1 +/- 2.1 L/min, implanted LVAD 12.4 +/- 2.2 L/min, explanted LVD 14.6 +/- 2.9 L/min, p <0.01). Peak oxygen consumption was higher in the explanted LVAD than in the heart failure and implanted LVAD groups (heart failure 15.8 +/- 4.1 ml/kg/min, implanted LVAD 19.8 +/- 5.8 ml/kg/min, explanted LVAD 28.2 +/- 5.0 ml/kg/min, p <0.05) as was anaerobic threshold (heart failure 11.2 +/- 1.9 ml/kg/min, implanted LVAD 14.7 +/- 4.9 ml/kg/min, explanted LVAD 21.4 +/- 5.0 ml/kg/min, p <0.05). In conclusion, peak CPO differentiates well during cardiac restoration using LVADs and emphasizes the benefits of this therapy. CPO has the potential to be a key physiologic marker of heart failure severity and can guide management of patients with LVAD.

  4. Plasma volume expansion does not increase maximal cardiac output or VO2 max in lowlanders acclimatized to altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, José A L; Rådegran, Göran; Boushel, Robert Christopher

    2004-01-01

    With altitude acclimatization, blood hemoglobin concentration increases while plasma volume (PV) and maximal cardiac output (Qmax) decrease. This investigation aimed to determine whether reduction of Qmax at altitude is due to low circulating blood volume (BV). Eight Danish lowlanders (3 females, 5...... males: age 24.0 +/- 0.6 yr; mean +/- SE) performed submaximal and maximal exercise on a cycle ergometer after 9 wk at 5,260 m altitude (Mt. Chacaltaya, Bolivia). This was done first with BV resulting from acclimatization (BV = 5.40 +/- 0.39 liters) and again 2-4 days later, 1 h after PV expansion with 1...... level Qmax and exercise capacity were restored with hyperoxia at altitude independently of BV. Low BV is not a primary cause for reduction of Qmax at altitude when acclimatized. Furthermore, hemodilution caused by PV expansion at altitude is compensated for by increased systemic O2 extraction...

  5. A Review of Intraoperative Goal-Directed Therapy Using Arterial Waveform Analysis for Assessment of Cardiac Output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Mehta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence shows that goal-directed hemodynamic management can improve outcomes in surgical and intensive care settings. Arterial waveform analysis is one of the different techniques used for guiding goal-directed therapy. Multiple proprietary systems have developed algorithms for obtaining cardiac output from an arterial waveform, including the FloTrac, LiDCO, and PiCCO systems. These systems vary in terms of how they analyze the arterial pressure waveform as well as their requirements for invasive line placement and calibration. Although small-scale clinical trials using these monitors show promising data, large-scale multicenter trials are still needed to better determine how intraoperative goal-directed therapy with arterial waveform analysis can improve patient outcomes. This review provides a comparative analysis of the different arterial waveform monitors for intraoperative goal-directed therapy.

  6. A review of intraoperative goal-directed therapy using arterial waveform analysis for assessment of cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Neil; Fernandez-Bustamante, Ana; Seres, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that goal-directed hemodynamic management can improve outcomes in surgical and intensive care settings. Arterial waveform analysis is one of the different techniques used for guiding goal-directed therapy. Multiple proprietary systems have developed algorithms for obtaining cardiac output from an arterial waveform, including the FloTrac, LiDCO, and PiCCO systems. These systems vary in terms of how they analyze the arterial pressure waveform as well as their requirements for invasive line placement and calibration. Although small-scale clinical trials using these monitors show promising data, large-scale multicenter trials are still needed to better determine how intraoperative goal-directed therapy with arterial waveform analysis can improve patient outcomes. This review provides a comparative analysis of the different arterial waveform monitors for intraoperative goal-directed therapy.

  7. Output-Only Identification of System Parameters from Noisy Measurements by Multiwavelet Denoising

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we estimate the parameters of a multidimensional system from a record of noisy output measurements by using a multiwavelet denoising technique. In this output-only identification scheme, we extend wavelet denoising methods to the multiwavelet case. After the noise has been removed from the output records by wavelet methods, either full model identification or deterministic subspace identification can be performed. In the former case, full information on the system such as modal ...

  8. Z factor: a new index for measuring academic research output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Min

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With rapid progress in scientific research activities and growing competition for funding resources, it becomes critical to effectively evaluate an individual researcher's annual academic performance, or their cumulative performance within the last 3–5 years. It is particularly important for young independent investigators, and is also useful for funding agencies when determining the productivity and quality of grant awardees. As the funding becomes increasingly limited, having an unbiased method of measuring recent performance of an individual scientist is clearly needed. Here I propose the Z factor, a new and useful way to measure recent academic performance.

  9. Effects of ventilation on cardiac output determined by inert gas rebreathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Morten; Norsk, Peter

    2005-01-01

    had no effects. CO was 1.0 +/- 0.2 l min(-1) higher when, rebreathing was performed after a forced expiration than following a normal tidal expiration. Serial determinations of CO required a 3-min interval between the measurements to avoid effects of recirculation of N(2)O. Changing RF from 15 to 30...... breaths min(-1) or adding serial dead space by up to 600 ml did not affect the determination of CO. In conclusion, the rebreathing procedure for determination of CO at rest should be performed following a normal tidal expiration with a rebreathing bag volume of between 1.5 and 2.5 l and with manoeuvres...

  10. Plasma volume expansion does not increase maximal cardiac output or VO2 max in lowlanders acclimatized to altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calbet, José A L; Rådegran, Göran; Boushel, Robert; Søndergaard, Hans; Saltin, Bengt; Wagner, Peter D

    2004-09-01

    With altitude acclimatization, blood hemoglobin concentration increases while plasma volume (PV) and maximal cardiac output (Qmax) decrease. This investigation aimed to determine whether reduction of Qmax at altitude is due to low circulating blood volume (BV). Eight Danish lowlanders (3 females, 5 males: age 24.0 +/- 0.6 yr; mean +/- SE) performed submaximal and maximal exercise on a cycle ergometer after 9 wk at 5,260 m altitude (Mt. Chacaltaya, Bolivia). This was done first with BV resulting from acclimatization (BV = 5.40 +/- 0.39 liters) and again 2-4 days later, 1 h after PV expansion with 1 liter of 6% dextran 70 (BV = 6.32 +/- 0.34 liters). PV expansion had no effect on Qmax, maximal O2 consumption (VO2), and exercise capacity. Despite maximal systemic O2 transport being reduced 19% due to hemodilution after PV expansion, whole body VO2 was maintained by greater systemic O2 extraction (P VO2 during exercise regardless of PV. Pulmonary ventilation, gas exchange, and acid-base balance were essentially unaffected by PV expansion. Sea level Qmax and exercise capacity were restored with hyperoxia at altitude independently of BV. Low BV is not a primary cause for reduction of Qmax at altitude when acclimatized. Furthermore, hemodilution caused by PV expansion at altitude is compensated for by increased systemic O2 extraction with similar peak muscular O2 delivery, such that maximal exercise capacity is unaffected.

  11. Evaluation of a morphological filter in mean cardiac output determination: application to left ventricular assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Michael Charles; Bradley, Andrew P; Wilson, Stephen J; Mason, David Glen

    2013-08-01

    A morphological filter (MF) is presented for the determination of beat-to-beat mean rotary left ventricular assist device (LVAD) flow rate, measured using an implanted flow probe. The performance of this non-linear filter was assessed using LVAD flow rate (QLVAD) data sets obtained from in silico and in vivo sources. The MF was compared with a third-order Butterworth filter (BWF) and a 10-s moving average filter (MAF). Performance was assessed by calculating the response time and steady state error across a range of heart rates and levels of noise. The response time of the MF was 3.5 times faster than the MAF, 0.5 s slower than the BWF, and had a steady state error of 2.61 %. It completely removed pulsatile signal components caused by residual ventricular function, and tracked sharp transient changes in QLVAD better than the BWF. The use of a two-stage MF improved the noise immunity compared to the single-stage MF. This study showed that the good performance characteristics of the non-linear MF make it a more suitable candidate for embedded real-time processing of QLVAD than linear filters.

  12. Estimation of cardiac output and total peripheral resistance in preterm infants by arterial waveform analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Chan, Gregory S H; Tracy, Mark B; Hinder, Murray; Redmond, Stephen J; Savkin, Andrey V; Lovell, Nigel H

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether arterial blood pressure waveform analysis could be useful for estimating left ventricular outflow (LVO) and total peripheral resistance (TPR) in preterm infants. A cohort of 27 infants were studied, with 89 measurements of left ventricular outflow (LVO) using Doppler echocardiography and arterial pressure using catheters, performed in 0, 12, 24 and 36 hours after birth. TPR was computed as mean arterial pressure divided by LVO. The diastolic decay rate (1/τ) was obtained via fitting an exponential function to the last one third of each arterial pulse, with the mean rate computed from 50 pulses selected from each infant. This decay rate was considered to be inversely related to TPR while positively related to LVO. The results of regression analysis have confirmed that the diastolic decay rate had significant positive and negative relationships with LVO and TPR respectively(r = 0.383, P = 0.0002 and r = -0.379, P = 0.0002 respectively). These preliminary results demonstrated the potential utility of arterial pressure waveform analysis for estimating LVO and TPR in preterm infants, but more advanced multi-parameter models may be needed to improve accuracy of the estimation.

  13. Cardiac MR Elastography: Comparison with left ventricular pressure measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samani Abbas

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose of study To compare magnetic resonance elastography (MRE with ventricular pressure changes in an animal model. Methods Three pigs of different cardiac physiology (weight, 25 to 53 kg; heart rate, 61 to 93 bpm; left ventricular [LV] end-diastolic volume, 35 to 70 ml were subjected to invasive LV pressure measurement by catheter and noninvasive cardiac MRE. Cardiac MRE was performed in a short-axis view of the heart and applying a 48.3-Hz shear-wave stimulus. Relative changes in LV-shear wave amplitudes during the cardiac cycle were analyzed. Correlation coefficients between wave amplitudes and LV pressure as well as between wave amplitudes and LV diameter were determined. Results A relationship between MRE and LV pressure was observed in all three animals (R2 ≥ 0.76. No correlation was observed between MRE and LV diameter (R2 ≤ 0.15. Instead, shear wave amplitudes decreased 102 ± 58 ms earlier than LV diameters at systole and amplitudes increased 175 ± 40 ms before LV dilatation at diastole. Amplitude ratios between diastole and systole ranged from 2.0 to 2.8, corresponding to LV pressure differences of 60 to 73 mmHg. Conclusion Externally induced shear waves provide information reflecting intraventricular pressure changes which, if substantiated in further experiments, has potential to make cardiac MRE a unique noninvasive imaging modality for measuring pressure-volume function of the heart.

  14. Fetal cardiac ventricular volume, cardiac output, and ejection fraction determined with four-dimensional ultrasound using Spatio-Temporal Image Correlation (STIC) and Virtual Organ Computed-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL™)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Neil; Yeo, Lami; Romero, Roberto; Hassan, Sonia S.; Myers, Stephen A.; Mittal, Pooja; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Balasubramaniam, Mamtha; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Vaisbuch, Edi; Espinoza, Jimmy; Gotsch, Francesca; Goncalves, Luis F.; Lee, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    Objective To quantify fetal cardiovascular parameters with Spatio-Temporal Image Correlation (STIC) and Virtual Organ Computed-aided AnaLysis (VOCAL™) utilizing the sub-feature: “Contour Finder: Trace”. Study Design A cross-sectional study was designed consisting of patients with normal pregnancies between 19 and 40 weeks of gestation. After STIC datasets were acquired, analysis was performed offline (4DView) and the following cardiovascular parameters were evaluated: ventricular volume in end systole and end diastole, stroke volume, cardiac output, and ejection fraction. To account for fetal size, cardiac output was also expressed as a function of head circumference, abdominal circumference, or femoral diaphysis length. Regression models were fitted for each cardiovascular parameter to assess the effect of gestational age and paired comparisons were made between the left and right ventricles. Results 1) Two hundred and seventeen patients were retrospectively identified, of whom 184 had adequate STIC datasets (85% acceptance); 2) ventricular volume, stroke volume, cardiac output, and adjusted cardiac output increased with gestational age; whereas, the ejection fraction decreased as gestation advanced; 3) the right ventricle was larger than the left in both systole (Right: 0.50 ml, IQR: 0.2 – 0.9; vs. Left: 0.27 ml, IQR: 0.1 – 0.5; p<0.001) and diastole (Right: 1.20 ml, IQR: 0.7 – 2.2; vs. Left: 1.03 ml, IQR: 0.5 – 1.7; p<0.001); 4) there were no differences between the left and right ventricle with respect to stroke volume, cardiac output, or adjusted cardiac output; and 5) the left ventricular ejection fraction was greater than the right (Left: 72.2%, IQR: 64 – 78; vs. Right: 62.4%, IQR: 56 – 69; p<0.001). Conclusion Fetal echocardiography, utilizing STIC and VOCAL™ with the sub-feature: “Contour Finder: Trace”, allows assessment of fetal cardiovascular parameters. Normal fetal cardiovascular physiology is characterized by ventricular

  15. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Increases Cardiac Output, Bradyarrhythmias, and Parasympathetic Tone in Aged Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute air pollutant inhalation is linked to adverse cardiac events and death, and hospitalizations for heart failure. Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major air pollutant suspected to exacerbate preexisting cardiac conditions, in part, through autonomic and electrophysiologic disturbance...

  16. Input-output relations in biological systems: measurement, information and the Hill equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Steven A

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems produce outputs in response to variable inputs. Input-output relations tend to follow a few regular patterns. For example, many chemical processes follow the S-shaped Hill equation relation between input concentrations and output concentrations. That Hill equation pattern contradicts the fundamental Michaelis-Menten theory of enzyme kinetics. I use the discrepancy between the expected Michaelis-Menten process of enzyme kinetics and the widely observed Hill equation pattern of biological systems to explore the general properties of biological input-output relations. I start with the various processes that could explain the discrepancy between basic chemistry and biological pattern. I then expand the analysis to consider broader aspects that shape biological input-output relations. Key aspects include the input-output processing by component subsystems and how those components combine to determine the system's overall input-output relations. That aggregate structure often imposes strong regularity on underlying disorder. Aggregation imposes order by dissipating information as it flows through the components of a system. The dissipation of information may be evaluated by the analysis of measurement and precision, explaining why certain common scaling patterns arise so frequently in input-output relations. I discuss how aggregation, measurement and scale provide a framework for understanding the relations between pattern and process. The regularity imposed by those broader structural aspects sets the contours of variation in biology. Thus, biological design will also tend to follow those contours. Natural selection may act primarily to modulate system properties within those broad constraints.

  17. Cardiac output monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal, Eric. E. C.; Wappler, Frank; Buhre, Wolfgang F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review The primary goal of hemodynamic therapy is the prevention of inadequate tissue perfusion and inadequate oxygenation. Advanced cardiovascular monitoring is a prerequisite to optimize hemodynamic treatment in critically ill patients prone to cardiocirculatory failure. The most ideal

  18. Flow measurements in cardiac MRI; Flussmessungen in der kardialen MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotz, J. [Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Hannover (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    Phase-contrast flow measurements have become an established method in cardiac MRI. The quantification of intra- and extracardiac shunt volumes as well as the evaluation of valvular disease and aortic coarctation have proved their clinical usefulness. There are some rules that have to be followed when performing and analyzing phase-contrast flow measurements. With these rules in mind, quantitative phase-contrast flow measurements are a reliable and precise method for clinical use of cardiac MRI. (orig.) [German] Flussmessungen gehoeren zum Standardrepertoire der MRT des Herzens. Dabei stehen die Quantifizierungen intra- und extrakardialer Shuntvolumina sowie von Klappenvitien im Vordergrund. Aber auch die Abschaetzung von Stenosen, beispielsweise des Aortenisthmus v. a. ueber einen assoziierten Kollateralfluss, sind klinisch akzeptiert. Bei der Planung und Auswertung einer Phasenkontrastflussmessung muessen einige Regeln beachtet werden, um fehlerhafte Ergebnisse zu vermeiden. Dann aber ist die Phasenkontrastflussmessung eine wertvolle Ergaenzung fuer die taegliche Routine in der Herzbildgebung. (orig.)

  19. High-sensitive cardiac troponin T measurements in prediction of non-cardiac complications after major abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordzij, P G; van Geffen, O; Dijkstra, I M; Boerma, D; Meinders, A J; Rettig, T C D; Eefting, F D; van Loon, D; van de Garde, E M W; van Dongen, E P A

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative non-cardiac complication rates are as high as 11-28% after high-risk abdominal procedures. Emerging evidence indicates that postoperative cardiac troponin T elevations are associated with adverse outcome in non-cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between postoperative high-sensitive cardiac troponin T elevations and non-cardiac complications in patients after major abdominal surgery. This prospective observational single-centre cohort study included patients at risk for coronary artery disease undergoing elective major abdominal surgery. Cardiac troponin was measured before surgery and at day 1, 3, and 7. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to examine the adjusted association for different cut-off concentrations of postoperative myocardial injury and non-cardiac outcome. In 203 patients, 690 high-sensitive cardiac troponin T measurements were performed. Fifty-three patients (26%) had a non-cardiac complication within 30 days after surgery. Hospital mortality was 4% (8/203). An increase in cardiac troponin T concentration ≥100% compared with baseline was a superior independent predictor of non-cardiac postoperative clinical complications (adjusted odds ratio 4.3, 95% confidence interval 1.8-10.1, Pcardiac troponin T increase ≥100% is a strong predictor of non-cardiac 30 day complications, increased hospital stay and hospital mortality in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery. NCT02150486. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The effect of intermittent intraabdominal pressure elevations and low cardiac output on the femoral to carotid arterial blood pressure difference in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksakal, Devrim; Hückstädt, Thomas; Richter, Steffen; Klitscher, Daniela; Wowra, Tobias; Schier, Felix; Wessel, Lucas M; Kubiak, Rainer

    2016-11-01

    Our previous work in a laparoscopic setting in piglets revealed that the systolic femoral artery pressure was approximately 5 % higher than its carotid counterpart, whereas the mean and diastolic values showed no significant difference. This remained idem when the intraabdominal pressure (IAP) was gradually increased. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of (1) intermittent IAP elevations and (2) a low cardiac output (CO) on the blood pressure (BP) difference cranially (carotid artery) and caudally (femoral artery) of a capnoperitoneum (ΔP = P a fem-P a carot). A total of twenty-two piglets (mean body weight 11.0 kg; range 8.9-13.3 kg) were studied. Of these, 14 underwent intermittent IAP elevations at 8 and 16 mmHg, and ΔP was measured. In another 8 piglets, a model of reduced CO was created by introducing an air embolism (2 ml/kg over 30 s) in the inferior caval vein (VCI) at 12 mmHg IAP to further assess the influence of this variable on ΔP. Systolic ΔP remained at a mean of 5.6 mmHg and was not significantly affected by insufflation or exsufflation up to an IAP of 16 mmHg. Diastolic and mean values showed no differences between P a carot and P a fem. P a fem, systol remained higher than its carotid counterpart as long as the cardiac index (CI) was above 1.5 l/min/m(2), but fell significantly below P a carot, systol at a low CI. There was no CO-dependent effect on diastolic and mean ΔP. Repeated IAP elevations do not significantly influence ΔP. Intermittent IAP elevations do not significantly influence ΔP. Despite of a CO-dependent inversion of systolic ΔP, mean BP measurements at the leg during laparoscopy remain representative even at low CO values.

  1. Prophylactic levosimendan for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome and mortality in paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Johanna; Rücker, Gerta; Stiller, Brigitte

    2017-08-02

    Low cardiac output syndrome remains a serious complication, and accounts for substantial morbidity and mortality in the postoperative course of paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. Standard prophylactic and therapeutic strategies for low cardiac output syndrome are based mainly on catecholamines, which are effective drugs, but have considerable side effects. Levosimendan, a calcium sensitiser, enhances the myocardial function by generating more energy-efficient myocardial contractility than achieved via adrenergic stimulation with catecholamines. Thus potentially, levosimendan is a beneficial alternative to standard medication for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome in paediatric patients after open heart surgery. To review the efficacy and safety of the postoperative prophylactic use of levosimendan for the prevention of low cardiac output syndrome and mortality in paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. We identified trials via systematic searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and Web of Science, as well as clinical trial registries, in June 2016. Reference lists from primary studies and review articles were checked for additional references. We only included randomised controlled trials (RCT) in our analysis that compared prophylactic levosimendan with standard medication or placebo, in infants and children up to 18 years of age, who were undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias according to a pre-defined protocol. We obtained additional information from all but one of the study authors of the included studies. We used the five GRADE considerations (study limitations, consistency of effect, imprecision, indirectness, and publication bias) to assess the quality of evidence from the studies that contributed data to the meta-analyses for the prespecified outcomes. We created a 'Summary of findings' table to

  2. Measurement of dynamic gas disengagement profile by using an analog output level gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkilineni, S.; Koelle, M.; Xu, H.

    The dynamic gas disengagement profile was measured in a 0.14 m diameter and 3.66 m high plexiglas column by using an analog output gauge, which was connected to a data acquisition system. This analog output gauge is a high accuracy continuous measurement level gauge. It is made up of a wave guide, a float, a motion or stress sensing device and a probe housing. The fluid level at any gas velocity is obtained by using the data acquisition system. The dynamic gas disengagement profile produced one slope in the bubble flow and two slopes in the churn turbulent flow representing unimodal and bimodal distributions of bubbles.

  3. Optimal Tracking Control of Unknown Discrete-Time Linear Systems Using Input-Output Measured Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiumarsi, Bahare; Lewis, Frank L; Naghibi-Sistani, Mohammad-Bagher; Karimpour, Ali

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an output-feedback solution to the infinite-horizon linear quadratic tracking (LQT) problem for unknown discrete-time systems is proposed. An augmented system composed of the system dynamics and the reference trajectory dynamics is constructed. The state of the augmented system is constructed from a limited number of measurements of the past input, output, and reference trajectory in the history of the augmented system. A novel Bellman equation is developed that evaluates the value function related to a fixed policy by using only the input, output, and reference trajectory data from the augmented system. By using approximate dynamic programming, a class of reinforcement learning methods, the LQT problem is solved online without requiring knowledge of the augmented system dynamics only by measuring the input, output, and reference trajectory from the augmented system. We develop both policy iteration (PI) and value iteration (VI) algorithms that converge to an optimal controller that require only measuring the input, output, and reference trajectory data. The convergence of the proposed PI and VI algorithms is shown. A simulation example is used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  4. Comparing the accuracy of ES-BC, EIS-GS, and ES Oxi on body composition, autonomic nervous system activity, and cardiac output to standardized assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis JE

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available John E Lewis1, Stacey L Tannenbaum1, Jinrun Gao3, Angelica B Melillo1, Evan G Long1, Yaima Alonso2, Janet Konefal1, Judi M Woolger2, Susanna Leonard1, Prabjot K Singh1, Lawrence Chen1, Eduard Tiozzo1 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 2Department of Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, 3State Farm Insurance, Bloomington, IL, USA Background and purpose: The Electro Sensor Complex (ESC is software that combines three devices using bioelectrical impedance, galvanic skin response, and spectrophotometry: (1 ES-BC (Electro Sensor-Body Composition; LD Technology, Miami, FL to assess body composition, (2 EIS-GS (Electro Interstitial Scan-Galvanic Skin; LD Technology to predict autonomic nervous system activity, and (3 ES Oxi (Electro Sensor Oxi; LD Technology to assess cardiac output. The objective of this study was to compare each to a standardized assessment: ES-BC to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, EIS-GS to heart rate variability, and ES Oxi to BioZ Dx Diagnostic System (BioZ Dx; SonoSite Inc, Bothell, WA. Patients and methods: The study was conducted in two waves. Fifty subjects were assessed for body composition and autonomic nervous system activity. Fifty-one subjects were assessed for cardiac output. Results: We found adequate relative and absolute agreement between ES-BC and DXA for fat mass (r = 0.97, P < 0.001 with ES-BC overestimating fat mass by 0.1 kg and for body fat percentage (r = 0.92, P < 0.001 with overestimation of fat percentage by 0.4%. For autonomic nervous system activity, we found marginal relative agreement between EIS-GS and heart rate variability by using EIS-GS as the predictor in a linear regression equation (adjusted R2 = 0.56, P = 0.03. For cardiac output, adequate relative and absolute agreement was found between ES Oxi and BioZ Dx at baseline (r = 0.60, P < 0.001, after the first exercise stage (r = 0.79, P < 0.001, and after the second exercise stage (r = 0.86, P

  5. Identification of Nonlinear Nonautonomous State Space Systems from Input-Output Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdult, Vincent; Verhaegen, Michel; Scherpen, Jacquelien

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a method to determine a nonlinear state space model from a finite number of measurements of the inputs and outputs. The method is based on embedding theory for nonlinear systems, and can be viewed as an extension of the subspace identification method for linear systems. The paper

  6. Substrate stiffness-regulated matrix metalloproteinase output in myocardial cells and cardiac fibroblasts: implications for myocardial fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Zhang, Quanyou; Zhu, Ting; Zhang, Yanyan; Liu, Bailin; Xu, Jianwen; Zhao, Hucheng

    2014-06-01

    Cardiac fibrosis, an important pathological feature of structural remodeling, contributes to ventricular stiffness, diastolic dysfunction, arrhythmia and may even lead to sudden death. Matrix stiffness, one of the many mechanical factors acting on cells, is increasingly appreciated as an important mediator of myocardial cell behavior. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates were fabricated with different stiffnesses to mimic physiological and pathological heart tissues, and the way in which the elastic modulus of the substrate regulated matrix-degrading gelatinases in myocardial cells and cardiac fibroblasts was explored. Initially, an increase in cell spreading area was observed, concomitant with the increase in PDMS stiffness in both cells. Later, it was demonstrated that the MMP-2 gene expression and protein activity in myocardial cells and cardiac fibroblasts can be enhanced with an increase in PDMS substrate stiffness and, moreover, such gene- and protein-related increases had a significant linear correlation with the elastic modulus. In comparison, the MMP-9 gene and protein expressions were up-regulated in cardiac fibroblasts only, not in myocardial cells. These results implied that myocardial cells and cardiac fibroblasts in the myocardium could sense the stiffness in pathological fibrosis and showed a differential but positive response in the expression of matrix-degrading gelatinases when exposed to an increased stiffening of the matrix in the microenvironment. The phenomenon of cells sensing pathological matrix stiffness can help to increase understanding of the mechanism underlying myocardial fibrosis and may ultimately lead to planning cure strategies.

  7. Aortic and Hepatic Contrast Enhancement During Hepatic-Arterial and Portal Venous Phase Computed Tomography Scanning: Multivariate Linear Regression Analysis Using Age, Sex, Total Body Weight, Height, and Cardiac Output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takanori; Nakaura, Takeshi; Funama, Yoshinori; Higaki, Toru; Kiguchi, Masao; Imada, Naoyuki; Sato, Tomoyasu; Awai, Kazuo

    We evaluated the effect of the age, sex, total body weight (TBW), height (HT) and cardiac output (CO) of patients on aortic and hepatic contrast enhancement during hepatic-arterial phase (HAP) and portal venous phase (PVP) computed tomography (CT) scanning. This prospective study received institutional review board approval; prior informed consent to participate was obtained from all 168 patients. All were examined using our routine protocol; the contrast material was 600 mg/kg iodine. Cardiac output was measured with a portable electrical velocimeter within 5 minutes of starting the CT scan. We calculated contrast enhancement (per gram of iodine: [INCREMENT]HU/gI) of the abdominal aorta during the HAP and of the liver parenchyma during the PVP. We performed univariate and multivariate linear regression analysis between all patient characteristics and the [INCREMENT]HU/gI of aortic- and liver parenchymal enhancement. Univariate linear regression analysis demonstrated statistically significant correlations between the [INCREMENT]HU/gI and the age, sex, TBW, HT, and CO (all P linear regression analysis showed that only the TBW and CO were of independent predictive value (P linear regression analysis only the TBW and CO were significantly correlated with aortic and liver parenchymal enhancement; the age, sex, and HT were not. The CO was the only independent factor affecting aortic and liver parenchymal enhancement at hepatic CT when the protocol was adjusted for the TBW.

  8. Calibrated versus uncalibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis in monitoring cardiac output with transpulmonary thermodilution in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagt, Cornelis; Helmi, Mochamat; Malagon, Ignacio; Groeneveld, A B Johan

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac output (CO) measurement is often required in critically ill patients. The performances of newer, less invasive techniques require evaluation in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. To compare calibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis-derived CO (COap, VolumeView/EV1000) and the uncalibrated form (COfv, FloTrac/Vigileo) with transpulmonary thermodilution derived CO (COtptd). A prospective, observational, single-centre study. ICU of a general teaching hospital. Twenty consecutive patients with severe sepsis or septic shock requiring haemodynamic monitoring by VolumeView/EV1000 and receiving mechanical ventilation. Connection of FloTrac/Vigileo to radial artery catheter already in situ. Radial (COfv) and femoral (COap) arterial waveform-derived CO measurements were compared with COtptd with respect to bias, precision, limits of agreement and percentage error, and the percentage error in the course of time since the last calibration of COap by COtptd. In comparing COap with COtptd (n = 267 paired measurements), the bias was 0.02 and limits of agreement were -2.49 to 2.52 l min, with a percentage error of 31%. The percentage error between COap and COtptd remained less than 30% until 8 h after calibration. In comparing COfv with COtptd (n = 301), the bias was -0.86 l min and limits of agreement were -4.48 to 2.77 l min, with a percentage error of 48%. The biases of COap and COfv correlated with systemic vascular resistance [r = 0.13 (P = 0.029) and r = 0.42 (P arterial waveform analysis technique. Compared with the uncalibrated COfv, the recently introduced calibrated arterial pressure waveform analysis-derived COap was more accurate and less dependent on vascular tone for up to 8 hours after callibation when monitoring CO in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. The COap and COfv methods have poor to moderate CO-tracking abilities.

  9. Feasibility of measuring superior mesenteric artery blood flow during cardiac surgery under hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass using transesophageal echocardiography: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen G Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abdominal complications being rare but results in high mortality, commonly due to splanchnic organ hypoperfusion during the perioperative period of cardiac surgery. There are no feasible methods to monitor intraoperative superior mesenteric artery blood flow (SMABF. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and to measure SMABF using transesophageal echocardiography (TEE during cardiac surgery under hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. Methodology: Thirty-five patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery under CPB were enrolled. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP, cardiac output (CO, SMABF, superior mesenteric artery (SMA diameter, superior mesentric artery blood flow over cardiac output (SMA/CO ratio and arterial blood lactates were recorded at three time intervals. T0: before sternotomy, T1: 30 min after initiation of CPB and T2: after sternal closure. Results: SMA was demonstrated in 32 patients. SMABF, SMA diameter, SMA/CO, MAP and CO-decreased significantly (P 0.05 between T0 and T2. Lactates increased progressively from T0 to T2. Conclusion: Study shows that there is decrease in SMABF during CPB and returns to baseline after CPB. Hence, it is feasible to measure SMABF using TEE in patients undergoing cardiac surgery under hypothermic CPB. TEE can be a promising tool in detecting and preventing splanchnic hypoperfusion during perioperative period.

  10. Pressure-volume loop-derived cardiac indices during dobutamine stress: a step towards understanding limitations in cardiac output in children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, James; Pushparajah, Kuberan; de Vecchi, Adelaide; Ruijsink, Bram; Greil, Gerald F; Hussain, Tarique; Razavi, Reza

    2017-03-01

    Children with a single systemic right ventricle, such as in hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), frequently experience reduced exercise capacity. Elucidating the causes could help with optimising treatment strategies. Prospective data from 10 consecutive symptomatic patients with HLHS undergoing clinical cardiac magnetic resonance with catheterisation (XMR) were analysed. Mean age 8.6years (range 3.5-11.6years), mean time since Fontan completion 5.5years. MR-compatible catheters were placed in the systemic right ventricle and branch pulmonary arteries to record pressures at rest, with dobutamine infusion at 10mcg/kg/min and at 20mcg/kg/min. Cine short-axis stacks of the ventricle were performed at each condition and used to construct pressure-volume loops. Compared to rest, cardiac index increased with low-dose dobutamine (pstress despite a further, albeit, blunted rise in heart rate (p=0.002). A fall in stroke volume occurred (p=0.014) despite good contractility (74% increase, p=0.045) and a well-coupled ventriculo-arterial ratio. End-diastolic pressure and early active relaxation, markers of diastolic function, were normal at rest. However, preload fell at peak stress (pstress, coinciding with a fall in preload. Markers of systolic and diastolic function remained normal. Failure to adequately fill the ventricle implies a ceiling of maximal flow through the Fontan circuit despite low PVR. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Dynamic Measurement of Hemodynamic Parameters and Cardiac Preload in Adults with Dengue: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipa Thanachartwet

    Full Text Available Few previous studies have monitored hemodynamic parameters to determine the physiological process of dengue or examined inferior vena cava (IVC parameters to assess cardiac preload during the clinical phase of dengue. From January 2013 to July 2015, we prospectively studied 162 hospitalized adults with confirmed dengue viral infection using non-invasive cardiac output monitoring and bedside ultrasonography to determine changes in hemodynamic and IVC parameters and identify the types of circulatory shock that occur in patients with dengue. Of 162 patients with dengue, 17 (10.5% experienced dengue shock and 145 (89.5% did not. In patients with shock, the mean arterial pressure was significantly lower on day 6 after fever onset (P = 0.045 and the pulse pressure was significantly lower between days 4 and 7 (P50% between days 4 and 5 (P<0.05. Hypovolemic shock was observed in 9 (52.9% patients and cardiogenic shock in 8 (47.1%, with a median (interquartile range time to shock onset of 6.0 (5.0-6.5 days after fever onset, which was the median day of defervescence. Intravascular hypovolemia occurred before defervescence, whereas myocardial dysfunction occurred on the day of defervescence until 2 weeks after fever onset. Hypovolemic shock and cardiogenic shock each occurred in approximately half of the patients with dengue shock. Therefore, dynamic measures to estimate changes in hemodynamic parameters and preload should be monitored to ensure adequate fluid therapy among patients with dengue, particularly patients with dengue shock.

  12. Estimating photoreceptor excitations from spectral outputs of a personal light exposure measurement device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dingcai; Barrionuevo, Pablo A

    2015-03-01

    The intrinsic circadian clock requires photoentrainment to synchronize the 24-hour solar day. Therefore, light stimulation is an important component of chronobiological research. Currently, the chronobiological research field overwhelmingly uses photopic illuminance that is based on the luminous efficiency function, V(λ), to quantify light levels. However, recent discovery of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), which are activated by self-contained melanopsin photopigment and also by inputs from rods and cones, makes light specification using a one-dimensional unit inadequate. Since the current understanding of how different photoreceptor inputs contribute to the circadian system through ipRGCs is limited, it is recommended to specify light in terms of the excitations of five photoreceptors (S-, M-, L-cones, rods and ipRGCs; Lucas et al., 2014). In the current study, we assessed whether the spectral outputs from a commercially available spectral watch (i.e. Actiwatch Spectrum) could be used to estimate photoreceptor excitations. Based on the color sensor spectral sensitivity functions from a previously published work, as well as from our measurements, we computed spectral outputs in the long-wavelength range (R), middle-wavelength range (G), short-wavelength range (B) and broadband range (W) under 52 CIE illuminants (25 daylight illuminants, 27 fluorescent lights). We also computed the photoreceptor excitations for each illuminant using human photoreceptor spectral sensitivity functions. Linear regression analyses indicated that the Actiwatch spectral outputs could predict photoreceptor excitations reliably, under the assumption of linear responses of the Actiwatch color sensors. In addition, R, G, B outputs could classify illuminant types (fluorescent versus daylight illuminants) satisfactorily. However, the assessment of actual Actiwatch recording under several testing light sources showed that the spectral outputs were subject to

  13. Input-output finite-time stabilisation of nonlinear stochastic system with missing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun; Niu, Yugang; Jia, Tinggang

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the problem of the input-output finite-time stabilisation for a class of nonlinear stochastic system with state-dependent noise. The phenomenon of the missing measurements may occur when state signals are transmitted via communication networks. An estimating method is proposed to compensate the lost state information. And then, a compensator-based controller is designed to ensure the input-output finite-time stochastic stability (IO-FTSS) of the closed-loop system. Some parameters-dependent sufficient conditions are derived and the corresponding solving approach is given. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed IO-FTSS scheme.

  14. Validation of maternal cardiac output assessed by transthoracic echocardiography against pulmonary artery catheterization in severely ill pregnant women: prospective comparative study and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornette, J; Laker, S; Jeffery, B; Lombaard, H; Alberts, A; Rizopoulos, D; Roos-Hesselink, J W; Pattinson, R C

    2017-01-01

    Most severe pregnancy complications are characterized by profound hemodynamic disturbances, thus there is a need for validated hemodynamic monitoring systems for pregnant women. Pulmonary artery catheterization (PAC) using thermodilution is the clinical gold standard for the measurement of cardiac output (CO), however this reference method is rarely performed owing to its invasive nature. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) allows non-invasive determination of CO. We aimed to validate TTE against PAC for the determination of CO in severely ill pregnant women. This study consisted of a meta-analysis combining data from a prospective study and a systematic review. The prospective arm was conducted in Pretoria, South Africa, in 2003. Women with severe pregnancy complications requiring invasive monitoring with PAC according to contemporary guidelines were included. TTE was performed within 15 min of PAC and the investigator was blinded to the PAC measurements. Comparative measurements were extracted from similar studies retrieved from a systematic review of the literature and added to a database. Simultaneous CO measurements by TTE and PAC were compared. Agreement between methods was assessed using Bland-Altman statistics and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Thirty-four comparative measurements were included in the meta-analysis. Mean CO values obtained by PAC and TTE were 7.39 L/min and 7.18 L/min, respectively. The bias was 0.21 L/min with lower and upper limits of agreement of -1.18 L/min and 1.60 L/min, percentage error was 19.1%, and ICC between the two methods was 0.94. CO measurements by TTE show excellent agreement with those obtained by PAC in pregnant women. Given its non-invasive nature and availability, TTE could be considered as a reference for the validation of other CO techniques in pregnant women. Copyright © 2016 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Las complicaciones del embarazo más graves se caracterizan por trastornos hemodin

  15. An updated h-index measures both the primary and total scientific output of a researcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucur, Octavian; Almasan, Alex; Zubarev, Roman; Friedman, Mark; Nicolson, Garth L; Sumazin, Pavel; Leabu, Mircea; Nikolajczyk, Barbara S; Avram, Dorina; Kunej, Tanja; Calin, George A; Godwin, Andrew K; Adami, Hans-Olov; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G; Richardson, Des R; Schmitt-Ulms, Gerold; Westerblad, Håkan; Keniry, Megan; Grau, Georges E R; Carbonetto, Salvatore; Stan, Radu V; Popa-Wagner, Aurel; Takhar, Kasumov; Baron, Beverly W; Galardy, Paul J; Yang, Feng; Data, Dipak; Fadare, Oluwole; Yeo, Kt Jerry; Gabreanu, Georgiana R; Andrei, Stefan; Soare, Georgiana R; Nelson, Mark A; Liehn, Elisa A

    2015-01-01

    The growing interest in scientometry stems from ethical concerns related to the proper evaluation of scientific contributions of an author working in a hard science. In the absence of a consensus, institutions may use arbitrary methods for evaluating scientists for employment and promotion. There are several indices in use that attempt to establish the most appropriate and suggestive position of any scientist in the field he/she works in. A scientist's Hirsch-index (h-index) quantifies their total effective published output, but h-index summarizes the total value of their published work without regard to their contribution to each publication. Consequently, articles where the author was a primary contributor carry the same weight as articles where the author played a minor role. Thus, we propose an updated h-index named Hirsch(p,t)-index that informs about both total scientific output and output where the author played a primary role. Our measure, h(p,t) = h(p),h(t), is composed of the h-index h(t) and the h-index calculated for articles where the author was a key contributor; i.e. first/shared first or senior or corresponding author. Thus, a h(p,t) = 5,10 would mean that the author has 5 articles as first, shared first, senior or corresponding author with at least 5 citations each, and 10 total articles with at least 10 citations each. This index can be applied in biomedical disciplines and in all areas where the first and last position on an article are the most important. Although other indexes, such as r- and w-indexes, were proposed for measuring the authors output based on the position of researchers within the published articles, our simpler strategy uses the already established algorithms for h-index calculation and may be more practical to implement.

  16. Output factor determination for dose measurements in axial and perpendicular planes using a silicon strip detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Haïdar, Z.; Bocci, A.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Espino, J. M.; Gallardo, M. I.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Ovejero, M. C.; Quesada, J. M.; Arráns, R.; Prieto, M. Ruiz; Vega-Leal, A. Pérez; Nieto, F. J. Pérez

    2012-04-01

    In this work we present the output factor measurements of a clinical linear accelerator using a silicon strip detector coupled to a new system for complex radiation therapy treatment verification. The objective of these measurements is to validate the system we built for treatment verification. The measurements were performed at the Virgin Macarena University Hospital in Seville. Irradiations were carried out with a Siemens ONCOR™ linac used to deliver radiotherapy treatment for cancer patients. The linac was operating in 6 MV photon mode; the different sizes of the fields were defined with the collimation system provided within the accelerator head. The output factor was measured with the silicon strip detector in two different layouts using two phantoms. In the first, the active area of the detector was placed perpendicular to the beam axis. In the second, the innovation consisted of a cylindrical phantom where the detector was placed in an axial plane with respect to the beam. The measured data were compared with data given by a commercial treatment planning system. Results were shown to be in a very good agreement between the compared set of data.

  17. Novel Measures of Volume Status and Cardiac Function in Traumatic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Focused rapid echocardiographic evaluation versus vascular catheter-based assessment of cardiac output and function in critically ill trauma ...adequacy of resuscitation in patients with traumatic shock and (2) to determine the incidence, time course, and clinical relevance of trauma ...evaluation serially over time in a civilian model of military trauma . Upon closure of the study, only six patients were enrolled, so no association

  18. Lvad pump speed increase is associated with increased peak exercise cardiac output and vo2, postponed anaerobic threshold and improved ventilatory efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignati, Carlo; Apostolo, Anna; Cattadori, Gaia; Farina, Stefania; Del Torto, Alberico; Scuri, Silvia; Gerosa, Gino; Bottio, Tomaso; Tarzia, Vincenzo; Bejko, Jonida; Sisillo, Erminio; Nicoli, Flavia; Sciomer, Susanna; Alamanni, Francesco; Paolillo, Stefania; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe

    2017-03-01

    Peak exercise cardiac output (CO) increase is associated with an increase of peak oxygen uptake (VO2), provided that arteriovenous O2 difference [Δ(Ca-Cv)O2] does not decrease. At anaerobic threshold, VO2, is related to CO. We tested the hypothesis that, in heart failure (HF) patients with left ventricular assistance device (LVAD), an acute increase of CO obtained through changes in LVAD pump speed is associated with peak exercise and anaerobic threshold VO2 increase. Fifteen of 20 patients bearing LVAD (Jarvik 2000) enrolled in the study successfully performed peak exercise evaluation. All patients had severe HF as shown by clinical evaluation, laboratory tests, echocardiography, spirometry with alveolar-capillary diffusion, and maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). CPETs with non-invasive CO measurements at rest and peak exercise were done on 2days at LVAD pump speed set randomly at 2 and 4. Increasing LVAD pump speed from 2 to 4 increased CO from 3.4±0.9 to 3.8±1.0L/min (ΔCO 0.4±0.6L/min, p=0.04) and from 5.3±1.3 to 5.9±1.4L/min (ΔCO 0.6±0.7L/min, pincreased from 788±169 to 841±152mL/min (ΔVO2 52±76mL/min, p=0.01) and from 568±116 to 619±124mL/min (ΔVO2 69±96mL/min, p=0.02) at peak exercise and at anaerobic threshold, respectively. Δ(Ca-Cv)O2 did not change significantly, while ventilatory efficiency improved (VE/VCO2 slope from 39.9±5.4 to 34.9±8.3, ΔVE/VCO2 -5.0±6.4, pincrease in CO with a higher LVAD pump speed is associated with increased peak VO2, postponed anaerobic threshold, and improved ventilatory efficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Measurements of pericardial adipose tissue using contrast enhanced cardiac multidetector computed tomography—comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elming, Marie Bayer; Lønborg, Jacob; Rasmussen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that pericardial adipose tissue (PAT) located in close vicinity to the epicardial coronary arteries may play a role in the development of coronary artery disease. PAT has primarily been measured with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) or with non......-contrast cardiac multidetector computered tomography (MDCT) images. The aim of this study was to validate contrast MDCT derived measures of total PAT volume by a comparison to CMRI. In 52 patients, aged 60 years (34-81 years), Body Mass Index 28 kg/m(2) (18-39), and with stable ischemic heart disease, paired MDCT...

  20. Role of heart rate and stroke volume during muscle metaboreflex-induced cardiac output increase: differences between activation during and after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisafulli, Antonio; Piras, Francesco; Filippi, Michele; Piredda, Carlo; Chiappori, Paolo; Melis, Franco; Milia, Raffaele; Tocco, Filippo; Concu, Alberto

    2011-09-01

    We hypothesized that the role of stroke volume (SV) in the metaboreflex-induced cardiac output (CO) increase was blunted when the metaboreflex was stimulated by exercise muscle ischemia (EMI) compared with post-exercise muscle ischemia (PEMI), because during EMI heart rate (HR) increases and limits diastolic filling. Twelve healthy volunteers were recruited and their hemodynamic responses to the metaboreflex evoked by EMI, PEMI, and by a control dynamic exercise were assessed. The main finding was that the blood pressure increment was very similar in the EMI and PEMI settings. In both conditions the main mechanism used to raise blood pressure was a CO elevation. However, during the EMI test CO was increased as a result of HR elevation whereas during the PEMI test CO was increased as a result of an increase in SV. These results were explainable on the basis of the different HR behavior between the two settings, which in turn led to different diastolic time and myocardial performance.

  1. A Case of Femoral Arteriovenous Fistula Causing High-Output Cardiac Failure, Originally Misdiagnosed as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Porter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous arterial catheterisation is commonly undertaken for a range of diagnostic and interventional procedures. Iatrogenic femoral arteriovenous fistulas are an uncommon complication of these procedures. Most are asymptomatic and close spontaneously, but can rarely increase in size leading to the development of symptoms. We report a case of an iatrogenic femoral arteriovenous fistula, causing worsening congestive cardiac failure, in a 34-year-old marathon runner. This was originally diagnosed as chronic fatigue syndrome. Following clinical examination, duplex ultrasound, and CT angiography a significant arteriovenous fistula was confirmed. Elective open surgery was performed, leading to a dramatic and rapid improvement in symptoms. Femoral arteriovenous fistulas have the potential to cause significant haemodynamic effects and can present many years after the initial procedure. Conservative, endovascular, and open surgical management strategies are available.

  2. Multiple shooting applied to robust reservoir control optimization including output constraints on coherent risk measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Codas, Andrés; Hanssen, Kristian G.; Foss, Bjarne

    2017-01-01

    The production life of oil reservoirs starts under significant uncertainty regarding the actual economical return of the recovery process due to the lack of oil field data. Consequently, investors and operators make management decisions based on a limited and uncertain description of the reservoir....... In this work, we propose a new formulation for robust optimization of reservoir well controls. It is inspired by the multiple shooting (MS) method which permits a broad range of parallelization opportunities and output constraint handling. This formulation exploits coherent risk measures, a concept...

  3. Scintillator-CCD camera system light output response to dosimetry parameters for proton beam range measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daftari, Inder K., E-mail: idaftari@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, 1600 Divisadero Street, Suite H1031, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Castaneda, Carlos M.; Essert, Timothy [Crocker Nuclear Laboratory,1 Shields Avenue, University of California-Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Phillips, Theodore L.; Mishra, Kavita K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, 1600 Divisadero Street, Suite H1031, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States)

    2012-09-11

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the luminescence light output response in a plastic scintillator irradiated by a 67.5 MeV proton beam using various dosimetry parameters. The relationship of the visible scintillator light with the beam current or dose rate, aperture size and the thickness of water in the water-column was studied. The images captured on a CCD camera system were used to determine optimal dosimetry parameters for measuring the range of a clinical proton beam. The method was developed as a simple quality assurance tool to measure the range of the proton beam and compare it to (a) measurements using two segmented ionization chambers and water column between them, and (b) with an ionization chamber (IC-18) measurements in water. We used a block of plastic scintillator that measured 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 cm{sup 3} to record visible light generated by a 67.5 MeV proton beam. A high-definition digital video camera Moticam 2300 connected to a PC via USB 2.0 communication channel was used to record images of scintillation luminescence. The brightness of the visible light was measured while changing beam current and aperture size. The results were analyzed to obtain the range and were compared with the Bragg peak measurements with an ionization chamber. The luminescence light from the scintillator increased linearly with the increase of proton beam current. The light output also increased linearly with aperture size. The relationship between the proton range in the scintillator and the thickness of the water column showed good linearity with a precision of 0.33 mm (SD) in proton range measurement. For the 67.5 MeV proton beam utilized, the optimal parameters for scintillator light output response were found to be 15 nA (16 Gy/min) and an aperture size of 15 mm with image integration time of 100 ms. The Bragg peak depth brightness distribution was compared with the depth dose distribution from ionization chamber measurements

  4. Calibrated Fair Measures of Measure: Indices to Quantify an Individual's Scientific Research Output

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A

    2013-01-01

    Are existing ways of measuring scientific quality reflecting disadvantages of not being part of giant collaborations? How could possible discrimination be avoided? We propose indices defined for each discipline (subfield) and which count the plausible contributions added up by collaborators maintaining the spirit of interdependency. Based on the growing debate about defining potential biases and detecting unethical behavior, a standardized method to measure contributions of the astronomical number of coauthors is introduced.

  5. Assessing Depression in Cardiac Patients: What Measures Should Be Considered?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ceccarini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is highly recommended to promptly assess depression in heart disease patients as it represents a crucial risk factor which may result in premature deaths following acute cardiac events and a more severe psychopathology, even in cases of subsequent nonfatal cardiac events. Patients and professionals often underestimate or misjudge depressive symptomatology as cardiac symptoms; hence, quick, reliable, and early mood changes assessments are warranted. Failing to detect depressive signals may have detrimental effects on these patients’ wellbeing and full recovery. Choosing gold-standard depression investigations in cardiac patients that fit a hospitalised cardiac setting well is fundamental. This paper will examine eight well established tools following Italian and international guidelines on mood disorders diagnosis in cardiac patients: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, the Cognitive Behavioural Assessment Hospital Form (CBA-H, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, the two and nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2, PHQ-9, the Depression Interview and Structured Hamilton (DISH, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D/HRSD, and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI. Though their strengths and weaknesses may appear to be homogeneous, the BDI-II and the PHQ are more efficient towards an early depression assessment within cardiac hospitalised patients.

  6. A Device for Automatically Measuring and Supervising the Critical Care Patient’S Urine Output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roemi Fernández

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical care units are equipped with commercial monitoring devices capable of sensing patients’ physiological parameters and supervising the achievement of the established therapeutic goals. This avoids human errors in this task and considerably decreases the workload of the healthcare staff. However, at present there still is a very relevant physiological parameter that is measured and supervised manually by the critical care units’ healthcare staff: urine output. This paper presents a patent-pending device capable of automatically recording and supervising the urine output of a critical care patient. A high precision scale is used to measure the weight of a commercial urine meter. On the scale’s pan there is a support frame made up of Bosch profiles that isolates the scale from force transmission from the patient’s bed, and guarantees that the urine flows properly through the urine meter input tube. The scale’s readings are sent to a PC via Bluetooth where an application supervises the achievement of the therapeutic goals. The device is currently undergoing tests at a research unit associated with the University Hospital of Getafe in Spain.

  7. Scanner-based image quality measurement system for automated analysis of EP output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipman, Yair; Mehta, Prashant; Johnson, Kate

    2003-12-01

    Inspection of electrophotographic print cartridge quality and compatibility requires analysis of hundreds of pages on a wide population of printers and copiers. Although print quality inspection is often achieved through the use of anchor prints and densitometry, more comprehensive analysis and quantitative data is desired for performance tracking, benchmarking and failure mode analysis. Image quality measurement systems range in price and performance, image capture paths and levels of automation. In order to address the requirements of a specific application, careful consideration was made to print volume, budgetary limits, and the scope of the desired image quality measurements. A flatbed scanner-based image quality measurement system was selected to support high throughput, maximal automation, and sufficient flexibility for both measurement methods and image sampling rates. Using an automatic document feeder (ADF) for sample management, a half ream of prints can be measured automatically without operator intervention. The system includes optical character recognition (OCR) for automatic determination of target type for measurement suite selection. This capability also enables measurement of mixed stacks of targets since each sample is identified prior to measurement. In addition, OCR is used to read toner ID, machine ID, print count, and other pertinent information regarding the printing conditions and environment. This data is saved to a data file along with the measurement results for complete test documentation. Measurement methods were developed to replace current methods of visual inspection and densitometry. The features that were being analyzed visually could be addressed via standard measurement algorithms. Measurement of density proved to be less simple since the scanner is not a densitometer and anything short of an excellent estimation would be meaningless. In order to address the measurement of density, a transfer curve was built to translate the

  8. Direct Measurements of Hydrothermal Heat Output at Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanovich, L. N.; di Iorio, D.; Genc, G.; Hurt, R. S.; Lowell, R. P.; Holden, J. F.; Butterfield, D. A.; Olson, E. J.

    2009-12-01

    Heat output and fluid flow are key parameters for characterizing seafloor hydrothermal systems at oceanic spreading centers. In particular, they are essential for examining partition of heat and geochemical fluxes between discrete and diffuse flow components. Hydrothermal heat output also constrains permeability of young oceanic crust and thickness of the conductive boundary layer separating hydrothermal circulation from the underlying magmatic heat source. Over the past several years, we have deployed a number of relatively simple devices to make direct measurements of focused and diffuse flow. Most recently, we have used cup anemometer and turbine flow meters to measure fluid flow and heat flux at individual high-temperature vents and diffuse flow sites. The turbine flow meter (Figure 1) includes a titanium rotor assembly housed within a stainless steel tube and supported by sapphire bearings. The device can be used at different seafloor settings for measurements of both diffuse and focused flow. The spin of the rotor blades is videotaped to acquire the angular velocity, which is a function of the flow rate determined through calibration. We report data obtained during four cruises to the Main Endeavor and High Rise vent fields, Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR), between 2007 and 2009. Overall more than 50 successful measurements of heat flow have been made on a variety of high-, medium-, and low-temperature hydrothermal sites on the Endeavor, Mothra, and High Rise structures. For example, the velocity of diffuse flow at Endeavor ranged from ~1 to ~10 cm/sec. The flow velocity from black smokers varied from ~10 cm/sec to ~1 m/sec, which appears to be similar to EPR 9°N. Typical measurements of heat flux obtained at JdFR ranged from ~1 kW for diffuse flow to ~1 MW for black smokers. Although it is difficult to extrapolate the data and obtain the integrated heat output for a vent field on JdFR, the data are used to characterize the heat fluxes from individual vent

  9. Evaluating digital libraries in the health sector. Part 1: measuring inputs and outputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Rowena

    2003-12-01

    This is the first part of a two-part paper which explores methods that can be used to evaluate digital libraries in the health sector. In this first part, some approaches to evaluation that have been proposed for mainstream digital information services are examined for their suitability to provide models for the health sector. The paper summarizes some major national and collaborative initiatives to develop measures for digital libraries, and analyses these approaches in terms of their relationship to traditional measures of library performance, which are focused on inputs and outputs, and their relevance to current debates among health information specialists. The second part* looks more specifically at evaluative models based on outcomes, and models being developed in the health sector.

  10. Measurement of Tip Trajectories in the Cardiac Reentry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MING Le-qun; ZHANG Hong; PENG Nian-cai; LI Ming-jun

    2008-01-01

    Reentrant impulse in the myocardium is considered to be a major factor promoting electrophysiological abnormalities or even leading to ventricular tachycardias (VTs) and ventricular fibrillations (VFs). Tip trajectory of the reentrant wave can reflect stability of the electrical propagation and area of the reentrant movement, thereby being considered as one of the most concerned parameters in studying electrical activities during VT/VF. The purpose of the present study is to propose a practical method to find out tip trajectories using a computational approach. In this study Luo-Rudy 1991 mathematical model of the ventricular cell was used. The operator splitting method was utilized to integrate the partial differential equations in the two-dimensional tissue. And spiral waves were initiated by the cut wave front technique. Through experiments we found it was difficult to find out the tips by finding intersection of the two isovoltage lines as proposed in most papers. Therefore, we suggested that tip points were detected by seeking the shortest distance of the two adjacent isovoltage contour lines. The results showed that tip trajectories of these spiral waves found in our way were very near to the tips observed, implying validation of our method in measuring tip trajectories in cardiac reentry.

  11. A model-free method for mass spectrometer response correction. [for oxygen consumption and cardiac output calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shykoff, Barbara E.; Swanson, Harvey T.

    1987-01-01

    A new method for correction of mass spectrometer output signals is described. Response-time distortion is reduced independently of any model of mass spectrometer behavior. The delay of the system is found first from the cross-correlation function of a step change and its response. A two-sided time-domain digital correction filter (deconvolution filter) is generated next from the same step response data using a regression procedure. Other data are corrected using the filter and delay. The mean squared error between a step response and a step is reduced considerably more after the use of a deconvolution filter than after the application of a second-order model correction. O2 consumption and CO2 production values calculated from data corrupted by a simulated dynamic process return to near the uncorrupted values after correction. Although a clean step response or the ensemble average of several responses contaminated with noise is needed for the generation of the filter, random noise of magnitude not above 0.5 percent added to the response to be corrected does not impair the correction severely.

  12. Reinforcement learning for partially observable dynamic processes: adaptive dynamic programming using measured output data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, F L; Vamvoudakis, Kyriakos G

    2011-02-01

    Approximate dynamic programming (ADP) is a class of reinforcement learning methods that have shown their importance in a variety of applications, including feedback control of dynamical systems. ADP generally requires full information about the system internal states, which is usually not available in practical situations. In this paper, we show how to implement ADP methods using only measured input/output data from the system. Linear dynamical systems with deterministic behavior are considered herein, which are systems of great interest in the control system community. In control system theory, these types of methods are referred to as output feedback (OPFB). The stochastic equivalent of the systems dealt with in this paper is a class of partially observable Markov decision processes. We develop both policy iteration and value iteration algorithms that converge to an optimal controller that requires only OPFB. It is shown that, similar to Q -learning, the new methods have the important advantage that knowledge of the system dynamics is not needed for the implementation of these learning algorithms or for the OPFB control. Only the order of the system, as well as an upper bound on its "observability index," must be known. The learned OPFB controller is in the form of a polynomial autoregressive moving-average controller that has equivalent performance with the optimal state variable feedback gain.

  13. A relative value method for measuring and evaluating cardiac reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xiaobo

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although a very close relationship between the amplitude of the first heart sound (S1 and the cardiac contractility have been proven by previous studies, the absolute value of S1 can not be applied for evaluating cardiac contractility. However, we were able to devise some indicators with relative values for evaluating cardiac function. Methods Tests were carried out on a varied group of volunteers. Four indicators were devised: (1 the increase of the amplitude of the first heart sound after accomplishing different exercise workloads, with respect to the amplitude of the first heart sound (S1recorded at rest was defined as cardiac contractility change trend (CCCT. When the subjects completed the entire designed exercise workload (7000 J, the resulting CCCT was defined as CCCT(1; when only 1/4 of the designed exercise workload was completed, the result was defined as CCCT(1/4. (2 The ratio of S1 amplitude to S2 amplitude (S1/S2. (3 The ratio of S1 amplitude at tricuspid valve auscultation area to that at mitral auscultation area T1/M1 (4 the ratio of diastolic to systolic duration (D/S. Data were expressed as mean ± SD. Results CCCT(1/4 was 6.36 ± 3.01 (n = 67, CCCT(1 was 10.36 ± 4.2 (n = 33, S1/S2 was1.89 ± 0.94 (n = 140, T1/M1 was 1.44 ± 0.99 (n = 144, and D/S was 1.68 ± 0.27 (n = 172. Conclusions Using indicators CCCT(1/4 and CCCT(1 may be beneficial for evaluating cardiac contractility and cardiac reserve mobilization level, S1/S2 for considering the factor for hypotension, T1/M1 for evaluating the right heart load, and D/S for evaluating diastolic cardiac blood perfusion time.

  14. Measurement of output power density from mobile phone as a function of input sound frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Emanuele; Magazù, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of power density emitted by a mobile phone were carried out as a function of the sound frequency transmitted by a sound generator, ranging from 250 to 14000 Hz. Output power density was monitored by means of the selective radiation meter Narda SRM 3000 in spectrum analysis mode, and the octave frequency analysis of each tone used for the experimental design was acquired by the sound level meter Larson Davis LxT Wind. Vodafone providers were used for mobile phone calls with respect to various local base station in Southern-Italy. A relationship between the mobile phone microwaves power density and the sound frequencies transmitted by the sound generator was observed. In particular, microwaves power density level decreases significantly at sound frequency values larger than 4500 Hz. This result can be explained assuming that discontinuous transmission mode of global system for mobile communications is powered not only in silence-mode, but also at frequencies larger than 4500 Hz.

  15. Tracking Changes in Cardiac Output: Statistical Considerations on the 4-Quadrant Plot and the Polar Plot Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Saugel, Bernd; Grothe, Oliver; Wagner, Julia Y

    2015-01-01

    When comparing 2 technologies for measuring hemodynamic parameters with regard to their ability to track changes, 2 graphical tools are omnipresent in the literaturethe 4-quadrant plot and the polar...

  16. Testicular measurements and daily sperm output of Tori and Estonian breed stallions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavak, A; Lundeheim, N; Aidnik, M; Einarsson, S

    2003-06-01

    Evaluation of testicular measurements and daily sperm output (DSO) yields valuable information for predicting the reproductive capacity of stallions. The present study evaluated testicular measurements (height, length, width and circumference) and DSO of eight Tori and eight Estonian breed stallions. One ejaculate of semen was collected daily for 10 subsequent days from each stallion. The gel-free volume of semen was measured with a graduated glass cylinder and the sperm concentration was assessed with a Chorjajev chamber. The volume of gel-free fraction was multiplied by the sperm concentration to give the total number of spermatozoa (TSN). The DSO was calculated as mean TSN of collection on days 8-10 in Tori breed stallions and on days 4-10 in Estonian breed stallions. The DSO of Tori breed stallions was 12.9 x 109 spermatozoa and of Estonian breed stallions 4.5 x 109 spermatozoa (p Estonian breed stallions; right testis- height 7.4, length 10.6 and width 7.4 in Tori breed stallions, and 5.5, 7.4 and 5.3, respectively, in Estonian breed stallions. All these testicular measurements were significantly smaller in Estonian than in Tori breed stallions (p Estonian breed stallions, respectively (p Estonian (p Estonian breed stallions.

  17. A practical and theoretical definition of very small field size for radiotherapy output factor measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, P. H., E-mail: p.charles@qut.edu.au; Crowe, S. B.; Langton, C. M.; Trapp, J. V. [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001 (Australia); Cranmer-Sargison, G. [Department of Medical Physics, Saskatchewan Cancer Agency, 20 Campus Dr., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7L 3P6, Canada and Academic Unit of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, 8.001 Worsley Building, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Thwaites, D. I. [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kairn, T. [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001, Australia and Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Brisbane, QLD 4066 (Australia); Knight, R. T. [Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Brisbane, QLD 4066 (Australia); Kenny, J. [The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, 619 Lower Plenty Road, Yallambie, VIC 3085, Australia and Radiation Oncology Queensland, St Andrew' s Toowoomba Hospital, Toowoomba, QLD 4350 (Australia)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This work introduces the concept of very small field size. Output factor (OPF) measurements at these field sizes require extremely careful experimental methodology including the measurement of dosimetric field size at the same time as each OPF measurement. Two quantifiable scientific definitions of the threshold of very small field size are presented. Methods: A practical definition was established by quantifying the effect that a 1 mm error in field size or detector position had on OPFs and setting acceptable uncertainties on OPF at 1%. Alternatively, for a theoretical definition of very small field size, the OPFs were separated into additional factors to investigate the specific effects of lateral electronic disequilibrium, photon scatter in the phantom, and source occlusion. The dominant effect was established and formed the basis of a theoretical definition of very small fields. Each factor was obtained using Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian iX linear accelerator for various square field sizes of side length from 4 to 100 mm, using a nominal photon energy of 6 MV. Results: According to the practical definition established in this project, field sizes ≤15 mm were considered to be very small for 6 MV beams for maximal field size uncertainties of 1 mm. If the acceptable uncertainty in the OPF was increased from 1.0% to 2.0%, or field size uncertainties are 0.5 mm, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be very small. Lateral electronic disequilibrium in the phantom was the dominant cause of change in OPF at very small field sizes. Thus the theoretical definition of very small field size coincided to the field size at which lateral electronic disequilibrium clearly caused a greater change in OPF than any other effects. This was found to occur at field sizes ≤12 mm. Source occlusion also caused a large change in OPF for field sizes ≤8 mm. Based on the results of this study, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be theoretically very small for 6

  18. Light output measurements and computational models of microcolumnar CsI scintillators for x-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nillius, Peter; Klamra, Wlodek; Sibczynski, Pawel; Sharma, Diksha; Danielsson, Mats; Badano, Aldo

    2015-02-01

    The authors report on measurements of light output and spatial resolution of microcolumnar CsI:Tl scintillator detectors for x-ray imaging. In addition, the authors discuss the results of simulations aimed at analyzing the results of synchrotron and sealed-source exposures with respect to the contributions of light transport to the total light output. The authors measured light output from a 490-μm CsI:Tl scintillator screen using two setups. First, the authors used a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to measure the response of the scintillator to sealed-source exposures. Second, the authors performed imaging experiments with a 27-keV monoenergetic synchrotron beam and a slit to calculate the total signal generated in terms of optical photons per keV. The results of both methods are compared to simulations obtained with hybridmantis, a coupled x-ray, electron, and optical photon Monte Carlo transport package. The authors report line response (LR) and light output for a range of linear absorption coefficients and describe a model that fits at the same time the light output and the blur measurements. Comparing the experimental results with the simulations, the authors obtained an estimate of the absorption coefficient for the model that provides good agreement with the experimentally measured LR. Finally, the authors report light output simulation results and their dependence on scintillator thickness and reflectivity of the backing surface. The slit images from the synchrotron were analyzed to obtain a total light output of 48 keV(-1) while measurements using the fast PMT instrument setup and sealed-sources reported a light output of 28 keV(-1) . The authors attribute the difference in light output estimates between the two methods to the difference in time constants between the camera and PMT measurements. Simulation structures were designed to match the light output measured with the camera while providing good agreement with the measured LR resulting in a bulk

  19. Measuring the surgical academic output of an institution: the "institutional" H-index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turaga, Kiran K; Gamblin, T Clark

    2012-01-01

    The Hirsch index is a novel index that combines the number of publications and citations in measuring the research output of researchers. We hypothesized that the h-index can be used to measure the academic success of an institution in a subject area (surgery) and compared this measure to previously published measures of ranking institutions. We identified the top 10 research medical schools as designated by the United States News and World Report 2010. The h-index for an institution was obtained in 3-year periods for articles published in surgery. Independent rankings from the NIH and other web sites were then used to compare with our newly generated rankings. The median h-index for institutions was 52.5 (46-54) for 2000-2002, 50 (44-52) for 2003-2005, 35.5 (33-40) for 2006-2008, and 15.5 (13-16) for 2009-2011. The percentage of self citations was the highest in publications from Harvard University (22.2%) and the lowest from Columbia University (10%) in the years 2009-11. Our ranking closely mirrored the United States News and World Report, and Harvard Medical School remains the top ranking in the field of surgery, although NIH funding-based ranking may suggest otherwise. The institutional h-index appears to be a viable indicator for the measure of academic success of institutions in a subject area. Despite limitations, it yields objective data regarding the citations and number of articles published by an institution in a subject area and could be used to measure performance. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cyberknife Relative Output Factor measurements using fiber-coupled luminescence, MOSFETS and RADPOS dosimetry system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploquin, N.; Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Vandervoort, E.

    2012-01-01

    corrections applied) yielded ROFs of 0.650 ± 1.9%, 0.811 ± 0.9% and 0.843 ± 1.7% for the 5, 7.5 and 10 mm cones, respectively, and were in excellent agreement with radiochromic film values (averaged for EBT1 and EBT2) of 0.645 ± 1.4%, 0.806 ± 1.1% and 0.859 ± 1.1%. Monte‐Carlo calculated correction factors......Novel dosimetry systems based on Al2O3:C radioluminescence (RL) and a 4D dosimetry system (RADPOS) from Best Medical Canada were used to measure the relative output factor (ROF) on Cyberknife. Measurements were performed in a solid water phantom at the depth of 1.5 cm and SSD = 78.5 cm for cones...... were applied to the RL readings to correct for excessive scatter due to the relatively high effective atomic number of Al2O3 (Z=10.2) compared to water for the 5, 7.5 and 10 mm cones. When these corrections are applied to our RL detector measurements, we obtain ROFs of 0.656 ± 0.3% and 0.815 ± 0.3...

  1. Tracking Changes in Cardiac Output: Statistical Considerations on the 4-Quadrant Plot and the Polar Plot Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugel, Bernd; Grothe, Oliver; Wagner, Julia Y

    2015-08-01

    When comparing 2 technologies for measuring hemodynamic parameters with regard to their ability to track changes, 2 graphical tools are omnipresent in the literature: the 4-quadrant plot and the polar plot recently proposed by Critchley et al. The polar plot is thought to be the more advanced statistical tool, but care should be taken when it comes to its interpretation. The polar plot excludes possibly important measurements from the data. The polar plot transforms the data nonlinearily, which may prevent it from being seen clearly. In this article, we compare the 4-quadrant and the polar plot in detail and thoroughly describe advantages and limitations of each. We also discuss pitfalls concerning the methods to prepare the researcher for the sound use of both methods. Finally, we briefly revisit the Bland-Altman plot for the use in this context.

  2. Characterization of cardiac quiescence from retrospective cardiac computed tomography using a correlation-based phase-to-phase deviation measure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, Carson A.; McClellan, James H. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Drive Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Arepalli, Chesnal D. [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, 3350-950 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E3 (Canada); Auffermann, William F.; Henry, Travis S. [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Division of Cardiothoracic Imaging, 1364 Clifton Road Northeast, Suite 309, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Khosa, Faisal [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Division of Emergency Radiology, 550 Peachtree Street Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia 30308 (United States); Coy, Adam M. [School of Medicine, Emory University, 100 Woodruff Circle, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Tridandapani, Srini, E-mail: stridan@emory.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Winship Cancer Institute, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Drive Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Accurate knowledge of cardiac quiescence is crucial to the performance of many cardiac imaging modalities, including computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). To accurately quantify quiescence, a method for detecting the quiescent periods of the heart from retrospective cardiac computed tomography (CT) using a correlation-based, phase-to-phase deviation measure was developed. Methods: Retrospective cardiac CT data were obtained from 20 patients (11 male, 9 female, 33–74 yr) and the left main, left anterior descending, left circumflex, right coronary artery (RCA), and interventricular septum (IVS) were segmented for each phase using a semiautomated technique. Cardiac motion of individual coronary vessels as well as the IVS was calculated using phase-to-phase deviation. As an easily identifiable feature, the IVS was analyzed to assess how well it predicts vessel quiescence. Finally, the diagnostic quality of the reconstructed volumes from the quiescent phases determined using the deviation measure from the vessels in aggregate and the IVS was compared to that from quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner. Three board-certified radiologists, fellowship-trained in cardiothoracic imaging, graded the diagnostic quality of the reconstructions using a Likert response format: 1 = excellent, 2 = good, 3 = adequate, 4 = nondiagnostic. Results: Systolic and diastolic quiescent periods were identified for each subject from the vessel motion calculated using the phase-to-phase deviation measure. The motion of the IVS was found to be similar to the aggregate vessel (AGG) motion. The diagnostic quality of the coronary vessels for the quiescent phases calculated from the aggregate vessel (P{sub AGG}) and IVS (P{sub IV} {sub S}) deviation signal using the proposed methods was comparable to the quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner (P{sub CT}). The one exception was the RCA, which improved for P{sub AGG} for 18 of the 20 subjects when compared to P

  3. ARX model-based damage sensitive features for structural damage localization using output-only measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Koushik; Bhattacharya, Bishakh; Ray-Chaudhuri, Samit

    2015-08-01

    The study proposes a set of four ARX model (autoregressive model with exogenous input) based damage sensitive features (DSFs) for structural damage detection and localization using the dynamic responses of structures, where the information regarding the input excitation may not be available. In the proposed framework, one of the output responses of a multi-degree-of-freedom system is assumed as the input and the rest are considered as the output. The features are based on ARX model coefficients, Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test statistical distance, and the model residual error. At first, a mathematical formulation is provided to establish the relation between the change in ARX model coefficients and the normalized stiffness of a structure. KS test parameters are then described to show the sensitivity of statistical distance of ARX model residual error with the damage location. The efficiency of the proposed set of DSFs is evaluated by conducting numerical studies involving a shear building and a steel moment-resisting frame. To simulate the damage scenarios in these structures, stiffness degradation of different elements is considered. It is observed from this study that the proposed set of DSFs is good indicator for damage location even in the presence of damping, multiple damages, noise, and parametric uncertainties. The performance of these DSFs is compared with mode shape curvature-based approach for damage localization. An experimental study has also been conducted on a three-dimensional six-storey steel moment frame to understand the performance of these DSFs under real measurement conditions. It has been observed that the proposed set of DSFs can satisfactorily localize damage in the structure.

  4. Direct recording of cardiac output- and venous return-curves in the dog heart-lung preparation for a graphical analysis of the effects of cardioactive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, N; Taki, K; Hojo, Y; Hagino, Y; Shigei, T

    1978-09-01

    The dog heart-lung preparations were prepared. The "equilibrium point", which could be defined as the point at which the cardiac output (CO)-curve and the venous return (VR)-curve crossed, when the CO and VR were plotted against the right atrial pressure, was recorded directly by utilizing an X-Y recorder. The CO-curve was obtained, as a locus of the equilibrium point, by raising and lowering the level of blood in the venous reservoir (competence test). The meaning of the procedure was shown to increase or decrease the mean systemic pressure, and to cause the corresponding parallel shift in the VR-curve. The VR-curve was obtained by changing myocardial contractility. When heart failure was induced by pentobarbital or by chloroform, the equilibrium point shifted downwards to the right, depicting the VR-curve. During development of the failure, the slopes of CO-curves decreased gradually. Effects of cinobufagin and norepinephrine were also analyzed. Utilization of the X-Y recorder enabled us to settle the uniform experimental conditions more easily, and to follow the effects of drugs continuously on a diagram equating the CO- and VR-curves (Gyton's scheme).

  5. A Novel Idea to Improve Cardiac Output of Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices by Optimizing Kinetic Energy Transfer Available in Forward Moving Aortic Blood Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Muhammad B; Glower, Jacob; Ewert, Daniel L; Koenig, Steven C

    2017-06-01

    Mechanical circulatory support devices (MCSDs) have gained widespread clinical acceptance as an effective heart failure (HF) therapy. The concept of harnessing the kinetic energy (KE) available in the forward aortic flow (AOF) is proposed as a novel control strategy to further increase the cardiac output (CO) provided by MCSDs. A complete mathematical development of the proposed theory and its application to an example MCSDs (two-segment extra-aortic cuff) are presented. To achieve improved device performance and physiologic benefit, the example MCSD timing is regulated to maximize the forward AOF KE and minimize retrograde flow. The proof-of-concept was tested to provide support with and without KE control in a computational HF model over a wide range of HF test conditions. The simulation predicted increased stroke volume (SV) by 20% (9 mL), CO by 23% (0.50 L/min), left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) by 23%, and diastolic coronary artery flow (CAF) by 55% (3 mL) in severe HF at a heart rate (HR) of 60 beats per minute (BPM) during counterpulsation (CP) support with KE control. The proposed KE control concept may improve performance of other MCSDs to further enhance their potential clinical benefits, which warrants further investigation. The next step is to investigate various assist technologies and determine where this concept is best applied. Then bench-test the combination of kinetic energy optimization and its associated technology choice and finally test the combination in animals.

  6. G16R single nucleotide polymorphism but not haplotypes of the ß2-adrenergic receptor gene alters cardiac output in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokamp, Kim Z; Staalsø, Jonatan M; Gartmann, Martin

    2013-01-01

    studied. Five SNPs within ADRB2 (46G>A, 79C>G, 491C>T, 523C>A and 1053G>C by a pairwise tagging principle) and the I/D (insertion/deletion) polymorphism in ACE were genotyped in 143 subjects. Cardiovascular variables were evaluated by the Model flow method at rest and during incremental cycling exercise......Variation in genes encoding the ß2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) may influence Q¿ (cardiac output). The 46G>A (G16R) SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) has been associated with ß2-mediated vasodilation, but the effect of ADRB2 haplotypes on Q¿ has not been...... V¿O2 (oxygen uptake) in G16G subjects, but the increase was 0.5 (0.0-0.9) l/min lower in Arg16 carriers (P=0.035). A similar effect size was observed for the Arg16 haplotypes ACCCG and ACCCC. No interaction was found between ADRB2 and ACE polymorphisms. During exercise, the increase in Q¿ was 0...

  7. Output field-quadrature measurements and squeezing in ultrastrong cavity-QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassi, Roberto; Savasta, Salvatore; Garziano, Luigi; Spagnolo, Bernardo; Nori, Franco

    2016-12-01

    We study the squeezing of output quadratures of an electro-magnetic field escaping from a resonator coupled to a general quantum system with arbitrary interaction strengths. The generalized theoretical analysis of output squeezing proposed here is valid for all the interaction regimes of cavity-quantum electrodynamics: from the weak to the strong, ultrastrong, and deep coupling regimes. For coupling rates comparable or larger then the cavity resonance frequency, the standard input-output theory for optical cavities fails to calculate the variance of output field-quadratures and predicts a non-negligible amount of output squeezing, even if the system is in its ground state. Here we show that, for arbitrary interaction strength and for general cavity-embedded quantum systems, no squeezing can be found in the output-field quadratures if the system is in its ground state. We also apply the proposed theoretical approach to study the output squeezing produced by: (i) an artificial two-level atom embedded in a coherently-excited cavity; and (ii) a cascade-type three-level system interacting with a cavity field mode. In the latter case the output squeezing arises from the virtual photons of the atom-cavity dressed states. This work extends the possibility of predicting and analyzing the results of continuous-variable optical quantum-state tomography when optical resonators interact very strongly with other quantum systems.

  8. A device for rapid and quantitative measurement of cardiac myocyte contractility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitas, Angelo; Malhotra, Ricky; Li, Tao; Herron, Todd; Jalife, José

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac contractility is the hallmark of cardiac function and is a predictor of healthy or diseased cardiac muscle. Despite advancements over the last two decades, the techniques and tools available to cardiovascular scientists are limited in their utility to accurately and reliably measure the amplitude and frequency of cardiomyocyte contractions. Isometric force measurements in the past have entailed cumbersome attachment of isolated and permeabilized cardiomyocytes to a force transducer followed by measurements of sarcomere lengths under conditions of submaximal and maximal Ca2+ activation. These techniques have the inherent disadvantages of being labor intensive and costly. We have engineered a micro-machined cantilever sensor with an embedded deflection-sensing element that, in preliminary experiments, has demonstrated to reliably measure cardiac cell contractions in real-time. Here, we describe this new bioengineering tool with applicability in the cardiovascular research field to effectively and reliably measure cardiac cell contractility in a quantitative manner. We measured contractility in both primary neonatal rat heart cardiomyocyte monolayers that demonstrated a beat frequency of 3 Hz as well as human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes with a contractile frequency of about 1 Hz. We also employed the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (100 nmol l-1) and observed that our cantilever demonstrated high sensitivity in detecting subtle changes in both chronotropic and inotropic responses of monolayers. This report describes the utility of our micro-device in both basic cardiovascular research as well as in small molecule drug discovery to monitor cardiac cell contractions.

  9. The Measurement of Maximal (Anaerobic Power Output on a Cycle Ergometer: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarak Driss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interests and limits of the different methods and protocols of maximal (anaerobic power ( assessment are reviewed: single all-out tests versus force-velocity tests, isokinetic ergometers versus friction-loaded ergometers, measure of during the acceleration phase or at peak velocity. The effects of training, athletic practice, diet and pharmacological substances upon the production of maximal mechanical power are not discussed in this review mainly focused on the technical (ergometer, crank length, toe clips, methodological (protocols and biological factors (muscle volume, muscle fiber type, age, gender, growth, temperature, chronobiology and fatigue limiting in cycling. Although the validity of the Wingate test is questionable, a large part of the review is dedicated to this test which is currently the all-out cycling test the most often used. The biomechanical characteristics specific of maximal and high speed cycling, the bioenergetics of the all-out cycling exercises and the influence of biochemical factors (acidosis and alkalosis, phosphate ions… are recalled at the beginning of the paper. The basic knowledge concerning the consequences of the force-velocity relationship upon power output, the biomechanics of sub-maximal cycling exercises and the study on the force-velocity relationship in cycling by Dickinson in 1928 are presented in Appendices.

  10. Spectral contaminant identifier for off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy measurements of liquid water isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Leen, J.; Berman, Elena S. F.; Gupta, Manish [Los Gatos Research, 67 East Evelyn Avenue, Suite 3, Mountain View, California 94041-1518 (United States); Liebson, Lindsay [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Developments in cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry have made it possible to measure water isotopes using faster, more cost-effective field-deployable instrumentation. Several groups have attempted to extend this technology to measure water extracted from plants and found that other extracted organics absorb light at frequencies similar to that absorbed by the water isotopomers, leading to {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O measurement errors ({Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O). In this note, the off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) spectra of stable isotopes in liquid water is analyzed to determine the presence of interfering absorbers that lead to erroneous isotope measurements. The baseline offset of the spectra is used to calculate a broadband spectral metric, m{sub BB}, and the mean subtracted fit residuals in two regions of interest are used to determine a narrowband metric, m{sub NB}. These metrics are used to correct for {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O. The method was tested on 14 instruments and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O was found to scale linearly with contaminant concentration for both narrowband (e.g., methanol) and broadband (e.g., ethanol) absorbers, while {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H scaled linearly with narrowband and as a polynomial with broadband absorbers. Additionally, the isotope errors scaled logarithmically with m{sub NB}. Using the isotope error versus m{sub NB} and m{sub BB} curves, {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O resulting from methanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 0.93 per mille and 0.25 per mille respectively, while {Delta}{delta}{sup 2}H and {Delta}{delta}{sup 18}O from ethanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 1.22 per mille and 0.22 per mille . Large variation between instruments indicates that the sensitivities must be calibrated for each individual isotope analyzer. These results suggest that the

  11. Effects of practices and teaching methods on different measures of the educational output: the case of Spanish universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro José PÉREZ VÁZQUEZ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses the relationships between the educational resources applied in higher education and two types of measures of educational output: average grade obtained by students and the contribution of studies to the development of diverse professional competencies. The relationships are modelled using multi-level production function equations, with the corresponding output measure as the dependent variable. The explanatory variables are the prevalence of various teaching/learning modes and a set of variables that control for the behaviour of students during their studies and for their personal attributes. Estimates, using data from European project Reflex, show significant relationships between the teaching and learning methods used and the alternative measures of educational output considered. The results show that attending lectures has the greatest impact on average grades; nonetheless, more proactive learning methods such as problem-based learning, internships and work provision, and practical knowledge are most influential for the development of professional competencies.

  12. Single session of sprint interval training elicits similar cardiac output but lower oxygen uptake versus ramp exercise to exhaustion in men and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Trevor; Roverud, Garret; Sutzko, Kandice; Browne, Melissa; Parra, Cristina; Astorino, Todd A

    2016-01-01

    Sprint interval training (SIT) elicits comparable long-term adaptations versus continuous exercise training (CEX) including increased maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and fat utilization. However, there is limited research examining acute hemodynamic responses to SIT. The aim of this study was to examine hemodynamic responses to low-volume SIT. Active men (n=6, VO2max = 39.8 ± 1.7 mL/kg/min) and women (n=7, VO2max = 37.3 ± 5.7 mL/kg/min) performed a ramp-based VO2max test (RAMP) to determine workload for the SIT session. Subjects returned within 1 wk and completed a session of SIT consisting of six 30-s bouts of “all-out” cycling at 130% maximal workload (Wmax) interspersed with 120 s of active recovery. Continuously during RAMP and exercise and recovery in SIT, VO2 was obtained and thoracic impedance was used to estimate heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), and cardiac output (CO). Results revealed no significant differences in COmax (p = 0.12, 19.7 ± 2.4 L/min vs. 20.3 ± 1.8 L/min) but lower SVmax (p = 0.004, 110.4 ± 15.7 mL vs. 119.4 ± 15.5 mL) in RAMP versus SIT. HRmax from SIT (179.0 ± 11.8 b/min) was lower (p = 0.008) versus RAMP (184.4 ± 7.9 b/min). Peak VO2 (L/min) was lower (p Sprint interval training consisting of 3 min of supramaximal exercise elicits similar CO yet lower VO2 compared to RAMP.

  13. Wind tunnel measurements of the power output variability and unsteady loading in a micro wind farm model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossuyt, Juliaan; Howland, Michael; Meneveau, Charles; Meyers, Johan

    2015-11-01

    To optimize wind farm layouts for a maximum power output and wind turbine lifetime, mean power output measurements in wind tunnel studies are not sufficient. Instead, detailed temporal information about the power output and unsteady loading from every single wind turbine in the wind farm is needed. A very small porous disc model with a realistic thrust coefficient of 0.75 - 0.85, was designed. The model is instrumented with a strain gage, allowing measurements of the thrust force, incoming velocity and power output with a frequency response up to the natural frequency of the model. This is shown by reproducing the -5/3 spectrum from the incoming flow. Thanks to its small size and compact instrumentation, the model allows wind tunnel studies of large wind turbine arrays with detailed temporal information from every wind turbine. Translating to field conditions with a length-scale ratio of 1:3,000 the frequencies studied from the data reach from 10-4 Hz up to about 6 .10-2 Hz. The model's capabilities are demonstrated with a large wind farm measurement consisting of close to 100 instrumented models. A high correlation is found between the power outputs of stream wise aligned wind turbines, which is in good agreement with results from prior LES simulations. Work supported by ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no. 306471) and by NSF (grants CBET-113380 and IIA-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project).

  14. Cardiac In-vivo Measurements Using Synthetic Transmit Aperture Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Henrik; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Hassager, Christian

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of acquiring cardiac images using synthetic transmit aperture (STA) ultrasound. Focusing in STA is done by beamforming all points in the image for every emission, creating a low-resolution image. The low-resolution images for each emission are summed......, together with the RASMUS experimental ultrasound scanner. Both transducers have a pitch of half a wavelength. To ensure an adequate signal-to-noise ratio, a 20 mus non-linear frequency modulated chirp and a 7-element de-focused virtual source were used for transmission. The number of virtual sources used...

  15. Automation of Mode Locking in a Nonlinear Polarization Rotation Fiber Laser through Output Polarization Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Michel; Gagnon, Marc-Daniel; Habel, Joé

    2016-02-28

    When a laser is mode-locked, it emits a train of ultra-short pulses at a repetition rate determined by the laser cavity length. This article outlines a new and inexpensive procedure to force mode locking in a pre-adjusted nonlinear polarization rotation fiber laser. This procedure is based on the detection of a sudden change in the output polarization state when mode locking occurs. This change is used to command the alignment of the intra-cavity polarization controller in order to find mode-locking conditions. More specifically, the value of the first Stokes parameter varies when the angle of the polarization controller is swept and, moreover, it undergoes an abrupt variation when the laser enters the mode-locked state. Monitoring this abrupt variation provides a practical easy-to-detect signal that can be used to command the alignment of the polarization controller and drive the laser towards mode locking. This monitoring is achieved by feeding a small portion of the signal to a polarization analyzer measuring the first Stokes parameter. A sudden change in the read out of this parameter from the analyzer will occur when the laser enters the mode-locked state. At this moment, the required angle of the polarization controller is kept fixed. The alignment is completed. This procedure provides an alternate way to existing automating procedures that use equipment such as an optical spectrum analyzer, an RF spectrum analyzer, a photodiode connected to an electronic pulse-counter or a nonlinear detecting scheme based on two-photon absorption or second harmonic generation. It is suitable for lasers mode locked by nonlinear polarization rotation. It is relatively easy to implement, it requires inexpensive means, especially at a wavelength of 1550 nm, and it lowers the production and operation costs incurred in comparison to the above-mentioned techniques.

  16. Effects of fasting on plasma glucose and prolonged tracer measurement of hepatic glucose output in NIDDM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glauber, H.; Wallace, P.; Brechtel, G.

    1987-10-01

    We studied the measurement of hepatic glucose output (HGO) with prolonged (3-/sup 3/H)glucose infusion in 14 patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Over the course of 10.5 h, plasma glucose concentration fell with fasting by one-third, from 234 +/- 21 to 152 +/- 12 mg/dl, and HGO fell from 2.35 +/- 0.18 to 1.36 +/- 0.07 mg . kg-1 . min-1 (P less than .001). In the basal state, HGO and glucose were significantly correlated (r = 0.68, P = .03), and in individual patients, HGO and glucose were closely correlated as both fell with fasting (mean r = 0.79, P less than .01). Plasma (3-/sup 3/H)glucose radioactivity approached a steady state only 5-6 h after initiation of the primed continuous infusion, and a 20% overestimate of HGO was demonstrated by not allowing sufficient time for tracer labeling of the glucose pool. Assumption of steady-state instead of non-steady-state kinetics in using Steele's equations to calculate glucose turnover resulted in a 9-24% overestimate of HGO. Stimulation of glycogenolysis by glucagon injection demonstrated no incorporation of (3-/sup 3/H)glucose in hepatic glycogen during the prolonged tracer infusion. In a separate study, plasma glucose was maintained at fasting levels (207 +/- 17 mg/dl) for 8 h with the glucose-clamp technique. Total glucose turnover rates remained constant during this prolonged tracer infusion. However, HGO fell to 30% of the basal value simply by maintaining fasting hyperglycemia in the presence of basal insulin levels.

  17. MR image analysis: Longitudinal cardiac motion influences left ventricular measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkovic, Patrick [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Cardiology (Belgium)], E-mail: pberko17@hotmail.com; Hemmink, Maarten [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Cardiology (Belgium)], E-mail: maartenhemmink@gmail.com; Parizel, Paul M. [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Radiology (Belgium)], E-mail: paul.parizel@uza.be; Vrints, Christiaan J. [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Cardiology (Belgium)], E-mail: chris.vrints@uza.be; Paelinck, Bernard P. [University Hospital Antwerp, Department of Cardiology (Belgium)], E-mail: Bernard.paelinck@uza.be

    2010-02-15

    Background: Software for the analysis of left ventricular (LV) volumes and mass using border detection in short-axis images only, is hampered by through-plane cardiac motion. Therefore we aimed to evaluate software that involves longitudinal cardiac motion. Methods: Twenty-three consecutive patients underwent 1.5-Tesla cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the entire heart in the long-axis and short-axis orientation with breath-hold steady-state free precession imaging. Offline analysis was performed using software that uses short-axis images (Medis MASS) and software that includes two-chamber and four-chamber images to involve longitudinal LV expansion and shortening (CAAS-MRV). Intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility was assessed by using Bland-Altman analysis. Results: Compared with MASS software, CAAS-MRV resulted in significantly smaller end-diastolic (156 {+-} 48 ml versus 167 {+-} 52 ml, p = 0.001) and end-systolic LV volumes (79 {+-} 48 ml versus 94 {+-} 52 ml, p < 0.001). In addition, CAAS-MRV resulted in higher LV ejection fraction (52 {+-} 14% versus 46 {+-} 13%, p < 0.001) and calculated LV mass (154 {+-} 52 g versus 142 {+-} 52 g, p = 0.004). Intraobserver and interobserver limits of agreement were similar for both methods. Conclusion: MR analysis of LV volumes and mass involving long-axis LV motion is a highly reproducible method, resulting in smaller LV volumes, higher ejection fraction and calculated LV mass.

  18. Measures of transinformation for multiple input/single output neuronal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhorst, U; Schultens, H A

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents a method for the calculation of the information transfer, or transinformation, in multiple input/single output neuronal systems. Our approach is an extension of an approach introduced by Eckhorn and Poepel in 1974. These authors computed the transinformation in single input/single output neuronal channels by regarding the spike (or stimulus) trains involved as finite Markov chains. The expressions for multiple input systems presented here are derived in close analogy to formulae in linear systems theory which show explicitly the correlations between the different input channels. A number of equivalent forms for the transinformation are discussed.

  19. Cardiac metabolism measured noninvasively by hyperpolarized 13C MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golman, K.; Petersson, J.S.; Magnusson, P.

    2008-01-01

    Pyruvate is included in the energy production of the heart muscle and is metabolized into lactate, alanine, and CO(2) in equilibrium with HCO(3) (-). The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using (13)C hyperpolarization enhanced MRI to monitor pyruvate metabolism in the heart...... was almost absent (0.2-11%) and the alanine signal was reduced (27-51%). Due to image-folding artifacts the data obtained for lactate were inconclusive. These studies demonstrate that cardiac metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized 1-(13)C-pyruvate is feasible. The changes in concentrations of the metabolites...... within a minute after injection can be detected and metabolic maps constructed Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  20. Light output measurements and computational models of microcolumnar CsI scintillators for x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nillius, Peter, E-mail: nillius@mi.physics.kth.se; Klamra, Wlodek; Danielsson, Mats [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm SE-100 44 (Sweden); Sibczynski, Pawel [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Otwock 05-400 (Poland); Sharma, Diksha; Badano, Aldo [Division of Imaging, Diagnostics, and Software Reliability, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, FDA, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The authors report on measurements of light output and spatial resolution of microcolumnar CsI:Tl scintillator detectors for x-ray imaging. In addition, the authors discuss the results of simulations aimed at analyzing the results of synchrotron and sealed-source exposures with respect to the contributions of light transport to the total light output. Methods: The authors measured light output from a 490-μm CsI:Tl scintillator screen using two setups. First, the authors used a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to measure the response of the scintillator to sealed-source exposures. Second, the authors performed imaging experiments with a 27-keV monoenergetic synchrotron beam and a slit to calculate the total signal generated in terms of optical photons per keV. The results of both methods are compared to simulations obtained with hybridMANTIS, a coupled x-ray, electron, and optical photon Monte Carlo transport package. The authors report line response (LR) and light output for a range of linear absorption coefficients and describe a model that fits at the same time the light output and the blur measurements. Comparing the experimental results with the simulations, the authors obtained an estimate of the absorption coefficient for the model that provides good agreement with the experimentally measured LR. Finally, the authors report light output simulation results and their dependence on scintillator thickness and reflectivity of the backing surface. Results: The slit images from the synchrotron were analyzed to obtain a total light output of 48 keV{sup −1} while measurements using the fast PMT instrument setup and sealed-sources reported a light output of 28 keV{sup −1}. The authors attribute the difference in light output estimates between the two methods to the difference in time constants between the camera and PMT measurements. Simulation structures were designed to match the light output measured with the camera while providing good agreement with the

  1. A method for the identification of state space models from input and output measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Di Ruscio

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a simple and general algorithm for the combined deterministic stochastic realization problem directly from known input and output time series. The solution to the pure deterministic as well as the pure stochastic realization problem are special cases of the method presented.

  2. Gain and maximum output of two electromagnetic middle ear implants: are real ear measurements helpful?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snik, A.F.M.; Noten, J.F.P.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2004-01-01

    We compared the output of two electronic middle ear implants: the Otologics MET device and the Vibrant Soundbridge device. Both devices were programmed in the linear amplification mode. Aided minus unaided sound pressure levels recorded in the ear canal (objective gain) were compared to unaided minu

  3. Measurement of recent thymic output function in uremia patients who underwent maintenance hemodialysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永新

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the recent thymic output of naive T cells in patients with uremia who underwent maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) . Methods Fifteen consecutive patients with uremia were recruited from Affiliated Oncology Hospital of Zhengzhou University between October 2010 and October 2011 and were subjected to

  4. Banking sector output measurement in the euro area – a modified approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colangelo, A.; Inklaar, R.

    2010-01-01

    Banks do not charge explicit fees for many of the services they provide but the service payment is bundled with the offered interest rates. This output therefore has to be imputed using estimates of the opportunity cost of funds. We argue that rather than using the single short-term, low-risk intere

  5. [Effects of temporary dual-chamber cardiac pacing in refractory cardiac failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanu, P; Lecluse, E; Michel, L; Bureau, G; Saloux, E; Cleron, S; Valette, B; Grollier, G; Potier, J C; Foucault, J P

    1996-12-01

    The authors studied 18 patients (15 men, 3 women) with an average age of 67 +/- 8 years with refractory cardiac failure. In order to determine the potential of pacing to raise cardiac output in severe cardiac failure. The average ejection fraction was 26 +/- 6.5%. All patients were in sinus rhythm:resting cardiac output was 3.35 l/min. Two temporary pacing catheters were positioned in the right atrium and at the apex of the right ventricle for dual-chamber mode pacing triggered by the spontaneous P waves. Changes in cardiac output were measured by Doppler echocardiography at different values of atrioventricular delay. Patients were considered to be responders if their cardiac outputs rose by 15%. In 7 patients meeting this criterion, the average increase in cardiac output was 27% (2.99 +/- 0.7 to 3.81 +/- 0.86 l/mn; p < 0.01); all had dilated cardiomyopathies with left bundle branch block and the optimal AV delay was 103 +/- 21 ms (80-140 ms); the duration of diastolic filling increased from 212 +/- 98 to 292 +/- 116 ms (p = 0.02). In the non-responding group (11 patients with an increase of cardiac output of only 3.6 +/- 0.09 to 3.9 +/- 0.92 l/mn; p < 0.01), the underlying disease process was mainly ischaemic. Two predictive factors of efficacy of dual-chamber pacing were identified: a short ventricular filling period (29 +/- 8% of the RR interval in the responders vs 44 +/- 9% in the non-responders; p < 0.01) and the presence of 1st degree atrioventricular block. Dual-chamber pacing could be a valuable method of increasing resting cardiac outputs in a selected group of patients with severe, refractory, cardiac failure.

  6. Asynchronous H∞ Dynamic Output Feedback Control of Switched Time-Delay Systems with Sensor Nonlinearity and Missing Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiwei Wen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The H∞ dynamic output feedback control problem for a class of discrete-time switched time-delay systems under asynchronous switching is investigated in this paper. Sensor nonlinearity and missing measurements are considered when collecting output knowledge of the system. Firstly, when there exists asynchronous switching between the switching modes and the candidate controllers, new results on the regional stability and l2 gain analysis for the underlying system are given by allowing the Lyapunov-like function (LLF to increase with a random probability. Then, a mean square stabilizing output feedback controller and a switching law subject to average dwell time (ADT are obtained with a given disturbance attenuation level. Moreover, the mean square domain of attraction could be estimated by a convex combination of a set of ellipsoids, the number of which depends on the number of switching modes. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. High-sensitive cardiac troponin T measurements in prediction of non-cardiac complications after major abdominal surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordzij, P. G.; van Geffen, O.; Dijkstra, I. M.; Boerma, D.; Meinders, A. J.; Rettig, T. C D; Eefting, F. D.; van Loon, D.; van de Garde, E. M W; van Dongen, E. P A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative non-cardiac complication rates are as high as 11-28% after high-risk abdominal procedures. Emerging evidence indicates that postoperative cardiac troponin T elevations are associated with adverse outcome in non-cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the rel

  8. Cardiac output in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus: association with arterial blood pressure and intracranial pressure wave amplitudes and outcome of shunt surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eide Per K

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH responding to shunt surgery, we have consistently found elevated intracranial pressure (ICP wave amplitudes during diagnostic ICP monitoring prior to surgery. It remains unknown why ICP wave amplitudes are increased in these patients. Since iNPH is accompanied by a high incidence of vascular co-morbidity, a possible explanation is that there is reduced vascular compliance accompanied by elevated arterial blood pressure (ABP wave amplitudes and even altered cardiac output (CO. To investigate this possibility, the present study was undertaken to continuously monitor CO to determine if it is correlated to ABP and ICP wave amplitudes and the outcome of shunting in iNPH patients. It was specifically addressed whether the increased ICP wave amplitudes seen in iNPH shunt responders were accompanied by elevated CO and/or ABP wave amplitude levels. Methods Prospective iNPH patients (29 were clinically graded using an NPH grading scale. Continuous overnight minimally-invasive monitoring of CO and ABP was done simultaneously with ICP monitoring; the CO, ABP, and ICP parameters were parsed into 6-second time windows. Patients were assessed for shunt surgery on clinical grade, Evan's index, and ICP wave amplitude. Follow-up clinical grading was performed 12 months after surgery. Results ICP wave amplitudes but not CO or ABP wave amplitude, showed good correlation with the response to shunt treatment. The patients with high ICP wave amplitude did not have accompanying high levels of CO or ABP wave amplitude. Correlation analysis between CO and ICP wave amplitudes in individual patients showed different profiles [significantly positive in 10 (35% and significantly negative in 16 (55% of 29 recordings]. This depended on whether there was also a correlation between ABP and ICP wave amplitudes and on the average level of ICP wave amplitude. Conclusions These results gave no

  9. Bioimpedance-based measurement method for simultaneous acquisition of respiratory and cardiac gating signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivumäki, T; Vauhkonen, M; Kuikka, J T; Hakulinen, M A

    2012-08-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion artefacts impair the quality and reliability of medical imaging, particularly in nuclear medicine. At worst, the interpretation of distorted images may lead to inadequate or unnecessary treatment. Image artefacts can be minimized by gating the image acquisition according to respiratory phase and cardiac contractions. However, currently there are no clinically established dual-gating methods in nuclear medicine imaging. The aim of this study is to validate a previously determined optimized bioimpedance measurement configuration against traditional respiratory and cardiac measurement systems in 12 volunteers. High agreement and excellent correlations (r = 0.944-0.999) were found between respiratory peak-to-peak amplitudes as well as temporal respiratory and cardiac intervals. Above all, good quality respiratory and cardiac gating signals were obtained from all test subjects with a fairly regular sinus rhythm. Importantly, both signals were acquired simultaneously with a single device. Due to the simplicity of this inexpensive method, the technique has high potential to be adopted for dual-gating in clinical practice in the future.

  10. Cardiovascular Ultrasound of Neonatal Long Evans Rats Exposed Prenatally to Trichloroacetic Acid: Effects on Heart Rate, Ejection Fraction, and Cardiac Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    This abstract describes the use of a relatively new technology, cardiovascular ultrasound (echocardiography) for evaluating developmental toxicity affecting heart development. The abstract describes the effects of two known cardiac teratogens, trichloroacetic acid and dimethadio...

  11. Diagnostics of the efficiency of surface plasmon-polariton excitation by quantum dots via polarization measurements of the output radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukushkin, V. A., E-mail: vakuk@appl.sci-nnov.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Federation); Baidus, N. V. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod (Russian Federation); Zdoroveishchev, A. V. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod, Physicotechnical Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-15

    It is demonstrated that the efficiency of surface plasmon-polariton excitation at a metal-semiconductor interface by active quantum dots can be determined from measurements of the polarization characteristics of the output radiation. Experimentally, the proposed diagnostic method is based on finding the ratio of the intensities of the output radiation with polarizations orthogonal and parallel to the nanoheterostructure plane for two different distances between the quantum-dot layer and the metal-semiconductor interface. These data are then used to obtain the unknown parameters in the proposed mathematical model which makes it possible to calculate the rate of surface plasmon-polariton excitation by active quantum dots. As a result, this rate can be determined without complicated expensive equipment for fast time-resolved measurements.

  12. Measurements on Prototype Inductive Adders with Ultra-Flat-Top Output Pulses for CLIC DR Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J; Belver-Aguilar, C

    2014-01-01

    The CLIC study is investigating the technical feasibility of an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings (DRs) will produce ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the DR kicker systems must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses. The specifications for the DR extraction kickers call for a 160 ns duration flat-top pulses of ±12.5 kV, 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 % (±2.5 V). An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the specifications because this topology allows the use of both passive and analogue modulation methods to adjust the output waveform. Recently, two five-layer, 3.5 kV, prototype inductive adders have been built at CERN. The first of these has been used to test the passive and active analogue modulation methods to compensate voltage droop and ripple of the output pulses. Pulse waveforms have been reco...

  13. Relationship between cardiac function and resting cerebral blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto M; Jensen, Lars T; Krabbe, Katja;

    2014-01-01

    Although both impaired cardiac function and reduced cerebral blood flow are associated with ageing, current knowledge of the influence of cardiac function on resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects of cardiac function on CBF. CBF...... and cardiac output were measured in 31 healthy subjects 50-75 years old using magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Mean values of CBF, cardiac output and cardiac index were 43.6 ml per 100 g min(-1), 5.5 l min(-1) and 2.7 l min(-1) m(-2), respectively, in males, and 53.4 ml per 100 g min(-1), 4.3 l min(-1......) and 2.4 l min(-1) m(-2), respectively, in females. No effects of cardiac output or cardiac index on CBF or structural signs of brain ageing were observed. However, fractional brain flow defined as the ratio of total brain flow to cardiac output was inversely correlated with cardiac index (r(2) = 0.22, P...

  14. Serial measurements of cardiac biomarkers in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roziakova Lubica

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous therapy with anthracyclines (ANT and conditioning regimen followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT represents a high risk for development of cardiotoxicity. The aim of this study was to assess subclinical myocardial damage after HSCT using echocardiography and cardiac biomarkers - high sensitive cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP and to identify patients at risk of developing clinical cardiotoxicity. Patients and methods Thirty-seven patients who were treated with allogeneic HSCT for hematologic diseases at median age of 28 years at time of HSCT were studied. Conditioning regimen included either chemotherapy without total body irradiation (TBI or combination of chemotherapy with TBI. Twenty-nine (78,3% patients were pretreated with ANT therapy. Cardiac biomarkers were serially measured before conditioning regimen and at days 1, 14 and 30 after HSCT. Cardiac systolic and diastolic functions were assessed before conditioning regimen and 1 month after HSCT by echocardiography. Results The changes in plasma NT-proBNP and hs-cTnT levels during the 30 days following the HSCT were statistically significant (P P Conclusions Elevations in both cardiac biomarkers were found before clinical signs of cardiotoxicity developed. Persistent elevations in NT-pro-BNP and hs-cTnT concentrations simultaneously for a period exceeding 14 days might be used for identification of patients at risk of developing cardiotoxicity and requiring further cardiological follow up.

  15. The cardiac cycle is a major contributor to variability in size measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysms by ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøndal, Nikolaj Fibiger; Bramsen, Morten; Thomsen, Marie Dahl

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of the cardiac cycle on ultrasound measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameters.......The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of the cardiac cycle on ultrasound measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameters....

  16. Serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T after exercise stress test in stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Anna; Ruwald, Martin Huth; Dalsgaard, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to assess serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTNT) post-exercise in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD).......The aim was to assess serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTNT) post-exercise in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD)....

  17. Indicators for Measuring Outputs of Innovative Initiatives in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Bumberová

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the identification of a set of KPIs that are used in Czech compa - nies to evaluate the outputs of innovative initiatives to maintain and improve organiza- tional performance as a goal of implementation of innovations. The empirical evidence is based on a quantitative data, gathered through an email by structured self-assessment tool (check-list which yielded 194 qualified responses. For the analysis of gained data there was used factor analysis within evaluation by factorial loadings. Results of the factor analysis provide possible groups according their similarity of variability and create new variables. Observed indexes were verified by coefficient Cronbach’s alpha. Findings of the paper serve up suggestions, that especially financial performance indicators are statistical significant in market area and operation management.

  18. Measuring and decomposing output gap: A production function approach of the USA and EU-27 countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domicián Máté

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The ICT-based techno-economic paradigm shift was sharpened by income inequalities in all over the world. The economic performance of USA and Europe were seemed to more different thanks to global economic events. The main purpose of this study is to estimate various macroeconomic variables such as GDP and labour for the period of 1993-2013. In order to indicate economic growth an alternative growth accounting method was used to decompose impacts of physical capital accumulation, technological changes and labour. Analysing the time series data of various OECD countries we could conclude that a large part of the variations in the output gap stem from the cyclical variations of total labour input and the total factor productivity (TFP. Hence, our results were reflected the relevance of technological progress.

  19. In situ measurements of wind and current speed and relationship between output power and turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran Medina, Olmo; Schmitt, François G.; Sentchev, Alexei; Calif, Rudy

    2015-04-01

    In a context of energy transition, wind and tidal energy are sources of clean energy with the potential of partially satisfying the growing demand. The main problem of this type of energy, and other types of renewable energy remains the discontinuity of the electric power produced in different scales, inducing large fluctuations also called intermittency. This intermittency of wind and tidal energy is inherent to the turbulent nature of wind and marine currents. We consider this intermittent power production in strong relation with the turbulent intermittency of the resource. The turbulence theory is multifractal energy cascades models, a classic in physics of turbulence. From earlier studies in atmospheric sciences, we learn that wind speed and the aggregate power output are intermittent and multifractal over a wide range of scales [Calif and Schmitt 2014]. We want to extend this study to a marine current turbine and compare the scaling properties for those renewable energy sources. We consider here coupling between simultaneous velocity time series and output power from a wind turbine and a marine current turbine. Wind turbine data were obtained from Denmark and marine current data from Western Scheldt, Belgium where a prototype of a vertical and horizontal marine current turbines are tested. After an estimation of their Fourier density power spectra, we study their scaling properties in Kolmogorov's theory and the framework of fully developed turbulence. Hence, we employ a Hilbert-based methodology, namely arbitrary-order Hilbert spectral analysis [Calif et al. 2013a, 2013b] to characterize the intermittent property of the wind and marine current velocity in order to characterize the intermittent nature of the fluid. This method is used in order to obtain the spectrum and the corresponding power law for non-linear and non-stationary time series. The goal is to study the non-linear transfer characteristics in a multi-scale and multi-intensity framework.

  20. Measuring cutaneous thermal nociception in group-housed pigs using laser technique - effects of laser power output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskin, Mette S.; Ladevig, Jan; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    of the metatarsus were examined using 15 gilts kept in one group and tested in individual feeding stalls after feeding. Increasing the power output led to gradually decreasing latency to respond (P ... are available, especially methodology which is applicable for pigs kept in group-housing without disturbing the daily routines of the animals. To validate a laser-based method to measure thermal nociception in group-housed pigs, we performed two experiments observing the behavioural responses toward cutaneous...... nociceptive stimulation from a computer-controlled CO2-laser beam applied to either the caudal part of the metatarsus on the hind legs or the shoulder region of gilts. In Exp. 1, effects of laser power output (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 W) on nociceptive responses toward stimulation on the caudal aspects...

  1. Data envelopment analysis with upper bound on output to measure efficiency performance of departments in Malaikulsaleh University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Dahlan; Suwilo, Saib; Tulus; Mawengkang, Herman; Efendi, Syahril

    2017-09-01

    The higher education system in Indonesia can be considered not only as an important source of developing knowledge in the country, but also could create positive living conditions for the country. Therefore it is not surprising that enrollments in higher education continue to expand. However, the implication of this situation, the Indonesian government is necessarily to support more funds. In the interest of accountability, it is essential to measure the efficiency for this higher institution. Data envelopment analysis (DEA) is a method to evaluate the technical efficiency of production units which have multiple input and output. The higher learning institution considered in this paper is Malikussaleh University located in Lhokseumawe, a city in Aceh province of Indonesia. This paper develops a method to evaluate efficiency for all departments in Malikussaleh University using DEA with bounded output. Accordingly, we present some important differences in efficiency of those departments. Finally we discuss the effort should be done by these departments in order to become efficient.

  2. Dynamic CT perfusion measurement in a cardiac phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemer, Benjamin P; Hubbard, Logan; Lipinski, Jerry; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-10-01

    Widespread clinical implementation of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion has been hampered by its limited accuracy and high radiation dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of a dynamic CT myocardial perfusion technique based on first pass analysis (FPA). To test the FPA technique, a pulsatile pump was used to generate known perfusion rates in a range of 0.96-2.49 mL/min/g. All the known perfusion rates were determined using an ultrasonic flow probe and the known mass of the perfusion volume. FPA and maximum slope model (MSM) perfusion rates were measured using volume scans acquired from a 320-slice CT scanner, and then compared to the known perfusion rates. The measured perfusion using FPA (P(FPA)), with two volume scans, and the maximum slope model (P(MSM)) were related to known perfusion (P(K)) by P(FPA) = 0.91P(K) + 0.06 (r = 0.98) and P(MSM) = 0.25P(K) - 0.02 (r = 0.96), respectively. The standard error of estimate for the FPA technique, using two volume scans, and the MSM was 0.14 and 0.30 mL/min/g, respectively. The estimated radiation dose required for the FPA technique with two volume scans and the MSM was 2.6 and 11.7-17.5 mSv, respectively. Therefore, the FPA technique can yield accurate perfusion measurements using as few as two volume scans, corresponding to approximately a factor of four reductions in radiation dose as compared with the currently available MSM. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that the FPA technique can make accurate dynamic CT perfusion measurements over a range of clinically relevant perfusion rates, while substantially reducing radiation dose, as compared to currently available dynamic CT perfusion techniques.

  3. TU-A-12A-09: Absolute Blood Flow Measurement in a Cardiac Phantom Using Low Dose CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemer, B; Hubbard, L; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a first pass analysis technique to measure absolute flow from low dose CT images in a cardiac phantom. This technique can be combined with a myocardial mass assignment to yield absolute perfusion using only two volume scans and reduce the radiation dose to the patient. Methods: A four-chamber cardiac phantom and perfusion chamber were constructed from poly-acrylic and connected with tubing to approximate anatomical features. The system was connected to a pulsatile pump, input/output reservoirs and power contrast injector. Flow was varied in the range of 1-2.67 mL/s with the pump operating at 60 beats/min. The system was imaged once a second for 14 seconds with a 320-row scanner (Toshiba Medical Systems) using a contrast-enhanced, prospective-gated cardiac perfusion protocol. Flow was calculated by the following steps: subsequent images of the perfusion volume were subtracted to find the contrast entering the volume; this was normalized by an upstream, known volume region to convert Hounsfield (HU) values to concentration; this was divided by the subtracted images time difference. The technique requires a relatively stable input contrast concentration and no contrast can leave the perfusion volume before the flow measurement is completed. Results: The flow calculated from the images showed an excellent correlation with the known rates. The data was fit to a linear function with slope 1.03, intercept 0.02 and an R{sup 2} value of 0.99. The average root mean square (RMS) error was 0.15 mL/s and the average standard deviation was 0.14 mL/s. The flow rate was stable within 7.7% across the full scan and served to validate model assumptions. Conclusion: Accurate, absolute flow rates were measured from CT images using a conservation of mass model. Measurements can be made using two volume scans which can substantially reduce the radiation dose compared with current dynamic perfusion techniques.

  4. Persistence length of human cardiac α-tropomyosin measured by single molecule direct probe microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campion K P Loong

    Full Text Available α-Tropomyosin (αTm is the predominant tropomyosin isoform in adult human heart and constitutes a major component in Ca²+-regulated systolic contraction of cardiac muscle. We present here the first direct probe images of WT human cardiac αTm by atomic force microscopy, and quantify its mechanical flexibility with three independent analysis methods. Single molecules of bacterially-expressed human cardiac αTm were imaged on poly-lysine coated mica and their contours were analyzed. Analysis of tangent-angle (θ(s correlation along molecular contours, second moment of tangent angles (, and end-to-end length (L(e-e distributions respectively yielded values of persistence length (L(p of 41-46 nm, 40-45 nm, and 42-52 nm, corresponding to 1-1.3 molecular contour lengths (L(c. We also demonstrate that a sufficiently large population, with at least 100 molecules, is required for a reliable L(p measurement of αTm in single molecule studies. Our estimate that L(p for αTm is only slightly longer than L(c is consistent with a previous study showing there is little spread of cooperative activation into near-neighbor regulatory units of cardiac thin filaments. The L(p determined here for human cardiac αTm perhaps represents an evolutionarily tuned optimum between Ca²+ sensitivity and cooperativity in cardiac thin filaments and likely constitutes an essential parameter for normal function in the human heart.

  5. Measurement of unsteady loading and power output variability in a micro wind farm model in a wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossuyt, Juliaan; Howland, Michael F.; Meneveau, Charles; Meyers, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Unsteady loading and spatiotemporal characteristics of power output are measured in a wind tunnel experiment of a microscale wind farm model with 100 porous disk models. The model wind farm is placed in a scaled turbulent boundary layer, and six different layouts, varied from aligned to staggered, are considered. The measurements are done by making use of a specially designed small-scale porous disk model, instrumented with strain gages. The frequency response of the measurements goes up to the natural frequency of the model, which corresponds to a reduced frequency of 0.6 when normalized by the diameter and the mean hub height velocity. The equivalent range of timescales, scaled to field-scale values, is 15 s and longer. The accuracy and limitations of the acquisition technique are documented and verified with hot-wire measurements. The spatiotemporal measurement capabilities of the experimental setup are used to study the cross-correlation in the power output of various porous disk models of wind turbines. A significant correlation is confirmed between streamwise aligned models, while staggered models show an anti-correlation.

  6. Bioimpedância transtorácica comparada à ressonância magnética na avaliação do débito cardíaco Transthoracic impedance compared to magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of cardiac output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Villacorta Junior

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A ressonância magnética cardíaca é considerada o método padrão-ouro para o cálculo de volumes cardíacos. A bioimpedância transtorácica cardíaca avalia o débito cardíaco. Não há trabalhos que validem essa medida comparada à ressonância. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o desempenho da bioimpedância transtorácica cardíaca no cálculo do débito cardíaco, índice cardíaco e volume sistólico, utilizando a ressonância como padrão-ouro. MÉTODOS: Avaliados 31 pacientes, com média de idade de 56,7 ± 18 anos, sendo 18 (58% do sexo masculino. Foram excluídos os pacientes cuja indicação para a ressonância magnética cardíaca incluía avaliação sob estresse farmacológico. A correlação entre os métodos foi avaliada pelo coeficiente de Pearson, e a dispersão das diferenças absolutas em relação à média foi demonstrada pelo método de Bland-Altman. A concordância entre os métodos foi realizada pelo coeficiente de correlação intraclasses. RESULTADOS: A média do débito cardíaco pela bioimpedância transtorácica cardíaca e pela ressonância foi, respectivamente, 5,16 ± 0,9 e 5,13 ± 0,9 L/min. Observou-se boa correlação entre os métodos para o débito cardíaco (r = 0,79; p = 0,0001, índice cardíaco (r = 0,74; p = 0,0001 e volume sistólico (r = 0,88; p = 0,0001. A avaliação pelo gráfico de Bland-Altman mostrou pequena dispersão das diferenças em relação à média, com baixa amplitude dos intervalos de concordância. Houve boa concordância entre os dois métodos quando avaliados pelo coeficiente de correlação intraclasses, com coeficientes para débito cardíaco, índice cardíaco e volume sistólico de 0,78, 0,73 e 0,88, respectivamente (p BACKGROUND: Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is considered the gold-standard method for the calculation of cardiac volumes. Transthoracic impedance cardiography assesses the cardiac output. No studies validating this measurement, in comparison to that obtained

  7. Bioimpedância transtorácica comparada à ressonância magnética na avaliação do débito cardíaco Transthoracic impedance compared to magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of cardiac output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Villacorta Junior

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A ressonância magnética cardíaca é considerada o método padrão-ouro para o cálculo de volumes cardíacos. A bioimpedância transtorácica cardíaca avalia o débito cardíaco. Não há trabalhos que validem essa medida comparada à ressonância. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o desempenho da bioimpedância transtorácica cardíaca no cálculo do débito cardíaco, índice cardíaco e volume sistólico, utilizando a ressonância como padrão-ouro. MÉTODOS: Avaliados 31 pacientes, com média de idade de 56,7 ± 18 anos, sendo 18 (58% do sexo masculino. Foram excluídos os pacientes cuja indicação para a ressonância magnética cardíaca incluía avaliação sob estresse farmacológico. A correlação entre os métodos foi avaliada pelo coeficiente de Pearson, e a dispersão das diferenças absolutas em relação à média foi demonstrada pelo método de Bland-Altman. A concordância entre os métodos foi realizada pelo coeficiente de correlação intraclasses. RESULTADOS: A média do débito cardíaco pela bioimpedância transtorácica cardíaca e pela ressonância foi, respectivamente, 5,16 ± 0,9 e 5,13 ± 0,9 L/min. Observou-se boa correlação entre os métodos para o débito cardíaco (r = 0,79; p = 0,0001, índice cardíaco (r = 0,74; p = 0,0001 e volume sistólico (r = 0,88; p = 0,0001. A avaliação pelo gráfico de Bland-Altman mostrou pequena dispersão das diferenças em relação à média, com baixa amplitude dos intervalos de concordância. Houve boa concordância entre os dois métodos quando avaliados pelo coeficiente de correlação intraclasses, com coeficientes para débito cardíaco, índice cardíaco e volume sistólico de 0,78, 0,73 e 0,88, respectivamente (p BACKGROUND: Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is considered the gold-standard method for the calculation of cardiac volumes. Transthoracic impedance cardiography assesses the cardiac output. No studies validating this measurement, in comparison to that obtained

  8. MAG3 diuresis renography and output efficiency measurement in renal transplant patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, T.; Gruenewald, S.; Chi, K.K.; Larcos, G.; Farlow, D.; Choong, K.; Chapman, J. [Westmead Hospital, Weastmead, NSW, (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasound

    1997-09-01

    Full text: Urinary tract obstruction following renal transplantation often presents a diagnostic dilemma, as some patients with equivocal investigations subsequently show improvement following stenting. The purposes of this study were to (1) establish a normal range of renal output efficiency (ROE) in transplants, and (2) assess the usefulness of MAG3 diuresis renography and ROE in suspected allograft obstruction. Twenty-two renal transplant patients with stable function and no evidence of hydronephrosis on serial ultrasound had a diuretic MAG3 scan with calculation of ROE. Three patients with proven graft obstruction underwent the same scanning procedure. Methodology was as follows: (1) 60 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA GFR was performed (single injection-dual blood sample method); (2) patients were then prehydrated with either oral or IV fluid; (3) 10 min prior to scanning, intravenous Frusemide 20-80 mg (dose depending on renal function) was injected, and then (4) 200 MBq of MAG3 for a 20 min scan. The studies were then qualitatively and quantitatively reviewed to assess uptake and excretion, and the ROE was calculated. The mean ROE for the twenty-two normal renal transplant patients was 85.7% {+-} 4.1% (range 78 - 90%). Technetium-99m-DTPA GFR was 55.5 mL/min/1.73m{sup 2} (range 27 to 83). The MAG3 scans in the three obstructed patients were equivocal for obstruction but the ROE values of 59%, 68% and 75% were more than 2.5 standard deviations below our calculated normal mean. The {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA GFRs were 61,17 and 57 mL/min/1.73m{sup 2}, respectively. Thus, in normal grafts the ROE should exceed 78 per cent. Our data suggest that ROE may be a useful addition to standard scintigraphic parameters in diagnosis of graft obstruction.

  9. Fast-acting calorimeter measures heat output of plasma gun accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethlefson, R.; Larson, A. V.; Liebing, L.

    1967-01-01

    Calorimeter measures the exhaust energy from a shot of a pulsed plasma gun accelerator. It has a fast response time and requires only one measurement to determine the total energy. It uses a long ribbon of copper foil wound around a glass frame to form a reentrant cavity.

  10. Enhancing ejection fraction measurement through 4D respiratory motion compensation in cardiac PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Wang, Xinhui; Gao, Xiangzhen; Segars, W. Paul; Lodge, Martin A.; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-06-01

    ECG gated cardiac PET imaging measures functional parameters such as left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction (EF), providing diagnostic and prognostic information for management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Respiratory motion degrades spatial resolution and affects the accuracy in measuring the LV volumes for EF calculation. The goal of this study is to systematically investigate the effect of respiratory motion correction on the estimation of end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and EF, especially on the separation of normal and abnormal EFs. We developed a respiratory motion incorporated 4D PET image reconstruction technique which uses all gated-frame data to acquire a motion-suppressed image. Using the standard XCAT phantom and two individual-specific volunteer XCAT phantoms, we simulated dual-gated myocardial perfusion imaging data for normally and abnormally beating hearts. With and without respiratory motion correction, we measured the EDV, ESV, and EF from the cardiac-gated reconstructed images. For all the phantoms, the estimated volumes increased and the biases significantly reduced with motion correction compared with those without. Furthermore, the improvement of ESV measurement in the abnormally beating heart led to better separation of normal and abnormal EFs. The simulation study demonstrated the significant effect of respiratory motion correction on cardiac imaging data with motion amplitude as small as 0.7 cm. The larger the motion amplitude the more improvement respiratory motion correction brought about on the EF measurement. Using data-driven respiratory gating, we also demonstrated the effect of respiratory motion correction on estimating the above functional parameters from list mode patient data. Respiratory motion correction has been shown to improve the accuracy of EF measurement in clinical cardiac PET imaging.

  11. Development of a unidimensional composite measure of neuropsychological functioning in older cardiac surgery patients with good measurement precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Richard N; Rudolph, James L; Inouye, Sharon K; Yang, Frances M; Fong, Tamara G; Milberg, William P; Tommet, Douglas; Metzger, Eran D; Cupples, L Adrienne; Marcantonio, Edward R

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this analysis was to develop a measure of neuropsychological performance for cardiac surgery and to assess its psychometric properties. Older patients (n = 210) underwent a neuropsychological battery using nine assessments. The number of factors was identified with variable reduction methods. Factor analysis methods based on item response theory were used to evaluate the measure. Modified parallel analysis supported a single factor, and the battery formed an internally consistent set (coefficient alpha = .82). The developed measure provided a reliable, continuous measure (reliability > .90) across a broad range of performance (-1.5 SDs to +1.0 SDs) with minimal ceiling and floor effects.

  12. Patients with cardiac arrest are ventilated two times faster than guidelines recommend : An observational prehospital study using tracheal pressure measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maertens, Vicky L.; De Smedt, Lieven E. G.; Lemoyne, Sabine; Huybrechts, Sofie A. M.; Wouters, Kristien; Kalmar, Alain F.; Monsieurs, Koenraad G.

    Aim: To measure ventilation rate using tracheal airway pressures in prehospitally intubated patients with and without cardiac arrest. Methods: Prospective observational study. In 98 patients (57 with and 41 without cardiac arrest) an air-filled catheter was inserted into the endotracheal tube and

  13. Patients with cardiac arrest are ventilated two times faster than guidelines recommend : An observational prehospital study using tracheal pressure measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maertens, Vicky L.; De Smedt, Lieven E. G.; Lemoyne, Sabine; Huybrechts, Sofie A. M.; Wouters, Kristien; Kalmar, Alain F.; Monsieurs, Koenraad G.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To measure ventilation rate using tracheal airway pressures in prehospitally intubated patients with and without cardiac arrest. Methods: Prospective observational study. In 98 patients (57 with and 41 without cardiac arrest) an air-filled catheter was inserted into the endotracheal tube and co

  14. Consenso brasileiro de monitorização e suporte hemodinâmico - parte III: métodos alternativos de monitorização do débito cardíaco e da volemia Brazilian consensus of monitoring and hemodynamic support - part III: alternative methods for cardiac output monitoring and volemia estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Schettino

    2006-03-01

    critical care setting, particularly for patients with signs of tissue hypoperfusion. Although PAC remains the " gold standard" to measure cardiac output and preload, new and alternative technologies were developed to evaluate these hemodynamic variables. METHODS: Modified Delphi methodology was used to create and quantify the consensus between the participants. AMIB indicated a coordinator who invited more six experts in the area of monitoring and hemodynamic support to constitute the Consensus Advisory Board. Twenty three physician and two nurses selected from different regions of the country completed the expert panel, which reviewed the pertinent bibliography listed at the MEDLINE in the period from 1996 to 2004. RESULTS: Recommendations regarding the use of arterial pulse pressure variation during mechanical ventilation, continuous arterial pulse contour and lithium dilution cardiac output measurements, esophageal Doppler waveform, thoracic electrical bioimpedance, echocardiography and partial CO2 rebreathing for monitoring cardiac output and preload were created. CONCLUSIONS: The new and less invasive techniques for the measurement of cardiac output, preload or fluid responsiveness are accurate and may be an alternative to PAC in critically ill patients.

  15. Measuring dose from radiotherapy treatments in the vicinity of a cardiac pacemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peet, Samuel C; Wilks, Rachael; Kairn, Tanya; Crowe, Scott B

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the dose absorbed by tissues surrounding artificial cardiac pacemakers during external beam radiotherapy procedures. The usefulness of out-of-field reference data, treatment planning systems, and skin dose measurements to estimate the dose in the vicinity of a pacemaker was also examined. Measurements were performed by installing a pacemaker onto an anthropomorphic phantom, and using radiochromic film and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters to measure the dose in the vicinity of the device during the delivery of square fields and clinical treatment plans. It was found that the dose delivered in the vicinity of the cardiac device was unevenly distributed both laterally and anteroposteriorly. As the device was moved distally from the square field, the dose dropped exponentially, in line with out-of-field reference data in the literature. Treatment planning systems were found to substantially underestimate the dose for volumetric modulated arc therapy, helical tomotherapy, and 3D conformal treatments. The skin dose was observed to be either greater or lesser than the dose received at the depth of the device, depending on the treatment site, and so care should be if skin dose measurements are to be used to estimate the dose to a pacemaker. Square field reference data may be used as an upper estimate of absorbed dose per monitor unit in the vicinity of a cardiac device for complex treatments involving multiple gantry angles. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of treadmill and cycle ergometer measurements of force-velocity relationships and power output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskólska, A; Goossens, P; Veenstra, B; Jaskólski, A; Skinner, J S

    1999-04-01

    Since body balance and weight-bearing factors present while running on the treadmill might cause additional muscle recruitment and thus could influence the force-velocity relationship and power, the present study was undertaken to find out whether the F-V and F-P relationships measured while running on the treadmill are different from the respective indices measured during cycling. On two separate occasions, 32 male subjects were tested using a series of 5 sec, all-out sprints against different braking forces on the Gymrol Sprint treadmill and on the Monark ergometer. The maximal peak power (PPmax) and maximal mean power (MPmax) were measured. The equation: EP = 0.5 maximal force (Fo) x0.5 maximal velocity (Vo) was used to calculate the estimated values of peak power (EPP) and mean power (EMP). The F-V relationship was linear in both cycle ergometer and treadmill measurements. PPmax, MPmax, EPP, and EMP values on the treadmill were lower than the respective values on the ergometer. EPP on the ergometer and on the treadmill, as well as EMP values on the ergometer, were slightly higher than the corresponding measured values of PPmax and MPmax. The levels of braking force at which PP, MP, PPmax, and MPmax were obtained were lower on the ergometer than on the treadmill. High correlation coefficients were found between PPmax, MPmax, EPP, and EMP measured on the ergometer and on the treadmill (r = 0.86, r = 0.84, r = 0.71, r = 0.78, respectively, P<0.01). In both tests, significant relationships between PPmax, MPmax, EPP, and EMP were observed. It is concluded that independent of the type of ergometry the force-velocity relationship is similar in the measured range of velocities which suggests that the number of muscle groups and joints engaged in movement are more important than body balance and weight-bearing factors present while running on a treadmill.

  17. Cardiac phantom measurement validating the methodology for a cardiac multi-centre trial with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuyts, Johan; Mortelmans, Luc; Van de Werf, Frans; Djian, Jacques; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Schwaiger, Marcus; Touboul, Paul; Maes, Alex

    2002-12-01

    In an ongoing international multi-centre trial, positron emission tomography (PET) is being used to evaluate the effect of a new P-selectin antagonist on the infarct size in patients with acute myocardial infarction, treated with thrombolysis. Although it is possible to correct for site-dependent factors, it is desirable to reduce these factors to a minimum. Therefore, acquisition and reconstruction protocols have been defined that can be closely followed by all participating centres. The resulting reconstructed images are transferred to the core centre for central processing with semi-automatic software. This paper reports on the multi-centre phantom experiment that was carried out to assess the inter-centre reproducibility of defect size determination with this protocol. Also, the spatial resolution of the short axis slices was examined. In addition, the analysis procedure was applied to normal PET studies to evaluate the specificity of perfusion defect detection. The transmural cold defect in the phantom occupied 14.8% of the left ventricular area. The automated analysis was applied to the phantom measurements from the 14 participating PET cameras. It yielded an accurate estimate of 15.1% with a standard deviation of 0.6%, indicating excellent reproducibility. The spatial resolution in the short axis slices was similar for all PET systems: 9.6+/-0.8 mm. The same procedure produced a defect size of zero in the studies of normal volunteers. This study indicates that cardiac studies from multiple PET systems can be pooled for statistical analysis.

  18. Cardiac phantom measurement validating the methodology for a cardiac multi-centre trial with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuyts, Johan; Mortelmans, Luc; Maes, Alex [Nuclear Medicine, UZ Gasthuisberg, K.U. Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Van de Werf, Frans [Cardiology, UZ Gasthuisberg, K.U. Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Djian, Jacques [Wyeth Research, Paris la Defense Cedex (France); Sambuceti, Gianmario [Instituto di Fisiologia Clinica CNR, Pisa (Italy); Schwaiger, Marcus [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, TU Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Touboul, Paul [Hopital Cardio-Vasculaire et Pneumologique, Lyon (France)

    2002-12-01

    In an ongoing international multi-centre trial, positron emission tomography (PET) is being used to evaluate the effect of a new P-selectin antagonist on the infarct size in patients with acute myocardial infarction, treated with thrombolysis. Although it is possible to correct for site-dependent factors, it is desirable to reduce these factors to a minimum. Therefore, acquisition and reconstruction protocols have been defined that can be closely followed by all participating centres. The resulting reconstructed images are transferred to the core centre for central processing with semi-automatic software. This paper reports on the multi-centre phantom experiment that was carried out to assess the inter-centre reproducibility of defect size determination with this protocol. Also, the spatial resolution of the short axis slices was examined. In addition, the analysis procedure was applied to normal PET studies to evaluate the specificity of perfusion defect detection. The transmural cold defect in the phantom occupied 14.8% of the left ventricular area. The automated analysis was applied to the phantom measurements from the 14 participating PET cameras. It yielded an accurate estimate of 15.1% with a standard deviation of 0.6%, indicating excellent reproducibility. The spatial resolution in the short axis slices was similar for all PET systems: 9.6{+-}0.8 mm. The same procedure produced a defect size of zero in the studies of normal volunteers. This study indicates that cardiac studies from multiple PET systems can be pooled for statistical analysis. (orig.)

  19. Objectively measured daily physical activity related to cardiac size in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, M; Thorsson, O; Karlsson, M K;

    2009-01-01

    ), aged 8-11 years, from a population-based cohort. Left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDD) and left atrial end-systolic diameter (LA) were measured with echocardiography and indexed for body surface area (BSA). Physical activity was assessed by accelerometry, and the duration of vigorous physical...... activity per day (VPA) was calculated. Acceptable accelerometer and echocardiography measurements were obtained in 228 children (boys=127, girls=101). Univariate correlations between VPA and LVDD were indexed for BSA in boys (r=0.27, P... that independent factors for LVDD, indexed for BSA for boys, were age and VPA. LA indexed for BSA was not related to physical activity variables in either gender. No clear relationship exists between cardiac size and daily physical activity in children aged 8-11 years. This suggests that significant cardiac...

  20. PET measures of pre- and post-synaptic cardiac beta adrenergic function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, Jeanne M.; Stratton, John R.; Levy, Wayne; Poole, Jeanne E.; Shoner, Steven C.; Stuetzle, Werner; Caldwell, James H. E-mail: jcald@u.washington.edu

    2003-11-01

    Positron Emission Tomography was used to measure global and regional cardiac {beta}-adrenergic function in 19 normal subjects and 9 congestive heart failure patients. [{sup 11}C]-meta-hydroxyephedrine was used to image norepinephrine transporter function as an indicator of pre-synaptic function and [{sup 11}C]-CGP12177 was used to measure cell surface {beta}-receptor density as an indicator of post-synaptic function. Pre-synaptic, but not post-synaptic, function was significantly different between normals and CHF patients. Pre-synaptic function was well matched to post-synaptic function in the normal hearts but significantly different and poorly matched in the CHF patients studied. This imaging technique can help us understand regional sympathetic function in cardiac disease.

  1. Harmonic force spectroscopy measures load-dependent kinetics of individual human β-cardiac myosin molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Mortensen, Kim I.; Vestergaard, Christian L.; Sutton, Shirley; Ruppel, Kathleen; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Spudich, James A.

    2015-08-01

    Molecular motors are responsible for numerous cellular processes from cargo transport to heart contraction. Their interactions with other cellular components are often transient and exhibit kinetics that depend on load. Here, we measure such interactions using `harmonic force spectroscopy'. In this method, harmonic oscillation of the sample stage of a laser trap immediately, automatically and randomly applies sinusoidally varying loads to a single motor molecule interacting with a single track along which it moves. The experimental protocol and the data analysis are simple, fast and efficient. The protocol accumulates statistics fast enough to deliver single-molecule results from single-molecule experiments. We demonstrate the method's performance by measuring the force-dependent kinetics of individual human β-cardiac myosin molecules interacting with an actin filament at physiological ATP concentration. We show that a molecule's ADP release rate depends exponentially on the applied load, in qualitative agreement with cardiac muscle, which contracts with a velocity inversely proportional to external load.

  2. Harmonic Force Spectroscopy measures load-dependent kinetics of individual human β-cardiac myosin molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Mortensen, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Molecular motors are responsible for numerous cellular processes from cargo transport to heart contraction. Their interactions with other cellular components are often transient and exhibit kinetics that depend on load. Here, we measure such interactions using ‘harmonic force spectroscopy...... concentration. We show that a molecule’s ADP release rate depends exponentially on the applied load, in qualitative agreement with cardiac muscle, which contracts with a velocity inversely proportional to external load....

  3. On-chip acidification rate measurements from single cardiac cells confined in sub-nanoliter volumes

    OpenAIRE

    Ges, Igor A.; Dzhura, Igor A.; Baudenbacher, Franz J.

    2008-01-01

    The metabolic activity of cells can be monitored by measuring the pH in the extracellular environment. Microfabrication and microfluidic technologies allow the sensor size and the extracellular volumes to be comparable to single cells. A glass substrate with thin film pH sensitive IrOx electrodes was sealed to a replica-molded polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic network with integrated valves. The device, termed NanoPhysiometer, allows the trapping of single cardiac myocytes and the meas...

  4. An Evaluative Measure for Outputs in Student-Run Public Relations Firms and Applied Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deemer, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    A valid, reliable survey instrument was created to be used by public relations student-run firms and other applied public relations courses to gauge client satisfaction. A series of focus groups and pilot tests were conducted to ascertain themes, refine questions, and then to refine the entire instrument. Six constructs to be measured, including…

  5. An Evaluative Measure for Outputs in Student-Run Public Relations Firms and Applied Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deemer, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    A valid, reliable survey instrument was created to be used by public relations student-run firms and other applied public relations courses to gauge client satisfaction. A series of focus groups and pilot tests were conducted to ascertain themes, refine questions, and then to refine the entire instrument. Six constructs to be measured, including…

  6. The Circulation/Acquisition Ratio: An Input-Output Measure for Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Marilyn M.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring library impact by calculating the ratio of materials circulated in a time unit to those acquired in that period. A breakdown by Dewey Decimal Classification for a hypothetical library is reported, as well as how this ratio can be interpreted. (BK)

  7. Output-Only Modal Identification of a Containment Building from Ambient Vibration Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soo-Yong; Shin, Yung-Moo; Kim, Ha-Yeon [Korea Maritime University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Dae-Hyuk [Korea National Railroad College, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of); Hyun, Chang-Hun; Kim, Moon-Soo; Kim, Sang-Yun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Ensuring and maintaining the structural integrity of the containment building (CB) in nuclear power plants is essential in preserving the nuclear reactor and other safety related systems from man-made as well as natural disasters, and protecting plant workers and publics from hazardous radioactive materials. To date, the structural integrity of the CB has been evaluated periodically via visual inspections, chemical tests, nondestructive strength tests, etc. However, these methods can only provide the local information on the structural condition and require considerable time and cost to estimate overall structural integrity. In this paper, the possibility of monitoring the structural integrity of a CB utilizing ambient vibration measurement (AVM) is explored. The ambient vibration testing has gained attention which can avoid the interruption of normal operation of civil structures. To fulfill the objective, the ambient vibration of the CB of the Ulchin 5th unit was measured, and the modal parameters, resonant frequencies and corresponding mode shapes, were extracted.

  8. Comprehensive Output Measurement: The 'Missing Link' in U.S. Federal Government Performance Reporting

    OpenAIRE

    King, David Lorne

    2014-01-01

    Performance and accrual-based financial management systems as envisaged in the 1990 Chief Financial Officers (CFO) Act, the 1993 Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA), the 1996 Federal Financial Management Improvement Act (FFMIA) and related legislation have been in place since prior to the turn of the millennium. Nevertheless, although performance has been measured and financial accountability improved in U.S. federal government agencies, there remains a gap in reporting on operation...

  9. The acute effect of lower-body training on average power output measured by loaded half-squat jump exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matúš Krčmár

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: High muscular power output is required in many athletic endeavors in order for success to be achieved. In the scientific community postactivation potentiation and its effect on performance are often discussed. There are many studies where the effect of resistance exercise on motor performance (such as vertical jump performance and running speed has been investigated but only a few of them studied power output. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the acute responses to a 2 set loaded half-squat jumps and 2 set loaded back half-squat protocols designed to induce the acute maximum average power output during loaded half-squat jumps. Methods: A randomized cross-over design was used. 11 participants of this study performed 3 trials in randomized order separated by at least 48 hours where maximum average power output was measured. The specific conditioning activities were comprised of 2 sets and 4 repetitions of half-squat jumps, 2 sets and 4 repetitions of back half-squat exercises and a control protocol without an intervention by specific a conditioning activity. Participants were strength trained athletes with different sport specializations (e.g. ice-hockey, volleyball. Mean age of the athletes was 22 ± 1.8 years, body mass 80 ± 7.1 kg and body height 185 ± 6.5 cm. Analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to determine differences between pre- and post-condition in each protocol, as well as between conditioning protocols, and also effect size was used to evaluate practical significance. Results: Maximum average power was significantly enhanced after application of the half-squat jump condition protocol (1496.2 ± 194.5 to 1552 ± 196.1 W, Δ ~ 3.72%, p < .001 and after application of the back half-squat protocol (1500.7 ± 193.2 to 1556 ± 191.2 W, Δ ~ 3.68%, p < .001 after 10 min of rest. Power output after control protocol was

  10. Correction of measured Gamma-Knife output factors for angular dependence of diode detectors and PinPoint ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hršak, Hrvoje; Majer, Marija; Grego, Timor; Bibić, Juraj; Heinrich, Zdravko

    2014-12-01

    Dosimetry for Gamma-Knife requires detectors with high spatial resolution and minimal angular dependence of response. Angular dependence and end effect time for p-type silicon detectors (PTW Diode P and Diode E) and PTW PinPoint ionization chamber were measured with Gamma-Knife beams. Weighted angular dependence correction factors were calculated for each detector. The Gamma-Knife output factors were corrected for angular dependence and end effect time. For Gamma-Knife beams angle range of 84°-54°. Diode P shows considerable angular dependence of 9% and 8% for the 18 mm and 14, 8, 4 mm collimator, respectively. For Diode E this dependence is about 4% for all collimators. PinPoint ionization chamber shows angular dependence of less than 3% for 18, 14 and 8 mm helmet and 10% for 4 mm collimator due to volumetric averaging effect in a small photon beam. Corrected output factors for 14 mm helmet are in very good agreement (within ±0.3%) with published data and values recommended by vendor (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden). For the 8 mm collimator diodes are still in good agreement with recommended values (within ±0.6%), while PinPoint gives 3% less value. For the 4 mm helmet Diodes P and E show over-response of 2.8% and 1.8%, respectively. For PinPoint chamber output factor of 4 mm collimator is 25% lower than Elekta value which is generally not consequence of angular dependence, but of volumetric averaging effect and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. Diodes P and E represent good choice for Gamma-Knife dosimetry.

  11. Comparison of cardiac and 60 Hz magnetically induced electric fields measured in anesthetized rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.L.; Creim, J.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Extremely low frequency magnetic fields interact with an animal by inducing internal electric fields, which are in addition to the normal endogenous fields present in living animals. Male rats weighing about 560 g each were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine. Small incisions were made in the ventral body wall at the chest and upper abdomen to position a miniature probe for measuring internal electric fields. The calibration constant for the probe size was 5.7 mm, with a flat response from at least 12 Hz to 20 kHz. A cardiac signal, similar to the normal electrocardiogram with a heart rate of about 250 bpm, was readily obtained at the chest. Upon analysis of its spectrum, the cardiac field detected by the probe had a broad maximum at 32--95 Hz. When the rates were exposed to a 1 mT, 60 Hz magnetic field, a spike appeared in the spectrum at 60 Hz. The peak-to-peak magnitudes of electric fields associated with normal heart function were comparable to fields induced by a 1 mT magnetic field at 60 Hz for those positions measured on the body surface. Within the body, or in different directions relative to the applied field, the induced fields were reduced. The cardiac field increased near the heart, becoming much larger than the induced field. Thus, the cardiac electric field, together with the other endogenous fields, combine with induced electric fields and help to provide reference levels for the induced-field dosimetry of ELF magnetic field exposures of living animals.

  12. Design of Transmitter for CDM Based 2×2 Multiple Input Multiple Output Channel Sounder for Multipath Delay Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Ullah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO wireless communication system is an innovative solution to improve the bandwidth efficiency by exploiting multipath-richness of the propagation environment. The degree of multipath-richness of the channel will determine the capacity gain attainable by MIMO deployment. Approach: Therefore, it is very important to have accurate knowledge of the propagation environment/radio channel before MIMO implement. The radio channel behavior can be anticipated by channel measurement or channel sounding. Code Division Multiplexing (CDM is one of the channel sounding techniques that allow accurate measurement at the cost of hardware complexity. CDM based channel sounder, requires code with excellent auto-correlation and cross-correlation properties which generally difficult to be achieved simultaneously. Results: In this study, an efficient transmitter for CDM-based 2×2 MIMO channel sounding technique with Loosely Synchronous (LS codes is designed. Simulation results shows that the channel sounding scheme using LS codes gives very good performance for measuring 2×2 MIMO channel behavior. The BPSK transmitter is designed using MATLAB, Verilog and Xilinx system generator blocks. Conclusion: The whole design is simulated as a single ISE project by using ModelSim simulation tool and compiled using ISE 9.2. However the proposed design of transmitter using LS code of length 8190 bits can measure multipath delay of minimum 0.13 μs and maximum 520 μs.

  13. Clinical evaluation of the accuracy of the USCOM ultrasonic cardiac output monitor in the septic shock patients%无创超声心输出量测定对急诊感染性休克患者血流动力学状态评价的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘继海; 于学忠; 王仲; 朱华栋; 徐胜勇

    2011-01-01

    comparing its cardiac index with paired measurements obtained by the PiCCO technique.Results Among the 32 patients, thirty paired measurements were obtained. Another 2 patients were excluded because we couldn 't get an acceptable signal. Comparison of the two techniques showed CIuscom ( cardiac output by USCOM) and CIpicco ( cardiac output by PiCCO) were separately ( 3.89±1.61 ) L/( min·m2 ) and ( 4.35±1.72 ) L/( min·m2 ) ( Pearson correlation = 0.97165 , P < 0.0001 ) .Conclusion The USCOM monitor has a place in Emergency Department because of its accurate, rapid,safe, well - tolerated, non - invasive and cost - effective advantages.

  14. Cephalic versus digital plethysmographic variability index measurement: a comparative pilot study in cardiac surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Pellissier, Arnaud; Saplacan, Vladimir; Gérard, Jean-Louis; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Fellahi, Jean-Luc

    2014-12-01

    Noninvasive measurement of digital plethysmographic variability index (PVI(digital)) has been proposed to predict fluid responsiveness, with conflicting results. The authors tested the hypothesis that cephalic sites of PVI measurement (namely PVI(ear) and PVI(forehead)) could be more discriminant than PVI(digital) to predict fluid responsiveness after cardiac surgery. A prospective observational study. A cardiac surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital. Fifty adult patients. Investigation before and after fluid challenge. Patients were prospectively included within the first 6-hour postoperative period and investigated before and after fluid challenge. A positive response to fluid challenge was defined as a 15% increase in cardiac index. PVI(digital), PVI(ear), PVI(forehead), and invasive arterial pulse-pressure variation (PPV) measurements were recorded simultaneously, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were built. Forty-one (82%) patients were responders and 9 (18%) patients were nonresponders to fluid challenge. ROCAUC were 0.74 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.60-0.86), 0.81 (95% CI: 0.68-0.91), 0.88 (95% CI: 0.75-0.95) and 0.87 (95% CI: 0.75-0.95) for PVI(digital), PVI(ear), PVI(forehead), and PPV, respectively. Significant differences were observed between PVI(forehead) and PVI(digital) (absolute difference in ROCAUC = 0.134 [95% CI: 0.003-0.265], p = 0.045) and between PPV and PVI(digital) (absolute difference in ROCAUC = 0.129 [95% CI: 0.011-0.247], p = 0.033). The percentage of patients within the inconclusive class of response was 46%, 70%, 44%, and 26% for PVI(digital), PVI(ear), PVI(forehead), and PPV, respectively. PVI(forehead) was more discriminant than PVI(digital) and could be a valuable alternative to arterial PPV in predicting fluid responsiveness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Measuring and mapping cardiac fiber and laminar architecture using diffusion tensor MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Patrick; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Miller, Michael I; Winslow, Raimond L

    2005-06-01

    The ventricular myocardium is known to exhibit a complex spatial organization, with fiber orientation varying as a function of transmural location. It is now well established that diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTMRI) may be used to measure this fiber orientation at high spatial resolution. Cardiac fibers are also known to be organized in sheets with surface orientation varying throughout the ventricles. This article reviews results on use of DTMRI for measuring ventricular fiber orientation, as well as presents new results providing strong evidence that the tertiary eigenvector of the diffusion tensor is aligned locally with the cardiac sheet surface normal. Considered together, these data indicate that DTMRI may be used to reconstruct both ventricular fiber and sheet organization. This article also presents the large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM) algorithm and shows that this algorithm may be used to bring ensembles of imaged and reconstructed hearts into correspondence (e.g., registration) so that variability of ventricular geometry, fiber, and sheet orientation may be quantified. Ventricular geometry and fiber structure is known to be remodeled in a range of disease processes; however, descriptions of this remodeling have remained subjective and qualitative. We anticipate that use of DTMRI for reconstruction of ventricular anatomy coupled with application of the LDDMM method for image volume registration will enable the detection and quantification of changes in cardiac anatomy that are characteristic of specific disease processes in the heart. Finally, we show that epicardial electrical mapping and DTMRI imaging may be performed in the same hearts. The anatomic data may then be used to simulate electrical conduction in a computational model of the very same heart that was mapped electrically. This facilitates direct comparison and testing of model versus experimental results and opens the door to quantitative measurement

  16. Quantitatively accurate activity measurements with a dedicated cardiac SPECT camera: Physical phantom experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourmoghaddas, Amir, E-mail: apour@ottawaheart.ca; Wells, R. Glenn [Physics Department, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6, Canada and Cardiology, The University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y4W7 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Recently, there has been increased interest in dedicated cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanners with pinhole collimation and improved detector technology due to their improved count sensitivity and resolution over traditional parallel-hole cameras. With traditional cameras, energy-based approaches are often used in the clinic for scatter compensation because they are fast and easily implemented. Some of the cardiac cameras use cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detectors which can complicate the use of energy-based scatter correction (SC) due to the low-energy tail—an increased number of unscattered photons detected with reduced energy. Modified energy-based scatter correction methods can be implemented, but their level of accuracy is unclear. In this study, the authors validated by physical phantom experiments the quantitative accuracy and reproducibility of easily implemented correction techniques applied to {sup 99m}Tc myocardial imaging with a CZT-detector-based gamma camera with multiple heads, each with a single-pinhole collimator. Methods: Activity in the cardiac compartment of an Anthropomorphic Torso phantom (Data Spectrum Corporation) was measured through 15 {sup 99m}Tc-SPECT acquisitions. The ratio of activity concentrations in organ compartments resembled a clinical {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi scan and was kept consistent across all experiments (1.2:1 heart to liver and 1.5:1 heart to lung). Two background activity levels were considered: no activity (cold) and an activity concentration 1/10th of the heart (hot). A plastic “lesion” was placed inside of the septal wall of the myocardial insert to simulate the presence of a region without tracer uptake and contrast in this lesion was calculated for all images. The true net activity in each compartment was measured with a dose calibrator (CRC-25R, Capintec, Inc.). A 10 min SPECT image was acquired using a dedicated cardiac camera with CZT detectors (Discovery NM530c, GE

  17. Effect of sediment turbidity and color on light output measurement for Microtox Basic Solid-Phase Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, T; Abbondanzi, F; Casado-Martinez, C; DelValls, T A; Guerra, R; Iacondini, A

    2005-06-01

    In this work, sediment samples collected from several Spanish harbours were tested with two toxicity procedures, designed for solid samples: the Microtox Basic Solid-Phase Test (BSPT) and a modified procedure of the previous test protocol (mBSPT). According to the BSPT procedure, after initial light readings, pure bacteria were exposed to sediment suspension dilutions and light production was directly measured on suspended sediments without any further manipulation. As measurements are likely to be affected by sediment turbidity and color, a variation in initial light measurement has been here suggested, in order to consider the sample effect at all time readings during the test. Firstly, when sediment suspensions at different concentrations were added to bacteria suspension, immediately the initial light output drastically decayed by more than 50% in signal difference, resulting in a false inhibition, as effect of sample turbidity/color. This effect was more evident at high EC50 values, when slightly or not toxic samples were assessed. Secondly, the comparison of the EC50 obtained with both procedures, demonstrated that the mBSPT produced higher EC50 values (less toxic) than those obtained with the standard procedure. The mBSPT procedure resulted rapid and effective and it could be applied simultaneously with BSPT, in order to better evaluate the toxicity.

  18. SU-E-T-370: Measurement of Conical Cone Output Factors for the Varian Edge Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H; Kim, J; Gordon, J; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Wang, S [Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Zhong, H [Henry Ford Hospital System, Detroit, MI (United States); Wen, N [Henry Ford Health System, West Bloomfield, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of detector type, SSD/depth, and intermediate reference on conical cone output factor (OF) measurements for the Varian Edge linac. Methods: OF's for 4, 5, 7.5, 10, 12.5, 15, and 17.5 mm diameter cones relative to 10cmx10cm field were measured for the 6X FFF and 10X FFF energies, with jaws set to 5cmx5cm. Measurements were performed with an Edge diode (0.8mmx0.8mmx0.03mm WxLxT), stereotatic diode SFD, photon diode, CC01 and pinpoint chambers (2mm diameter for both). 95cm SSD/5cm depth were used in a water tank. For the measurement with diodes, OF's were cross-referred to CC13 ion chamber measurements with 3cmx3cm field, as recommended, to help mitigate the energy variation in diode response with field size. Results were compared to the representative data from Varian measured with Edge detector. With SFD, OF's at 98.5cm SSD/1.5cm depth and 90cm SSD/10cm depth were also measured. Results: OF's measured with the Edge detector matched within 1.3% (max diff) with the representative data from Varian. For the SFD, OF's matched within 1.3% for the 4, 5 and 17.5 mm cones and within 3.7% for the other cones. OF's with photon diode were within 1.3% except for the 4 and 5 mm cones where they were 8.1% and 3.7%, respectively. OF's for the CC01 and pinpoint chamber deviated up to 36% and 44%, respectively for the 4 mm cone. OF's after intermediate reference with 3cmx3cm field changed by 3.7% for SFD, 0.8% for photon diode, and 0.6% for Edge detector. OF's at 98.5cm SSD/1.5cm depth were 10.8% higher than that at 95cm SSD/5cm depth, and OF's at 90cm SSD/1.5cm depth were 7.5% lower. Conclusion: OF's measured with the Edge detector appear to be reliable. CC01 and pinpoint chambers do not appear suitable for measuring the small cone OF's. SSD/depth affects OF measurements significantly.

  19. FloTrac/Vigileo系统在单肺通气心输出量监测中应用的探讨%Investigation of FloTrac/Vigileo in monitoring cardiac output during one lung ventilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏宇; 苏中宏; 史宏伟; 鲍红光

    2011-01-01

    观察FloTrac/Vigileo系统在单肺通气心输出量(CO)监测中的应用效果.方法择期单肺通气手术患者17例,ASAⅡ或Ⅲ级,使用FloTrac/Vigileo系统观察CO变化,记录诱导后(T0)、单肺通气5 min(T1)、10 min(T2)、30min(T3)以及双腔管双肺通气时(T4)、关胸时(T5)的HR、MAP、心脏指数(CI)、每搏量变异度(SVV)和气道峰压(Pmax).结果 与T0时比较,T1、T5时CI明显增加(P<0.05);T1~T5时SVV均明显下降(P<0.05);T1~T3时Pmax显著增加(P<0.05).结论 FloTrac/Vigileo系统能快速、持续地监测单肺通气时CO的变化.%Objective To investigate the efficacy of FloTrac/Vigileo in monitoring cardiac output during one lung ventilatioa Methods Seventeen ASA Ⅱ or Ⅲ patients requiring one lung ventilation (OLV) were enrolled in the study. Cardiac index (CD and stroke volume variation (SVV) were recorded using FloTrac/Vigileo after anesthesia induction (T0), 5 min after (T1), 10 min after (T2), 30 min after (T3) OLV, during double-lumen-endobronchial-tube ventilation (T4) and at closing thorax (T5). HR, MAP and airway pressure were also recorded at these time points. Results Compared with T0, CI increased significantly at T1 and T5 (P<0. 05); SW decreased significantly from T1 to T5 (P<0. 05); and Pmax increased significantly from T1 to T3 (P<0. 05). Conclusion FloTrac/Vigileo can be used to rapidly and continuously monitor cardiac output during one lung ventilation continuously.

  20. Progress in developing a thermal method for measuring the output power of medical ultrasound transducers that exploits the pyroelectric effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeqiri, Bajram; Zauhar, Gordana; Hodnett, Mark; Barrie, Jill

    2011-05-01

    Progress in developing a new measurement method for ultrasound output power is described. It is a thermal-based technique with the acoustic power generated by a transducer being absorbed within a specially developed polyurethane rubber material, whose high absorption coefficient ensures energy deposition within a few mm of the ultrasonic wave entering the material. The rate of change of temperature at the absorber surface is monitored using the pyroelectric voltage generated from electrodes disposed either side of a 60 mm diameter, 0.061 mm thick membrane of the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (pvdf) bonded to the absorber. The change in the pyroelectric output voltage generated by the sensor when the transducer is switched ON and OFF is proportional to the delivered ultrasound power. The sensitivity of the device is defined as the magnitude of these switch voltages to a unit input stimulus of power (watt). Three important aspects of the performance of the pyroelectric sensor have been studied. Firstly, measurements have revealed that the temperature dependent sensitivity increases over the range from approximately 20°C to 30°C at a rate of +1.6% °C(-1). Studies point to the key role that the properties of both the absorbing backing layer and pvdf membrane play in controlling the sensor response. Secondly, the high sensitivity of the technique has been demonstrated using an NPL Pulsed Checksource, a 3.5 MHz focused transducer delivering a nominal acoustic power level of 4 mW. Finally, proof-of-concept of a new type of acoustic sensor responding to time-averaged intensity has been demonstrated, through fabrication of an absorber-backed hydrophone of nominal active element diameter 0.4 mm. A preliminary study using such a device to resolve the spatial distribution of acoustic intensity within plane-piston and focused 3.5 MHz acoustic fields has been completed. Derived beam profiles are compared to conventional techniques that depend on deriving

  1. Equilibrator-based measurements of dissolved methane in the surface ocean using an integrated cavity output laser absorption spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuhong; ZHAN Liyang; ZHANG Jiexia; CHEN Liqi

    2015-01-01

    A new off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) is coupled to Weiss equilibrator for continuous high-resolution dissolved methane measurement in the surface ocean. The time constant for the equilibrator in freshwater at room temperature is determined via dis-equilibration and re-equilibration experiments. The constant for methane is about 40 min. The system is calibrated using a standard gas of 3.980×10–6, and the precision of the ICOS for methane is 0.07%. This system is equipped onboard to measure the spatial distribution in methane concentrations of South Yellow Sea (SYS) along the cruise track from Shanghai to Qingdao. Result shows that the methane concentration varies from 2.79 to 36.36 nmol/L, reveals a significant pattern of methane source in SYS, and a distinct decreasing trend from south to north. The peak value occurs at the coast area outside mouth of the Changjiang River, likely to be affected by the Changjiang diluted water mass dissolving a large amount of rich in methane. Moreover, all the surface waters are oversaturated, air-to-sea fluxes range from 98.59 to 5 485.35 μmol/(m2·d) (average value (1 169.74±1 398.46) μmol/(m2·d)), indicating a source region for methane to the atmosphere.

  2. Classification of cardiac rhythm using heart rate dynamical measures: validation in MIT-BIH databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Marta; Carozzi, Luca; Moss, Travis J; de Pasquale, Marco; Cerutti, Sergio; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall; Ferrario, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Identification of atrial fibrillation (AF) is a clinical imperative. Heartbeat interval time series are increasingly available from personal monitors, allowing new opportunity for AF diagnosis. Previously, we devised numerical algorithms for identification of normal sinus rhythm (NSR), AF, and SR with frequent ectopy using dynamical measures of heart rate. Here, we wished to validate them in the canonical MIT-BIH ECG databases. We tested algorithms on the NSR, AF and arrhythmia databases. When the databases were combined, the positive predictive value of the new algorithms exceeded 95% for NSR and AF, and was 40% for SR with ectopy. Further, dynamical measures did not distinguish atrial from ventricular ectopy. Inspection of individual 24hour records showed good correlation of observed and predicted rhythms. Heart rate dynamical measures are effective ingredients in numerical algorithms to classify cardiac rhythm from the heartbeat intervals time series alone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Family-based associations in measures of psychological distress and quality of life in a cardiac screening clinic for inheritable cardiac diseases: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGorrian Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family-based cardiac screening programmes for persons at risk for genetic cardiac diseases are now recommended. However, the psychological wellbeing and health related quality of life (QoL of such screened patients is poorly understood, especially in younger patients. We sought to examine wellbeing and QoL in a representative group of adults aged 16 and over in a dedicated family cardiac screening clinic. Methods Prospective survey of consecutive consenting patients attending a cardiac screening clinic, over a 12 month period. Data were collected using two health measurement tools: the Short Form 12 (version 2 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, along with baseline demographic and screening visit-related data. The HADS and SF-12v.2 outcomes were compared by age group. Associations with a higher HADS score were examined using logistic regression, with multi-level modelling used to account for the family-based structure of the data. Results There was a study response rate of 86.6%, with n=334 patients providing valid HADS data (valid response rate 79.5%, and data on n=316 retained for analysis. One-fifth of patients were aged under 25 (n=61. Younger patients were less likely than older to describe significant depression on their HADS scale (p Conclusions High levels of anxiety were seen amongst patients attending a family-based cardiac screening clinic.Younger patients also had high rates of clinically significant anxiety. Higher levels of anxiety and depression tends to run in families, and this has implications for family screening and intervention programmes.

  4. A compact and stable eddy covariance set-up for methane measurements using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. D. Hendriks

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A Fast Methane Analyzer (FMA is assessed for its applicability in a closed path eddy covariance field set-up in a peat meadow. The FMA uses off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy combined with a highly specific narrow band laser for the detection of CH4 and strongly reflective mirrors to obtain a laser path length of 2–20×103 m. Statistical testing and a calibration experiment showed high precision (7.8×10−3 ppb and accuracy (<0.30% of the instrument, while no drift was observed. The instrument response time was determined to be 0.10 s. In the field set-up, the FMA is attached to a scroll pump and combined with a 3-axis ultrasonic anemometer and an open path infrared gas analyzer for measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapour. The power-spectra and co-spectra of the instruments were satisfactory for 10 Hz sampling rates.

    Due to erroneous measurements, spikes and periods of low turbulence the data series consisted for 26% of gaps. Observed CH4 fluxes consisted mainly of emission, showed a diurnal cycle, but were rather variable over. The average CH4 emission was 29.7 nmol m−2 s−1, while the typical maximum CH4 emission was approximately 80.0 nmol m−2 s−1 and the typical minimum flux was approximately 0.0 nmol m−2 s−1. The correspondence of the measurements with flux chamber measurements in the footprint was good and the observed CH4 emission rates were comparable with eddy covariance CH4 measurements in other peat areas.

    Additionally, three measurement techniques with lower sampling frequencies were simulated, which might give the possibility to measure CH4 fluxes without an external pump and save energy. Disjunct eddy covariance appeared to be the most reliable substitute for 10 Hz eddy covariance, while relaxed eddy accumulation gave

  5. Interpreting measurements of cardiac function using vendor-independent speckle tracking echocardiography in children: a prospective, blinded comparison with catheter-derived measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudar, Suma P; Baker, G Hamilton; Chowdhury, Shahryar M; Reid, Kimberly J; Shirali, Girish; Scheurer, Mark A

    2016-12-01

    Adult studies demonstrate that echocardiographic measurements of cardiac function using speckle tracking correlate with invasive measurements, but such data in the pediatric population are sparse. Our aim was to compare speckle-derived measures of cardiac function to measurements routinely obtained by cardiac catheterization in children. Echocardiograms were performed on the day of cardiac catheterization. Using Tomtec 2D Cardiac Performance Analysis, longitudinal strain (LS), longitudinal strain rate (LSR), early diastolic LSR, and ejection fraction (EF) for the right and left ventricle (RV and LV) were calculated via speckle tracking. Global LS and LSR were calculated for the LV. These results were compared to cardiac index, maximum ventricular dp/dt (max dp/dt), ventricular end-diastolic pressure (EDP), and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) obtained by fluid-filled catheters. A blinded observer performed all echo measurements. Fifty studies were performed on 28 patients ages 4 months to 20 years old. Their diagnoses included cardiac transplant (48 studies), repaired AV septal defect (1), and dilated cardiomyopathy (1). RVEDP ranged from 2 to 22 mm Hg (median=6) and PCWP ranged from 6 to 32 mmHg (median 10). LV global LS and LV 2-chamber LSR by speckle-tracking negatively correlated with LV max dp/dt (LV global LS R=-.83, P=.001; LV 2-chamber LSR R=-.69, P=.009). RV LS weakly correlated with max dp/dt (R=.363, P=.002). Early diastolic strain rate did not correlate with EDP in either ventricle. Speckle-derived measurements of function in the LV have stronger correlation than the RV to catheter-derived measures. LV global LS has the strongest correlation with invasive function measures in children. © 2016, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Gain and output power measurements in an electrically excited oxygen-iodine laser with a scaled discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruzzese, J R; Hicks, A; Erofeev, A; Cole, A C; Nishihara, M; Adamovich, I V [Michael A Chaszeyka Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics Laboratories, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2010-01-13

    Singlet delta oxygen (SDO) yield, small signal gain, and output power have been measured in a scaled electric discharge excited oxygen-iodine laser. Two different types of discharges have been used for SDO generation in O{sub 2}-He-NO flows at pressures up to 90 Torr, crossed nanosecond pulser/dc sustainer discharge and capacitively coupled transverse RF discharge. The total flow rate through the laser cavity with a 10 cm gain path is approximately 0.5 mole s{sup -1}, with steady-state run time at a near-design Mach number of M = 2.9 of up to 5 s. The results demonstrate that SDO yields and flow temperatures obtained using the pulser-sustainer and the RF discharges are close. Gain and static temperature in the supersonic cavity remain nearly constant, {gamma} = 0.10-0.12% cm{sup -1} and T = 125-140 K, over the axial distance of approximately 10 cm. The highest gain measured is 0.122% cm{sup -1} at T = 140 K. Positive gain measured in the supersonic inviscid core extends over approximately one half to one third of the cavity height, with absorption measured in the boundary layers near top and bottom walls of the cavity. Laser power has been measured using (i) two 99.9% mirrors on both sides of the resonator, 2.5 W, and (ii) 99.9% mirror on one side and 99% mirror on the other side, 3.1 W. Gain downstream of the resonator is moderately reduced during lasing (by up to 20-30%) and remains nearly independent of the axial distance, by up to 10 cm. This suggests that only a small fraction of power available for lasing is coupled out, and that additional power may be coupled in a second resonator. Preliminary laser power measurements using two transverse resonators operating at the same time (both using 99.9-99% mirror combinations) demonstrated lasing at both axial locations, with the total power of 3.8 W.

  7. In situ measurement of dissolved methane and carbon dioxide in freshwater ecosystems by off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Valencia, Rodrigo; Magana-Rodriguez, Felipe; Gerardo-Nieto, Oscar; Sepulveda-Jauregui, Armando; Martinez-Cruz, Karla; Anthony, Katey Walter; Baer, Doug; Thalasso, Frederic

    2014-10-07

    A novel low-cost method for the combined, real-time, and in situ determination of dissolved methane and carbon dioxide concentrations in freshwater ecosystems was designed and developed. This method is based on the continuous sampling of water from a freshwater ecosystem to a gas/liquid exchange membrane. Dissolved gas is transferred through the membrane to a continuous flow of high purity nitrogen, which is then measured by an off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer (OA-ICOS). This method, called M-ICOS, was carefully tested in a laboratory and was subsequently applied to four lakes in Mexico and Alaska with contrasting climates, ecologies, and morphologies. The M-ICOS method allowed for the determination of dissolved methane and carbon dioxide concentrations with a frequency of 1 Hz and with a method detection limit of 2.76 × 10(-10) mol L(-1) for methane and 1.5 × 10(-7) mol L(-1) for carbon dioxide. These detection limits are below saturated concentrations with respect to the atmosphere and significantly lower than the minimum concentrations previously reported in lakes. The method is easily operable by a single person from a small boat, and the small size of the suction probe allows the determination of dissolved gases with a minimized impact on shallow freshwater ecosystems.

  8. A comparison of pain measures in newborn infants after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Linda S; Ridout, Deborah; Howard, Richard; Peters, Judy; Honour, John W

    2011-08-01

    Accurate pain assessment tools to evaluate pain in critically ill neonates in the postoperative period are lacking. Therefore, we compared a number of potentially useful indices of pain in critically ill neonates following cardiac surgery. Eighty-one full-term infants were studied during the first 48 postoperative hours and the following indices were measured: heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, heart-rate variability, urinary and plasma cortisol, and 4 composite pain measurement scales: Children's and Infants' Postoperative Pain Scale (CHIPPS), CRIES, COMFORT, and Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP). Regression models were used to investigate relationships between individual pain indices or composite pain assessment scales with respect to procedural intensity and opioid dose and plasma levels. COMFORT score performed best, with a 27% difference in score between procedures causing tissue damage and those that did not (Ppain indices studied, the COMFORT score performed best, with both behavioural and physiological components providing significant contributions.

  9. Influence of the sample anticoagulant on the measurements of impedance aggregometry in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Solomon

    2008-10-01

    postoperative day showed a significant recovery in platelet activity in the samples containing heparin (increase from 30 ± 22 U to 46 ± 27 U for the COLtest and from 70 ± 34 U to 95 ± 32 U for the TRAPtest, p < 0.001, Student’s t-test, while no significant recovery of platelet function could be established in the MEA measurements performed with citrated blood.Conclusions: The choice of blood sample anticoagulant used for impedance aggregometry influenced the platelet aggregation response. Postoperative platelet function recovery was only detected in the heparinized samples. Heparin seems to be better suited than citrate for the analysis of impedance aggregometry in heart surgery.Keywords: cardiac surgery, impedance aggregometry, platelet recovery, sample anticoagulant  

  10. 超声心动图对中晚孕正常胎儿心排血量及主动脉峡部血流量的研究%Research on cardiac output and blood flow of aortic isthmus of normal fetus in middle and late pregnancy by echocardiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈桂红; 张燕宏; 米杰; 张晓云; 李伟娟; 孙聪欣; 梁丽华; 刘涛; 王玮婧

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the changes of cardiac output and distribution with the increasing of pregnancy week in normal fetuses of middle and late pregnancy and establish the normal reference range.Methods Three hundred and thirteen normal fetuses in 20-40 pregnancy weeks underwent fetal echocardiography.The largest diameters of aortic valve,pulmonary valve,ductus arteriosus,aortic isthmus were measured respectively in the left ventricular outflow view,right ventricular outflow view,three vessels view and aortic arch longitudinal view.The blood flow spectrums of these parts were acquired and its velocity time integral (VTI) and heart rate (HR) were got by automatic envelope model.According to the formula of Q =(diameter/2)2 × 3.14 × VTI × HR,the cardiac output of left and right ventricle,the blood flow of aortic isthmus and ductus arteriosus were calculated.Results The cardiac outputs of left and right ventricle,combined cardiac output and the blood flow of aortic isthmus and ductus arteriosus of normal fetuses in middle and late pregnancy gradually increased with the increasing of gestational age and there were linear positive correlation between them.The blood flow of aortic isthmus increased with fetal weight,and there was significant correlation between them.The ratio of blood flow of aortic isthmus and ductus arteriosus decreased gradually with the increasing pregnancy week,and there was linear negative relationship between them.The ratio of blood flow of aortic isthmus and output of left ventricle and the ratio of blood flow of aortic isthmus and cardiac output were relatively constant,and there was poor correlation with gestational age.Conclusions Quantification of cardiac output and blood flow of AI can improve understanding about fetal circulation system physiology and help to identify abnormal pathological conditions,especially prompt the late morphological changes because of early abnormal flow of aortic isthmus.There was high clinical value for

  11. Measurement of Functional Capacity Requirements of Farmers: IMPLICATIONS FOR A CARDIAC REHABILITATION TRAINING PROGRAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Shannon; Karcher, Justin; Rogers, Rebecca; Kennedy, Kathleen; Lawrence, Anne; Adams, Jenny

    2017-03-01

    Updated cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and return-to-work guidelines from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) now include specificity of training for industrial athletes (exercise training that involves the muscle groups, movements, and energy systems that these patients use during occupational tasks). However, many CR facilities do not apply this principle, relying instead on the traditional protocol that consists primarily of aerobic exercise. This study was conducted to measure the metabolic cost of typical farming tasks and to compare 2 methods of calculating training intensities. Metabolic data were collected from 28 participants (23 men and 5 women, aged 18 to 57 years) while they loaded 10 hay bales, dug a fence posthole, filled 8 seed hoppers, and shoveled grain. Mean metabolic equivalent levels during these activities were 5.9 to 7.6 and participants reached 60% to 70% of heart rate reserve (HRR). By comparison, their mean resting heart rate + 30 beats per minute (RHR+30, a traditional CR intensity level) represented only 28% of HRR. Participants in the current study performed farming tasks within the ACSM's recommended range of 40% to 80% of HRR, and the results suggest that training at RHR+30 would have been inadequate for helping a farmer return to work after a cardiac event. Using the study tasks as a basis, we described exercises that would be appropriate for the supervised resistance training of farmers in a CR setting.

  12. A compact and stable eddy covariance set-up for methane measurements using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. D. Hendriks

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A DLT-100 Fast Methane Analyser (FMA from Los Gatos Research (LGR Ltd. is assessed for its applicability in a closed path eddy covariance field set-up. The FMA uses off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS combined with a highly specific narrow band laser for the detection of CH4 and strongly reflective mirrors to obtain a laser path length of 2×10³ to 20×10³ m. Statistical testing, a calibration experiment and comparison with high tower data showed high precision and very good stability of the instrument. The measurement cell response time was tested to be 0.10 s. In the field set-up, the FMA is attached to a scroll pump and combined with a Gill Windmaster Pro 3 axis Ultrasonic Anemometer and a Licor 7500 open path infrared gas analyzer. The power-spectra and co-spectra of the instrument are satisfactory for 10 Hz sampling rates. The correspondence with CH4 flux chamber measurements is good and the observed CH4 emissions are comparable with (eddy covariance CH4 measurements in other peat areas.

    CH4 emissions are rather variable over time and show a diurnal pattern. The average CH4 emission is 50±12.5 nmol m−2 s−1, while the typical maximum CH4 emission is 120±30 nmol m−2 s−1 (during daytime and the typical minimum flux is –20±2.5 nmol m−2 s−1 (uptake, during night time.

    Additionally, the set-up was tested for three measurement techniques with slower measurement rates, which could be used in the future to make the scroll pump superfluous and save energy. Both disjunct eddy covariance as well as slow 1 Hz eddy covariance showed results very similar to normal 10 Hz eddy covariance. Relaxed eddy accumulation (REA only matched with normal 10 Hz eddy covariance over an averaging period of at least several weeks.

  13. Early assessment of post-operative cardiac output and causes of death in the neonates with congenital heart diseases%新生儿先天性心脏病术后早期心排血量评估及死亡原因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仇黎生; 刘锦纷; 徐志伟; 朱丽敏; 徐卓明

    2010-01-01

    analysis and calculated with the PiCCO plus system. Meanwhile, serum cardiac troponin I ( cTnl), mixed venous oxygen saturation ( SvO_2 ) and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time were measured. Finally, the risk factors for surgical treatment in survivors and that associated with an increased mortality were analyzed. The association between post-operative cardiac output and the death after surgery was examined. Results Four neonates died after surgery, with a surgical mortality of 8.5%. CIvalue in the neonates [ (2.0±0.3 ) liters per minute per square meter of body surface was less than normal 2.5±0. 3. CI was associated inversely with CPB time but had a positive correlation with SvO_2. No significant difference association between CI and cTnI was observed. The value of cTnl was associated with the type of surgical procedures. Cases for which DHCA and low flow cerebral pefusion technique were used were free from neurological complications, ischemia in the lower extremities and oli-guria. The duration of cardiopulmonary bypass, urgent state of the operation and the abnormal coronary artery were associated with high mortality in the neonates after cardiac surgery. Conclusion The cardiac output of the neonates in whom cardiac pro-cedures were performed is adequate for the the oxygen supply required by the whole body though it is slightly lower than nomad after cardiac surgery. Higher mortality in the neonates during early postoperative period may be due to the complexity of the primary diseases, prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass time, residual abnormalities and severe acidosis before operation. Various techniques for CPB and that for the myocardial protection are safe and can provide an appropriate operative field.

  14. Serial measurement of neuron specific enolase improves prognostication in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Storm Christian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuron specific enolase (NSE has repeatedly been evaluated for neurological prognostication in patients after cardiac arrest. However, it is unclear whether current guidelines for NSE cutoff levels also apply to cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. Thus, we investigated the prognostic significance of absolute NSE levels and NSE kinetics in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. Methods In a prospective study of 35 patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest, NSE was measured daily for four days following admission. Outcome was assessed at ICU discharge using the CPC score. All patients received hypothermia treatment for 24 hours at 33°C with a surface cooling device according to current guidelines. Results The cutoff for absolute NSE levels in patients with unfavourable outcome (CPC 3-5 72 hours after cardiac arrest was 57 μg/l with an area under the curve (AUC of 0.82 (sensitivity 47%, specificity 100%. The cutoff level for NSE kinetics in patients with unfavourable outcome (CPC 3-5 was an absolute increase of 7.9 μg/l (AUC 0.78, sensitivity 63%, specificity 100% and a relative increase of 33.1% (AUC 0.803, sensitivity 67%, specificity 100% at 48 hours compared to admission. Conclusion In cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia, prognostication of unfavourable outcome by NSE kinetics between admission and 48 hours after resuscitation may be superior to prognostication by absolute NSE levels.

  15. Mechanical and optical characteristics of a new fiber optical system used for cardiac contraction measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppe, A; Hoeland, K; Müller, S; Hexamer, M; Nowack, G; Mügge, A; Werner, J

    2004-10-01

    In order to obtain a better physiological performance and a closer restoration of the regular rhythm of failing hearts, a new fiber optical sensor system for the measurement of cardiac contraction has been developed. It consists of an opto-electrical unit and a sensing fiber which has to be positioned in the heart. The objective of this new fiber optic sensor system is to use the inotropic information to adjust a stimulation algorithm in single or multichamber pacing or to detect arrhythmia in insufficient heart function. In this study, the mechanical and optical characteristics of different fibers are investigated. The relationship between the attenuation (with an achieved numerical maximum of 0.3 dB), the bending diameter and the angle of bending is determined in a range of 20-160 mm. The most suitable fiber for the application in cardiological problems is determined (WT8 fiber), for which the sensitivity is analyzed. Additionally, power spectra are calculated from WT8 fiber signals obtained from pig hearts, working under physiological conditions. The maximal frequency response was 23 Hz. It is concluded that the fiber optical measurement of cardiac contraction is not only feasible and reproducible, but the WT8 fiber also shows optimal behavior in the range of parameters occurring in the heart chambers. Nevertheless, in order to restrict the measured signal reliably to bending processes within the chambers only, it is concluded that a special combined fiber has to be constructed with a high sensitivity only at its terminal section within the heart.

  16. [Semi-invasive monitoring of cardiac output in renal transplantation by a new device using arterial pressure waveform analysis compare with intermittent pulmonary thermodilution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Takashi; Maemura, Yumi; Toyoda, Daisuke; Iwasaki, Ririko; Sato, Nobukazu; Ochtai, Ryoichi

    2010-07-01

    Clinical usefulness of PA catheter is controversial. We compared a new semi-invasive device (FloTrac/Vigileo) using arterial pressure waveform analysis for CO measurement in patients undergoing renal transplantation with bolus thermodilution method. Simultaneously CCO was measured, and we compared CCO with that obtained by bolus thermodilution method. Forty seven patients undergoing renal transplantation were enrolled. A PAC was inserted and radial arterial access was used for semi-invasive determination of CO (APCO) with the Vigileo. CO was measured simultaneously by bolus thermodilution and the Vigileo technique, and after starting operation, volume loading, before surgery, and other points were measured over 1 hour during measurements. And CCO was measured simultaneously at all points. Statistical analysis was performed using the method described by Bland and Altman. Bias was defined as the mean difference between the volumes obtained by pulmonary artery thermodilution and those by arterial pressure waveform analysis. Precision was expressed by the upper and lower limits of agreement. Means of age, height and weight were 45 years, 163.8 cm and 59.2 kg, respectively. Regression analysis of CO; APCO and ICO showed y = 0.8x + 2.2, R2 = 0.57. CCO and ICO; y = 0.8x + 1.1, R2 = 0.74. Average of APCO and ICO; bias = -0.65. SD = 1.54 average of CCO and ICO; bias = 0.38, SD = 1.23. In renal transplantation, CO measured by a new semi-invasive arterial pressure waveform analysis device showed good agreement with the volume obtained by intermittent pulmonary artery thermodilution method.

  17. 静脉输注氨茶碱治疗严重脓毒症的可行性%Effects of aminophylline on cardiac index,oxygenation index, urine output and APACHEⅡ in patients with sepsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代冬梅; 王飞; 许汪斌; 杨磊; 谢翠英

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of aminophylline on cardiac index, oxygenation index and urine output in patients with sepsis. Methods Sixty APACHE Ⅱ score > 16 points patients with spesis of both sexes, aged 22 -76yr, were randomly divided into 2 groups( n = 30 each ) : aminophylline group ( group A ) and control group( group C ). Mechanical ventilation, antibiotics according to susceptibility or the sites of infection, early goal - directed therapy and low - dose steroids were administered for septic shock in both groups. Aminophylline 3mg/kg was infused iv over 30 min and followed by an infusion at 0. 4 mg/( kg·h ) for 4 days. Cardiac index, stroke volume variation and invasive arterial blood pressure were continuously monitored. Blood samples were drawn for blood gas analysis calculating oxygenation index and for determination of aminophylline serum concentration before aminophylline infusion( T0) and at 24h( T1), 48h( T2 ) and 72 h( T3 ) following aminophylline infusion. Urine output and total daily infusion were recorded at T0- T3. Results There were no significant differences in age, gender ratios, height, weight, APACHE Ⅱ scores, and total daily infusion between two groups ( P>0. 05 ). Compared with group C, there were no significant differences in the total daily infusion, cardiac index, oxygenation index and urine output before intravenous infusion of aminophylline ( P >0. 05 ). Compared with the values before intravenous infusion of aminophylline ( T0), oxygenation index and urine output increased in two groups ( P 0. 05 ), but it increased at T1 and T3( P 0. 05 ). Conclusion Intravenous infusion of aminophylline can increase urine output, oxygenation index and cardiac index in patients with sepsis.%目的 观察静脉输注氨茶碱对严重脓毒症患者氧合指数、尿量、心脏指数和APACHEII评分的影响,探讨静脉输注氨茶碱治疗脓毒症的可行性.方法 将60例APACHE 评分>16分的脓毒症患者随机分为氨茶

  18. Development of measurement device for evaluation of solar cell module output. 2; Taiyo denchi module shutsuryoku hyokayo sokuteiki no kaihatsu. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minoda, M.; Itsumi, J. [Kumamoto Institute of Technology, Kumamoto (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    Enhancement in design efficiency may be attained as well as utilization in maintenance if on-the-spot data is made available, for the purpose of flexibly dealing with changes in design or matching with a house structure, in calculating the power generation output of a solar cell (PV) module. Under the circumstances, a small-sized compound measuring device was produced as a prototype which, using an I-V curve tracer, measured output and condition of a roof at the time of installation, compared with the optimum operation and predicted the power generation. The device was structured with the main body consisting of a computing part, measurement controller and power supply and with various sensor modules. The electron load control method was employed in order to measure I-V characteristics of the PV module, since it was desirable to use a variable load and to cover the range from the release voltage of a solar cell to the short-circuit state through the maximum output point. The reference module method was used for the system evaluation. The device was presumably applicable to a PV system design by incorporating a sensor module for measuring design environment data, which was essential at the time of a system design, in addition to those for measuring output. 9 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Determining the light scattering and absorption parameters from forward-directed flux measurements in cardiac tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Anthony J; Hyatt, Christopher J; Kollisch-Singule, Michaela C; Beaumont, Jacques; Roth, Bradley J; Pertsov, Arkady M

    2017-07-01

    We describe a method to accurately measure the light scattering model parameters from forward-directed flux (FDF) measurements carried out with a fiber-optic probe (optrode). Improved determination of light scattering parameters will, in turn, permit better modeling and interpretation of optical mapping in the heart using voltage-sensitive dyes. Using our optrode-based system, we carried out high spatial resolution measurements of FDF in intact and homogenized cardiac tissue, as well as in intralipid-based tissue phantoms. The samples were illuminated with a broad collimated beam at 660 and 532 nm. Measurements were performed with a plunge fiber-optic probe (NA=0.22) at a spatial resolution of up to 10  μm. In the vicinity of the illuminated surface, the FDF consistently manifested a fast decaying exponent with a space constant comparable with the decay rate of ballistic photons. Using a Monte Carlo model, we obtained a simple empirical formula linking the rate of the fast exponent to the scattering coefficient, the anisotropy parameter g, and the numerical aperture of the probe. The estimates of scattering coefficient based on this formula were validated in tissue phantoms. Potential applications of optical fiber-based FDF measurements for the evaluation of optical parameters in turbid media are discussed.

  20. Fast, reproducible measurement of the vascular input function in mice using constrained reconstruction and cardiac sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan, Dustin K; Lai, Stephen Y; Bankson, James A

    2011-05-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is often used to assess the response to therapy in small animal models of cancer. Rigorous quantification of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data using common pharmacokinetic models requires dynamic determination of the concentration of contrast in tumor tissue and in blood. Measurement of the blood concentration, or vascular input function (VIF), requires high temporal resolution and is prone to distortion as a result of flow and partial volume artifacts when measured in local blood vessels. We have developed a strategy for the robust measurement of VIF in mice that uses a constrained reconstruction algorithm to enable sampling from the left ventricle of the heart. The feasibility of the algorithm and its resistance to cardiac motion are demonstrated in vivo and through numerical simulations. VIF sampling is interleaved with slices dedicated to tumor coverage to yield a fast VIF sampling period (81 ms) that is decoupled from the temporal resolution of tumor data (3.9 s). The algorithm provides results that agree with fully encoded measurements in the slowly varying component of VIF to within a 4% root-mean-square signal difference. Analysis of a parametric representation of VIFs measured in a population of mice showed a significant reduction in variations observed within subjects (5%-58% over four parameters; p model of anaplastic thyroid cancer revealed a decrease in the variation of pharmacokinetic parameters between mice by a factor of two. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Measurement of Cardiac Angiotensin II by Immunoassays, HPLC-Chip/Mass Spectrometry, and Functional Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mello, Walmor C; Gerena, Yamil

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms related to the effect of angiotensin II, its level on cardiac tissues, as well as its overexpression represent an important aspect of cardiovascular pharmacology and pathology. Severe alterations of cardiac functions are induced by hypertension including activation of circulating and local cardiac renin angiotensin systems. In this chapter, we are providing the methods and materials necessary for further investigation of this important topic.

  2. Evaluation of Scientific Outputs of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in Scopus Citation Database based on Scopus, ResearchGate, and Mendeley Scientometric Measures

    OpenAIRE

    Batooli, Zahra; Ravandi, Somaye Nadi; Bidgoli, Mohammad Sabahi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is essential to evaluate the impact of scientific publications through citation analysis in citation indexes. In addition, scientometric measures of social media also should be assessed. These measures include how many times the publications were read, viewed, and downloaded. The present study aimed to assess the scientific output of scholars at Kashan University of Medical Sciences by the end of March 2014 based on scientometric measures of Scopus, ResearchGate, and Mendeley....

  3. Cardiac Time Intervals Measured by Tissue Doppler Imaging M-mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Mogelvang, Rasmus; Schnohr, Peter

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that the cardiac time intervals reveal reduced myocardial function in persons with hypertension and are strong predictors of future ischemic cardiovascular diseases in the general population. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a large community-based population study, cardiac......). Additionally, they displayed a significant dose-response relationship, between increasing severity of elevated blood pressure and increasing left ventricular mass index (P... chart, and the European Society of Hypertension/European Society of Cardiology risk chart. CONCLUSION: The cardiac time intervals identify impaired cardiac function in individuals with hypertension, not only independent of conventional risk factors but also in participants with a normal conventional...

  4. Predictive factors related to low cardiac output syndrome following aortic valve replacement%主动脉瓣置换术后发生低心排出量综合征的预测因素探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马红; 张其霞; 李晓静; 郑晓燕

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the predictive factors related to postoperative low cardiac output syndrome in pa-tients after aortic valve replacement due to aortic stenosis or regurgitation. Methods Three hundred patients with aortic valve defect due to aortic stenosis (AS, n=150) or aortic incompetence (AI, n=150), who underwent isolated aortic valve replacement were included in the study. Low cardiac output syndrome(LOS) was defined as the need for high dosages of inotropic medication, and/or intra- aortic bal oon pumping to sustain adequate hemodynamic status. Results Postoperative low cardiac output syn-drome developed in 86 patients (28.6%), including 39 patients with AS (26.0%) and 47 patients with AI (31.3%). The development of postoperative LOS were associated with the fol owing factors (odds ratio in parentheses): for AS group: advanced age (OR=4.7), obesity (OR=1.8), history of heart failure (OR=1.7), end- systolic (OR=5.5) and end- diastolic intraventricular septum thickness (OR=4.2), left atrial diameter (OR=1.6), mitral and tricuspid regurgitation (OR=1.9, 1.5) before surgery, LVEF≤50.0%(OR=5.4), left ventricular end systolic diameter (OR=1.7), left ventricular end diastolic diameter (OR=1.9) and mitral regurgitation (OR=4.1) in early postoperative period; for AI group:advanced age (OR=1.9), obesity (OR=4.8), history of heart failure (OR=1.7), LVEF≤50.0%(OR=1.8), left ventricular end- systolic (OR=4.5), end- diastolic diameters (OR=6.4), left ventricular end systolic di-ameter (OR=1.5), left ventricular end diastolic diameter(OR=1.6), and tricuspid regurgitation (OR=1.5) in preoperative period and left ventricular end- systolic (OR=4.7) and end- diastolic diameters (OR=6.1), and LVEF≤50.0% (OR=7.2) in early postoperative period. Conclusion The patients at high risk for the development of low cardiac output syndrome should be the focus of trials of new techniques of myocardial protection to effectively resuscitate the ischemic myocardium and

  5. Gravity Compensation Method for Combined Accelerometer and Gyro Sensors Used in Cardiac Motion Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Magnus Reinsfelt; Nghiem, Giang M; Halvorsen, Per Steinar; Elle, Ole Jakob; Grymyr, Ole-Johannes; Hoff, Lars; Remme, Espen W

    2017-05-01

    A miniaturized accelerometer fixed to the heart can be used for monitoring of cardiac function. However, an accelerometer cannot differentiate between acceleration caused by motion and acceleration due to gravity. The accuracy of motion measurements is therefore dependent on how well the gravity component can be estimated and filtered from the measured signal. In this study we propose a new method for estimating the gravity, based on strapdown inertial navigation, using a combined accelerometer and gyro. The gyro was used to estimate the orientation of the gravity field and thereby remove it. We compared this method with two previously proposed gravity filtering methods in three experimental models using: (1) in silico computer simulated heart motion; (2) robot mimicked heart motion; and (3) in vivo measured motion on the heart in an animal model. The new method correlated excellently with the reference (r (2) > 0.93) and had a deviation from reference peak systolic displacement (6.3 ± 3.9 mm) below 0.2 ± 0.5 mm for the robot experiment model. The new method performed significantly better than the two previously proposed methods (p gravity component from the accelerometer signal.

  6. Automatic detection of measurement points for non-contact vibrometer-based diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Jürgen; Kroschel, Kristian; Willersinn, Dieter

    2017-03-01

    Monitoring of the heart rhythm is the cornerstone of the diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias. It is done by means of electrocardiography which relies on electrodes attached to the skin of the patient. We present a new system approach based on the so-called vibrocardiogram that allows an automatic non-contact registration of the heart rhythm. Because of the contactless principle, the technique offers potential application advantages in medical fields like emergency medicine (burn patient) or premature baby care where adhesive electrodes are not easily applicable. A laser-based, mobile, contactless vibrometer for on-site diagnostics that works with the principle of laser Doppler vibrometry allows the acquisition of vital functions in form of a vibrocardiogram. Preliminary clinical studies at the Klinikum Karlsruhe have shown that the region around the carotid artery and the chest region are appropriate therefore. However, the challenge is to find a suitable measurement point in these parts of the body that differs from person to person due to e. g. physiological properties of the skin. Therefore, we propose a new Microsoft Kinect-based approach. When a suitable measurement area on the appropriate parts of the body are detected by processing the Kinect data, the vibrometer is automatically aligned on an initial location within this area. Then, vibrocardiograms on different locations within this area are successively acquired until a sufficient measuring quality is achieved. This optimal location is found by exploiting the autocorrelation function.

  7. Serial high sensitivity cardiac troponin T measurement in acute heart failure : insights from the RELAX-AHF study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felker, G. Michael; Mentz, Robert J.; Teerlink, John R.; Voors, Adriaan A.; Pang, Peter S.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Greenberg, Barry H.; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Davison, Beth A.; Cotter, Gad; Prescott, Margaret F.; Hua, Tsushung A.; Lopez-Pintado, Sara; Severin, Thomas; Metra, Marco

    2015-01-01

    AimsTroponin elevation is common in acute heart failure (AHF) and may be useful for prognostication; however, available data are mixed and many previous studies used older, less sensitive assays. We examined the association between serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT)

  8. Measuring Cardiac Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) Activity in Toddlers - Resting and Developmental Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Nicole R; Caron, Zoe K; Blackburn, Katherine S; Alkon, Abbey

    2016-02-25

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) consists of two branches, the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, and controls the function of internal organs (e.g., heart rate, respiration, digestion) and responds to everyday and adverse experiences (1). ANS measures in children have been found to be related to behavior problems, emotion regulation, and health (2-7). Therefore, understanding the factors that affect ANS development during early childhood is important. Both branches of the ANS affect young children's cardiovascular responses to stimuli and have been measured noninvasively, via external monitoring equipment, using valid and reliable measures of physiological change (8-11). However, there are few studies of very young children with simultaneous measures of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems, which limits understanding of the integrated functioning of the two systems. In addition, the majority of existing studies of young children report on infants' resting ANS measures or their reactivity to commonly used mother-child interaction paradigms, and less is known about ANS reactivity to other challenging conditions. We present a study design and standardized protocol for a non-invasive and rapid assessment of cardiac autonomic control in 18 month old children. We describe methods for continuous monitoring of the parasympathetic and sympathetic branches of the ANS under resting and challenge conditions during a home or laboratory visit and provide descriptive findings from our sample of 140 ethnically diverse toddlers using validated equipment and scoring software. Results revealed that this protocol can produce a range of physiological responses to both resting and developmentally challenging conditions, as indicated by changes in heart rate and indices of parasympathetic and sympathetic activity. Individuals demonstrated variability in resting levels, responses to challenges, and challenge reactivity, which provides additional evidence

  9. Measurement of oxygen consumption in children undergoing cardiac catheterization: comparison between mass spectrometry and the breath-by-breath method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Long; Cui, Yong; Pharis, Scott; Walsh, Mark; Atallah, Joseph; Tan, Meng-Wei; Rutledge, Jennifer; Coe, J Y; Adatia, Ian

    2014-06-01

    Accurate measurement of oxygen consumption (VO2) is important to precise calculation of blood flow using the Fick equation. This study aimed to validate the breath-by-breath method (BBBM) of measuring oxygen consumption VO2 compared with respiratory mass spectroscopy (MS) for intubated children during cardiac catheterization. The study used MS and BBBM to measure VO2 continuously and simultaneously for 10 min in consecutive anesthetized children undergoing cardiac catheterization who were intubated with a cuffed endotracheal tube, ventilated mechanically, and hemodynamically stable, with normal body temperature. From 26 patients, 520 data points were obtained. The mean VO2 was 94.5 ml/min (95 % confidence interval [CI] 65.7-123.3 ml/min) as measured by MS and 91.4 ml/min (95 % CI 64.9-117.9 ml/min) as measured by BBBM. The mean difference in VO2 measurements between MS and BBBM (3.1 ml/min; 95 % CI -1.7 to +7.9 ml/min) was not significant (p = 0.19). The MS and BBBM VO2 measurements were highly correlated (R (2) = 0.98; P measure VO2 in anesthetized intubated children undergoing cardiac catheterization. The two methods demonstrated excellent agreement. However, BBBM may be more suited to clinical use with children.

  10. Measurements of output factors with different detector types and Monte Carlo calculations of stopping-power ratios for degraded electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, Peter; Knöös, Tommy; Nilsson, Per

    2004-10-07

    The aim of the present study was to investigate three different detector types (a parallel-plate ionization chamber, a p-type silicon diode and a diamond detector) with regard to output factor measurements in degraded electron beams, such as those encountered in small-electron-field radiotherapy and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). The Monte Carlo method was used to calculate mass collision stopping-power ratios between water and the different detector materials for these complex electron beams (nominal energies of 6, 12 and 20 MeV). The diamond detector was shown to exhibit excellent properties for output factor measurements in degraded beams and was therefore used as a reference. The diode detector was found to be well suited for practical measurements of output factors, although the water-to-silicon stopping-power ratio was shown to vary slightly with treatment set-up and irradiation depth (especially for lower electron energies). Application of ionization-chamber-based dosimetry, according to international dosimetry protocols, will introduce uncertainties smaller than 0.3% into the output factor determination for conventional IORT beams if the variation of the water-to-air stopping-power ratio is not taken into account. The IORT system at our department includes a 0.3 cm thin plastic scatterer inside the therapeutic beam, which furthermore increases the energy degradation of the electrons. By ignoring the change in the water-to-air stopping-power ratio due to this scatterer, the output factor could be underestimated by up to 1.3%. This was verified by the measurements. In small-electron-beam dosimetry, the water-to-air stopping-power ratio variation with field size could mostly be ignored. For fields with flat lateral dose profiles (>3 x 3 cm2), output factors determined with the ionization chamber were found to be in close agreement with the results of the diamond detector. For smaller field sizes the lateral extension of the ionization chamber hampers

  11. Simulation method for cardiac stroke volume estimation by intracardiac electrical impedance measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, C; Leviatan, Y; Inbar, G F; Hoekstein, K N

    1992-09-01

    Using the electrical impedance measurement technique to investigate stroke volume estimation, three models of the ventricle were simulated. A four-electrode impedance catheter was used; two electrodes to set up an electric field in the model and the other two to measure the potential difference. A new approach, itself an application of the quasi-static case of a method used to solve electromagnetic field problems, was used to solve the electric field in the model. The behaviour of the estimation is examined with respect to the electrode configuration on the catheter and to catheter location with respect to the ventricle walls. Cardiac stroke volume estimation was found to be robust to catheter location generating a 10 per cent error for an offset of 40 per cent of the catheter from the chamber axis and rotation of 20 degrees with respect to the axis. The electrode configuration has a dominant effect on the sensitivity and accuracy of the estimation. Certain configurations gave high accuracy, whereas in others high sensitivity was found with lower accuracy. This led to the conclusion that the electrode configuration should be carefully chosen according to the desired criteria.

  12. Validation of the Patient Activation Measure (PAM-13) among adults with cardiac conditions in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngooi, Bi Xia; Packer, Tanya L; Kephart, George; Warner, Grace; Koh, Karen Wei Ling; Wong, Raymond Ching Chiew; Lim, Serene Peiying

    2017-04-01

    The Patient Activation Measure (PAM-13) measures patients' knowledge, skill, and confidence in chronic condition self-management. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of PAM-13 (English version) among English-speaking adults with cardiac conditions in Singapore. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a convenient sample of 270 heart clinic patients. Using the unitary concept of validity, evidence of (1) internal structure via data quality, unidimensionality, differential item functioning, and internal consistency, (2) response process through item difficulty and item fit using Rasch modeling, and (3) relationship to other variables via correlations with depression and self-efficacy were examined. The item response was high with only one missing answer. All items had a small floor effect, but nine out of 13 items had a ceiling effect larger than 15 %. Cronbach's α was 0.86, and average inter-item correlations was 0.324. Results suggested unidimensionality; however, differences in item difficulty ranking were found. A low, negative correlation was found with depression, while a moderate, positive correlation was found with self-efficacy. Evidence in all three areas of validity were mixed. Caution should be exercised when using categorical activation "level" to inform clinical decisions.

  13. Repeatability of cardiac-MRI-measured right ventricular size and function in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Rowan; Salem, Yishay [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Shah, Amee; Lai, Wyman W. [Morgan Stanley Children' s Hospital of New York Presbyterian, New York, NY (United States); Nielsen, James C. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai Children' s Heart Center, Box 1201, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The measurement error for right ventricular (RV) size and function assessed by cardiac MRI (CMRI) in congenital heart disease has not been fully characterized. As CMRI parameters are being increasingly utilized to make clinical decisions, defining error in the clinical setting is critical. This investigation examines the repeatability of CMRI for RV size and function. Forty consecutive people with congenital heart disease involving the RV were retrospectively identified. Contouring of RV volumes was performed by two expert CMRI clinicians. The coefficient of variability and repeatability coefficients were calculated. Repeatability coefficients were multiplied by the mean value for each group studied to define a threshold beyond which measurement error was unlikely to be responsible. The variability for indexed RV end-diastolic volume = 3.2% and 3.3% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, respectively. The repeatability coefficients were 13.2% and 14.9% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, which yielded threshold values of 15.1 ml/m{sup 2} and 20.2 ml/m{sup 2}, respectively. For RV ejection fraction (EF), the repeatability coefficients for intra- and interobserver comparisons were 5.0% and 6.0%, which resulted in threshold values of 2.6 EF% and 3.0 EF%. The threshold values generated can be used during serial assessment of RV size and function. (orig.)

  14. Rapidly detecting disorder in rhythmic biological signals: a spectral entropy measure to identify cardiac arrhythmias

    CERN Document Server

    Staniczenko, Phillip P A; Jones, Nick S

    2008-01-01

    We consider the use of a running measure of power spectrum disorder to distinguish between the normal sinus rhythm of the heart and two forms of cardiac arrhythmia: atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. This is motivated by characteristic differences in the spectra of beats during the three rhythms. We plot patient data derived from 10-beat windows on a `disorder map' and identify rhythm-defining ranges in the level and variance of spectral entropy values. Employing the spectral entropy within an automatic arrhythmia detection algorithm enables the classification of periods of atrial fibrillation from the time series of patients' beats. When the algorithm is set to identify abnormal rhythms within 6s it agrees with 85.7% of the annotations of professional rhythm assessors; for a response time of 30s this becomes 89.5%, and with 60s it is 90.3%. The algorithm provides a rapid way to detect atrial fibrillation, demonstrating usable response times as low as six seconds. Measures of disorder in the frequency do...

  15. Non-Invasive Intra-cardiac Pressure Measurements Using Subharmonic-Aided Pressure Estimation: Proof of Concept in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Jaydev K; Kulkarni, Sushmita V; Pangaonkar, Purva P; Stanczak, Maria; McDonald, Maureen E; Cohen, Ira S; Mehrotra, Praveen; Savage, Michael P; Walinsky, Paul; Ruggiero, Nicholas J; Fischman, David L; Ogilby, David; VanWhy, Carolyn; Lombardi, Matthew; Forsberg, Flemming

    2017-08-11

    This study evaluated the feasibility of employing non-invasive intra-cardiac pressure estimation using subharmonic signals from ultrasound contrast agents in humans. This institutional review board-approved proof-of-concept study included 15 consenting patients scheduled for left and right heart catheterization. During the catheterization procedure, Definity was infused intra-venously at 4-10 mL/min. Ultrasound scanning was performed with a Sonix RP using pulse inversion, three incident acoustic output levels and 2.5-MHz transmit frequency. Radiofrequency data were processed and subharmonic amplitudes were compared with the pressure catheter data. The correlation coefficient between subharmonic signals and pressure catheter data ranged from -0.3 to -0.9. For acquisitions with optimum acoustic output, pressure errors between the subharmonic technique and catheter were as low as 2.6 mmHg. However, automatically determining optimum acoustic output during scanning for each patient remains to be addressed before clinical applicability can be decided. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Short communication: milk output in llamas (Lama glama) in relation to energy intake and water turnover measured by an isotope dilution technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riek, A; Klinkert, A; Gerken, M; Hummel, J; Moors, E; Südekum, K-H

    2013-03-01

    Despite the fact that llamas have become increasingly popular as companion and farm animals in both Europe and North America, scientific knowledge on their nutrient requirements is scarce. Compared with other livestock species, relatively little is known especially about the nutrient and energy requirements for lactating llamas. Therefore, we aimed to measure milk output in llama dams using an isotope dilution technique and relate it to energy intakes at different stages of lactation. We also validated the dilution technique by measuring total water turnover (TWT) directly and comparing it with values estimated by the isotope dilution technique. Our study involved 5 lactating llama dams and their suckling young. Milk output and TWT were measured at 4 stages of lactation (wk 3, 10, 18, and 26 postpartum). The method involved the application of the stable hydrogen isotope deuterium ((2)H) to the lactating dam. Drinking water intake and TWT decreased significantly with lactation stage, whether estimated by the isotope dilution technique or calculated from drinking water and water ingested from feeds. In contrast, lactation stage had no effect on dry matter intake, metabolizable energy (ME) intake, or the milk water fraction (i.e., the ratio between milk water excreted and TWT). The ratios between TWT measured and TWT estimated (by isotope dilution) did not differ with lactation stage and were close to 100% in all measurement weeks, indicating that the D(2)O dilution technique estimated TWT with high accuracy and only small variations. Calculating the required ME intakes for lactation from milk output data and gross energy content of milk revealed that, with increasing lactation stage, ME requirements per day for lactation decreased but remained constant per kilogram of milk output. Total measured ME intakes at different stages of lactation were similar to calculated ME intakes from published recommendation models for llamas.

  17. The role of dye affinity in optical measurements of Cai(2+) transients in cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wei; Fast, Vladimir G

    2014-07-01

    Previous experiments in cultures of neonatal rat myocytes demonstrated that the shape of Cai(2+) transients measured using high-affinity Ca(2+)-sensitive dyes may be misrepresented. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of dye affinity in Cai(2+) measurements in intact adult cardiac tissue by comparing optical recordings obtained with high- and low-affinity dyes. Experiments were carried out in porcine left ventricular (LV) wedge preparations stained locally by intramural injection via microcapillaries (diameter = 150 μm) with a low-affinity Ca(2+)-sensitive dye Fluo-4FF or Fluo-2LA (nominal Kd, ~7-10 μmol/l), high-affinity dye Rhod-2 (Kd = 0.57 μmol/l), and Fluo-4 or Fluo-2MA (Kd, ~0.4 μmol/l); in addition, tissue was stained with transmembrane potential (Vm)-sensitive dye RH-237. Optical recordings of Vm and Cai(2+) were made using optical fibers (diameter = 325 μm) glued with the microcapillaries. The durations of Cai(2+) transients measured at 50% level of recovery (CaD50) using high-affinity Fluo-4/Fluo-2MA dyes were up to ~81% longer than those measured with low-affinity Fluo-4FF/Fluo-2LA at long pacing cycle lengths (CL). In Fluo-4/Fluo-2MA measurements at long CLs, Cai(2+) transients often (~50% of cases) exhibited slow upstroke rise and extended plateau. In Rhod-2 measurements, CaD50 was moderately longer (up to ~35%) than in Fluo-4FF recordings, but Cai(2+) transient shapes were similar. In all series of measurements, mean action potential duration values were not significantly different (P > 0.05). The delays between Vm and Cai(2+) upstrokes were comparable for low- and high-affinity dyes (P > 0.05). In conclusion, measurements of Cai(2+) transient in ventricular myocardium are strongly affected by the affinity of Ca(2+) dyes. The high-affinity dyes may overestimate the duration and alter the shape of Cai(2+) transients. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  18. The role of dye affinity in optical measurements of Cai2+ transients in cardiac muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Previous experiments in cultures of neonatal rat myocytes demonstrated that the shape of Cai2+ transients measured using high-affinity Ca2+-sensitive dyes may be misrepresented. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of dye affinity in Cai2+ measurements in intact adult cardiac tissue by comparing optical recordings obtained with high- and low-affinity dyes. Experiments were carried out in porcine left ventricular (LV) wedge preparations stained locally by intramural injection via microcapillaries (diameter = 150 μm) with a low-affinity Ca2+-sensitive dye Fluo-4FF or Fluo-2LA (nominal Kd, ∼7–10 μmol/l), high-affinity dye Rhod-2 (Kd = 0.57 μmol/l), and Fluo-4 or Fluo-2MA (Kd, ∼0.4 μmol/l); in addition, tissue was stained with transmembrane potential (Vm)-sensitive dye RH-237. Optical recordings of Vm and Cai2+ were made using optical fibers (diameter = 325 μm) glued with the microcapillaries. The durations of Cai2+ transients measured at 50% level of recovery (CaD50) using high-affinity Fluo-4/Fluo-2MA dyes were up to ∼81% longer than those measured with low-affinity Fluo-4FF/Fluo-2LA at long pacing cycle lengths (CL). In Fluo-4/Fluo-2MA measurements at long CLs, Cai2+ transients often (∼50% of cases) exhibited slow upstroke rise and extended plateau. In Rhod-2 measurements, CaD50 was moderately longer (up to ∼35%) than in Fluo-4FF recordings, but Cai2+ transient shapes were similar. In all series of measurements, mean action potential duration values were not significantly different (P > 0.05). The delays between Vm and Cai2+ upstrokes were comparable for low- and high-affinity dyes (P > 0.05). In conclusion, measurements of Cai2+ transient in ventricular myocardium are strongly affected by the affinity of Ca2+ dyes. The high-affinity dyes may overestimate the duration and alter the shape of Cai2+ transients. PMID:24791783

  19. EVALUACIÓN ECOCARDIOGRÁFICA DEL GASTO CARDÍACO SISTÉMICO EN LA ATRESIA PULMONAR CON SEPTO INTERVENTRICULAR INTACTO / Echocardiographic evaluation of cardiac output in pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Serrano Ricardo

    2013-07-01

    hemodynamic performance, influencing cardiac output and generating potential conditions for short-term prognosis. Method: A descriptive, prospective and applied study was conducted. It included 43 patients who were referred to the William Soler Pediatric Cardiology Hospital from January 1992 to November 2011 with a diagnosis of the disease. In each subject, the profiles of eight echocardiographic variables were assessed, as well as the heart rate profile. Their level of association and mutual dependence were statistically assessed by simple regression models. Results: There are considerable variations in heart rate, in the volume index and in the ejection fraction of the patients´ left ventricle compared with those in the reference control group. Conclusions: The increased size of the atrial septal defect and the prolongation of transmitral diastasis favor left ventricular volume increment. Heart rate, the restrictive nature of the left ventricular myocardium and its ejection fraction are regulatory factors of cardiac output in this disease.

  20. Using a sensitivity study to facilitate the design of a multi-electrode array to measure six cardiac conductivity values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Barbara M

    2013-07-01

    When using the bidomain model to model the electrical activity of the heart, there are potentially six cardiac conductivity values involved: conductivity values in directions along and normal to the cardiac fibres with a sheet, as well as a conductivity value in the normal direction between the sheets, and these occur for both the extracellular and intracellular domains in the model. To date it has been common to assume that the two normal direction conductivity values are the same. However, recent work has demonstrated that six cardiac conductivity values, rather than four, are necessary for accurate modelling, which can then facilitate understanding of cardiovascular disease. To design a method to determine these conductivities, it is also necessary to design a suitable multi-electrode array, which can be used, in conjunction with an inversion technique, to retrieve conductivity values from measurements of potential made on the array. This work uses the results of a study, into the sensitivity of the measuring potentials to variability in the input conductivities, to facilitate the design of an array that could be used to retrieve six cardiac conductivity values, as well as fibre rotation angle. It is found that if an electrode in the array has a much lower value of potential than the other electrodes, then it tends to be much more sensitive to the input conductivities than the other electrodes. It also appears that inclusion of this type of electrode in the set of measuring electrodes is essential for accurately retrieving conductivity values. This technique is used to identify electrodes to be included in the array and using the final design it is demonstrated, using synthetic values of potential, that the six cardiac conductivity values, and the fibre rotation angle, can be retrieved very accurately.

  1. Quantification of the uncertainty in coronary CTA plaque measurements using dynamic cardiac phantom and 3D-printed plaque models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Taylor; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Rubin, Geoffrey; Segars, Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the accuracy of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) stenosis measurements using newly developed physical coronary plaque models attached to a base dynamic cardiac phantom (Shelley Medical DHP-01). Coronary plaque models (5 mm diameter, 50% stenosis, and 32 mm long) were designed and 3D-printed with tissue equivalent materials (calcified plaque with iodine enhanced lumen). Realistic cardiac motion was achieved by fitting known cardiac motion vectors to left ventricle volume-time curves to create synchronized heart motion profiles executed by the base cardiac phantom. Realistic coronary CTA acquisition was accomplished by synthesizing corresponding ECG waveforms for gating and reconstruction purposes. All scans were acquired using a retrospective gating technique on a dual-source CT system (Siemens SOMATOM FLASH) with 75ms temporal resolution. Multi-planar reformatted images were reconstructed along vessel centerlines and the enhanced lumens were manually segmented by 5 independent operators. On average, the stenosis measurement accuracy was 0.9% positive bias for the motion free condition (0 bpm). The measurement accuracy monotonically decreased to 18.5% negative bias at 90 bpm. Contrast-tonoise (CNR), vessel circularity, and segmentation conformity also decreased monotonically with increasing heart rate. These results demonstrate successful implementation of the base cardiac phantom with 3D-printed coronary plaque models, adjustable motion profiles, and coordinated ECG waveforms. They further show the utility of the model to ascertain metrics of coronary CT accuracy and image quality under a variety of plaque, motion, and acquisition conditions.

  2. Combined heart rate variability and dynamic measures for quantitatively characterizing the cardiac stress status during cycling exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szi-Wen; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Chang, Ya-Ju; Chuang, Li-Ling; Chien, Chun-Tse

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we aimed to seek for different ways of measuring cardiac stress in terms of heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate (HR) dynamics, and to develop a novel index that can effectively summarize the information reflected by these measures to continuously and quantitatively characterize the cardiac stress status during physical exercise. Standard deviation, spectral measure of HRV as well as a nonlinear detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) based fractal-like behavior measure of HR dynamics were all evaluated on the RR time series derived from windowed electrocardiogram (ECG) data for the subjects undergoing cycling exercise. We recruited eleven young healthy subjects in our tests. Each subject was asked to maintain a fixed speed under a constant load during the pedaling test. We obtained the running estimates of the standard deviation of the normal-to-normal interval (SDNN), the high-fidelity power spectral density (PSD) of HRV, and the DFA scaling exponent α, respectively. A trend analysis and a multivariate linear regression analysis of these measures were then performed. Numerical experimental results produced by our analyses showed that a decrease in both SDNN and α was seen during the cycling exercise, while there was no significant correlation between the standard lower frequency to higher frequency (LF-to-HF) spectral power ratio of HRV and the exercise intensity. In addition, while the SDNN and α were both negatively correlated with the Borg rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale value, it seemed that the LF-to-HF power ratio might not have substantial impact on the Borg value, suggesting that the SDNN and α may be further used as features to detect the cardiac stress status during the physical exercise. We further approached this detection problem by applying a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to both feature candidates for the task of cardiac stress stratification. As a result, a time-varying parameter, referred to as the cardiac

  3. Measuring high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T blood concentration in population surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindell, Jennifer S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The blood test for high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (HS-CTnT) has been proposed as a marker of cardiovascular risk in the general population, as it is associated with subsequent incidence of cardiovascular events and mortality. We aimed at evaluating the feasibility of HS-CTnT testing within large nationally-representative population surveys in which blood samples are collected during household visits, shipped using the standard civil postal service, and then frozen for subsequent analyses. Methods The Health Survey for England (HSE) consists of a series of annual surveys beginning in 1991. It is designed to provide regular information on various aspects of the nation’s health and risk factors. We measured HS-CTnT in the blood of 200 people from the HSE 2016 wave, then froze and stored their blood samples at -40°C for 5–10 weeks, and then thawed and retested them to appreciate the extent of within-person agreement or test-retest reliability of the two measurements. Results The Cronbach's Alpha (Scale Reliability Coefficient) and the Interclass Correlation Coefficient (two-way mixed-effects model for consistency of agreement at individual level) were 0.97 (95%CI = 0.96–0.99) and 0.95 (95%CI = 0.94–0.96) respectively. The time delay from blood withdrawal to analysis and storage (1–4 days) did not affect the results, nor did the freezing time before the retest (5–10 weeks). Conclusion The measurement of HS-CTnT plasma concentration within large nationally-representative surveys such as the Health Survey for England is feasible. PMID:28141863

  4. Automated high-throughput measurement of body movements and cardiac activity of Xenopus tropicalis tadpoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Eckelt

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Xenopus tadpoles are an emerging model for developmental, genetic and behavioral studies. A small size, optical accessibility of most of their organs, together with a close genetic and structural relationship to humans make them a convenient experimental model. However, there is only a limited toolset available to measure behavior and organ function of these animals at medium or high-throughput. Herein, we describe an imaging-based platform to quantify body and autonomic movements of Xenopus tropicalis tadpoles of advanced developmental stages. Animals alternate periods of quiescence and locomotor movements and display buccal pumping for oxygen uptake from water and rhythmic cardiac movements. We imaged up to 24 animals in parallel and automatically tracked and quantified their movements by using image analysis software. Animal trajectories, moved distances, activity time, buccal pumping rates and heart beat rates were calculated and used to characterize the effects of test compounds. We evaluated the effects of propranolol and atropine, observing a dose-dependent bradycardia and tachycardia, respectively. This imaging and analysis platform is a simple, cost-effective high-throughput in vivo assay system for genetic, toxicological or pharmacological characterizations.

  5. Gel stretch method: a new method to measure constitutive properties of cardiac muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zile, M. R.; Cowles, M. K.; Buckley, J. M.; Richardson, K.; Cowles, B. A.; Baicu, C. F.; Cooper G, I. V.; Gharpuray, V.

    1998-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is an important cause of congestive heart failure; however, the basic mechanisms causing diastolic congestive heart failure are not fully understood, especially the role of the cardiac muscle cell, or cardiocyte, in this process. Before the role of the cardiocyte in this pathophysiology can be defined, methods for measuring cardiocyte constitutive properties must be developed and validated. Thus this study was designed to evaluate a new method to characterize cardiocyte constitutive properties, the gel stretch method. Cardiocytes were isolated enzymatically from normal feline hearts and embedded in a 2% agarose gel containing HEPES-Krebs buffer and laminin. This gel was cast in a shape that allowed it to be placed in a stretching device. The ends of the gel were held between a movable roller and fixed plates that acted as mandibles. Distance between the right and left mandibles was increased using a stepper motor system. The force applied to the gel was measured by a force transducer. The resultant cardiocyte strain was determined by imaging the cells with a microscope, capturing the images with a CCD camera, and measuring cardiocyte and sarcomere length changes. Cardiocyte stress was characterized with a finite-element method. These measurements of cardiocyte stress and strain were used to determine cardiocyte stiffness. Two variables affecting cardiocyte stiffness were measured, the passive elastic spring and viscous damping. The passive spring was assessed by increasing the force on the gel at 1 g/min, modeling the resultant stress vs. strain relationship as an exponential [sigma = A/k(ekepsilon - 1)]. In normal cardiocytes, A = 23.0 kN/m2 and k = 16. Viscous damping was assessed by examining the loop area between the stress vs. strain relationship during 1 g/min increases and decreases in force. Normal cardiocytes had a finite loop area = 1.39 kN/m2, indicating the presence of viscous damping. Thus the gel stretch method provided accurate

  6. 3D multifunctional integumentary membranes for spatiotemporal cardiac measurements and stimulation across the entire epicardium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Lizhi; Gutbrod, Sarah R; Bonifas, Andrew P; Su, Yewang; Sulkin, Matthew S; Lu, Nanshu; Chung, Hyun-Joong; Jang, Kyung-In; Liu, Zhuangjian; Ying, Ming; Lu, Chi; Webb, R Chad; Kim, Jong-Seon; Laughner, Jacob I; Cheng, Huanyu; Liu, Yuhao; Ameen, Abid; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Kim, Gwang-Tae; Huang, Yonggang; Efimov, Igor R; Rogers, John A

    2014-01-01

    ... and optoelectronic components. Such integumentary devices completely envelop the heart, in a form-fitting manner, and possess inherent elasticity, providing a mechanically stable biotic/abiotic interface during normal cardiac cycles...

  7. Application of peritoneal dialysis in the treatment of children with low cardiac output after cardiosurgery%腹膜透析在小儿先天性心脏病术后低心排的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王风

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of peritoneal dialysis in the treatment of children with low cardiac output after cardiosurgery .Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on the therapeutic effect of 12 children with low cardiac output after surgery of congenital heart disease by the early peritoneal dialysis in our hospital , 2.5%low calcium peritoneal dialysis solution was selected .The single amount of peritoneal dialysis was 15~20 ml/kg, and dialysis fluid retention time was 20~30 min.After 30 min reservation, dialysis fluid was drained for about 20 min according to the blood pressure .Peritoneal dialysis interval time was extended gradually after the urine occurred .Re-tention time of peritoneal dialysis was extended if patients were suffered from hyperlactacidemia .The frequency of di-alysis was adjusted according to the the level of serum creatinine and lactate .The blood glucose , electrolytes as well as arterial and venous blood gas was monitored , and the colloid was supplied when necessary .The peritoneal dialysis start, duration and the urine recovery time was recorded .Results The urine recovery time was 5~22 h.The appli-cation time of ventilator was 70~128 h, and the time in ICU was 5~18 d.The complications of peritoneal dialysis included catheter blockage (3 cases), hypoglycemia(3 cases), hyperglycemia(1 case) and hypokalemia (2 cases). No patients suffered from peritonitis and intestinal perforation .Two cases of tetralogy of fallot were died of severe low cardiac output and multiple organ dysfunction .Conclusion Early application of peritoneal dialysis can reduce the burden of heart , lung and kidney , maintain the stability of internal environment , and reduce mortality .%目的观察腹膜透析对小儿先天性心脏病术后的低心排治疗效果。方法回顾性分析该院12例先天性心脏病术后低心排早期治疗使用腹膜透析效果。腹透液选择百特公司2.5%低钙腹膜透析液。单次腹膜透析量15

  8. Infliximab reduces cardiac output in rheumatoid arthritis patients without heart failure Infliximabe reduz débito cardíaco em pacientes com artrite reumatoide sem insuficiência cardíaca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Cardoso Santos

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Human anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α monoclonal antibody (infliximab is used to treat autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Although the risk of worsening heart failure has been described in patients under chronic treatment, the acute cardiovascular effects of this drug are unknown in RA patients without heart failure. METHODS: 14 RA patients with normal echocardiography and no history of heart failure were evaluated during the 2-hour infliximab (3-5 mg/kg infusion period, using a noninvasive hemodynamic beat-to-beat system (Portapres. Stroke volume (SV; systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressures (SBP, DBP and MBP, respectively; cardiac output (CO; heart rate (HR; and total peripheral vascular resistance (PVR were recorded. All patients also received saline infusion instead of infliximab as a control. Significant differences in hemodynamic parameters were determined using Tuckey's test. All values were expressed as mean ± standard deviation (SD. RESULTS: Fourteen RA patients (6M/8F with mean age of 47.2 ± 8.8 years were evaluated. A significant decrease was found in cardiac output and stroke volume (7.04 ± 2.3 to 6.12 ± 2.1 l/min and 91 ± 29.0 to 83 ± 28.8 mL/beat, respectively after infliximab infusion. Although not statistically significant, a progressive increase was detected in SBP, DBP and total PVR during infusion. Saline infusion did not cause significant hemodynamic changes in the same group of RA patients. No adverse effects were observed during the infusion period. CONCLUSION: Acute infliximab administration decreased cardiac output due to low stroke volume in RA patients without heart disease. The results also demonstrated that, in spite of its negative inotropic effect, infliximab enhanced BP, probably by increasing PVR.OBJETIVO: O inibidor de fator de necrose tumoral (TNF-α infliximabe é usado no tratamento de doenças autoimunes como a artrite reumatoide (AR. Embora o risco de piora de

  9. Output beam energy measurement of a 100-MeV KOMAC drift tube linac by using a stripline beam position monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Sung

    2015-10-01

    The 100-MeV proton linac at the KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) is composed of a 50-keV proton injector, a 3-MeV RFQ (radio-frequency quadrupole) and a 100-MeV DTL (drift tube linac). The proton beam is accelerated from 3 MeV to 100 MeV through 11 DTL tanks. The precise measurement of the proton-beam's energy at the output of each DTL tank is important for the longitudinal beam dynamics and can be performed by using a time-of-flight method with a BPM (beam position monitor), which is installed between each DTL tank. The details of the output beam energy measurement of the KOMAC DTL with stripline-type BPM and BPM signal processing, along with a comparison with the simulation results, will be presented in this paper.

  10. Output factor comparison of Monte Carlo and measurement for Varian TrueBeam 6 MV and 10 MV flattening filter-free stereotactic radiosurgery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jason Y; Ning, Holly; Arora, Barbara C; Zhuge, Ying; Miller, Robert W

    2016-05-08

    The dose measurements of the small field sizes, such as conical collimators used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), are a significant challenge due to many factors including source occlusion, detector size limitation, and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. One useful tool in dealing with the small field effect is Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. In this study, we report a comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of output factors for the Varian SRS system with conical collimators for energies of 6 MV flattening filter-free (6 MV) and 10 MV flattening filter-free (10 MV) on the TrueBeam accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations of Varian's SRS system for 6 MV and 10 MV photon energies with cones sizes of 17.5 mm, 15.0 mm, 12.5 mm, 10.0 mm, 7.5 mm, 5.0 mm, and 4.0 mm were performed using EGSnrc (release V4 2.4.0) codes. Varian's version-2 phase-space files for 6 MV and 10 MV of TrueBeam accelerator were utilized in the Monte Carlo simulations. Two small diode detectors Edge (Sun Nuclear) and Small Field Detector (SFD) (IBA Dosimetry) were applied to measure the output factors. Significant errors may result if detector correction factors are not applied to small field dosimetric measurements. Although it lacked the machine-specific kfclin,fmsrQclin,Qmsr correction factors for diode detectors in this study, correction factors were applied utilizing published studies conducted under similar conditions. For cone diameters greater than or equal to 12.5 mm, the differences between output factors for the Edge detector, SFD detector, and MC simulations are within 3.0% for both energies. For cone diameters below 12.5 mm, output factors differences exhibit greater variations.

  11. A new framework for output feedback controller design for a class of discrete-time stochastic nonlinear system with quantization and missing measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Liu, Yurong; Alsaadi, Fuad E.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with the problem of analysis and synthesis for a class of output feedback control system. The system under consideration is a discrete-time stochastic system with time-varying delay. It is assumed that the measurement of system is quantized via a logarithmic quantizer before it is transmitted, and the measurement data would be missing from time to time which can be described by a Bernoulli distributed white sequence. In addition, the nonlinearities are assumed to satisfy the sector conditions. The problem addressed is to design an output feedback controller such that the resulting closed-loop system is exponentially stable in the mean square. By employing Lyapunov theory and some new techniques, a new framework is established to cope with the design of output feedback controller for nonlinear systems involving quantization and missing measurement. Sufficient conditions are derived to guarantee the existence of the desired controllers, and the controller parameters are given in an explicit expression as well. A numerical example is exploited to show the usefulness of the results obtained.

  12. Troponin not just a simple cardiac marker: prognostic significance of cardiac troponin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benny Mulyanto Setiadi; LEI Han; CHANG Jing

    2009-01-01

    Objective The object of this study was to review the role of cardiac troponin as a prognostic factor in acute coronary syndrome patients of varying circumstances.Data sources The data used in this review were obtained mainly from the studies of cardiac troponin reported in pubmed from 1981 to 2006.Study selection Relevant articles on studies of cardiac troponin were selected.Results Elevated cardiac troponin in patients with ST elevation and non ST elevation myocardial infarction was associated with adverse outcomes, including a higher incidence of congestive heart failure, shock, and death. Patients with elevated cardiac troponin value seemed to benefit more from invasive strategies including a percutaneous coronary intervention and bypass surgery, but elevated cardiac troponin was also correlated with adverse outcomes, including a higher degree of failure, shock, and mortality in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention; a higher degree of perioperative myocardial infarction, low cardiac output syndrome, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and new-onset ventricular arrhythmia in patients undergoing bypass surgery were also observed. Elevated troponin after a percutaneous coronary intervention seemed to be associated with short-term adverse outcomes rather than long-term adverse outcomes, unless the elevation of the troponin post percutaneous coronary intervention was quite high (about 5 times above normal). On the contrary, elevated cardiac troponin after bypass surgery was more confusing to analyze since it happened in almost all patients. Furthermore, differences in cutoff values and time measurements in some studies add more confusion; thus, further research is warranted.Conclusions The prognostic value of cardiac troponin is demonstrated in almost all acute coronary syndrome patients. In addition to its high sensitivity and specificity, the prognostic value of cardiac troponin is another reason to make it the "golden cardiac marker' of this time.

  13. Systematic evaluation of a secondary method for measuring diagnostic-level medical ultrasound transducer output power based on a large-area pyroelectric sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeqiri, B.; Žauhar, G.; Rajagopal, S.; Pounder, A.

    2012-06-01

    A systematic study of the application of a novel pyroelectric technique to the measurement of diagnostic-level medical ultrasound output power is described. The method exploits the pyroelectric properties of a 0.028 mm thick membrane of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), backed by an acoustic absorber whose ultrasonic absorption coefficient approaches 1000 dB cm-1 at 3 MHz. When exposed to an ultrasonic field, absorption of ultrasound adjacent to the PVDF-absorber interface results in heating and the generation of a pyroelectric output voltage across gold electrodes deposited on the membrane. For a sensor large enough to intercept the whole of the acoustic beam, the output voltage can be calibrated for the measurement of acoustic output power. A number of key performance properties of the method have been investigated. The technique is very sensitive, with a power to voltage conversion factor of typically 0.23 V W-1. The frequency response of a particular embodiment of the sensor in which acoustic power reflected at the absorber-PVDF interface is subsequently returned to the pyroelectric membrane to be absorbed, has been evaluated over the frequency range 1.5 MHz to 10 MHz. This has shown the frequency response to be flat to within ±4%, above 2.5 MHz. Below this frequency, the sensitivity falls by 20% at 1.5 MHz. Linearity of the technique has been demonstrated to within ±1.6% for applied acoustic power levels from 1 mW up to 120 mW. A number of other studies targeted at assessing the achievable measurement uncertainties are presented. These involve: the effects of soaking, the influence of the angle of incidence of the acoustic beam, measurement repeatability and sensitivity to transducer positioning. Additionally, over the range 20 °C to 30 °C, the rate of change in sensitivity with ambient temperature has been shown to be +0.5% °C-1. Implications of the work for the development of a sensitive, traceable, portable, secondary method of ultrasound output power

  14. [Changes in the morphology of the normal left ventricle during the phases of isovolumic contraction and relaxation. Consequences on the calculation of the volume and cardiac output by cineangiocardiographic methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitenberg, A; Geschwind, H; Herreman, F

    1976-04-01

    It is well known that the left ventricular volume, as measured by the cineangiographic method, decreases during the phase of isometric contraction. What is more, the cardiac index and the ejection fraction measured by this method are definitely larger than those derived from dilution methods. These discrepancies can be explained by movements of the mitral valve during the phases of isometric contraction and relaxation. The systolic ejection volume (SEV) was measured by three different methods: 1. End-diastolic volume (EDV) -end-systolic volume (ESV) ; 2. EDV - pre-filling volume (PFV) ; 3. Pre-ejection volume (PEV) - ESV. It has emerged that the results given by the methods (2) and (3) correspond closely, and differ significantly from those given by method (1); they are also close to those obtained by the dilution method. This difference seems to arise from the fact that the movements of the mitral valve during the phase of isometric relaxation are diametrically opposite to those which occur during isometric contraction; thus, when the values EDV-ESV are used in the calculation of SEV, an overestimate is made because the mitral valve is not to be found in the same position within the ventricular cavity for both values.

  15. Evaluation of a simple radionuclide procedure for left-to-right cardiac shunt measurement - correlation with earpiece densitometry and cardiac catheterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziada, G.; Hayat, N.; Jarrad, I.; Uthaman, B.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.

    1986-08-01

    Measurement of shunts from systemic to pulmonary circulation using a simple radionuclide technique has been introduced at our department. A good bolus of the Technetium-99m sodium pertechnetate at a dose of 200 ..mu..Ci/kg body weight (minimal dose 2 mCi) was injected by way of a scalp vein needle connected to a three-way stopcock, thus permitting immediate flushing of the radioactive bolus dose with physiologic saline solution. An IGE-400A gamma camera with a low-energy, high-sensitivity parallel hole collimator was used. The data were stored for analysis on a Star computer at a rate of 4 frames/second for a 40-second period. Twenty-three patients (aged 3-33 years) underwent first pass radionuclide angiography and cardiac catheterization to estimate the degree of systemic-to-pulmonary shunting (QP/QS) ratio). In 15 of these patients, another non-invasive method, earpiece densitometry (EPD), was done to determine the size of the shunt qualitatively. Fifteen healthy volunteers submitted to first pass studies comprised our control group. Out of the 23 patients with shunts, 15 had simple intra-cardiac septal defects (atrial or ventricular) or patent ductus arteriosus, and 8 had valvular lesions plus shunts. Compared with the oximetry data, EPD resulted in misclassification of 5 out of 15 patients in that left-to-right shunts were interpreted as moderate in 4, i.e. QP/QS 2:1, when in fact they were smaller. The correlation coefficient value of the first pass method for simple defect is r=0.89 (A=0.41 and B=0.85), for combined lesions it is r=0.94 (A=0.1 and B=1.1). The mean value for QP:QS in 15 normal subjects is 1.06:1 (SD=+- 0.05). We conclude that first pass radionuclide angiography is a non-invasive and reliable method for determining QP/QS ratios. Unlike cardiac catheterization, it can be performed rapidly on an out-patient basis. (orig./TRV).

  16. Evaluation of a high-sensitivity assay for measurement of canine and feline serum cardiac troponin I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhorn, Rebecca; Willesen, Jakob; Tarnow, Inge;

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac troponins are established as the gold standard biomarkers for acute cardiac injury. As even small elevations of cardiac troponins have prognostic relevance in people, it is important to investigate the performance of sensitive assays for use in veterinary medicine....

  17. Blind identification of full-field vibration modes of output-only structures from uniformly-sampled, possibly temporally-aliased (sub-Nyquist), video measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongchao; Dorn, Charles; Mancini, Tyler; Talken, Zachary; Nagarajaiah, Satish; Kenyon, Garrett; Farrar, Charles; Mascareñas, David

    2017-03-01

    what is required by the Shannon-Nyquist sampling theorem for output-only modal analysis. In particular, the spatio-temporal uncoupling property of the modal expansion of structural vibration responses enables a direct modal decoupling of the temporally-aliased vibration measurements by existing output-only modal analysis methods, yielding (full-field) mode shapes estimation directly. Then the signal aliasing properties in modal analysis is exploited to estimate the modal frequencies and damping ratios. The proposed method is validated by laboratory experiments where output-only modal identification is conducted on temporally-aliased acceleration responses and particularly the temporally-aliased video measurements of bench-scale structures, including a three-story building structure and a cantilever beam.

  18. Clinical implications of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin measurements in hospitalized medical patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon Y Stein

    Full Text Available The increased use of high sensitivity cardiac troponins (hs-cTn, have made the diagnosis of non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (MI challenging, especially in complex medical patients, in whom the clinical presentation of MI is nonspecific and multiple comorbidities as well as non-ischemic acute conditions may account for elevated hs-cTn levels. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of both elevated hs-cTn levels and dynamic changes in hospitalized patients.We conducted a retrospective study identifying all patients hospitalized in the Internal Medicine Division of Rabin Medical Center, Israel between January 2011 to December 2011, for whom at least one hs-cTn T (hs-cTnT measurement was obtained. Collected data included patient demographics, acute and chronic diagnosis, hs-cTnT and creatinine levels and date of death. Hs-cTnT levels were obtained in 5,696 admissions and was above the 99th percentile (> = 13 ng/L in 61.6% of the measurements. A relative change of 50% or higher was observed in 24% of the admissions. Among those with elevated hs-cTnT levels, acute coronary syndromes (ACS accounted for only 6.1% of acute diagnoses. Maximal hs-cTnT levels above 100 ng/L but not dynamic changes discriminated between ACS and non-ACS conditions (positive and negative predictive values of 12% and 96% respectively. The frequency of elevated hs-cTnT levels was age-dependent and over 75% of patients aged >70 years-old had levels above the 99th percentile. Multivariate analysis identified hs-cTnT levels higher than the 99th percentile, as an independent, strong predictor for 30-day mortality (OR 4.58 [2.8, 7.49], p<0.0001.Elevated hs-cTnT levels together with dynamic changes are frequent findings among hospitalized patients and in most cases, are not related to the ACS diagnosis. These findings highlight the diagnostic challenge of ACS in this complex population. Further studies are needed in order to optimize the use of hs-cTnT measurements

  19. [Development of all-in-one multi-slit equipment for measurements of the input-output characteristic of a phosphor plate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Natsumi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Maehata, Itsumi; Nonomiya, Izumi; Takegami, Kazuki; Konishi, Yuki; Ujita, Syohei; Fukuda, Ikuma

    2013-10-01

    An input-output characteristic curve is an essential piece of information for analyzing medical images taken using a phosphor plate. In the multi-slit method, an actuator moves shields that have numerous slits during X-ray irradiation. Numerous data can be measured by one-time irradiation, so the fading effect is negligibly small. This method was recently proposed by Takegami et al., but their equipment consisted of large multiple compositions. The aim of this study was to fabricate a new handy type equipment that combines multiple productions into one small production. In this paper, we propose an idea for downscaling the size of the equipment, and report that the same input-output characteristic is obtained using our newly proposed method.

  20. Cardiac impairment evaluated by transesophageal echocardiography and invasive measurements in rats undergoing sinoaortic denervation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel A Sirvente

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sympathetic hyperactivity may be related to left ventricular (LV dysfunction and baro- and chemoreflex impairment in hypertension. However, cardiac function, regarding the association of hypertension and baroreflex dysfunction, has not been previously evaluated by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE using intracardiac echocardiographic catheter. METHODS AND RESULTS: We evaluated exercise tests, baroreflex sensitivity and cardiovascular autonomic control, cardiac function, and biventricular invasive pressures in rats 10 weeks after sinoaortic denervation (SAD. The rats (n = 32 were divided into 4 groups: 16 Wistar (W with (n = 8 or without SAD (n = 8 and 16 spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR with (n = 8 or without SAD (SHRSAD (n = 8. Blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR did not change between the groups with or without SAD; however, compared to W, SHR groups had higher BP levels and BP variability was increased. Exercise testing showed that SHR had better functional capacity compared to SAD and SHRSAD. Echocardiography showed left ventricular (LV concentric hypertrophy; segmental systolic and diastolic biventricular dysfunction; indirect signals of pulmonary arterial hypertension, mostly evident in SHRSAD. The end-diastolic right ventricular (RV pressure increased in all groups compared to W, and the end-diastolic LV pressure increased in SHR and SHRSAD groups compared to W, and in SHRSAD compared to SAD. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that baroreflex dysfunction impairs cardiac function, and increases pulmonary artery pressure, supporting a role for baroreflex dysfunction in the pathogenesis of hypertensive cardiac disease. Moreover, TEE is a useful and feasible noninvasive technique that allows the assessment of cardiac function, particularly RV indices in this model of cardiac disease.

  1. Quartz crystal microbalance for the cardiac markers/antibodies binding kinetic measurements in the plasma samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, L. E.; Shumyantseva, V. V.; Archakov, A. I.

    2014-06-01

    The quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) was exploited for cardiac markers detection and kinetic studies of immunochemical reaction of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and human heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) with the corresponding monoclonal antibodies in undiluted plasma (serum) and standard solutions. The QCM technique allowed to dynamically monitor the kinetic differences in specific interactions and nonspecific sorption, without multiple labeling procedures and separation steps. The affinity binding process was characterized by the association (ka) and the dissociation (kd) kinetic constants and the equilibrium association (K) constant, all of which were obtained from experimental data.

  2. Comparison of Single-Particle Monte Carlo Simulation with Measured Output Characteristics of an 0.1µm n-MOSFET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. M. Bufler

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparison between non-selfconsistent single-particle Monte Carlo (MC simulations and measurements of the output characteristics of an 0.1 µm n-MOSFET is presented. First the bulk MC model, which features a new simplified treatment of inelastic acoustic intravalley scattering, is validated by comparison with experimental literature data for mobilities and velocities. The dopant distribution of the MOSFET is obtained from a 2D process simulation, which is calibrated with SIMS and electrical measurements and fine-tuned by a comparison of the measured transfer characteristics in the subthreshold regime with a coupled Schro¨dinger drift-diffusion (DD simulation. Then the quantum effect is replaced by a shift of the work function and the DD, hydrodynamic (HD and MC models are adjusted to reproduce the measured drain current in the linear regime. The results of the three models in the non-linear regime are compared without further adjustment to the measured output characteristics. While good agreement is found for the MC model, the on-current is significantly overestimated by the HD model and underestimated by the DD model.

  3. Detector to detector corrections: a comprehensive experimental study of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small radiotherapy beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azangwe, Godfrey; Grochowska, Paulina; Georg, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study is to provide a comprehensive set of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small beams, for a wide range of real time and passive detectors. The detector specific correction factors determined in this study may be potentially u...... measurements, the authors recommend the use of detectors that require relatively little correction, such as unshielded diodes, diamond detectors or microchambers, and solid state detectors such as alanine, TLD, Al2O3:C, or scintillators.......Purpose: The aim of the present study is to provide a comprehensive set of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small beams, for a wide range of real time and passive detectors. The detector specific correction factors determined in this study may be potentially...... useful as a reference data set for small beam dosimetry measurements. Methods: Dose response of passive and real time detectors was investigated for small field sizes shaped with a micromultileaf collimator ranging from 0.6 × 0.6 cm2 to 4.2 × 4.2 cm2 and the measurements were extended to larger fields...

  4. State-shared model for multiple-input multiple-output systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenhua TIAN; Karlene A. HOO

    2005-01-01

    This work proposes a method to construct a state-shared model for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO)systems. A state-shared model is defined as a linear time invariant state-space structure that is driven by measurement signals-the plant outputs and the manipulated variables, but shared by different multiple input/output models. The genesis of the state-shared model is based on a particular reduced non-minimal realization. Any such realization necessarily fulfills the requirement that the output of the state-shared model is an asymptotically correct estimate of the output of the plant, if the process model is selected appropriately. The approach is demonstrated on a nonlinear MIMO system- a physiological model of calcium fluxes that controls muscle contraction and relaxation in human cardiac myocytes.

  5. Frequency Modulated Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy: A General Technique for Trace Gas and Isotope Measurements with Unprecedented Sensitivity Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new technique is proposed for improved trace gas detection and measurement that combines the high absorption depths afforded by mid-infrared Integrated Cavity...

  6. Measurements of intensity correlations in the transverse plane of the output from a confocal optical parametric oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Mikael Østergaard; Buchhave, Preben

    We describe simultaneous measurements of signal/idler near field and far field patterns of a 2nd order nonlinear multi-mode parametric downconverter. We also describe the use of auto- and cross correlation techniques to obtain statistical data.......We describe simultaneous measurements of signal/idler near field and far field patterns of a 2nd order nonlinear multi-mode parametric downconverter. We also describe the use of auto- and cross correlation techniques to obtain statistical data....

  7. Integrated Navigation Based on Robust Estimation Outputs of Multi-sensor Measurements and Adaptive Weights of Dynamic Model Information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yuanxi; GAO Weiguang

    2005-01-01

    An integrated navigation based on the kinematic or dynamic state model and the raw measurements has the advantages of high redundancy, high reliability, as well as high ability of fault tolerance and simplicity in calculation. In order to control the influences of measurements outliers and the kinematic model errors on the integrated navigation results, a robust estimation method and an adaptive data fusion method are applied. An integrated navigation example using simulated data is performed and analyzed.

  8. Relationship between peak cardiac pumping capability and indices of cardio-respiratory fitness in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Popadic-Gacesa, Jelena Z; Barak, Otto F; Nunan, David; Donovan, Gay; Trenell, Michael I; Grujic, Nikola G; Brodie, David A

    2012-09-01

    Cardiac power output (CPO) is a unique and direct measure of overall cardiac function (i.e. cardiac pumping capability) that integrates both flow- and pressure-generating capacities of the heart. The present study assessed the relationship between peak exercise CPO and selected indices of cardio-respiratory fitness. Thirty-seven healthy adults (23 men and 14 women) performed an incremental exercise test to volitional fatigue using the Bruce protocol with gas exchange and ventilatory measurements. Following a 40-min recovery, the subjects performed a constant maximum workload exercise test at or above 95% of maximal oxygen consumption. Cardiac output was measured using the exponential CO(2) rebreathing method. The CPO, expressed in W, was calculated as the product of the mean arterial blood pressure and cardiac output. At peak exercise, CPO was well correlated with cardiac output (r = 0·92, P<0·01), stroke volume (r = 0·90, P<0·01) and peak oxygen consumption (r = 0·77, P<0·01). The coefficient of correlation was moderate between CPO and anaerobic threshold (r = 0·47, P<0·01), oxygen pulse (r = 0·57, P<0·01), minute ventilation (r = 0·53, P<0·01) and carbon dioxide production (r = 0·56, P<0·01). Small but significant relationship was found between peak CPO and peak heart rate (r = 0·23, P<0·05). These findings suggest that only peak cardiac output and stroke volume truly reflect CPO. Other indices of cardio-respiratory fitness such as oxygen consumption, anaerobic threshold, oxygen pulse, minute ventilation, carbon dioxide production and heart rate should not be used as surrogates for overall cardiac function and pumping capability of the heart.

  9. Equilibrator-based measurements of dissolved nitrous oxide in the surface ocean using an integrated cavity output laser absorption spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Grefe

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A laser-based analyser for nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide and water vapour was coupled to an equilibrator for continuous high-resolution dissolved gas measurements in the surface ocean. Results for nitrous oxide measurements from laboratory tests and field deployments are presented here. Short-term precision for 10 s-average N2O mole fractions at an acquisition rate of 1 Hz was better than 0.2 nmol mol−1 for standard gases and equilibrator measurements. The same precision was achieved for replicate standard gas analyses within 1 h of each other. The accuracy of the equilibrator measurements was verified by comparison with purge-and-trap GC-MS measurements of N2O concentrations in discrete samples from the Southern Ocean and showed agreement to within the 2% measurement uncertainty of the GC-MS method. Measured atmospheric N2O mole fractions agreed with AGAGE values to within 0.4%. The equilibrator response time to concentration changes in water was 142 to 203 s, depending on the headspace flow rate. The system was tested at sea during a north-to-south transect of the Atlantic Ocean. While the subtropical gyres were slightly undersaturated, the equatorial region was a source of nitrous oxide to the atmosphere. The ability to measure at high temporal and spatial resolution revealed sub-mesoscale variability in dissolved N2O concentrations. The magnitude of the observed saturation is in agreement with published data. Mean sea-to-air fluxes in the tropical and subtropical Atlantic ranged between −1.6 and 0.11 μmol m−2d−1 and confirm that the subtropical Atlantic is not an important source region for N2O to the atmosphere, compared to average global fluxes of 0.6 to 2.4 μmol m−2d−1. The system can be easily modified for autonomous operation on voluntary observing ships (VOS. Further work should include an interlaboratory comparison exercise with other methods of dissolved N2O analyses.

  10. Stability of beating frequency in cardiac myocytes by their community effect measured by agarose microchamber chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuda Kenji

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To understand the contribution of community effect on the stability of beating frequency in cardiac myocyte cell groups, the stepwise network formation of cells as the reconstructive approach using the on-chip agarose microchamber cell microcultivation system with photo-thermal etching method was applied. In the system, the shapes of agarose microstructures were changed step by step with photo-thermal etching of agarose-layer of the chip using a 1064-nm infrared focused laser beam to increase the interaction of cardiac myocyte cells during cultivation. First, individual rat cardiac myocyte in each microstructure were cultivated under isolated condition, and then connected them one by one through newly-created microchannels by photo-thermal etching to compare the contribution of community size for the magnitude of beating stability of the cell groups. Though the isolated individual cells have 50% fluctuation of beating frequency, their stability increased as the number of connected cells increased. And finally when the number reached to eight cells, they stabilized around the 10% fluctuation, which was the same magnitude of the tissue model cultivated on the dish. The result indicates the importance of the community size of cells to stabilize their performance for making cell-network model for using cells for monitoring their functions like the tissue model.

  11. Equilibrator-based measurements of dissolved nitrous oxide in the surface ocean using an integrated cavity output laser absorption spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grefe, I.; Kaiser, J.

    2014-06-01

    Dissolved nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations are usually determined by gas chromatography (GC). Here we present laboratory tests and initial field measurements using a novel setup comprising a commercially available laser-based analyser for N2O, carbon monoxide and water vapour coupled to a glass-bed equilibrator. This approach is less labour-intensive and provides higher temporal and spatial resolution than the conventional GC technique. The standard deviation of continuous equilibrator or atmospheric air measurements was 0.2 nmol mol-1 (averaged over 5 min). The short-term repeatability for reference gas measurements within 1 h of each other was 0.2 nmol mol-1 or better. Another indicator of the long-term stability of the analyser is the standard deviation of the calibrated N2O mole fraction in marine air, which was between 0.5 and 0.7 nmol mol-1. The equilibrator measurements were compared with purge-and-trap gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses of N2O concentrations in discrete samples from the Southern Ocean and showed agreement to within the 2% measurement uncertainty of the GC-MS method. The equilibrator response time to concentration changes in water was from 142 to 203 s, depending on the headspace flow rate. The system was tested at sea during a north-to-south transect of the Atlantic Ocean. While the subtropical gyres were slightly undersaturated, the equatorial region was a source of nitrous oxide to the atmosphere, confirming previous findings (Forster et al., 2009). The ability to measure at high temporal and spatial resolution revealed submesoscale variability in dissolved N2O concentrations. Mean sea-to-air fluxes in the tropical and subtropical Atlantic ranged between -1.6 and 0.11 μmol m-2 d-1 and confirm that the subtropical Atlantic is not an important source region for N2O to the atmosphere, compared to global average fluxes of 0.6-2.4 μmol m-2 d-1. The system can be easily modified for autonomous operation on voluntary

  12. First measurements of gas output from bubbling pools in a mud volcano at the periphery of Mt Etna (Italy): methodologies and implications for monitoring purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Cinzia; Giudice, Gaetano; Liuzzo, Marco; Pedone, Maria; Cosenza, Paolo; Riccobono, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    Gases and brines emitted in the southern sector of Mt Etna from mofettes, mud pools and mud volcanoes come from an hydrothermal reservoir hosted within the clayey formations of the sedimentary basement (Chiodini et al., 1996). The gas emitted consists mainly of CO2, with CH4, N2 and He as minor species. CO2 and He stable isotopes indicate a clear magmatic origin for these gases, and their compositional changes during either eruptive or rest periods closely parallel that of crater fumaroles (Paonita et al., 2012). Altough these manifestations are the most significant CO2 emitters outside the crater area, their mass output has never been measured. We present the first measurements of gas flux from several bubbling mud pools in a mud volcano located in the village of Paternò (Lon 14.89° Lat 37.57°), in the southern flank of the volcano. We performed gas measurements using a home-made apparatus, able to capture all the bubbles over an area of 0.4 m2. Over an area of about 7000 m2, we measured the flow rate of every single bubbling pool, providing that it had a minimum flux rate of 0.5 l/min. The maximum measured flow rate for a single pool was 15 l/min. A preliminary estimate of the total CO2 output over the whole mud volcano is in the order of few t/d. At the same time, we measured the chemical composition of emitted gases in various pools, characterised by different gas flow rates, to calculate the output of CO2 and verify the effect of eventual chemical fractionation processes upon gas chemistry. During the same campaign of direct measurements, we also used a commercial infrared laser unit (GasFinder 2.0 from Boreal Laser Ltd) for measurement of volcanic CO2 path-integrated concentrations along cross-sections of the atmospheric plumes in the area. The GasFinder was set as to measure CO2 concentrations at 1 Hz rate. During the field campaigns, the position of the GasFinder unit was sequentially moved so as to scan the plumes from different viewing directions and

  13. Assessment of the dose distribution inside a cardiac cath lab using TLD measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, M.; Teles, P.; Cardoso, G.; Vaz, P.

    2014-11-01

    Over the last decade, there was a substantial increase in the number of interventional cardiology procedures worldwide, and the corresponding ionizing radiation doses for both the medical staff and patients became a subject of concern. Interventional procedures in cardiology are normally very complex, resulting in long exposure times. Also, these interventions require the operator to work near the patient and, consequently, close to the primary X-ray beam. Moreover, due to the scattered radiation from the patient and the equipment, the medical staff is also exposed to a non-uniform radiation field that can lead to a significant exposure of sensitive body organs and tissues, such as the eye lens, the thyroid and the extremities. In order to better understand the spatial variation of the dose and dose rate distributions during an interventional cardiology procedure, the dose distribution around a C-arm fluoroscopic system, in operation in a cardiac cath lab at Portuguese Hospital, was estimated using both Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and dosimetric measurements. To model and simulate the cardiac cath lab, including the fluoroscopic equipment used to execute interventional procedures, the state-of-the-art MC radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.0 was used. Subsequently, Thermo-Luminescent Detector (TLD) measurements were performed, in order to validate and support the simulation results obtained for the cath lab model. The preliminary results presented in this study reveal that the cardiac cath lab model was successfully validated, taking into account the good agreement between MC calculations and TLD measurements. The simulated results for the isodose curves related to the C-arm fluoroscopic system are also consistent with the dosimetric information provided by the equipment manufacturer (Siemens). The adequacy of the implemented computational model used to simulate complex procedures and map dose distributions around the operator and the medical staff is discussed, in

  14. Application of pulse index continuous cardiac output monitoring to improve efficiency of acute heart failure care%应用脉搏指数连续心输出量监测提升急性心力衰竭护理效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙秀月; 张领; 赵书琴

    2015-01-01

    Objective To ihvestigate the effect of pulse index continuous cardiac output (PiCCO) monitoring to nursing care of acute heart failure care.Methods The clinical data of 43 acute heart failure patients were retrospectively analyzed,patients were given pulse index continuous cardiac output monitoring and care,the patient' s nursing outcomes were observed,and the intrathoracic blood volume,cardiac output and oxygen consumption before and after the intervention were compared.Results After the implementation of PiCCO and nursing intervention,43 patients had no serious complications,improved 42 cases discharged,the other 1 patient in critical condition due to old age and heart function improvement sustained no automatic discharge.Oxygen consumption,cardiac output and intrathoracic blood volume were improved after the intervention,there was a significant difference (P < 0.05) compared to the previous indicators and intervention after intervention.Conclusions Application of pulse index continuous cardiac output can effectively improve patient's clinical parameters such as cardiac output,through the implementation of appropriate care can improve symptoms and reduce complications.%目的 探讨急性心力衰竭患者护理中应用脉搏指数连续心输出量监测(PiCCO)的效果.方法 选取平顶山市第二人民医院收治的43例急性心力衰竭患者作为研究对象,收集患者的临床资料并对其做回顾性分析,对患者实施脉搏指数连续心输出量监测和护理,对患者的护理效果进行观察,并对其干预前后的胸腔内血容量、心排血量与氧耗量进行对比观察.结果 实施PiCCO和护理干预,本研究43例患者均无严重并发症产生,42例好转出院,1例由于病情危重、高龄及心功能持续无改善自动出院.患者干预后的氧耗量、心排血量与胸腔内血容量均有所改善,干预后各项指标与干预前比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 应用脉搏指数连续心

  15. Differential-output B-dot and D-dot monitors for current and voltage measurements on a 20-MA, 3-MV pulsed-power accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. Wagoner

    2008-10-01

    signals from a pair are not combined in a balun; they are instead numerically processed for common-mode-noise rejection after digitization. All the current monitors are calibrated on a 76-cm-diameter axisymmetric radial transmission line that is driven by a 10-kA current pulse. The reference current is measured by a current-viewing resistor (CVR. The stack voltage monitors are also differential-output gauges, consisting of one 1.8-cm-diameter D-dot sensor and one null sensor. Hence, each voltage monitor is also a differential detector with two output signals, processed as described above. The voltage monitors are calibrated in situ at 1.5 MV on dedicated accelerator shots with a short-circuit load. Faraday’s law of induction is used to generate the reference voltage: currents are obtained from calibrated outer-MITL B-dot monitors, and inductances from the system geometry. In this way, both current and voltage measurements are traceable to a single CVR. Dependable and consistent measurements are thus obtained with this system of calibrated diagnostics. On accelerator shots that deliver 22 MA to a low-impedance z-pinch load, the peak lineal current densities at the stack, outer-MITL, and inner-MITL monitor locations are 0.5, 1, and 58  MA/m, respectively. On such shots the peak currents measured at these three locations agree to within 1%.

  16. Application of pulse contour cardiac output monitoring technique in hemodynamic monitoring in critical patients%脉搏轮廓心排血量监测技术在危重病患者血流动力学监测中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    房贺; 郑兴锋; 夏照帆

    2014-01-01

    Pulse contour cardiac output (PiCCO) monitoring is a new type of invasive hemodynamic monitoring technology,which is more and more often applied in perioperative period and the patients suffering from multiple injuries,septic shock,and extensive burn.With PiCCO one is able to monitor patients' hemodynamic indexes safely,timely,accurately,and continuously to provide reference for judgment of patients' condition and proper quality and quantity of fluid administration.This technique has a good prospect in clinical application.

  17. Regulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy: the nuclear option

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W.D. Kuster (Diederik)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiac hypertrophy is the response of the heart to an increased workload. After myocardial infarction (MI) the surviving muscle tissue has to work harder to maintain cardiac output. This sustained increase in workload leads to cardiac hypertrophy. Despite its apparent appropriateness, c

  18. Regulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy: the nuclear option

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W.D. Kuster (Diederik)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiac hypertrophy is the response of the heart to an increased workload. After myocardial infarction (MI) the surviving muscle tissue has to work harder to maintain cardiac output. This sustained increase in workload leads to cardiac hypertrophy. Despite its apparent appropriateness, c

  19. Regulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy: the nuclear option

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W.D. Kuster (Diederik)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiac hypertrophy is the response of the heart to an increased workload. After myocardial infarction (MI) the surviving muscle tissue has to work harder to maintain cardiac output. This sustained increase in workload leads to cardiac hypertrophy. Despite its apparent appropriateness,

  20. Adaptive Output Tracking of Driven Oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Diao

    2008-01-01

    of the output tracking error to an adjustable neighborhood of the origin. In addition, good approximation of the unknown nonlinearities is also achieved by incorporating a persistent exciting signal in the parameter update law. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by an application to a cardiac conduction system modelled by two coupled driven oscillators.

  1. The left ventricle as a mechanical engine: from Leonardo da Vinci to the echocardiographic assessment of peak power output-to-left ventricular mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, Frank L; Guarini, Giacinta; Ballo, Piercarlo; Carluccio, Erberto; Maiello, Maria; Capozza, Paola; Innelli, Pasquale; Rosa, Gian M; Palmiero, Pasquale; Galderisi, Maurizio; Razzolini, Renato; Nodari, Savina

    2013-03-01

    The interpretation of the heart as a mechanical engine dates back to the teachings of Leonardo da Vinci, who was the first to apply the laws of mechanics to the function of the heart. Similar to any mechanical engine, whose performance is proportional to the power generated with respect to weight, the left ventricle can be viewed as a power generator whose performance can be related to left ventricular mass. Stress echocardiography may provide valuable information on the relationship between cardiac performance and recruited left ventricular mass that may be used in distinguishing between adaptive and maladaptive left ventricular remodeling. Peak power output-to-mass, obtained during exercise or pharmacological stress echocardiography, is a measure that reflects the number of watts that are developed by 100 g of left ventricular mass under maximal stimulation. Power output-to-mass may be calculated as left ventricular power output per 100 g of left ventricular mass: 100× left ventricular power output divided by left ventricular mass (W/100 g). A simplified formula to calculate power output-to-mass is as follows: 0.222 × cardiac output (l/min) × mean blood pressure (mmHg)/left ventricular mass (g). When the integrity of myocardial structure is compromised, a mismatch becomes apparent between maximal cardiac power output and left ventricular mass; when this occurs, a reduction of the peak power output-to-mass index is observed.

  2. CT measurement of coronary calcium mass: impact on global cardiac risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Christoph R.; Majeed, Amal; Reiser, Maximilian F. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Crispin, Alexander [University Hospital Munich, Department of Medical Data Processing, Biometry, and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany); Knez, Andreas; Boekstegers, Peter; Steinbeck, Gerhard [University Hospital Munich, Department of Cardiology, Munich (Germany); Schoepf, U. Joseph [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Coronary calcium mass percentiles can be derived from electron beam CT as well as from multidetector-row CT of all manufacturers. Coronary calcium mass may serve as a more individualized substitute for age for cardiac risk stratification. The aim was to investigate the potential impact of CT coronary calcium mass quantification on cardiac risk stratification using an adjusted Framingham score. Standardized coronary calcium mass was determined by multidetector-row CT in a total of 1,473 patients (1,038 male, 435 female). The impact on risk stratification of replacing the traditional Framingham age point score by a point score based on calcium mass relative to age was tested. Any coronary calcium found in males in the age group of 20-34 years and females in the age group of 20-59 years results in an increase of the Framingham score by 9 and 4-7 points, respectively. Only in males 65 years of age and older, none or minimal amounts of coronary calcium decrease the Framingham score by three points. The coronary calcium mass and age-related scoring system may have impact on the reassignment of patients with an intermediate Framingham risk to a lower or higher risk group. (orig.)

  3. 3D multifunctional integumentary membranes for spatiotemporal cardiac measurements and stimulation across the entire epicardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lizhi; Gutbrod, Sarah R.; Bonifas, Andrew P.; Su, Yewang; Sulkin, Matthew S.; Lu, Nanshu; Chung, Hyun-Joong; Jang, Kyung-In; Liu, Zhuangjian; Ying, Ming; Lu, Chi; Webb, R. Chad; Kim, Jong-Seon; Laughner, Jacob I.; Cheng, Huanyu; Liu, Yuhao; Ameen, Abid; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Kim, Gwang-Tae; Huang, Yonggang; Efimov, Igor R.; Rogers, John A.

    2014-02-01

    Means for high-density multiparametric physiological mapping and stimulation are critically important in both basic and clinical cardiology. Current conformal electronic systems are essentially 2D sheets, which cannot cover the full epicardial surface or maintain reliable contact for chronic use without sutures or adhesives. Here we create 3D elastic membranes shaped precisely to match the epicardium of the heart via the use of 3D printing, as a platform for deformable arrays of multifunctional sensors, electronic and optoelectronic components. Such integumentary devices completely envelop the heart, in a form-fitting manner, and possess inherent elasticity, providing a mechanically stable biotic/abiotic interface during normal cardiac cycles. Component examples range from actuators for electrical, thermal and optical stimulation, to sensors for pH, temperature and mechanical strain. The semiconductor materials include silicon, gallium arsenide and gallium nitride, co-integrated with metals, metal oxides and polymers, to provide these and other operational capabilities. Ex vivo physiological experiments demonstrate various functions and methodological possibilities for cardiac research and therapy.

  4. Effect of increases in cardiac contractility on cerebral blood flow in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogoh, Shigehiko; Moralez, Gilbert; Washio, Takuro; Sarma, Satyam; Hieda, Michinari; Romero, Steven A; Cramer, Matthew N; Shibasaki, Manabu; Crandall, Craig G

    2017-09-15

    The effect of acute increases in cardiac contractility on cerebral blood flow (CBF) remains unknown. We hypothesized that the external carotid artery (ECA) downstream vasculature modifies the direct influence of acute increases in heart rate and cardiac function on CBF regulation. Twelve healthy subjects received two infusions of dobutamine (first a low dose; 5 μg/kg/min and then a high dose; 15 μg/kg/min) for 12 min each. Cardiac output, blood flow through the internal carotid artery (ICA) and ECA and echocardiographic measurements were performed during dobutamine infusions. Despite increases in cardiac contractility, cardiac output and arterial pressure with dobutamine, ICA blood flow and conductance slightly decreased from resting baseline during both low and high dose infusions. In contrast, ECA blood flow and conductance increased appreciably during both low and high dose infusions. Greater ECA vascular conductance and corresponding increases in blood flow may protect over-perfusion of intracranial cerebral arteries during enhanced cardiac contractility and associated increases in cardiac output and perfusion pressure. Importantly, these findings suggest that the acute increase of blood perfusion due to dobutamine administration does not cause cerebral over-perfusion or an associated risk of cerebral vascular damage. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Heart and Circulatory Physiology.

  5. The low frequency power of heart rate variability is neither a measure of cardiac sympathetic tone nor of baroreflex sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Davide; Silvani, Alessandro; McAllen, Robin M; May, Clive N; Ramchandra, Rohit

    2014-10-01

    The lack of noninvasive approaches to measure cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) has driven the development of indirect estimates such as the low-frequency (LF) power of heart rate variability (HRV). Recently, it has been suggested that LF HRV can be used to estimate the baroreflex modulation of heart period (HP) rather than cardiac sympathetic tone. To test this hypothesis, we measured CSNA, HP, blood pressure (BP), and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) of HP, estimated with the modified Oxford technique, in conscious sheep with pacing-induced heart failure and in healthy control sheep. We found that CSNA was higher and systolic BP and HP were lower in sheep with heart failure than in control sheep. Cross-correlation analysis showed that in each group, the beat-to-beat changes in HP correlated with those in CSNA and in BP, but LF HRV did not correlate significantly with either CSNA or BRS. However, when control sheep and sheep with heart failure were considered together, CSNA correlated negatively with HP and BRS. There was also a negative correlation between CSNA and BRS in control sheep when considered alone. In conclusion, we demonstrate that in conscious sheep, LF HRV is neither a robust index of CSNA nor of BRS and is outperformed by HP and BRS in tracking CSNA. These results do not support the use of LF HRV as a noninvasive estimate of either CSNA or baroreflex function, but they highlight a link between CSNA and BRS.

  6. Measurement of four chambers' volumes and ventricular masses by cardiac CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Motomasa; Naito, Hiroaki; Ohta, Mitsushige; Kozuka, Takahiro; Kito, Yoshitsugu (National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan))

    1983-09-01

    Using cardiac computed tomography (CT), the ''mean'' volume of each cardiac chamber and both ventricular masses were calculated from summation of a sliced volume by ungated scans obtained using rapid sequential scanning covering the whole heart. 1. Estimation of a normal value of each chamber's volume was attempted in 20 patients with ischemic heart disease and with normal heart function. The ''mean'' volume of the right atrium (RAMV), right ventricle (RVMV), and left atrium (LAMV) was 22.3 +- 6.5, 40.3 +- 6.5 and 28.7 +- 8.2ml/m/sup 2/, respectively. 2. In 54 patients with valvular heart diseases, each chamber's volume obrained by CT was compared with the grade of tricuspid regurgitation (TR) estimated by ultrasonic Doppler technique or the grade of mitral regurgitation (MR) by left ventriculography (LVG). The RAMV (234 +- 119 ml/m/sup 2/) and the RVMV (101 +- 39 ml/m/sup 2/) were markedly increased in patients with severe TR (grade 3 to 4) (p<0.01). The LAMV (487 +- 231 ml/m/sup 2/) was also increased in patients with severe mitral regurgitation (grade 3 to 4) (p<0.01). 3. In 46 patients with valvular heart diseases, the LVMV by CT was well correlated with end-diastolic volume (EDV) obtained by LVG (r=0.92), and the LVEDVs by ECG gated CT and by LVG showed a fairly good correlation (r=0.95). 4. CT examination was performed before and after surgery in 17 patients with MR or TR for evaluation of the change of chamber volumes. The mean reduction ratio (MRR) of the RAMV after tricuspid annuloplasty, the LVMV after mitral valve plasty, and the LAMV after left atrial plication was 44%, 41%, and 60%, respectively.

  7. Calibration of δ13C and δ18O measurements in CO2 using Off-axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectrometer (ICOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jobin; Külls, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    The δ13C and δ18O of CO2 has enormous potential as tracers to study and quantify the interaction between the water and carbon cycles. Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) being the conventional method for stable isotopic measurements, has many limitations making it impossible for deploying them in remote areas for online or in-situ sampling. New laser based absorption spectroscopy approaches like Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (ICOS) have been developed for online measurements of stable isotopes at an expense of considerably less power requirement but with precision comparable to IRMS. In this research project, we introduce a new calibration system for an Off- Axis ICOS (Los Gatos Research CCIA-36d) for a wide range of varying concentrations of CO2 (800ppm - 25,000ppm), a typical CO2 flux range at the plant-soil continuum. The calibration compensates for the concentration dependency of δ13C and δ18O measurements, and was performed using various CO2 standards with known CO2 concentration and δC13 and δO18 values. A mathematical model was developed after the calibration procedure as a correction factor for the concentration dependency of δ13C and δ18O measurements. Temperature dependency of δ13C and δ18O measurements were investigated and no significant influence was found. Simultaneous calibration of δ13C and δ18O is achieved using this calibration system with an overall accuracy of (~ 0.75±0.24 ‰ for δ13C, ~ 0.81 ±0.26‰ for δ18O). This calibration procedure is found to be appropriate for making Off-Axis ICOS suitable for measuring CO2 concentration and δ13C and δ18O measurements at atmosphere-plant-soil continuum.

  8. Heterogeneous filament network formation by myosin light chain isoforms effects on contractile energy output of single cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeomi Mizutani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-CMs are expected to play an important role in heart therapies, in which hiPSC-CMs should generate sufficient contractile force to pump blood. However, recent studies have shown that the contractility of myocardial mimics composed of hiPSC-CMs is lower than that of adult human myocardium. To examine the mechanism by which contractile force output of hiPSC-CMs is weakened, we measured the contractile force of single hiPSC-CMs and observed the fibrous distribution of myosin II regulatory light chain (MRLC of cardiac (contributes to beating and non-cardiac (does not contribute to beating isoforms. Single hiPSC-CMs were cultured on an extracellular matrix gel, and the contractile force and strain energy exerted on the gel were measured. Strain energy was not uniform between cells and ranged from 0.2 to 5.8 pJ. The combination of contractile force measurement and immunofluorescent microscopy for MRLC isoforms showed that cells with higher strain energy expressed the weakened non-cardiac myosin II fibers compared to those of cells with lower strain energy. Observation of cardiac and non-cardiac MRLC showed that the MRLC isoforms formed heterogeneous filament networks. These results suggest that strain energy output from single hiPSC-CMs depends both cardiac and non-cardiac myosin fibers, which prevent deformation of the cell body.

  9. SU-E-T-557: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac Devices Irradiated During Proton Therapy Using Indium Foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avery, S; Christodouleas, J; Delaney, K; Diffenderfer, E; Brown, K [University of Pennsylvania, Sicklerville, NJ (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac devices Irradiated during Proton Therapy using Indium Foils Methods: The foils had dimensions of 25mm x 25mm x 1mm. After being activated, the foils were placed in a Canberra Industries well chamber utilizing a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The resulting gamma spectrum was acquired and analyzed using Genie 2000 spectroscopy software. One activation foil was placed over the upper, left chest of RANDO where a pacemaker would be. The rest of the foils were placed over the midline of the patient at different distances, providing a spatial distribution over the phantom. Using lasers and BBs to align the patient, 200 MU square fields were delivered to various treatment sites: the brain, the pancreas, and the prostate. Each field was shot at least a day apart, giving more than enough time for activity of the foil to decay (t1=2 = 54.12 min). Results: The net counts (minus background) of the three aforementioned peaks were used for our measurements. These counts were adjusted to account for detector efficiency, relative photon yields from decay, and the natural abundance of 115-In. The average neutron flux for the closed multi-leaf collimator irradiation was measured to be 1.62 x 106 - 0.18 x 106 cm2 s-1. An order of magnitude estimate of the flux for neutrons up to 1 keV from Diffenderfer et al. gives 3 x 106 cm2 s-1 which does agree on the order of magnitude. Conclusion: Lower energy neutrons have higher interaction cross-sections and are more likely to damage pacemakers. The thermal/slow neutron component may be enough to estimate the overall risk. The true test of the applicability of activation foils is whether or not measurements are capable of predicting cardiac device malfunction. For that, additional studies are needed to provide clinical evidence one way or the other.

  10. {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure in vivo cardiac energetics in normal myocardium and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Experiences at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shivu, Ganesh Nallur [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Birmingham, Vincent Drive, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: drgani23@gmail.com; Abozguia, Khalid; Phan, Thanh Trung; Ahmed, Ibrar [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Birmingham, Vincent Drive, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Henning, Anke [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University and ETH Zurich, Gloriastrasse 35, CH-8092, Zurich CH ETZ F97 (Switzerland); Frenneaux, Michael [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Birmingham, Vincent Drive, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    Background: {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) allows measurement of in vivo high-energy phosphate kinetics in the myocardium. While traditionally {sup 31}P cardiac spectroscopy is performed at 1.5 T, cardiac MRS at higher field strength can theoretically increase signal to noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution therefore improving sensitivity and specificity of the cardiac spectra. The reproducibility and feasibility of performing cardiac spectroscopy at 3 T is presented here in this study in healthy volunteers and patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods: Cardiac spectroscopy was performed using a Phillips 3T Achieva scanner in 37 healthy volunteers and 26 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) to test the feasibility of the protocol. To test the reproducibility a single volunteer was scanned eight times on separate occasions. A single voxel {sup 31}P MRS was performed using Image Selected In vivo Spectroscopy (ISIS) volume localization. Results: The mean phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate (PCr/ATP) ratio of the eight measurements performed on one individual was 2.11 {+-} 0.25. Bland Altman plots showed a variance of 12% in the measurement of PCr/ATP ratios. The PCr/ATP ratio was significantly reduced in HCM patients compared to controls, 1.42 {+-} 0.51 and 2.11 {+-} 0.57, respectively, P < 0.0001. (All results are expressed as mean {+-} standard deviation). Conclusions: Here we demonstrate that cardiac {sup 31}P MRS at 3 T is a reliable method of measuring in vivo high-energy phosphate kinetics in the myocardium for clinical studies and diagnostics. Based on our data an impairment of cardiac energetic state in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is indisputable.

  11. Comparison of RIMPUFF, HYSPLIT, ADMS atmospheric dispersion model outputs, using emergency response procedures, with (85)Kr measurements made in the vicinity of nuclear reprocessing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connan, Olivier; Smith, Kilian; Organo, Catherine; Solier, Luc; Maro, Denis; Hébert, Didier

    2013-10-01

    The Institut de Radioprotection et de Sureté Nucléaire (IRSN) performed a series of (85)Kr air sampling campaigns at mesoscale distances (18-50 km) from the AREVA NC La Hague nuclear reprocessing plant (North West France) between 2007 and 2009. The samples were collected in order to test and optimise a technique to measure low krypton-85 ((85)Kr) air concentrations and to investigate the performance of three atmospheric dispersion models (RIMPUFF, HYSPLIT, and ADMS), This paper presents the (85)Kr air concentrations measured at three sampling locations which varied from 2 to 8000 Bq m(-3), along with the (85)Kr air concentrations output by the dispersion models. The dispersion models made reasonable estimates of the mean concentrations of (85)Kr field measurements during steady wind conditions. In contrast, the models failed to accurately predict peaks in (85)Kr air concentration during periods of rapid and large changes in wind speed and/or wind direction. At distances where we made the comparisons (18-50 km), in all cases, the models underestimated the air concentration activities.

  12. Establishing an appropriate mode of comparison for measuring the performance of marbling score output from video image analysis beef carcass grading systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C B; Bass, P D; Green, M D; Chapman, P L; O'Connor, M E; Yates, L D; Scanga, J A; Tatum, J D; Smith, G C; Belk, K E

    2010-07-01

    A beef carcass instrument grading system that improves accuracy and consistency of marbling score (MS) evaluation would have the potential to advance value-based marketing efforts and reduce disparity in quality grading among USDA graders, shifts, and plants. The objectives of this study were to use output data from the Video Image Analysis-Computer Vision System (VIA-CVS, Research Management Systems Inc., Fort Collins, CO) to develop an appropriate method by which performance of video image analysis MS output could be evaluated for accuracy, precision, and repeatability for purposes of seeking official USDA approval for using an instrument in commerce to augment assessment of quality grade, and to use the developed standards to gain approval for VIA-CVS to assist USDA personnel in assigning official beef carcass MS. An initial MS output algorithm was developed (phase I) for the VIA-CVS before 2 separate preliminary instrument evaluation trials (phases II and III) were conducted. During phases II and III, a 3-member panel of USDA expert graders independently assigned MS to 1,068 and 1,242 stationary carcasses, respectively. Mean expert MS was calculated for each carcass. Additionally, a separate 3-member USDA expert panel developed a consensus MS for each carcass in phase III. In phase II, VIA-CVS stationary triple-placement and triple-trigger instrument repeatability values (n = 262 and 260, respectively), measured as the percentage of total variance explained by carcasses, were 99.9 and 99.8%, respectively. In phases II and III, 95% of carcasses were assigned expert MS for which differences between individual expert MS, and for which the consensus MS in phase III only, was < or = 96 MS units. Two differing approaches to simple regression analysis, as well as a separate method-comparability analysis that accommodates error in both dependent and independent variables, were used to assess accuracy and precision of instrument MS predictions vs. mean expert MS. Method

  13. SU-C-201-01: Investigation of the Effects of Scintillator Surface Treatment On Light Output Measurements with SiPM Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenciaga, Y; Prout, D; Chatziioannou, A [University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the effect of different scintillator surface treatments (BGO crystals) on the fraction of scintillation photons that exit the crystal and reach the photodetector (SiPM). Methods: Positron Emission Tomography is based on the detection of light that exits scintillator crystals, after annihilation photons deposit energy inside these crystals. A considerable fraction of the scintillation light gets trapped or absorbed after going through multiple internal reflections on the interfaces surrounding the crystals. BGO scintillator crystals generate considerably less scintillation light than crystals made of LSO and its variants. Therefore, it is crucial that the small amount of light produced by BGO exits towards the light detector. The surface treatment of scintillator crystals is among the factors affecting the ability of scintillation light to reach the detectors. In this study, we analyze the effect of different crystal surface treatments on the fraction of scintillation light that is detected by the solid state photodetector (SiPM), once energy is deposited inside a BGO crystal. Simulations were performed by a Monte Carlo based software named GATE, and validated by measurements from individual BGO crystals coupled to Philips digital-SiPM sensor (DPC-3200). Results: The results showed an increment in light collection of about 4 percent when only the exit face of the BGO crystal, is unpolished; compared to when all the faces are polished. However, leaving several faces unpolished caused a reduction of at least 10 percent of light output when the interaction occurs as far from the exit face of the crystal as possible compared to when it occurs very close to the exit face. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the advantages on light collection from leaving unpolished the exit face of BGO crystals. The configuration with best light output will be used to obtain flood images from BGO crystal arrays coupled to SiPM sensors.

  14. Paediatric cardiac anaesthesia in sickle cell disease: a case series

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This case series details experience of four paediatric patients with SCD who underwent corrective cardiac surgery at Red ..... Increased LV stroke volume, increased cardiac output & heart rate ... Hydroxyurea treatment may cause bone marrow.

  15. The output factor correction as function of the photon beam field size - direct measurement and calculation from the lateral dose response functions of gas-filled and solid detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, Daniela; Delfs, Björn; Meyners, Jutta; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Looe, Hui Khee

    2017-08-28

    The first aim of this study has been to extend the systematic experimental study of the field size dependence of the output factor correction for three micro-ionization chambers (PTW 31014, PTW 31022 and IBA Razor chamber), two silicon diodes (PTW 60017 and IBA Razor Diode) and the synthetic diamond detector microDiamond (PTW 60019) in a 6 MV photon beam down to an effective field side length of 2.6mm, and to summarize the present knowledge of this factor by treating it as a function of the dosimetric field size. In order to vary the dosimetric field size over this large range, output factors measurements were performed at source-to-surface distances of 60cm and 90cm. Since the output factors obtained with the organic scintillation detector Exradin W1 (Standard Imaging, Middleton, USA) at all field sizes closely agreed with those measured by EBT3 radiochromic films (ISP Corp, Wayne, USA), the scintillation detector served as the reference detector. The measured output correction factors reflect the influences of the volume averaging and density effects upon the uncorrected output factor values. In case of the microDiamond detector these opposing influences result in output factor correction values less than 1 for moderately small field sizes and larger than 1 for very small field sizes. Our results agree with most of the published experimental as well as Monte-Carlo simulated data within detector-specific limits of uncertainty. The dosimetric field side length has been identified as a reliable determinant of the output factor correction, and typical functional curve shapes of the field-size dependent output factor correction vs. dosimetric field side length have been associated with gas-filled, silicon diode and synthetic diamond detectors. The second aim of this study has been a novel, semi-empirical approach to calculate the field-size dependent output correction factors of small photon detectors by convolving film measured true dose profile data with measured

  16. Physical activity measured by accelerometry and its associations with cardiac structure and vascular function in young and middle-aged adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Lyass, Asya; Larson, Martin G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity is associated with several health benefits, including lower cardiovascular disease risk. The independent influence of physical activity on cardiac and vascular function in the community, however, has been sparsely investigated. MEASURES AND RESULTS: We related...... relations of usual levels of physical activity and cardiovascular remodeling....... objective measures of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA, assessed by accelerometry) to cardiac and vascular indices in 2376 participants of the Framingham Heart Study third generation cohort (54% women, mean age 47 years). Using multivariable regression models, we related MVPA...

  17. Chronic impairment of leg muscle blood flow following cardiac catheterization in childhood. [/sup 133/Xe clearance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skovranek, J.; Samanek, M.

    1979-01-01

    In 99 patients with congenital heart defects or chronic respiratory disease without clinical symptoms of disturbances in peripheral circulation, resting and maximal blood flow in the anterior tibial muscle of both extremities were investigated 2.7 yrs (average) after cardiac catheterization. The method used involved /sup 133/Xe clearance. Resting blood flow was normal and no difference could be demonstrated between the extremity originally used for catheterization and the contralateral control extremity. No disturbance in maximal blood flow could be proved in the extremity used for catheterization by the venous route only. Maximal blood flow was significantly lower in that extremity where the femoral artery had been catheterized or cannulated for pressure measurement and blood sampling. The disturbance in maximal flow was shown regardless of whether the arterial catheterization involved the Seldinger percutaneous technique, arteriotomy, or mere cannulation of the femoral artery. The values in the involved extremity did not differ significantly from the values in a healthy population.

  18. Optimal fluid amount for haemodynamic benefit in cardiac tamponade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vikas; Dwivedi, Sudhanshu K; Chandra, Sharad; Sanguri, Ritesh; Sethi, Rishi; Puri, Aniket; Narain, Varun S; Saran, Ram K

    2014-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the effect of volume expansion on cardiac haemodynamics in patients with cardiac tamponade and to ascertain an optimum amount of fluid that can produce the maximum benefit in tamponade patients. In patients of tamponade, interim measures may occasionally be needed when facilities for pericardial fluid drainage are not immediately available. Intravascular volume expansion is the most commonly advocated measure but with limited scientific data. Patients ≥16 years of age with large circumferential pericardial effusion and showing echocardiographic evidence of cardiac tamponade were included. Haemodynamically unstable patients, those with structural heart diseases, pregnant females, and those undergoing haemodialysis were excluded. The various haemodynamic parameters were measured using Edwards Life Sciences Vigilance II monitor, Swan Ganz CCO catheter, intrapericardial access, and arterial access at baseline and after each 250 ml fluid over 5 min (total 1000 ml in 20 min). The entire fluid was drained at the end of the procedure. A total of 28 patients constituted the study group, all of whom exhibited an improvement in haemodynamic parameters (systolic blood pressure, cardiac output) and a rise of the intracardiac pressures with volume expansion. Significant (p15% increase in cardiac index. Rapid infusion of as little as 250 ml intravenous normal saline may improve the cardiac haemodynamics in a significant proportion of tamponade patients.

  19. Measurement of the left ventricular regurgitation by gated cardiac blood pool scan: Before and after valvular replacement surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sung Hae; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Cho, Bo Youn; Seo, Jung Don; Lee, Young Woo; Koh, Chang Soon; Suh, Kyung Phill; Lee, Yung Kyoon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1982-09-15

    Quantification of the regurgitation amount is important before and after valvular replacement surgery. Until now cardiac catheterization with cine ventriculography, echocardiography have been used to measure the regurgitation amount, but also have many limitations EKG gated cardiac blood pool scan provides a simple, non-invasive method for quantify the regurgitation amount. By calculating the ratio of left ventricular to right ventricular stroke counts (stroke volume ratio) in gated blood pool scan, we measured the left ventricular regurgitation amount in 28 cases of valvular regurgitation and 25 cases of normal group. 1) Stroke volume ratio was higher in cases of valvular regurgitation(2.11+-0.58) than in cases of normal control(l.15+-0.31). (p<0.01). 2) Stroke volume ratio was classified by regurgitation grade using X-ray cine ventriculography. In grades of mild regurgitation(Grade I-II), stroke volume ratio was 2.02+-0.29, and in grades of severe regurgitation(Grade III-IV), stroke volume ratio was 2.55+-0.34, so stroke volume ratio was well correlated with the grade of X-ray cine ventriculography. 3) Stroke volume ratio was classified by functional class made in New York Heart Association. In classes of mild regurgitation (class I-II), stroke volume ratio was 2.08+-0.26, and in classes of severe regurgitation (class III-IV), stroke volume ratio was 2.55+-0.38, Stroke volume ratio well represented the functional class. 4) After aortic and mitral valve replacement in 28 patients, the stroke volume ratio decreased from 2.11+-0.58 to 1.06+-0.26. Gated blood pool scan provides a noninvasive method of quantifying valvular regurgitation and assessing the result of surgical interventions.

  20. Statiscal characteristics of measurement noise included in DME output. Compatibility check with doppler radar output. Hiko shiken de erareta DME data no zatsuon tokusei. Doppler radar data tono seigosei kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Koji.

    1988-02-01

    VOR and DME data can be accurate enough for the purpose of navigation. The accuracy is, however, not satisfactory for the analysis of flight test data, and must be improved by the combined use of other sensor systems. The result of the experiment carried out to clarify and model the statistical characteristics of noises contained in the DME output is reported. The statistical characteristics of noises in DME data were studied by flight tests using two DME systems and one Doppler radar system currently installed in VSRA (variable stability and response airplane). 2 residuals are obtained by a compatibility check of the data of the 2 DME and 1 Doppler radar, and the statistical characteristics of noises contained in the DME data and Doppler radar data can be separately identified. 23 references, 11 figures, 1 table.

  1. External cardiac compression may be harmful in some scenarios of pulseless electrical activity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, T S

    2012-10-01

    Pulseless electrical activity occurs when organised or semi-organised electrical activity of the heart persists but the product of systemic vascular resistance and the increase in systemic arterial flow generated by the ejection of the left venticular stroke volume is not sufficient to produce a clinically detectable pulse. Pulseless electrical activity encompasses a very heterogeneous variety of severe circulatory shock states ranging in severity from pseudo-cardiac arrest to effective cardiac arrest. Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for pulseless electrical activity are generally poor. Impairment of cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output in many scenarios of pulseless electrical activity, including extreme vasodilatory shock states. There is no evidence that external cardiac compression can increase cardiac output when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. If impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output and the heart is effectively ejecting all the blood returning to it, then external cardiac compression can only increase cardiac output if it increases venous return and cardiac filling. Repeated cardiac compression asynchronous with the patient\\'s cardiac cycle and raised mean intrathoracic pressure due to chest compression can be expected to reduce rather than to increase cardiac filling and therefore to reduce rather than to increase cardiac output in such circumstances. The hypothesis is proposed that the performance of external cardiac compression will have zero or negative effect on cardiac output in pulseless electrical activity when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. External cardiac compression may be both directly and indirectly harmful to significant sub-groups of patients with pulseless electrical activity. We have neither evidence nor theory to provide comfort that external cardiac compression is not harmful in many scenarios of pulse