WorldWideScience

Sample records for cardiac output measurements

  1. Methods in pharmacology: measurement of cardiac output

    OpenAIRE

    Geerts, Bart F; Aarts, Leon P; Jansen, Jos R.

    2011-01-01

    Many methods of cardiac output measurement have been developed, but the number of methods useful for human pharmacological studies is limited. The ‘holy grail’ for the measurement of cardiac output would be a method that is accurate, precise, operator independent, fast responding, non-invasive, continuous, easy to use, cheap and safe. This method does not exist today. In this review on cardiac output methods used in pharmacology, the Fick principle, indicator dilution techniques, arterial pul...

  2. Comparison of cardiac output measurement techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, K; Jensen, E W; Rosenborg, D; Thomsen, J K; Eliasen, Kirstin; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Kanstrup, I L

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneously measured cardiac output obtained by thermodilution (TD), transcutaneous suprasternal ultrasonic Doppler (DOP), CO2-rebreathing (CR) and the direct Fick method (FI) were compared in eleven healthy subjects in a supine position (SU), a sitting position (SI), and during sitting exercise...

  3. Invasive and non-invasive methods for cardiac output measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Lavdaniti M.

    2008-01-01

    The hemodynamic status monitoring of high-risk surgical patients and critically ill patients inIntensive Care Units is one of the main objectives of their therapeutic management. Cardiac output is one of the mostimportant parameters for cardiac function monitoring, providing an estimate of whole body perfusion oxygen deliveryand allowing for an understanding of the causes of high blood pressure. The purpose of the present review is thedescription of cardiac output measurement methods as prese...

  4. Issues in methods and measurement of thermodilution cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, M S; Woods, S L; Courtade, M A

    1993-01-01

    Criterion-related validity of the thermodilution cardiac output technique for cardiac output measurement has to have a high correlation (r = .91 to .98) with the direct Fick method, the gold standard of cardiac output measurement. Issues that can affect validity of the measurements include the position of the pulmonary artery catheter, the rate of injection of the indicator solution, the volume and temperature of the injectate, the timing of the injection of indicator solution during the respiratory cycle, the position of the subject, and the presence of concomitant infusions. Variation in measurement can be limited by considering the delivery system for the indicator solution, by recording time-temperature cardiac output curves, and by considering normal biologic variations. PMID:8337161

  5. A Numerical Investigation of Heat Transfer Cardiac Output Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Fotheringham, P.; A R Gourlay; McKee, S.; Andrews, S

    2005-01-01

    Measurement of cardiac output is often investigated using a technique based on hot-film anemometry. Here, we discuss a modification to hot-film anemometry, which involves a cylindrical heating element mounted flush on the surface of a typical Swan-Ganz catheter. In contrast to traditional thermodilution, the method discussed here has the potential to allow continuous monitoring of cardiac output.This paper demonstrates that there is a simple approximate relationship between the power input to...

  6. Evaluation of heavy water for indicator dilution cardiac output measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiner, M.S.; Leksell, L.G.; Neufeld, G.R. (Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia (USA))

    1989-10-01

    We evaluated deuterium oxide (D2O) as a tracer for cardiac output measurements. Cardiac output measurements made by thermodilution were compared with those made by indicator dilution with D2O and indocyanine green as tracers. Five triplicate measurements for each method were made at intervals of 30 minutes in each of 9 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated goats. Cardiac output ranged between 0.68 and 3.79 L/min. The 45 data points yielded a correlation coefficient of 0.948 for the comparison of D2O indicator dilution cardiac output measurements with thermodilution measurements and a linear regression slope of 1.046. D2O indicator dilution measurements were biased by -0.11 +/- 0.22 L/min compared with thermodilution measurements and had a standard deviation of +/- 0.12 L/min for triplicate measurements. Hematocrits ranging between 20 and 50 vol% had no effect on optical density for D2O. D2O is more stable than indocyanine green and approximately one-tenth the price (40 cents per injection compared with $4). The basic instrumentation cost of approximately $9,000 is an additional initial expense, but provides the ability to perform pulmonary extravascular water measurements with a double-indicator dilution technique. D2O has potential as a tracer for the clinical determination of indicator dilution cardiac output measurements and pulmonary extravascular water measurements.

  7. Invasive and non-invasive methods for cardiac output measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavdaniti M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemodynamic status monitoring of high-risk surgical patients and critically ill patients inIntensive Care Units is one of the main objectives of their therapeutic management. Cardiac output is one of the mostimportant parameters for cardiac function monitoring, providing an estimate of whole body perfusion oxygen deliveryand allowing for an understanding of the causes of high blood pressure. The purpose of the present review is thedescription of cardiac output measurement methods as presented in the international literature. The articles documentthat there are many methods of monitoring the hemodynamic status of patients, both invasive and non-invasive, themost popular of which is thermodilution. The invasive methods are the Fick method and thermodilution, whereasthe non-invasive methods are oeshophaegeal Doppler, transoesophageal echocardiography, lithium dilution, pulsecontour, partial CO2 rebreathing and thoracic electrical bioimpedance. All of them have their advantages and disadvantages,but thermodilution is the golden standard for critical patients, although it does entail many risks. The idealsystem for cardiac output monitoring would be non-invasive, easy to use, reliable and compatible in patients. A numberof research studies have been carried out in clinical care settings, by nurses as well as other health professionals, for thepurpose of finding a method of measurement that would have the least disadvantages. Nevertheless, the thermodilutiontechnique remains the most common approach in use today.

  8. Cardiac Output Measurement in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vondra, Vlastimil; Halámek, Josef; Viščor, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Novák, M.

    Danvers : Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., 2007, s. 916-918. ISBN 978-1-4244-0787-3. ISSN 1557-170X. [Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society /29./. Lyon (FR), 23.08.2007-26.08.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/06/0136 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : cardiac output measurement * implanted pacemaker Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  9. Minimally invasive or noninvasive cardiac output measurement: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangkum, Lisa; Liu, Geoffrey L; Yu, Ling; Yan, Hong; Kaye, Alan D; Liu, Henry

    2016-06-01

    Although cardiac output (CO) by pulmonary artery catheterization (PAC) has been an important guideline in clinical management for more than four decades, some studies have questioned the clinical efficacy of CO in certain patient populations. Further, the use of CO by PAC has been linked to numerous complications including dysrhythmia, infection, rupture of pulmonary artery, injury to adjacent arteries, embolization, pulmonary infarction, cardiac valvular damage, pericardial effusion, and intracardiac catheter knotting. The use of PAC has been steadily declining over the past two decades. Minimally invasive and noninvasive CO monitoring have been studied in the past two decades with some evidence of efficacy. Several different devices based on pulse contour analysis are available currently, including the uncalibrated FloTrac/Vigileo system and the calibrated PiCCO and LiDCO systems. The pressure-recording analytical method (PRAM) system requires only an arterial line and is commercially available as the MostCare system. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) can measure CO by non-Doppler- or Doppler-based methods. The partial CO2 rebreathing technique, another method to measure CO, is marketed by Novametrix Medical Systems as the NICO system. Thoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB) and electric bioreactance (EB) are totally noninvasive CO monitoring. Nexfin HD and the newer ClearSight systems are examples of noninvasive CO monitoring devices currently being marketed by Edwards Lifesciences. The developing focus in CO monitoring devices appears to be shifting to tissue perfusion and microcirculatory flow and aimed more at markers that indicate the effectiveness of circulatory and microcirculatory resuscitations. PMID:26961819

  10. Lack of agreement between esophageal doppler cardiac output measurements and continuous pulse contour analysis during off-pump cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. V. Groesdonk

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Transesophageal echo-Doppler cardiac output as well as arterial pulse contour analyses cardiac output are increasingly used for cardiac output monitoring. No data are available whether both techniques may be used interchangeably in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Design: Prospective, observational study Setting: Operating rooms of a university affiliated hospital. Patients: 30 patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting surgery.Interventions: NoneMeasurements: 900 paired cardiac output measurements were obtained by pulse contour analysis following transpulmonary thermodilution equilibration by the PiCCO system (PiCCO, Pulsion, Munich, Germany and by the HemoSonic esophageal doppler monitor (HemoSonic 100; Arrow International, Reading, PA. Measurements were performed within the first hour after induction of anesthesia. Results: Bland-Altman analysis of the complete data set showed a mean difference (bias of - 0.12 l/min (95% CI -0.06 to -0.18 with limits of agreement + 1.8 l/min to -1.6 l/min (upper 95% CI 1.78 to 1.98; lower 95% CI -1.74 to -1.54, the percentage error was + 37% to -44.5%. Transesophageal echo-Doppler cardiac output closely correlated (r = 0.75, p < 0.0001 with pulse-contour analyses cardiac output. Conclusions: Several studies have shown the accuracy of calibrated pulse contour cardiac output measurements in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Thus, the present data question the reliability of transesophageal echo-Doppler derived cardiac output measurements in this setting and may have implications for using transesophageal echo-Doppler during goal-directed hemodynamic optimization.

  11. Techniques of cardiac output measurement during liver transplantation: arterial pulse wave versus thermodilution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, P.; Lieshout, J.J. van; Novovic, S.;

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we compared continuous cardiac output (CO) obtained from the femoral arterial pressure by simulation of an aortic input impedance model [model-simulated cardiac output (MCO)] to thermodilution cardiac output (TDCO) determined by bolus injection during liver transplantation. Both...... variables were measured in 39 adult patients (13 females) every 10th minute during liver transplant surgery. Paired measurements were compared during the 4 phases of surgery-dissection, anhepatic phase, early reperfusion (the first 15 minutes after reperfusion), and late reperfusion (15-60 minutes after......, and the mutual correlation coefficient was 0.812 (P < 0.001). This study indicates that during liver transplantation surgery, MCO reflects TDCO throughout the operation. Thus, for CO, this less invasive method appears to provide a reliable uninterrupted measurement during orthotopic liver...

  12. Validation of a new spectrometer for noninvasive measurement of cardiac output

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acetylene is a blood-soluble gas and for many years its uptake rate during rebreathing tests has been used to calculate the flow rate of blood through the lungs (normally equal to cardiac output) as well as the volume of lung tissue. A new, portable, noninvasive instrument for cardiac output determination using the acetylene uptake method is described. The analyzer relies on nondispersive IR absorption spectroscopy as its principle of operation and is configured for extractive (side-stream) sampling. The instrument affords exceptionally fast (30 ms, 10%-90%, 90%-10%, at 500 mL min-1 flow rates), interference-free, simultaneous measurement of acetylene, sulfur hexafluoride (an insoluble reference gas used in the cardiac output calculation), and carbon dioxide (to determine alveolar ventilation), with good (typically ±2% full-scale) signal-to-noise ratios. Comparison tests with a mass spectrometer using serially diluted calibration gas samples gave excellent (R2>0.99) correlation for all three gases, validating the IR system's linearity and accuracy. A similar level of agreement between the devices also was observed during human subject C2H2 uptake tests (at rest and under incremental levels of exercise), with the instruments sampling a common extracted gas stream. Cardiac output measurements by both instruments were statistically equivalent from rest to 90% of maximal oxygen consumption; the physiological validity of the measurements was confirmed by the expected linear relationship between cardiac output and oxygen consumption, with both the slope and intercept in the published range. These results indicate that the portable, low-cost, rugged prototype analyzer discussed here is suitable for measuring cardiac output noninvasively in a point-of-care setting

  13. Measurement of cardiac output by dynamic computed transmission tomography. Comparison with thermodilution method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Yoshiaki; Yoshino, Futoshi; Ootani, Yukihiro; Kishimoto, Kinya; Takahashi, Ryuji

    1989-05-01

    The capacity of the new computed tomography (CT) instrument with excellent time resolution to measure cardiac output was explored. Dynamic scans of serial one-second images were performed at the middle section of left ventricle for 28 sec. We injected a bolus of 0.3 ml/kg angiografin for 2 sec or 0.4 ml/kg angiografin for 4 sec into the inferior vena cava. The regions of interest were set in the left ventricular cavity and thoracic aorta. Cardiac output was calculated by applying indicator dilution principles. The results were compared with those obtained by thermodilution. The CT results by using 2 sec 0.3 ml/kg angiografin correlated well (r=0.91, p<0.001) with those of thermodilution. This study indicates the utililty of dynamic CT for estimation of cardiac output. (author).

  14. Investigations concerning the application of the cross-correlation method in cardiac output measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawlikowski Maciej

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of numerous non-invasive examinations the “gold clinical standard” of cardiac output measurements is the invasive pulmonary artery catheterization by means of the Swan-Ganz catheter and the application of the thermodilution method to estimate the blood flow. The results obtained by means of thermodilution are sensitive to many physical and biological disturbances. The unreliability of this method amounts to 20-45% and depends on the given variant of the method. Therefore some other method, more accurate and resistant to disturbances, was looked for. This paper presents a new approach to cardiac output measurements, based on cross-correlation signal analysis. The goal of investigations was to verify experimentally the application of the cross-correlation method of cardiac output measurements. Results In 99.2% of the examined cases the extreme of the cross-correlation function was easy to be estimated by numerical algorithms. In 0,8% of the remaining cases (with a plateau region adjacent to the maximum point numerical detection of the extreme was inaccurate. The typical unreliability of the investigated method amounted o 5.1% (9.8% in the worst case. Investigations performed on a physical model revealed that the unreliability of cardiac output measurements by means of the cross-correlation method is 3–5 times better than in the case of thermodilution. Conclusions The performed investigations and theoretical analysis have shown, that the cross-correlation method may be applied in cardiac output measurements. This kind of measurements seems to be more accurate and disturbance-resistant than clinically applied thermodilution.

  15. Aspects of the continuous clinical measurement of arterial blood pressure and cardiac output

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the authors try to classify circulatory measurements as to certain characteristics such as ''activeness'', ''invasivenesss'', etc. Next they turn to defining some fundamental measurements in the blood circulation and focus attention on the continuous measurement of systemic arterial pressure and flow to finally emphasize the inaccuracy of clinical cardiac output methods. The conclusion is that clinical circulatory measurement methods have accuracies at least an order of magnitude worse than common physical methods used in electrical or mechanical engineering. (Auth.)

  16. Automated non-invasive measurement of cardiac output: comparison of electrical bioimpedance and carbon dioxide rebreathing techniques.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, S A; Russell, A.E.; West, M. J.; Chalmers, J

    1988-01-01

    Two commercial automated, non-invasive systems for estimation of cardiac output were evaluated. Values of cardiac output obtained by electrical bioimpedance cardiography (BoMed NCCOM3 machine) were compared with values derived from an indirect Fick technique that uses carbon dioxide rebreathing (Gould 9000 IV system) during 103 simultaneous measurements made at rest in 19 randomly selected subjects and on exercise in 11 subjects. Cardiac output values obtained with impedance cardiography were...

  17. Cardiac output during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, C; Rasmussen, P.; Sørensen, H.;

    2015-01-01

    Several techniques assessing cardiac output (Q) during exercise are available. The extent to which the measurements obtained from each respective technique compares to one another, however, is unclear. We quantified Q simultaneously using four methods: the Fick method with blood obtained from the...... right atrium (Q(Fick-M)), Innocor (inert gas rebreathing; Q(Inn)), Physioflow (impedance cardiography; Q(Phys)), and Nexfin (pulse contour analysis; Q(Pulse)) in 12 male subjects during incremental cycling exercise to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (FiO2  = 12%). While all four methods reported a...... progressive increase in Q with exercise intensity, the slopes of the Q/oxygen uptake (VO2) relationship differed by up to 50% between methods in both normoxia [4.9 ± 0.3, 3.9 ± 0.2, 6.0 ± 0.4, 4.8 ± 0.2 L/min per L/min (mean ± SE) for Q(Fick-M), Q(Inn), QP hys and Q(Pulse), respectively; P = 0.001] and...

  18. Cardiac output monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathews Lailu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive and non-invasive methods of estimation of cardiac output (CO were developed to overcome the limitations of invasive nature of pulmonary artery catheterization (PAC and direct Fick method used for the measurement of stroke volume (SV. The important minimally invasive techniques available are: oesophageal Doppler monitoring (ODM, the derivative Fick method (using partial carbon dioxide (CO 2 breathing, transpulmonary thermodilution, lithium indicator dilution, pulse contour and pulse power analysis. Impedance cardiography is probably the only non-invasive technique in true sense. It provides information about haemodynamic status without the risk, cost and skill associated with the other invasive or minimally invasive techniques. It is important to understand what is really being measured and what assumptions and calculations have been incorporated with respect to a monitoring device. Understanding the basic principles of the above techniques as well as their advantages and limitations may be useful. In addition, the clinical validation of new techniques is necessary to convince that these new tools provide reliable measurements. In this review the physics behind the working of ODM, partial CO 2 breathing, transpulmonary thermodilution and lithium dilution techniques are dealt with. The physical and the physiological aspects underlying the pulse contour and pulse power analyses, various pulse contour techniques, their development, advantages and limitations are also covered. The principle of thoracic bioimpedance along with computation of CO from changes in thoracic impedance is explained. The purpose of the review is to help us minimize the dogmatic nature of practice favouring one technique or the other.

  19. Lack of agreement between bioimpedance and continuous thermodilution measurement of cardiac output in intensive care unit patients

    OpenAIRE

    Barry, Ben N; Mallick, Abhiram; Bodenham, Andrew R; Vucevic, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Background: Bolus thermodilution is the standard bedside method of cardiac output measurement in the intensive care unit (ICU). The Baxter Vigilance monitor uses a modified thermodilution pulmonary artery catheter with a thermal filament to give a continuous read-out of cardiac output. This has been shown to correlate very well with both the 'gold standard' dye dilution method and the bolus thermodilution method. Bioimpedance cardiography using the Bomed NCCOM 3 offers a noninvasive means of ...

  20. A-V Delay Versus Cardiac Output Measured with Thorax Bioimpedance Monitor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vondra, Vlastimil; Halámek, Josef; Viščor, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Novák, M.; Lipoldová, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2008), s. 73. ISSN 1556-7451. [World Congress on Heart Disease /14./. 26.07.2008-29.07.2008, Toronto] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : atrio-ventricular delay * resynchronization therapy * impedance cardiography * cardiac output Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  1. Non-invasive measurements of cardiac output in atrial fibrillation: Inert gas rebreathing and impedance cardiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osbak, Philip S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Kofoed, Klaus F;

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To test the effect of interventions, knowledge of cardiac output (CO) is important. However, the irregular heart rate might cause some methods for determination of CO to have inherent weaknesses...

  2. Non-invasive measurement of cardiac output by Finometer in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Nicolai Stefan; Hobolth, L; Møller, S

    2010-01-01

    The Finometer measures haemodynamic parameters including cardiac output (CO) using non-invasive volume-clamp techniques. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of the Finometer in hyperdynamic cirrhotic patients using an invasive indicator dilution technique as control. CO was measured......(I) was 6.1 +/- 1.6 [3.9;9.7] l min(-1) (mean +/- SD [range]) compared to mean CO(F) of 7.2 +/- 2.3 [3.1;11.9] l min(-1). There was a mean difference between CO(F) and CO(I) of 1.0 +/- 1.8 [-2.1;4.0] l min(-1) and 95% confidence interval of [0.2;1.8], P<0.001. In patients with measurements before and...... after beta-blockade, mean DeltaCO(I) was 1.6 +/- 1.4 [-0.1;3.3] l min(-1) compared to mean DeltaCO(F) of 1.9 +/- 1.3 [0.4;3.8] l min(-1). Mean difference between DeltaCO(F) and DeltaCO(I) was 0.3 +/- 0.3 [-0.2;0.7] l min(-1) with a 95% confidence interval of [-0.1;0.6], P = 0.11. Compared with invasive...

  3. Thermal dilution measurement of cardiac output in dogs using an analog computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, F F; Schipperheyn, J J; Quanjer, P H

    1978-01-01

    Thermal dilution cardiac output determinations in dogs were compared to simultaneously performed Fick oxygen measurements. The purpose of this study was to validate in dog experiments a method for thermal dilution measurement which employs a double-thermistor catheter combined with an automatic computer as described by Olsson et al. Dilution and injectate temperature are entered directly into the calculation. The method does not employ logarithmic extrapolation, integration of the dilution signal being terminated when a preset cut-off level is reached. Errors due to recirculation, thermal capacitance of the right heart and heat exchange with the catheter's dead space require the use of an empirically derived correction factor, which in dogs was found to be significantly different from the factor used for human thermal dilution curves. With the appropriate cut-off level and correction factor a good agreement was found between the results of the thermal dilution and the Fick method. The regression equation for 47 experiments was found to be COtd = 0.95 COFick + 0.08; the correlation coefficient was 0.94. PMID:728031

  4. Cardiac Output Measurements in Septic Patients: Comparing the Accuracy of USCOM to PiCCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Horster

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available USCOM is an ultrasound-based method which has been accepted for noninvasive hemodynamic monitoring in various clinical conditions (USCOM, Ultrasonic cardiac output monitoring. The present study aimed at comparing the accuracy of the USCOM device with that of the thermodilution technique in patients with septicemia. We conducted a prospective observational study in a medical but noncardiological ICU of a university hospital. Septic adult patients (median age 55 years, median SAPS-II-Score 43 points on mechanical ventilation and catecholamine support were monitored with USCOM and PiCCO (=70. Seventy paired left-sided CO measurements (transaortic access = COUS-A were obtained. The mean COUS-A were 6.55 l/min (±2.19 versus COPiCCO 6.5 l/min (±2.18. The correlation coefficient was =0.89. Comparison by Bland-Altman analysis revealed a bias of −0.36 l/min (±0.99 l/min leading to a mean percentage error of 29%. USCOM is a feasible and rapid method to evaluate CO in septic patients. USCOM does reliably represent CO values as compared to the reference technique based on thermodilution (PiCCO. It seems to be appropriate in situations where CO measurements are most pertinent to patient management.

  5. Measurement of cardiac output during exercise by open-circuit acetylene uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, R C; Hopkins, S R; Kellogg, N; Olfert, I M; Brutsaert, T D; Gavin, T P; Entin, P L; Rice, A J; Wagner, P D

    1999-10-01

    Noninvasive measurement of cardiac output (QT) is problematic during heavy exercise. We report a new approach that avoids unpleasant rebreathing and resultant changes in alveolar PO(2) or PCO(2) by measuring short-term acetylene (C(2)H(2)) uptake by an open-circuit technique, with application of mass balance for the calculation of QT. The method assumes that alveolar and arterial C(2)H(2) pressures are the same, and we account for C(2)H(2) recirculation by extrapolating end-tidal C(2)H(2) back to breath 1 of the maneuver. We correct for incomplete gas mixing by using He in the inspired mixture. The maneuver involves switching the subject to air containing trace amounts of C(2)H(2) and He; ventilation and pressures of He, C(2)H(2), and CO(2) are measured continuously (the latter by mass spectrometer) for 20-25 breaths. Data from three subjects for whom multiple Fick O(2) measurements of QT were available showed that measurement of QT by the Fick method and by the C(2)H(2) technique was statistically similar from rest to 90% of maximal O(2) consumption (VO(2 max)). Data from 12 active women and 12 elite male athletes at rest and 90% of VO(2 max) fell on a single linear relationship, with O(2) consumption (VO(2)) predicting QT values of 9.13, 15.9, 22.6, and 29.4 l/min at VO(2) of 1, 2, 3, and 4 l/min. Mixed venous PO(2) predicted from C(2)H(2)-determined QT, measured VO(2), and arterial O(2) concentration was approximately 20-25 Torr at 90% of VO(2 max) during air breathing and 10-15 Torr during 13% O(2) breathing. This modification of previous gas uptake methods, to avoid rebreathing, produces reasonable data from rest to heavy exercise in normal subjects. PMID:10517785

  6. The ability of the Vigileo-FloTrac system to measure cardiac output and track cardiac output changes during one-lung ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suehiro, Koichi; Tanaka, Katsuaki; Yamada, Tokuhiro; Matsuura, Tadashi; Mori, Takashi; Funao, Tomoharu; Nishikawa, Kiyonobu

    2015-06-01

    This study was aimed at comparing the cardiac output (CO) measured by the Vigileo™-FloTrac™ system with that estimated by the thermodilution pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) during one-lung ventilation (OLV) and determining the reliability of this system in tracking phenylephrine-induced CO changes during OLV. Sixteen patients scheduled for descending aorta replacement were enrolled. The study was performed 30 min after starting OLV under stable hemodynamic conditions. We recorded hemodynamic variables, CO measured by PAC thermodilution (ICO), CO measured by Vigileo™-FloTrac™ system (Version 3.02, Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) (APCO), and systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI) before (T0) and after (T1) phenylephrine (100 μg) administration. We used Bland-Altman analysis to compare ICO and APCO. Polar plot and four-quadrant plot were used to assess the tracking ability of the Vigileo™-FloTrac™ system against ICO after administration of phenylephrine. Ninety hemodynamic interventions were performed. Bland-Altman analysis revealed that the mean bias between APCO and ICO was 0.05 L/min and the percentage error, 46.9 %. Four-quadrant plot analysis showed a concordance rate of 24.7 %, while polar plot analysis showed that the concordance rate was 13.3 %; the angular bias, -45.9°; radial limit of agreement, 85.3°. The bias between APCO and ICO was significantly correlated with the SVRI value (p < 0.001, r(2) = 0.822). The reliability of the Vigileo™-FloTrac™ system during OLV to estimate CO and track phenylephrine-induced CO changes was not acceptable. PMID:25212705

  7. The correlation between the first heart sound and cardiac output as measured by using digital esophageal stethoscope under anaesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Duck Shin, Young; Hoon Yim, Kyoung; Hi Park, Sang; Wook Jeon, Yong; Ho Bae, Jin; Soo Lee, Tae; Hwan Kim, Myoung; Jin Choi, Young

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The use of an esophageal stethoscope is a basic heart sounds monitoring procedure performed in patients under general anesthesia. As the size of the first heart sound can express the left ventricle function, its correlation with cardiac output should be investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cardiac output (CO) on the first heart sound (S1) amplitude. Methods : Six male beagles were chosen. The S1 was obtained with the newly developed esophageal steth...

  8. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  9. [Cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography in cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, H; Seki, S; Mizuguchi, A; Tsuchida, H; Watanabe, H; Namiki, A

    1990-04-01

    The cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography, NCCOM3, was evaluated in adult patients (n = 12) who were subjected to coronary artery bypass grafting. Values of cardiac output measured by impedance cardiography were compared to those by the thermodilution method. Changes of base impedance level used as an index of thoracic fluid volume were also investigated before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Correlation coefficient (r) of the values obtained by thermodilution with impedance cardiography was 0.79 and the mean difference was 1.29 +/- 16.9 (SD)% during induction of anesthesia. During the operation, r was 0.83 and the mean difference was -14.6 +/- 18.7%. The measurement by impedance cardiography could be carried out through the operation except when electro-cautery was used. Base impedance level before CPB was significantly lower as compared with that after CPB. There was a negative correlation between the base impedance level and central venous pressure (CVP). No patients showed any signs suggesting lung edema and all the values of CVP, pulmonary artery pressure and blood gas analysis were within normal ranges. From the result of this study, it was concluded that cardiac output monitoring by impedance cardiography was useful in cardiac surgery, but further detailed examinations will be necessary on the relationship between the numerical values of base impedance and the clinical state of the patients. PMID:2362347

  10. Pulsatile flow simulator for comparison of cardiac output measurements by electromagnetic flow meter and thermodilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebson, P J; Karkow, W S

    1986-01-01

    This study examined a pulsatile flow simulator for the purpose of evaluating two measurement devices, an extracorporeal flow probe with an electromagnetic flow meter and several thermodilution catheters. We measured the performance of these devices in a range of low to high flows. Using either saline or blood as a perfusate, we obtained different results with these fluids (p less than 0.001). Each catheter behaved in a linear manner, although variation occurred among the catheters with both saline (minimum slope 1.090, maximum slope 1.190) and blood (minimum slope 1.107, maximum slope 1.154). An increase in rate and stroke volumes of the simulator did not demonstrate an identifiable trend in error. The thermodilution catheters were most accurate at 5.0 L/min irrespective of rate, stroke volume, or perfusate used. In contrast, the electromagnetic flow meter accurately represented flows across the wide range of outputs examined (2.4 to 10.7 L/min). (Slope with saline 1.091, slope with blood 1.080) Throughout the range of flow, the flow meter gave a calibration line 5% higher with blood than with saline. The results indicate that accurate measurement of pulsatile blood flow can be achieved in vitro with an electromagnetic flow meter using saline as a perfusate, provided a correction factor is determined and applied to convert values for saline to accurate values for blood. PMID:2940345

  11. Cardiac output measured by the FloTrac/Vigileo system: Does the „plug and play“ principle work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Maxeiner

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Determination of cardiac output by the classic thermodilution technique is widely accepted to be the gold standard, but it is not without additional risks due to invasive catheterisation. Therefore, we compared it with the less invasive FloTracTM/VigileoTM-system based on an automated pulse contour analysis.Methods: 34 patients who underwent cardiac surgery with extracorporal circulation were included. In each patient, four measurements were performed. A software update split the patients into two groups: 19 of them were measured using software version V1.07, 15 were measured using software version V1.10.Results: Overall, 120 measurements were performed. Software version V1.07 showed a bias of -0.45l•(min•m2-1 and a precision of 0.53l•(min•m2-1. The percentage error was 45%. Software version V1.10 showed a bias of -0.26l•(min•m2-1 and a precision of 0.42l•(min•m2-1, the percentage error was 36% in this case. The differences were statistically significant with respect to the bias but not to the precision.Conclusion: Although software version V1.10 led to an improvement in the concordance with thermodilution technique, the percentage error exceeds the acceptable threshold of 28.28%. Therefore, in the setting of cardiac surgery the FloTracTM/VigileoTM-system cannot replace the thermodilution technique at present.

  12. Measurement of cardiac output during exercise in healthy, trained humans using lithium dilution and pulse contour analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of pulse contour analysis calibrated with lithium dilution in a single device (LiDCO™) for measurement of cardiac output (.Q) during exercise in healthy volunteers. We sought to; (a) compare pulse contour analysis (PulseCO) and lithium indicator dilution (LiDCO) for the measurement of .Q during exercise, and (b) assess the requirement for recalibration of PulseCO with LiDCO during exercise. Ten trained males performed multi-stage cycling exercise at intensities below and above ventilatory threshold before constant load maximal exercise to exhaustion. Uncalibrated PulseCO .Q (.Qraw) was compared to that calibrated with lithium dilution at baseline (.Qbaseline), during submaximal exercise below (.Qlow) and above (.Qhigh) ventilatory threshold, and at each exercise stage individually (.Qexercise). There was a significant difference between .Qbaseline and all other calibration methods during exercise, but not at rest. No significant differences were observed between other methods. Closest agreement with .Qexercise was observed for .Qhigh (bias ± limits of agreement: 4.8 ± 30.0%). The difference between .Qexercise and both .Qlow and .Qraw was characterized by low bias (4–7%) and wide limits of agreement (>±40%). Calibration of pulse contour analysis with lithium dilution prior to exercise leads to a systematic overestimation of exercising cardiac output. A single calibration performed during exercise above the ventilatory threshold provided acceptable limits of agreement with an approach incorporating multiple calibrations throughout exercise. Pulse contour analysis may be used for .Q measurement during exercise providing the system is calibrated during exercise. (paper)

  13. Methods and apparatus for determining cardiac output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Richard J. (Inventor); Mukkamala, Ramakrishna (Inventor); Sherman, Derin A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for determining a dynamical property of the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree using long time scale information, i.e., information obtained from measurements over time scales greater than a single cardiac cycle. In one aspect, the invention provides a method and apparatus for monitoring cardiac output (CO) from a single blood pressure signal measurement obtained at any site in the systemic or pulmonary arterial tree or from any related measurement including, for example, fingertip photoplethysmography.According to the method the time constant of the arterial tree, defined to be the product of the total peripheral resistance (TPR) and the nearly constant arterial compliance, is determined by analyzing the long time scale variations (greater than a single cardiac cycle) in any of these blood pressure signals. Then, according to Ohm's law, a value proportional to CO may be determined from the ratio of the blood pressure signal to the estimated time constant. The proportional CO values derived from this method may be calibrated to absolute CO, if desired, with a single, absolute measure of CO (e.g., thermodilution). The present invention may be applied to invasive radial arterial blood pressure or pulmonary arterial blood pressure signals which are routinely measured in intensive care units and surgical suites or to noninvasively measured peripheral arterial blood pressure signals or related noninvasively measured signals in order to facilitate the clinical monitoring of CO as well as TPR.

  14. Non-invasive measurement of cardiac output by a single breath constant expiratory technique.

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    A new single breath test has been developed that measures pulmonary blood flow (Qc) and pulmonary tissue volume by using the fact that Qc is proportional to the relationship between the absorption rate of acetylene (C2H2) from the alveolar gas and the rate of change of lung volume during constant expiratory flow. To make these measurements a bag in bottle system with a rolling seal spirometer, a mass spectrometer, and a minicomputer with analogue to digital conversion have been used. Qc was c...

  15. Measurements of cardiac output obtained with transesophageal echocardiography and pulmonary artery thermodilution are not interchangeable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Sørensen, H; Graeser, K; Hansen, K L;

    2014-01-01

    was placed in the following successive positions: supine, head-down tilt, head-up tilt, supine, supine with phenylephrine administration, pace heart rate 80 beats per minute (bpm), pace heart rate 110 bpm. TEE CO and PAC CO were measured simultaneously. The agreement was analysed by Bland-Altman plots...

  16. Impact of changes in systemic vascular resistance on a novel non-invasive continuous cardiac output measurement system based on pulse wave transit time: a report of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Ishihara, Hironori; Tsutsui, Masato

    2013-01-01

    The inaccuracy of arterial waveform analysis for measuring continuos cardiac output (CCO) associated with changes in systemic vascular resistance (SVR) has been well documented. A new non-invasive continuous cardiac output monitoring system (esCCO) mainly utilizing pulse wave transit time (PWTT) in place of arterial waveform analysis has been developed. However, the trending ability of esCCO to measure cardiac output during changes in SVR remains unclear. After a previous multicenter study on...

  17. Modelflow underestimates cardiac output in heat-stressed individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shibasaki, Manabu; Wilson, Thad E; Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; Seifert, Thomas; Secher, Niels H; Crandall, Craig G

    2011-01-01

    Modelflow accurately tracks thermodilution-derived cardiac outputs during whole body heat stress. Acute changes of cardiac output were accomplished via lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) during normothermic and heat-stressed conditions. In nine healthy normotensive subjects, arterial pressure was measured...... similar with cardiac outputs measured by thermodilution (6.4 ± 0.8 l/min). The subsequent reduction in cardiac output during LBNP was also similar among these methods. Whole body heat stress elevated internal temperature from 36.6 ± 0.3 to 37.8 ± 0.4°C and increased cardiac output from 6.4 ± 0.8 to 10.......9 ± 2.0 l/min when evaluated with thermodilution (P <0.001). However, the increase in cardiac output estimated from the Modelflow method for both arterial cannulation (2.3 ± 1.1 l/min) and Finometer (1.5 ± 1.2 l/min) was attenuated compared with thermodilution (4.5 ± 1.4 l/min, both P <0.01). Finally...

  18. Addressing Assumptions for the Use of Non-invasive Cardiac Output Measurement Techniques During Exercise in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, Hélène; Richard, Ruddy; Kapchinsky, Sophia; Baril, Jacinthe; Bourbeau, Jean; Taivassalo, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    The multifactorial functional limitation of COPD increasingly demonstrates the need for an integrated circulatory assessment. In this study cardiac output (Qc) derived from non-inert (CO2-RB), inert (N2O-RB) gas rebreathing approaches and bioimpedance were compared to examine the limitations of currently available non-invasive techniques for exercise Qc determination in patients with chronic lung disease. Thirteen COPD patients (GOLD II-III) completed three constant cycling bouts at 20, 35, and 50% of peak work on two occasions to assess Qc with bioimpedance as well as using CO2-RB and N2O-RB for all exercise tests. Results showed significantly lower Qc using the N2O-RB or end-tidal CO2-derived Qc compared to the PaCO2-derived CO2-RB or the bioimpedance at rest and for all exercise intensities. End-tidal CO2-derived values are however not statistically different from those obtained using inert-gas rebreathing. This study show that in COPD patients, CO2-rebreathing Qc values obtained using PaCO2 contents which account for any gas exchange impairment or inadequate gas mixing are similar to those obtained using thoracic bioimpedance. Alternately, the lower values for N2O rebreathing derived Qc indicates the inability of this technique to account for gas exchange impairment in the computation of Qc. These findings indicate that the choice of a gas rebreathing technique to measure Qc in patients must be dictated by the ability to include in the derived computations a correction for either gas exchange inadequacies and/or a vascular shunt. PMID:26408087

  19. Comparison of transthoracic electrical bioimpedance cardiac output measurement with thermodilution method in post coronary artery bypass graft patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Vikas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transthoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB has been proposed as a non-invasive, continuous, and cost-effective method of cardiac output (CO measurement. In this prospective, non-randomized, clinical study, we measured CO with NICOMON (Larsen and Toubro Ltd., Mysore, India and compared it with thermodilution (TD method in patients after off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB graft surgery. We also evaluated the effect of ventilation (mechanical and spontaneous on the measurement of CO by the two methods. Forty-six post-OPCAB patients were studied at five predefined time points during controlled ventilation and at five time points when breathing spontaneously. A total of 230 data pairs of CO were obtained. During controlled ventilation, TD CO values ranged from 2.29 to 6.74 L/min (mean 4.45 ± 0.85 L/min, while TEB CO values ranged from 1.70 to 6.90 L/min (mean 4.43 ± 0.94 L/min. The average correlation (r was 0.548 (P = 0.0002, accompanied by a bias of 0.015 L/min and precision of 0.859 L/min. In spontaneously breathing patients, TD CO values ranged from 2.66 to 6.92 L/min (mean 4.66 ± 0.76 L/min, while TEB CO values ranged from 3.08 to 6.90 L/min (mean 4.72 ± 0.82 L/min. Their average correlation was relatively poor (r = 0.469, P= 0.002, accompanied by a bias of −0.059 L/min and precision of 0.818 L/min. The overall percent errors between TD CO and TEB CO were 19.3% (during controlled ventilation and 17.4% (during spontaneous breathing, respectively. To conclude, a fair correlation was found between TD CO and TEB CO measurements among post-OPCAB patients during controlled ventilation. However, the correlation was weak in spontaneously breathing patients.

  20. Estimation of cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance using a multivariate regression model with features selected from the finger photoplethysmogram and routine cardiovascular measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Qim Y; Stephen J. Redmond; Chan, Gregory SH; Middleton, Paul M; Steel, Elizabeth; Malouf, Philip; Critoph, Cristopher; Flynn, Gordon; O’Lone, Emma; Lovell, Nigel H

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac output (CO) and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) are two important parameters of the cardiovascular system. The ability to measure these parameters continuously and noninvasively may assist in diagnosing and monitoring patients with suspected cardiovascular diseases, or other critical illnesses. In this study, a method is proposed to estimate both the CO and SVR of a heterogeneous cohort of intensive care unit patients (N=48). Methods Spectral and morphological features w...

  1. Differences of cardiac output measurements by open-circuit acetylene uptake in pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwaiblmair Martin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As differences in gas exchange between pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH have been demonstrated, we asked if cardiac output measurements determined by acetylene (C2H2 uptake significantly differed in these diseases when compared to the thermodilution technique. Method Single-breath open-circuit C2H2 uptake, thermodilution, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing were performed in 72 PAH and 32 CTEPH patients. Results In PAH patients the results for cardiac output obtained by the two methods showed an acceptable agreement with a mean difference of -0.16 L/min (95% CI -2.64 to 2.32 L/min. In contrast, the agreement was poorer in the CTEPH group with the difference being -0.56 L/min (95% CI -4.96 to 3.84 L/min. Functional dead space ventilation (44.5 ± 1.6 vs. 32.2 ± 1.4%, p 2 gradient (9.9 ± 0.8 vs. 4.1 ± 0.5 mmHg, p Conclusion Cardiac output evaluation by the C2H2 technique should be interpreted with caution in CTEPH, as ventilation to perfusion mismatching might be more relevant than in PAH.

  2. Pulse contour-derived cardiac output in hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Joakim; Ladefoged, Soeren D

    2010-01-01

    analysis, namely the Finometer monitor (FNM) for further use on patients dialyzing on a central vascular catheter. Fifty simultaneous cardiac output measurements were obtained during hemodialysis sessions in 25 patients. The internal variability of the FNM measurements was assessed by comparing 24 pairs of...

  3. Relationship between cardiac output and effective renal plasma flow in patients with cardiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGriffin, D.; Tauxe, W.N.; Lewis, C.; Karp, R.; Mantle, J.

    1984-12-01

    The relationship between effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) and cardiac output was examined in 46 patients (22 with congestive heart failure and 24 following cardiac surgical procedures) by simultaneously measuring the global ERPF by the single-injection method and cardiac output by the thermodilution method. Of the patients in the heart-failure group, 21 also had pulmonary artery end diastolic pressure (PAEDP) recorded at the same time. ERPF and cardiac output were found to be related by the regression equations: cardiac output = 2.08 + 0.0065 ERPF (r, 080), with a SE of estimate of 0.81 l/min. ERPF and PAEDP were related by the regression equation: PAEDP = 42.02 - 0.0675 ERPF (r, 0.86), with a SE of estimate of 5.5 mm Hg. ERPF may be a useful noninvasive method of estimating cardiac output if it is known that no intrinsic kidney disease is present, and if the error of 0.81 l/min (1 SE of estimate) is within the range of clinical usefulness. The error is principally attributable to the determination of cardiac output by the thermodilution method.

  4. Assessment of cardiac output changes using a modified FloTrac/Vigileo™ algorithm in cardiac surgery patients

    OpenAIRE

    Senn, Alban; Button, Danny; Zollinger, Andreas; Hofer, Christoph K

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The FloTrac/Vigileo™ (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) allows pulse pressure-derived cardiac output measurement without external calibration. Software modifications were performed in order to eliminate initially observed deficits. The aim of this study was to assess changes in cardiac output determined by the FloTrac/Vigileo™ system (FCO) with an initially released (FCOA) and a modified (FCOB) software version, as well as changes in cardiac output from the PiCCOplus™ system...

  5. Cardiac output estimation using pulmonary mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hann Christopher E; Chase J; Sundaresan Ashwath; Shaw Geoffrey M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) in mechanically ventilated (MV) patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) decreases cardiac output (CO). Accurate measurement of CO is highly invasive and is not ideal for all MV critically ill patients. However, the link between the PEEP used in MV, and CO provides an opportunity to assess CO via MV therapy and other existing measurements, creating a CO measure without further invasiveness. This paper examines...

  6. Simultaneous cardiac output and regional myocardial perfusion determination with PET and nitrogen 13 ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, Jens D; Kofoed, Klaus F; Wu, Hsiao M;

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of measuring cardiac output during positron emission tomography (PET) examination of myocardial perfusion with nitrogen 13 ammonia.......The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility of measuring cardiac output during positron emission tomography (PET) examination of myocardial perfusion with nitrogen 13 ammonia....

  7. Uncalibrated pulse power analysis fails to reliably measure cardiac output in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Broch, Ole; Renner, Jochen; Höcker, Jan; Gruenewald, Matthias; Meybohm, Patrick; Schöttler, Jan; Steinfath, Markus; Bein, Berthold

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Uncalibrated arterial pulse power analysis has been recently introduced for continuous monitoring of cardiac index (CI). The aim of the present study was to compare the accuracy of arterial pulse power analysis with intermittent transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) before and after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods Forty-two patients scheduled for elective coronary surgery were studied after induction of anaesthesia, before and after CPB respectively. Each patient was monitor...

  8. Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring in neonates using bioreactance: a comparison with echocardiography.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Weisz, Dany E

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive cardiac output monitoring is a potentially useful clinical tool in the neonatal setting. Our aim was to evaluate a new method of non-invasive continuous cardiac output (CO) measurement (NICOM™) based on the principle of bioreactance in neonates.

  9. Kredsløbsmonitorering af kritisk syge patienter med "pulse contour cardiac output"-systemet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshari, Arash; Perner, Anders; Bonde, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The Pulse Contour Cardiac Output (PiCCO) monitoring system measures cardiac output with high precision and accuracy. The system may replace the pulmonary artery catheter in most critically ill patients because the rate of serious complications may be lower. Whether the use of dynamic or static fl...

  10. Kredsløbsmonitorering med lithium dilution cardiac output-systemet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christian; Hostrup, Anette; Tønnesen, Else;

    2008-01-01

    The lithium dilution cardiac output (LiDCO) system measures cardiac output beat-to-beat with high precision. The system is based on an arterial pulse power analysis which is calibrated every eight hours with a small non-pharmacological dose of lithium. The system is minimally invasive; it requires...

  11. Peripheral vasodilatation determines cardiac output in exercising humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bada, A A; Svendsen, J H; Secher, N H; Saltin, B; Mortensen, S P

    In dogs, manipulation of heart rate has no effect on the exercise-induced increase in cardiac output. Whether these findings apply to humans remain uncertain, because of the large differences in cardiovascular anatomy and regulation. To investigate the role of heart rate and peripheral...... arterial ATP infusion at rest. Exercise and ATP infusion increased cardiac output, leg blood flow and vascular conductance (P <0.05), whereas cerebral perfusion remained unchanged. During atrial pacing increasing heart rate by up to 54 beats min(−1), cardiac output did not change in any of the three...... demonstrate that the elevated cardiac output during steady-state exercise is regulated by the increase in skeletal muscle blood flow and venous return to the heart, whereas the increase in heart rate appears to be secondary to the regulation of cardiac output....

  12. Non-invasive determination of cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography and electrical bioimpedance

    OpenAIRE

    Silke, Bernard

    1990-01-01

    Cardiac output measured by thermodilution in 25 patients within 24 hours of acute myocardial infarction was compared with cardiac output measured by Doppler echocardiography (24 patients) and electrical bioimpedance (25 patients). The mean (range) cardiac outputs measured by Doppler (4.03 (2.2-6.0) 1/min) and electrical bioimpedance (3.79 (1.1-6.2) 1/min) were similar to the mean thermodilution value (3.95 (2.1-6.2) 1/min). Both non-invasive techniques agreed closely with thermodilution in mo...

  13. Mini invasive hemodynamic monitoring: from arterial pressure to cardiac output

    OpenAIRE

    GIORGIO DELLA ROCCA; MAURIZIO CECCONI; MARIA GABRIELLA COSTA

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the Cardiac Output (CO) the standard invasive pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) is considered today the gold standard. The major criticism to the PAC is that its level of invasiveness is not supported by an improvement in patient's outcome. The interest to lesser and lesser invasive techniques is high. Therefore, the alternative techniques have been recently developed.Cardiac Output can be monitored continuously by different devices that analyze the arterial waveform to track change...

  14. Lack of agreement and trending ability of the endotracheal cardiac output monitor compared with thermodilution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Sørensen, H; Hansen, K L; Ostergaard, M; Andersen, L W; Møller, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Minimally invasive monitoring systems of central haemodynamics are gaining increasing popularity. The present study investigated the precision of the endotracheal cardiac output monitor (ECOM) system and its agreement with pulmonary artery catheter thermodilution (PAC TD) for measuring...

  15. Noninvasive continuous cardiac output monitoring in perioperative and intensive care medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugel, B; Cecconi, M; Wagner, J Y; Reuter, D A

    2015-04-01

    The determination of blood flow, i.e. cardiac output, is an integral part of haemodynamic monitoring. This is a review on noninvasive continuous cardiac output monitoring in perioperative and intensive care medicine. We present the underlying principles and validation data of the following technologies: thoracic electrical bioimpedance, thoracic bioreactance, vascular unloading technique, pulse wave transit time, and radial artery applanation tonometry. According to clinical studies, these technologies are capable of providing cardiac output readings noninvasively and continuously. They, therefore, might prove to be innovative tools for the assessment of advanced haemodynamic variables at the bedside. However, for most technologies there are conflicting data regarding the measurement performance in comparison with reference methods for cardiac output assessment. In addition, each of the reviewed technology has its own limitations regarding applicability in the clinical setting. In validation studies comparing cardiac output measurements using these noninvasive technologies in comparison with a criterion standard method, it is crucial to correctly apply statistical methods for the assessment of a technology's accuracy, precision, and trending capability. Uniform definitions for 'clinically acceptable agreement' between innovative noninvasive cardiac output monitoring systems and criterion standard methods are currently missing. Further research must aim to further develop the different technologies for noninvasive continuous cardiac output determination with regard to signal recording, signal processing, and clinical applicability. PMID:25596280

  16. Determination of myocardial energetic output for cardiac rhythm pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Dalibor; Prevorovská, Svetlana; Marsík, Frantisek

    2007-12-01

    This research is aimed to the determination of the changes in the cardiac energetic output for three different modes of cardiac rhythm pacing. The clinical investigation of thirteen patients with the permanent dual-chamber pacemaker implantation was carried out. The patients were taken to echocardiography examination conducted by way of three pacing modes (AAI, VVI and DDD). The myocardial energetic parameters-the stroke work index (SWI) and the myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) are not directly measurable, however, their values can be determined using the numerical model of the human cardiovascular system. The 24-segment hemodynamical model (pulsating type) of the human cardiovascular system was used for the numerical simulation of the changes of myocardial workload for cardiac rhythm pacing. The model was fitted by well-measurable parameters for each patient. The calculated parameters were compared using the two-tailed Student's test. The differences of SWI and MVO2 between the modes AAI and VVI and the modes DDD and VVI are statistically significant (P0.05). PMID:18080208

  17. Evaluation of a new arterial pressure-based cardiac output device requiring no external calibration

    OpenAIRE

    Amann Matthias; Trabold Benedikt; Schweiger Stefan; Keyl Cornelius; Bele Sylvia; Prasser Christopher; Welnhofer Julia; Wiesenack Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Several techniques have been discussed as alternatives to the intermittent bolus thermodilution cardiac output (COPAC) measurement by the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC). However, these techniques usually require a central venous line, an additional catheter, or a special calibration procedure. A new arterial pressure-based cardiac output (COAP) device (FloTrac™, Vigileo™; Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) only requires access to the radial or femoral artery using a s...

  18. Cardiac output estimation using pulmonary mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hann Christopher E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP in mechanically ventilated (MV patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS decreases cardiac output (CO. Accurate measurement of CO is highly invasive and is not ideal for all MV critically ill patients. However, the link between the PEEP used in MV, and CO provides an opportunity to assess CO via MV therapy and other existing measurements, creating a CO measure without further invasiveness. This paper examines combining models of diffusion resistance and lung mechanics, to help predict CO changes due to PEEP. The CO estimator uses an initial measurement of pulmonary shunt, and estimations of shunt changes due to PEEP to predict CO at different levels of PEEP. Inputs to the cardiac model are the PV loops from the ventilator, as well as the oxygen saturation values using known respiratory inspired oxygen content. The outputs are estimates of pulmonary shunt and CO changes due to changes in applied PEEP. Data from two published studies are used to assess and initially validate this model. The model shows the effect on oxygenation due to decreased CO and decreased shunt, resulting from increased PEEP. It concludes that there is a trade off on oxygenation parameters. More clinically importantly, the model also examines how the rate of CO drop with increased PEEP can be used as a method to determine optimal PEEP, which may be used to optimise MV therapy with respect to the gas exchange achieved, as well as accounting for the impact on the cardiovascular system and its management.

  19. Cardiac output estimation using pulmonary mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Ashwath; Chase, J Geoffrey; Hann, Christopher E; Shaw, Geoffrey M

    2010-01-01

    The application of positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) in mechanically ventilated (MV) patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) decreases cardiac output (CO). Accurate measurement of CO is highly invasive and is not ideal for all MV critically ill patients. However, the link between the PEEP used in MV, and CO provides an opportunity to assess CO via MV therapy and other existing measurements, creating a CO measure without further invasiveness.This paper examines combining models of diffusion resistance and lung mechanics, to help predict CO changes due to PEEP. The CO estimator uses an initial measurement of pulmonary shunt, and estimations of shunt changes due to PEEP to predict CO at different levels of PEEP. Inputs to the cardiac model are the PV loops from the ventilator, as well as the oxygen saturation values using known respiratory inspired oxygen content. The outputs are estimates of pulmonary shunt and CO changes due to changes in applied PEEP. Data from two published studies are used to assess and initially validate this model.The model shows the effect on oxygenation due to decreased CO and decreased shunt, resulting from increased PEEP. It concludes that there is a trade off on oxygenation parameters. More clinically importantly, the model also examines how the rate of CO drop with increased PEEP can be used as a method to determine optimal PEEP, which may be used to optimise MV therapy with respect to the gas exchange achieved, as well as accounting for the impact on the cardiovascular system and its management. PMID:21108836

  20. Determination of myocardial energetic output for cardiac rhythm pacing

    OpenAIRE

    Heřman, Dalibor; Převorovská, Světlana; Maršík, František

    2007-01-01

    This research is aimed to the determination of the changes in the cardiac energetic output for three different modes of cardiac rhythm pacing. The clinical investigation of thirteen patients with the permanent dual-chamber pacemaker implantation was carried out. The patients were taken to echocardiography examination conducted by way of three pacing modes (AAI, VVI and DDD). The myocardial energetic parameters—the stroke work index (SWI) and the myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) are not di...

  1. The decrease of cardiac chamber volumes and output during positive-pressure ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper Kyhl; Ahtarovski, Kiril Aleksov; Iversen, Kasper;

    2013-01-01

    effect of PPV on the central circulation by studying cardiac chamber volumes with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). We hypothesized that PPV lowers cardiac output (CO) mainly via the Frank-Starling relationship. In 18 healthy volunteers, cardiac chamber volumes and flow in aorta and the pulmonary......Positive-pressure ventilation (PPV) is widely used for treatment of acute cardiorespiratory failure, occasionally at the expense of compromised cardiac function and arterial blood pressure. The explanation why has largely rested on interpretation of intracardiac pressure changes. We evaluated the...... artery were measured by CMR during PPV levels of 0, 10, and 20 cmH2O applied via a respirator and a face mask. All cardiac chamber volumes decreased in proportion to the level of PPV. Following 20-cmH2O PPV, the total diastolic and systolic cardiac volumes (±SE) decreased from 605 (±29) ml to 446 (±29...

  2. Validation of noninvasive pulse contour cardiac output using finger arterial pressure in cardiac surgery patients requiring fluid therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofhuizen, C.M.; Lansdorp, B.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Scheffer, G.J.; Lemson, J.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Nexfin (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) allows for noninvasive continuous monitoring of blood pressure (ABPNI) and cardiac output (CONI) by measuring finger arterial pressure (FAP). To evaluate the accuracy of FAP in measuring ABPNI and CONI as well as the adequacy of detecting chang

  3. Validation of noninvasive pulse contour cardiac output using finger arterial pressure in cardiac surgery patients requiring fluid therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofhuizen, Charlotte; Lansdorp, Benno; Hoeven, van der Johannes G.; Scheffer, Gert-Jan; Lemson, Joris

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nexfin (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA) allows for noninvasive continuous monitoring of blood pressure (ABPNI) and cardiac output (CONI) by measuring finger arterial pressure (FAP). To evaluate the accuracy of FAP in measuring ABPNI and CONI as well as the adequacy of detecting change

  4. Pulse contour-derived cardiac output in hemodialysis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordtz, Joakim; Ladefoged, Soeren D

    2010-01-01

    Reliable methods for cardiac output determination are essential for studying the pathophysiology of intradialytic hypotension. Use of the current gold standard, the Transonic monitor, requires an arteriovenous fistula. We wished to verify the accuracy of a method based on finger pulse contour...

  5. Cardiac output and vasodilation in the vasovagal response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieling, Wouter; Jardine, David L; de Lange, Frederik J;

    2016-01-01

    The simple faint is secondary to hypotension and bradycardia resulting in transient loss of consciousness. According to Ohm's law applied to the circulation, BP = SVR × CO, hypotension can result from a decrease in systemic vascular resistance (SVR), cardiac output (CO), or both. It is important...

  6. Cardiac output determined by echocardiography in patients with cirrhosis: comparison with the indicator dilution technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulrik B; Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming; Henriksen, Jens H

    2003-01-01

    technique (CO(I)). METHODS: Twelve patients with cirrhosis were studied. CO(d) was measured as the spatial mean velocity of the left ventricular outflow tract, multiplied by the cross-sectional area and the heart rate. CO(I) was determined by the standard indicator dilution technique after injection of 125I......BACKGROUND/AIMS: Measurement of cardiac output in hyperkinetic patients with cirrhosis by Doppler echocardiography is increasingly reported, but has not been validated. We have compared simultaneous measurements of cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography (CO(d)) and by the indicator dilution...... with the Doppler technique. CONCLUSION: Doppler measurements of cardiac output in groups of patients with cirrhosis are accurate with respect to the group mean, but marked disagreements of over- and underestimation were seen in individual patients. The reproducibility of the Doppler technique is...

  7. Dye-dilution cardiac output without blood withdrawal in the conscious rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac output can be measured in the conscious rabbit without blood withdrawal by use of a modified dye-dilution method. Blood flows continuously from the central ear artery through a Silastic catheter that passes through a modified cuvette lumen and back into an ear vein. Blood flow through this shunt was 1.5 ml/min. This modified technique was evaluated by comparison with a simultaneously performed cardiac output measurement using radioactive microspheres and by making consecutive dye-dilution measurements at short time intervals. A correlation coefficient of 0.96 was obtained when comparing dye-dilution and microsphere cardiac outputs. The difference between 11 paired measurements was 7.09 +- 5.24% (mean +- SD). Consecutive outputs measured within 3 min of each other by the flow-through technique had a correlation coefficient of 0.99 and a difference between the first and second determinations of 3.52 +- 2.38%. The method permits dye-dilution cardiac output measurement in the conscious rabbit while avoiding the potential error caused by blood withdrawal from small animals

  8. A model to calculate cardiac output in hemodialysis patients by thermodilution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alayoud Ahmed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Blood Temperature Monitor module (BTM is used to measure recirculation by thermodilution in dialysis. Numerous studies have confirmed its interest in the measuring of the vascular access flow. In this letter we describe a model to calculate cardiac output in dialysis by the BTM.

  9. Valve area and cardiac output in aortic stenosis: quantification by magnetic resonance velocity mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Hildebrandt, P; Lindvig, K;

    1993-01-01

    Valve area and cardiac output were determined with magnetic resonance (MR) velocity mapping in 12 patients with aortic stenosis. Heart catheterization, Doppler echocardiography, and indicator dilution were performed for comparison. Left ventricle could be catheterized in only nine patients; in...... material, MR measured a mean area of 1.1 cm2 compared with 1.2 cm2 derived from Doppler echocardiography data, with a mean difference of 0.1 cm2 and [-0.5, +0.6] cm2 as limits of agreement. In 11 patients the cardiac output was quantified by MR to a mean of 4.9 L/min and by indicator dilution to 5.0 L......--the valvular area and the cardiac output--may be quantified, MR has potential to become a clinical tool in assessment of severity in aortic stenosis....

  10. Cardiac Output and Performance during a Marathon Race in Middle-Aged Recreational Runners

    OpenAIRE

    Billat, Véronique L.; Hélène Petot; Morgan Landrain; Renaud Meilland; Jean Pierre Koralsztein; Laurence Mille-Hamard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Despite the increasing popularity of marathon running, there are no data on the responses of stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) to exercise in this context. We sought to establish whether marathon performance is associated with the ability to sustain high fractional use of maximal SV and CO (i.e, cardiac endurance) and/or CO, per meter (i.e., cardiac cost). Methods. We measured the SV, heart rate (HR), CO, and running speed of 14 recreational runners in an incremental, maxima...

  11. Cardiac output determination during intravenous cardioangiography using X-ray fluorescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boijsen, M.; Goss, F.; Jacobsson, L.; Lamm, C.; Schlossmann, D.; Bjoerneld, L.; Tylen, U.

    Cardiac output was determined with an indicator dilution technique during digital venous angiography of the left ventricle in 11 patients. The contrast medium injected into the right atrium was used as indicator. During and after the injection of contrast medium one blood sample per second was obtained through a catheter placed in the descending aorta. The samples were analyzed for iodine content with X-ray fluorescence analysis and cardiac output determined ad modum Stewart-Hamilton. Thermodilution was used as a reference method. The results indicate that the indicator dilution method with the use of contrast medium might be used for calibration of videodensitometric methods for blood flow measurements.

  12. A prospective study to evaluate the accuracy of pulse power analysis to monitor cardiac output in critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Grounds R Michael; Fawcett Jayne; Cecconi Maurizio; Rhodes Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Intermittent measurement of cardiac output may be performed using a lithium dilution technique (LiDCO). This can then be used to calibrate a pulse power algorithm of the arterial waveform which provides a continuous estimate of this variable. The purpose of this study was to examine the duration of accuracy of the pulse power algorithm in critically ill patients with respect to time when compared to measurements of cardiac output by an independent technique. Methods Pulse ...

  13. Determinación y análisis comparativo de gasto cardíaco en enfermos críticos mediante Doppler transesofágico y termodilución en bolos: Experiencia preliminar Comparison of cardiac output measurement in critical patients using transesophageal Doppler or thermodilution: A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Andresen H

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac output can be measured non invasively by transesophageal Doppler. This is an alternative to measure it by thermodilution with a catheter in the pulmonary artery. Aim: To compare both methods of cardiac output measurement. Material and methods: Simultaneous measurement of cardiac output by transesophageal Doppler and thermodilution with a catheter in the pulmonary artery in four male critical patients, aged 60±12 years, hospitalized in a University Hospital. The Bland and Altman method to compare the concordance between two measurements, was used. Results: Forty measurements were performed. The results of both methods had a correlation coefficient of 0.98. According to the Bland and Altman method, the difference between both methods was -0.5 L with a precision of 0.52 L/min (95% confidence interval -1.51 to 0.52 L/min. Considering that a change between two sequential measurements is considered significant when the difference is more than 15%, both measurements agreed in 83% of cases, that there was a change in cardiac output. Conclusions:Transesophageal Doppler is a promising non invasive technique to measure cardiac output in critical care patients. It becomes a valid alternative to the thermodilution technique. This preliminary experience must be confirmed in a larger series

  14. Mongolia; Measuring the Output Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Bersch; Tara M. Sinclair

    2011-01-01

    This paper compares the output gap estimates for Mongolia based on a number of different methods. Special attention is paid to the substantial role of mining in the Mongolian economy. We find that a Blanchard and Quah-type joint model of output and inflation provides a more robust estimate of the output gap for Mongolia than the traditional statistical decompositions.

  15. Effect of region of interest selection on first-pass radionuclide cardiac output determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In principle, region of interest (ROI) selection should not affect the measurement of cardiac output by the first-pass technique with a radioactive intravascular indicator. Clinical application of the method requires that this theoretical hypothesis be tested. Sixty-eight left anterior oblique first-pass studies were acquired with a scintillation camera and computer using red blood cells labeled in vitro with /sup 99m/Tc. Calculated mean cardiac output varied in the following order with respect to ROI: lung greater than right heart greater than left ventricle greater than whole heart (both ventricles) greater than aorta. Similar variations were observed in patients both with and without valvular regurgitation. Regions of interest over left ventricle or whole heart yielded the best correlations with cardiac output by thermodilution (r = 0.96, 0.95, respectively, n = 28) as well as the smallest interobserver variations (r = 0.994, 0.995, respectively, n = 33). First-pass studies with [/sup 99m/Tc]red blood cells labeled in vitro can yield accurate, reproducible determinations of cardiac output provided that the effect of ROI selection is recognized and that regions are properly selected

  16. Effect of region of interest selection on first-pass radionuclide cardiac output determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, E.C.; Rahimian, J.; Hines, H.H.

    1986-08-01

    In principle, region of interest (ROI) selection should not affect the measurement of cardiac output by the first-pass technique with a radioactive intravascular indicator. Clinical application of the method requires that this theoretical hypothesis be tested. Sixty-eight left anterior oblique first-pass studies were acquired with a scintillation camera and computer using red blood cells labeled in vitro with /sup 99m/Tc. Calculated mean cardiac output varied in the following order with respect to ROI: lung greater than right heart greater than left ventricle greater than whole heart (both ventricles) greater than aorta. Similar variations were observed in patients both with and without valvular regurgitation. Regions of interest over left ventricle or whole heart yielded the best correlations with cardiac output by thermodilution (r = 0.96, 0.95, respectively, n = 28) as well as the smallest interobserver variations (r = 0.994, 0.995, respectively, n = 33). First-pass studies with (/sup 99m/Tc)red blood cells labeled in vitro can yield accurate, reproducible determinations of cardiac output provided that the effect of ROI selection is recognized and that regions are properly selected.

  17. Non-invasive cardiac output trending during exercise recovery on a bathroom-scale-based ballistocardiograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac ejection of blood into the aorta generates a reaction force on the body that can be measured externally via the ballistocardiogram (BCG). In this study, a commercial bathroom scale was modified to measure the BCGs of nine healthy subjects recovering from treadmill exercise. During the recovery, Doppler echocardiogram signals were obtained simultaneously from the left ventricular outflow tract of the heart. The percentage changes in root-mean-square (RMS) power of the BCG were strongly correlated with the percentage changes in cardiac output measured by Doppler echocardiography (R2 = 0.85, n = 275 data points). The correlation coefficients for individually analyzed data ranged from 0.79 to 0.96. Using Bland–Altman methods for assessing agreement, the mean bias was found to be −0.5% (±24%) in estimating the percentage changes in cardiac output. In contrast to other non-invasive methods for trending cardiac output, the unobtrusive procedure presented here uses inexpensive equipment and could be performed without the aid of a medical professional

  18. Clinical validation of a new thermodilution system for the assessment of cardiac output and volumetric parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Kiefer, Nicholas; Hofer, Christoph K; Marx, Gernot; Geisen, Martin; Giraud, Raphaël; Siegenthaler, Nils; Hoeft, Andreas; Bendjelid, Karim; Rex, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Transpulmonary thermodilution is used to measure cardiac output (CO), global end-diastolic volume (GEDV) and extravascular lung water (EVLW). A system has been introduced (VolumeView/EV1000™ system, Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine CA, USA) that employs a novel algorithm for the mathematical analysis of the thermodilution curve. Our aim was to evaluate the agreement of this method with the established PiCCO™ method (Pulsion Medical Systems SE, Munich, Germany, clinicaltria...

  19. Initial Observations of the Effects of Calcium Chloride Infusions in Pediatric Patients with Low Cardiac Output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averin, Konstantin; Villa, Chet; Krawczeski, Catherine D; Pratt, Jesse; King, Eileen; Jefferies, John L; Nelson, David P; Cooper, David S; Ryan, Thomas D; Sawyer, Jaclyn; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Lorts, Angela

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial contractility and relaxation are highly dependent on calcium homeostasis. Immature myocardium, as in pediatric patients, is thought to be more dependent on extracellular calcium for optimal function. For this reason, intravenous calcium chloride infusions may improve myocardial function in the pediatric patient. The objectives of this study were to report the hemodynamic changes seen after administration of continuous calcium chloride to critically ill children. We retrospectively identified pediatric patients (newborn to 17 years old) with hemodynamic instability admitted to the cardiac ICU between May 2011 and May 2012 who received a continuous infusion of calcium chloride. The primary outcome was improvement in cardiac output, assessed by arterial-mixed venous oxygen saturation (A-V) difference. Sixty-eight patients, mean age 0.87 ± 2.67 years, received a total of 116 calcium infusions. Calcium chloride infusions resulted in significant improvements in primary and secondary measures of cardiac output at 2 and 6 h. Six hours after calcium initiation, A-V oxygen saturation difference decreased by 7.4 % (32.6 ± 2.1 to 25.2 ± 2.0 %, p HR (149.1 vs 145.6 bpm p = 0.07). Urine output increased 0.66 ml/kg/h in the 8-h period after calcium initiation when compared to pre-initiation (p = 0.003). Neonates had the strongest evidence of effectiveness with other age groups trending toward significance. Calcium chloride infusions improve markers of cardiac output in a heterogenous group of pediatric patients in a cardiac ICU. Neonates appear to derive the most benefit from utilization of these infusions. PMID:26687150

  20. Estimating changes in cardiac output using an implanted hemodynamic monitor in heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ståhlberg, Marcus; Damgaard, Morten; Ersgård, David;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate an algorithm that estimates changes in cardiac output (CO) from right ventricular (RV) pressure waveforms derived from an implantable hemodynamic monitor (IHM) in heart failure patients. DESIGN: Twelve heart failure patients (NYHA II-III, EF 32......%) with an implantable hemodynamic monitor (Chronicle) were included in this study. Changes in cardiac output were provoked by body position change at rest (left lateral supine, horizontal supine, sitting, and standing) and a steady state bicycle exercise at 20 watts. Estimated CO derived from the IHM (CO(IHM......)) was compared to CO measured with inert gas rebreathing (CO(RB)), echocardiography (CO(ECHO)) and impedance cardiography (CO(ICG)). CO(RB) was considered the reference method. RESULTS: The median intra-patient correlation coefficient comparing CO(RB) and CO(IHM) was 0.83 (range: 0.63-0.98). Comparing...

  1. Reliability of first-pass radionuclide determination of cardiac output in the upright position at rest and during exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelbaek, H.; Gjoerup, T.; Hvid-Jacobsen, K.; Skagen, K.; Munck, O. (Herlev Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine); Godtfredsen, J. (Herlev Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Cardiology); Heslet, L. (Herlev Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Anesthesiology); Tjur, T.; Jensen, A.M. (Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Inst. for Mathematical Statistics)

    1992-11-01

    The reliability of non-invasive determination of cardiac output using first-pass radionuclide cardiography at rest and during exercise in the upright position was evaluated in 20 patients with coronary artery disease. Cardiac output values ranged from 2.97 to 5.99 l/min at rest and from 5.08 to 10.82 l/min during exercise. Cardiac output results obtained by the radionuclide method were compared with those derived from the thermodilution technique performed simultaneously. The mean difference between the two techniques was 0.02/l min at rest and -0.34 l/min during exercise; the limits of agreement (mean {+-}1.96 SD) were -1.29 to 1.33 l/min and -1.97 to 1.29 l/min, respectively, indicating an acceptable level of agreement. A high reproducibility of the radionuclide technique was found, with a mean difference between determinations by two observers of 0.03 l/min at rest and 0.21 l/min during exercise, the corresponding limits of agreement being -0.75 to 0.81 l/min and -0.79 to 1.21 l/min, respectively. With the aid of a variance component analysis of two determinations by each of four observers, 95% confidence intervals of {+-}10% at rest at {+-}12% during exercise were computed for the radionuclide cardiac output measurements. The observer variation was most pronounced for the part of the cardiac output determination related to measurement of left ventricular equilibrium activity during exercise. First-pass radionuclide cardiography is a reliable method for determination of cardiac output in cardiac patients at rest and during exercise in the upright position. (orig.).

  2. A prospective study to evaluate the accuracy of pulse power analysis to monitor cardiac output in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grounds R Michael

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent measurement of cardiac output may be performed using a lithium dilution technique (LiDCO. This can then be used to calibrate a pulse power algorithm of the arterial waveform which provides a continuous estimate of this variable. The purpose of this study was to examine the duration of accuracy of the pulse power algorithm in critically ill patients with respect to time when compared to measurements of cardiac output by an independent technique. Methods Pulse power analysis was performed on critically ill patients using a proprietary commercial monitor (PulseCO. All measurements were made using an in-dwelling radial artery line and according to manufacturers instructions. Intermittent measurements of cardiac output were made with LiDCO in order to validate the pulse power measurements. These were made at baseline and then following 1, 2, 4 and 8 hours. The LiDCO measurement was considered the reference for comparison in this study. The two methods of measuring cardiac output were then compared by linear regression and a Bland Altman analysis. An error rate for the limits of agreement (LOA between the two techniques of less than 30% was defined as being acceptable for this study. Results 14 critically ill medical and surgical patients were enrolled over a three month period. At baseline patients showed a wide range of cardiac output (median 7.5 L/min, IQR 5.1 -9.0 L/min. The bias and limits of agreement between the two techniques was deemed acceptable for the first four hours of the study with percentage errors being 29%, 22%, and 285 respectively. The percentage error at eight hours following calibration increased to 36%. The ability of the PulseCo to detect changes in cardiac output was assessed with a similar analysis. The PulseCO tracked the changes in cardiac output with adequate accuracy for the first four hours with percentage errors being 20%, 24% and 25%. However at eight hours the error had increased to

  3. Cardiac output response to changes of the atrioventricular delay in different body positions and during exercise in patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ståhlberg, Marcus; Damgaard, Morten; Norsk, Peter; Gabrielsen, Anders; Sahlén, Anders; Linde, Cecilia; Braunschweig, Frieder

    2009-01-01

    prolonged by 40 ms in 27 CRT patients and 9 controls without heart failure. Cardiac output (CO) was measured by inert gas rebreathing (Innocor) as the average over different body positions (left-lateral, supine, sitting, standing, and exercise). In eight CRT patients with an implantable haemodynamic monitor...

  4. Continuous versus bolus cardiac output monitoring during or thotopic liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang-Ping Bao; Jian Wu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac output monitoring is important for critical patients. This study aimed to determine the delayed response of continuous cardiac output (CCO) thermodilution measurement, whether CCO and bolus cardiac output (BCO) thermodilution agree sufifciently to be used interchangeably, and whether CCO monitoring is reliable for patients undergoing liver transplantation. METHODS:Thirteen patients undergoing liver transplan-tation without veno-venous bypass were studied (37-66 years old, weight 46-75 kg). Continuous and bolus thermodilution measurements were performed at predeifned time points using an "Opti-Q" SvO2/CCO monitor (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, IL, USA). Bias and 95% limits of agreement were calculated according to Bland and Altman analysis. The limits of agreement by which two methods are judged to be interchangeable were deifned in advance as ±(13%× BCOmean) L/min. The repeatability and relative error of CCO, and the differences between CCO and the mean of the two measurements were calculated. RESULTS:Cardiac output measurements yielded 196 data pairs with ranges of 1.9 to 17.9 L/min for CCO and 2.1 to 18.3 L/min for BCO. The response time of CCO was delayed in the early phases after caval clamping and after reperfusion. At most of the measurement points, bias and 95%limits of agreement were-0.18±1.91 L/min. 95%limits of agreement did not fall within the predetermined limits of agreement of ±1.14 L/min. The repeatability coefifcient of CCO was 0.36 L/min and the relative error was 4.6±4.7%. The mean difference between CCO and the average of the two methods was-0.09 L/min (0.49 L/min). CONCLUSIONS:In patients undergoing liver transplan-tation, the delayed response of CCO limits its application during the early phases after caval clamping and after reperfusion of the graft. The two methods are not interchangeable even in hemodynamic stability. Continuous thermodilution monitoring, however, is reliable or acceptable for clinical purposes.

  5. Estimation of cardiac output by first-pass transit of radiotracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate cardiac function with various tracers to be used for radionuclide scintigraphy, we examined the validity of a simplified method to measure cardiac output (CO) by modifying the equation of Stewart-Hamilton in the radionuclide study. After a bolus injection of I-123 or Tc-99m tracer, the total injection dose and count in the pulmonary artery during the first transit of the tracer were measured to calculate the CO Index. The CO Index was obtained from the integral of the first transit of radiotracers in the pulmonary artery divided by the total injected count. CO was estimated from the regression formula which was obtained by comparing the CO Index with CO measured by the Doppler echocardiographic method. There were close correlations between the CO Index and CO measured by Doppler echocardiography both in the study with I-123 (n=13, r=0.85, p0.634 for I-123 and CO=3.18 x (CO Index)0.518 for Tc-99m). CO measured by this method is useful for the assessment of cardiac function with various tracers in routine clinical studies, and this simple method may be utilized for assessment of organ blood flow on the basis of the microsphere model. (author)

  6. Cardiac output and vasodilation in the vasovagal response: An analysis of the classic papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieling, Wouter; Jardine, David L; de Lange, Frederik J; Brignole, Michele; Nielsen, Henning B; Stewart, Julian; Sutton, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The simple faint is secondary to hypotension and bradycardia resulting in transient loss of consciousness. According to Ohm's law applied to the circulation, BP = SVR × CO, hypotension can result from a decrease in systemic vascular resistance (SVR), cardiac output (CO), or both. It is important to understand that when blood pressure (BP) is falling, SVR and CO do not change reciprocally as they do in the steady state. In 1932, Lewis, assuming that decreased SVR alone accounted for hypotension, defined "the vasovagal response" along pathophysiologic lines to denote the association of vasodilation with vagal-induced bradycardia in simple faint. Studies performed by Barcroft and Sharpey-Schafer between 1940 and 1950 used volume-based plethysmography to demonstrate major forearm vasodilation during extreme hypotension and concluded that the main mechanism for hypotension was vasodilation. Plethysmographic measurements were intermittent and not frequent enough to capture rapid changes in blood flow during progressive hypotension. However, later investigations by Weissler, Murray, and Stevens performed between 1950 and 1970 used invasive beat-to-beat BP measurements and more frequent measurements of CO using the Fick principle. They demonstrated that CO significantly fell before syncope, and little vasodilation occurred until very late in the vasovagal reaction Thus, since the 1970s, decreasing cardiac output rather than vasodilation has been regarded as the principal mechanism for the hypotension of vasovagal syncope. PMID:26598322

  7. Determination of cardiac output, tissue blood flow, volume and lipid content in Sprague-Dawley rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One critical aspect of physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model development is the choice of values for organ blood flows, cardiac output and tissue volumes for input into models. These values vary depending upon the strain, size, age, and sex of animal for which a PBPK model is being developed. Tissue blood flows, cardiac output, tissue volume, and lipid content were determined in male S-D rats, (350-375 g, N=8). A radiolabel microsphere method utilizing Scandium (46Sc), Tin (113Sn),and Gadolinium (153Gd) was used to determine blood flow. Each rat received 3 radiolabeled injections. After the third injection, animals were sacrificed, and radioactivity in each tissue was determined in a 3-channel gamma counter. Tissues sampled include brain, heart, kidneys, liver, lungs, spleen, pancreas, adrenals, stomach, intestines, colon, testis, bone and skeletal muscle. Cardiac output was 142 ml/min. Blood flow values for eliminating organs were 0.49 (liver), 16.52 (kidney), and 1.77 (lung) ml/min/g tissue. Tissues which had significantly increased blood flow during the dark cycle included femur, abdonimal fat, triceps brachii and abdominal muscles, stomach, spleen and lung. Dissectable fat, organ volume, and organ lipid content were determined in a separate group of rats (N= 8). Volume and lipid content were determined for the same tissues as blood flow. Body fat was 7.35% of bw and extractable lipid content of eliminating organs was 42.3 (liver), 43.4 (kidney), and 35.9 (lung) mg/g tissue. Precise measurements should improve the accuracy of PBPK model predictions, and therfore help in reducing uncertainites in risk assessment of volatile organics and other pollutnats

  8. Impact of pacing modality and biventricular pacing on cardiac output and coronary conduit flow in the post-cardiotomy patient.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Healy, David G

    2012-02-03

    We have previously demonstrated the role of univentricular pacing modalities in influencing coronary conduit flow in the immediate post-operative period in the cardiac surgery patient. We wanted to determine the mechanism of this improved coronary conduit and, in addition, to explore the possible benefits with biventricular pacing. Sixteen patients undergoing first time elective coronary artery bypass grafting who required pacing following surgery were recruited. Comparison of cardiac output and coronary conduit flow was performed between VVI and DDD pacing with a single right ventricular lead and biventricular pacing lead placement. Cardiac output was measured using arterial pulse waveform analysis while conduit flow was measured using ultrasonic transit time methodology. Cardiac output was greatest with DDD pacing using right ventricular lead placement only [DDD-univentricular 5.42 l (0.7), DDD-biventricular 5.33 l (0.8), VVI-univentricular 4.71 l (0.8), VVI-biventricular 4.68 l (0.6)]. DDD-univentricular pacing was significantly better than VVI-univentricular (P=0.023) and VVI-biventricular pacing (P=0.001) but there was no significant advantage to DDD-biventricular pacing (P=0.45). In relation to coronary conduit flow, DDD pacing again had the highest flow [DDD-univentricular 55 ml\\/min (24), DDD-biventricular 52 ml\\/min (25), VVI-univentricular 47 ml\\/min (23), VVI-biventricular 50 ml\\/min (26)]. DDD-univentricular pacing was significantly better than VVI-univentricular (P=0.006) pacing but not significantly different to VVI-biventricular pacing (P=0.109) or DDD-biventricular pacing (P=0.171). Pacing with a DDD modality offers the optimal coronary conduit flow by maximising cardiac output. Biventricular lead placement offered no significant benefit to coronary conduit flow or cardiac output.

  9. Increasing cardiac output and decreasing oxygenation sequence in pump twins of acardiac twin pregnancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An acardiac twin pregnancy is a rare but serious complication of monochorionic twinning and consists of an acardiac twin and a pump twin. The acardiac twin is a severely malformed fetus that lacks most organs, particularly a heart, but grows during pregnancy because it is perfused by the developmentally normal pump twin via a set of arterioarterial and venovenous placental anastomoses. Pump twins die intrauterine or neonatally in about 50% of the cases. Because the effects of an acardiac mass on the pump twin's development are incompletely known, methods for outcome prognosis are currently not available. We sought to derive simple relations for the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decreased oxygenation and to use available clinical cases for a preliminary test of the model. As a method, we used a theoretical flow model to represent the fetoplacental circulation of an acardiac twin pregnancy and estimated blood deoxygenation and reoxygenation following perfusion of the two bodies and placentas, respectively. The results show the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decrease of venous oxygen saturation to depend on the ratio of pump twin to acardiac twin umbilical blood flow, whose ratio can be measured by ultrasonography. The clinical cases show a decreasing umbilical flow ratio with gestation. In conclusion, prospective serial study is necessary to test whether measurement of umbilical flow ratios allows monitoring the pump twin's pathophysiologic development, possibly resulting in a guideline for prognosis of pump twin survival. (note)

  10. Increasing cardiac output and decreasing oxygenation sequence in pump twins of acardiac twin pregnancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemert, Martin J C van [Laser Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Umur, Asli [Laser Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M van den [Laser Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VanBavel, Ed [Department of Medical Physics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Vandenbussche, Frank P H A [Department of Obstetrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Nikkels, Peter G J [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2005-02-07

    An acardiac twin pregnancy is a rare but serious complication of monochorionic twinning and consists of an acardiac twin and a pump twin. The acardiac twin is a severely malformed fetus that lacks most organs, particularly a heart, but grows during pregnancy because it is perfused by the developmentally normal pump twin via a set of arterioarterial and venovenous placental anastomoses. Pump twins die intrauterine or neonatally in about 50% of the cases. Because the effects of an acardiac mass on the pump twin's development are incompletely known, methods for outcome prognosis are currently not available. We sought to derive simple relations for the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decreased oxygenation and to use available clinical cases for a preliminary test of the model. As a method, we used a theoretical flow model to represent the fetoplacental circulation of an acardiac twin pregnancy and estimated blood deoxygenation and reoxygenation following perfusion of the two bodies and placentas, respectively. The results show the pump twin's excess cardiac output and decrease of venous oxygen saturation to depend on the ratio of pump twin to acardiac twin umbilical blood flow, whose ratio can be measured by ultrasonography. The clinical cases show a decreasing umbilical flow ratio with gestation. In conclusion, prospective serial study is necessary to test whether measurement of umbilical flow ratios allows monitoring the pump twin's pathophysiologic development, possibly resulting in a guideline for prognosis of pump twin survival. (note)

  11. Determination of myocardial energetic output for cardiac rhythm pacing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heřman, D.; Převorovská, Světlana; Maršík, František

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2007), s. 156-161. ISSN 1567-8822 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/03/1073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : heart arrhythmia * cardiac pacing modes * numerical simulation Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  12. Evaluation of a new arterial pressure-based cardiac output device requiring no external calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amann Matthias

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several techniques have been discussed as alternatives to the intermittent bolus thermodilution cardiac output (COPAC measurement by the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC. However, these techniques usually require a central venous line, an additional catheter, or a special calibration procedure. A new arterial pressure-based cardiac output (COAP device (FloTrac™, Vigileo™; Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA only requires access to the radial or femoral artery using a standard arterial catheter and does not need an external calibration. We validated this technique in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU using COPAC as the method of reference. Methods We studied 20 critically ill patients, aged 16 to 74 years (mean, 55.5 ± 18.8 years, who required both arterial and pulmonary artery pressure monitoring. COPAC measurements were performed at least every 4 hours and calculated as the average of 3 measurements, while COAP values were taken immediately at the end of bolus determinations. Accuracy of measurements was assessed by calculating the bias and limits of agreement using the method described by Bland and Altman. Results A total of 164 coupled measurements were obtained. Absolute values of COPAC ranged from 2.80 to 10.80 l/min (mean 5.93 ± 1.55 l/min. The bias and limits of agreement between COPAC and COAP for unequal numbers of replicates was 0.02 ± 2.92 l/min. The percentage error between COPAC and COAP was 49.3%. The bias between percentage changes in COPAC (ΔCOPAC and percentage changes in COAP (ΔCOAP for consecutive measurements was -0.70% ± 32.28%. COPAC and COAP showed a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.58 (p PAC and ΔCOAP was 0.46 (p Conclusion Although the COAP algorithm shows a minimal bias with COPAC over a wide range of values in an inhomogeneous group of critically ill patients, the scattering of the data remains relative wide. Therefore, the used algorithm (V 1.03 failed to

  13. Estimation of cardiac output by first-pass data with technetium-99m-labeled myocardial perfusion imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technetium-99m-tetrofosmin, a myocardial perfusion imaging agent was used for estimation of cardiac output by means of first-pass radionuclide angiography performed in the anterior projection. Region of interests (ROIs) were assigned over right ventricle, left ventricle and whole chest, and time activity curves (TACs) were obtained. Cardiac output indices (COIs) were calculated by the following equation; COI=p3/2·Qc/∫0tA(s)ds, where p=number of pixels of the ventricular ROI, Qc=the peak count rate of the TAC obtained from the whole chest's ROI and ∫0tA(s)ds=the area under ventricular TAC. The COI(y) determined by ROI over the left ventricle yield the best correlation with the cardiac output by conventional radionuclide method (x) (y=0.0381x+6.22, r=0.828, n=48, p<0.001). In conclusion, cardiac output can be easily measured with first pass data using myocardial perfusion imaging agent. (author)

  14. Temporary epicardial left ventricular and biventricular pacing improves cardiac output after cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Bengochea Jose B

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate, with different pacing modes, acute changes in left ventricular systolic function, obtained by continuous cardiac output thermodilution in various subsets of patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. Increments of mean arterial pressure and cardiac output were considered the end point. Methods Fifty cases electively submitted to cardiac surgery were analyzed. Isolated valve surgery 62%, coronary revascularization 30% and 8% mixed disease. Left ventricular ejection fraction was preserved in 50%,36% had moderate depression,(EF 36%-50% whereas 14% had severe depression (EF  Results Right atrium-right ventricular pacing, decreased significantly mean arterial pressure and cardiac output (2.3% in the overall population and in the subgroups studied. Right atrium-left ventricle, increased mean arterial pressure and cardiac output in 79% of patients and yielded cardiac output increments of 7.5% (0.40 l/m in the low ejection fraction subgroup and 7.3% (0.43 l/m in the left bundle branch block subset. In atrial fibrillation patients, left ventricular and biventricular pacing produced a significant increase in cardiac output 8.5% (0.39 l/min and 11.6% (0.53 l/min respectively. The dP/dt max increased significantly with both modes (p = 0.021,p = 0.028. Conclusion Right atrial-right ventricular pacing generated adverse hemodynamic effects. Right atrium-left ventricular pacing produced significant CO improvement particularly in cases with depressed ventricular function and left bundle branch block. The greatest increments were observed with left ventricular or biventricular pacing in atrial fibrillation with depressed ejection fraction.

  15. Reference values for total blood volume and cardiac output in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, L.R. [Indiana Univ., South Bend, IN (United States). Division of Liberal Arts and Sciences

    1994-09-01

    Much research has been devoted to measurement of total blood volume (TBV) and cardiac output (CO) in humans but not enough effort has been devoted to collection and reduction of results for the purpose of deriving typical or {open_quotes}reference{close_quotes} values. Identification of normal values for TBV and CO is needed not only for clinical evaluations but also for the development of biokinetic models for ultra-short-lived radionuclides used in nuclear medicine (Leggett and Williams 1989). The purpose of this report is to offer reference values for TBV and CO, along with estimates of the associated uncertainties that arise from intra- and inter-subject variation, errors in measurement techniques, and other sources. Reference values are derived for basal supine CO and TBV in reference adult humans, and differences associated with age, sex, body size, body position, exercise, and other circumstances are discussed.

  16. Management of the Low Cardiac Output Syndrome Following Surgery for Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Heather K; Kirsch, Roxanne

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the management of the low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) following surgery for congenital heart disease. The LCOS is a well-recognized, frequent post-operative complication with an accepted collection of hemodynamic and physiologic aberrations. Approximately 25% of children experience a decrease in cardiac index of less than 2 L/min/m2 within 6-18 hours after cardiac surgery. Post-operative strategies that may be used to manage patients as risk for or in a state of low cardiac output include the use of hemodynamic monitoring, enabling a timely and accurate assessment of cardiovascular function and tissue oxygenation; optimization of ventricular loading conditions; the judicious use of inotropic agents; an appreciation of and the utilization of positive pressure ventilation for circulatory support; and, in some circumstances, mechanical circulatory support. All interventions and strategies should culminate in improving the relationship between oxygen supply and demand, ensuring adequate tissue oxygenation. PMID:26585039

  17. The Measurement of Potential Output for Austria

    OpenAIRE

    Franz R. Hahn; Gerhard Rünstler

    1996-01-01

    Most empirical approaches to measuring potential output (PO) are based on variants of the method of trend extraction. This is also true for estimating PO on the basis of production functions. Structural approaches rely on trend extraction methods, in connection with determining potential employment or the long-term path of productivity for example. Thus, trend adjustment methods are of central importance for the measurement of PO, regardless of whether PO is estimated through a structural or ...

  18. Constant infusion transpulmonary thermodilution for the assessment of cardiac output in exercising humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J A L; Mortensen, Stefan; Munch, G D W;

    2016-01-01

    To determine the accuracy and precision of constant infusion transpulmonary thermodilution cardiac output (CITT-Q) assessment during exercise in humans, using indocyanine green (ICG) dilution and bolus transpulmonary thermodilution (BTD) as reference methods, cardiac output (Q) was determined at...... rest and during incremental one- and two-legged pedaling on a cycle ergometer, and combined arm cranking with leg pedaling to exhaustion in 15 healthy men. Continuous infusions of iced saline in the femoral vein (n = 41) or simultaneously in the femoral and axillary (n = 66) veins with determination of......: 6.1-11.1%). In conclusion, cardiac output can be precisely and accurately determined with constant infusion transpulmonary thermodilution in exercising humans....

  19. On output measurements via radiation pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeman, S.; Healey, A.J.; Forsberg, F.; Jensen, J.A.

    It is shown, by simple physical argument, that measurements of intensity with a radiation pressure balance should not agree with those based on calorimetric techniques. The conclusion is ultimately a consequence of the circumstance that radiation pressure measurements relate to wave momentum, while...... calorimetric methods relate to wave energy. Measurements with some typical ultrasound fields are performed with a novel type of hydrophone, and these allow an estimate to be made of the magnitude of the discrepancy to be expected between the two types of output measurement in a typical case....

  20. High-output cardiac failure secondary to multiple vascular malformations in the liver: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaner, S.; Demeter, S. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Lien, D. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Pulmonary Medicine, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Shapiro, J. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Surgery, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); McCarthy, M.; Raymond, G. [Univ. of Alberta, Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2001-08-01

    High-output cardiac failure is associated with several systemic illnesses, including hyperthyroidism, thiamine deficiency, severe anemia, multiple myeloma, Paget's disease of bone and Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome. We present an unusual case of a woman with high-output cardiac failure as a result of multiple arteriovenous fistulas in the liver, most likely representing an unusual variant of Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome (i.e., no other telangiectasias or a family history of vascular malformations was demonstrated). (author)

  1. Sildenafil improves cardiac output and exercise performance during acute hypoxia, but not normoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew R; Barnholt, Kimberly E; Grundmann, Nicolas K; Lin, Joseph H; McCallum, Stewart W; Friedlander, Anne L

    2006-06-01

    Sildenafil causes pulmonary vasodilation, thus potentially reducing impairments of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension on exercise performance at altitude. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of sildenafil during normoxic and hypoxic exercise. We hypothesized that 1) sildenafil would have no significant effects on normoxic exercise, and 2) sildenafil would improve cardiac output, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), and performance during hypoxic exercise. Ten trained men performed one practice and three experimental trials at sea level (SL) and simulated high altitude (HA) of 3,874 m. Each cycling test consisted of a set-work-rate portion (55% work capacity: 1 h SL, 30 min HA) followed immediately by a time trial (10 km SL, 6 km HA). Double-blinded capsules (placebo, 50, or 100 mg) were taken 1 h before exercise in a randomly counterbalanced order. For HA, subjects also began breathing hypoxic gas (12.8% oxygen) 1 h before exercise. At SL, sildenafil had no effects on any cardiovascular or performance measures. At HA, sildenafil increased stroke volume (measured by impedance cardiography), cardiac output, and SaO2 during set-work-rate exercise. Sildenafil lowered 6-km time-trial time by 15% (P<0.05). SaO2 was also higher during the time trial (P<0.05) in response to sildenafil, despite higher work rates. Post hoc analyses revealed two subject groups, sildenafil responders and nonresponders, who improved time-trial performance by 39% (P<0.05) and 1.0%, respectively. No dose-response effects were observed. During cycling exercise in acute hypoxia, sildenafil can greatly improve cardiovascular function, SaO2, and performance for certain individuals. PMID:16455814

  2. Indirect calorimetry can be used to measure cardiac output in septic patients? A calorimetria indireta pode ser utilizada para medir o débito cardíaco em pacientes sépticos?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Auxiliadora Martins

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to compare two different cardiac output (CO monitoring systems based on the thermodilution principle (Thermo-CO and indirect calorimetry (Fick mixed-CO in septic patients. METHODS: Prospective study in septic patients admitted in an intensive care unit of a university hospital. Nineteen patients aged on average 45.4 ± 21.5 years were enrolled in the study. Four series of hourly measurements by the two techniques were carried out simultaneously. RESULTS: No significant differences were observed between Thermo-CO and Fick mixed-CO (7.0 ± 1.8 L.min-1 and 6.4 ± 1.7 L.min-1.. Parallel analysis of Fick mixed-CO and Fick atrial-CO was performed introducing a correction factor for the eight atrial samples in order to adjust the values of oxygen saturation obtained from atrial blood (Fick corrected atrial-CO to those obtained from mixed venous blood. No significant differences could be detected between Fick mixed-CO and Fick corrected atrial-CO. The correlation coefficients of Thermo CO/Fick mixed-CO and Fick mixed-CO/Fick corrected atrial-CO were 0.84 and 0.94, respectively. CONCLUSION: We observed that the agreement between the two methods was satisfactory on the basis of the decisions made for treatment. Indirect calorimetry is useful to measure CO in patients with septic shock.OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar as medidas do débito cardíaco (DC obtidas pela termodiluição (DC-termo e pela calorimetria indireta (DC-Fick misto em pacientes com choque séptico. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo em pacientes sépticos internados em unidade de terapia intensiva de um hospital universitário. Foram estudados 19 pacientes (45,4 ± 21,5 anos. Foram realizadas quatro séries de medidas do DC pelos dois métodos, simultaneamente. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferenças significativas entre os valores do DC-termo e DC-Fick misto (7,0 ± 1,8 L.min-1 e 6,4 ± 1,7 L.min-1, respectivamente. Na avaliação dos oito casos

  3. Performance of a new pulse contour method for continuous cardiac output monitoring: validation in critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bendjelid, Karim; Marx, G.; Kiefer, N.; Simon, T P; Geisen, M; Hoeft, A.; Siegenthaler, Nils; Hofer, C K

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: /st>A new calibrated pulse wave analysis method (VolumeView™/EV1000™, Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) has been developed to continuously monitor cardiac output (CO). The aim of this study was to compare the performance of the VolumeView method, and of the PiCCO2™ pulse contour method (Pulsion Medical Systems, Munich, Germany), with reference transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) CO measurements. METHODS: /st>This was a prospective, multicentre observational study performed i...

  4. In vivo validation of cardiac output assessment in non-standard 3D echocardiographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nillesen, M. M.; Lopata, R. G. P.; de Boode, W. P.; Gerrits, I. H.; Huisman, H. J.; Thijssen, J. M.; Kapusta, L.; de Korte, C. L.

    2009-04-01

    Automatic segmentation of the endocardial surface in three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic images is an important tool to assess left ventricular (LV) geometry and cardiac output (CO). The presence of speckle noise as well as the nonisotropic characteristics of the myocardium impose strong demands on the segmentation algorithm. In the analysis of normal heart geometries of standardized (apical) views, it is advantageous to incorporate a priori knowledge about the shape and appearance of the heart. In contrast, when analyzing abnormal heart geometries, for example in children with congenital malformations, this a priori knowledge about the shape and anatomy of the LV might induce erroneous segmentation results. This study describes a fully automated segmentation method for the analysis of non-standard echocardiographic images, without making strong assumptions on the shape and appearance of the heart. The method was validated in vivo in a piglet model. Real-time 3D echocardiographic image sequences of five piglets were acquired in radiofrequency (rf) format. These ECG-gated full volume images were acquired intra-operatively in a non-standard view. Cardiac blood flow was measured simultaneously by an ultrasound transit time flow probe positioned around the common pulmonary artery. Three-dimensional adaptive filtering using the characteristics of speckle was performed on the demodulated rf data to reduce the influence of speckle noise and to optimize the distinction between blood and myocardium. A gradient-based 3D deformable simplex mesh was then used to segment the endocardial surface. A gradient and a speed force were included as external forces of the model. To balance data fitting and mesh regularity, one fixed set of weighting parameters of internal, gradient and speed forces was used for all data sets. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were computed from the segmented endocardial surface. The cardiac output derived from this automatic segmentation was

  5. In vivo validation of cardiac output assessment in non-standard 3D echocardiographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nillesen, M M; Lopata, R G P; Gerrits, I H; Thijssen, J M; De Korte, C L [Clinical Physics Laboratory-833, Department of Pediatrics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); De Boode, W P [Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Huisman, H J [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kapusta, L [Pediatric Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.m.nillesen@cukz.umcn.nl

    2009-04-07

    Automatic segmentation of the endocardial surface in three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic images is an important tool to assess left ventricular (LV) geometry and cardiac output (CO). The presence of speckle noise as well as the nonisotropic characteristics of the myocardium impose strong demands on the segmentation algorithm. In the analysis of normal heart geometries of standardized (apical) views, it is advantageous to incorporate a priori knowledge about the shape and appearance of the heart. In contrast, when analyzing abnormal heart geometries, for example in children with congenital malformations, this a priori knowledge about the shape and anatomy of the LV might induce erroneous segmentation results. This study describes a fully automated segmentation method for the analysis of non-standard echocardiographic images, without making strong assumptions on the shape and appearance of the heart. The method was validated in vivo in a piglet model. Real-time 3D echocardiographic image sequences of five piglets were acquired in radiofrequency (rf) format. These ECG-gated full volume images were acquired intra-operatively in a non-standard view. Cardiac blood flow was measured simultaneously by an ultrasound transit time flow probe positioned around the common pulmonary artery. Three-dimensional adaptive filtering using the characteristics of speckle was performed on the demodulated rf data to reduce the influence of speckle noise and to optimize the distinction between blood and myocardium. A gradient-based 3D deformable simplex mesh was then used to segment the endocardial surface. A gradient and a speed force were included as external forces of the model. To balance data fitting and mesh regularity, one fixed set of weighting parameters of internal, gradient and speed forces was used for all data sets. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were computed from the segmented endocardial surface. The cardiac output derived from this automatic segmentation was

  6. A multiple-input multiple-output system for modeling the cardiac dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzon, Jorge E; Picaza, Carlos Alvarez; Pisarello, Maria I

    2011-01-01

    We describe the dynamics of the cardiovascular system by finding the input-output relationships in the state space of a functional cardiac model, based on state equations and observability criteria of control theory. The unit step response of the multiple-input multiple-output system model illustrates the damping effect of the arterial wall to the pulsatility of the heart. Our results show that hypertensive patients exhibit a lower inertia of the blood flow. PMID:22254491

  7. Rowing increases stroke volume and cardiac output to a greater extent than cycling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horn, P.; Ošťádal, P.; Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 2 (2015), s. 203-207. ISSN 0862-8408 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cardiac output * cycling * heart rate * stroke volume Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  8. Phlebotomy eliminates the maximal cardiac output response to six weeks of exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonne, Thomas Christian; Doucende, Gregory; Flück, Daniela;

    2014-01-01

    With this study we tested the hypothesis that six weeks of endurance training increases maximal cardiac output (Qmax) relatively more by elevating blood volume (BV) than by inducing structural and functional changes within the heart. Nine healthy but untrained volunteers (VO2max 47 ± 5 ml.min(-1)...

  9. Effects of levosimendan for low cardiac output syndrome in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koster, Geert; Wetterslev, Jørn; Gluud, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the benefits and harms of levosimendan for low cardiac output syndrome in critically ill patients. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses (TSA) of randomised clinical trials comparing levosimendan with any type of control. Two...

  10. Impact of extracorporeal blood flow rate on blood pressure, pulse rate and cardiac output during haemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Philip Andreas; Mace, Maria Lerche; Soja, Anne Merete Boas;

    2015-01-01

    reducing EBFR on BP exists and data are conflicting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect and the potential mechanism(s) involved by investigating the impact of changes in EBFR on BP, pulse rate (PR) and cardiac output (CO) in HD patients with arteriovenous-fistulas (AV-fistulas). METHODS: We...

  11. Assessment of cardiac output with transpulmonary thermodilution during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, José A L; Boushel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy and reproducibility of transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTd) to assess cardiac output (Q̇) in exercising men was determined using indocyanine green (ICG) dilution as a reference method. TPTd has been utilized for the assessment of Q̇ and preload indexes of global end-diastolic volume...

  12. Pulmonary diffusing capacity, capillary blood volume, and cardiac output during sustained microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisk, G. K.; Guy, Harold J. B.; Elliott, Ann R.; Deutschman, Robert A., III; West, John B.

    1993-01-01

    We measured pulmonary diffusing capacity (DL), diffusing capacity per unit lung volume, pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc), membrane diffusing capacity (Dm), pulmonary capillary blood flow or cardiac output (Qc), and cardiac stroke volume (SV) in four subjects exposed to nine days of microgravity. DL in microgravity was elevated compared with preflight standing values and was higher than preflight supine because of the elevation of both Vc and Dm. The elevation in Vc was comparable to that measured supine in 1 G, but the increase in Dm was in sharp contrast to the supine value. We postulate that, in 0 G, pulmonary capillary blood is evenly distributed throughout the lung, providing for uniform capillary filling, leading to an increase in the surface area available for diffusion. By contrast, in the supine 1-G state, the capillaries are less evenly filled, and although a similar increase in blood volume is observed, the corresponding increase in surface area does not occur. DL and its subdivisions showed no adaptive changes from the first measurement 24 h after the start of 0 G to eight days later. Similarly, there were no trends in the postflight data, suggesting that the principal mechanism of these changes was gravitational. The increase in Dm suggests that subclinical pulmonary edema did not result from exposure to 0 G. Qc was modestly increased inflight and decreased postflight compared with preflight standing. Compared with preflight standing, SV was increased 46 percent inflight and decreased 14 percent in the 1st week postflight. There were temporal changes in Qc and SV during 0 G, with the highest values recorded at the first measurement, 24 h into the flight. The lowest values of Qc and SV occurred on the day of return.

  13. Application of cardiac output measurement by bioelectrical impedance in critically ill patients%生物电阻抗法监测心输出量在危重病中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘紫锰; 杨春华; 陈娟; 欧阳彬; 管向东

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨生物电阻抗法测量无创心输出量(CO)在危重病中应用的准确性和有效性.方法 选择2008年1月至5月间本院外科重症监护中心(SICU)收治的12例需放置SWAN-GANZ导管进行血流动力学监测的患者,同时用生物电阻抗法和SWAN-GANZ导管热稀释法测定患者CO曲线平稳后0、1、6、12、24、48 h的CO值,并应用Pearson相关对两种方法测得的CO值与时间进行分析.结果 生物电阻抗法测最的CO值在所有时间点均低于SWAN-GANZ导管热稀释法的测最值[0 h:(5.5±0.9)L/min比(7.7±1.4)L/min;1h:(5.3±0.7)L/min比(7.4±1.5)L/min;6 h:(4.6±0.6)L/min比(6.8±1.4)L/min;12 h:(5.1±0.9)L/min比(7.6±1.6)L/min;24 h:(6.1±1.1)L/min比(9.0±1.6)L/min;48 h:(6.3±1.3)L/min比(9.5±1.5)L/min;均P<0.05].两种方法测量的CO值均随着时间的延长而呈升高趋势(r=0.818,P=0.047和r=0.884,P=0.020).结论 生物电阻抗法测量的无创CO与SWAN-GANZ导管测定的患者CO同样呈时间依赖性,是一种有效的CO监测方法.%Objective To evaluate the efficacy and accuracy of non-invasive bioelectrical impedance measurement of cardiac output (CO) in critically ill patients. Methods Between January and May 2008, 12 patients who needed hemodynamics monitoring using SWAN-GANZ catheterization in surgical intensive care unit (SICU) of our hospital were measured for CO by bioelectrical impedance and SWAN-GANZ catheterization thermodilution approaches. These values were recorded at 0, 1, 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours after the CO curve became stable in these patients. Pearson correlation analysis was performed for CO values over time recorded by these two approaches. Results At all the time points, CO measurement by bioelectrical impedance yielded lower values than those by SWAN-GANZ catheterization thermodilution approach [0 h: (5.5±0.9) L/min vs (7.7±1.4) L/min; 1 h: (5.3±0.7) L/min vs (7.4±1.5) L/min; 6 h: (4.6±0.6) L/min vs (6.8±1.4) L/min; 12 h: (5.1±0.9) L/min vs (7.6±1.6) L

  14. Three-dimensional display and measurement of cardiac dynamic indexes from MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cardiac dynamic index, to which such variables as cardiac output, ejection fraction, and wall motion contribute, is routinely determined using various modalities such as angiography, radionuclide imaging, US, and x-ray CT. Each of these modalities, however, has some disadvantages in regard to evaluating the cardiac dynamic index. The authors have obtained precise multidirectional projection images of the heart by means of computer graphics and reformatted data of cardiac MR images obtained with cardiac gating. The contiguous coronal MR images of the heart are made at an interimage distance of 5 mm. In each section, five or six cardiac images can be obtained, depending on the systolic or diastolic phase. These images are stored in a computer, and a three-dimensional display of the heart with biocular observation and with multiplex holograms is made possible with computer graphics. Three-dimensional measurement of the cardiac index is now being attempted, including cardiac output, ejection fraction, and wall motion

  15. The thick left ventricular wall of the giraffe heart normalises wall tension, but limits stroke volume and cardiac output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smerup, Morten Holdgaard; Damkjær, Mads; Brøndum, Emil; Baandrup, Ulrik T.; Kristiansen, Steen Buus; Nygaard, Hans; Aalkjær, Christian; Sauer, Cathrine; Buchanan, Rasmus; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Østergaard, Kristine Hovkjær; Grøndahl, Carsten; Candy, Geoffrey; Hasenkam, J Michael; Secher, Niels H; Bie, Peter; Wang, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    pressures to calculate left ventricular wall stress. Cardiac output was also determined by inert gas rebreathing to provide an additional and independent estimate of stroke volume. Echocardiography and inert gas-rebreathing yielded similar cardiac outputs of 16.1±2.5 and 16.4±1.4 l min(-1), respectively...

  16. Exercise-related change in airway blood flow in humans: Relationship to changes in cardiac output and ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Norman R; Ceridon, Maile L.; Beck, Kenneth C.; Strom, Nicholas A.; Schneider, Donald A; Mendes, Eliana S; Wanner, Adam; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between airway blood flow (Q̇aw), ventilation (V̇E) and cardiac output (Q̇tot) during exercise in healthy humans (n = 12, mean age 34 ± 11 yr). Q̇aw was estimated from the uptake of the soluble gas dimethyl ether while V̇E and Q̇tot were measured using open circuit spirometry. Measurements were made prior to and during exercise at 34 ± 5W (Load 1) and 68 ± 10 W (Load 2) and following the cessation of exercise (recovery). Q̇aw increased in a stepwise fashio...

  17. Comparative radionuclide and thermodilution determinations of cardiac output and stroke volume in the baboon (Papio ursinus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormehl, I.C.; Bosman, H.; Hugo, N.; Maree, M.; van Vuuren, C.; van Zandwyk, C.; van Aswegen, A.; Paterson, L.

    1987-01-01

    Thermodilution cardiac output determinations and multigated equilibrium blood-pool scintigraphy were performed in ten healthy chacma baboons (Papio ursinus). The correlation was moderately good between both the radionuclide and thermodilution stroke volume (r = 0.58, SEE = 3 ml; SVth = 0.78SVr + 15.6 ml) as well as the cardiac output (r = 0.72, SEE = 0.2 liter/min; COth = 0.56 Cor + 2.1 liter/min). The attenuation depth dr as determined by radionuclide techniques was found to correlate well with the radiologically determined values dx (r = 0.8, SEE = 0.4 cm; dx = 0.87dr + 0.72 cm) which validated the depth values used in the calculations.

  18. Pulmonary artery pressure responses to increased cardiac output in chickens with raised metabolic rate

    OpenAIRE

    West, John B.; Fu, Zhenxing; Gu, Yusu; Wagner, Harrieth E.; Carr, J. Austin; Peterson, Kirk L.

    2010-01-01

    Previous work has shown remarkable differences in the pressure-flow relations of the pulmonary circulation between birds and mammals. For example several studies suggest that the avian pulmonary blood vessels behave like rigid tubes, very different from the situation in mammalian lung. We therefore speculated that birds would develop high pulmonary artery pressures when the cardiac output was substantially increased during heavy exercise, for example during flight. However because of the tech...

  19. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia Presenting as High Output Cardiac Failure during Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Tareq Goussous; Alex Haynes; Katherine Najarian; Marcos Daccarett; Shukri David

    2009-01-01

    High-output cardiac failure secondary to hepatic involvement is a rare complication of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Here we report a 43-year-old woman who presented at 29 weeks gestation of her second pregnancy with complications of right-sided heart failure and preterm labor. After delivery via cesarean section, the patient was found to have intrahepatic arteriovenous malformations through non-invasive imaging. Subsequently, a family history of vascular malformations and epis...

  20. The Unpredictable Effect of Changing Cardiac Output on Hypoxemia after Acute Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Tsang, John Y.C.; Wayne J E Lamm; Blazej Neradilek; Polissar, Nayak L.; Michael P. Hlastala

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies reported that the degree of hypoxemia following acute pulmonary thromboembolism (APTE) was highly variable and that its mechanism was mainly due to the creation of many high and low ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) units, as a result of the heterogeneous regional blood flow (Q) caused by embolic obstruction. We studied the effect of changing cardiac output (Qt) on gas exchange after APTE in 5 embolized piglets (23 ± 3 Kg), using Dobutamine intermittently at approximately 20 µg/kg/...

  1. A novel continuous cardiac output monitor based on pulse wave transit time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugo, Yoshihiro; Ukawa, Teiji; Takeda, Sunao; Ishihara, Hironori; Kazama, Tomiei; Takeda, Junzo

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring cardiac output (CO) is important for the management of patient circulation in an operation room (OR) or intensive care unit (ICU). We assumed that the change in pulse wave transit time (PWTT) obtained from an electrocardiogram (ECG) and a pulse oximeter wave is correlated with the change in stroke volume (SV), from which CO is derived. The present study reports the verification of this hypothesis using a hemodynamic analysis theory and animal study. PWTT consists of a pre-ejection period (PEP), the pulse transit time through an elasticity artery (T(1)), and the pulse transit time through peripheral resistance arteries (T(2)). We assumed a consistent negative correlation between PWTT and SV under all conditions of varying circulatory dynamics. The equation for calculating SV from PWTT was derived based on the following procedures. 1. Approximating SV using a linear equation of PWTT. 2. The slope and y-intercept of the above equation were determined under consideration of vessel compliance (SV was divided by Pulse Pressure (PP)), animal type, and the inherent relationship between PP and PWTT. Animal study was performed to verify the above-mentioned assumption. The correlation coefficient of PWTT and SV became r = -0.710 (p 〈 0.001), and a good correlation was admitted. It has been confirmed that accurate continuous CO and SV measurement is only possible by monitoring regular clinical parameters (ECG, SpO2, and NIBP). PMID:21095971

  2. Improved system measures output energy of pyrotechnic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortly, E. M.

    1966-01-01

    System for measuring the output energy of pyrotechnic devices discharges the reaction products into a test chamber. It measures the radiant heat output from a pinhole aperture as well as internal pressure changes on a common time base.

  3. Multisite Tissue Oxygenation Monitoring Indicates Organ-Specific Flow Distribution and Oxygen Delivery Related to Low Cardiac Output in Preterm Infants With Clinical Sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Michelle E; Roofthooft, Marc; Fries, Marian W A; Schat, Trijntje E; Bos, Arend F; Berger, Rolf M F; Kooi, Elisabeth M W

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cardiac output may be compromised in preterm infants with sepsis. Whether low cardiac output is associated with low tissue oxygen supply in these patients is unclear. The aim of the current study was to assess the association between cardiac output, assessed by echocardiography, and tiss

  4. Noninvasive cardiac output determination using applanation tonometry-derived radial artery pulse contour analysis in critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Compton, Friederike; Wittrock, Marc; Schaefer, Juergen-Heiner;

    2008-01-01

    Conventional thermodilution cardiac output (CO) monitoring is limited mainly to intensive care units and operating rooms because it requires the use of invasive techniques. To reduce the potential for complications and to broaden the applicability of hemodynamic monitoring, noninvasive methods for...... were analyzed with bias and precision statistics, a large bias of 2.03 L x min(-1) x m(-2) and a high percentage error of 85% were found between the invasive measurements and applanation tonometry-derived CO estimates, with the noninvasive CO results being significantly lower than the invasive ones (P...

  5. Estimation of international output-energy relation. Effects of alternative output measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyzes the output-energy relationship with alternative measures of output and energy. Our analysis rejects the hypothesis of non-diminishing returns to energy consumption when GDP at purchasing power parities is used as the output measure unlike the case with GNP at market exchange rates. This finding also holds when energy input includes the usage of both commercial and traditional fuels. 13 refs

  6. Corporate Social Performance: From Output Measurement to Impact Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Maas, Karen

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAll organisations have social, environmental and economic impacts that effect people, their communities and the natural environment. Impacts include intended as well as unintended effects and negative as well as positive effects. Current practice in performance measurement tends to focus on measuring only a part of the total impact that organisations have on society. The research about what impact, as distinct from output and outcomes, organisational actions have upon the society ...

  7. Regional blood flow distribution in dog during induced hypotension and low cardiac output. Spontaneous breathing versus artificial ventilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Viires, N; Sillye, G; Aubier, M.; Rassidakis, A; Roussos, C

    1983-01-01

    Respiratory muscle blood flow and organ blood flow was studied in two groups of dogs with radioactively labeled microspheres to assess the influence of the working respiratory muscles on the regional distribution of blood flow when arterial pressure and cardiac output were lowered by pericardial tamponade. In one group (n = 6), the dogs were paralyzed and mechanically ventilated (Mv), while in the other (n = 6), they were left to breathe spontaneously (Sb). Cardiac output fell to 30% of contr...

  8. At high cardiac output, diesel exhaust exposure increases pulmonary vascular resistance and decreases distensibility of pulmonary resistive vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauters, Aurélien; Vicenzi, Marco; De Becker, Benjamin; Riga, Jean-Philippe; Esmaeilzadeh, Fatemeh; Faoro, Vitalie; Vachiéry, Jean-Luc; van de Borne, Philippe; Argacha, Jean-François

    2015-12-15

    Air pollution has recently been associated with the development of acute decompensated heart failure, but the underlying biological mechanisms remain unclear. A pulmonary vasoconstrictor effect of air pollution, combined with its systemic effects, may precipitate decompensated heart failure. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of acute exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) under resting and stress conditions but also to determine whether air pollution may potentiate acquired pulmonary hypertension. Eighteen healthy male volunteers were exposed to ambient air (AA) or dilute DE with a particulate matter of effects of DE on PVR, on the coefficient of distensibilty of pulmonary vessels (α), and on right and left ventricular function were evaluated at rest (n = 18), during dobutamine stress echocardiography (n = 10), and during exercise stress echocardiography performed in hypoxia (n = 8). Serum endothelin-1 and fractional exhaled nitric oxide were also measured. At rest, exposure to DE did not affect PVR. During dobutamine stress, the slope of the mean pulmonary artery pressure-cardiac output relationship increased from 2.8 ± 0.5 mmHg · min · l (-1) in AA to 3.9 ± 0.5 mmHg · min · l (-1) in DE (P hypoxia-related upper shift of the mean pulmonary artery pressure-cardiac output relationship. Exposure to DE did not affect serum endothelin-1 concentration or fractional exhaled nitric oxide. In conclusion, acute exposure to DE increased pulmonary vasomotor tone by decreasing the distensibility of pulmonary resistive vessels at high cardiac output. PMID:26497960

  9. Changes in Heart Rate in Patients with a Pacemaker do not Affect Cardiac Output

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vondra, Vlastimil; Soukup, L.; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef; Viščor, Ivo; Lipoldová, J.; Leinveber, Pavel

    Piscataway : IEEE, 2012, s. 511. ISBN 978-1-4244-4119-8. [EMBC 2012. Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society /34./. San Diego (US), 28.08.2012-01.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME09050; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA ČR GAP102/12/2034 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Pacemaker * Changes in Heart Rate * Cardiac Output Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  10. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia Presenting as High Output Cardiac Failure during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tareq Goussous

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available High-output cardiac failure secondary to hepatic involvement is a rare complication of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT. Here we report a 43-year-old woman who presented at 29 weeks gestation of her second pregnancy with complications of right-sided heart failure and preterm labor. After delivery via cesarean section, the patient was found to have intrahepatic arteriovenous malformations through non-invasive imaging. Subsequently, a family history of vascular malformations and epistaxis was elucidated and a diagnosis of HHT was made. This case is presented, along with a review of the literature and discussion of hepatic involvement in HHT with particular focus on the pregnant patient.

  11. Developing new approaches to measuring NHS outputs and productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Mary OMahony; Philip Stevens; Lucy Stokes; Pete Loveridge

    2005-01-01

    In March 2004 the Department of Health commissioned a research team from the Centre for Health Economics at the University of York and the National Institute for Economic and Social Research to develop new approaches to measuring NHS outputs and productivity. The research objectives were development of: 1)A comprehensive measure of NHS outputs and productivity. 2) Methods to facilitate regular in-year analysis of NHS productivity. 3) Output measures capable of measuring efficiency and product...

  12. Reduced peripheral arterial blood flow with preserved cardiac output during submaximal bicycle exercise in elderly heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leng Xiaoyan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Older heart failure (HF patients exhibit exercise intolerance during activities of daily living. We hypothesized that reduced lower extremity blood flow (LBF due to reduced forward cardiac output would contribute to submaximal exercise intolerance in older HF patients. Methods and Results Twelve HF patients both with preserved and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF (aged 68 ± 10 years without large (aorta or medium sized (iliac or femoral artery vessel atherosclerosis, and 13 age and gender matched healthy volunteers underwent a sophisticated battery of assessments including a peak exercise oxygen consumption (peak VO2, b physical function, c cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR submaximal exercise measures of aortic and femoral arterial blood flow, and d determination of thigh muscle area. Peak VO2 was reduced in HF subjects (14 ± 3 ml/kg/min compared to healthy elderly subjects (20 ± 6 ml/kg/min (p = 0.01. Four-meter walk speed was 1.35 ± 0.24 m/sec in healthy elderly verses 0.98 ± 0.15 m/sec in HF subjects (p p ≤ 0.03. Conclusion During CMR submaximal bike exercise in the elderly with heart failure, mechanisms other than low cardiac output are responsible for reduced lower extremity blood flow.

  13. Acupuncture Effects on Cardiac Functions Measured by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Feline Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Hsou Lin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The usefulness of acupuncture (AP as a complementary and/or alternative therapy in animals is well established but more research is needed on its clinical efficacy relative to conventional therapy, and on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of AP. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI, an important tool in monitoring cardiovascular diseases, provides a reliable method to monitor the effects of AP on the cardiovascular system. This controlled experiment monitored the effect electro-acupuncture (EA at bilateral acupoint Neiguan (PC6 on recovery time after ketamine/xylazine cocktail anesthesia in healthy cats. The CMRI data established the basic feline cardiac function index (CFI, including cardiac output and major vessel velocity. To evaluate the effect of EA on the functions of the autonomic nervous and cardiovascular systems, heart rate, respiration rate, electrocardiogram and pulse rate were also measured. Ketamine/xylazine cocktail anesthesia caused a transient hypertension in the cats; EA inhibited this anesthetic-induced hypertension and shortened the post-anesthesia recovery time. Our data support existing knowledge on the cardiovascular benefits of EA at PC6, and also provide strong evidence for the combination of anesthesia and EA to shorten post-anesthesia recovery time and counter the negative effects of anesthetics on cardiac physiology.

  14. Acupuncture effects on cardiac functions measured by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in a feline model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jen-Hsou; Shih, Chen-Haw; Kaphle, Krishna; Wu, Leang-Shin; Tseng, Weng-Yih; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Lee, Tzu-Chi; Wu, Ying-Ling

    2010-06-01

    The usefulness of acupuncture (AP) as a complementary and/or alternative therapy in animals is well established but more research is needed on its clinical efficacy relative to conventional therapy, and on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of AP. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI), an important tool in monitoring cardiovascular diseases, provides a reliable method to monitor the effects of AP on the cardiovascular system. This controlled experiment monitored the effect electro-acupuncture (EA) at bilateral acupoint Neiguan (PC6) on recovery time after ketamine/xylazine cocktail anesthesia in healthy cats. The CMRI data established the basic feline cardiac function index (CFI), including cardiac output and major vessel velocity. To evaluate the effect of EA on the functions of the autonomic nervous and cardiovascular systems, heart rate, respiration rate, electrocardiogram and pulse rate were also measured. Ketamine/xylazine cocktail anesthesia caused a transient hypertension in the cats; EA inhibited this anesthetic-induced hypertension and shortened the post-anesthesia recovery time. Our data support existing knowledge on the cardiovascular benefits of EA at PC6, and also provide strong evidence for the combination of anesthesia and EA to shorten post-anesthesia recovery time and counter the negative effects of anesthetics on cardiac physiology. PMID:18955311

  15. Comparison between continuous non-invasive estimated cardiac output by pulse wave transit time and thermodilution method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish C Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: Cardiac output (CO measurement is essential for many therapeutic decisions in anesthesia and critical care. Most available non-invasive CO measuring methods have an invasive component. We investigate "pulse wave transit time" (estimated continuous cardiac output [esCCO] a method of CO measurement that has no invasive component to its use. Materials and Methods: After institutional ethical committee approval, 14 adult (21-85 years patients undergoing surgery and requiring pulmonary artery catheter (PAC for measuring CO, were included. Postoperatively CO readings were taken simultaneously with thermodilution (TD via PAC and esCCO, whenever a change in CO was expected due to therapeutic interventions. Both monitoring methods were continued until patients′ discharge from the Intensive Care Unit and observer recording values using TD method was blinded to values measured by esCCO system. Results: Three hundred and one readings were obtained simultaneously from both methods. Correlation and concordance between the two methods was derived using Bland-Altman analysis. Measured values showed significant correlation between esCCO and TD ( r = 0.6, P < 0.001, 95% confidence limits of 0.51-0.68. Mean and (standard deviation for bias and precision were 0.13 (2.27 L/min and 6.56 (2.19 L/min, respectively. The 95% confidence interval for bias was - 4.32 to 4.58 L/min and for precision 2.27 to10.85 L/min. Conclusions: Although, esCCO is the only true non-invasive continuous CO monitor available and even though its values change proportionately to TD method (gold standard with the present degree of error its utility for clinical/therapeutic decision-making is questionable.

  16. The global output gap: measurement issues and regional disparities

    OpenAIRE

    Petra Gerlach

    2011-01-01

    The global output gap seems to be negative but closing. According to structural estimates, the gap is still wide, particularly in the advanced economies. However, these measures may overestimate potential output, eg by not accounting for the fact that certain investments may have turned out to be unproductive. Purely statistical estimates, on the other hand, suggest that the global output gap has already closed in both the advanced and the emerging market economies, but statistical measures a...

  17. Taking the Measure: Applying Reference Outputs to Collection Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Carolyn M.; Mielke, Linda

    1986-01-01

    Presents preliminary results of Clearwater Public Library's study of the usefulness of "Output Measures for Public Libraries" as an indicator of reference performance, and the impact of collection development choices on reference output measures. Data on turnover rate, in-library use, reference fill rate, and reference transactions per capita are…

  18. Cooperative linear output regulation for networked systems by dynamic measurement output feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaobao; Feng, Gang; Wang, Juan; Luo, Xiaoyuan; Guan, Xinping

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the cooperative linear output regulation problem of a class of heterogeneous networked systems with a common reference input but with different disturbances for individual nodes. A novel distributed control law is presented based on dynamic measurement output feedback. It is shown that the overall networked closed-loop control system is asymptotically stable and the output regulation errors asymptotically approach zero as time goes to infinity under a sufficient and necessary condition. Finally, a numerical example is provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control law.

  19. Non-Invasive Determination of Cardiac Output in Pre-Capillary Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Lador

    Full Text Available Cardiac output (CO is a major diagnostic and prognostic factor in pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension (PH. Reference methods for CO determination, like thermodilution (TD, require invasive procedures and allow only steady-state measurements. The Modelflow (MF method is an appealing technique for this purpose as it allows non-invasive and beat-by-beat determination of CO.We aimed to compare CO values obtained simultaneously from non-invasive pulse wave analysis by MF (COMF and by TD (COTD to determine its precision and accuracy in pre-capillary PH. The study was performed on 50 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH or chronic thrombo-embolic PH (CTEPH. CO was determined at rest in all patients (n = 50 and during nitric oxide vasoreactivity test, fluid challenge or exercise (n = 48.Baseline COMF and COTD were 6.18 ± 1.95 and 5.46 ± 1.95 L·min-1, respectively. Accuracy and precision were 0.72 and 1.04 L·min-1, respectively. Limits of agreement (LoA ranged from -1.32 to 2.76 L·min-1. Percentage error (PE was ±35.7%. Overall sensitivity and specificity of COMF for directional change were 95.2% and 82.4%, (n = 48 and 93.3% and 100% for directional changes during exercise (n = 16, respectively. After application of a correction factor (1.17 ± 0.25, neither proportional nor fixed bias was found for subsequent CO determination (n = 48. Accuracy was -0.03 L·min-1 and precision 0.61 L·min-1. LoA ranged from -1.23 to 1.17 L·min-1 and PE was ±19.8%.After correction against a reference method, MF is precise and accurate enough to determine absolute values and beat-by-beat relative changes of CO in pre-capillary PH.

  20. Femoral Blood Flow and Cardiac Output During Blood Flow Restricted Leg Press Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M. E.; Hackney, K.; Ploutz-Snyder, L.

    2011-01-01

    Low load blood flow restricted resistance exercise (LBFR) causes muscle hypertrophy that may be stimulated by the local ischemic environment created by the cuff pressure. However, local blood flow (BF) during such exercise is not well understood. PURPOSE: To characterize femoral artery BF and cardiac output (CO) during leg press exercise (LP) performed at a high load (HL) and low load (LL) with different levels of cuff pressure. METHODS: Eleven subjects (men/women 4/7, age 31.4+/-12.8 y, weight 68.9+/-13.2 kg, mean+/-SD) performed 3 sets of supine left LP to fatigue with 90 s of rest in 4 conditions: HL (%1-RM/cuff pressure: 80%/0); LL (20%/0); LBFR(sub DBP) (20%/1.3 x diastolic blood pressure, BP); LBFR(sub SBP) (20%/1.3 x supine systolic BP). The cuff remained inflated throughout the LBFR exercise sessions. Artery diameter, velocity time integral (VTI), and stroke volume (SV) were measured using Doppler ultrasound at rest and immediately after each set of exercise. Heart rate (HR) was monitored using a 3-lead ECG. BF was calculated as VTI x vessel cross-sectional area. CO was calculated as HR x SV. The data obtained after each set of exercise were averaged and used for analyses. Multi-level modeling was used to determine the effect of exercise condition on dependent variables. Statistical significance was set a priori at p LL (9.92+/-0.82 cm3) > LBFR(sub dBP)(6.47+/-0.79 cm3) > LBFR(sub SBP) (3.51+/-0.59 cm3). Blunted exercise induced increases occurred in HR, SV, and CO after LBFR compared to HL and LL. HR increased 45% after HL and LL and 28% after LBFR (p<0.05), but SV increased (p<0.05) only after HL. Consequently, the increase (p<0.05) in CO was greater in HL and LL (approximately 3 L/min) than in LBFR (approximately 1 L/min). CONCLUSION: BF during LBFR(sub SBP) was 1/3 of that observed in LL, which supports the hypothesis that local ischemia stimulates the LBFR hypertrophic response. As the cuff did not compress the artery, the ischemia may have occurred

  1. Cardiac Output and Stroke Volume at Anaerobic Threshold During Walking Exercise in Healthy Aged Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Haga, Shukoh; Esaki, Kazuki; Toshinai, Kouji; Kinugasa, Takeshi; Takemasa, Toru; Ueya, Etsuo; Hamaoka, Takaumi; Katsumura, Toshihito; Kizaki, Takako; Ohno, Hideki

    2003-01-01

    HAGA, S., ESAKI, K., TOSHINAI, K., KINUGASA, T., TAKEMASA, T., UEYA, E., HAMAOKA, T., KATSUMURA, T., KIZAKI, t. and OHNO, H., Cardiac Output and Stroke Volume at Anaerobic Threshold During Walking Exercise in Healthy Aged Subjects. Abv. Exerc. Sports Physiol., Vol.9, No.1 pp.37-43, 2003. There have been few previous studies of cardiac outout for cardiovascular function at anaerobic threshold (AT) during walking exercise in healthy elderly subjects. The present study was performed to investiga...

  2. Is pulmonary gas exchange during exercise in hypoxia impaired with the increase of cardiac output?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J.A.; Robach, P.; Lundby, C.;

    2008-01-01

    diffusion with increases in exercise intensity. We have consistently observed that during steady-state, submaximal (100-120 W) exercise on the cycle ergometer in hypoxia the lung can accommodate an increase in cardiac output of approximately 2 L x min(-1) without any significant effect on pulmonary gas......During exercise in humans, the alveolar-arterial O(2) tension difference ((A-a)DO(2)) increases with exercise intensity and is an important factor determining the absolute level of oxygen binding to hemoglobin and therefore the level of systemic oxygen transport. During exercise in hypoxia, the (A......-a)DO(2) is accentuated. Using the multiple inert gas elimination technique it has been shown that during exercise in acute hypoxia the contribution of ventilation-perfusion inequality to (A-a)DO(2) is rather small and in the absence of pulmonary edema intrapulmonary shunts can be ruled out. This implies...

  3. Cardiac Aging Detection Using Complexity Measures

    CERN Document Server

    Balasubramanian, Karthi

    2016-01-01

    As we age, our hearts undergo changes which result in reduction in complexity of physiological interactions between different control mechanisms. This results in a potential risk of cardiovascular diseases which are the number one cause of death globally. Since cardiac signals are nonstationary and nonlinear in nature, complexity measures are better suited to handle such data. In this study, non-invasive methods for detection of cardiac aging using complexity measures are explored. Lempel-Ziv (LZ) complexity, Approximate Entropy (ApEn) and Effort-to-Compress (ETC) measures are used to differentiate between healthy young and old subjects using heartbeat interval data. We show that both LZ and ETC complexity measures are able to differentiate between young and old subjects with only 10 data samples while ApEn requires at least 15 data samples.

  4. Management of perioperative low cardiac output state without extracorporeal life support: What is feasible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Girish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A transient and reversible reduction in cardiac output-low cardiac output state (LCOS often occurs following surgery for congenital heart disease. Inappropriately managed LCOS is a risk factor for increased morbidity and death. LCOS may occasionally be progressive and refractory needing a period of "myocardial rest" with extracorporeal life support (ECLS. ECLS is currently considered a routine tool available for rapid deployment in most industrialized countries. Accumulated experience and refinements in technology have led to improving survivals - discharge survivals of 35%−50%, with almost 100% survival in select groups on elective left ventricular assist device. Thus, there is an increasing trend to initiate ECLS "early or electively in the operating room" in high-risk patients. India has a huge potential need for ECLS given the large number of infants presenting late with preexisting ventricular dysfunction or in circulatory collapse. ECLS is an expensive and resource consuming treatment modality and is not a viable therapeutic option in our country. The purpose of this paper is to reiterate an anticipatory, proactive approach to LCOS: (1 methods for early detection of evolving LCOS and (2 timely initiation of individualized therapy. This paper also explores what is feasible with the refinement of "simple, conventional, inexpensive strategies" for the management of LCOS. Therapy for LCOS should be multimodal based on the type of circulation and physiology. Our approach to LCOS includes: (1 intraoperative strategies, (2 aggressive afterload reduction, (3 lusitropy, (4 exclusion of structural defects, (5 harnessing cardiopulmonary interactions, and (6 addressing metabolic and endocrine abnormalities. We have achieved a discharge survival rate of greater than 97% with these simple methods.

  5. Against Journal Articles for Measuring Value in University Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbali, C.

    2010-01-01

    The following lines of arguments against the metrics of journal articles is developed: (1) Textual output should no longer be main valued output; (2) Digitalization enables other ways of advancing knowledge; (3) Measures by journal article favours the disciplines of Natural Science and Engineering (NSE) and moulds other disciplines of Social…

  6. Are output measurements always necessary after CT tube replacement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Stauduhar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: TX regulations and the ACR require that CT radiation output be measured within 30 days of major service. The most common major service is tube replacement. We hypothesized that historical QC data could be used instead to determine if output measurements are necessary, reducing the need for costly output measurements.Methods: We reviewed 66 records of tube replacements to determine with what frequency output falls outside specifications. We also conducted an experiment to verify that clinically significant output changes could be identified by comparing image noise in historical QC data with the same data after tube replacement. We used 30 days of historical QC data to establish a baseline noise level and 95% confidence interval (CI for individual noise measurements. To simulate output changes, we acquired phantom images with our QC protocol while manually changing output (mA. We acquired 10 images using the baseline output and 10 images at each different “output”. We evaluated individual images and subsets of images at each “output” to determine if the system was within the manufacturer’s specifications.Results: None of the 66 tube replacements resulted in an output change that exceeded specifications. Analysis of 30 days of historic QC data for our experimental system indicated a mean noise of 5.4 HU with 95% CI of 5.1 ‒ 5.7 HU. When using the mean noise of 10 images acquired at each of the varying outputs, we were able to identify, with 100% accuracy, images acquired at outputs outside manufacturer’s specifications.Conclusion: The results of our review of historical tube replacement data indicated the likelihood of output falling outside manufacturer’s specifications is low. Considering this, it is likely that by using QC data from programs required by regulation and the ACR physicists can reliably verify radiation output stability remotely instead of making physical measurements.--------------------Cite this article

  7. Classification of hospitals based on measured output: the VA system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J W; Berki, S E; Wyszewianski, L; Ashcraft, M L

    1983-07-01

    Evaluation of hospital performance and improvement of resource allocation in hospital systems require a method for classifying hospitals on the basis of their output. Previous approaches to hospital classification relied largely on input characteristics. The authors propose and apply a procedure for classifying hospitals into groups where within-group hospitals are similar with respect to output. Direct measures of case-mix-adjusted discharges and outpatient visits are the principal measures of patient care output; other measures capture training and research functions. The component measures were weighted, and a composite output measure was calculated for each of the 162 hospitals in the Veterans Administration health care system. The output score then was used as the dependent variable in an Automatic Interaction Detector analysis, which partitioned the 162 hospitals into 10 groups, accounting for 85 per cent of the variance in the dependent variable. An extension of the output classification method is presented for illustration of how the difference between hospitals' actual operating costs and costs predicted on the basis of output can be used in defining isoefficiency groups. PMID:6350744

  8. Effect of heat stress on cardiac output and systemic vascular conductance during simulated hemorrhage to presyncope in young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganio, Matthew S; Overgaard, Morten; Seifert, Thomas; Secher, Niels H; Johansson, Pär I; Meyer, Martin; Crandall, Craig G

    2012-01-01

    During moderate actual or simulated hemorrhage, as cardiac output decreases, reductions in systemic vascular conductance (SVC) maintain mean arterial pressure (MAP). Heat stress, however, compromises the control of MAP during simulated hemorrhage, and it remains unknown whether this response is due...

  9. Comparison of cardiac output of the left and right side of the heart by ultrafast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfkiel, C.J.; Ferguson, J.L.; Law, W.R.; Chomka, E.V.; Brundage, B.H.

    1986-03-05

    Ultrafast computed tomography (CT) evaluation of cardiac output (CO) can be determined using indicator dilution theory. The concentration of an iodinated contrast agent injected into a vein of a subject can be measured as a function of time by serial EKG, gated CT imaging. The contrast density of the blood pool measured by CT defines the indicator concentration. CT CO is proportional to the area under a time density curve from a region of the blood pool. Proper subject position and scanning timing allows CT to measure CO in the pulmonary (PA) artery and the aorta (AO) with the same contrast bolus. Three anesthetized dogs were multiply scanned following simultaneous injections of contrast and radioactive tracer microspheres. Microsphere CO was determined by reference withdrawal method. Multiple thermodilution CO measurements were made just prior and after each CT CO procedure. 24 comparisons were made of thermodilution, microsphere and CT CO measured in the PA (right sided CO (RSCO)) and the AO (left sided CO (LSCO)). CT CO was calculated as the ratio of the volume of contrast injected to the time density curve area corrected for the relation of contrast density to CT number. RSCO agreed very closely to LSCO (r = .99, p < .001; y = 1.0x +/- .32). RSCO correlated to thermodilution (r = .96, p < .001; y = 1.2x +/- 1.3) and microsphere CO (r = .93, p < .001; y = .69x +/- 1.3). These data show that CT CO measurements can be made in the PA and AO with equal accuracy.

  10. Management of perioperative low cardiac output state without extracorporeal life support: What is feasible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transient and reversible reduction in cardiac output–low cardiac output state (LCOS) often occurs following surgery for congenital heart disease. Inappropriately managed LCOS is a risk factor for increased morbidity and death. LCOS may occasionally be progressive and refractory needing a period of “myocardial rest” with extracorporeal life support (ECLS). ECLS is currently considered a routine tool available for rapid deployment in most industrialized countries. Accumulated experience and refinements in technology have led to improving survivals – discharge survivals of 35%–50%, with almost 100% survival in select groups on elective left ventricular assist device. Thus, there is an increasing trend to initiate ECLS “early or electively in the operating room” in high-risk patients. India has a huge potential need for ECLS given the large number of infants presenting late with preexisting ventricular dysfunction or in circulatory collapse. ECLS is an expensive and resource consuming treatment modality and is not a viable therapeutic option in our country. The purpose of this paper is to reiterate an anticipatory, proactive approach to LCOS: (1) methods for early detection of evolving LCOS and (2) timely initiation of individualized therapy. This paper also explores what is feasible with the refinement of “simple, conventional, inexpensive strategies” for the management of LCOS. Therapy for LCOS should be multimodal based on the type of circulation and physiology. Our approach to LCOS includes: (1) intraoperative strategies, (2) aggressive afterload reduction, (3) lusitropy, (4) exclusion of structural defects, (5) harnessing cardiopulmonary interactions, and (6) addressing metabolic and endocrine abnormalities. We have achieved a discharge survival rate of greater than 97% with these simple methods

  11. Influence of water immersion, water gymnastics and swimming on cardiac output in patients with heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Jean‐Paul; Noveanu, Markus; Morger, Cyrill; Gaillet, Raymond; Capoferri, Mauro; Anderegg, Matthias; Saner, Hugo

    2007-01-01

    Background Whole‐body water immersion leads to a significant shift of blood from the periphery to the intrathoracic circulation, followed by an increase in central venous pressure and heart volume. In patients with severely reduced left ventricular function, this hydrostatically induced volume shift might overstrain the cardiovascular adaptive mechanisms and lead to cardiac decompensation. Aim To assess the haemodynamic response to water immersion, gymnastics and swimming in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods 10 patients with compensated CHF (62.9 (6.3) years, ejection fraction 31.5% (4.1%), peak oxygen consumption (V̇o2) 19.4 (2.8) ml/kg/min), 10 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) but preserved left ventricular function (57.2 (5.6) years, ejection fraction 63.9% (5.5%), peak V̇o2 28 (6.3) ml/kg/min), and 10 healthy controls (32.8 (7.2) years, peak V̇o2 45.6 (6) ml/kg/min) were examined. Haemodynamic response to thermoneutral (32°C) water immersion and exercise was measured using a non‐invasive foreign gas rebreathing method during stepwise water immersion, water gymnastics and swimming. Results Water immersion up to the chest increased cardiac index by 19% in controls, by 21% in patients with CAD and by 16% in patients with CHF. Although some patients with CHF showed a decrease of stroke volume during immersion, all subjects were able to increase cardiac index (by 87% in healthy subjects, by 77% in patients with CAD and by 53% in patients with CHF). V̇o2 during swimming was 9.7 (3.3) ml/kg/min in patients with CHF, 12.4 (3.5) ml/kg/min in patients with CAD and 13.9 (4) ml/kg/min in controls. Conclusions Patients with severely reduced left ventricular function but stable clinical conditions and a minimal peak V̇o2 of at least 15 ml/kg/min during a symptom‐limited exercise stress test tolerate water immersion and swimming in thermoneutral water well. Although cardiac index and V̇o2 are lower than in patients

  12. Noninvasive ambulatory measurement system of cardiac activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, Esteban J; Chavez, Javier A P; Aqueveque, Pablo

    2015-08-01

    This work implements a noninvasive system that measures the movements caused by cardiac activity. It uses unobtrusive Electro-Mechanical Films (EMFi) on the seat and on the backrest of a regular chair. The system detects ballistocardiogram (BCG) and respiration movements. Real data was obtained from 54 volunteers. 19 of them were measured in the laboratory and 35 in a hospital waiting room. Using a BIOPAC acquisition system, the ECG was measured simultaneously to the BCG for comparison. Wavelet Transform (WT) is a better option than Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) for signal extraction and produces higher effective measurement time. In the laboratory, the best results are obtained on the seat. The correlation index was 0.9800 and the Bland-Altman limits of agreement were 0.7136 ± 4.3673 [BPM]. In the hospital waiting room, the best results are also from the seat sensor. The correlation index was 0.9840, and the limits of agreement were 0.4386 ± 3.5884 [BPM]. The system is able to measure BCG in an unobtrusive way and determine the cardiac frequency with high precision. It is simple to use, which means the system can easily be used in non-standard settings: resting in a chair or couch, at the gym, schools or in a hospital waiting room, as shown. PMID:26738057

  13. High Output Cardiac Failure Resolving after Repair of AV Fistula in a Six-Month-Old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teomete, Uygar; Gugol, Rubee Anne; Neville, Holly; Dandin, Ozgur; Young, Ming-Lon

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acquired AVF in pediatrics are commonly caused by iatrogenic means, including arterial or venous punctures. These fistulae can cause great hemodynamic stress on the heart as soon as they are created. Case. A six-month-old 25-week gestation infant was referred for respiratory distress. Initial exam revealed tachypnea, tachycardia, and hypertension. There was a bruit noted on her left arm. An ultrasound showed an arteriovenous fistula. Its location, however, precluded intervention because of the high risk for limb-loss. An echocardiogram showed evidence of pulmonary hypertension that was treated with sildenafil and furosemide. However, no improvement was seen. On temporary manual occlusion of the fistula, the patient was noted to have increased her blood pressure and decreased her heart rate, suggesting significant hemodynamic effect of the fistula. The fistula was subsequently ligated and the patient clinically and echocardiographically improved. Conclusion. A patient in high output cardiac failure or pulmonary artery hypertension, especially prematüre patients with preexisting lung disease, should be probed for history of multiple punctures, trauma, or surgery and should have prompt evaluation for AVF. If it can be diagnosed and repaired, most of the cases have been shown to decrease the stress on the heart and reverse the pathologic hemodynamics. PMID:26885434

  14. PRESAGE 3D dosimetry accurately measures Gamma Knife output factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klawikowski, Slade J.; Yang, James N.; Adamovics, John; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2014-12-01

    Small-field output factor measurements are traditionally very difficult because of steep dose gradients, loss of lateral electronic equilibrium, and dose volume averaging in finitely sized detectors. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry is ideal for measuring small output factors and avoids many of these potential challenges of point and 2D detectors. PRESAGE 3D polymer dosimeters were used to measure the output factors for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Perfexion Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment system. Discrepancies between the planned and measured distance between shot centers were also investigated. A Gamma Knife head frame was mounted onto an anthropomorphic head phantom. Special inserts were machined to hold 60 mm diameter, 70 mm tall cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters. The phantom was irradiated with one 16 mm shot and either one 4 mm or one 8 mm shot, to a prescribed dose of either 3 Gy or 4 Gy to the 50% isodose line. The two shots were spaced between 30 mm and 60 mm apart and aligned along the central axis of the cylinder. The Presage dosimeters were measured using the DMOS-RPC optical CT scanning system. Five independent 4 mm output factor measurements fell within 2% of the manufacturer’s Monte Carlo simulation-derived nominal value, as did two independent 8 mm output factor measurements. The measured distances between shot centers varied by ±0.8 mm with respect to the planned shot displacements. On the basis of these results, we conclude that PRESAGE dosimetry is excellently suited to quantify the difficult-to-measure Gamma Knife output factors.

  15. Predictors of Post Pericardiotomy Low Cardiac Output Syndrome in Patients With Pericardial Effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabzi Feridoun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pathological involvement of pericardium by any disease that resulting in effusion may require decompression and pericardiectomy. The current article describes rare patients with effusion who after pericadiectomy and transient hemodynamic improvement rapidly developed progressive heart failure and subsequent multi organ failure.Methods: During periods of five years, 423 patients in our hospital underwent pericardiotomy for decompression of effusion. The clinical characteristics of those patient with postoperative low cardiac output (B group (14 cases recorded and compared with other patients without this postoperative complication (A group by test and X2. Significant variables in invariables (P≤0.1 entered in logistic regression analysis and odd ratio of these significant variables obtained. Results: Idiopathic pericardial effusion, malignancy, renal failure, connective tissue disease, viral pericarditis was found in 125 patients (27%, 105 patients (25.4%, 65 patients (15.6%, 50 (17.1% and 10 (2.4% of patients subsequently. The factors that predict post-operative death in logistic regression analysis were malignancy, radiotherapy, constrictive pericarditis inotropic drug using IABP using, pre-operative EF and pericardial calcification.Conclusion: Certain preoperative variables such as malignancy, radiotherapy, low EF, calcified pericardium and connective tissue disease are associated with POLCOS and post-operative risk of death. This paradoxical response to pericardial decompression may be more frequent than currently appreciated. Its cause may relate to the sudden removal of the chronic external ventricular support from the effusion or thicken pericardium resulting in ventricular dilatation and failure or intra operative myocardial injury due to pericardiectomy of calcified pericardium, radiation and cardiomyopathy.

  16. The effect of halothane on the distribution of cardiac output and organ blood flows in the hemorrhagic, hypotensive dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halothane was given to dogs which had been bled to an arterial mean blood pressure of 60 mmHg, and the circulatory effects were studied with the aid of the radioactive microsphere technique. The cardiac output and coronary blood flow were well maintained, whereas the arterial mean blood pressure was slightly, and the stroke volume markedly increased, indicating an improved heart function. The blood flows to the brain, lungs, liver and kidneys were well preserved throughout the anesthesia. The effect of retransfusing the withdrawn blood was also studied, and it resulted in an increased cardiac output, arterial mean blood pressure and increased blood flows to the heart, lungs, spleen, bowel and liver. (author)

  17. Effectiveness of Human Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Supplementation in Pulmonary Edema Patients Using the Pulse Contour Cardiac Output System

    OpenAIRE

    Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Mashiko, Kunihiro; Saito, Nobuyuki; Matsumoto, Hisashi; Hara, Yoshiaki; Kutsukata, Noriyoshi; Yokota, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has a variety of pharmacologic effects, including natriuresis, diuresis, vasodilatation, and suppression of the renin-angiotensin system. A recent study showed that ANP infusion improved hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension in a lung injury model. On the other hand, the pulse contour cardiac output (PiCCO™) system (Pulsion Medical Systems, Munich, Germany) allows monitoring of the intravascular volume status and may be used to guide volume therapy in s...

  18. The use of a cardiac output monitor to guide the initial fluid resuscitation in a patient with burns

    OpenAIRE

    Reid, Robert Darren; Jayamaha, John

    2007-01-01

    A case of initial resuscitation of a patient with severe burns is described. Such patients can have hypotension and reduced organ perfusion for a number of reasons, and can remain in the emergency department for many hours while awaiting transfer to specialist centres. The case provides a comparison between resuscitation using traditional burns formulae and a relatively new and simple‐to‐use cardiac output (CO) monitor—the Vigileo monitor (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California, USA). The c...

  19. HEART FAILURE WITH LOW CARDIAC OUTPUT AND RISK OF DEVELOPMENT OF LESIONS IN THE CEREBRAL WHITE MATTER

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Aim: Diminished cardiac output can lead to the development of white matter lesions. White matter lesions are related to cognitive impairment, stroke risk and vascular death, yet the precise aetiology is uncertain. Methods: In this study we recruited 130 patients attending our medicine and neurology outpatient department, and divided them into those with a history of heart failure (n:24), atrial fibrillation (n:26), and those with atherosclerotic risk factors (n:80). The patients without low o...

  20. Stable xenon CT measurement of cerebral blood flow in cardiac transplantation candidates: Correlation with cognitive function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirteen consecutive unselected patients with NYHA class 4 cardiac failure referred for cardiac transplantation underwent neurologic examination and cerebral blood flow measurement (rCBF) using the stable xenon enhanced CT method on a GE9800 system. Eleven men and two women were studied (mean age = 43.8 +- 6.1). On neurological examination, six of the patients demonstrated normal mental function; the remaining seven patients demonstrated memory, language, or learning impairment. There was no difference in mean cardiac output between the groups (4.9 L/min +- 1.68 vs. 4.2L/min +- 1.57). rCBF was significantly reduced in the impaired group. Cognitive impairment in patients with cardiac failure can be correlated with cerebral ischemia. Stable xenon CT measurement of rCBF in transplant candidates may help identify patients requiring more rapid transplantation to prevent permanent cerebral injury

  1. The non-invasive and continuous estimation of cardiac output using a photoplethysmogram and electrocardiogram during incremental exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac output (CO) monitoring is not only essential for critically ill patients in the hospital, but also for patients at home and those undergoing cardiopulmonary exercise testing. However, CO is difficult to monitor during daily activities and exercise. In this paper, we aim at developing a novel CO estimation method that can be used under these challenging conditions. The tube model was utilized to derive a CO index, namely the pulse time reflection ratio (PTRR) from an electrocardiogram and photoplethysmogram. After calibration, the PTRR can be used to estimate beat-to-beat CO. The proposed method was verified against CO measured by impedance cardiography on 19 healthy subjects in an incremental intensity exercise test. Results showed that there were strong correlations (r) between the PTRR and reference CO in 18 subjects (mean r: 0.88, n = 245 trials). Two calibration approaches reported in the literature were applied to the proposed method and the corresponding bias ± precisions of estimation errors were 0 ± 1.89 L min−1 and −0.22 ± 2.12 L min−1, respectively. The percent errors were 21.94% and 24.90%, smaller than the clinical acceptance limit (30%). To conclude, after calibration, this method can be used to monitor CO on healthy subjects during incremental intensity exercise

  2. Cardiac output obtained from test bolus injections as a factor in contrast injection rate revision of following coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konno, Masahiko [Division of Diagnostic Image Analysis, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Miyagi (Japan); Yamagata Prefecture Comprehensive Rehabilitation and Education Center, Yamagata (Japan)], E-mail: mkonno@med.tohoku.ac.jp; Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Usui, Akihito; Abe, Mitsuya; Tateishi, Toshiki; Kawasumi, Yusuke; Saito, Haruo [Division of Diagnostic Image Analysis, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Miyagi (Japan); Tsuda, Masashi; Ota, Hideki; Takase, Kei [Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Miyagi (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Background.. Optimal contrast enhancement is crucial for the detection of coronary artery stenoses and atherosclerotic changes in coronary CT angiography (CTA). Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of using the cardiac output (CO) obtained from the test bolus injection data-set (CO test) as a factor in contrast injection rate revision of the following coronary CTA. Material and Methods. The test bolus injection data-sets of 52 consecutive coronary CTAs were examined. CO test was calculated from the test bolus data-set. Aortic peak enhancement (APE) was measured on the following coronary CTA. We simulated the APE at a fixed contrast injection rate of 4 mL/s (simAPE) in each patient. Results. The ranges of COtest and simAPE were 2.82-7.56 L/min and 194-527 Hounsfield Units, respectively. There was a significant negative correlation (R = -0.802, P < 0.001) between simAPE and COtest. Conclusion. COtest can be used for injection rate revision on coronary CTA.

  3. Clinical evaluation of the flotrac/vigileo™ system for continuous cardiac output monitoring in patients undergoing regional anesthesia for elective cesarean section: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auler, José Otavio C.; Torres, Marcelo L. A.; Cardoso, Mônica M.; Tebaldi, Thais C.; Schmidt, André P.; Kondo, Mario M.; Zugaib, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery may cause severe maternal hypotension and a decrease in cardiac output. Compared to assessment of cardiac output via a pulmonary artery catheter, the FloTrac/Vigileo™ system may offer a less invasive technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate cardiac output and other hemodynamic measurements made using the FloTrac/Vigileo™ system in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia for elective cesarean section. METHODS: A prospective study enrolling 10 healthy pregnant women was performed. Hemodynamic parameters were continuously obtained at 15 main points: admission to surgery (two baseline measurements), after preload, after spinal anesthesia administration and 4 time points thereafter (4, 6, 8 and 10 min after anesthesia), at skin and uterine incision, newborn and placental delivery, oxytocin administration, end of surgery, and recovery from anesthesia. Hemodynamic therapy was guided by mean arterial pressure, and vasopressors were used as appropriate to maintain baseline values. A repeated measures ANOVA was used for data analysis. RESULTS: There was a significant increase in heart rate and a decrease of stroke volume and stroke volume index up to 10 min after spinal anesthesia (P < 0.01). Importantly, stroke volume variation increased immediately after newborn delivery (P < 0.001) and returned to basal values at the end of surgery. Further hemodynamic parameters showed no significant changes over time. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: No significant hemodynamic effects, except for heart rate and stroke volume changes, were observed in pregnant women managed with preload and vasopressors when undergoing elective cesarean section and spinal anesthesia. PMID:20835557

  4. Clinical evaluation of the flotrac/vigileo™ system for continuous cardiac output monitoring in patients undergoing regional anesthesia for elective cesarean section: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Otavio Costa Auler Junior

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spinal anesthesia for cesarean delivery may cause severe maternal hypotension and a decrease in cardiac output. Compared to assessment of cardiac output via a pulmonary artery catheter, the FloTrac/Vigileo™ system may offer a less invasive technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate cardiac output and other hemodynamic measurements made using the FloTrac/Vigileo™ system in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia for elective cesarean section. METHODS: A prospective study enrolling 10 healthy pregnant women was performed. Hemodynamic parameters were continuously obtained at 15 main points: admission to surgery (two baseline measurements, after preload, after spinal anesthesia administration and 4 time points thereafter (4, 6, 8 and 10 min after anesthesia, at skin and uterine incision, newborn and placental delivery, oxytocin administration, end of surgery, and recovery from anesthesia. Hemodynamic therapy was guided by mean arterial pressure, and vasopressors were used as appropriate to maintain baseline values. A repeated measures ANOVA was used for data analysis. RESULTS: There was a significant increase in heart rate and a decrease of stroke volume and stroke volume index up to 10 min after spinal anesthesia (P < 0.01. Importantly, stroke volume variation increased immediately after newborn delivery (P < 0.001 and returned to basal values at the end of surgery. Further hemodynamic parameters showed no significant changes over time. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: No significant hemodynamic effects, except for heart rate and stroke volume changes, were observed in pregnant women managed with preload and vasopressors when undergoing elective cesarean section and spinal anesthesia.

  5. Cardiac output by Doppler echocardiography in the premature baboon: Comparison with radiolabeled microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed-Doppler echocardiography (PDE) is a useful noninvasive method for determining left ventricular output (LVO). However, despite increasingly widespread use in neonatal intensive care units, validation studies in prematures with cardiopulmonary disease are lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare radiolabeled microsphere (RLM) and PDE measurements of LVO, using the critically ill premature baboon as a model of the human neonate. Twenty-two paired RLM and PDE measurements of LVO were obtained in 14 animals between 3 and 24 h of age. Average PDE LVO was 152 ml/min/kg (range, 40-258 ml/min/kg) compared to 158 ml/min/kg (range, 67-278 ml/min/kg) measured by RLM. Linear regression analysis of the paired measurements showed good correlation with a slope near unity (gamma = 0.94x + 4.20, r = 0.91, SEE = 25.7 ml). The authors conclude that PDE determinations of LVO compare well with those measured by RLM in the premature baboon. PDE appears to provide a valid estimate of LVO and should be useful in human prematures with cardiopulmonary distress

  6. Measuring fluid flow and heat output in seafloor hydrothermal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanovich, Leonid N.; Hurt, Robert S.; Smith, Joshua E.; Genc, Gence; Lowell, Robert P.

    2015-12-01

    We review techniques for measuring fluid flow and advective heat output from seafloor hydrothermal systems and describe new anemometer and turbine flowmeter devices we have designed, built, calibrated, and tested. These devices allow measuring fluid velocity at high- and low-temperature focused and diffuse discharge sites at oceanic spreading centers. The devices perform at ocean floor depths and black smoker temperatures and can be used to measure flow rates ranging over 2 orders of magnitude. Flow velocity is determined from the rotation rate of the rotor blades or paddle assembly. These devices have an open bearing design that eliminates clogging by particles or chemical precipitates as the fluid passes by the rotors. The devices are compact and lightweight enough for deployment from either an occupied or remotely operated submersible. The measured flow rates can be used in conjunction with vent temperature or geochemical measurements to obtain heat outputs or geochemical fluxes from both vent chimneys and diffuse flow regions. The devices have been tested on 30 Alvin dives on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and 3 Jason dives on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). We measured an anomalously low entrainment coefficient (0.064) and report 104 new measurements over a wide range of discharge temperatures (5°-363°C), velocities (2-199 cm/s), and depths (1517-2511 m). These include the first advective heat output measurements at the High Rise vent field and the first direct fluid flow measurement at Middle Valley. Our data suggest that black smoker heat output at the Main Endeavour vent field may have declined since 1994 and that after the 2005-2006 eruption, the high-temperature advective flow at the EPR 9°50'N field may have become more channelized, predominately discharging through the Bio 9 structure. We also report 16 measurements on 10 Alvin dives and 2 Jason dives with flow meters that predate devices described in this work and were used in the process of their development

  7. 脉搏指示连续心排血量监测技术救治重症胰腺炎并发急性呼吸窘迫综合征患儿二例%Pulse indicator continuous cardiac output measurement-guided treatment aids two pediatric patients with severe acute pancreatitis complicated with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜卫源; 王丽杰

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical value of the pulse indicator continuous cardiac output (PiCCO) system in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) complicated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).Method Two cases of SAP with ARDS were monitored using PiCCO during comprehensive management in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of Shengjing Hospital,China Medical University.To guide fluid management,the cardiac index (CI) was measured to assess cardiac function,the global end-diastolic volume index (GEDVI) was used to evaluate cardiac preload,and the extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) was used to evaluate the pulmonary edema.Result Case 1 was diagnosed with type L2 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (intermediate risk) and received the sixth maintenance phases of chemotherapy this time.After a 1-week dosage of chemotherapeutic drugs (pegaspargase and mitoxantrone),he suffered SAP combined with ARDS.Except comprehensive treatment (life supporting,antibiotic,etc.) and applying continuous veno-venous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) to remove inflammatory mediators.PiCCO monitor was utilized to guide fluid management.During the early stage of PiCCO monitoring,the patient showed no significant manifestations of pulmonary edema in the bedside chest X-ray (bedside ultrasound showed left pleural effusion),and had an oxygenation index 223 mmHg (1 mmHg =0.133 kPa),GEDVI 450 ml/m2,and ELVWI 7 ml/kg.We increased cardiac output to increase tissue perfusion and dehydration speed of CVVHDF was set at 70 ml/h.Two hours later,GEDVI significantly increased to 600 ml/m2 and ELVWI significantly increased to 10 ml/kg,the oxygenation index declined to 155 mmHg,the bedside chest X-ray showed a significant decrease of permeability (right lung) and PEEP was adjusted to 5 cmH2O (1 cmH2O =0.098 kPa),indicating circulating overload.ARDS subsequently occurred,upon which the fluid infusion was halted,the dehydration rate of CVVHDF raised (adjusted to 100-200 ml/h).On day 3 in the

  8. Measuring quality of life in cardiac spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbesen, L S; Guyatt, G H; McCartney, N; Oldridge, N B

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an objective instrument to measure changes in quality of life of spouses of post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients, and to determine its responsiveness and validity. A 70-item list of potential areas of concern was compiled; the 25 most frequent and important concerns comprised the framework of the final questionnaire. The questions on the Quality of Life Questionnaire for Cardiac Spouses (QL-SP) were categorized into the Emotional Function Dimension (EFD), and the Physical and Social Function Dimension (PSFD). Subjects (n = 39) completed the QL-SP and a battery of established questionnaires at home, 1-2 weeks post-hospital discharge for the patient, and 8 weeks later. Scores on the QL-SP between visits were improved for both the EFD (t = 5.56, p less than 0.001), and the PSFD (t = 6.11, p less than 0.001). The agreement between predicted and observed relationships between the dimension changes and other index changes, as measured statistically by a kappa with Cicchetti weights, was significant (kappa w = 0.43, p = 0.0012). The QL-SP appears to be responsive and valid, and may be useful in evaluating clinical and research intervention strategies. PMID:2324789

  9. Corporate Social Performance: From Output Measurement to Impact Measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.E.H. Maas (Karen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAll organisations have social, environmental and economic impacts that effect people, their communities and the natural environment. Impacts include intended as well as unintended effects and negative as well as positive effects. Current practice in performance measurement tends to focus

  10. Sarcomere length dependence of power output is increased after PKA treatment in rat cardiac myocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Hanft, Laurin M.; McDonald, Kerry S.

    2009-01-01

    The Frank-Starling relationship of the heart yields increased stroke volume with greater end-diastolic volume, and this relationship is steeper after β-adrenergic stimulation. The underlying basis for the Frank-Starling mechanism involves length-dependent changes in both Ca2+ sensitivity of myofibrillar force and power output. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that PKA-induced phosphorylation of myofibrillar proteins would increase the length dependence of myofibrillar power output, whi...

  11. Blood-Pressure Measuring System Gives Accurate Graphic Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    The problem: To develop an instrument that will provide an external (indirect) measurement of arterial blood pressure in the form of an easily interpreted graphic trace that can be correlated with standard clinical blood-pressure measurements. From sphygmograms produced by conventional sphygmographs, it is very difficult to differentiate the systolic and diastolic blood-pressure pulses and to correlate these indices with the standard clinical values. It is nearly impossible to determine these indices when the subject is under physical or emotional stress. The solution: An electronic blood-pressure system, basically similar to conventional ausculatory sphygmomanometers, employing a standard occluding cuff, a gas-pressure source, and a gas-pressure regulator and valve. An electrical output transducer senses cuff pressure, and a microphone positioned on the brachial artery under the occluding cuff monitors the Korotkoff sounds from this artery. The output signals present the conventional systolic and diastolic indices in a clear, graphical display. The complete system also includes an electronic timer and cycle-control circuit.

  12. Model-based Measures of Output Gap: Application to the Thai Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Vimut Vanitcharearnthum

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we compare two model-based measures of the output gap. The first measure, as proposed by Gali (2011), defines output gap as the difference between actual output and the output level that would be if the economy operates under a perfectly competitive market without price or wage stickiness. We used annual data of relevant variables for Thailand and computed the output gap under this approach. The calculated output gap for Thailand shows that the Thai economy performs consistently...

  13. Cardiac MR Elastography: Comparison with left ventricular pressure measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Samani Abbas; Hamm Bernd; Schnorr Jörg; Kaufels Nikola; Laule Michael; Elgeti Thomas; Braun Jürgen; Sack Ingolf

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Purpose of study To compare magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) with ventricular pressure changes in an animal model. Methods Three pigs of different cardiac physiology (weight, 25 to 53 kg; heart rate, 61 to 93 bpm; left ventricular [LV] end-diastolic volume, 35 to 70 ml) were subjected to invasive LV pressure measurement by catheter and noninvasive cardiac MRE. Cardiac MRE was performed in a short-axis view of the heart and applying a 48.3-Hz shear-wave stimulus. Relative changes...

  14. Cardiovascular measurement and cardiac function analysis with electron beam computed tomography in health Chinese people (50 cases report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantitatively measure cardiovascular diameters and function parameters by using electron beam computed tomography, EBCT. Methods: Men 50 health Chinese people accepted EBCT common transverse and short-axis enhanced movie scan (27 men, 23 women, average age 47.7 years.). The transverse scan was used to measure the diameters of the ascending aorta, descending aorta, pulmonary artery and left atrium. The movie study was used to measure the left ventricular myocardium thickness and analysis global, sectional and segmental function of the right and left ventricles. Results: The cardiovascular diameters and cardiac functional parameters were calculated. The diameters and most functional parameters (end syspoble volume, syspole volume, ejection fraction, cardiac-output, cardiac index) of normal Chinese men were greater than those of women (P>0.05). However, the EDV and MyM(myocardium mass) of both ventricles were significant (p<0.01). Conclusion: EBCT is a minimally invasive method for cardiovascular measurement and cardiac function evaluation

  15. Use of transesophageal Doppler as a sole cardiac output monitor for reperfusion hemodynamic changes during living donor liver transplantation: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hussien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To report the use of transesophageal Doppler (TED, a minimally invasive cardiac output (COP monitor, before, during and after reperfusion and study its effect on anesthetic management during living donor liver transplantation (LDLT. Setting and Design: A prospective observational study. Methods: A total of 25 consecutive recipients with a MELD score between 15 and 20 were enrolled. Data were recorded at baseline (TB; anhepatic phase (TA; and post-reperfusion - 1, 5, 10 and 30 minutes. Fluid therapy was guided by corrected flow time (FTc of the TED. Packed red blood cells (RBCs were only given when hematocrit was less than 25%. Rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM and standard laboratory tests were used to guide component blood products requirements. Results: Post-reperfusion, the COP, Cardiac Index (CI and stroke volume (SV increased significantly at all points of measurements; this was associated with a significant decrease in systemic vascular resistance (SVR ( P <.05. Immediately post-reperfusion, for 5 minutes, mean arterial blood pressure (ABP dropped significantly (P<.05, and 14 out of the 25 patients required boluses of epinephrine (10 μg to restore the mean ABP; 3 of the 14 patients required norepinephrine infusion till the end of surgery. Central venous pressure (CVP and urine output (UOP at all measures were maintained adequately with FTc-guided fluid replacement. Eight out of the 25 patients required no blood transfusion, and 4 of the 8 patients required no catecholamine support. Conclusion: TED as a sole monitor for COP was able to present significant and reliable changes in the cardiovascular status of the recipients during reperfusion, which could help to guide fluid- and drug-supportive therapy in this population of patients. This preliminary study needs to be applied on a larger scale.

  16. A sensitive flow-through microcalorimeter for measuring the heat production of cardiac trabeculae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taberner, A; Kirton, R; F Nielsen, P; Loiselle, D; Hunter, I

    2004-01-01

    Measurement of the energy consumption of isolated cardiac muscle requires a flow-through microcalorimeter with sensitivity in the microW range. In this paper we describe and characterize a sensitive flow-through microcalorimeter, designed and constructed for measuring the heat output of cardiac trabeculae. The device exploits a non-contact, temperature-sensing technique utilizing infra-red-sensitive, thin-film thermopile sensors. The microcalorimeter achieves a sensitivity of 1.8-1.9 V/W at a flow rate of 1 microl/s, with a time constant of approximately 3.5 s. The typical power signal-to-noise ratio is better than 200. Predictions of a finite element model of the calorimeter's characteristics compare favourably with measured data. PMID:17272117

  17. Automated Functional Morphology Measurement Using Cardiac SPECT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seok Yoon; Ko, Seong Jin; Kang, Se Sik; Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    For the examination of nuclear medicine, myocardial scan is a good method to evaluate a hemodynamic importance of coronary heart disease. but, the automatized qualitative measurement is additionally necessary to improve the decoding efficiency. we suggests the creation of cardiac three-dimensional model and model of three-dimensional cardiac thickness as a new measurement. For the experiment, cardiac reduced cross section was obtained from SPECT. Next, the pre-process was performed and image segmentation was fulfilled by level set. for the modeling of left cardiac thickness, it was realized by applying difference equation of two-dimensional laplace equation. As the result of experiment, it was successful to measure internal wall and external wall and three-dimensional modeling was realized by coordinate. and, with laplace formula, it was successful to develop the thickness of cardiac wall. through the three-dimensional model, defects were observed easily and position of lesion was grasped rapidly by the revolution of model. The model which was developed as the support index of decoding will provide decoding information to doctor additionally and reduce the rate of false diagnosis as well as play a great role for diagnosing IHD early.

  18. Output efficiency measurement in the diagnosis of kidney transplant obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A recent publication from our department showed that output efficiency measurement (OE) during Mercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG3) diuretic renography in twenty-two normal kidney transplants was greater than 77%. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate this cut-off value in the assessment of possible kidney transplant obstruction (KTO). Twenty-two patients with suspected obstruction on the basis of allograft dysfunction and associated hydronephrosis or perinephric collections had diuretic MAG3 scans after oral or IV fluid hydration and a variable dose of IV frusemide (depending on renal function) 10 minutes before scanning. Transplant tracer uptake and excretion were quantitatively and qualitatively assessed with calculation of parenchymal transit time (PTT) and OE. The presence of absence of KTO was determined on the basis of response to relief of obstruction by nephrostomy or stenting (n=8), drainage of obstructing collections (n=6) and follow up investigations including transplant biopsy in establishing alternative diagnoses (n=8). A total of forty-two studies were performed: thirteen had proven KTO and in these the mean ± 1 SD for OE was 64.5 ± 15%(range 18% to 80%) and for PTT was 7.4 ± 4.1 min (range 2.8 to 19.5 min). Two patients with mild obstruction had results above our OE cut-off level (OE; PTT of 78%; 6.1 min and 80%; 2.8 min respectively). In twenty-nine studies without KTO, mean ± 1SD for OE was 81 ± 5% (range 67% to 88%) and for PTT was 3.7 ± 1.5 min (range 1.4 to 7.3 min). OE has thus been shown to be useful in the diagnosis of KTO with only a small indeterminate range in partial transplant obstruction. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  19. G16R single nucleotide polymorphism but not haplotypes of the ß2-adrenergic receptor gene alters cardiac output in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokamp, Kim Z; Staalsø, Jonatan M; Gartmann, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    Variation in genes encoding the ß2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) may influence Q¿ (cardiac output). The 46G>A (G16R) SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) has been associated with ß2-mediated vasodilation, but the effect of ADRB2 haplotypes on Q¿ has not been ...

  20. Output trends, characteristics, and measurements of three megavoltage radiotherapy linear accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Murshed

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize and understand the long-term behavior of the output from megavoltage radiotherapy linear accelerators. Output trends of nine beams from three linear accelerators over a period of more than three years are reported and analyzed. Output, taken during daily warm-up, forms the basis of this study. The output is measured using devices having ion chambers. These are not calibrated by accredited dosimetry laboratory, but are baseline-compared against monthly output which is measured using calibrated ion chambers. We consider the output from the daily check devices as it is, and sometimes normalized it by the actual output measured during the monthly calibration of the linacs. The data show noisy quasi-periodic behavior. The output variation, if normalized by monthly measured "real' output, is bounded between ± 3%. Beams of different energies from the same linac are correlated with a correlation coefficient as high as 0.97, for one particular linac, and as low as 0.44 for another. These maximum and minimum correlations drop to 0.78 and 0.25 when daily output is normalized by the monthly measurements. These results suggest that the origin of these correlations is both the linacs and the daily output check devices. Beams from different linacs, independent of their energies, have lower correlation coefficient, with a maximum of about 0.50 and a minimum of almost zero. The maximum correlation drops to almost zero if the output is normalized by the monthly measured output. Some scatter plots of pairs of beam output from the same linac show band-like structures. These structures are blurred when the output is normalized by the monthly calibrated output. Fourier decomposition of the quasi-periodic output is consistent with a 1/f power law. The output variation appears to come from a distorted normal distribution with a mean of slightly greater than unity. The quasi-periodic behavior is manifested in the seasonally averaged output

  1. Bank output measurement in the euro area : A modified approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colangelo, A.; Inklaar, R.

    2012-01-01

    Banks do not charge explicit fees for many of the services they provide, bundling the service payment with the offered interest rates. This output therefore has to be imputed using estimates of the opportunity cost of funds. We argue that rather than using the single short-term, low-risk interest ra

  2. Measuring Equity: Creating a New Standard for Inputs and Outputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoeppel, Robert C.; Della Sala, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce a new statistic to capture the ratio of equitable student outcomes given equitable inputs. Given the fact that finance structures should be aligned to outcome standards according to judicial interpretation, a ratio of outputs to inputs, or "equity ratio," is introduced to discern if conclusions can be…

  3. Pulmonary tissue volume, cardiac output, and diffusing capacity in sustained microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbanck, S.; Larsson, H.; Linnarsson, D.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.; Paiva, M.

    1997-01-01

    In microgravity (microG) humans have marked changes in body fluids, with a combination of an overall fluid loss and a redistribution of fluids in the cranial direction. We investigated whether interstitial pulmonary edema develops as a result of a headward fluid shift or whether pulmonary tissue fluid volume is reduced as a result of the overall loss of body fluid. We measured pulmonary tissue volume (Vti), capillary blood flow, and diffusing capacity in four subjects before, during, and after 10 days of exposure to microG during spaceflight. Measurements were made by rebreathing a gas mixture containing small amounts of acetylene, carbon monoxide, and argon. Measurements made early in flight in two subjects showed no change in Vti despite large increases in stroke volume (40%) and diffusing capacity (13%) consistent with increased pulmonary capillary blood volume. Late in-flight measurements in four subjects showed a 25% reduction in Vti compared with preflight controls (P capacity remained elevated (11%; P pulmonary perfusion and pulmonary capillary blood volume, interstitial pulmonary edema does not result from exposure to microG.

  4. Pulmonary tissue volume, cardiac output, and diffusing capacity in sustained microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbanck, S.; Larsson, H.; Linnarsson, D.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.; Paiva, M.

    1997-01-01

    In microgravity (microG) humans have marked changes in body fluids, with a combination of an overall fluid loss and a redistribution of fluids in the cranial direction. We investigated whether interstitial pulmonary edema develops as a result of a headward fluid shift or whether pulmonary tissue fluid volume is reduced as a result of the overall loss of body fluid. We measured pulmonary tissue volume (Vti), capillary blood flow, and diffusing capacity in four subjects before, during, and after 10 days of exposure to microG during spaceflight. Measurements were made by rebreathing a gas mixture containing small amounts of acetylene, carbon monoxide, and argon. Measurements made early in flight in two subjects showed no change in Vti despite large increases in stroke volume (40%) and diffusing capacity (13%) consistent with increased pulmonary capillary blood volume. Late in-flight measurements in four subjects showed a 25% reduction in Vti compared with preflight controls (P volume, to the extent that it was no longer significantly different from preflight control. Diffusing capacity remained elevated (11%; P pulmonary perfusion and pulmonary capillary blood volume, interstitial pulmonary edema does not result from exposure to microG.

  5. Routine measurements of left and right ventricular output by gated blood pool emission tomography in comparison with thermodilution measurements: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariano-Goulart, D.; Boudousq, V.; Comte, F.; Eberle, M.C.; Zanca, M.; Kotzki, P.O.; Rossi, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Montpellier University Hospital (France); Piot, C.; Raczka, F.; Davy, J.M. [Dept. of Cardiology B, Montpellier University Hospital (France)

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate the accuracy of left and right ventricular output computed from a semi-automatic processing of tomographic radionuclide ventriculography data (TRVG) in comparison with the conventional thermodilution method. Twenty patients with various heart diseases were prospectively included in the study. Thermodilution and TRVG acquisitions were carried out on the same day for all patients. Analysis of gated blood pool slices was performed using a watershed-based segmentation algorithm. Right and left ventricular output measured by TRVG correlated well with the measurements obtained with thermodilution (r=0.94 and 0.91 with SEE=0.38 and 0.46 l/min, respectively, P<0.001). The limits of agreement for TRVG and thermodilution measurements were -0.78-1.20 l/min for the left ventricle and -0.34-1.16 l/min for the right ventricle. No significant difference was found between the results of TRVG and thermodilution with respect to left ventricular output (P=0.09). A small but significant difference was found between right ventricular output measured by TRVG and both left ventricular output measured by TRVG (mean difference=0.17 l/min, P=0.04) and thermodilution-derived cardiac output (mean difference=0.41 l/min, P=0.0001). It is concluded that the watershed-based semi-automatic segmentation of TRVG slices provides non-invasive measurements of right and left ventricular output and stroke volumes at equilibrium, in routine clinical settings. Further studies are necessary to check whether the accuracy of these measurements is good enough to permit correct assessment of intracardiac shunts. (orig.)

  6. Diesel Exhaust Inhalation Increases Cardiac Output, Bradyarrhythmias, and Parasympathetic Tone in Aged Heart Failure-Prone Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute air pollutant inhalation is linked to adverse cardiac events and death, and hospitalizations for heart failure. Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major air pollutant suspected to exacerbate preexisting cardiac conditions, in part, through autonomic and electrophysiologic disturbance...

  7. Technical Note: PRESAGE three-dimensional dosimetry accurately measures Gamma Knife output factors

    OpenAIRE

    Klawikowski, Slade J.; Yang, James N.; Adamovics, John; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Small-field output factor measurements are traditionally very difficult because of steep dose gradients, loss of lateral electronic equilibrium, and dose volume averaging in finitely sized detectors. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry is ideal for measuring small output factors and avoids many of these potential challenges of point and two-dimensional detectors. PRESAGE 3D polymer dosimeters were used to measure the output factors for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Perfexion Gamma...

  8. Accurate measurement of oxygen consumption in children undergoing cardiac catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen consumption (VO(2) ) is an important part of hemodynamics using the direct Fick principle in children undergoing cardiac catheterization. Accurate measurement of VO(2) is vital. Obviously, any error in the measurement of VO(2) will translate directly into an equivalent percentage under- or overestimation of blood flows and vascular resistances. It remains common practice to estimate VO(2) values from published predictive equations. Among these, the LaFarge equation is the most commonly used equation and gives the closest estimation with the least bias and limits of agreement. However, considerable errors are introduced by the LaFarge equation, particularly in children younger than 3 years of age. Respiratory mass spectrometry remains the "state-of-the-art" method, allowing highly sensitive, rapid and simultaneous measurement of multiple gas fractions. The AMIS 2000 quadrupole respiratory mass spectrometer system has been adapted to measure VO(2) in children under mechanical ventilation with pediatric ventilators during cardiac catheterization. The small sampling rate, fast response time and long tubes make the equipment a unique and powerful tool for bedside continuous measurement of VO(2) in cardiac catheterization for both clinical and research purposes. PMID:22488802

  9. Use of a capillary input function with cardiac output for the estimation of lesion pharmacokinetic parameters: preliminary results on a breast cancer patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, P.; Ahearn, T. S.; Semple, S. I.; Azlan, C. A.; Lloyd, W. K. C.; Gilbert, F. J.; Redpath, T. W.

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this work was to propose and demonstrate a novel technique for the assessment of tumour pharmacokinetic parameters together with a regionally estimated vascular input function. A breast cancer patient T2*-weighted dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) dataset acquired at high temporal resolution during the first-pass bolus perfusion was used for testing the technique. Extraction of the lesion volume transfer constant Ktrans together with the intravascular plasma volume fraction vp was achieved by optimizing a capillary input function with a measure of cardiac output using the principle of intravascular indicator dilution theory. For a region of interest drawn within the breast lesion a vp of 0.16 and a Ktrans of 0.70 min-1 were estimated. Despite the value of vp being higher than expected, estimated Ktrans was in accordance with the literature values. In conclusion, the technique proposed here, has the main advantage of allowing the estimation of breast tumour pharmacokinetic parameters from first-pass perfusion T2*-weighted DCE-MRI data without the need of measuring an arterial input function. The technique may also have applicability to T1-weighted DCE-MRI data.

  10. The effects of cardiac output and pulmonary arterial hypertension on volumetric capnography derived-variables during normoxia and hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosing, Martina; Kutter, Annette P N; Iff, Samuel; Raszplewicz, Joanna; Mauch, Jacqueline; Bohm, Stephan H; Tusman, Gerardo

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effect of cardiac output (CO) and pulmonary artery hypertension (PHT) on volumetric capnography (VCap) derived-variables. Nine pigs were mechanically ventilated using fixed ventilatory settings. Two steps of PHT were induced by IV infusion of a thromboxane analogue: PHT25 [mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) of 25 mmHg] and PHT40 (MPAP of 40 mmHg). CO was increased by 50% from baseline (COup) with an infusion of dobutamine≥5 μg kg(-1) min(-1) and decreased by 40% from baseline (COdown) infusing sodium nitroglycerine≥30 μg kg(-1) min(-1) plus esmolol 500 μg kg(-1) min(-1). Another state of PHT and COdown was induced by severe hypoxemia (FiO2 0.07). Invasive hemodynamic data and VCap were recorded and compared before and after each step using a mixed random effects model. Compared to baseline, the normalized slope of phase III (SnIII) increased by 32% in PHT25 and by 22% in PHT40. SnIII decreased non-significantly by 4% with COdown. A combination of PHT and COdown associated with severe hypoxemia increased SnIII by 28% compared to baseline. The elimination of CO2 per breath decreased by 7% in PHT40 and by 12% in COdown but increased only slightly with COup. Dead space variables did not change significantly along the protocol. At constant ventilation and body metabolism, pulmonary artery hypertension and decreases in CO had the biggest effects on the SnIII of the volumetric capnogram and on the elimination of CO2. PMID:24908108

  11. The 24 h pattern of arterial pressure in mice is determined mainly by heart rate‐driven variation in cardiac output

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtz, Theodore W.; Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have systematically investigated whether daily patterns of arterial blood pressure over 24 h are mediated by changes in cardiac output, peripheral resistance, or both. Understanding the hemodynamic mechanisms that determine the 24 h patterns of blood pressure may lead to a better understanding of how such patterns become disturbed in hypertension and influence risk for cardiovascular events. In conscious, unrestrained C57BL/6J mice, we investigated whether the 24 h patter...

  12. A Note on Equivalences in Measuring Returns to Scale in Multi-output-multi-input Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Valentin Zelenyuk

    2011-01-01

    In this article we show equivalence between the input oriented and output oriented scale elasticity measures for multi-output, multi-input technologies. We show the necessary and sufficient condition for this equivalence. We also provide a Lagrange multiplier (or shadow price) interpretation of the scale elasticity measure.

  13. Analysis of thermal output of high temperature strain gauge by different measurement methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Thermal output of high temperature strain gauges can be measured by different methods. Purpose: This paper is to discover measurement methods' effects on thermal output of high temperature strain gauge and to suggest a method of clamping instead of welding for fixture of high temperature strain gauge for thermal output measurement. Methods: By analysis of impacting factors of thermal output, thermal outputs were explored for mismatching thermal expansion coefficients between material of components to be tested and that of strain gauge base. Thermal outputs of all kinds by different fixture methods were obtained and compared for hanging, clamping and spot welding, respectively. Results: Thermal output obtained by way of hanging strain gauge can be used in case of installation on material of the same thermal expansion coefficient as the strain gauge base. And this hanging measurement method provides access to thermal output that strain gauge undergoes different temperature changing ratio from that one of provision offered by strain gauge fabrication factory. Thermal output obtained by way of clamping measurement method can substitute for the one obtained by spot welding. This clamping measurement method can not only realize the effect of spot welding, reducing calibration cost due to spot welding of strain gauges, but also realize the aim of calibration of strain gauges one by one with the strain gauges be intact after calibration. Differences between thermal outputs by two measurement ways of both hanging and clamping explain that large divergence can be made when thermal expansion coefficients between the material of strain gauge base and the one of the component to be installed on. Conclusions: Thermal output can be measured among all methods by fixture of clamping instead of welding, with an advantage of realizing strain gauge calibration one by one and also with a high precision. (authors)

  14. MEASUREMENT AND DECOMPOSITION OF FLEXIBILITY OF MULTI-OUTPUT FIRMS

    OpenAIRE

    Renner, Swetlana; Glauben, Thomas; Hockmann, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Flexibility can be considered as a crucial factor of competitive advantage, especially under conditions of dynamically changing environments. Based on the classical microeconomic definition of flexibility, as introduced by Stigler, and some recent concepts developed in the production economics, this article proposes a primal flexibility measure for multi-product firms. When decomposed, this measure offers useful insights into possible sources of flexibility, especially by investigating the ro...

  15. Z factor: a new index for measuring academic research output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Min

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With rapid progress in scientific research activities and growing competition for funding resources, it becomes critical to effectively evaluate an individual researcher's annual academic performance, or their cumulative performance within the last 3–5 years. It is particularly important for young independent investigators, and is also useful for funding agencies when determining the productivity and quality of grant awardees. As the funding becomes increasingly limited, having an unbiased method of measuring recent performance of an individual scientist is clearly needed. Here I propose the Z factor, a new and useful way to measure recent academic performance.

  16. In vivo measurement of muscle output in intact Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Christopher J H; Sparrow, John C

    2012-01-01

    We describe our methods for analysing muscle function in a whole intact small insect, taking advantage of a simple flexible optical beam to produce an inexpensive transducer with wide application. We review our previous data measuring the response to a single action potential driven muscle twitch to explore jumping behaviour in Drosophila melanogaster. In the fruitfly, where the sophisticated and powerful genetic toolbox is being widely employed to investigate neuromuscular function, we further demonstrate the use of the apparatus to analyse in detail, within whole flies, neuronal and muscle mutations affecting activation of muscle contraction in the jump muscle. We have now extended the use of the apparatus to record the muscle forces during larval and other aspects of adult locomotion. The robustness, simplicity and versatility of the apparatus are key to these measurements. PMID:22037247

  17. Measuring technical efficiency of output quality in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junoy, J P

    1997-01-01

    Presents some examples of the implications derived from imposing the objective of maximizing social welfare, subject to limited resources, on ethical care patients management in respect of quality performance of health services. Conventional knowledge of health economics points out that critically ill patients are responsible for increased use of technological resources and that they receive a high proportion of health care resources. Attempts to answer, from the point of view of microeconomics, the question: how do we measure comparative efficiency in the management of intensive care units? Analyses this question through data from an international empirical study using micro-economic measures of productive efficiency in public services (data envelopment analysis). Results show a 28.8 per cent level of technical inefficiency processing data from 25 intensive care units in the USA. PMID:10169231

  18. Measuring Scale Efficiency from the Translog Multi-Input, Multi-Output Distance Function

    OpenAIRE

    Subhash Ray

    2003-01-01

    Ray (1998) developed measures of input- and output-oriented scale efficiency that can be directly computed from an estimated Translog frontier production function. This note extends the earlier results from Ray (1998) to the multiple-output multiple input case.

  19. NONINVASIVE CARDIAC OUTPUT MONITORING DURING EXERCISE TESTING: NEXFIN PULSE CONTOUR ANALYSIS COMPARED TO AN INERT GAS REBREATHING METHOD AND RESPIRED GAS ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Bartels; W.J. Stok; R. Bezemer; R.J. Boksem; J Goudoever; T.G.V. Cherpanath; J.J. van Lieshout; B.E. Westerhof; J.M. Karemaker; C. Ince

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Exercise testing is often used to assess cardiac function during physical exertion to obtain diagnostic information. However, this procedure is limited to measuring the electrical activity of the heart using electrocardiography and intermittent blood pressure (BP) measurements and does not

  20. Comparing the accuracy of ES-BC, EIS-GS, and ES Oxi on body composition, autonomic nervous system activity, and cardiac output to standardized assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis JE

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available John E Lewis1, Stacey L Tannenbaum1, Jinrun Gao3, Angelica B Melillo1, Evan G Long1, Yaima Alonso2, Janet Konefal1, Judi M Woolger2, Susanna Leonard1, Prabjot K Singh1, Lawrence Chen1, Eduard Tiozzo1 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 2Department of Medicine, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, 3State Farm Insurance, Bloomington, IL, USA Background and purpose: The Electro Sensor Complex (ESC is software that combines three devices using bioelectrical impedance, galvanic skin response, and spectrophotometry: (1 ES-BC (Electro Sensor-Body Composition; LD Technology, Miami, FL to assess body composition, (2 EIS-GS (Electro Interstitial Scan-Galvanic Skin; LD Technology to predict autonomic nervous system activity, and (3 ES Oxi (Electro Sensor Oxi; LD Technology to assess cardiac output. The objective of this study was to compare each to a standardized assessment: ES-BC to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, EIS-GS to heart rate variability, and ES Oxi to BioZ Dx Diagnostic System (BioZ Dx; SonoSite Inc, Bothell, WA. Patients and methods: The study was conducted in two waves. Fifty subjects were assessed for body composition and autonomic nervous system activity. Fifty-one subjects were assessed for cardiac output. Results: We found adequate relative and absolute agreement between ES-BC and DXA for fat mass (r = 0.97, P < 0.001 with ES-BC overestimating fat mass by 0.1 kg and for body fat percentage (r = 0.92, P < 0.001 with overestimation of fat percentage by 0.4%. For autonomic nervous system activity, we found marginal relative agreement between EIS-GS and heart rate variability by using EIS-GS as the predictor in a linear regression equation (adjusted R2 = 0.56, P = 0.03. For cardiac output, adequate relative and absolute agreement was found between ES Oxi and BioZ Dx at baseline (r = 0.60, P < 0.001, after the first exercise stage (r = 0.79, P < 0.001, and after the second exercise stage (r = 0.86, P

  1. MEASURING THE IMPACT OF FOOD SAFETY REGULATION-AN OUTPUT DIRECTIONAL DISTANCE FUNCTION APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Bo-Hyun; Hooker, Neal H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a novel methodology to measure the impact of food safety regulation. An output directional distance function approach is applied to estimate the opportunity cost of food safety regulation. Such a measure should be included as part of the overall cost for a more precise benefit-cost analysis of food safety regulation. Using US Census and food safety recall data, the value of potential output loss due to food safety regulation is suggested $2.5 billion.

  2. In Vivo Measurement of Levofloxacin Penetration into Lung Tissue after Cardiac Surgery†

    OpenAIRE

    Hutschala, Doris; Skhirtladze, Keso; Zuckermann, Andreas; Wisser, Wilfried; Jaksch, Peter; Mayer-Helm, Bernhard Xaver; Burgmann, Heinz; Wolner, Ernst; Müller, Markus; Tschernko, Edda M.

    2005-01-01

    Nosocomial pneumonia is a severe complication after cardiac surgery (CS). Levofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, qualifies for the therapy of postoperative pneumonia. However, penetration properties of levofloxacin into the lung tissue could be substantially affected by CS: atelectasis, low cardiac output after CS, high volume loads, and inflammatory capillary leak potentially influence drug distribution. The aim of our study was to gain information on interstitial antibiotic concentrations in lung...

  3. Output Feedback Control of Jet Engine Stall and Surge Using Pressure Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Maggiore, Manfredi; Passino, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    The problem of controlling surge and stall in jet engine compressors is of fundamental importance in preventing damage and lengthening the life of these components. In this paper, we use the Moore-Greitzer mathematical model to develop an output feedback controller for these two instabilities (only one of the three states is measurable). This problem is particularly challenging since the system is not completely observable and, hence, none of the output feedback control techniques found in th...

  4. Measuring power output intermittency and unsteady loading in a micro wind farm model

    OpenAIRE

    Bossuyt, Juliaan; Howland, Michael; Meneveau, Charles; Meyers, Johan

    2016-01-01

    In this study porous disc models are used as a turbine model for a wind-tunnel wind farm experiment, allowing the measurement of the power output, thrust force and spatially averaged incoming velocity for every turbine. The model's capabilities for studying the unsteady turbine loading, wind farm power output intermittency and spatio temporal correlations between wind turbines are demonstrated on an aligned wind farm, consisting of 100 wind turbine models.

  5. Gain and maximum output of two electromagnetic middle ear implants: are real ear measurements helpful?

    OpenAIRE

    Snik, A.F.M.; Noten, J.F.P.; Cremers, C. W. R. J.

    2004-01-01

    We compared the output of two electronic middle ear implants: the Otologics MET device and the Vibrant Soundbridge device. Both devices were programmed in the linear amplification mode. Aided minus unaided sound pressure levels recorded in the ear canal (objective gain) were compared to unaided minus aided soundfield thresholds (functional gain) in 13 patients with severe sensorineural hearing loss. In addition, input/output characteristics were studied with the help of ear canal measurements...

  6. An economic approach to the measurement of growth in the output of public services

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Chandler

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the application of economic theory to the measurement of growth in public service output. This approach is designed to take account of changes in the quality of the output. The article discusses two alternative economic approaches; the basic expenditure determinants approach and the use of outcome production functions. The article demonstrates how the approaches could work in practice with ahypothetical example of expenditure and outcome production functions for police s...

  7. A Case of Femoral Arteriovenous Fistula Causing High-Output Cardiac Failure, Originally Misdiagnosed as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, J; Al-Jarrah, Q.; Richardson, S

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous arterial catheterisation is commonly undertaken for a range of diagnostic and interventional procedures. Iatrogenic femoral arteriovenous fistulas are an uncommon complication of these procedures. Most are asymptomatic and close spontaneously, but can rarely increase in size leading to the development of symptoms. We report a case of an iatrogenic femoral arteriovenous fistula, causing worsening congestive cardiac failure, in a 34-year-old marathon runner. This was originally dia...

  8. Measurements of pericardial adipose tissue using contrast enhanced cardiac multidetector computed tomography—comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elming, Marie Bayer; Lønborg, Jacob; Rasmussen, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that pericardial adipose tissue (PAT) located in close vicinity to the epicardial coronary arteries may play a role in the development of coronary artery disease. PAT has primarily been measured with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) or with non......-contrast cardiac multidetector computered tomography (MDCT) images. The aim of this study was to validate contrast MDCT derived measures of total PAT volume by a comparison to CMRI. In 52 patients, aged 60 years (34-81 years), Body Mass Index 28 kg/m(2) (18-39), and with stable ischemic heart disease, paired MDCT...

  9. PRESAGE 3D dosimetry accurately measures Gamma Knife output factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small-field output factor measurements are traditionally very difficult because of steep dose gradients, loss of lateral electronic equilibrium, and dose volume averaging in finitely sized detectors. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry is ideal for measuring small output factors and avoids many of these potential challenges of point and 2D detectors. PRESAGE 3D polymer dosimeters were used to measure the output factors for the 4 mm and 8 mm collimators of the Leksell Perfexion Gamma Knife radiosurgery treatment system. Discrepancies between the planned and measured distance between shot centers were also investigated. A Gamma Knife head frame was mounted onto an anthropomorphic head phantom. Special inserts were machined to hold 60 mm diameter, 70 mm tall cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters. The phantom was irradiated with one 16 mm shot and either one 4 mm or one 8 mm shot, to a prescribed dose of either 3 Gy or 4 Gy to the 50% isodose line. The two shots were spaced between 30 mm and 60 mm apart and aligned along the central axis of the cylinder. The Presage dosimeters were measured using the DMOS-RPC optical CT scanning system. Five independent 4 mm output factor measurements fell within 2% of the manufacturer’s Monte Carlo simulation-derived nominal value, as did two independent 8 mm output factor measurements. The measured distances between shot centers varied by ±0.8 mm with respect to the planned shot displacements. On the basis of these results, we conclude that PRESAGE dosimetry is excellently suited to quantify the difficult-to-measure Gamma Knife output factors. (note)

  10. Low cardiac output as physiological phenomenon in hibernating, free-ranging Scandinavian brown bears (Ursus arctos) - an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Godsk; Arnemo, Jon; Swenson, Jon E;

    2014-01-01

    cardiac function associated with metabolic depression in the hibernating vs. active states in free-ranging Scandinavian brown bears. METHODS: We performed echocardiography on seven free-ranging brown bears in Dalarna, Sweden, anesthetized with medetomidine-zolazepam-tiletamine-ketamine during winter....... CONCLUSION: Free-ranging brown bears demonstrate hemodynamics comparable to humans during active state, whereas during hibernation, we documented extremely low-flow hemodynamics. Understanding these physiological changes in bears may help to gain insight into the mechanisms of cardiogenic shock and heart...

  11. Radiation dose measurement for patients and staff during cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the patient and staff dose during cardiac catheterization procedures in Ahmed Gasim Hospital, Khartoum Bahry. A survey of patient and staff exposure was performed covered 2 Cath Lab units from 2 manufacturers. The measurements involved 50 operations. The medical staff was monitored using TLD chips (LiF: Mg, Cu, P). The main operator who was closer to the patient and the x-ray tube, was monitored at six positions (forehead, neck chest - over the lead apron, waist - under the lead apron, leg, and hand), while the exposure to the assistant was measured at two positions (chest - over the lead apron, and hand), where the technologist and the circulator were monitored at one position (chest - over the lead apron). patient exposure was measured using the DAP meter. The main operator and the rest of the staff received 0.14, 0.01 mSv/y respectively. The estimated patient dose rate was found to be 125 mGy/min which considered higher than the recommended DRL for the continuous high mode fluoroscopy used in interventional radiology (100 mGy/min). The study concluded to the fact that the main operator received relatively high dose which is a direct result to the poor radiation protection in the department. (Author)

  12. Optimal Tracking Control of Unknown Discrete-Time Linear Systems Using Input-Output Measured Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiumarsi, Bahare; Lewis, Frank L; Naghibi-Sistani, Mohammad-Bagher; Karimpour, Ali

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an output-feedback solution to the infinite-horizon linear quadratic tracking (LQT) problem for unknown discrete-time systems is proposed. An augmented system composed of the system dynamics and the reference trajectory dynamics is constructed. The state of the augmented system is constructed from a limited number of measurements of the past input, output, and reference trajectory in the history of the augmented system. A novel Bellman equation is developed that evaluates the value function related to a fixed policy by using only the input, output, and reference trajectory data from the augmented system. By using approximate dynamic programming, a class of reinforcement learning methods, the LQT problem is solved online without requiring knowledge of the augmented system dynamics only by measuring the input, output, and reference trajectory from the augmented system. We develop both policy iteration (PI) and value iteration (VI) algorithms that converge to an optimal controller that require only measuring the input, output, and reference trajectory data. The convergence of the proposed PI and VI algorithms is shown. A simulation example is used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. PMID:25576591

  13. Comparison and reproducibility of transthoracic bioimpedance and dual beam Doppler ultrasound measurement of cardiac function in healthy volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, H W; Walley, T.; Tsao, Y; Breckenridge, A M

    1991-01-01

    1. We compared the ease of use and reproducibility of two noninvasive methods, transthoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB) (BoMed NCCOM3-R7) and non-imaging dual beam Doppler ultrasound (Quantascope--Vital Science), in cardiac output (CO) and stroke volume (SV) measurement in healthy volunteers at rest and during physiological stress, both short term and from day to day. 2. The TEB method was easier to use and not dependent on the operator. The TEB method was more reproducible both in the sho...

  14. Measures of endothelial dysfunction predict response to cardiac resynchronisation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warriner, David R; Lawford, Patricia; Sheridan, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) improves morbidity and mortality in heart failure (HF). Impaired endothelial function, as measured by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in HF and may help to differentiate responders from non-responders. Methods 19 patients were recruited, comprising 94% men, mean age 69±8 years, New York Heart Association functional classes II–IV, QRSd 161±21 ms and mean left ventricular ejection fraction 26±8%. Markers of response and FMD were measured at baseline, 6 and 12 months following CRT. Results 14 patients were responders to CRT. Responders had significant improvements in VO2 (12.6±1.7 to 14.7±1.5 mL/kg/min, pFMD in responders was 2.9±1.9% and 7.4±3.73% in non-responders (pFMD. This study confirms that FMD identifies responders to CRT, due to endothelium-dependent mechanisms alone. PMID:27335654

  15. Assessing Depression in Cardiac Patients: What Measures Should Be Considered?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ceccarini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is highly recommended to promptly assess depression in heart disease patients as it represents a crucial risk factor which may result in premature deaths following acute cardiac events and a more severe psychopathology, even in cases of subsequent nonfatal cardiac events. Patients and professionals often underestimate or misjudge depressive symptomatology as cardiac symptoms; hence, quick, reliable, and early mood changes assessments are warranted. Failing to detect depressive signals may have detrimental effects on these patients’ wellbeing and full recovery. Choosing gold-standard depression investigations in cardiac patients that fit a hospitalised cardiac setting well is fundamental. This paper will examine eight well established tools following Italian and international guidelines on mood disorders diagnosis in cardiac patients: the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, the Cognitive Behavioural Assessment Hospital Form (CBA-H, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, the two and nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2, PHQ-9, the Depression Interview and Structured Hamilton (DISH, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D/HRSD, and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI. Though their strengths and weaknesses may appear to be homogeneous, the BDI-II and the PHQ are more efficient towards an early depression assessment within cardiac hospitalised patients.

  16. A Case of Femoral Arteriovenous Fistula Causing High-Output Cardiac Failure, Originally Misdiagnosed as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Porter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous arterial catheterisation is commonly undertaken for a range of diagnostic and interventional procedures. Iatrogenic femoral arteriovenous fistulas are an uncommon complication of these procedures. Most are asymptomatic and close spontaneously, but can rarely increase in size leading to the development of symptoms. We report a case of an iatrogenic femoral arteriovenous fistula, causing worsening congestive cardiac failure, in a 34-year-old marathon runner. This was originally diagnosed as chronic fatigue syndrome. Following clinical examination, duplex ultrasound, and CT angiography a significant arteriovenous fistula was confirmed. Elective open surgery was performed, leading to a dramatic and rapid improvement in symptoms. Femoral arteriovenous fistulas have the potential to cause significant haemodynamic effects and can present many years after the initial procedure. Conservative, endovascular, and open surgical management strategies are available.

  17. Comparing Input- and Output-Oriented Measures of Technical Efficiency to Determine Local Returns to Scale in DEA Models

    OpenAIRE

    Subhash C. Ray

    2008-01-01

    This paper shows how one can infer the nature of local returns to scale at the input- or output-oriented efficient projection of a technically inefficient input-output bundle, when the input- and output-oriented measures of efficiency differ.

  18. Measurements of output intensities at cone tip using six dental x-ray generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Output intensities (air-absorbed doses in air: Gy) were measured at the cone tip using six dental x-ray generators. The type 660 ionizing dosimeter (Victoreen, Inc.) was used. The flat probe, type 660-3, was set at the cone tip of each dental x-ray generator. Measurements at three exposure times, of approx. 0.3, 0.6 and 1.0 s were repeated five times. The exposure time versus air-absorbed dose relationship and the air-absorbed dose rate, were obtained for each generator. The number of exposure time settings required to give an air-absorbed dose of less than 2.00 mGy at the cone tip was evaluated for each generator. Outputs of two generators which were furnished with a short cone (20 cm focal spot to cone tip distance) were 3.38 and 6.95 mGy/sec at 60 kV, and 4.67 and 9.82 mGy/sec at 70 kV. Outputs of four generators with a long cone (30-35 cm) were distributed in the range of either 1.50-1.68 mGy/sec or 3.06-3.57 mGy/sec at 60 kV, and either 1.95-2.29 or 4.06-4.73 mGy/sec at 70 kV, respectively. The calculated outputs at 10 cm beyond the cone tip with two generators with a short cone were included in this range. The number of exposure time settings to give absorbed doses of less than 2.00 mGy was in the range of 43 to 70% for five generators. One of the six generators had the low output rate. This experiment using six dental generators clarified that there were two kinds of generators which were distinguished by the x-ray output intensity. Some dental x-ray generators had outputs in the range of approximately 1.5-1.7 mGy/sec at 60 kV, and approx. 2.0-2.3 mGy/sec at 70 kV at the tip of the long cone. Outputs with other generators were approximately twice of these values. These findings are useful to evaluate the doses absorbed by the patient's skin surface, which is the maximum for the patient at the intraoral radiographic examination. (author)

  19. Cyberknife Relative Output Factor measurements using fiber-coupled luminescence, MOSFETS and RADPOS dosimetry system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploquin, N.; Kertzscher Schwencke, Gustavo Adolfo Vladimir; Vandervoort, E.;

    2012-01-01

    from 5 to 60 mm. ROFs were also measured using a mobileMOSFET system (Best Medical Canada) and EBT1 and EBT2 GAFCHROMIC® (ISP, Ashland) radiochromic films. For cone sizes 12.5–60 mm all detector results were in agreement within the measurement uncertainty. The microMOSFET/RADPOS measurements (published...... 0.865 ± 0.3% for 5, 7.5 and 10 mm cones. Our study shows that the microMOSFET/RADPOS and optical fiber‐coupled RL dosimetry system are well suited for Cyberknife cone output factors measurements over the entire range of field sizes, provided that appropriate correction factors are applied for the...

  20. Acupuncture Effects on Cardiac Functions Measured by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a Feline Model

    OpenAIRE

    Tzu-chi Lee; Jen-Hwey Chiu; Weng-Yih Tseng; Leang-Shin Wu; Krishna Kaphle; Jen-Hsou Lin; Chen-Haw Shih; Ying-Ling Wu

    2010-01-01

    The usefulness of acupuncture (AP) as a complementary and/or alternative therapy in animals is well established but more research is needed on its clinical efficacy relative to conventional therapy, and on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of AP. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI), an important tool in monitoring cardiovascular diseases, provides a reliable method to monitor the effects of AP on the cardiovascular system. This controlled experiment monitored the effect electro-a...

  1. Characterization of cardiac quiescence from retrospective cardiac computed tomography using a correlation-based phase-to-phase deviation measure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wick, Carson A.; McClellan, James H. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Drive Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Arepalli, Chesnal D. [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, 3350-950 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E3 (Canada); Auffermann, William F.; Henry, Travis S. [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Division of Cardiothoracic Imaging, 1364 Clifton Road Northeast, Suite 309, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Khosa, Faisal [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Division of Emergency Radiology, 550 Peachtree Street Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia 30308 (United States); Coy, Adam M. [School of Medicine, Emory University, 100 Woodruff Circle, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Tridandapani, Srini, E-mail: stridan@emory.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University, Winship Cancer Institute, 1701 Uppergate Drive Northeast, Suite 5018, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Drive Northwest, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Accurate knowledge of cardiac quiescence is crucial to the performance of many cardiac imaging modalities, including computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). To accurately quantify quiescence, a method for detecting the quiescent periods of the heart from retrospective cardiac computed tomography (CT) using a correlation-based, phase-to-phase deviation measure was developed. Methods: Retrospective cardiac CT data were obtained from 20 patients (11 male, 9 female, 33–74 yr) and the left main, left anterior descending, left circumflex, right coronary artery (RCA), and interventricular septum (IVS) were segmented for each phase using a semiautomated technique. Cardiac motion of individual coronary vessels as well as the IVS was calculated using phase-to-phase deviation. As an easily identifiable feature, the IVS was analyzed to assess how well it predicts vessel quiescence. Finally, the diagnostic quality of the reconstructed volumes from the quiescent phases determined using the deviation measure from the vessels in aggregate and the IVS was compared to that from quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner. Three board-certified radiologists, fellowship-trained in cardiothoracic imaging, graded the diagnostic quality of the reconstructions using a Likert response format: 1 = excellent, 2 = good, 3 = adequate, 4 = nondiagnostic. Results: Systolic and diastolic quiescent periods were identified for each subject from the vessel motion calculated using the phase-to-phase deviation measure. The motion of the IVS was found to be similar to the aggregate vessel (AGG) motion. The diagnostic quality of the coronary vessels for the quiescent phases calculated from the aggregate vessel (P{sub AGG}) and IVS (P{sub IV} {sub S}) deviation signal using the proposed methods was comparable to the quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner (P{sub CT}). The one exception was the RCA, which improved for P{sub AGG} for 18 of the 20 subjects when compared to P

  2. Characterization of cardiac quiescence from retrospective cardiac computed tomography using a correlation-based phase-to-phase deviation measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Accurate knowledge of cardiac quiescence is crucial to the performance of many cardiac imaging modalities, including computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). To accurately quantify quiescence, a method for detecting the quiescent periods of the heart from retrospective cardiac computed tomography (CT) using a correlation-based, phase-to-phase deviation measure was developed. Methods: Retrospective cardiac CT data were obtained from 20 patients (11 male, 9 female, 33–74 yr) and the left main, left anterior descending, left circumflex, right coronary artery (RCA), and interventricular septum (IVS) were segmented for each phase using a semiautomated technique. Cardiac motion of individual coronary vessels as well as the IVS was calculated using phase-to-phase deviation. As an easily identifiable feature, the IVS was analyzed to assess how well it predicts vessel quiescence. Finally, the diagnostic quality of the reconstructed volumes from the quiescent phases determined using the deviation measure from the vessels in aggregate and the IVS was compared to that from quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner. Three board-certified radiologists, fellowship-trained in cardiothoracic imaging, graded the diagnostic quality of the reconstructions using a Likert response format: 1 = excellent, 2 = good, 3 = adequate, 4 = nondiagnostic. Results: Systolic and diastolic quiescent periods were identified for each subject from the vessel motion calculated using the phase-to-phase deviation measure. The motion of the IVS was found to be similar to the aggregate vessel (AGG) motion. The diagnostic quality of the coronary vessels for the quiescent phases calculated from the aggregate vessel (PAGG) and IVS (PIV S) deviation signal using the proposed methods was comparable to the quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner (PCT). The one exception was the RCA, which improved for PAGG for 18 of the 20 subjects when compared to PCT (PCT = 2.48; PAGG = 2.07, p = 0

  3. Measure of synchrony in the activity of intrinsic cardiac neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent multielectrode array recordings in ganglionated plexi of canine atria have opened the way to the study of population dynamics of intrinsic cardiac neurons. These data provide critical insights into the role of local processing that these ganglia play in the regulation of cardiac function. Low firing rates, marked non-stationarity, interplay with the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems and artifacts generated by myocardial activity create new constraints not present in brain recordings for which almost all neuronal analysis techniques have been developed. We adapted and extended the jitter-based synchrony index (SI) to (1) provide a robust and computationally efficient tool for assessing the level and statistical significance of SI between cardiac neurons, (2) estimate the bias on SI resulting from neuronal activity possibly hidden in myocardial artifacts, (3) quantify the synchrony or anti-synchrony between neuronal activity and the phase in the cardiac and respiratory cycles. The method was validated on firing time series from a total of 98 individual neurons identified in 8 dog experiments. SI ranged from −0.14 to 0.66, with 23 pairs of neurons with SI > 0.1. The estimated bias due to artifacts was typically <1%. Strongly cardiovascular- and pulmonary-related neurons (SI > 0.5) were found. Results support the use of jitter-based SI in the context of intrinsic cardiac neurons. (paper)

  4. Infrared Measurements of the RF Output of 170-GHz/2-MW Coaxial Cavity Gyrotron and Its Phase Retrieval Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jawla, S.; Hogge, J.-P.; Alberti, S.; Goodman, T.; Piosczyk, B.; Rzesnicki, T.

    2009-01-01

    We report the experimental results of the infrared measurements of output RF beam of the European 2-MW 170-GHz coaxial cavity gyrotron for ITER. The output beam profile is measured by the infrared thermographic technique using an infrared camera and a target material which is being irradiated by the RF output. The beam intensity was measured at several locations along the propagation direction. The data were processed for noise reduction and perspective correction and then used with the phase...

  5. Cardiac and Liver T2* Measurement in 2000 Thalassemia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Akhlaghpoor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nIntroduction: Although several studies have been published for the evaluation of  myocardial and hepatic iron loads and serum ferritin levels in beta - thalassemia major patients, most of them are reported in small series. The purpose of this study is to evaluate these parameters in a larger group of patients. "nMaterial and Methods: One thousand and five hundred and eighty eight beta thalassemia major patients with the mean age of 23.5 (SD=9.4 years were enrolled in this study and T2* images were obtained from their heart and liver by 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner using respiratory and cardiac gating. Quantitative T2* were calculated for myocardium and liver parenchyma by a dedicated well known software. Serum ferritin concentration was also recorded for all patients and correlations were calculated. "nResults: There was no correlation found between myocardial and serum ferritin and hepatic iron loads and serum ferritin. There was no correlation between organs’ iron load and the patients’ age. Mild correlation was observed between hepatic iron loads and serum ferritin (r=-0.37 which was slightly improved using non-linear correlation (r=- 0.49. "nConclusion: Iron accumulation in different organs is independent and direct iron load measurement is the best way for organ iron deposition risk evaluation especially in the heart and liver. Serum ferritin is not a good indicator of organ iron load and clinical decision could not be made on this parameter alone.  

  6. Application and Nursing of Pulse Index Continuous Cardiac Output Monitoring in Patients with Post-cardiac Arrest Syndrome%脉波指示剂连续心排血量监测在心搏骤停后综合征患者中的应用与护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈淑兰; 刘刚; 张秋真; 陈秋恋

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the application effect and nursing of the pulse index continuous cardiac output (PICCO) monitoring technique in patients with post-cardiac arrest syndrome (PCAS). Methods The precautions and nursing points were developed for the flowsheet of operation, cooperation for the vein catheterization and measurements. Results Of the 15 patients using the PICCO monitoring technique in early stage,no complication occurred ,except one patient died of multiple organ failure and 3 abandoned the treatment,and the rest 11 patients survived. Conclusion PCAS patients undergoing PICCO monitoring device in the early stage can efficiently assist the fluid management,maintain the vital signs of the patients,and save their lives.%目的 探讨脉波指示剂连续心排血量监测( pulse index continuous cardiac output,PICCO)在心搏骤停后综合征(postcardiac arrest syndrome,PCAS)患者中的应用效果及护理.方法 制定操作流程、置管配合、测量的注意事项和护理要点.结果 15例患者通过早期采用了PICCO监测,并采取了相应的护理措施,均未出现并发症,除了1例患者因多器官功能衰竭死亡外,3例患者放弃治疗,其余11例患者均存活.结论 对PCAS患者早期进行PICCO监测,能对患者进行更准确的血流动力学监测,可以有效协助液体管理,维持患者生命体征的稳定,挽救患者生命.

  7. Measurement of the output of ISO recommended beta sources with an extrapolation chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Output measurements in terms of absorbed dose rate to tissue were carried out for the ISO (International Organization for Standardization) recommended beta sources 90Sr/90Y, 85Kr and 147Pm using an extrapolation chamber. A holder made of anodized aluminium for the extrapolation chamber for the output measurements was designed indigenously. The measured dose rates for three beta sources were compared with the corresponding values provided in the certificate by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the National Standard Laboratory of Germany. Depending upon the source and source-to-chamber distance, the PTB certificate values have uncertainties in the range ±1.2–±1.5%. The measured dose rates have uncertainties of about ±0.3%. The deviations between the measured dose rates and the PTB certificate values compare well (maximum deviation is about 2%) considering the combined uncertainties associated with the measurements and the certificate values. The study suggests that the beta irradiation system comprising the above beta sources can be utilized for quality assurance programme related to personnel monitoring services in India. - Highlights: • Absorbed dose rates to tissue were measured for 90Sr/90Y, 85Kr and 147Pm ISO recommended beta sources with extrapolation chamber. • A holder made of aluminium was designed indigenously for the extrapolation chamber. • The measured dose rates agree well with the values provided in the PTB certificate. • The study suggests beta sources can be utilized for QA programme in personnel monitoring services

  8. A Device for Automatically Measuring and Supervising the Critical Care Patient’S Urine Output

    OpenAIRE

    Roemi Fernández; Francisco Palacios; Teodor Akinfiev; Abraham Otero

    2010-01-01

    Critical care units are equipped with commercial monitoring devices capable of sensing patients’ physiological parameters and supervising the achievement of the established therapeutic goals. This avoids human errors in this task and considerably decreases the workload of the healthcare staff. However, at present there still is a very relevant physiological parameter that is measured and supervised manually by the critical care units’ healthcare staff: urine output. This paper presents a pate...

  9. Cardiac metabolism measured noninvasively by hyperpolarized 13C MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golman, K.; Petersson, J.S.; Magnusson, P.;

    2008-01-01

    was almost absent (0.2-11%) and the alanine signal was reduced (27-51%). Due to image-folding artifacts the data obtained for lactate were inconclusive. These studies demonstrate that cardiac metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized 1-(13)C-pyruvate is feasible. The changes in concentrations of the...

  10. Measurement of the output dose of diagnostic X-ray facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A regular measurement of the output dose of diagnostic X-ray facilities is a reliable test for quality assurance. From an analysis of the literature and a measuring program carried out in the GDR a normal value of 6.5 to 13.0 mGy for 80 kVp, 200 mAs and 1 m focus distance (three-phase generator without additional filtration) seems reasonable. For single phase generators literature gives values between 3 and 7 mGy. Service activities should be arranged, if the above mentioned upper or lower limits are exceeded. (author)

  11. Estimating photoreceptor excitations from spectral outputs of a personal light exposure measurement device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dingcai; Barrionuevo, Pablo A

    2015-03-01

    The intrinsic circadian clock requires photoentrainment to synchronize the 24-hour solar day. Therefore, light stimulation is an important component of chronobiological research. Currently, the chronobiological research field overwhelmingly uses photopic illuminance that is based on the luminous efficiency function, V(λ), to quantify light levels. However, recent discovery of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), which are activated by self-contained melanopsin photopigment and also by inputs from rods and cones, makes light specification using a one-dimensional unit inadequate. Since the current understanding of how different photoreceptor inputs contribute to the circadian system through ipRGCs is limited, it is recommended to specify light in terms of the excitations of five photoreceptors (S-, M-, L-cones, rods and ipRGCs; Lucas et al., 2014). In the current study, we assessed whether the spectral outputs from a commercially available spectral watch (i.e. Actiwatch Spectrum) could be used to estimate photoreceptor excitations. Based on the color sensor spectral sensitivity functions from a previously published work, as well as from our measurements, we computed spectral outputs in the long-wavelength range (R), middle-wavelength range (G), short-wavelength range (B) and broadband range (W) under 52 CIE illuminants (25 daylight illuminants, 27 fluorescent lights). We also computed the photoreceptor excitations for each illuminant using human photoreceptor spectral sensitivity functions. Linear regression analyses indicated that the Actiwatch spectral outputs could predict photoreceptor excitations reliably, under the assumption of linear responses of the Actiwatch color sensors. In addition, R, G, B outputs could classify illuminant types (fluorescent versus daylight illuminants) satisfactorily. However, the assessment of actual Actiwatch recording under several testing light sources showed that the spectral outputs were subject to

  12. Input-output finite-time stabilisation of nonlinear stochastic system with missing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jun; Niu, Yugang; Jia, Tinggang

    2016-09-01

    This paper considers the problem of the input-output finite-time stabilisation for a class of nonlinear stochastic system with state-dependent noise. The phenomenon of the missing measurements may occur when state signals are transmitted via communication networks. An estimating method is proposed to compensate the lost state information. And then, a compensator-based controller is designed to ensure the input-output finite-time stochastic stability (IO-FTSS) of the closed-loop system. Some parameters-dependent sufficient conditions are derived and the corresponding solving approach is given. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed IO-FTSS scheme.

  13. Estimación del gasto cardíaco: Utilidad en la práctica clínica. Monitorización disponible invasiva y no invasiva Estimating cardiac output: Utility in the clinical practice. Available invasive and non-invasive monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. García

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Esta revisión pretende profundizar en el conocimiento del gasto cardíaco, sus variables y sus condicionantes, así como repasar exhaustivamente las diferentes técnicas disponibles para su monitorización y establecer las situaciones en que el conocimiento del gasto cardíaco nos aporta una información fundamental en el manejo del paciente crítico. La técnica de Fick, utilizada en los inicios para calcular el gasto cardíaco de los pacientes, ha sido sustituida hoy en día en la práctica clínica por los métodos de termodilución (transcardíaca o transpulmonar, litiodilución, biorreactancia, la tecnología basada en el efecto Doppler o la ecocardiografía. El análisis de la onda de pulso ha permitido la obtención de una medida continua y mínimamente invasiva del gasto cardíaco. Otros métodos, como la biorrectancia, el Doppler o la ecocardiografía nos permiten, en la actualidad, obtener medidas del gasto cardíaco de forma no invasiva, rápida y fiable.This aim of this review is to provide a detailed review of the physiologic conditions and variables of the cardiac output, as well as review the different techniques available for its measurement. We also want to establish the clinical situations in which the measurement of cardiac output can add valuable information for the management of critically ill patients. The Fick technique, used in the beginning to calculate cardiac output, has been replaced today by thermodilution techniques (transcardiac or transpulmonary, lithium dilution, bioreactance, Doppler technique or echocardiography. Pulse wave analysis allows a continuous minimally invasive cardiac output measurement. Other methods, such bioreactance, Doppler technique or echocardiography currently provide a valid, fast and non-invasive measurement of cardiac output.

  14. How to simplify the analytics for input-output accountability measurements in a reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical approach to high-performance uranium and plutonium accountancy measurements in reprocessing input and output solutions is presented, which provides larger operational simplicity than the conventionally applied chemical methods. The proposed alternative is based on energy-dispersive absorption edge and fluorescence X-ray spectrometry, using the proven and reliable K-edge densitometry technique as reference method. Two X-ray densitometers developed for accurate and reliable uranium and plutonium analysis in both the feed and product solutions are described. Practical experiences and results from their performance evaluation on actual process solutions from a reprocessing plant are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  15. How can a cost/benefit ratio be optimized for an output measurement program of external photon radiotherapy beams?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We estimated cost/benefit ratios for different quality control programs of radiation output measurements of medical linear accelerators. The cost/benefit ratios of quality control (QC) programs (a combination of output measurement time interval and measurement action levels) were defined as workload divided by achievable dose accuracy. Dose accuracy was assumed to be inversely proportional to the 99% confidence limit of shifts of total treatment doses and workload as inversely proportional to the output measurement time interval. Our previously reported method was used to estimate the distribution of shifts of total treatment doses due to changes in accelerator radiation output (Gy/MU). The confidence limits of dose shifts were estimated for different QC programs and for different levels of output measurement reproducibility. Output shifts used in the estimations had previously been observed for four linear accelerators over 5 years. We observed that the cost/benefit ratio increases remarkably when the output measurement time interval is less than 1 month. The ratio depends strongly on the action levels and reproducibility of the QC measurements. Improvement of these factors optimizes the cost/benefit ratio by a factor of several times. The most cost-effective output measurement time interval to achieve 99% confidence limits of ±2, ±2.5 or ±3% for dose shifts ranged from 0.25 month to as much as 6 months depending on the factors given above and the intended accuracy level. It is several times more cost effective to increase dose accuracy by lowering the action levels of the QC measurements and by attempting to improve their reproducibility than by simply shortening the time interval of the output measurements. Methods improving utilization and interpretation of the results of the QC measurements play a key role in further optimization of cost/benefit ratios in dosimetric QC.

  16. An innovative work-loop calorimeter for in vitro measurement of the mechanics and energetics of working cardiac trabeculae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taberner, Andrew J; Han, June-Chiew; Loiselle, Denis S; Nielsen, Poul M F; Nielsen, Paul M F

    2011-12-01

    We describe a unique work-loop calorimeter with which we can measure, simultaneously, the rate of heat production and force-length work output of isolated cardiac trabeculae. The mechanics of the force-length work-loop contraction mimic those of the pressure-volume work-loops experienced by the heart. Within the measurement chamber of a flow-through microcalorimeter, a trabecula is electrically stimulated to respond, under software control, in one of three modes: fixed-end, isometric, or isotonic. In each mode, software controls the position of a linear motor, with feedback from muscle force, to adjust muscle length in the desired temporal sequence. In the case of a work-loop contraction, the software achieves seamless transitions between phases of length control (isometric contraction, isometric relaxation, and restoration of resting muscle length) and force control (isotonic shortening). The area enclosed by the resulting force-length loop represents the work done by the trabecula. The change of enthalpy expended by the muscle is given by the sum of the work term and the associated amount of evolved heat. With these simultaneous measurements, we provide the first estimation of suprabasal, net mechanical efficiency (ratio of work to change of enthalpy) of mammalian cardiac trabeculae. The maximum efficiency is at the vicinity of 12%. PMID:21903883

  17. The effect of age on the relationship between cardiac and vascular function

    OpenAIRE

    Houghton, David; Jones, Thomas W.; Cassidy, Sophie; Siervo, Mario; MacGowan, Guy A.; Trenell, Michael I; Jakovljevic, Djordje G.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in cardiac and vascular function are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The aim of the present study was to define the effect of age on the relationship between cardiac and vascular function. Haemodynamic and gas exchange measurements were performed at rest and peak exercise in healthy individuals. Augmentation index was measured at rest. Cardiac power output, a measure of overall cardiac function, was calculated as the product of car...

  18. A Device for Automatically Measuring and Supervising the Critical Care Patient’S Urine Output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roemi Fernández

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical care units are equipped with commercial monitoring devices capable of sensing patients’ physiological parameters and supervising the achievement of the established therapeutic goals. This avoids human errors in this task and considerably decreases the workload of the healthcare staff. However, at present there still is a very relevant physiological parameter that is measured and supervised manually by the critical care units’ healthcare staff: urine output. This paper presents a patent-pending device capable of automatically recording and supervising the urine output of a critical care patient. A high precision scale is used to measure the weight of a commercial urine meter. On the scale’s pan there is a support frame made up of Bosch profiles that isolates the scale from force transmission from the patient’s bed, and guarantees that the urine flows properly through the urine meter input tube. The scale’s readings are sent to a PC via Bluetooth where an application supervises the achievement of the therapeutic goals. The device is currently undergoing tests at a research unit associated with the University Hospital of Getafe in Spain.

  19. Measurement and analysis of force-time outputs of pyrotechnic nuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, V. H.

    1973-01-01

    The dynamic loadings produced by two standard pyrotechnic nuts were compared with loadings produced by four recently developed low-shock nuts. The nuts were manufactured by separate contractors. Each nut was given a number designation, the number having no special significance. The results show that the use of the Hopkinson bar to measure force-time outputs of the nuts at stud and housing sides aided greatly in understanding the events occurring in the nuts. Acceleration data appear to be dependable, for the most part, but of more limited value. The low-shock designs show considerable improvement over the standard designs above 4,000 Hz when the results are plotted in shock spectrum form. They involve some penalties with regard to weight and cost.

  20. Output tracking control for a velocity-sensorless VTOL aircraft with measurement delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shanwei; Lin, Yan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we develop a non-linear controller to achieve output tracking for a velocity-sensorless vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft in the presence of measurement delays. By applying the Pade approximation technique, the original controlled system is transformed into an augmented dimension system without any time delay. After constructing full-order observers, error coordinate transformation, and system decomposition, the tracking problem of the newly transformed system is changed into the stabilisation problem of two non-minimum phase subsystems and one minimum phase subsystem. The resulting controller not only forces the VTOL aircraft to asymptotically track the desired trajectories, but also drives the unstable internal dynamics, which stands for the non-minimum property of VTOL aircraft, to follow the causal ideal internal dynamics (IID) solved via the stable system centre (SSC) method. Numerical simulation results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller.

  1. Relative output factor measurements of a 5 mm diameter radiosurgical photon beam using polymer gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besides the fine spatial resolution inherent in polymer gel-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dosimetry, the method also features the potential for multiple measurements of varying sensitive volume in a single experiment by integrating results in MRI voxels of finite dimensions (i.e., in plane resolution by slice thickness). This work exploits this feature of polymer gel dosimetry to propose an experimental technique for relative output factor (OF) measurements of small radiosurgical beams. Two gel vials were irradiated with a 5 and 30 mm diameter 6 MV radiosurgery beam and MR scanned with the same slice thickness and three different in plane resolutions. Using this experimental data set, 5 mm OF measurements with the PinPoint ion chamber are simulated by integrating results over a sensitive volume equal to that of the chamber. Results are found in agreement within experimental uncertainties with actual PinPoint measurements verifying the validity of the proposed experimental procedure. The polymer gel data set is subsequently utilized for OF measurements of the 5 mm beam with varying sensitive volume to discuss the magnitude of detector volume averaging effects. Seeking to correct for volume averaging, results are extrapolated to zero sensitive volume yielding a 5 mm OF measurement of (0.66±5%). This result compares reasonably with corresponding ionometric and radiographic film measurements of this work and corresponding, limited, data in the literature. Overall, results suggest that polymer gel dosimetry coupled with the proposed experimental procedure helps overcome not only tissue-equivalence and beam perturbation implications but also volume averaging and positioning uncertainties which constitute the main drawback in small radiosurgical beam dosimetry

  2. Bioimpedance-based measurement method for simultaneous acquisition of respiratory and cardiac gating signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory and cardiac motion artefacts impair the quality and reliability of medical imaging, particularly in nuclear medicine. At worst, the interpretation of distorted images may lead to inadequate or unnecessary treatment. Image artefacts can be minimized by gating the image acquisition according to respiratory phase and cardiac contractions. However, currently there are no clinically established dual-gating methods in nuclear medicine imaging. The aim of this study is to validate a previously determined optimized bioimpedance measurement configuration against traditional respiratory and cardiac measurement systems in 12 volunteers. High agreement and excellent correlations (r = 0.944–0.999) were found between respiratory peak-to-peak amplitudes as well as temporal respiratory and cardiac intervals. Above all, good quality respiratory and cardiac gating signals were obtained from all test subjects with a fairly regular sinus rhythm. Importantly, both signals were acquired simultaneously with a single device. Due to the simplicity of this inexpensive method, the technique has high potential to be adopted for dual-gating in clinical practice in the future. (paper)

  3. Relationship between cardiac function and resting cerebral blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto M; Jensen, Lars T; Krabbe, Katja;

    2014-01-01

    and cardiac output were measured in 31 healthy subjects 50-75 years old using magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Mean values of CBF, cardiac output and cardiac index were 43.6 ml per 100 g min(-1), 5.5 l min(-1) and 2.7 l min(-1) m(-2), respectively, in males, and 53.4 ml per 100 g min(-1), 4.3 l......Although both impaired cardiac function and reduced cerebral blood flow are associated with ageing, current knowledge of the influence of cardiac function on resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects of cardiac function on CBF. CBF...... min(-1) and 2.4 l min(-1) m(-2), respectively, in females. No effects of cardiac output or cardiac index on CBF or structural signs of brain ageing were observed. However, fractional brain flow defined as the ratio of total brain flow to cardiac output was inversely correlated with cardiac index (r(2...

  4. Light output measurements and computational models of microcolumnar CsI scintillators for x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The authors report on measurements of light output and spatial resolution of microcolumnar CsI:Tl scintillator detectors for x-ray imaging. In addition, the authors discuss the results of simulations aimed at analyzing the results of synchrotron and sealed-source exposures with respect to the contributions of light transport to the total light output. Methods: The authors measured light output from a 490-μm CsI:Tl scintillator screen using two setups. First, the authors used a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to measure the response of the scintillator to sealed-source exposures. Second, the authors performed imaging experiments with a 27-keV monoenergetic synchrotron beam and a slit to calculate the total signal generated in terms of optical photons per keV. The results of both methods are compared to simulations obtained with hybridMANTIS, a coupled x-ray, electron, and optical photon Monte Carlo transport package. The authors report line response (LR) and light output for a range of linear absorption coefficients and describe a model that fits at the same time the light output and the blur measurements. Comparing the experimental results with the simulations, the authors obtained an estimate of the absorption coefficient for the model that provides good agreement with the experimentally measured LR. Finally, the authors report light output simulation results and their dependence on scintillator thickness and reflectivity of the backing surface. Results: The slit images from the synchrotron were analyzed to obtain a total light output of 48 keV−1 while measurements using the fast PMT instrument setup and sealed-sources reported a light output of 28 keV−1. The authors attribute the difference in light output estimates between the two methods to the difference in time constants between the camera and PMT measurements. Simulation structures were designed to match the light output measured with the camera while providing good agreement with the measured LR

  5. In vivo dose measurement using TLDs and MOSFET dosimeters for cardiac radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Edward A; Sumanaweera, Thilaka S; Blanck, Oliver; Iwamura, Alyson K; Steel, James P; Dieterich, Sonja; Maguire, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    In vivo measurements were made of the dose delivered to animal models in an effort to develop a method for treating cardiac arrhythmia using radiation. This treatment would replace RF energy (currently used to create cardiac scar) with ionizing radiation. In the current study, the pulmonary vein ostia of animal models were irradiated with 6 MV X-rays in order to produce a scar that would block aberrant signals characteristic of atrial fibrillation. The CyberKnife radiosurgery system was used to deliver planned treatments of 20-35 Gy in a single fraction to four animals. The Synchrony system was used to track respiratory motion of the heart, while the contractile motion of the heart was untracked. The dose was measured on the epicardial surface near the right pulmonary vein and on the esophagus using surgically implanted TLD dosimeters, or in the coronary sinus using a MOSFET dosimeter placed using a catheter. The doses measured on the epicardium with TLDs averaged 5% less than predicted for those locations, while doses measured in the coronary sinus with the MOSFET sensor nearest the target averaged 6% less than the predicted dose. The measurements on the esophagus averaged 25% less than predicted. These results provide an indication of the accuracy with which the treatment planning methods accounted for the motion of the target, with its respiratory and cardiac components. This is the first report on the accuracy of CyberKnife dose delivery to cardiac targets. PMID:22584173

  6. A unique micromechanocalorimeter for simultaneous measurement of heat rate and force production of cardiac trabeculae carneae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, June-Chiew; Taberner, Andrew J; Kirton, Robert S; Nielsen, Poul M; Smith, Nicholas P; Loiselle, Denis S

    2009-09-01

    To study cardiac muscle energetics quantitatively, it is of paramount importance to measure, simultaneously, mechanical and thermal performance. Ideally, this should be achieved under conditions that minimize the risk of tissue anoxia, especially under high rates of energy expenditure. In vitro, this consideration necessitates the use of preparations of small radial dimensions. To that end, we have constructed a unique micromechanocalorimeter, consisting of an open-ended flow-through microcalorimeter, a force transducer, and a pair of muscle-length actuators. The device enables the metabolic and mechanical performance of cardiac trabeculae carneae to be investigated for prolonged periods in a continuously replenished oxygen- and nutrient-rich environment. PMID:19589958

  7. Serial measurements of cardiac biomarkers in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roziakova Lubica

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous therapy with anthracyclines (ANT and conditioning regimen followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT represents a high risk for development of cardiotoxicity. The aim of this study was to assess subclinical myocardial damage after HSCT using echocardiography and cardiac biomarkers - high sensitive cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP and to identify patients at risk of developing clinical cardiotoxicity. Patients and methods Thirty-seven patients who were treated with allogeneic HSCT for hematologic diseases at median age of 28 years at time of HSCT were studied. Conditioning regimen included either chemotherapy without total body irradiation (TBI or combination of chemotherapy with TBI. Twenty-nine (78,3% patients were pretreated with ANT therapy. Cardiac biomarkers were serially measured before conditioning regimen and at days 1, 14 and 30 after HSCT. Cardiac systolic and diastolic functions were assessed before conditioning regimen and 1 month after HSCT by echocardiography. Results The changes in plasma NT-proBNP and hs-cTnT levels during the 30 days following the HSCT were statistically significant (P P Conclusions Elevations in both cardiac biomarkers were found before clinical signs of cardiotoxicity developed. Persistent elevations in NT-pro-BNP and hs-cTnT concentrations simultaneously for a period exceeding 14 days might be used for identification of patients at risk of developing cardiotoxicity and requiring further cardiological follow up.

  8. Serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T after exercise stress test in stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Anna; Ruwald, Martin Huth; Dalsgaard, Morten; Rossing, Kasper; Steffensen, Rolf; Iversen, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to assess serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTNT) post-exercise in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD).......The aim was to assess serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTNT) post-exercise in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD)....

  9. The cardiac cycle is a major contributor to variability in size measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysms by ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøndal, Nikolaj Fibiger; Bramsen, Morten; Thomsen, Marie Dahl;

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of the cardiac cycle on ultrasound measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameters.......The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of the cardiac cycle on ultrasound measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameters....

  10. A general-equilibrium asset-pricing approach to the measurement of nominal and real bank output

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, J. Christina; Basu, Susanto; Fernald, John G.

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the proper measurement of financial service output that is not priced explicitly. It shows how to impute nominal service output from financial intermediaries’ interest income and how to construct price indices for those financial services. We present an optimizing model with financial intermediaries that provide financial services to resolve asymmetric information between borrowers and lenders. We embed these intermediaries in a dynamic, stochastic, general-equilibrium mo...

  11. A Value-Added Based Measure of Health System Output and Estimating the Efficiency of OECD Health Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis Petrie; Kam Ki Tang; Prasada Rao, D.S.

    2009-01-01

    Life expectancy at birth is the most commonly used measure for health system output. However, there are a number of reasons why it may be a poor proxy. First, life expectancy assumes a stationary population and thus does not take into account the current demographic structure of a country; and second, the output of a health system should be measured in terms of the value-added to the population’s health status rather than health status itself. The paper develops a new measure of health system...

  12. The Measurement of Maximal (Anaerobic Power Output on a Cycle Ergometer: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarak Driss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interests and limits of the different methods and protocols of maximal (anaerobic power ( assessment are reviewed: single all-out tests versus force-velocity tests, isokinetic ergometers versus friction-loaded ergometers, measure of during the acceleration phase or at peak velocity. The effects of training, athletic practice, diet and pharmacological substances upon the production of maximal mechanical power are not discussed in this review mainly focused on the technical (ergometer, crank length, toe clips, methodological (protocols and biological factors (muscle volume, muscle fiber type, age, gender, growth, temperature, chronobiology and fatigue limiting in cycling. Although the validity of the Wingate test is questionable, a large part of the review is dedicated to this test which is currently the all-out cycling test the most often used. The biomechanical characteristics specific of maximal and high speed cycling, the bioenergetics of the all-out cycling exercises and the influence of biochemical factors (acidosis and alkalosis, phosphate ions… are recalled at the beginning of the paper. The basic knowledge concerning the consequences of the force-velocity relationship upon power output, the biomechanics of sub-maximal cycling exercises and the study on the force-velocity relationship in cycling by Dickinson in 1928 are presented in Appendices.

  13. The Measurement of Maximal (Anaerobic) Power Output on a Cycle Ergometer: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driss, Tarak; Vandewalle, Henry

    2013-01-01

    The interests and limits of the different methods and protocols of maximal (anaerobic) power (Pmax) assessment are reviewed: single all-out tests versus force-velocity tests, isokinetic ergometers versus friction-loaded ergometers, measure of Pmax during the acceleration phase or at peak velocity. The effects of training, athletic practice, diet and pharmacological substances upon the production of maximal mechanical power are not discussed in this review mainly focused on the technical (ergometer, crank length, toe clips), methodological (protocols) and biological factors (muscle volume, muscle fiber type, age, gender, growth, temperature, chronobiology and fatigue) limiting Pmax in cycling. Although the validity of the Wingate test is questionable, a large part of the review is dedicated to this test which is currently the all-out cycling test the most often used. The biomechanical characteristics specific of maximal and high speed cycling, the bioenergetics of the all-out cycling exercises and the influence of biochemical factors (acidosis and alkalosis, phosphate ions…) are recalled at the beginning of the paper. The basic knowledge concerning the consequences of the force-velocity relationship upon power output, the biomechanics of sub-maximal cycling exercises and the study on the force-velocity relationship in cycling by Dickinson in 1928 are presented in Appendices. PMID:24073413

  14. Spectral contaminant identifier for off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy measurements of liquid water isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developments in cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry have made it possible to measure water isotopes using faster, more cost-effective field-deployable instrumentation. Several groups have attempted to extend this technology to measure water extracted from plants and found that other extracted organics absorb light at frequencies similar to that absorbed by the water isotopomers, leading to δ2H and δ18O measurement errors (Δδ2H and Δδ18O). In this note, the off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) spectra of stable isotopes in liquid water is analyzed to determine the presence of interfering absorbers that lead to erroneous isotope measurements. The baseline offset of the spectra is used to calculate a broadband spectral metric, mBB, and the mean subtracted fit residuals in two regions of interest are used to determine a narrowband metric, mNB. These metrics are used to correct for Δδ2H and Δδ18O. The method was tested on 14 instruments and Δδ18O was found to scale linearly with contaminant concentration for both narrowband (e.g., methanol) and broadband (e.g., ethanol) absorbers, while Δδ2H scaled linearly with narrowband and as a polynomial with broadband absorbers. Additionally, the isotope errors scaled logarithmically with mNB. Using the isotope error versus mNB and mBB curves, Δδ2H and Δδ18O resulting from methanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 0.93 per mille and 0.25 per mille respectively, while Δδ2H and Δδ18O from ethanol contamination were corrected to a maximum mean absolute error of 1.22 per mille and 0.22 per mille . Large variation between instruments indicates that the sensitivities must be calibrated for each individual isotope analyzer. These results suggest that the properly calibrated interference metrics can be used to correct for polluted samples and extend off-axis ICOS measurements of liquid water to include plant waters, soil extracts, wastewater, and alcoholic

  15. First measurement of the volcanic gas output from Anak Krakatau, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bani, Philipson; Normier, Adrien; Bacri, Clémentine; Allard, Patrick; Gunawan, Hendra; Hendrasto, Muhammad; Surono; Tsanev, Vitchko

    2015-09-01

    Anak Krakatau is the active cone that has built up in the caldera of Krakatau volcano after the 1883 cataclysmic eruption, in the Sunda Strait. Initially submarine, this new cone definitely emerged from the sea in 1930 and since then has progressively grown up through both explosive and effusive eruptions (~ one eruption every 3 years). Here we report on the first quantification of volcanic gas output from Anak Krakatau, based on airborn UV measurements of the SO2 flux in 2014, and then discuss its implication in terms of magma degassing budget since 1930. We find that during non-eruptive activity Anak Krakatau passively emits 190 ± 40 tons per day of SO2, which is comparable to the emission rate during lava dome extrusion at Merapi, central Java, but substantially more than those measured on few other Indonesian volcanoes (Tangkubanparahu, Slamet, Bromo and Papandayan). Anak Krakatau thus appears to be an important persistent emitter of volcanic volatiles in the Indonesian arc, even though this very active region still remains weakly documented on that aspect. Combining with available data for the composition of its high-temperature (~ 700 °C) crater gases, Anak Krakatau may release annually 0.07 Tg of SO2, 3 Tg of H2O, and 0.13 moles of 3He. Using published data for the sulfur content of its feeding magma, we estimate that about 1.3 km3 of magma may have been degassed during its subaerial growth over the past 85 years. The subaerial cone represents only 14% of this volume. Thus, a substantial fraction (1.1 km3) of the degassed magma did not extrude and may have accumulated in the plumbing system. This inference is consistent with geophysical and petrologic evidence of the presence of dense magma bodies in the shallow crustal basement of Krakatau volcano.

  16. Assessment and Utility of Frailty Measures in Critical Illness, Cardiology, and Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabali, Naheed; Rolfson, Darryl; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2016-09-01

    Frailty is a clearly emerging theme in acute care medicine, with obvious prognostic and health resource implications. "Frailty" is a term used to describe a multidimensional syndrome of loss of homeostatic reserves that gives rise to a vulnerability to adverse outcomes after relatively minor stressor events. This is conceptually simple, yet there has been little consensus on the operational definition. The gold standard method to diagnose frailty remains a comprehensive geriatric assessment; however, a variety of validated physical performance measures, judgement-based tools, and multidimensional scales are being applied in critical care, cardiology, and cardiac surgery settings, including open cardiac surgery and transcatheter aortic value replacement. Frailty is common among patients admitted to the intensive care unit and correlates with an increased risk for adverse events, increased resource use, and less favourable patient-centred outcomes. Analogous findings have been described across selected acute cardiology and cardiac surgical settings, in particular those that commonly intersect with critical care services. The optimal methods for screening and diagnosing frailty across these settings remains an active area of investigation. Routine assessment for frailty conceivably has numerous purported benefits for patients, families, health care providers, and health administrators through better informed decision-making regarding treatments or goals of care, prognosis for survival, expectations for recovery, risk of complications, and expected resource use. In this review, we discuss the measurement of frailty and its utility in patients with critical illness and in cardiology and cardiac surgery settings. PMID:27476983

  17. TU-A-12A-09: Absolute Blood Flow Measurement in a Cardiac Phantom Using Low Dose CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemer, B; Hubbard, L; Lipinski, J; Molloi, S [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a first pass analysis technique to measure absolute flow from low dose CT images in a cardiac phantom. This technique can be combined with a myocardial mass assignment to yield absolute perfusion using only two volume scans and reduce the radiation dose to the patient. Methods: A four-chamber cardiac phantom and perfusion chamber were constructed from poly-acrylic and connected with tubing to approximate anatomical features. The system was connected to a pulsatile pump, input/output reservoirs and power contrast injector. Flow was varied in the range of 1-2.67 mL/s with the pump operating at 60 beats/min. The system was imaged once a second for 14 seconds with a 320-row scanner (Toshiba Medical Systems) using a contrast-enhanced, prospective-gated cardiac perfusion protocol. Flow was calculated by the following steps: subsequent images of the perfusion volume were subtracted to find the contrast entering the volume; this was normalized by an upstream, known volume region to convert Hounsfield (HU) values to concentration; this was divided by the subtracted images time difference. The technique requires a relatively stable input contrast concentration and no contrast can leave the perfusion volume before the flow measurement is completed. Results: The flow calculated from the images showed an excellent correlation with the known rates. The data was fit to a linear function with slope 1.03, intercept 0.02 and an R{sup 2} value of 0.99. The average root mean square (RMS) error was 0.15 mL/s and the average standard deviation was 0.14 mL/s. The flow rate was stable within 7.7% across the full scan and served to validate model assumptions. Conclusion: Accurate, absolute flow rates were measured from CT images using a conservation of mass model. Measurements can be made using two volume scans which can substantially reduce the radiation dose compared with current dynamic perfusion techniques.

  18. TU-A-12A-09: Absolute Blood Flow Measurement in a Cardiac Phantom Using Low Dose CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate a first pass analysis technique to measure absolute flow from low dose CT images in a cardiac phantom. This technique can be combined with a myocardial mass assignment to yield absolute perfusion using only two volume scans and reduce the radiation dose to the patient. Methods: A four-chamber cardiac phantom and perfusion chamber were constructed from poly-acrylic and connected with tubing to approximate anatomical features. The system was connected to a pulsatile pump, input/output reservoirs and power contrast injector. Flow was varied in the range of 1-2.67 mL/s with the pump operating at 60 beats/min. The system was imaged once a second for 14 seconds with a 320-row scanner (Toshiba Medical Systems) using a contrast-enhanced, prospective-gated cardiac perfusion protocol. Flow was calculated by the following steps: subsequent images of the perfusion volume were subtracted to find the contrast entering the volume; this was normalized by an upstream, known volume region to convert Hounsfield (HU) values to concentration; this was divided by the subtracted images time difference. The technique requires a relatively stable input contrast concentration and no contrast can leave the perfusion volume before the flow measurement is completed. Results: The flow calculated from the images showed an excellent correlation with the known rates. The data was fit to a linear function with slope 1.03, intercept 0.02 and an R2 value of 0.99. The average root mean square (RMS) error was 0.15 mL/s and the average standard deviation was 0.14 mL/s. The flow rate was stable within 7.7% across the full scan and served to validate model assumptions. Conclusion: Accurate, absolute flow rates were measured from CT images using a conservation of mass model. Measurements can be made using two volume scans which can substantially reduce the radiation dose compared with current dynamic perfusion techniques

  19. Dynamic CT perfusion measurement in a cardiac phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemer, Benjamin P; Hubbard, Logan; Lipinski, Jerry; Molloi, Sabee

    2015-10-01

    Widespread clinical implementation of dynamic CT myocardial perfusion has been hampered by its limited accuracy and high radiation dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and radiation dose reduction of a dynamic CT myocardial perfusion technique based on first pass analysis (FPA). To test the FPA technique, a pulsatile pump was used to generate known perfusion rates in a range of 0.96-2.49 mL/min/g. All the known perfusion rates were determined using an ultrasonic flow probe and the known mass of the perfusion volume. FPA and maximum slope model (MSM) perfusion rates were measured using volume scans acquired from a 320-slice CT scanner, and then compared to the known perfusion rates. The measured perfusion using FPA (P(FPA)), with two volume scans, and the maximum slope model (P(MSM)) were related to known perfusion (P(K)) by P(FPA) = 0.91P(K) + 0.06 (r = 0.98) and P(MSM) = 0.25P(K) - 0.02 (r = 0.96), respectively. The standard error of estimate for the FPA technique, using two volume scans, and the MSM was 0.14 and 0.30 mL/min/g, respectively. The estimated radiation dose required for the FPA technique with two volume scans and the MSM was 2.6 and 11.7-17.5 mSv, respectively. Therefore, the FPA technique can yield accurate perfusion measurements using as few as two volume scans, corresponding to approximately a factor of four reductions in radiation dose as compared with the currently available MSM. In conclusion, the results of the study indicate that the FPA technique can make accurate dynamic CT perfusion measurements over a range of clinically relevant perfusion rates, while substantially reducing radiation dose, as compared to currently available dynamic CT perfusion techniques. PMID:26156231

  20. Cardiac phantom measurement validating the methodology for a cardiac multi-centre trial with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuyts, Johan; Mortelmans, Luc; Maes, Alex [Nuclear Medicine, UZ Gasthuisberg, K.U. Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Van de Werf, Frans [Cardiology, UZ Gasthuisberg, K.U. Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Djian, Jacques [Wyeth Research, Paris la Defense Cedex (France); Sambuceti, Gianmario [Instituto di Fisiologia Clinica CNR, Pisa (Italy); Schwaiger, Marcus [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, TU Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Touboul, Paul [Hopital Cardio-Vasculaire et Pneumologique, Lyon (France)

    2002-12-01

    In an ongoing international multi-centre trial, positron emission tomography (PET) is being used to evaluate the effect of a new P-selectin antagonist on the infarct size in patients with acute myocardial infarction, treated with thrombolysis. Although it is possible to correct for site-dependent factors, it is desirable to reduce these factors to a minimum. Therefore, acquisition and reconstruction protocols have been defined that can be closely followed by all participating centres. The resulting reconstructed images are transferred to the core centre for central processing with semi-automatic software. This paper reports on the multi-centre phantom experiment that was carried out to assess the inter-centre reproducibility of defect size determination with this protocol. Also, the spatial resolution of the short axis slices was examined. In addition, the analysis procedure was applied to normal PET studies to evaluate the specificity of perfusion defect detection. The transmural cold defect in the phantom occupied 14.8% of the left ventricular area. The automated analysis was applied to the phantom measurements from the 14 participating PET cameras. It yielded an accurate estimate of 15.1% with a standard deviation of 0.6%, indicating excellent reproducibility. The spatial resolution in the short axis slices was similar for all PET systems: 9.6{+-}0.8 mm. The same procedure produced a defect size of zero in the studies of normal volunteers. This study indicates that cardiac studies from multiple PET systems can be pooled for statistical analysis. (orig.)

  1. Simultaneous measurement of cerebral and muscle tissue parameters during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Reyhaneh; Ramadeen, Andrew; Hu, Xudong; Woldemichael, Ermias; Kim, Siwook; Dorian, Paul; Toronov, Vladislav

    2015-03-01

    In this series of animal experiments on resuscitation after cardiac arrest we had a unique opportunity to measure hyperspectral near-infrared spectroscopy (hNIRS) parameters directly on the brain dura, or on the brain through the intact pig skull, and simultaneously the muscle hNIRS parameters. Simultaneously the arterial blood pressure and carotid and femoral blood flow were recorded in real time using invasive sensors. We used a novel hyperspectral signalprocessing algorithm to extract time-dependent concentrations of water, hemoglobin, and redox state of cytochrome c oxidase during cardiac arrest and resuscitation. In addition in order to assess the validity of the non-invasive brain measurements the obtained results from the open brain was compared to the results acquired through the skull. The comparison of hNIRS data acquired on brain surface and through the adult pig skull shows that in both cases the hemoglobin and the redox state cytochrome c oxidase changed in similar ways in similar situations and in agreement with blood pressure and flow changes. The comparison of simultaneously measured brain and muscle changes showed expected differences. Overall the results show feasibility of transcranial hNIRS measurements cerebral parameters including the redox state of cytochrome oxidase in human cardiac arrest patients.

  2. PET measures of pre- and post-synaptic cardiac beta adrenergic function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, Jeanne M.; Stratton, John R.; Levy, Wayne; Poole, Jeanne E.; Shoner, Steven C.; Stuetzle, Werner; Caldwell, James H. E-mail: jcald@u.washington.edu

    2003-11-01

    Positron Emission Tomography was used to measure global and regional cardiac {beta}-adrenergic function in 19 normal subjects and 9 congestive heart failure patients. [{sup 11}C]-meta-hydroxyephedrine was used to image norepinephrine transporter function as an indicator of pre-synaptic function and [{sup 11}C]-CGP12177 was used to measure cell surface {beta}-receptor density as an indicator of post-synaptic function. Pre-synaptic, but not post-synaptic, function was significantly different between normals and CHF patients. Pre-synaptic function was well matched to post-synaptic function in the normal hearts but significantly different and poorly matched in the CHF patients studied. This imaging technique can help us understand regional sympathetic function in cardiac disease.

  3. Harmonic force spectroscopy measures load-dependent kinetics of individual human β-cardiac myosin molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Mortensen, Kim I.; Vestergaard, Christian L.; Sutton, Shirley; Ruppel, Kathleen; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Spudich, James A.

    2015-08-01

    Molecular motors are responsible for numerous cellular processes from cargo transport to heart contraction. Their interactions with other cellular components are often transient and exhibit kinetics that depend on load. Here, we measure such interactions using `harmonic force spectroscopy'. In this method, harmonic oscillation of the sample stage of a laser trap immediately, automatically and randomly applies sinusoidally varying loads to a single motor molecule interacting with a single track along which it moves. The experimental protocol and the data analysis are simple, fast and efficient. The protocol accumulates statistics fast enough to deliver single-molecule results from single-molecule experiments. We demonstrate the method's performance by measuring the force-dependent kinetics of individual human β-cardiac myosin molecules interacting with an actin filament at physiological ATP concentration. We show that a molecule's ADP release rate depends exponentially on the applied load, in qualitative agreement with cardiac muscle, which contracts with a velocity inversely proportional to external load.

  4. Left ventricular AV-plane displacement is preserved with lifelong endurance training and is the main determinant of maximal cardiac output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina; Boushel, Robert C; Calbet, José A; Åkeson, Per; Mortensen, Stefan P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Age-related decline in cardiac function can be prevented or postponed by lifelong endurance training. However, effects of normal ageing as well as of lifelong endurance exercise on longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine...

  5. Linear system identification - The application of Lion's identification scheme to a third order system with noisy input-output measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C. M., Jr.; Monopoli, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    A linear system identification technique developed by Lion is adapted for use on a third-order system with six unknown parameters and noisy input-output measurements. A digital computer is employed so that rapid identification takes place with only two state variable filters. Bias in the parameter estimates is partially eliminated by a signal-to-noise ratio testing procedure.

  6. Light output measurements and computational models of microcolumnar CsI scintillators for x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nillius, Peter, E-mail: nillius@mi.physics.kth.se; Klamra, Wlodek; Danielsson, Mats [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm SE-100 44 (Sweden); Sibczynski, Pawel [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Otwock 05-400 (Poland); Sharma, Diksha; Badano, Aldo [Division of Imaging, Diagnostics, and Software Reliability, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, FDA, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The authors report on measurements of light output and spatial resolution of microcolumnar CsI:Tl scintillator detectors for x-ray imaging. In addition, the authors discuss the results of simulations aimed at analyzing the results of synchrotron and sealed-source exposures with respect to the contributions of light transport to the total light output. Methods: The authors measured light output from a 490-μm CsI:Tl scintillator screen using two setups. First, the authors used a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to measure the response of the scintillator to sealed-source exposures. Second, the authors performed imaging experiments with a 27-keV monoenergetic synchrotron beam and a slit to calculate the total signal generated in terms of optical photons per keV. The results of both methods are compared to simulations obtained with hybridMANTIS, a coupled x-ray, electron, and optical photon Monte Carlo transport package. The authors report line response (LR) and light output for a range of linear absorption coefficients and describe a model that fits at the same time the light output and the blur measurements. Comparing the experimental results with the simulations, the authors obtained an estimate of the absorption coefficient for the model that provides good agreement with the experimentally measured LR. Finally, the authors report light output simulation results and their dependence on scintillator thickness and reflectivity of the backing surface. Results: The slit images from the synchrotron were analyzed to obtain a total light output of 48 keV{sup −1} while measurements using the fast PMT instrument setup and sealed-sources reported a light output of 28 keV{sup −1}. The authors attribute the difference in light output estimates between the two methods to the difference in time constants between the camera and PMT measurements. Simulation structures were designed to match the light output measured with the camera while providing good agreement with the

  7. THE VALUE OF RISK : MEASURING THE SERVICE OUTPUT OF U.S. COMMERCIAL BANKS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basu, Susanto; Inklaar, Robert; Wang, J. Christina

    2011-01-01

    Banks often charge implicitly for their services via interest spreads, instead of explicit fees. Much of bank output thus has to be estimated indirectly. In contrast to current statistical practice, dynamic optimizing models of banks argue that compensation for bearing systematic risk is not part of

  8. The Value of Risk : Measuring the Service Output of U.S. Commercial Banks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basu, Susanto; Inklaar, Robert; Wang, J. Christina

    2008-01-01

    Rather than charging direct fees, banks often charge implicitly for their services via interest spreads. As a result, much of bank output has to be estimated indirectly. In contrast to current statistical practice, dynamic optimizing models of banks argue that compensation for bearing systematic ris

  9. Banking sector output measurement in the euro area – a modified approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colangelo, A.; Inklaar, R.

    2010-01-01

    Banks do not charge explicit fees for many of the services they provide but the service payment is bundled with the offered interest rates. This output therefore has to be imputed using estimates of the opportunity cost of funds. We argue that rather than using the single short-term, low-risk intere

  10. A method for the identification of state space models from input and output measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Di Ruscio

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a simple and general algorithm for the combined deterministic stochastic realization problem directly from known input and output time series. The solution to the pure deterministic as well as the pure stochastic realization problem are special cases of the method presented.

  11. The intercomparison of 137Cs irradiator output measurement and personal dose equivalent, Hp(10), using TLD and film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intercomparison of output measurement of 137Cs irradiator and personal dose equivalent, Hp(10) using TLD and film have been carried out in the year of 2006 to 2008. According to IAEA recommendation, intercomparison is one of audit activities but it is performed in the spirit of collaboration and support rather than in the spirit of inspection. The aim of intercomparison of output measurement of 137Cs irradiator is to verify the dose stated by the participant laboratories. Intercomparison is also to assess the competency of the participant, to keep traceability and consistency of measurement result, to assure that instrument work correctly and the result of evaluation was in agreement, and also for fulfilling one of the clauses of ISO-17025-2005. Besides that, this intercomparison aimed to facilitate link between the system and members of national measurement and transfer of experience in measurement technique and dose evaluation of radiation. The benefit of intercomparison is important among others as tests of proficiency in dose evaluation or measurement, upgrading quality of service and for obeying supervisor body legislation (BAPETEN). TLD was used as a means of output 137Cs irradiator measurement, whereas film and TLD were used for dose intercomparison. This paper presented result of intercomparison of output measurement and evaluation of personal dose equivalent, Hp(10) in the year of 2006 to 2008 followed by 6 participants: Balai Pengamanan Fasilitas Kesehatan (BPFK) Jakarta, Medan, Surabaya, Makasar, PTLR and Laboratory of Keselamatan dan Kesehatan Lingkungan (KKL)-PTKMR BATAN. In this intercomparison, the dose of TLD stated by participant were compared with the dose measured by Radiation Metrology Laboratory (LMR), and the results showed the differences were within 10 %, so it was satisfied. The results of intercomparison of personal dose equivalent, Hp(10) were evaluated based on ISO/IEC Guide 43-1, 1997 analysis and expressed as En. The values of En

  12. Agreement between the force platform method and the combined method measurements of power output during the loaded countermovement jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Peter D; Lake, Jason P; Carden, Patrick J C; Smith, Neal A; Lauder, Mike A

    2016-03-01

    There are two perceived criterion methods for measuring power output during the loaded countermovement jump (CMJ): the force platform method and the combined method (force platform + optoelectronic motion capture system). Therefore, the primary aim of the present study was to assess agreement between the force platform method and the combined method measurements of peak power and mean power output during the CMJ across a spectrum of loads. Forty resistance-trained team sport athletes performed maximal effort CMJ with additional loads of 0 (body mass only), 25, 50, 75 and 100% of body mass (BM). Bias was present for peak velocity, mean velocity, peak power and mean power at all loads investigated, and present for mean force up to 75% of BM. Peak velocity, mean velocity, peak power and mean power 95% ratio limits of agreement were clinically unacceptable at all loads investigated. The 95% ratio limits of agreement were widest at 0% of BM and decreased linearly as load increased. Therefore, the force platform method and the combined method cannot be used interchangeably for measuring power output during the loaded CMJ. As such, if power output is to be meaningfully investigated, a standardised method must be adopted. PMID:27075378

  13. Material properties identification using ultrasonic waves and laser Doppler vibrometer measurements: a multi-input multi-output approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a multi-input multi-output approach able to determine the material properties of homogeneous materials is presented. To do so, an experimental set-up which combines the use of multi harmonic signals with interleaved frequencies and laser Doppler vibrometer measurements has been developed. A modeling technique, based on transmission and reflection measurements, allowed the simultaneous determination of longitudinal wave velocity, density and thickness of the materials under test with high levels of precision and accuracy. (paper)

  14. Reference values for quantitative left ventricular and left atrial measurements in cardiac computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess reference values for left ventricular (LV) and left atrial (LA) dimensions, global LV function, and LV-myocardial mass for cardiac CT. We examined 120 subjects undergoing a coronary angiography using 64-slice and dual-source CT. All individuals had a low cardiovascular risk, normal ECG, negative biomarkers, and a normal cardiac CT examination. All subjects had a negative medical history of cardiovascular disease both on admission and at clinical 6-month follow-up. The following measurements were obtained: septal wall thickness (SWT), posterior wall thickness (PWT), LV inner diameter (LVID), LA anterior posterior diameter (LADsys), end-systolic volume (ESV), and end-diastolic volume (EDV), LV-myocardial mass (LVMM). We found significant gender-related differences for all LV dimensions (SWTsys, SWTdia,PWTsys,PWTdia,LVIDsys,LVIDdia). LADsys showed no significant difference between males and females. Significant differences were found for global LV functional parameters including ESV, EDV, and SV, whereas no significant differences were found for the EF. LV-myocardial mass parameters showed significant gender-related differences. No significant correlation was found between any of these parameters and age. All data were transferred to percentile ranks. This study provides gender-related reference values and percentiles for LV and LA quantitative measurements for cardiac CT and should assist in interpreting results. (orig.)

  15. Consenso brasileiro de monitorização e suporte hemodinâmico - parte III: métodos alternativos de monitorização do débito cardíaco e da volemia Brazilian consensus of monitoring and hemodynamic support - part III: alternative methods for cardiac output monitoring and volemia estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Schettino

    2006-03-01

    critical care setting, particularly for patients with signs of tissue hypoperfusion. Although PAC remains the " gold standard" to measure cardiac output and preload, new and alternative technologies were developed to evaluate these hemodynamic variables. METHODS: Modified Delphi methodology was used to create and quantify the consensus between the participants. AMIB indicated a coordinator who invited more six experts in the area of monitoring and hemodynamic support to constitute the Consensus Advisory Board. Twenty three physician and two nurses selected from different regions of the country completed the expert panel, which reviewed the pertinent bibliography listed at the MEDLINE in the period from 1996 to 2004. RESULTS: Recommendations regarding the use of arterial pulse pressure variation during mechanical ventilation, continuous arterial pulse contour and lithium dilution cardiac output measurements, esophageal Doppler waveform, thoracic electrical bioimpedance, echocardiography and partial CO2 rebreathing for monitoring cardiac output and preload were created. CONCLUSIONS: The new and less invasive techniques for the measurement of cardiac output, preload or fluid responsiveness are accurate and may be an alternative to PAC in critically ill patients.

  16. Input-output measures for model reduction and closed-loop control: Application to global modes

    OpenAIRE

    Barbagallo, Alexandre; Sipp, Denis; Schmid, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Feedback control applications for flows with a large number of degrees of freedom require the reduction of the full flow model to a system with significantly fewer degrees of freedom. This model-reduction process is accomplished by Galerkin projections using a reduction basis composed of modal structures that ideally preserve the input-output behaviour between actuators and sensors and ultimately result in a stabilized compensated system. In this study, global modes are critically assessed as...

  17. Direct measurement of a patient's entrance skin dose during pediatric cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Children with complex congenital heart diseases often require repeated cardiac catheterization; however, children are more radiosensitive than adults. Therefore, radiation-induced carcinogenesis is an important consideration for children who undergo those procedures. We measured entrance skin doses (ESDs) using radio-photoluminescence dosimeter (RPLD) chips during cardiac catheterization for 15 pediatric patients (median age, 1.92 years; males, n = 9; females, n = 6) with cardiac diseases. Four RPLD chips were placed on the patient's posterior and right side of the chest. Correlations between maximum ESD and dose-area products (DAP), total number of frames, total fluoroscopic time, number of cine runs, cumulative dose at the interventional reference point (IRP), body weight, chest thickness, and height were analyzed. The maximum ESD was 80 ± 59 (mean ± standard deviation) mGy. Maximum ESD closely correlated with both DAP (r = 0.78) and cumulative dose at the IRP (r = 0.82). Maximum ESD for coiling and ballooning tended to be higher than that for ablation, balloon atrial septostomy, and diagnostic procedures. In conclusion, we directly measured ESD using RPLD chips and found that maximum ESD could be estimated in real-time using angiographic parameters, such as DAP and cumulative dose at the IRP. Children requiring repeated catheterizations would be exposed to high radiation levels throughout their lives, although treatment influences radiation dose. Therefore, the radiation dose associated with individual cardiac catheterizations should be analyzed, and the effects of radiation throughout the lives of such patients should be followed. (author)

  18. Cardiac MRI in pulmonary artery hypertension: correlations between morphological and functional parameters and invasive measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare cardiac MRI with right heart catheterisation in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and to evaluate its ability to assess PH severity. Forty patients were included. MRI included cine and phase-contrast sequences, study of ventricular function, cardiac cavity areas and ratios, position of the interventricular septum (IVS) in systole and diastole, and flow measurements. We defined four groups according to the severity of PH and three groups according to IVS position: A, normal position; B, abnormal in diastole; C, abnormal in diastole and systole. IVS position was correlated with pulmonary artery pressures and PVR (pulmonary vascular resistance). Median pulmonary artery pressures and resistance were significantly higher in patients with an abnormal septal position compared with those with a normal position. Correlations were good between the right ventricular ejection fraction and PVR, right ventricular end-systolic volume and PAP, percentage of right ventricular area change and PVR, and diastolic and systolic ventricular area ratio and PVR. These parameters were significantly associated with PH severity. Cardiac MRI can help to assess the severity of PH. (orig.)

  19. Measurements on Prototype Inductive Adders with Ultra-Flat-Top Output Pulses for CLIC DR Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Holma, J; Belver-Aguilar, C

    2014-01-01

    The CLIC study is investigating the technical feasibility of an electron-positron collider with high luminosity and a nominal centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV. The CLIC pre-damping rings and damping rings (DRs) will produce ultra-low emittance beam with high bunch charge. To avoid beam emittance increase, the DR kicker systems must provide extremely flat, high-voltage, pulses. The specifications for the DR extraction kickers call for a 160 ns duration flat-top pulses of ±12.5 kV, 250 A, with a combined ripple and droop of not more than ±0.02 % (±2.5 V). An inductive adder is a very promising approach to meeting the specifications because this topology allows the use of both passive and analogue modulation methods to adjust the output waveform. Recently, two five-layer, 3.5 kV, prototype inductive adders have been built at CERN. The first of these has been used to test the passive and active analogue modulation methods to compensate voltage droop and ripple of the output pulses. Pulse waveforms have been reco...

  20. An on-line data acquisition system of oscilloscope-embedded input/output controller for cavity BPM measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavity beam position monitor (BPM) is widely used in a precise electron beam position measurement. Based on high performance oscilloscope-embedded EPICS input/output controller, we developed an on-line cavity BPM signal processing system for fast data acquisition solution when designing a cavity BPM. Also, methods for extracting the position information from cavity pickup signals and calibration algorithm are included in this solution. (authors)

  1. Price and Real Output Measures for the Education Function of Government: Exploratory Estimates for Primary & Secondary Education. NBER Working Paper No. 14099

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraumeni, Barbara M.; Reinsdorf, Marshall B.; Robinson, Brooks B.; Williams, Matthew P.

    2008-01-01

    In a previous paper, the authors took the first step in their research on measuring the education function of government by estimating real output measures (Fraumeni, et. al. 2004). In this paper, chain-type Fisher quantity indexes for those output measures are calculated to be more consistent with Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) methodology and…

  2. Measuring and decomposing output gap: A production function approach of the USA and EU-27 countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domicián Máté

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The ICT-based techno-economic paradigm shift was sharpened by income inequalities in all over the world. The economic performance of USA and Europe were seemed to more different thanks to global economic events. The main purpose of this study is to estimate various macroeconomic variables such as GDP and labour for the period of 1993-2013. In order to indicate economic growth an alternative growth accounting method was used to decompose impacts of physical capital accumulation, technological changes and labour. Analysing the time series data of various OECD countries we could conclude that a large part of the variations in the output gap stem from the cyclical variations of total labour input and the total factor productivity (TFP. Hence, our results were reflected the relevance of technological progress.

  3. In situ measurements of wind and current speed and relationship between output power and turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran Medina, Olmo; Schmitt, François G.; Sentchev, Alexei; Calif, Rudy

    2015-04-01

    In a context of energy transition, wind and tidal energy are sources of clean energy with the potential of partially satisfying the growing demand. The main problem of this type of energy, and other types of renewable energy remains the discontinuity of the electric power produced in different scales, inducing large fluctuations also called intermittency. This intermittency of wind and tidal energy is inherent to the turbulent nature of wind and marine currents. We consider this intermittent power production in strong relation with the turbulent intermittency of the resource. The turbulence theory is multifractal energy cascades models, a classic in physics of turbulence. From earlier studies in atmospheric sciences, we learn that wind speed and the aggregate power output are intermittent and multifractal over a wide range of scales [Calif and Schmitt 2014]. We want to extend this study to a marine current turbine and compare the scaling properties for those renewable energy sources. We consider here coupling between simultaneous velocity time series and output power from a wind turbine and a marine current turbine. Wind turbine data were obtained from Denmark and marine current data from Western Scheldt, Belgium where a prototype of a vertical and horizontal marine current turbines are tested. After an estimation of their Fourier density power spectra, we study their scaling properties in Kolmogorov's theory and the framework of fully developed turbulence. Hence, we employ a Hilbert-based methodology, namely arbitrary-order Hilbert spectral analysis [Calif et al. 2013a, 2013b] to characterize the intermittent property of the wind and marine current velocity in order to characterize the intermittent nature of the fluid. This method is used in order to obtain the spectrum and the corresponding power law for non-linear and non-stationary time series. The goal is to study the non-linear transfer characteristics in a multi-scale and multi-intensity framework.

  4. Family-based associations in measures of psychological distress and quality of life in a cardiac screening clinic for inheritable cardiac diseases: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGorrian Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Family-based cardiac screening programmes for persons at risk for genetic cardiac diseases are now recommended. However, the psychological wellbeing and health related quality of life (QoL of such screened patients is poorly understood, especially in younger patients. We sought to examine wellbeing and QoL in a representative group of adults aged 16 and over in a dedicated family cardiac screening clinic. Methods Prospective survey of consecutive consenting patients attending a cardiac screening clinic, over a 12 month period. Data were collected using two health measurement tools: the Short Form 12 (version 2 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, along with baseline demographic and screening visit-related data. The HADS and SF-12v.2 outcomes were compared by age group. Associations with a higher HADS score were examined using logistic regression, with multi-level modelling used to account for the family-based structure of the data. Results There was a study response rate of 86.6%, with n=334 patients providing valid HADS data (valid response rate 79.5%, and data on n=316 retained for analysis. One-fifth of patients were aged under 25 (n=61. Younger patients were less likely than older to describe significant depression on their HADS scale (p Conclusions High levels of anxiety were seen amongst patients attending a family-based cardiac screening clinic.Younger patients also had high rates of clinically significant anxiety. Higher levels of anxiety and depression tends to run in families, and this has implications for family screening and intervention programmes.

  5. To Capture Production or Wellbeing? A Review Article on Towards Measuring the Volume Output of Education and Health Services: A Handbook

    OpenAIRE

    Aled ab Iorwerth

    2012-01-01

    This review article evaluates the report Towards Measuring the Volume Output of Education and Health Services: A Handbook produced by the OECD. Traditionally, input costs have been used to estimate the value of education and health services. The Handbook provides detailed analysis and recommendations regarding appropriate methodologies and data to improve volume output measures for these services. The author welcomes the efforts of the OECD in this area. However, it is argued that output meas...

  6. Lactotripeptides effect on office and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure, blood pressure stress response, pulse wave velocity and cardiac output in patients with high-normal blood pressure or first-degree hypertension: a randomized double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, Arrigo F G; Rosticci, Martina; Gerocarni, Beatrice; Bacchelli, Stefano; Veronesi, Maddalena; Strocchi, Enrico; Borghi, Claudio

    2011-09-01

    Contrasting data partially support a certain antihypertensive efficacy of lactotripeptides (LTPs) derived from enzymatic treatment of casein hydrolysate. Our aim was to evaluate this effect on a large number of hemodynamic parameters. We conducted a prospective double-blind randomized clinical trial, which included 52 patients affected by high-normal blood pressure (BP) or first-degree hypertension. We investigated the effect of a 6-week treatment with the LTPs isoleucine-proline-proline and valine-proline-proline at 3 mg per day, assumed to be functional food, on office BP, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) values, stress-induced BP increase and cardiac output-related parameters. In the LTP-treated subjects, we observed a significant reduction in office systolic BP (SBP; -5±8 mm Hg, P=0.013) and a significant improvement in pulse wave velocity (PWV; -0.66±0.81 m s(-1), P=0.001; an instrumental biomarker of vascular rigidity). No effect on 24-h ABPM parameters and BP reaction to stress was observed from treatment with the combined LTPs. LTPs, but not placebo, were associated with a mild but significant change in the stroke volume (SV), SV index (markers of cardiac flow), the acceleration index (ACI) and velocity index (VI) (markers of cardiac contractility). No effect was observed on parameters related to fluid dynamics or vascular resistance. LTPs positively influenced the office SBP, PWV, SV, SV index, ACI and VI in patients with high-normal BP or first-degree hypertension. PMID:21753776

  7. A comparison of sympathoadrenal activity and cardiac performance at rest and during exercise in patients with ventricular demand or atrial synchronous pacing.

    OpenAIRE

    Pehrsson, S K; Hjemdahl, P; Nordlander, R; Aström, H

    1988-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic function was assessed by measuring the coronary sinus overflow of noradrenaline and dopamine at rest and during supine exercise in eight patients with high degree atrioventricular block treated with dual chamber pacemakers (DDD). Patients exercised (30-60 W) during both ventricular inhibited (VVI) and atrial synchronous (VAT) pacing. During exercise cardiac output increased less markedly in the VVI mode than in the VAT mode. The cardiac output response was entirely stroke ...

  8. A New Measurement for International Fragmentation of the Production Process: An International Input-Output Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Inomata, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    The paper investigates the possibility of constructing a new measurement for analysing international fragmentation of the production process. It asserts that the current usage of relevant data, whether the trade shares of parts and components or the index of Vertical Specialisation, is quite unsatisfactory for measuring the phenomenon, since they critically lack the overall perspective of the entire structure of production chains.  The new measurement is formulated such that it captures eve...

  9. A New Measurement for International Fragmentation of the Production Process: An International Input-Output Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Inomata, Satoshi; 猪俣, 哲史

    2008-01-01

    The paper investigates the possibility of constructing a new measurement for analysing international fragmentation of the production process. It asserts that the current usage of relevant data, whether the trade shares of parts and components or the index of Vertical Specialisation, is quite unsatisfactory for measuring the phenomenon, since they critically lack the overall perspective of the entire structure of production chains. The new measurement is formulated such that it captures every ...

  10. Non-invasive measurement of cardiac output in heart failure patients using a new foreign gas rebreathing technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabrielsen, Anders; Videbaek, Regitze; Schou, Morten; Damgaard, Morten; Kastrup, Jens; Norsk, Peter

    2002-01-01

    (EP), and -0.8 +/- 1.3 litre x min(-1) when comparing CO(FICK) and CO(TD). When correction for intrapulmonary shunt flow was applied (i.e. calculation of CO(RB)) in all 11 patients, the bias between CO(FICK) and CO(RB) was 0.1 +/- 0.9 litre x min(-1), primarily because agreement improved in the three...

  11. Evaluation of radiophotoluminescent glass rod detector for small field dosimetry; measurement of output factor in water for CyberKnife

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CyberKnife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is composed of a miniaturized 6 MV LINAC attached to a computer driven robot arm with six degrees of freedom and real-time image correlation system. The CyberKnife SRS system can deliver with a high precision, a single or several fractions of radiation doses to a well defined small intracranial or extracranial target. Unlike the gamma knife, there are collimators of 12 different sizes in the CyberKnife SRS system, ranging from 5 to 60 mm in diameter. Accuracy of the output factor, defined as the ratio of the dose rate for a given collimator to that of the 60 mm collimator, directly affects the accuracy of dose delivery in CyberKnife SRS system. This is of obvious importance for any SRS system, particularly when a single large radiation dose is delivered to a small selected target with the 5 mm collimator, as in the treatment of trigeminal neuraliga. The measurements of such small output factors are generally difficult due to the sharp radial dose fall-off, the small size of the dose plateau region and the lack of lateral electron equilibrium. A radiophotoluminescent (RPL) glass rod detector (GRD) system has recently become commercially available. The dosimeter system is composed of small, rod shaped, silver activated metaphosphate glass detectors and readout system. The weight compositions of the GRD is as 31.55% P, 51.16% O, 6.12% Al, 11.00% Na and 0.17% Ag. The effective atomic number and density of GRD is 12.039 and 2.61, respectively. The advantage of GRD over TLD is that GRD can be read an infinite number of times whereas TLD can be read only once. This is because repeated pulses of the UV beam excatation do not eliminate the RPL centers in the GRD. Consequently, each individual GRD measurement allows many readouts, whose average value has higher reproducibility than TLD. Like TLD, When the stable RPL centers disappear by annealing (400 deg. C, 30 min), the accumulated dose in a GRD is reset and the GRD can be

  12. Diferencia veno-arterial de dióxido de carbono como predictor de gasto cardiaco disminuido en modelo pediátrico experimental Veno-arterial difference of carbondioxide as a predictor of low cardiac output in an experimental pediatric model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Díaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac output (CO measurement is not a standard of care for critically ill children, but it can be estimated by indirect methods such as veno-arterial pCO2 difference (ΔVACO2. Aim: To determine the correlation between CO and ΔVACO2 and evaluate the usefulness of ΔVACO2 in the diagnosis of low CO in an experimental pediatric model. Materials and Methods: Thirty piglets weighing 4.8 ± 0.35 kg were anesthetized and monitored with transpulmonary thermodilution. Lung injury was induced with tracheal instillation of Tween 20®. Serial measurements of central venous and arterial blood gases, as well as CO, were obtained at baseline, 1, 2 and 4 h after lung injury induction. Low cardiac output (LCO was defined as CO lower than 2.5 Llminlm². Results: There was an inverse correlation between CO and ΔVACO2 (r = -0.36, p < 0.01. ΔVACO2 was 14 ± 8 mmHg in LCO state and 8 ± 6 mmHg when this condition was not present (p < 0.01. Area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves of ΔVACO2 and LCO state was 0.78 (0.68-0.86. The best cut-point was 8.9 mmHg to determine LCO with a sensibility 0.78, specificity 0.7, positive predictive value 0.27 and negative predictive value 0.96. Conclusions: In this model there was an inverse correlation between ΔVACO2 and CO. The best cutoff value to discard LCO was ΔVACO2 of 8.9 mmHg, indicating that under this value the presence of LCO is very unlikely.

  13. Influence of the sample anticoagulant on the measurements of impedance aggregometry in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Solomon

    2008-10-01

    postoperative day showed a significant recovery in platelet activity in the samples containing heparin (increase from 30 ± 22 U to 46 ± 27 U for the COLtest and from 70 ± 34 U to 95 ± 32 U for the TRAPtest, p < 0.001, Student’s t-test, while no significant recovery of platelet function could be established in the MEA measurements performed with citrated blood.Conclusions: The choice of blood sample anticoagulant used for impedance aggregometry influenced the platelet aggregation response. Postoperative platelet function recovery was only detected in the heparinized samples. Heparin seems to be better suited than citrate for the analysis of impedance aggregometry in heart surgery.Keywords: cardiac surgery, impedance aggregometry, platelet recovery, sample anticoagulant  

  14. Factor analysis of multigated cardiac blood pool scintigram for the measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) was measured by factor analysis (FA) of multigated cardiac blood pool scintigram in 38 consecutive patients, and compared with that measured by the variable ROI method (EFVROI) with automated left ventricular contour detection. FA was automatically performed without operator intervention with a success rate of 100%. The correlation of EF with EFVROI was significant in the group of 22 patients with normal wall motion (r=0.65, p<0.001), and the entire group of patients (r=0.70, p<0.001), but not significant (p=0.19) in the group of 16 patients with abnormal wall motion. In conclusion, left ventricular ejection fraction can be estimated by factor analysis of MUGA in patients with normal wall motion. (author)

  15. Measurement of cardiac dimensions with two-dimensional echocardiography in the living horse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE) was performed on 22 unsedated Thoroughbred and part Thoroughbred horses weighing between 411 and 650 kg to establish normal reference values for 2DE measurements. Animals stood during examinations performed with a 3.5 MHz mechanical sector transducer using various transducer positions and tomographic planes. Right ventricular diameter (RVD), ventricular septal thickness (VSTh), aortic diameter (AoD), area of the chordal lumen of the left ventricle (CTA), left ventricular diameter (LVD) and left atrial diameter (LAD) were determined at ventricular end-diastole (Ed) and/or end-systole (Es). Fractional shortening (FS) of the left ventricle and end-systolic left atrial to aortic ratio (LADEs: AoD-Es) also were calculated. Echocardiographic data were related to body weight by linear regression analysis. Intra-observer variability was checked in five horses by measuring each parameter during each of 10 consecutive cardiac cycles. The 2DE data were compared with M-mode values in published reports. In the 18 horses whose weight did not exceed 551 kg, repeatable recordings of good quality were obtained, and 2DE measurements could be made using intra-cardiac reference points. Increasing body weight proved to impose substantial limitations on measurements taken with the available machine and transducer. This problem might be overcome by using probes of lower frequency or equipment with higher quality image display at greater depth. The following parameters correlated significantly to body weight: VSTh-Es (r = 0.69; P<0.01). AoD-Es (r = 0.64; P<0.01) and CTA-Es (r = 0.84; P<0.001). However, technical limitations prevented determination of the relationship between bodyweight and CTA-Ed and LVD-Ed. For each parameter, good reproducibility of values was found because the mean coefficient of variation (CV) varied between 2.6 and 7.2. In this study, 2DE provided reliable qualitative and quantitative assessment of cardiac anatomy and function

  16. Serial measurement of neuron specific enolase improves prognostication in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Storm Christian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuron specific enolase (NSE has repeatedly been evaluated for neurological prognostication in patients after cardiac arrest. However, it is unclear whether current guidelines for NSE cutoff levels also apply to cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. Thus, we investigated the prognostic significance of absolute NSE levels and NSE kinetics in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. Methods In a prospective study of 35 patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest, NSE was measured daily for four days following admission. Outcome was assessed at ICU discharge using the CPC score. All patients received hypothermia treatment for 24 hours at 33°C with a surface cooling device according to current guidelines. Results The cutoff for absolute NSE levels in patients with unfavourable outcome (CPC 3-5 72 hours after cardiac arrest was 57 μg/l with an area under the curve (AUC of 0.82 (sensitivity 47%, specificity 100%. The cutoff level for NSE kinetics in patients with unfavourable outcome (CPC 3-5 was an absolute increase of 7.9 μg/l (AUC 0.78, sensitivity 63%, specificity 100% and a relative increase of 33.1% (AUC 0.803, sensitivity 67%, specificity 100% at 48 hours compared to admission. Conclusion In cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia, prognostication of unfavourable outcome by NSE kinetics between admission and 48 hours after resuscitation may be superior to prognostication by absolute NSE levels.

  17. A Novel Device for Total Acoustic Output Measurement of High Power Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, S.; Twomey, R.; Morris, H.; Zanelli, C. I.

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a device for ultrasound power measurement applicable over a broad range of medical transducer types, orientations and powers, and which supports automatic measurements to simplify use and minimize errors. Considering all the recommendations from standards such as IEC 61161, an accurate electromagnetic null-balance has been designed for ultrasound power measurements. The sensing element is placed in the water to eliminate errors due to surface tension and water evaporation, and the motion and detection of force is constrained to one axis, to increase immunity to vibration from the floor, water sloshing and water surface waves. A transparent tank was designed so it could easily be submerged in a larger tank to accommodate large transducers or side-firing geometries, and can also be turned upside-down for upward-firing transducers. A vacuum lid allows degassing the water and target in situ. An external control module was designed to operate the sensing/driving loop and to communicate to a local computer for data logging. The sensing algorithm, which incorporates temperature compensation, compares the feedback force needed to cancel the motion for sources in the "on" and "off" states. These two states can be controlled by the control unit or manually by the user, under guidance by a graphical user interface (the system presents measured power live during collection). Software allows calibration to standard weights, or to independently calibrated acoustic sources. The design accommodates a variety of targets, including cone, rubber, brush targets and an oil-filled target for power measurement via buoyancy changes. Measurement examples are presented, including HIFU sources operating at powers from 1 to 100.

  18. Complete Inverse Method Using Ant Colony Optimization Algorithm for Structural Parameters and Excitation Identification from Output Only Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vibration-based structural health monitoring of existing large civil structures, it is difficult, sometimes even impossible, to measure the actual excitation applied to structures. Therefore, an identification method using output-only measurements is crucial for the practical application of structural health monitoring. This paper integrates the ant colony optimization (ACO algorithm into the framework of the complete inverse method to simultaneously identify unknown structural parameters and input time history using output-only measurements. The complete inverse method, which was previously suggested by the authors, converts physical or spatial information of the unknown input into the objective function of an optimization problem that can be solved by the ACO algorithm. ACO is a newly developed swarm computation method that has a very good performance in solving complex global continuous optimization problems. The principles and implementation procedure of the ACO algorithm are first introduced followed by an introduction of the framework of the complete inverse method. Construction of the objective function is then described in detail with an emphasis on the common situation wherein a limited number of actuators are installed on some key locations of the structure. Applicability and feasibility of the proposed method were validated by numerical examples and experimental results from a three-story building model.

  19. An Evaluative Measure for Outputs in Student-Run Public Relations Firms and Applied Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deemer, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    A valid, reliable survey instrument was created to be used by public relations student-run firms and other applied public relations courses to gauge client satisfaction. A series of focus groups and pilot tests were conducted to ascertain themes, refine questions, and then to refine the entire instrument. Six constructs to be measured, including…

  20. Icing measurements at Milešovka and their comparison with reanalysis and mesoscale model outputs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hošek, Jiří

    Yokohama: IWAIS 2007 Advisory Committee, 2007, ---. [IWAIS2007. International workshop on atmospheric icing of structures /12./. Yokohama (JP), 09.10.2007-13.10.2007] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05OC034 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : icing measurements * icing model * Milešovka Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  1. Methods of mathematical processing of impulse signals from output of initial transformers at measuring of radiation control parameters at NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of mathematical processing of impulse signals from the output of initial transformers of sensors while measuring radiation control parameters at NPP are considered in this article. Time of measuring is calculated taking into account a random error term. For implementation of requirements of norm documents for NPP in the sphere of precise (accurate) and time characteristics the 'moving window' method is used. It allows to renew the information got from the radiation control sensors with 1 s tact. For the increase of accuracy (precise) of measure of radiation control parameters, filtration is applied preliminary. It allows to filter the single troop landing. Its duration is no more than 100 ms. They are caused by the presence of impulse interference. The emergency troop landing modeling from NPP is produced with a random number generator

  2. Comprehensive Output Measurement: The 'Missing Link' in U.S. Federal Government Performance Reporting

    OpenAIRE

    King, David Lorne

    2014-01-01

    Performance and accrual-based financial management systems as envisaged in the 1990 Chief Financial Officers (CFO) Act, the 1993 Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA), the 1996 Federal Financial Management Improvement Act (FFMIA) and related legislation have been in place since prior to the turn of the millennium. Nevertheless, although performance has been measured and financial accountability improved in U.S. federal government agencies, there remains a gap in reporting on operation...

  3. The Measurement of Maximal (Anaerobic) Power Output on a Cycle Ergometer: A Critical Review

    OpenAIRE

    Tarak Driss; Henry Vandewalle

    2013-01-01

    The interests and limits of the different methods and protocols of maximal (anaerobic) power (P max) assessment are reviewed: single all-out tests versus force-velocity tests, isokinetic ergometers versus friction-loaded ergometers, measure of P max during the acceleration phase or at peak velocity. The effects of training, athletic practice, diet and pharmacological substances upon the production of maximal mechanical power are not discussed in this review mainly focused on the technical (er...

  4. Portable transfer digital dosemeter for beam output measurements with X and gamma rays, electrons and neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, A; Gokarn, R S; Gangadharan, P

    1981-04-01

    This instrument was developed in response to a requirement for an accurate, stable and portable transfer dosemeter for calibration, at therapy dose levels, of equipment used for generating X and gamma rays, electrons and neutrons. The detector is a 0.5 cm3 ionization chamber capable of fitting various wall materials reproducibly at the end of the chamber stem. The measuring system uniquely combines the features of a MOSFET electrometer and an automatic Townsend balance. When used for X, gamma and neutron radiations, the instrument measures the tissue kerma in free air on two ranges: 0.001 - 1.999 Gy (0.1 - 199.9 rad) and 0.01 - 19.99 Gy (1 - 1999 rad) or their exposure equivalents, with autoranging feature when the first range is exceeded. The polarizing voltage (180 V) can be reversed for electron and neutron dosimetry. The dosemeter has a measuring accuracy of +/- 0.2% FS +/- 1 digit and operates on four 1.5 V torchlight cells or on AC mains (200-250 V, 50 - 60 Hz). It utilizes solid state devices, CMOS integrated circuits and displays, and is not affected by RF fields. The instrument is enclosed in a brief-case for portability and is easy to operate and maintain in a hospital. PMID:7225720

  5. Portable transfer digital dosemeter for beam output measurements with X and gamma rays, electrons and neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This instrument was developed in response to a requirement for an accurate, stable and portable transfer dosemeter for calibration, at therapy dose levels, of equipment used for generating X and γ rays, electrons and neutrons. The detector is a 0.5 cm3 ionization chamber capable of fitting various wall materials reproducibly at the end of the chamber stem. The measuring system uniquely combines the features of a MOSFET electrometer and an automatic Townsend balance. When used for X, γ and neutron radiations, the instrument measures the tissue kerma in free air on two ranges: 0.001-1.999 Gy(0.1-199.9 rad) and 0.01-19.99 Gy(1-1999 rad) or their exposure equivalents, with autoranging feature when the first range is exceeded. The polarizing voltage (180 V) can be reversed for electron and neutron dosimetry. The dosemeter has a measuring accuracy of +-0.2% FS +-1 digit and operates on four 1.5 V torchlight cells or on AC mains (200-250 V, 50-60 Hz). It utilizes solid state devices, CMOS integrated circuits and displays, and is not affected by RF fields. The instrument is enclosed in a briefcase for portability and is easy to operate and maintain in a hospital. (author)

  6. Analysis of electrode configurations for measuring cardiac tissue conductivities and fibre rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Barbara M; Johnston, Peter R; Kilpatrick, David

    2006-06-01

    : This paper describes a multi-electrode grid, which could be used to determine cardiac tissue parameters by direct measurement. A two pass process is used, where potential measurements are made, during the plateau phase of the action potential, on a subset of these electrodes and these measurements are used to determine the bidomain conductivities. In the first pass, the potential measurements are made on a set of 'closely-spaced' electrodes and the parameters are fitted to the potential measurements in an iterative process using a bidomain model and a solver based on a modified Shor's r-algorithm. This first pass yields the extracellular conductivities. The second pass is similar except that a 'widely-spaced' electrode set is used and this time the intracellular conductivities are recovered. In addition, it is possible to determine the fibre rotation throughout the tissue, since the bidomain model used here is able to include the effects of fibre rotation. In the simulation studies presented here, the model is solved with known conductivities, on each of the two subsets of electrodes, to generate two sets of 'measured potentials.' Conductivities are then recovered by solving an inverse problem based on the measured potentials, to which various levels of noise are added. For example, simulations in the first pass are performed using an electrode spacing of 500 mum, for a situation where the longitudinal and transverse space constants are 769 and 308 mum, respectively. These give very accurate average percentage relative errors for the longitudinal and transverse extracellular conductivities, over five simulations with 1% noise added, of 0.3 and 0.2%. Twenty-five second pass simulations, on a 1 mm grid, yield average percentage relative errors of 3.8, 2.6 and 1.4% for the corresponding intracellular values and the fibre rotation angle, respectively. PMID:16783654

  7. Analysis of Upper Bound Power Output for a Wrist-Worn Rotational Energy Harvester from Real-World Measured Inputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy harvesting from human motion addresses the growing need for battery-free health and wellness sensors in wearable applications. The major obstacles to harvesting energy in such applications are low and random frequencies due to the nature of human motion. This paper presents a generalized rotational harvester model in 3 dimensions to determine the upper bound of power output from real world measured data. Simulation results indicate much space for improvement on power generation comparing to existing devices. We have developed a rotational energy harvester for human motion that attempts to close the gap between theoretical possibility and demonstrated devices. Like previous work, it makes use of magnetically plucked piezoelectric beams. However, it more fully utilizes the space available and has many degrees of freedom available for optimization. Finally we present a prototype harvester based on the coupled harvester model with preliminary experimental validation

  8. Design of Transmitter for CDM Based 2×2 Multiple Input Multiple Output Channel Sounder for Multipath Delay Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Ullah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO wireless communication system is an innovative solution to improve the bandwidth efficiency by exploiting multipath-richness of the propagation environment. The degree of multipath-richness of the channel will determine the capacity gain attainable by MIMO deployment. Approach: Therefore, it is very important to have accurate knowledge of the propagation environment/radio channel before MIMO implement. The radio channel behavior can be anticipated by channel measurement or channel sounding. Code Division Multiplexing (CDM is one of the channel sounding techniques that allow accurate measurement at the cost of hardware complexity. CDM based channel sounder, requires code with excellent auto-correlation and cross-correlation properties which generally difficult to be achieved simultaneously. Results: In this study, an efficient transmitter for CDM-based 2×2 MIMO channel sounding technique with Loosely Synchronous (LS codes is designed. Simulation results shows that the channel sounding scheme using LS codes gives very good performance for measuring 2×2 MIMO channel behavior. The BPSK transmitter is designed using MATLAB, Verilog and Xilinx system generator blocks. Conclusion: The whole design is simulated as a single ISE project by using ModelSim simulation tool and compiled using ISE 9.2. However the proposed design of transmitter using LS code of length 8190 bits can measure multipath delay of minimum 0.13 μs and maximum 520 μs.

  9. Global source identification of arctic air pollution using statistical analysis of particle dispersion model output and measurement data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Arctic air pollution has received renewed interest recently because of its contribution to climate change in the arctic. Nevertheless, its sources are still not known with sufficient accuracy. Most of our understanding of artic air pollution sources is based on model simulations, analysis of air pollution episodes or, at best, statistical analysis of air mass back-trajectories. We present a new approach, namely combining the output of a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, FLEXPART, with measurement data from Arctic air pollution monitoring sites (Alert, Barrow, Zeppelin). This approach is similar to existing statistical methods for analyzing back-trajectories in conjunction with air pollution monitoring data. However, it has the advantage that the underlying model calculations also take into account turbulence and convection in the atmosphere, which are ignored by ordinary trajectory calculations. FLEXPART is run 20 days backward in time from each of the stations and every three hours, for several years. With every calculation, a so-called potential emission sensitivity (PES) field is obtained, which identifies where the measured air mass has come into contact with the Earth's surface. It quantitatively measures the sensitivity of the signal obtained at the station, to emissions occurring at or near the surface. By combining these PES fields with measured concentrations of several trace species and performing a statistical analysis, we identify where the measured species originate. Statistical analyses are performed both for average concentrations as well as the 10th and 90th percentiles of the measured frequency distribution. We show results for black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3) for every station individually as well as by combining data from all stations, both yearly and for different seasons of the year. We find strong differences in source regions between the 10th and 90th percentiles, in particular for CO. (author)

  10. SU-E-T-370: Measurement of Conical Cone Output Factors for the Varian Edge Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of detector type, SSD/depth, and intermediate reference on conical cone output factor (OF) measurements for the Varian Edge linac. Methods: OF's for 4, 5, 7.5, 10, 12.5, 15, and 17.5 mm diameter cones relative to 10cmx10cm field were measured for the 6X FFF and 10X FFF energies, with jaws set to 5cmx5cm. Measurements were performed with an Edge diode (0.8mmx0.8mmx0.03mm WxLxT), stereotatic diode SFD, photon diode, CC01 and pinpoint chambers (2mm diameter for both). 95cm SSD/5cm depth were used in a water tank. For the measurement with diodes, OF's were cross-referred to CC13 ion chamber measurements with 3cmx3cm field, as recommended, to help mitigate the energy variation in diode response with field size. Results were compared to the representative data from Varian measured with Edge detector. With SFD, OF's at 98.5cm SSD/1.5cm depth and 90cm SSD/10cm depth were also measured. Results: OF's measured with the Edge detector matched within 1.3% (max diff) with the representative data from Varian. For the SFD, OF's matched within 1.3% for the 4, 5 and 17.5 mm cones and within 3.7% for the other cones. OF's with photon diode were within 1.3% except for the 4 and 5 mm cones where they were 8.1% and 3.7%, respectively. OF's for the CC01 and pinpoint chamber deviated up to 36% and 44%, respectively for the 4 mm cone. OF's after intermediate reference with 3cmx3cm field changed by 3.7% for SFD, 0.8% for photon diode, and 0.6% for Edge detector. OF's at 98.5cm SSD/1.5cm depth were 10.8% higher than that at 95cm SSD/5cm depth, and OF's at 90cm SSD/1.5cm depth were 7.5% lower. Conclusion: OF's measured with the Edge detector appear to be reliable. CC01 and pinpoint chambers do not appear suitable for measuring the small cone OF's. SSD/depth affects OF measurements significantly

  11. Rapidly detecting disorder in rhythmic biological signals: a spectral entropy measure to identify cardiac arrhythmias

    CERN Document Server

    Staniczenko, Phillip P A; Jones, Nick S

    2008-01-01

    We consider the use of a running measure of power spectrum disorder to distinguish between the normal sinus rhythm of the heart and two forms of cardiac arrhythmia: atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. This is motivated by characteristic differences in the spectra of beats during the three rhythms. We plot patient data derived from 10-beat windows on a `disorder map' and identify rhythm-defining ranges in the level and variance of spectral entropy values. Employing the spectral entropy within an automatic arrhythmia detection algorithm enables the classification of periods of atrial fibrillation from the time series of patients' beats. When the algorithm is set to identify abnormal rhythms within 6s it agrees with 85.7% of the annotations of professional rhythm assessors; for a response time of 30s this becomes 89.5%, and with 60s it is 90.3%. The algorithm provides a rapid way to detect atrial fibrillation, demonstrating usable response times as low as six seconds. Measures of disorder in the frequency do...

  12. Repeatability of cardiac-MRI-measured right ventricular size and function in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Rowan; Salem, Yishay [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Shah, Amee; Lai, Wyman W. [Morgan Stanley Children' s Hospital of New York Presbyterian, New York, NY (United States); Nielsen, James C. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai Children' s Heart Center, Box 1201, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The measurement error for right ventricular (RV) size and function assessed by cardiac MRI (CMRI) in congenital heart disease has not been fully characterized. As CMRI parameters are being increasingly utilized to make clinical decisions, defining error in the clinical setting is critical. This investigation examines the repeatability of CMRI for RV size and function. Forty consecutive people with congenital heart disease involving the RV were retrospectively identified. Contouring of RV volumes was performed by two expert CMRI clinicians. The coefficient of variability and repeatability coefficients were calculated. Repeatability coefficients were multiplied by the mean value for each group studied to define a threshold beyond which measurement error was unlikely to be responsible. The variability for indexed RV end-diastolic volume = 3.2% and 3.3% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, respectively. The repeatability coefficients were 13.2% and 14.9% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, which yielded threshold values of 15.1 ml/m{sup 2} and 20.2 ml/m{sup 2}, respectively. For RV ejection fraction (EF), the repeatability coefficients for intra- and interobserver comparisons were 5.0% and 6.0%, which resulted in threshold values of 2.6 EF% and 3.0 EF%. The threshold values generated can be used during serial assessment of RV size and function. (orig.)

  13. Repeatability of cardiac-MRI-measured right ventricular size and function in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement error for right ventricular (RV) size and function assessed by cardiac MRI (CMRI) in congenital heart disease has not been fully characterized. As CMRI parameters are being increasingly utilized to make clinical decisions, defining error in the clinical setting is critical. This investigation examines the repeatability of CMRI for RV size and function. Forty consecutive people with congenital heart disease involving the RV were retrospectively identified. Contouring of RV volumes was performed by two expert CMRI clinicians. The coefficient of variability and repeatability coefficients were calculated. Repeatability coefficients were multiplied by the mean value for each group studied to define a threshold beyond which measurement error was unlikely to be responsible. The variability for indexed RV end-diastolic volume = 3.2% and 3.3% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, respectively. The repeatability coefficients were 13.2% and 14.9% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, which yielded threshold values of 15.1 ml/m2 and 20.2 ml/m2, respectively. For RV ejection fraction (EF), the repeatability coefficients for intra- and interobserver comparisons were 5.0% and 6.0%, which resulted in threshold values of 2.6 EF% and 3.0 EF%. The threshold values generated can be used during serial assessment of RV size and function. (orig.)

  14. Troponin not just a simple cardiac marker: prognostic significance of cardiac troponin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benny Mulyanto Setiadi; LEI Han; CHANG Jing

    2009-01-01

    Objective The object of this study was to review the role of cardiac troponin as a prognostic factor in acute coronary syndrome patients of varying circumstances.Data sources The data used in this review were obtained mainly from the studies of cardiac troponin reported in pubmed from 1981 to 2006.Study selection Relevant articles on studies of cardiac troponin were selected.Results Elevated cardiac troponin in patients with ST elevation and non ST elevation myocardial infarction was associated with adverse outcomes, including a higher incidence of congestive heart failure, shock, and death. Patients with elevated cardiac troponin value seemed to benefit more from invasive strategies including a percutaneous coronary intervention and bypass surgery, but elevated cardiac troponin was also correlated with adverse outcomes, including a higher degree of failure, shock, and mortality in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention; a higher degree of perioperative myocardial infarction, low cardiac output syndrome, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and new-onset ventricular arrhythmia in patients undergoing bypass surgery were also observed. Elevated troponin after a percutaneous coronary intervention seemed to be associated with short-term adverse outcomes rather than long-term adverse outcomes, unless the elevation of the troponin post percutaneous coronary intervention was quite high (about 5 times above normal). On the contrary, elevated cardiac troponin after bypass surgery was more confusing to analyze since it happened in almost all patients. Furthermore, differences in cutoff values and time measurements in some studies add more confusion; thus, further research is warranted.Conclusions The prognostic value of cardiac troponin is demonstrated in almost all acute coronary syndrome patients. In addition to its high sensitivity and specificity, the prognostic value of cardiac troponin is another reason to make it the "golden cardiac marker' of this time.

  15. Validation of measurements of Fourier phase and amplitude analysis of technetium99 gated cardiac scans using artificial hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of artificial hearts, developed for total heart replacement programs, allows assessment of the accuracy of measuring the first Fourier component phase and amplitude when applied to gated cardiac technetium 99 scans. In the extreme example of asynchrony of ventricular contraction in coronary artery disease that of ventricular aneurysms, the first Fourier component measurements of amplitude were highly correlated to volume increases suggesting that the calculated amplitude accurately reflects volume changes. The calculated asynchrony using Fourier analysis of the gated technetium 99 studies of two artificial hearts was highly accurate when compared to the predetermined calculation of phase angle difference and hence degree of asynchrony. The studies suggest that measurement of phase and amplitude using the first Fourier component of time-activity waves of gated cardiac technetium 99 studies accurately measure degree of asynchrony and volume changes respectively

  16. Progress in developing a thermal method for measuring the output power of medical ultrasound transducers that exploits the pyroelectric effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeqiri, Bajram; Zauhar, Gordana; Hodnett, Mark; Barrie, Jill

    2011-05-01

    Progress in developing a new measurement method for ultrasound output power is described. It is a thermal-based technique with the acoustic power generated by a transducer being absorbed within a specially developed polyurethane rubber material, whose high absorption coefficient ensures energy deposition within a few mm of the ultrasonic wave entering the material. The rate of change of temperature at the absorber surface is monitored using the pyroelectric voltage generated from electrodes disposed either side of a 60 mm diameter, 0.061 mm thick membrane of the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride (pvdf) bonded to the absorber. The change in the pyroelectric output voltage generated by the sensor when the transducer is switched ON and OFF is proportional to the delivered ultrasound power. The sensitivity of the device is defined as the magnitude of these switch voltages to a unit input stimulus of power (watt). Three important aspects of the performance of the pyroelectric sensor have been studied. Firstly, measurements have revealed that the temperature dependent sensitivity increases over the range from approximately 20°C to 30°C at a rate of +1.6% °C(-1). Studies point to the key role that the properties of both the absorbing backing layer and pvdf membrane play in controlling the sensor response. Secondly, the high sensitivity of the technique has been demonstrated using an NPL Pulsed Checksource, a 3.5 MHz focused transducer delivering a nominal acoustic power level of 4 mW. Finally, proof-of-concept of a new type of acoustic sensor responding to time-averaged intensity has been demonstrated, through fabrication of an absorber-backed hydrophone of nominal active element diameter 0.4 mm. A preliminary study using such a device to resolve the spatial distribution of acoustic intensity within plane-piston and focused 3.5 MHz acoustic fields has been completed. Derived beam profiles are compared to conventional techniques that depend on deriving

  17. Equilibrator-based measurements of dissolved methane in the surface ocean using an integrated cavity output laser absorption spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuhong; ZHAN Liyang; ZHANG Jiexia; CHEN Liqi

    2015-01-01

    A new off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) is coupled to Weiss equilibrator for continuous high-resolution dissolved methane measurement in the surface ocean. The time constant for the equilibrator in freshwater at room temperature is determined via dis-equilibration and re-equilibration experiments. The constant for methane is about 40 min. The system is calibrated using a standard gas of 3.980×10–6, and the precision of the ICOS for methane is 0.07%. This system is equipped onboard to measure the spatial distribution in methane concentrations of South Yellow Sea (SYS) along the cruise track from Shanghai to Qingdao. Result shows that the methane concentration varies from 2.79 to 36.36 nmol/L, reveals a significant pattern of methane source in SYS, and a distinct decreasing trend from south to north. The peak value occurs at the coast area outside mouth of the Changjiang River, likely to be affected by the Changjiang diluted water mass dissolving a large amount of rich in methane. Moreover, all the surface waters are oversaturated, air-to-sea fluxes range from 98.59 to 5 485.35 μmol/(m2·d) (average value (1 169.74±1 398.46) μmol/(m2·d)), indicating a source region for methane to the atmosphere.

  18. Cardiac metabolism during exercise in healthy volunteers measured by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, M A; Bristow, J D; Blackledge, M J; Rajagopalan, B; Radda, G K

    1991-01-01

    A technique was devised for individuals to exercise prone in a magnet during magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the heart and phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectra of the heart were obtained by the phase modulated rotating frame imaging technique in six healthy volunteers during steady state dynamic quadriceps exercise. During prone exercise heart rate, blood pressure, and total body oxygen consumption were measured at increasing loads and the results were compared with those during Bruce protocol treadmill exercise. During prone exercise with a 5 kg load the heart rate was similar and the systolic and diastolic blood pressures were higher than those during stage 1 of the Bruce protocol. The rate-pressure products were similar but the total body oxygen consumption was lower during prone exercise. There was no difference in the ratio of phosphocreatine to adenosine triphosphate during rest and exercise.Thus during exercise that produced a local cardiac stress equal to or greater than that during stage 1 of the Bruce protocol treadmill exercise, the energy requirements of the normal human myocardium were adequately supplied by oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:1993127

  19. A compact and stable eddy covariance set-up for methane measurements using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. D. Hendriks

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A Fast Methane Analyzer (FMA is assessed for its applicability in a closed path eddy covariance field set-up in a peat meadow. The FMA uses off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy combined with a highly specific narrow band laser for the detection of CH4 and strongly reflective mirrors to obtain a laser path length of 2–20×103 m. Statistical testing and a calibration experiment showed high precision (7.8×10−3 ppb and accuracy (<0.30% of the instrument, while no drift was observed. The instrument response time was determined to be 0.10 s. In the field set-up, the FMA is attached to a scroll pump and combined with a 3-axis ultrasonic anemometer and an open path infrared gas analyzer for measurements of carbon dioxide and water vapour. The power-spectra and co-spectra of the instruments were satisfactory for 10 Hz sampling rates.

    Due to erroneous measurements, spikes and periods of low turbulence the data series consisted for 26% of gaps. Observed CH4 fluxes consisted mainly of emission, showed a diurnal cycle, but were rather variable over. The average CH4 emission was 29.7 nmol m−2 s−1, while the typical maximum CH4 emission was approximately 80.0 nmol m−2 s−1 and the typical minimum flux was approximately 0.0 nmol m−2 s−1. The correspondence of the measurements with flux chamber measurements in the footprint was good and the observed CH4 emission rates were comparable with eddy covariance CH4 measurements in other peat areas.

    Additionally, three measurement techniques with lower sampling frequencies were simulated, which might give the possibility to measure CH4 fluxes without an external pump and save energy. Disjunct eddy covariance appeared to be the most reliable substitute for 10 Hz eddy covariance, while relaxed eddy accumulation gave

  20. Effect of cardiac function on aortic peak time and peak enhancement during coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Shuji, E-mail: sakai@shs.kyushu-u.ac.j [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yabuuchi, Hidetake, E-mail: yabuuchi@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.j [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Chishaki, Akiko, E-mail: chishaki@shs.kyushu-u.ac.j [Department of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Okafuji, Takashi, E-mail: oka-pu@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.j [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Matsuo, Yoshio, E-mail: yymatsuo@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.j [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Kamitani, Takeshi, E-mail: kamitani@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.j [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Setoguchi, Taro, E-mail: taro-s@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.j [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi, E-mail: honda@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.j [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To examine the manner in which cardiac function affects the magnitude and timing of aortic contrast enhancement during coronary CT angiography (CTA). Materials and methods: Twenty-nine patients (21 men, 8 women; mean age, 64.4 {+-} 13.4 years; mean weight, 59.4 {+-} 10.3 kg) underwent measurement of cardiac output within 2 weeks of coronary CTA. The cardiac output of each patient was measured by the thermodilution technique and the cardiac index was calculated from the body surface area. During coronary CTA, attenuation of the descending aorta was measured at the workstation every 3 s. The aortic peak time (APT) and aortic peak enhancement (APE) of each patient were calculated. Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis was used to investigate the relationships between the cardiac output or cardiac index and APT or APE. Furthermore, the relationship between patient factors or parameters on test bolus injection and APT or APE was also evaluated. Results: The range of cardiac output, cardiac index, APT, and APE was 1.55-10.46 L/min (mean: 4.77 {+-} 2.13), 1.11-5.30 L/(min-m{sup 2}) (mean: 3.28 {+-} 1.08), 25-51 s (mean: 38.3 {+-} 7.5), and 273.1-598.1 HU (mean: 390.4 {+-} 72.1), respectively. With an increase in the cardiac index, both APT (r = -0.698, p < 0.0001) and APE (r = -0.573, p = 0.0009) decreased. There were significant correlations between the patient body weight and APT and APE with the test bolus injection, and with APT and APE during coronary CTA. Conclusion: The APT and APE during coronary CTA are closely related to cardiac function.

  1. Evaluation of a simple radionuclide procedure for left-to-right cardiac shunt measurement - correlation with earpiece densitometry and cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of shunts from systemic to pulmonary circulation using a simple radionuclide technique has been introduced at our department. A good bolus of the Technetium-99m sodium pertechnetate at a dose of 200 μCi/kg body weight (minimal dose 2 mCi) was injected by way of a scalp vein needle connected to a three-way stopcock, thus permitting immediate flushing of the radioactive bolus dose with physiologic saline solution. An IGE-400A gamma camera with a low-energy, high-sensitivity parallel hole collimator was used. The data were stored for analysis on a Star computer at a rate of 4 frames/second for a 40-second period. Twenty-three patients (aged 3-33 years) underwent first pass radionuclide angiography and cardiac catheterization to estimate the degree of systemic-to-pulmonary shunting (QP/QS) ratio). In 15 of these patients, another non-invasive method, earpiece densitometry (EPD), was done to determine the size of the shunt qualitatively. Fifteen healthy volunteers submitted to first pass studies comprised our control group. Out of the 23 patients with shunts, 15 had simple intra-cardiac septal defects (atrial or ventricular) or patent ductus arteriosus, and 8 had valvular lesions plus shunts. Compared with the oximetry data, EPD resulted in misclassification of 5 out of 15 patients in that left-to-right shunts were interpreted as moderate in 4, i.e. QP/QS 2:1, when in fact they were smaller. The correlation coefficient value of the first pass method for simple defect is r=0.89 (A=0.41 and B=0.85), for combined lesions it is r=0.94 (A=0.1 and B=1.1). The mean value for QP:QS in 15 normal subjects is 1.06:1 (SD=± 0.05). We conclude that first pass radionuclide angiography is a non-invasive and reliable method for determining QP/QS ratios. Unlike cardiac catheterization, it can be performed rapidly on an out-patient basis. (orig./TRV)

  2. A compact and stable eddy covariance set-up for methane measurements using off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. D. Hendriks

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A DLT-100 Fast Methane Analyser (FMA from Los Gatos Research (LGR Ltd. is assessed for its applicability in a closed path eddy covariance field set-up. The FMA uses off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS combined with a highly specific narrow band laser for the detection of CH4 and strongly reflective mirrors to obtain a laser path length of 2×10³ to 20×10³ m. Statistical testing, a calibration experiment and comparison with high tower data showed high precision and very good stability of the instrument. The measurement cell response time was tested to be 0.10 s. In the field set-up, the FMA is attached to a scroll pump and combined with a Gill Windmaster Pro 3 axis Ultrasonic Anemometer and a Licor 7500 open path infrared gas analyzer. The power-spectra and co-spectra of the instrument are satisfactory for 10 Hz sampling rates. The correspondence with CH4 flux chamber measurements is good and the observed CH4 emissions are comparable with (eddy covariance CH4 measurements in other peat areas.

    CH4 emissions are rather variable over time and show a diurnal pattern. The average CH4 emission is 50±12.5 nmol m−2 s−1, while the typical maximum CH4 emission is 120±30 nmol m−2 s−1 (during daytime and the typical minimum flux is –20±2.5 nmol m−2 s−1 (uptake, during night time.

    Additionally, the set-up was tested for three measurement techniques with slower measurement rates, which could be used in the future to make the scroll pump superfluous and save energy. Both disjunct eddy covariance as well as slow 1 Hz eddy covariance showed results very similar to normal 10 Hz eddy covariance. Relaxed eddy accumulation (REA only matched with normal 10 Hz eddy covariance over an averaging period of at least several weeks.

  3. EVALUACIÓN ECOCARDIOGRÁFICA DEL GASTO CARDÍACO SISTÉMICO EN LA ATRESIA PULMONAR CON SEPTO INTERVENTRICULAR INTACTO / Echocardiographic evaluation of cardiac output in pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Serrano Ricardo

    2013-07-01

    hemodynamic performance, influencing cardiac output and generating potential conditions for short-term prognosis. Method: A descriptive, prospective and applied study was conducted. It included 43 patients who were referred to the William Soler Pediatric Cardiology Hospital from January 1992 to November 2011 with a diagnosis of the disease. In each subject, the profiles of eight echocardiographic variables were assessed, as well as the heart rate profile. Their level of association and mutual dependence were statistically assessed by simple regression models. Results: There are considerable variations in heart rate, in the volume index and in the ejection fraction of the patients´ left ventricle compared with those in the reference control group. Conclusions: The increased size of the atrial septal defect and the prolongation of transmitral diastasis favor left ventricular volume increment. Heart rate, the restrictive nature of the left ventricular myocardium and its ejection fraction are regulatory factors of cardiac output in this disease.

  4. The PhysioFlow Thoracic Impedancemeter Is Not Valid for the Measurements of Cardiac Hemodynamic Parameters in Chronic Anemic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bogui, Pascal; Balayssac-Siransy, Edwige; Connes, Philippe; Tuo, Nalourgo; Ouattara, Soualiho; Pichon, Aurélien; Dah, Cyrille Serges

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the validity of the transthoracic electrical bioimpedance method PhysioFlow® to measure stroke volume in patients with chronic anemia. Stroke volume index (SVI), as well as cardiac index (CI) obtained by transthoracic electrical bioimpedance method and doppler echocardiography were compared in healthy subjects (n = 25) and patients with chronic anemia (i.e. mainly with sickle cell anemia; n = 32), at rest. While doppler echocardiography was able to det...

  5. Evaluation of a high-sensitivity assay for measurement of canine and feline serum cardiac troponin I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhorn, Rebecca; Willesen, Jakob; Tarnow, Inge; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac troponins are established as the gold standard biomarkers for acute cardiac injury. As even small elevations of cardiac troponins have prognostic relevance in people, it is important to investigate the performance of sensitive assays for use in veterinary medicine.......Cardiac troponins are established as the gold standard biomarkers for acute cardiac injury. As even small elevations of cardiac troponins have prognostic relevance in people, it is important to investigate the performance of sensitive assays for use in veterinary medicine....

  6. Transplanting hearts after death measured by cardiac criteria: the challenge to the dead donor rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Robert M

    2010-06-01

    The current definition of death used for donation after cardiac death relies on a determination of the irreversible cessation of the cardiac function. Although this criterion can be compatible with transplantation of most organs, it is not compatible with heart transplantation since heart transplants by definition involve the resuscitation of the supposedly "irreversibly" stopped heart. Subsequently, the definition of "irreversible" has been altered so as to permit heart transplantation in some circumstances, but this is unsatisfactory. There are three available strategies for solving this "irreversibility problem": altering the definition of death so as to rely on circulatory irreversibility, rather than cardiac; defining death strictly on the basis of brain death (either whole-brain or more pragmatically some higher brain criteria); or redefining death in traditional terms and simultaneously legalizing some limited instances of medical killing to procure viable hearts. The first two strategies are the most ethically justifiable and practical. PMID:20439354

  7. SU-E-T-586: Field Size Dependence of Output Factor for Uniform Scanning Proton Beams: A Comparison of TPS Calculation, Measurement and Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Output dependence on field size for uniform scanning beams, and the accuracy of treatment planning system (TPS) calculation are not well studied. The purpose of this work is to investigate the dependence of output on field size for uniform scanning beams and compare it among TPS calculation, measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Methods: Field size dependence was studied using various field sizes between 2.5 cm diameter to 10 cm diameter. The field size factor was studied for a number of proton range and modulation combinations based on output at the center of spread out Bragg peak normalized to a 10 cm diameter field. Three methods were used and compared in this study: 1) TPS calculation, 2) ionization chamber measurement, and 3) Monte Carlos simulation. The XiO TPS (Electa, St. Louis) was used to calculate the output factor using a pencil beam algorithm; a pinpoint ionization chamber was used for measurements; and the Fluka code was used for Monte Carlo simulations. Results: The field size factor varied with proton beam parameters, such as range, modulation, and calibration depth, and could decrease over 10% from a 10 cm to 3 cm diameter field for a large range proton beam. The XiO TPS predicted the field size factor relatively well at large field size, but could differ from measurements by 5% or more for small field and large range beams. Monte Carlo simulations predicted the field size factor within 1.5% of measurements. Conclusion: Output factor can vary largely with field size, and needs to be accounted for accurate proton beam delivery. This is especially important for small field beams such as in stereotactic proton therapy, where the field size dependence is large and TPS calculation is inaccurate. Measurements or Monte Carlo simulations are recommended for output determination for such cases

  8. Noninvasive measurement of left ventricular pressure and max dP/dt using radionuclide multigated cardiac pool image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noninvasive measurements of left ventricular pressure and max dP/dt were performed using radionuclide multigated cardiac pool image (RMPI). The following differential equation was derived from the Bernoulli's theorum; dP/dt=ρ/S2.(dV/dt).(d2V/dt2) where dP/dt is the first derivative of the left ventricular pressure. ρ is the density of the blood, S is an area of the aortic valvular orifice, dV/dt and d2V/dt2 are the first and second derivatives of the cardiac volume measured by RMPI. The left ventricular pressure was calculated by the integrating of this equation in 6 patients. The max dP/dt was derived from Harada's equation; max dP/dt=ρ.C.max(du/dt) where ρ is the density of the blood, c is the pulse velocity of the aorta, and u is the velocity of the blood stream, therefore, du/dt is the acceleration of the blood stream. Value of du/dt was regarded as equivalent to d2V/dt2 obtained from the RMPI volume curves using the third Fourier's transform. Results were as follows; 1) The pressure curves determined from 6 subjects by the RMPI method were not exactly identical to those obtained directly by cardiac catheterization. The discrepancy is probably due to the interaction with reflexion waves. 2) Despite the above discrepancy, there was a significant correlation (r=0.57, Y=1.18X+146, p<0.05) between max dP/dt (X) measured from 16 subjects by cardiac catheterization and calculated max dP/dt (RI) (Y). It was concluded that the max dP/dt could be estimated noninvasively by RMPI method. (author)

  9. Cardiac impairment evaluated by transesophageal echocardiography and invasive measurements in rats undergoing sinoaortic denervation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel A Sirvente

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sympathetic hyperactivity may be related to left ventricular (LV dysfunction and baro- and chemoreflex impairment in hypertension. However, cardiac function, regarding the association of hypertension and baroreflex dysfunction, has not been previously evaluated by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE using intracardiac echocardiographic catheter. METHODS AND RESULTS: We evaluated exercise tests, baroreflex sensitivity and cardiovascular autonomic control, cardiac function, and biventricular invasive pressures in rats 10 weeks after sinoaortic denervation (SAD. The rats (n = 32 were divided into 4 groups: 16 Wistar (W with (n = 8 or without SAD (n = 8 and 16 spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR with (n = 8 or without SAD (SHRSAD (n = 8. Blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR did not change between the groups with or without SAD; however, compared to W, SHR groups had higher BP levels and BP variability was increased. Exercise testing showed that SHR had better functional capacity compared to SAD and SHRSAD. Echocardiography showed left ventricular (LV concentric hypertrophy; segmental systolic and diastolic biventricular dysfunction; indirect signals of pulmonary arterial hypertension, mostly evident in SHRSAD. The end-diastolic right ventricular (RV pressure increased in all groups compared to W, and the end-diastolic LV pressure increased in SHR and SHRSAD groups compared to W, and in SHRSAD compared to SAD. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that baroreflex dysfunction impairs cardiac function, and increases pulmonary artery pressure, supporting a role for baroreflex dysfunction in the pathogenesis of hypertensive cardiac disease. Moreover, TEE is a useful and feasible noninvasive technique that allows the assessment of cardiac function, particularly RV indices in this model of cardiac disease.

  10. Development of measurement device for evaluation of solar cell module output. 2; Taiyo denchi module shutsuryoku hyokayo sokuteiki no kaihatsu. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minoda, M.; Itsumi, J. [Kumamoto Institute of Technology, Kumamoto (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    Enhancement in design efficiency may be attained as well as utilization in maintenance if on-the-spot data is made available, for the purpose of flexibly dealing with changes in design or matching with a house structure, in calculating the power generation output of a solar cell (PV) module. Under the circumstances, a small-sized compound measuring device was produced as a prototype which, using an I-V curve tracer, measured output and condition of a roof at the time of installation, compared with the optimum operation and predicted the power generation. The device was structured with the main body consisting of a computing part, measurement controller and power supply and with various sensor modules. The electron load control method was employed in order to measure I-V characteristics of the PV module, since it was desirable to use a variable load and to cover the range from the release voltage of a solar cell to the short-circuit state through the maximum output point. The reference module method was used for the system evaluation. The device was presumably applicable to a PV system design by incorporating a sensor module for measuring design environment data, which was essential at the time of a system design, in addition to those for measuring output. 9 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Assessment of the dose distribution inside a cardiac cath lab using TLD measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last decade, there was a substantial increase in the number of interventional cardiology procedures worldwide, and the corresponding ionizing radiation doses for both the medical staff and patients became a subject of concern. Interventional procedures in cardiology are normally very complex, resulting in long exposure times. Also, these interventions require the operator to work near the patient and, consequently, close to the primary X-ray beam. Moreover, due to the scattered radiation from the patient and the equipment, the medical staff is also exposed to a non-uniform radiation field that can lead to a significant exposure of sensitive body organs and tissues, such as the eye lens, the thyroid and the extremities. In order to better understand the spatial variation of the dose and dose rate distributions during an interventional cardiology procedure, the dose distribution around a C-arm fluoroscopic system, in operation in a cardiac cath lab at Portuguese Hospital, was estimated using both Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and dosimetric measurements. To model and simulate the cardiac cath lab, including the fluoroscopic equipment used to execute interventional procedures, the state-of-the-art MC radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.0 was used. Subsequently, Thermo-Luminescent Detector (TLD) measurements were performed, in order to validate and support the simulation results obtained for the cath lab model. The preliminary results presented in this study reveal that the cardiac cath lab model was successfully validated, taking into account the good agreement between MC calculations and TLD measurements. The simulated results for the isodose curves related to the C-arm fluoroscopic system are also consistent with the dosimetric information provided by the equipment manufacturer (Siemens). The adequacy of the implemented computational model used to simulate complex procedures and map dose distributions around the operator and the medical staff is discussed, in

  12. Measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction with ionic sup(113m)In and a cardiac probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was measured with a cardiac probe (Nuclear Stethoscope. Bios Inc., Valhalla, New York) and sup(113m)In in 28 normal subjects and 86 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). In 20 normal subjects sup(99m)TC-RBCs were compared with sup(113m)In, which binds to transferrin after IV injection. With sup(99m)Tc-RBCs average LVEF was 57+-7% (1 SD); with sup(113m)In, average LEVF was 55+-8% (N.S.). Sequential measurements at different times over 60 min revealed good reproducibility. Comparison of LVEF's obtained using sup(99m)Tc-RBCs with a gamma camera and cardiac probe revealed a good correlation. The correlation coefficients were 0.92 in 25 patients with CAD and 0.95 in 10 patients with LV wall motion abnormalities. The LVEF obtained using a cardiac probe and sup(113m)In increased in 28 normals from 57+-9% to 64+-13% (P<0.001) during handgrip exercise, while the LVEF decreased from 45+-9% to 41+-10% (P<0.01) in patients with acute myocardial infarction 4-7 weeks after episode, from 48+-11 to 40+-12% (P<0.001) in patients with old myocardial infarction, and from 52+-9 to 42+-9% (P<0.001) in patients with angina pectoris. The cardiac probe and sup(113m)In provide a useful alternate means of determining left ventricular dysfunction in facilities where sup(99m)Tc and a gamma camera computer system are not readily available. (orig.)

  13. Measurement of left ventricular ejection fraction with ionic sup(113m)In and a cardiac probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X.; Harrison, K.S.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1982-09-01

    Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was measured with a cardiac probe (Nuclear Stethoscope. Bios Inc., Valhalla, New York) and sup(113m)In in 28 normal subjects and 86 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). In 20 normal subjects sup(99m)TC-RBCs were compared with sup(113m)In, which binds to transferrin after IV injection. With sup(99m)Tc-RBCs average LVEF was 57+-7% (1 SD); with sup(113m)In, average LEVF was 55+-8% (N.S.). Sequential measurements at different times over 60 min revealed good reproducibility. Comparison of LVEF's obtained using sup(99m)Tc-RBCs with a gamma camera and cardiac probe revealed a good correlation. The correlation coefficients were 0.92 in 25 patients with CAD and 0.95 in 10 patients with LV wall motion abnormalities. The LVEF obtained using a cardiac probe and sup(113m)In increased in 28 normals from 57+-9% to 64+-13% (P<0.001) during handgrip exercise, while the LVEF decreased from 45+-9% to 41+-10% (P<0.01) in patients with acute myocardial infarction 4-7 weeks after episode, from 48+-11 to 40+-12% (P<0.001) in patients with old myocardial infarction, and from 52+-9 to 42+-9% (P<0.001) in patients with angina pectoris. The cardiac probe and sup(113m)In provide a useful alternate means of determining left ventricular dysfunction in facilities where sup(99m)Tc and a gamma camera computer system are not readily available.

  14. Standardization of measuring power output during wheelchair propulsion on a treadmill Pitfalls in a multi-center study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, S; Zuidgeest, M; van der Woude, L H V

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In a multi-center study the power output of wheelchair propulsion, attained by a wheelchair drag test, differed among rehabilitation centers. The purpose of this study was to investigate what causes the differences in drag force among centers. METHODS: A set of standardized drag tests was

  15. Impedance measurement to assess epicardial fat prior to RF intraoperative cardiac ablation: a feasibility study using a computer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiofrequency (RF) cardiac ablation is used to treat certain types of arrhythmias. In the epicardial approach, efficacy of RF ablation is uncertain due to the presence of epicardial adipose tissue interposed between the ablation electrode and the atrial wall. We planned a feasibility study based on a theoretical model in order to assess a new technique to estimate the quantity of fat by conducting bioimpedance measurements using a multi-electrode probe. The finite element method was used to solve the electrical problem. The results showed that the measured impedance profile coincided approximately with the epicardial fat profile measured under the probe electrodes and also that the thicker the epicardial fat, the higher the impedance values. When the lateral fat width was less than 4.5 mm, the impedance values altered, suggesting that measurements should always be conducted over a sizeable fat layer. We concluded that impedance measurement could be a practical method of assessing epicardial fat prior to RF intraoperative cardiac ablation, i.e. 'to map' the amount of adipose tissue under the probe. (note)

  16. Simultaneous cardiac and respiratory frequency measurement based on a single fiber Bragg grating sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, A. F.; Carmo, J. P.; Mendes, P. M.; Correia, J. H.

    2011-07-01

    A respiratory and cardiac-frequency sensor has been designed and manufactured to monitor both components with a single fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. The main innovation of the explored system is the structure in which the FBG sensor is embedded. A specially developed polymeric foil allowed the simultaneous detection of heart rate and respiration cycles. The PVC has been designed to enhance the sensor sensitivity. In order to retrieve both components individually, a signal processing system was implemented for filtering out the respiratory and cardiac frequencies. The developed solution was tested along with a commercial device for referencing, from which the proposed system reliability is concluded. This optical-fiber system type has found an application niche in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam rooms, where no other types of sensors than optical ones are advised to enter due to the electromagnetic interference.

  17. Simultaneous cardiac and respiratory frequency measurement based on a single fiber Bragg grating sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A respiratory and cardiac-frequency sensor has been designed and manufactured to monitor both components with a single fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. The main innovation of the explored system is the structure in which the FBG sensor is embedded. A specially developed polymeric foil allowed the simultaneous detection of heart rate and respiration cycles. The PVC has been designed to enhance the sensor sensitivity. In order to retrieve both components individually, a signal processing system was implemented for filtering out the respiratory and cardiac frequencies. The developed solution was tested along with a commercial device for referencing, from which the proposed system reliability is concluded. This optical-fiber system type has found an application niche in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam rooms, where no other types of sensors than optical ones are advised to enter due to the electromagnetic interference

  18. Regulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy: the nuclear option

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W.D. Kuster (Diederik)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiac hypertrophy is the response of the heart to an increased workload. After myocardial infarction (MI) the surviving muscle tissue has to work harder to maintain cardiac output. This sustained increase in workload leads to cardiac hypertrophy. Despite its apparent appropriateness, c

  19. Cardiac autonomic function measured by heart rate variability and turbulence in pre-hypertensive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Alim; Uenishi, Masahiro; Küçükdurmaz, Zekeriya; Matsumoto, Kazuo; Kato, Ritsushi; Hara, Motoki; Yazıcı, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Non-dipping blood pressure pattern was shown to be associated with increased cardiovascular events. In addition, cardiac autonomic dysfunction was found to be associated with non-dipper phenomenon. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the cardiac autonomic functions in dipper and non-dipper pre-hypertensive subjects. A total of 65 pre-hypertensive subjects were enrolled in this study. They were divided into two groups as non-dippers (40 subjects, 52% female) and dippers (25 subjects, 52.5% female). Cardiac autonomic functions of the two groups were compared with the aid of heart rate variability, heart rate turbulence (HRT), atrial premature contractions (APCs), ventricular premature contractions (VPCs), and mean heart rate (MHR). There was no significant difference between non-dippers and dippers in basal characteristics. The two parameters of HRT, turbulence onset and turbulence slope, were found to be significantly abnormal in non-dippers than in dippers (P < .011 and P < .002, respectively). Heart rate variability parameters, including SDNN, SDANN, RMSSD, and pNN50, were found to be similar in dipper and non-dipper pre-hypertensive subjects (P < .998, P < .453, P < .205, and P < .788, respectively). APCs, VPCs, and MHR were compared, and there were statistical differences between the groups (APCs 5.80 ± 4.55, 9.14 ± 7.33, P < .024; VPCs 8.48 ± 8.83, 13.23 ± 9.68, P < .044; and MHR 70.16 ± 11.08, 76.26 ± 11.31, P < .035; respectively). This study demonstrated a possible cardiac autonomic dysfunction in pre-hypertensive subjects with non-dipper pattern. This may be a basis for future studies related to pre-hypertension and non-dipping BP pattern. PMID:22676318

  20. Measurements of output factors with different detector types and Monte Carlo calculations of stopping-power ratios for degraded electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to investigate three different detector types (a parallel-plate ionization chamber, a p-type silicon diode and a diamond detector) with regard to output factor measurements in degraded electron beams, such as those encountered in small-electron-field radiotherapy and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). The Monte Carlo method was used to calculate mass collision stopping-power ratios between water and the different detector materials for these complex electron beams (nominal energies of 6, 12 and 20 MeV). The diamond detector was shown to exhibit excellent properties for output factor measurements in degraded beams and was therefore used as a reference. The diode detector was found to be well suited for practical measurements of output factors, although the water-to-silicon stopping-power ratio was shown to vary slightly with treatment set-up and irradiation depth (especially for lower electron energies). Application of ionization-chamber-based dosimetry, according to international dosimetry protocols, will introduce uncertainties smaller than 0.3% into the output factor determination for conventional IORT beams if the variation of the water-to-air stopping-power ratio is not taken into account. The IORT system at our department includes a 0.3 cm thin plastic scatterer inside the therapeutic beam, which furthermore increases the energy degradation of the electrons. By ignoring the change in the water-to-air stopping-power ratio due to this scatterer, the output factor could be underestimated by up to 1.3%. This was verified by the measurements. In small-electron-beam dosimetry, the water-to-air stopping-power ratio variation with field size could mostly be ignored. For fields with flat lateral dose profiles (>3 x 3 cm2), output factors determined with the ionization chamber were found to be in close agreement with the results of the diamond detector. For smaller field sizes the lateral extension of the ionization chamber hampers

  1. Anti-rat soluble IL-6 receptor antibody down-regulates cardiac IL-6 and improves cardiac function following trauma-hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaolong; Hu, Shunhua; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Rue, Loring W; Bland, Kirby I; Chaudry, Irshad H

    2007-03-01

    Although anti-IL-6-mAb down-regulates cardiac IL-6 and attenuates IL-6-mediated cardiac dysfunction following trauma-hemorrhage, it is not known whether blockade of IL-6 receptor will down-regulate cardiac IL-6 and improve cardiac function under those conditions. Six groups of male adult rats (275-325 g) were used: sham/trauma-hemorrhage+vehicle, sham/trauma-hemorrhage+IgG, sham/trauma-hemorrhage+anti-rat sIL-6R. Rats underwent trauma-hemorrhage (removal of 60% of the circulating blood volume and fluid resuscitation after 90 min). Vehicle (V), normal goat IgG or anti-rat sIL-6R (16.7 microg/kg BW) was administered intra-peritoneally in the middle of resuscitation. Two hours later, cardiac function was measured by ICG dilution technique; blood samples collected, cardiomyocytes isolated, and cardiomyocyte nuclei were then extracted. Cardiac IL-6, IL-6R, gp130, IkappaB-alpha/P-IkappaB-alpha, NF-kappaB, and ICAM-1 expressions were measured by immunoblotting. Plasma IL-6 and cardiomyocyte NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity were determined by ELISA. In additional animals, heart harvested and cardiac MPO activity and CINC-1 and -3 were also measured. In another group of rats, cardiac function was measure by microspheres at 24 h following trauma-hemorrhage. Cardiac function was depressed and cardiac IL-6, P-IkappaB-alpha, NF-kappaB and its DNA-binding activity, ICAM-1, MPO activity, and CINC-1 and -3 were markedly increased after trauma-hemorrhage. Moreover, cardiac dysfunction was evident even 24 h after trauma-hemorrhage. Administration of sIL-6R following trauma-hemorrhage: (1) improved cardiac output at 2 h and 24 h (p<0.05); (2) down-regulated both cardiac IL-6 and IL-6R (p<0.05); and (3) attenuated cardiac P-IkappaB-alpha, NF-kappaB, NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity, ICAM-1, CINC-1, -3, and MPO activity (p<0.05). IgG did not significantly influence the above parameters. Thus, IL-6-mediated up-regulation of cardiac NF-kappaB, ICAM-1, CINC-1, -3, and MPO activity likely

  2. Assessment of the dose distribution inside a cardiac cath lab using TLD measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, M.; Teles, P.; Cardoso, G.; Vaz, P.

    2014-11-01

    Over the last decade, there was a substantial increase in the number of interventional cardiology procedures worldwide, and the corresponding ionizing radiation doses for both the medical staff and patients became a subject of concern. Interventional procedures in cardiology are normally very complex, resulting in long exposure times. Also, these interventions require the operator to work near the patient and, consequently, close to the primary X-ray beam. Moreover, due to the scattered radiation from the patient and the equipment, the medical staff is also exposed to a non-uniform radiation field that can lead to a significant exposure of sensitive body organs and tissues, such as the eye lens, the thyroid and the extremities. In order to better understand the spatial variation of the dose and dose rate distributions during an interventional cardiology procedure, the dose distribution around a C-arm fluoroscopic system, in operation in a cardiac cath lab at Portuguese Hospital, was estimated using both Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and dosimetric measurements. To model and simulate the cardiac cath lab, including the fluoroscopic equipment used to execute interventional procedures, the state-of-the-art MC radiation transport code MCNPX 2.7.0 was used. Subsequently, Thermo-Luminescent Detector (TLD) measurements were performed, in order to validate and support the simulation results obtained for the cath lab model. The preliminary results presented in this study reveal that the cardiac cath lab model was successfully validated, taking into account the good agreement between MC calculations and TLD measurements. The simulated results for the isodose curves related to the C-arm fluoroscopic system are also consistent with the dosimetric information provided by the equipment manufacturer (Siemens). The adequacy of the implemented computational model used to simulate complex procedures and map dose distributions around the operator and the medical staff is discussed, in

  3. Analysis of quality control data of eight modern radiotherapy linear accelerators: the short- and long-term behaviours of the outputs and the reproducibility of quality control measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapanen, Mika [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Laippatie 4, 00881 Helsinki (Finland); Tenhunen, Mikko [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Haartmaninkatu 4, 00029 Helsinki (Finland); Haemaelaeinen, Tuomo [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Haartmaninkatu 4, 00029 Helsinki (Finland); Sipilae, Petri [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Laippatie 4, 00881 Helsinki (Finland); Parkkinen, Ritva [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Laippatie 4, 00881 Helsinki (Finland); Jaervinen, Hannu [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK), Laippatie 4, 00881 Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-21

    Quality control (QC) data of radiotherapy linear accelerators, collected by Helsinki University Central Hospital between the years 2000 and 2004, were analysed. The goal was to provide information for the evaluation and elaboration of QC of accelerator outputs and to propose a method for QC data analysis. Short- and long-term drifts in outputs were quantified by fitting empirical mathematical models to the QC measurements. Normally, long-term drifts were well ({<=}1%) modelled by either a straight line or a single-exponential function. A drift of 2% occurred in 18 {+-} 12 months. The shortest drift times of only 2-3 months were observed for some new accelerators just after the commissioning but they stabilized during the first 2-3 years. The short-term reproducibility and the long-term stability of local constancy checks, carried out with a sealed plane parallel ion chamber, were also estimated by fitting empirical models to the QC measurements. The reproducibility was 0.2-0.5% depending on the positioning practice of a device. Long-term instabilities of about 0.3%/month were observed for some checking devices. The reproducibility of local absorbed dose measurements was estimated to be about 0.5%. The proposed empirical model fitting of QC data facilitates the recognition of erroneous QC measurements and abnormal output behaviour, caused by malfunctions, offering a tool to improve dose control.

  4. Analysis of quality control data of eight modern radiotherapy linear accelerators: the short- and long-term behaviours of the outputs and the reproducibility of quality control measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality control (QC) data of radiotherapy linear accelerators, collected by Helsinki University Central Hospital between the years 2000 and 2004, were analysed. The goal was to provide information for the evaluation and elaboration of QC of accelerator outputs and to propose a method for QC data analysis. Short- and long-term drifts in outputs were quantified by fitting empirical mathematical models to the QC measurements. Normally, long-term drifts were well (≤1%) modelled by either a straight line or a single-exponential function. A drift of 2% occurred in 18 ± 12 months. The shortest drift times of only 2-3 months were observed for some new accelerators just after the commissioning but they stabilized during the first 2-3 years. The short-term reproducibility and the long-term stability of local constancy checks, carried out with a sealed plane parallel ion chamber, were also estimated by fitting empirical models to the QC measurements. The reproducibility was 0.2-0.5% depending on the positioning practice of a device. Long-term instabilities of about 0.3%/month were observed for some checking devices. The reproducibility of local absorbed dose measurements was estimated to be about 0.5%. The proposed empirical model fitting of QC data facilitates the recognition of erroneous QC measurements and abnormal output behaviour, caused by malfunctions, offering a tool to improve dose control

  5. Regulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy: the nuclear option

    OpenAIRE

    Kuster, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiac hypertrophy is the response of the heart to an increased workload. After myocardial infarction (MI) the surviving muscle tissue has to work harder to maintain cardiac output. This sustained increase in workload leads to cardiac hypertrophy. Despite its apparent appropriateness, cardiac hypertrophy is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure and is therefore called pathological hypertrophy. That hypertrophy is not bad per se, is illustrated by the hyp...

  6. Output beam energy measurement of a 100-MeV KOMAC drift tube linac by using a stripline beam position monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Sung

    2015-10-01

    The 100-MeV proton linac at the KOMAC (Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex) is composed of a 50-keV proton injector, a 3-MeV RFQ (radio-frequency quadrupole) and a 100-MeV DTL (drift tube linac). The proton beam is accelerated from 3 MeV to 100 MeV through 11 DTL tanks. The precise measurement of the proton-beam's energy at the output of each DTL tank is important for the longitudinal beam dynamics and can be performed by using a time-of-flight method with a BPM (beam position monitor), which is installed between each DTL tank. The details of the output beam energy measurement of the KOMAC DTL with stripline-type BPM and BPM signal processing, along with a comparison with the simulation results, will be presented in this paper.

  7. CT measurement of coronary calcium mass: impact on global cardiac risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronary calcium mass percentiles can be derived from electron beam CT as well as from multidetector-row CT of all manufacturers. Coronary calcium mass may serve as a more individualized substitute for age for cardiac risk stratification. The aim was to investigate the potential impact of CT coronary calcium mass quantification on cardiac risk stratification using an adjusted Framingham score. Standardized coronary calcium mass was determined by multidetector-row CT in a total of 1,473 patients (1,038 male, 435 female). The impact on risk stratification of replacing the traditional Framingham age point score by a point score based on calcium mass relative to age was tested. Any coronary calcium found in males in the age group of 20-34 years and females in the age group of 20-59 years results in an increase of the Framingham score by 9 and 4-7 points, respectively. Only in males 65 years of age and older, none or minimal amounts of coronary calcium decrease the Framingham score by three points. The coronary calcium mass and age-related scoring system may have impact on the reassignment of patients with an intermediate Framingham risk to a lower or higher risk group. (orig.)

  8. Radiation exposure of patients from paediatric cardiac catheterizations. Part 2. Results of patient related measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Age, entire exposure duration and dose-area products for pa and lat beam as well as the number of angiographies have been recorded for 2114 pediatric cardiac catheterizations within the time period 1982 to 1996. Furthermore, the average field dimensions and sizes at the patient entrance surface for pa and lat beams and the frequency distributions for dose-area product rates, the entire dose-area products and the effective doses, calculated by means of age class dependent conversion factors, are given for all patients. The effective doses for new-borns are higher by about a factor 2 (Q50=6.5 mSv compared to 3.0 mSv) compared to children of higher age class, despite of the quite smaller body dimensions and thus smaller dose-area product rates. Cancer risks by radiation exposure are significantly higher for new-borns than for elder children for the same effective dose. Although no age specific factor can be given it is possible to derive from literature data, that cardiac catheterizations cause radiation risks, which are larger at least by a factor 2 to 4 with decreasing age, especially for thyroid and breast cancer (the latter more for girls). (orig.)

  9. 3D multifunctional integumentary membranes for spatiotemporal cardiac measurements and stimulation across the entire epicardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lizhi; Gutbrod, Sarah R.; Bonifas, Andrew P.; Su, Yewang; Sulkin, Matthew S.; Lu, Nanshu; Chung, Hyun-Joong; Jang, Kyung-In; Liu, Zhuangjian; Ying, Ming; Lu, Chi; Webb, R. Chad; Kim, Jong-Seon; Laughner, Jacob I.; Cheng, Huanyu; Liu, Yuhao; Ameen, Abid; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Kim, Gwang-Tae; Huang, Yonggang; Efimov, Igor R.; Rogers, John A.

    2014-02-01

    Means for high-density multiparametric physiological mapping and stimulation are critically important in both basic and clinical cardiology. Current conformal electronic systems are essentially 2D sheets, which cannot cover the full epicardial surface or maintain reliable contact for chronic use without sutures or adhesives. Here we create 3D elastic membranes shaped precisely to match the epicardium of the heart via the use of 3D printing, as a platform for deformable arrays of multifunctional sensors, electronic and optoelectronic components. Such integumentary devices completely envelop the heart, in a form-fitting manner, and possess inherent elasticity, providing a mechanically stable biotic/abiotic interface during normal cardiac cycles. Component examples range from actuators for electrical, thermal and optical stimulation, to sensors for pH, temperature and mechanical strain. The semiconductor materials include silicon, gallium arsenide and gallium nitride, co-integrated with metals, metal oxides and polymers, to provide these and other operational capabilities. Ex vivo physiological experiments demonstrate various functions and methodological possibilities for cardiac research and therapy.

  10. Analysis of the Environmental Efficiency of the Chinese Transportation Sector Using an Undesirable Output Slacks-Based Measure Data Envelopment Analysis Model

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaowei Song; Yongpei Hao; Xiaodong Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Many countries are attempting to reduce energy consumption and CO2 emissions while increasing the productivity and efficiency of their industries. An undesirable-output-oriented data envelopment analysis (DEA) model with slacks-based measure (SBM) was used to evaluate the changes in the environmental efficiency of the transportation sector in 30 Chinese provinces (municipalities and autonomous regions) between 2003 and 2012. The potential for decreasing CO2 emissions and energy saving was also...

  11. Analysis of the Environmental Efficiency of the Chinese Transportation Sector Using an Undesirable Output Slacks-Based Measure Data Envelopment Analysis Model

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaowei Song; Yongpei Hao; Xiaodong Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Many countries are attempting to reduce energy consumption and CO 2 emissions while increasing the productivity and efï¬ ciency of their industries. An undesirable-output-oriented data envelopment analysis (DEA) model with slacks-based measure (SBM) was used to evaluate the changes in the environmental efficiency of the transportation sector in 30 Chinese provinces (municipalities and autonomous regions) between 2003 and 2012. The potential for decreasing CO 2 emissions and energy saving was ...

  12. Output factor comparison of Monte Carlo and measurement for Varian TrueBeam 6 MV and 10 MV flattening filter-free stereotactic radiosurgery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jason Y; Ning, Holly; Arora, Barbara C; Zhuge, Ying; Miller, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    The dose measurements of the small field sizes, such as conical collimators used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), are a significant challenge due to many factors including source occlusion, detector size limitation, and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. One useful tool in dealing with the small field effect is Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. In this study, we report a comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of output factors for the Varian SRS system with conical collimators for energies of 6 MV flattening filter-free (6 MV) and 10 MV flattening filter-free (10 MV) on the TrueBeam accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations of Varian's SRS system for 6 MV and 10 MV photon energies with cones sizes of 17.5 mm, 15.0 mm, 12.5 mm, 10.0 mm, 7.5 mm, 5.0 mm, and 4.0 mm were performed using EGSnrc (release V4 2.4.0) codes. Varian's version-2 phase-space files for 6 MV and 10 MV of TrueBeam accelerator were utilized in the Monte Carlo simulations. Two small diode detectors Edge (Sun Nuclear) and Small Field Detector (SFD) (IBA Dosimetry) were applied to measure the output factors. Significant errors may result if detector correction factors are not applied to small field dosimetric measurements. Although it lacked the machine-specific kfclin,fmsrQclin,Qmsr correction factors for diode detectors in this study, correction factors were applied utilizing published studies conducted under similar conditions. For cone diameters greater than or equal to 12.5 mm, the differences between output factors for the Edge detector, SFD detector, and MC simulations are within 3.0% for both energies. For cone diameters below 12.5 mm, output factors differences exhibit greater variations. PMID:27167266

  13. Application of pulse index continuous cardiac output monitoring to improve efficiency of acute heart failure care%应用脉搏指数连续心输出量监测提升急性心力衰竭护理效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙秀月; 张领; 赵书琴

    2015-01-01

    Objective To ihvestigate the effect of pulse index continuous cardiac output (PiCCO) monitoring to nursing care of acute heart failure care.Methods The clinical data of 43 acute heart failure patients were retrospectively analyzed,patients were given pulse index continuous cardiac output monitoring and care,the patient' s nursing outcomes were observed,and the intrathoracic blood volume,cardiac output and oxygen consumption before and after the intervention were compared.Results After the implementation of PiCCO and nursing intervention,43 patients had no serious complications,improved 42 cases discharged,the other 1 patient in critical condition due to old age and heart function improvement sustained no automatic discharge.Oxygen consumption,cardiac output and intrathoracic blood volume were improved after the intervention,there was a significant difference (P < 0.05) compared to the previous indicators and intervention after intervention.Conclusions Application of pulse index continuous cardiac output can effectively improve patient's clinical parameters such as cardiac output,through the implementation of appropriate care can improve symptoms and reduce complications.%目的 探讨急性心力衰竭患者护理中应用脉搏指数连续心输出量监测(PiCCO)的效果.方法 选取平顶山市第二人民医院收治的43例急性心力衰竭患者作为研究对象,收集患者的临床资料并对其做回顾性分析,对患者实施脉搏指数连续心输出量监测和护理,对患者的护理效果进行观察,并对其干预前后的胸腔内血容量、心排血量与氧耗量进行对比观察.结果 实施PiCCO和护理干预,本研究43例患者均无严重并发症产生,42例好转出院,1例由于病情危重、高龄及心功能持续无改善自动出院.患者干预后的氧耗量、心排血量与胸腔内血容量均有所改善,干预后各项指标与干预前比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 应用脉搏指数连续心

  14. A new framework for output feedback controller design for a class of discrete-time stochastic nonlinear system with quantization and missing measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Liu, Yurong; Alsaadi, Fuad E.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with the problem of analysis and synthesis for a class of output feedback control system. The system under consideration is a discrete-time stochastic system with time-varying delay. It is assumed that the measurement of system is quantized via a logarithmic quantizer before it is transmitted, and the measurement data would be missing from time to time which can be described by a Bernoulli distributed white sequence. In addition, the nonlinearities are assumed to satisfy the sector conditions. The problem addressed is to design an output feedback controller such that the resulting closed-loop system is exponentially stable in the mean square. By employing Lyapunov theory and some new techniques, a new framework is established to cope with the design of output feedback controller for nonlinear systems involving quantization and missing measurement. Sufficient conditions are derived to guarantee the existence of the desired controllers, and the controller parameters are given in an explicit expression as well. A numerical example is exploited to show the usefulness of the results obtained.

  15. Unobtrusive Estimation of Cardiac Contractility and Stroke Volume Changes Using Ballistocardiogram Measurements on a High Bandwidth Force Plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashouri, Hazar; Orlandic, Lara; Inan, Omer T

    2016-01-01

    Unobtrusive and inexpensive technologies for monitoring the cardiovascular health of heart failure (HF) patients outside the clinic can potentially improve their continuity of care by enabling therapies to be adjusted dynamically based on the changing needs of the patients. Specifically, cardiac contractility and stroke volume (SV) are two key aspects of cardiovascular health that change significantly for HF patients as their condition worsens, yet these parameters are typically measured only in hospital/clinical settings, or with implantable sensors. In this work, we demonstrate accurate measurement of cardiac contractility (based on pre-ejection period, PEP, timings) and SV changes in subjects using ballistocardiogram (BCG) signals detected via a high bandwidth force plate. The measurement is unobtrusive, as it simply requires the subject to stand still on the force plate while holding electrodes in the hands for simultaneous electrocardiogram (ECG) detection. Specifically, we aimed to assess whether the high bandwidth force plate can provide accuracy beyond what is achieved using modified weighing scales we have developed in prior studies, based on timing intervals, as well as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimates. Our results indicate that the force plate BCG measurement provides more accurate timing information and allows for better estimation of PEP than the scale BCG (r² = 0.85 vs. r² = 0.81) during resting conditions. This correlation is stronger during recovery after exercise due to more significant changes in PEP (r² = 0.92). The improvement in accuracy can be attributed to the wider bandwidth of the force plate. ∆SV (i.e., changes in stroke volume) estimations from the force plate BCG resulted in an average error percentage of 5.3% with a standard deviation of ±4.2% across all subjects. Finally, SNR calculations showed slightly better SNR in the force plate measurements among all subjects but the small difference confirmed that SNR is limited by

  16. Unobtrusive Estimation of Cardiac Contractility and Stroke Volume Changes Using Ballistocardiogram Measurements on a High Bandwidth Force Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashouri, Hazar; Orlandic, Lara; Inan, Omer T.

    2016-01-01

    Unobtrusive and inexpensive technologies for monitoring the cardiovascular health of heart failure (HF) patients outside the clinic can potentially improve their continuity of care by enabling therapies to be adjusted dynamically based on the changing needs of the patients. Specifically, cardiac contractility and stroke volume (SV) are two key aspects of cardiovascular health that change significantly for HF patients as their condition worsens, yet these parameters are typically measured only in hospital/clinical settings, or with implantable sensors. In this work, we demonstrate accurate measurement of cardiac contractility (based on pre-ejection period, PEP, timings) and SV changes in subjects using ballistocardiogram (BCG) signals detected via a high bandwidth force plate. The measurement is unobtrusive, as it simply requires the subject to stand still on the force plate while holding electrodes in the hands for simultaneous electrocardiogram (ECG) detection. Specifically, we aimed to assess whether the high bandwidth force plate can provide accuracy beyond what is achieved using modified weighing scales we have developed in prior studies, based on timing intervals, as well as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimates. Our results indicate that the force plate BCG measurement provides more accurate timing information and allows for better estimation of PEP than the scale BCG (r2 = 0.85 vs. r2 = 0.81) during resting conditions. This correlation is stronger during recovery after exercise due to more significant changes in PEP (r2 = 0.92). The improvement in accuracy can be attributed to the wider bandwidth of the force plate. ∆SV (i.e., changes in stroke volume) estimations from the force plate BCG resulted in an average error percentage of 5.3% with a standard deviation of ±4.2% across all subjects. Finally, SNR calculations showed slightly better SNR in the force plate measurements among all subjects but the small difference confirmed that SNR is limited by

  17. State-shared model for multiple-input multiple-output systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenhua TIAN; Karlene A. HOO

    2005-01-01

    This work proposes a method to construct a state-shared model for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO)systems. A state-shared model is defined as a linear time invariant state-space structure that is driven by measurement signals-the plant outputs and the manipulated variables, but shared by different multiple input/output models. The genesis of the state-shared model is based on a particular reduced non-minimal realization. Any such realization necessarily fulfills the requirement that the output of the state-shared model is an asymptotically correct estimate of the output of the plant, if the process model is selected appropriately. The approach is demonstrated on a nonlinear MIMO system- a physiological model of calcium fluxes that controls muscle contraction and relaxation in human cardiac myocytes.

  18. Cardiac interbeat interval dynamics from childhood to senescence : comparison of conventional and new measures based on fractals and chaos theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikkujamsa, S. M.; Makikallio, T. H.; Sourander, L. B.; Raiha, I. J.; Puukka, P.; Skytta, J.; Peng, C. K.; Goldberger, A. L.; Huikuri, H. V.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: New methods of R-R interval variability based on fractal scaling and nonlinear dynamics ("chaos theory") may give new insights into heart rate dynamics. The aims of this study were to (1) systematically characterize and quantify the effects of aging from early childhood to advanced age on 24-hour heart rate dynamics in healthy subjects; (2) compare age-related changes in conventional time- and frequency-domain measures with changes in newly derived measures based on fractal scaling and complexity (chaos) theory; and (3) further test the hypothesis that there is loss of complexity and altered fractal scaling of heart rate dynamics with advanced age. METHODS AND RESULTS: The relationship between age and cardiac interbeat (R-R) interval dynamics from childhood to senescence was studied in 114 healthy subjects (age range, 1 to 82 years) by measurement of the slope, beta, of the power-law regression line (log power-log frequency) of R-R interval variability (10(-4) to 10(-2) Hz), approximate entropy (ApEn), short-term (alpha(1)) and intermediate-term (alpha(2)) fractal scaling exponents obtained by detrended fluctuation analysis, and traditional time- and frequency-domain measures from 24-hour ECG recordings. Compared with young adults (60 years, n=29). CONCLUSIONS: Cardiac interbeat interval dynamics change markedly from childhood to old age in healthy subjects. Children show complexity and fractal correlation properties of R-R interval time series comparable to those of young adults, despite lower overall heart rate variability. Healthy aging is associated with R-R interval dynamics showing higher regularity and altered fractal scaling consistent with a loss of complex variability.

  19. External cardiac compression may be harmful in some scenarios of pulseless electrical activity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hogan, T S

    2012-10-01

    Pulseless electrical activity occurs when organised or semi-organised electrical activity of the heart persists but the product of systemic vascular resistance and the increase in systemic arterial flow generated by the ejection of the left venticular stroke volume is not sufficient to produce a clinically detectable pulse. Pulseless electrical activity encompasses a very heterogeneous variety of severe circulatory shock states ranging in severity from pseudo-cardiac arrest to effective cardiac arrest. Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation for pulseless electrical activity are generally poor. Impairment of cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output in many scenarios of pulseless electrical activity, including extreme vasodilatory shock states. There is no evidence that external cardiac compression can increase cardiac output when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. If impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output and the heart is effectively ejecting all the blood returning to it, then external cardiac compression can only increase cardiac output if it increases venous return and cardiac filling. Repeated cardiac compression asynchronous with the patient\\'s cardiac cycle and raised mean intrathoracic pressure due to chest compression can be expected to reduce rather than to increase cardiac filling and therefore to reduce rather than to increase cardiac output in such circumstances. The hypothesis is proposed that the performance of external cardiac compression will have zero or negative effect on cardiac output in pulseless electrical activity when impaired cardiac filling is the limiting factor to cardiac output. External cardiac compression may be both directly and indirectly harmful to significant sub-groups of patients with pulseless electrical activity. We have neither evidence nor theory to provide comfort that external cardiac compression is not harmful in many scenarios of pulseless

  20. Comparison of Single-Particle Monte Carlo Simulation with Measured Output Characteristics of an 0.1µm n-MOSFET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. M. Bufler

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparison between non-selfconsistent single-particle Monte Carlo (MC simulations and measurements of the output characteristics of an 0.1 µm n-MOSFET is presented. First the bulk MC model, which features a new simplified treatment of inelastic acoustic intravalley scattering, is validated by comparison with experimental literature data for mobilities and velocities. The dopant distribution of the MOSFET is obtained from a 2D process simulation, which is calibrated with SIMS and electrical measurements and fine-tuned by a comparison of the measured transfer characteristics in the subthreshold regime with a coupled Schro¨dinger drift-diffusion (DD simulation. Then the quantum effect is replaced by a shift of the work function and the DD, hydrodynamic (HD and MC models are adjusted to reproduce the measured drain current in the linear regime. The results of the three models in the non-linear regime are compared without further adjustment to the measured output characteristics. While good agreement is found for the MC model, the on-current is significantly overestimated by the HD model and underestimated by the DD model.

  1. Using performance measures to evaluate programmatic outputs and outcomes in the Department of Energy's environmental restoration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last year, a revolution has occurred in the use of performance measures in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). The performance measures range from traditional cost and schedule performance criteria to strategic measures of program outcomes. Each area of performance measurement has resulted (or is resulting) in a different approach for evaluating performance using a different set of performance criteria. Although some data elements cross cut the groups, each of the approaches focuses on different data collection process. The Office of Environmental Restoration is attempting to link these groups together through a unified system of performance measurement. This paper will define and discuss each type of performance measurement and its supporting systems or approaches

  2. Effects of electron contamination on output factor measurements of Cobalt GWGP -80 Teletherapy unit in Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital Accra, Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dose to any point in a medium can be analyzed into primary and scattered components. The scattered component can be further analyzed into collimator and phantom scatter. The phantom component can be effectively manipulated; thus the effective primary dose at a point is due to the primary dose and those scattered from collimator. Output factors which separate collimator and phantom scatter factors are required in dose calculations. Scatter factors used in these systems are based on reference depths equal to the depth of the maximum absorbed dose dmax on the beam central axis. These factors defined at the depth of maximum absorbed dose are sensitive to electron contamination and are difficult to measure and calculate. Percent Depth Dose and Tissue Mass Ratio which are dependent on Sp (phantom scatter factor) and Sc (collimator scatter factor) are difficult to measure; hence reference data from BJR (British journal of radiologists) supplement 25 are often used in evaluation. Sp and Sc are defined at the reference depth of dmax and actual measurement of these factors at this depth is not reliable as a result of the possible influence of electron contamination. Many suggestions on the influence of electron contamination have been made and approaches to reduce it, including the use of Helium bags, shadow trays, magnetic fields. Though each of these approaches have proved successes, in clinical situations some of the techniques are not the best. As the result with large fields (collimator setting) electron contamination decreases with distance from source hardware as electrons are absorbed and scattered, then EC increases with larger distance due to electrons originating from air as the beam size expands with distance. Petti et al, 1982 carried out calculations and measurement of electron contamination in clinical photon beams and concluded that electron contamination accounts for buildup dose. Duncan et al, 1984, also showed that buildup dose is due to electron

  3. Accuracy of dual-energy computed tomography for the measurement of iodine concentration using cardiac CT protocols: validation in a phantom model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koonce, James D. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Center for Medical Imaging - North East Netherlands, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Charleston, SC (United States); Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas G. [Siemens Healthcare, Imaging and Therapy Division, Forchheim (Germany); Wahlquist, Amy E.; Nietert, Paul J. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Public Health Services, Charleston, SC (United States); Bastarrika, Gorka [University of Navarra, Department of Radiology, Pamplona (Spain); Meinel, Felix G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    To assess the accuracy of dual-energy CT (DECT) for the quantification of iodine concentrations in a thoracic phantom across various cardiac DECT protocols and simulated patient sizes. Experiments were performed on first- and second-generation dual-source CT (DSCT) systems in DECT mode using various cardiac DECT protocols. An anthropomorphic thoracic phantom was equipped with tubular inserts containing known iodine concentrations (0-20 mg/mL) in the cardiac chamber and up to two fat-equivalent rings to simulate different patient sizes. DECT-derived iodine concentrations were measured using dedicated software and compared to true concentrations. General linear regression models were used to identify predictors of measurement accuracy Correlation between measured and true iodine concentrations (n = 72) across CT systems and protocols was excellent (R = 0.994-0.997, P < 0.0001). Mean measurement errors were 3.0 ± 7.0 % and -2.9 ± 3.8 % for first- and second-generation DSCT, respectively. This error increased with simulated patient size. The second-generation DSCT showed the most stable measurements across a wide range of iodine concentrations and simulated patient sizes. Overall, DECT provides accurate measurements of iodine concentrations across cardiac CT protocols, strengthening the case for DECT-derived blood volume estimates as a surrogate of myocardial blood supply. (orig.)

  4. Detector to detector corrections: a comprehensive experimental study of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small radiotherapy beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azangwe, Godfrey; Grochowska, Paulina; Georg, Dietmar;

    2014-01-01

    -doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C), organic plastic scintillators, diamond detectors, liquid filled ion chamber, and a range of small volume air filled ionization chambers (volumes ranging from 0.002 cm3 to 0.3 cm3). All detector measurements were corrected for volume averaging effect and compared with dose ratios......Purpose: The aim of the present study is to provide a comprehensive set of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small beams, for a wide range of real time and passive detectors. The detector specific correction factors determined in this study may be potentially...... useful as a reference data set for small beam dosimetry measurements. Methods: Dose response of passive and real time detectors was investigated for small field sizes shaped with a micromultileaf collimator ranging from 0.6 × 0.6 cm2 to 4.2 × 4.2 cm2 and the measurements were extended to larger fields...

  5. Measurement of neutron doses from the models 9000 and 9090 cardiac pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose distribution in various points within the body of a patient implanted with a cardiac pacemaker must be known in order to assess long-term risks for patients. Absorbed doses due to neutrons were computed by means of a method based on the use of the TRIPOLI code initially developed for reactor neutronic calculations. For this purpose, the human trunk was assimilated to an elliptical cylinder as proposed by Snyder et al. The results were compared with those obtained in other laboratories: data for surface doses for the pacemaker 9000 and the phantom are in good agreement with the results of Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory; contact doses for both models 9000 and 9090 are much similar to the results obtained using PLESCH's formula. The results show that absorbed doses at the level of the various organs, i.e. at fairly large distances, are little modified as a function of the pacemaker size, the source geometry remaining the same. However, contact doses may vary by a large factor (about 2) on account of the variation of distances to the source

  6. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure in vivo cardiac energetics in normal myocardium and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Experiences at 3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) allows measurement of in vivo high-energy phosphate kinetics in the myocardium. While traditionally 31P cardiac spectroscopy is performed at 1.5 T, cardiac MRS at higher field strength can theoretically increase signal to noise ratio (SNR) and spectral resolution therefore improving sensitivity and specificity of the cardiac spectra. The reproducibility and feasibility of performing cardiac spectroscopy at 3 T is presented here in this study in healthy volunteers and patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Methods: Cardiac spectroscopy was performed using a Phillips 3T Achieva scanner in 37 healthy volunteers and 26 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) to test the feasibility of the protocol. To test the reproducibility a single volunteer was scanned eight times on separate occasions. A single voxel 31P MRS was performed using Image Selected In vivo Spectroscopy (ISIS) volume localization. Results: The mean phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate (PCr/ATP) ratio of the eight measurements performed on one individual was 2.11 ± 0.25. Bland Altman plots showed a variance of 12% in the measurement of PCr/ATP ratios. The PCr/ATP ratio was significantly reduced in HCM patients compared to controls, 1.42 ± 0.51 and 2.11 ± 0.57, respectively, P 31P MRS at 3 T is a reliable method of measuring in vivo high-energy phosphate kinetics in the myocardium for clinical studies and diagnostics. Based on our data an impairment of cardiac energetic state in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is indisputable.

  7. Frequency Modulated Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy: A General Technique for Trace Gas and Isotope Measurements with Unprecedented Sensitivity Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new technique is proposed for improved trace gas detection and measurement that combines the high absorption depths afforded by mid-infrared Integrated Cavity...

  8. Developing Tools to Measure Quality in Congenital Catheterization and Interventions: The Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Project on Outcomes (C3PO)

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhry-Waterman, Nadia; Coombs, Sandra; Porras, Diego; Holzer, Ralf; Bergersen, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The broad range of relatively rare procedures performed in pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratories has made the standardization of care and risk assessment in the field statistically quite problematic. However, with the growing number of patients who undergo cardiac catheterization, it has become imperative that the cardiology community overcomes these challenges to study patient outcomes. The Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Project on Outcomes was able to develop benchmarks, tools ...

  9. Aggregate Measures of Income and Output in Canada and the United States: Implications for Productivity and Living Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Ross; Alexander Murray

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this article are to clarify definitions and to produce estimates of the eight aggregate measures of income and product (gross domestic product, gross domestic income, gross national product, gross national income, net domestic product, net domestic income, net national product and net national income) for Canada and the United States over the 1980-2008 period. The article also discusses the implications of the eight measures for productivity and living standards analysis. It...

  10. Tenure and Output

    OpenAIRE

    Kathryn Shaw; Edward P. Lazear

    2007-01-01

    A key tenet of the theory of human capital is that investment in skills results in higher productivity. The previous literature has estimated the degree of investment in human capital for individuals by looking at individual wage growth as a proxy for productivity growth. In this paper, we have both wage and personal productivity data, and thus are able to measure of the increase in workers' output with tenure. The data is from an autoglass company. Most of production occurs at the individual...

  11. Use of the cardiopulmonary flow index to evaluate cardiac function in thoroughbred horses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ratio of the cardiopulmonary blood volume to stroke volume is called the cardiopulmonary flow index (CPFI). The CPFI can be determined indirectly from the simultaneous recording of a radiocardiogram and an electrocardiogram. The CPFI and cardiac output were measured simultaneously in horses that were diagnosed as having cardiac disease. The results obtained from these subjects were compared with those from control animals and significant differences were found between the mean CPFI of the control horses and those with macroscopically visible myocardial fibrosis on post mortem examination. No significant differences were found between the means of the cardiac output measured in either of the groups of horses. The effect of pharmacological acceleration of the heart rate on the CPFI was also studied. Significant differences were found between the mean CPFI and the slopes of the regression lines of CPFI on heart rate of the control and principal groups of horses. These differences were greatest at heart rates near to the resting heart rates of the individuals. The CPFI was found to be a more sensitive measure of cardiac function than cardiac output, in the horses. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Cardiac catheterization and angiography. Third edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book discusses the papers on cardiac catheterization and angiography. The topics covered are: historical perspective and present practice of cardiac catheterization; angiography principles and utilization of radiologic and cineangiographic equipment; complications, incidence and prevention of side effects of cardiac catheterization; techniques; blood flow measurement of heart; pressure measurement; diagnostic techniques of angiography; special catheter techniques; coronary angiography, temporary and permanent pacemakers, potential role of lasers in the cardiac catheterization and evaluation of cardiac function

  13. Development of soil clod fineness measuring system by using a laser displacement sensor: Clarification of relationship between tillage effect and laser displacement sensor output

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to develop a tilled soil clod fineness measurement method that uses non-contact and non-distractive technique. A laser displacement sensor was adopted as a sensing device, which was installed to an irregularity measuring system stationary set up for this study. We calculated an index of soil clod fineness from measured irregularity data. To obtain a relationship between laser displacement sensor outputs and tilled clod size, we did a calibration experiment in the laboratory. We then applied our system to a tilled soil experiment in a field. As a result, it is confirmed that clod size and index of soil clod fineness (i.e. Roughness) calculated from irregularity data shows a linear relationship

  14. Pediatric cardiac postoperative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auler Jr. José Otávio Costa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo, Medical School is a referral center for the treatment of congenital heart diseases of neonates and infants. In the recent years, the excellent surgical results obtained in our institution may be in part due to modern anesthetic care and to postoperative care based on well-structured protocols. The purpose of this article is to review unique aspects of neonate cardiovascular physiology, the impact of extracorporeal circulation on postoperative evolution, and the prescription for pharmacological support of acute cardiac dysfunction based on our cardiac unit protocols. The main causes of low cardiac output after surgical correction of heart congenital disease are reviewed, and methods of treatment and support are proposed as derived from the relevant literature and our protocols.

  15. Cardiac Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to assess cardiac risk include: High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) : Studies have shown that measuring ... LDL-C but does not respond to typical strategies to lower LDL-C such as diet, exercise, ...

  16. Safety in cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Siregar, S.

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of safety in cardiac surgery is a complex process, which involves many clinical, practical, methodological and statistical issues. The objective of this thesis was to measure and to compare safety in cardiac surgery in The Netherlands using the Netherlands Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (NVT) database. The safety of care is usually measured using patient outcomes. If outcomes are not available, the process and structure of care may be used. Outcomes should be adjusted ...

  17. Measures of sleep and cardiac functioning during sleep using a multi-sensory commercially-available wristband in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zambotti, Massimiliano; Baker, Fiona C; Willoughby, Adrian R; Godino, Job G; Wing, David; Patrick, Kevin; Colrain, Ian M

    2016-05-01

    To validate measures of sleep and heart rate (HR) during sleep generated by a commercially-available activity tracker against those derived from polysomnography (PSG) in healthy adolescents. Sleep data were concurrently recorded using FitbitChargeHR™ and PSG, including electrocardiography (ECG), during an overnight laboratory sleep recording in 32 healthy adolescents (15 females; age, mean±SD: 17.3±2.5years). Sleep and HR measures were compared between FitbitChargeHR™ and PSG using paired t-tests and Bland-Altman plots. Epoch-by-epoch analysis showed that FitbitChargeHR™ had high overall accuracy (91%), high sensitivity (97%) in detecting sleep, and poor specificity (42%) in detecting wake on a min-to-min basis. On average, FitbitChargeHR™ significantly but negligibly overestimated total sleep time by 8min and sleep efficiency by 1.8%, and underestimated wake after sleep onset by 5.6min (pECG (60.2±7.6bpm, pECG in measuring sleep and HR during sleep, supporting its use in assessing sleep and cardiac function in healthy adolescents. Further validation is needed to assess its reliability over prolonged periods of time in ecological settings and in clinical populations. PMID:26969518

  18. The PhysioFlow thoracic impedancemeter is not valid for the measurements of cardiac hemodynamic parameters in chronic anemic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Bogui

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to test the validity of the transthoracic electrical bioimpedance method PhysioFlow® to measure stroke volume in patients with chronic anemia. Stroke volume index (SVI, as well as cardiac index (CI obtained by transthoracic electrical bioimpedance method and doppler echocardiography were compared in healthy subjects (n = 25 and patients with chronic anemia (i.e. mainly with sickle cell anemia; n = 32, at rest. While doppler echocardiography was able to detect difference in SVI between the two populations, the Physioflow® failed to detect any difference. Bland & Altman analyses have demonstrated no interchangeability between the two methods to assess CI and SVI in anemic patients and healthy subjects. While doppler echocardiography displayed a good concordance for SVI results with those obtained in the literature for anemic patients, the Physioflow® did not. Finally, in contrast to doppler echocardiography: 1 the CI obtained with the Physioflow® was not correlated with the hemoglobin level and 2 the stroke volume determined by the Physioflow® was highly influenced by body surface area. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the Physioflow® device is inaccurate for the measurement of SVI and CI in patients with chronic anemia and has a poor accuracy for the measurement of these parameters in African healthy subjects.

  19. Ventilation and gas exchange management after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherasan, Yuda; Raimondo, Pasquale; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    For several decades, physicians had integrated several interventions aiming to improve the outcomes in post-cardiac arrest patients. However, the mortality rate after cardiac arrest is still as high as 50%. Post-cardiac arrest syndrome is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to not only poor neurological outcome and cardiovascular failure but also respiratory dysfunction. To minimize ventilator-associated lung injury, protective mechanical ventilation by using low tidal volume ventilation and driving pressure may decrease pulmonary complications and improve survival. Low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can be initiated and titrated with careful cardiac output and respiratory mechanics monitoring. Furthermore, optimizing gas exchange by avoiding hypoxia and hyperoxia as well as maintaining normocarbia may improve neurological and survival outcome. Early multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation intervention is recommended. Minimally invasive monitoring techniques, that is, echocardiography, transpulmonary thermodilution method measuring extravascular lung water, as well as transcranial Doppler ultrasound, might be useful to improve appropriate management of post-cardiac arrest patients. PMID:26670813

  20. Modification of nitrogen Townsend ionization coefficient in a N2 laser with a weak corona preionization and high gas pressure using laser output power measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikhani, S.; Hariri, A.

    2013-05-01

    Based on the reported experimental measurements on the output power in a transversely excited nitrogen laser with a weak corona preionization and rate equations, a simulation study was made to describe the laser output power behavior. For the study, we first made a literature survey for the appropriate E/p functional dependences of nitrogen molecules on drift velocity vd, and the Townsend ionization coefficient α, to be applied for the laser operational characteristics of high gas pressures up to 1 atmosphere, and 20 Townsend ionization coefficient to include the effect of the preionization for the laser system. This realization revealed that the Townsend coefficient upon utilizing the corona effect, (α/p)corona, can be viewed as a perturbation to be added to the (α/p)main due to the main gas discharge, where the total (α/p)t = (α/p)main + (α/p)corona was used for the calculation. We also introduced a single α/p relation with A* and B* coefficients to explain the gas discharge due to both the main and corona discharges. The results of the two approaches are introduced and have been compared with each other. The present study indicates that laser optical measurements, by themselves, constitute a reliable approach for understanding the physical quantities that are involved during plasma formation in a gas discharge. Details of the approach will be presented in this paper.

  1. Differential-output B-dot and D-dot monitors for current and voltage measurements on a 20-MA, 3-MV pulsed-power accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, T. C.; Stygar, W. A.; Ives, H. C.; Gilliland, T. L.; Spielman, R. B.; Johnson, M. F.; Reynolds, P. G.; Moore, J. K.; Mourning, R. L.; Fehl, D. L.; Androlewicz, K. E.; Bailey, J. E.; Broyles, R. S.; Dinwoodie, T. A.; Donovan, G. L.; Dudley, M. E.; Hahn, K. D.; Kim, A. A.; Lee, J. R.; Leeper, R. J.; Leifeste, G. T.; Melville, J. A.; Mills, J. A.; Mix, L. P.; Moore, W. B. S.; Peyton, B. P.; Porter, J. L.; Rochau, G. A.; Rochau, G. E.; Savage, M. E.; Seamen, J. F.; Serrano, J. D.; Sharpe, A. W.; Shoup, R. W.; Slopek, J. S.; Speas, C. S.; Struve, K. W.; van de Valde, D. M.; Woodring, R. M.

    2008-10-01

    are not combined in a balun; they are instead numerically processed for common-mode-noise rejection after digitization. All the current monitors are calibrated on a 76-cm-diameter axisymmetric radial transmission line that is driven by a 10-kA current pulse. The reference current is measured by a current-viewing resistor (CVR). The stack voltage monitors are also differential-output gauges, consisting of one 1.8-cm-diameter D-dot sensor and one null sensor. Hence, each voltage monitor is also a differential detector with two output signals, processed as described above. The voltage monitors are calibrated in situ at 1.5 MV on dedicated accelerator shots with a short-circuit load. Faraday’s law of induction is used to generate the reference voltage: currents are obtained from calibrated outer-MITL B-dot monitors, and inductances from the system geometry. In this way, both current and voltage measurements are traceable to a single CVR. Dependable and consistent measurements are thus obtained with this system of calibrated diagnostics. On accelerator shots that deliver 22 MA to a low-impedance z-pinch load, the peak lineal current densities at the stack, outer-MITL, and inner-MITL monitor locations are 0.5, 1, and 58MA/m, respectively. On such shots the peak currents measured at these three locations agree to within 1%.

  2. The Impact of Journal Weighting Scheme Characteristics on Research Output Measurement in Economics: The New Zealand Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Tressler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:  In this study we test for the ‘power’ or aggressiveness of various journal weighting schemes, especially those based on the recursive adjustment methodology first developed by Liebowitz and Palmer.  Using data generated by New Zealand’s academic economists, we provide quantitative measures of the differences between recursive adjustment-based schemes and selected alternatives.  We then compare the performance of economics departments under each of our journal weighting schemes and, for comparison purposes, one based on direct citation counts.   We find departmental rankings based on selected recursive adjustment schemes to be relatively stable, but these rankings differed substantially from those generated by our alternative schemes.  This suggests that departmental hiring practices and research strategies must be sensitive to the type of funding scheme employed.   In particular, research on domestic and regional issues is likely to be unattractive to researchers if a high-powered journal weighting scheme is adopted as the “official” standard since regional journals, the natural outlet for such work, are frequently zero-weighted by such schemes.

  3. Right-sided cardiac function in healthy volunteers measured by first-pass radionuclide ventriculography and gated blood-pool SPECT: comparison with cine MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Hesse, Birger;

    2005-01-01

    evaluation of right-sided cardiac function. The aim of our study was to compare the agreement between these methods when measuring right-sided cardiac function. METHODS: Twenty-four healthy volunteers were included. Mean age was 44 years (range: 25-60) and 29% were females. All participants had FP, GBPS and...... 6 ml m(-2) (95% CI: 0-11). CONCLUSIONS: (i) Normal values of RVEF differ between MRI, FP and GBPS with wide limits of agreement, accordingly it is difficult to evaluate changes over time if measured by different methods, (ii) RV volumes are in the same range when measured by MRI or GBPS but with...... wide limits of agreement, and (iii) if MRI is considered gold standard then FP is more accurate than GBPS for RVEF measurements....

  4. Noninvasive measurement of cardiac stroke volume using pulse wave velocity and aortic dimensions: a simulation study

    OpenAIRE

    Charles F. Babbs

    2014-01-01

    Background: Concerns about the cost-effectiveness of invasive hemodynamic monitoring in critically ill patients using pulmonary artery catheters motivate a renewed search for effective noninvasive methods to measure stroke volume. This paper explores a new approach based on noninvasively measured pulse wave velocity, pulse contour, and ultrasonically determined aortic cross sectional area. Methods: The Bramwell-Hill equation relating pulse wave velocity to aortic compliance is applied. At the...

  5. Simultaneous measurement of respiration and cardiac period in preterm infants by laser Doppler vibrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, Lorenzo; Marchionni, Paolo; Ercoli, Ilaria; Tomasini, Enrico Primo

    2012-06-01

    The paper presents an optical non-contact method for simultaneous measurement of the heart beat and respiration period, based on the assessment of the chest wall movements induced by the pumping action of the heart, and by inspiration/expiration acts of the lungs. The measurement method is applied on 40 patients recovered in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), where the operating conditions are often critical and the contact with the patient's skin needs to be minimized. The method proposed is based on optical recording of the movements of chest wall by means of a laser Doppler vibrometer directly pointed onto the left, frontal part of the thoracic surface. Data measured were compared with reference instrumentation; to reach this goal, the ECG and Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) signals were simultaneously acquired to monitor the heart period (HP), while to measure respiration period (RP) signals from a spirometer and a LDV were collected simultaneously. After LDV signals decomposition, heart and respiration acts were detected and compared in term of beat per minute (bpm). HPs measured by the proposed method showed an uncertainty ECG), while for RPs data an uncertainty of 3% (respect to spirometer data) was estimated. The proposed method has the intrinsic advantage to be totally without contact and to allow the simultaneous measurement of heart and respiration rate also in critical, clinical environments such as the NICU.

  6. The Effect of Threshold Values and Weighting Factors on the Association between Entropy Measures and Mortality after Myocardial Infarction in the Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial (CAST)

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Mayer; Martin Bachler; Andreas Holzinger; Stein, Phyllis K.; Siegfried Wassertheurer

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a non-invasive measurement based on the intervals between normal heart beats that characterize cardiac autonomic function. Decreased HRV is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events. Characterizing HRV using only moment statistics fails to capture abnormalities in regulatory function that are important aspects of disease risk. Thus, entropy measures are a promising approach to quantify HRV for risk stratification. The purpose of this study was to ...

  7. Analysis of the Environmental Efficiency of the Chinese Transportation Sector Using an Undesirable Output Slacks-Based Measure Data Envelopment Analysis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Song

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are attempting to reduce energy consumption and CO2 emissions while increasing the productivity and efficiency of their industries. An undesirable-output-oriented data envelopment analysis (DEA model with slacks-based measure (SBM was used to evaluate the changes in the environmental efficiency of the transportation sector in 30 Chinese provinces (municipalities and autonomous regions between 2003 and 2012. The potential for decreasing CO2 emissions and energy saving was also assessed. Transportation was found to be inefficient in most of the provinces and the average environmental efficiency was low (0.45. The overall average efficiency reached a maximum in 2005 and continually decreased until a minimum was reached in 2009; since then, it has increased. In general, transportation is more efficient in eastern than in central or western China. A sensitivity analysis was also carried out on the input and output indicators. Based on these findings, some policies are proposed to improve the environmental efficiency of the transportation sector in China.

  8. Evidence for increased cardiac compliance during exposure to simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, S. C.; Convertino, V. A.; Fanton, J. W.; Reister, C. A.; Gaffney, F. A.; Ludwig, D. A.; Krotov, V. P.; Trambovetsky, E. V.; Latham, R. D.

    1998-01-01

    We measured hemodynamic responses during 4 days of head-down tilt (HDT) and during graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in invasively instrumented rhesus monkeys to test the hypotheses that exposure to simulated microgravity increases cardiac compliance and that decreased stroke volume, cardiac output, and orthostatic tolerance are associated with reduced left ventricular peak dP/dt. Six monkeys underwent two 4-day (96 h) experimental conditions separated by 9 days of ambulatory activities in a crossover counterbalance design: 1) continuous exposure to 10 degrees HDT and 2) approximately 12-14 h per day of 80 degrees head-up tilt and 10-12 h supine (control condition). Each animal underwent measurements of central venous pressure (CVP), left ventricular and aortic pressures, stroke volume, esophageal pressure (EsP), plasma volume, alpha1- and beta1-adrenergic responsiveness, and tolerance to LBNP. HDT induced a hypovolemic and hypoadrenergic state with reduced LBNP tolerance compared with the control condition. Decreased LBNP tolerance with HDT was associated with reduced stroke volume, cardiac output, and peak dP/dt. Compared with the control condition, a 34% reduction in CVP (P = 0.010) and no change in left ventricular end-diastolic area during HDT was associated with increased ventricular compliance (P = 0.0053). Increased cardiac compliance could not be explained by reduced intrathoracic pressure since EsP was unaltered by HDT. Our data provide the first direct evidence that increased cardiac compliance was associated with headward fluid shifts similar to those induced by exposure to spaceflight and that reduced orthostatic tolerance was associated with lower cardiac contractility.

  9. Comparação dos efeitos da dobutamina e da milrinona sobre a hemodinâmica e o transporte de oxigênio em pacientes submetidos à cirurgia cardíaca com baixo débito cardíaco após indução anestésica Comparación de los efectos de la dobutamina y de la milrinona sobre la hemodinámica y el transporte de oxígeno en pacientes sometidos a cirugía cardiaca con bajo débito cardiaco después de inducción anestésica Comparison of the effects of dobutamine and milrinone on hemodynamic parameters and oxygen supply in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with low cardiac output after anesthetic induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Carvalho Carmona

    2010-06-01

    measured after anesthetic induction and after 30 and 60 minutes, and arterial and venous blood gases were measured at baseline and 60 minutes. Non-paired Student t test or two-way ANOVA for repeated measurements was used to compare the data. RESULTS: Dobutamine and milrinone promoted significant increases in cardiac index (56% and 47% and oxygen supply (53% and 45%, and reduction in systemic (33% and 36% and pulmonary (34% and 19% vascular resistance, respectively. However, statistically significant differences were not observed between both drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Both inotropic drugs were similarly effective in restoring tissue blood flow and oxygen supply to adequate levels in patients with low cardiac output undergoing cardiac surgery.

  10. Harmonic Force Spectroscopy measures load-dependent kinetics of individual human β-cardiac myosin molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Mortensen, Kim;

    2015-01-01

    Molecular motors are responsible for numerous cellular processes from cargo transport to heart contraction. Their interactions with other cellular components are often transient and exhibit kinetics that depend on load. Here, we measure such interactions using ‘harmonic force spectroscopy’. In th...

  11. Objectively measured daily physical activity related to cardiac size in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, M; Thorsson, O; Karlsson, M K; Lindén, C; Wollmer, P; Andersen, Lars Bo

    2009-01-01

    activity per day (VPA) was calculated. Acceptable accelerometer and echocardiography measurements were obtained in 228 children (boys=127, girls=101). Univariate correlations between VPA and LVDD were indexed for BSA in boys (r=0.27, P<0.05) and in girls (r=0.10, NS). Multiple regression analysis showed...

  12. Complexity-Measure-Based Sequential Hypothesis Testing for Real-Time Detection of Lethal Cardiac Arrhythmias

    OpenAIRE

    Szi-Wen Chen

    2007-01-01

    A novel approach that employs a complexity-based sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) technique for real-time detection of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) is presented. A dataset consisting of a number of VF and VT electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings drawn from the MIT-BIH database was adopted for such an analysis. It was split into two smaller datasets for algorithm training and testing, respectively. Each ECG recording was measured in a 10-second interval. For ...

  13. Novel experimental results in human cardiac electrophysiology: measurement of the Purkinje fibre action potential from the undiseased human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Norbert; Szél, Tamás; Jost, Norbert; Tóth, András; Gy Papp, Julius; Varró, András

    2015-09-01

    Data obtained from canine cardiac electrophysiology studies are often extrapolated to the human heart. However, it has been previously demonstrated that because of the lower density of its K(+) currents, the human ventricular action potential has a less extensive repolarization reserve. Since the relevance of canine data to the human heart has not yet been fully clarified, the aim of the present study was to determine for the first time the action potentials of undiseased human Purkinje fibres (PFs) and to compare them directly with those of dog PFs. All measurements were performed at 37 °C using the conventional microelectrode technique. At a stimulation rate of 1 Hz, the plateau potential of human PFs is more positive (8.0 ± 1.8 vs 8.6 ± 3.4 mV, n = 7), while the amplitude of the spike is less pronounced. The maximal rate of depolarization is significantly lower in human PKs than in canine PFs (406.7 ± 62 vs 643 ± 36 V/s, respectively, n = 7). We assume that the appreciable difference in the protein expression profiles of the 2 species may underlie these important disparities. Therefore, caution is advised when canine PF data are extrapolated to humans, and further experiments are required to investigate the characteristics of human PF repolarization and its possible role in arrhythmogenesis. PMID:26320996

  14. Modification of nitrogen Townsend ionization coefficient in a N2 laser with a weak corona preionization and high gas pressure using laser output power measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the reported experimental measurements on the output power in a transversely excited nitrogen laser with a weak corona preionization and rate equations, a simulation study was made to describe the laser output power behavior. For the study, we first made a literature survey for the appropriate E/p functional dependences of nitrogen molecules on drift velocity vd, and the Townsend ionization coefficient α, to be applied for the laser operational characteristics of high gas pressures up to 1 atmosphere, and 20 −1 Torr−1. For the study when the corona UV preionization is applied, it was realized that it is necessary to modify the Townsend ionization coefficient to include the effect of the preionization for the laser system. This realization revealed that the Townsend coefficient upon utilizing the corona effect, (α/p)corona, can be viewed as a perturbation to be added to the (α/p)main due to the main gas discharge, where the total (α/p)t = (α/p)main + (α/p)corona was used for the calculation. We also introduced a single α/p relation with A* and B* coefficients to explain the gas discharge due to both the main and corona discharges. The results of the two approaches are introduced and have been compared with each other. The present study indicates that laser optical measurements, by themselves, constitute a reliable approach for understanding the physical quantities that are involved during plasma formation in a gas discharge. Details of the approach will be presented in this paper. (paper)

  15. Complexity-Measure-Based Sequential Hypothesis Testing for Real-Time Detection of Lethal Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Szi-Wen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach that employs a complexity-based sequential hypothesis testing (SHT technique for real-time detection of ventricular fibrillation (VF and ventricular tachycardia (VT is presented. A dataset consisting of a number of VF and VT electrocardiogram (ECG recordings drawn from the MIT-BIH database was adopted for such an analysis. It was split into two smaller datasets for algorithm training and testing, respectively. Each ECG recording was measured in a 10-second interval. For each recording, a number of overlapping windowed ECG data segments were obtained by shifting a 5-second window by a step of 1 second. During the windowing process, the complexity measure (CM value was calculated for each windowed segment and the task of pattern recognition was then sequentially performed by the SHT procedure. A preliminary test conducted using the database produced optimal overall predictive accuracy of . The algorithm was also implemented on a commercial embedded DSP controller, permitting a hardware realization of real-time ventricular arrhythmia detection.

  16. Complexity-Measure-Based Sequential Hypothesis Testing for Real-Time Detection of Lethal Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szi-Wen

    2006-12-01

    A novel approach that employs a complexity-based sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) technique for real-time detection of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) is presented. A dataset consisting of a number of VF and VT electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings drawn from the MIT-BIH database was adopted for such an analysis. It was split into two smaller datasets for algorithm training and testing, respectively. Each ECG recording was measured in a 10-second interval. For each recording, a number of overlapping windowed ECG data segments were obtained by shifting a 5-second window by a step of 1 second. During the windowing process, the complexity measure (CM) value was calculated for each windowed segment and the task of pattern recognition was then sequentially performed by the SHT procedure. A preliminary test conducted using the database produced optimal overall predictive accuracy of[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]. The algorithm was also implemented on a commercial embedded DSP controller, permitting a hardware realization of real-time ventricular arrhythmia detection.

  17. Complexity-Measure-Based Sequential Hypothesis Testing for Real-Time Detection of Lethal Cardiac Arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szi-Wen Chen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach that employs a complexity-based sequential hypothesis testing (SHT technique for real-time detection of ventricular fibrillation (VF and ventricular tachycardia (VT is presented. A dataset consisting of a number of VF and VT electrocardiogram (ECG recordings drawn from the MIT-BIH database was adopted for such an analysis. It was split into two smaller datasets for algorithm training and testing, respectively. Each ECG recording was measured in a 10-second interval. For each recording, a number of overlapping windowed ECG data segments were obtained by shifting a 5-second window by a step of 1 second. During the windowing process, the complexity measure (CM value was calculated for each windowed segment and the task of pattern recognition was then sequentially performed by the SHT procedure. A preliminary test conducted using the database produced optimal overall predictive accuracy of 96.67%. The algorithm was also implemented on a commercial embedded DSP controller, permitting a hardware realization of real-time ventricular arrhythmia detection.

  18. Exceptional cardiac anoxia tolerance in tilapia (Oreochromis hybrid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lague, Sabine L; Speers-Roesch, Ben; Richards, Jeffrey G; Farrell, Anthony P

    2012-04-15

    Anoxic survival requires the matching of cardiac ATP supply (i.e. maximum glycolytic potential, MGP) and demand (i.e. cardiac power output, PO). We examined the idea that the previously observed in vivo downregulation of cardiac function during exposure to severe hypoxia in tilapia (Oreochromis hybrid) represents a physiological strategy to reduce routine PO to within the heart's MGP. The MGP of the ectothermic vertebrate heart has previously been suggested to be ∼70 nmol ATP s(-1) g(-1), sustaining a PO of ∼0.7 mW g(-1) at 15°C. We developed an in situ perfused heart preparation for tilapia (Oreochromis hybrid) and characterized the routine and maximum cardiac performance under both normoxic (>20 kPa O(2)) and severely hypoxic perfusion conditions (tilapia heart maintained a routine normoxic cardiac output (Q) and PO under all hypoxic conditions, a result that contrasts with the hypoxic cardiac downregulation previously observed in vivo under less severe conditions. Thus, we conclude that the in vivo downregulation of routine cardiac performance in hypoxia is not needed in tilapia to balance cardiac energy supply and demand. Indeed, the MGP of the tilapia heart proved to be quite exceptional. Measurements of myocardial lactate efflux during severe hypoxia were used to calculate the MGP of the tilapia heart. The MGP was estimated to be 172 nmol ATP s(-1) g(-1) at 22°C, and allowed the heart to generate a PO(max) of at least ∼3.1 mW g(-1), which is only 30% lower than the PO(max) observed with normoxia. Even with this MGP, the additional challenge of acidosis during severe hypoxia decreased maximum ATP turnover rate and PO(max) by 30% compared with severe hypoxia alone, suggesting that there are probably direct effects of acidosis on cardiac contractility. We conclude that the high maximum glycolytic ATP turnover rate and levels of PO, which exceed those measured in other ectothermic vertebrate hearts, probably convey a previously unreported anoxia tolerance

  19. Stored-fluorography mode reduces radiation dose during cardiac catheterization measured with OSLD dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Chien-Yi; Chen, Zhih-Cherng; Tang, Kuo-Ting; Liu, Wei-Chung; Lin, Chun-Chih; Wang, Hsin-Ell

    2015-12-01

    Coronary angiogram is an imperative tool for diagnosis of coronary artery diseases, in which cine-angiography is a commonly used method. Although the angiography proceeds under radiation, the potential risk of radiation exposure for both the patients and the operators was seldom noticed. In this study, the absorbed radiation dose in stored-fluorography mode was compared with that in cine-angiography mode by using optically simulated luminescent dosimeters to realize their effects on radiation dose. Patients received coronary angiogram via radial artery approach were randomized into the stored-fluorography group (N=30) or the cine-angiography group (N=30). The excluded criteria were: 1. women at pregnancy or on breast feeding, 2. chronic kidney diseases with glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min. During the coronary angiogram, absorbed dose of the patients and the operator radiation exposure was measured with optically simulated luminescent dosimeter (OSLD). The absorbed dose of the patients in the stored-fluorography group (3.13±0.25 mGy) was apparently lower than that in the cine-angiography group (65.57±5.37 mGy; Pstatistical difference (P<0.001) was also found between the stored-fluorography group (0.09163 μGy) and the cine-angiography (0.6519μGy). Compared with traditional cine-angiography mode, the stored-fluorography mode can apparently reduce radiation exposure of the patients and the operator in coronary angiogram.

  20. SU-C-201-01: Investigation of the Effects of Scintillator Surface Treatment On Light Output Measurements with SiPM Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenciaga, Y; Prout, D; Chatziioannou, A [University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To examine the effect of different scintillator surface treatments (BGO crystals) on the fraction of scintillation photons that exit the crystal and reach the photodetector (SiPM). Methods: Positron Emission Tomography is based on the detection of light that exits scintillator crystals, after annihilation photons deposit energy inside these crystals. A considerable fraction of the scintillation light gets trapped or absorbed after going through multiple internal reflections on the interfaces surrounding the crystals. BGO scintillator crystals generate considerably less scintillation light than crystals made of LSO and its variants. Therefore, it is crucial that the small amount of light produced by BGO exits towards the light detector. The surface treatment of scintillator crystals is among the factors affecting the ability of scintillation light to reach the detectors. In this study, we analyze the effect of different crystal surface treatments on the fraction of scintillation light that is detected by the solid state photodetector (SiPM), once energy is deposited inside a BGO crystal. Simulations were performed by a Monte Carlo based software named GATE, and validated by measurements from individual BGO crystals coupled to Philips digital-SiPM sensor (DPC-3200). Results: The results showed an increment in light collection of about 4 percent when only the exit face of the BGO crystal, is unpolished; compared to when all the faces are polished. However, leaving several faces unpolished caused a reduction of at least 10 percent of light output when the interaction occurs as far from the exit face of the crystal as possible compared to when it occurs very close to the exit face. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the advantages on light collection from leaving unpolished the exit face of BGO crystals. The configuration with best light output will be used to obtain flood images from BGO crystal arrays coupled to SiPM sensors.

  1. A study on cardiac autonomic modulation during pregnancy by non-invasive heart rate variability measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritesh Hariprasad Gandhi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Remarkable and uncontrollable changes with modification during pregnancy are connected with the autonomic control and consequently with the heart rate variability (HRV. Heart rate variability is a sum of different mechanisms and if pregnancy is a state of change, these modifications could be extracted from HRV analysis. Objective: To assess the effect of pregnancy on heart rate variability among pregnant mothers during first trimester of pregnancy and third trimester of pregnancy. Materials and Methods: HRV was measured for 5 minutes of continuous recording of electrocardiogram (ECG lead II, using windows based HRV analysis system variowin-HR after obtaining permission from the Institutional Review Board of Government Medical College, Bhavnagar and written consent from 30 pregnant subjects and 30 non-pregnant control subjects at autonomic function lab, Dept of Physiology, Bhavnagar. Result: Frequency domain parameters, very low frequency (VLF, low frequency (LF, high frequency (HF and HF normalized unit (nu were significantly decreased and LF (nu and LF/HF significantly increased in pregnant subject in 3 rd trimester as compared to their 1 st trimester of pregnancy. Time Domain parameters like SDNN, RMSSD, SDSD, NN50 count, pNN50, SD1/SD2, triangular HRV index and average R-R interval were significantly decreased during 3 rd trimester of pregnancy. Conclusion: The inhibition of resting parasympathetic activity or vagal blockage and an increment of the sympathetic modulation during the 3 rd third trimester of gestation in pregnancy as compared to their 1 st trimester and healthy non-pregnant subjects. Sympathovagal imbalance and abnormally low HRV may more pronounce during later stage of normal pregnancy.

  2. Myocardial bridging in a survivor of sudden cardiac near-death: role of intracoronary doppler flow measurements and angiography during dobutamine stress in the clinical evaluation.

    OpenAIRE

    Tio, R.A.; van Gelder, I.C.; Boonstra, P.W.; Crijns, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    Extensive myocardial bridging in the left anterior descending coronary artery was found in a 46 year old survivor of sudden cardiac near-death. Positron emission tomography and dobutamine stress echocardiography revealed ischaemia in the myocardium distal to the bridging. Spasm was excluded as cause of the ischaemia by intracoronary infusion of acetylcholine. Further evaluation of the haemodynamic importance of the bridging using intracoronary Doppler flow velocity measurements revealed an ab...

  3. Cardiac Time Intervals by Tissue Doppler Imaging M-Mode: Normal Values and Association with Established Echocardiographic and Invasive Measures of Systolic and Diastolic Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogelvang, Rasmus; de Knegt, Martina Chantal; Olsen, Flemming Javier; Galatius, Søren; Jensen, Jan Skov

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To define normal values of the cardiac time intervals obtained by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) M-mode through the mitral valve (MV). Furthermore, to evaluate the association of the myocardial performance index (MPI) obtained by TDI M-mode (MPITDI) and the conventional method of obtaining MPI (MPIConv), with established echocardiographic and invasive measures of systolic and diastolic function. Methods In a large community based population study (n = 974), where all are free of any cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk factors, cardiac time intervals, including isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT), isovolumic contraction time (IVCT), and ejection time (ET) were obtained by TDI M-mode through the MV. IVCT/ET, IVRT/ET and the MPI ((IVRT+IVCT)/ET) were calculated. We also included a validation population (n = 44) of patients who underwent left heart catheterization and had the MPITDI and MPIConv measured. Results IVRT, IVRT/ET and MPI all increased significantly with increasing age in both genders (p<0.001 for all). IVCT, ET, IVRT/ET, and MPI differed significantly between males and females, displaying that women, in general exhibit better cardiac function. MPITDI was significantly associated with invasive (dP/dt max) and echocardiographic measures of systolic (LVEF, global longitudinal strain and global strainrate s) and diastolic function (e’, global strainrate e)(p<0.05 for all), whereas MPIConv was significantly associated with LVEF, e’ and global strainrate e (p<0.05 for all). Conclusion Normal values of cardiac time intervals differed between genders and deteriorated with increasing age. The MPITDI (but not MPIConv) is associated with most invasive and established echocardiographic measures of systolic and diastolic function. PMID:27093636

  4. Cardiac Time Intervals by Tissue Doppler Imaging M-Mode: Normal Values and Association with Established Echocardiographic and Invasive Measures of Systolic and Diastolic Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor Biering-Sørensen

    Full Text Available To define normal values of the cardiac time intervals obtained by tissue Doppler imaging (TDI M-mode through the mitral valve (MV. Furthermore, to evaluate the association of the myocardial performance index (MPI obtained by TDI M-mode (MPITDI and the conventional method of obtaining MPI (MPIConv, with established echocardiographic and invasive measures of systolic and diastolic function.In a large community based population study (n = 974, where all are free of any cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular risk factors, cardiac time intervals, including isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT, isovolumic contraction time (IVCT, and ejection time (ET were obtained by TDI M-mode through the MV. IVCT/ET, IVRT/ET and the MPI ((IVRT+IVCT/ET were calculated. We also included a validation population (n = 44 of patients who underwent left heart catheterization and had the MPITDI and MPIConv measured.IVRT, IVRT/ET and MPI all increased significantly with increasing age in both genders (p<0.001 for all. IVCT, ET, IVRT/ET, and MPI differed significantly between males and females, displaying that women, in general exhibit better cardiac function. MPITDI was significantly associated with invasive (dP/dt max and echocardiographic measures of systolic (LVEF, global longitudinal strain and global strainrate s and diastolic function (e', global strainrate e(p<0.05 for all, whereas MPIConv was significantly associated with LVEF, e' and global strainrate e (p<0.05 for all.Normal values of cardiac time intervals differed between genders and deteriorated with increasing age. The MPITDI (but not MPIConv is associated with most invasive and established echocardiographic measures of systolic and diastolic function.

  5. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, Marthin; Held, Klaus; Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the rehabilitation measures provided for cardiac patients in Germany and to outline its legal basis and outcomes. In Germany the cardiac rehabilitation system is different from rehabilitation measures in other European countries. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany since 1885 is based on specific laws and the regulations of insurance providers. Cardiac rehabilitation has predominantly been offered as an inpatient service, but has recently been complemented by outpatient services. A general agreement on the different indications for offering these two services has yet to be reached. Cardiac rehabilitation is mainly offered after an acute cardiac event and bypass surgery. It is also indicated in severe heart failure and special cases of percutaneous coronary intervention. Most patients are men (>65%) and the age at which events occur is increasing. The benefits obtained during the 3-4 weeks after an acute event, and confirmed in numerous studies, are often later lost under 'usual care' conditions. Many attempts have been made by rehabilitation institutions to improve this deficit by providing intensive aftercare. One instrument set up to achieve this is the nationwide institution currently comprising more than 6000 heart groups with approximately 120000 outpatients. After coronary artery bypass grafting or acute coronary syndrome cardiac rehabilitation can usually be started within 10 days. The multidisciplinary rehabilitation team consists of cardiologists, psychologists, exercise therapists, social workers, nutritionists and nurses. The positive effects of cardiac rehabilitation are also important economically, for example, for the improvement of secondary prevention and vocational integration. PMID:17301623

  6. Estimation of utility values from visual analog scale measures of health in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oddershede L

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lars Oddershede,1,2 Jan Jesper Andreasen,1 Lars Ehlers2 1Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Center for Cardiovascular Research, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 2Danish Center for Healthcare Improvements, Faculty of Social Sciences and Faculty of Health Sciences, Aalborg University, Aalborg East, Denmark Introduction: In health economic evaluations, mapping can be used to estimate utility values from other health outcomes in order to calculate quality adjusted life-years. Currently, no methods exist to map visual analog scale (VAS scores to utility values. This study aimed to develop and propose a statistical algorithm for mapping five dimensions of health, measured on VASs, to utility scores in patients suffering from cardiovascular disease. Methods: Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting at Aalborg University Hospital in Denmark were asked to score their health using the five VAS items (mobility, self-care, ability to perform usual activities, pain, and presence of anxiety or depression and the EuroQol 5 Dimensions questionnaire. Regression analysis was used to estimate four mapping models from patients' age, sex, and the self-reported VAS scores. Prediction errors were compared between mapping models and on subsets of the observed utility scores. Agreement between predicted and observed values was assessed using Bland–Altman plots. Results: Random effects generalized least squares (GLS regression yielded the best results when quadratic terms of VAS scores were included. Mapping models fitted using the Tobit model and censored least absolute deviation regression did not appear superior to GLS regression. The mapping models were able to explain approximately 63%–65% of the variation in the observed utility scores. The mean absolute error of predictions increased as the observed utility values decreased. Conclusion: We concluded that it was possible to predict utility scores from VAS scores of the five

  7. Detector to detector corrections: A comprehensive experimental study of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small radiotherapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of the present study is to provide a comprehensive set of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small beams, for a wide range of real time and passive detectors. The detector specific correction factors determined in this study may be potentially useful as a reference data set for small beam dosimetry measurements. Methods: Dose response of passive and real time detectors was investigated for small field sizes shaped with a micromultileaf collimator ranging from 0.6 × 0.6 cm2 to 4.2 × 4.2 cm2 and the measurements were extended to larger fields of up to 10 × 10 cm2. Measurements were performed at 5 cm depth, in a 6 MV photon beam. Detectors used included alanine, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), stereotactic diode, electron diode, photon diode, radiophotoluminescent dosimeters (RPLDs), radioluminescence detector based on carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C), organic plastic scintillators, diamond detectors, liquid filled ion chamber, and a range of small volume air filled ionization chambers (volumes ranging from 0.002 cm3 to 0.3 cm3). All detector measurements were corrected for volume averaging effect and compared with dose ratios determined from alanine to derive a detector correction factors that account for beam perturbation related to nonwater equivalence of the detector materials. Results: For the detectors used in this study, volume averaging corrections ranged from unity for the smallest detectors such as the diodes, 1.148 for the 0.14 cm3 air filled ionization chamber and were as high as 1.924 for the 0.3 cm3 ionization chamber. After applying volume averaging corrections, the detector readings were consistent among themselves and with alanine measurements for several small detectors but they differed for larger detectors, in particular for some small ionization chambers with volumes larger than 0.1 cm3. Conclusions: The results demonstrate how important it is for the appropriate corrections to be

  8. Cardiac rehabilitation: a good measure to improve quality of life in peri- and postmenopausal women with microvascular angina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Szot

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac Syndrome X (CSX was considered a stable coronary syndrome, yet due to its nature, CSX symptoms often have a great impact on patients’ Quality of Life (QoL. According to ESC 2013 stable coronary artery disease criteria, CSX was replaced by Microvascular Angina (MA.Unfortunately, most CSX or MA patients, after classical angina (involving main coronary vessels has been ruled out, often do not receive proper treatment. Indications for pharmacological treatment of MA patients were introduced only recently. Another problematic issue is that scientists describing the pathophysiology of both CSX and MA stress a lack of a deeper insight into the multifactorial etiology of the source of pain associated with this disease. In the presented article we have attempted to study the influence of cardiac rehabilitation (3 months programme on the QoL of patients recognized as suffering from MA, as well as to check if changes in myocardial perfusion in these patients at baseline and after completion of cardiac rehabilitation match changes in their QoL. Therefore, after screening 436 women for MA, we studied 55 of them who were confirmed as having MA and who agreed to participate in the study. Exercise tests, Myocardial Perfusion Imaging, and QoL questionnaires were studied at baseline and after completing 3 months period of cardiac rehabilitation. Results were subsequently compared, which showed a link between improved perfusion score in SPECT study and improved overall physical capacity, on one hand, and improved QoL score on the other. These results confirm that cardiac rehabilitation is a very useful treatment option for MA patients. It seems that training during cardiac rehabilitation is a very important factor (improved physical efficiency –> increase in self-belief, and that taking into consideration the multifactor pathophysiology of pain, it is connected with a better quality of life for MA patients.

  9. Remote Monitoring of the Heart Condition of Athletes by Measuring the Cardiac Action Potential Propagation Time Using a Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amang Sudarsono

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Highly performing athletes are susceptible to cardiac damage of several kinds which may be irreversible. The monitoring of heart rate and ECG waveforms from such subjects by wireless sensor networks has been reported in health and sports care documents. However, a more decisive parameter for instant to instant changes would be the time of Cardiac Action Potential Propagation. This time, which can be between 15-20 ms would shoot suddenly in acute stress in highly performing athletes for short durations. Repeated incidents of such rising values will tend to cause irreversible damage to the heart. We developed the technique of measuring this time and reporting it through a wireless sensor network to monitoring station.

  10. Influence of gravity on cardiac performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantalos, G. M.; Sharp, M. K.; Woodruff, S. J.; O'Leary, D. S.; Lorange, R.; Everett, S. D.; Bennett, T. E.; Shurfranz, T.

    1998-01-01

    Results obtained by the investigators in ground-based experiments and in two parabolic flight series of tests aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft with a hydraulic simulator of the human systemic circulation have confirmed that a simple lack of hydrostatic pressure within an artificial ventricle causes a decrease in stroke volume of 20%-50%. A corresponding drop in stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) was observed over a range of atrial pressures (AP), representing a rightward shift of the classic CO versus AP cardiac function curve. These results are in agreement with echocardiographic experiments performed on space shuttle flights, where an average decrease in SV of 15% was measured following a three-day period of adaptation to weightlessness. The similarity of behavior of the hydraulic model to the human system suggests that the simple physical effects of the lack of hydrostatic pressure may be an important mechanism for the observed changes in cardiac performance in astronauts during the weightlessness of space flight.

  11. Cardiac arrest - cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basri Lenjani; Besnik Elshani; Nehat Baftiu; Kelmend Pallaska; Kadir Hyseni; Njazi Gashi; Nexhbedin Karemani; Ilaz Bunjaku; Taxhidin Zaimi; Arianit Jakupi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR) measures within the golden minutes inEurope.Methods:The material was taken from theUniversityClinical Center ofKosovo -EmergencyCentre inPristina, during the two(2) year period(2010-2011).The collected date belong to the patients with cardiac arrest have been recorded in the patients' log book protocol at the emergency clinic.Results:During the2010 to2011 in the emergency center of theCUCK inPristina have been treated a total of269 patients with cardiac arrest, of whom159 or59.1% have been treated in2010, and110 patients or40.9% in2011.Of the269 patients treated in the emergency centre,93 or34.6% have exited lethally in the emergency centre, and176 or 65.4% have been transferred to other clinics.In the total number of patients with cardiac arrest, males have dominated with186 cases, or69.1%.The average age of patients included in the survey was56.7 year oldSD±16.0 years.Of the269 patients with cardiac arrest, defibrillation has been applied for93 or34.6% of patients.In the outpatient settings defibrillation has been applied for3 or3.2% of patients.Patients were defibrillated with application of one to four shocks. Of27 cases with who have survived cardiac arrest, none of them have suffered cardiac arrest at home,3 or11.1% of them have suffered cardiac arrest on the street, and24 or88.9% of them have suffered cardiac arrest in the hospital.5 out of27 patients survived have ended with neurological impairment.Cardiac arrest cases were present during all days of the week, but frequently most reported cases have been onMonday with32.0% of cases, and onFriday with24.5% of cases. Conclusions:All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care(with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care) the rate of survival is higher.

  12. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attack or other heart problem. You might consider cardiac rehab if you have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery Heart transplant Procedures such as angioplasty and stenting In some ...

  13. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program to help people who have A heart attack Angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting for coronary heart disease A heart valve repair or replacement A ...

  14. Effects of dobutamine stress on cardiac contraction synchronism in a canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In cardiac resynchronization therapy, many devices need to be optimized to take into account the magnitude and characteristics of patients’ ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony. The optimization process is mostly performed at rest; however, mechanical resynchronization might be more important under stress, while patients need to improve their cardiac efficiency. The objective of this study was to observe if levels of cardiac stress could modify the ventricular contraction synchronism. Cardiac stress was induced with dobutamine infusion in eight healthy canine subjects. Hemodynamic and ventricular synchronism assessments were performed by left ventricular pressure measurements and radionuclide tomographic-gated blood pools. Cardiac output increased from 2.8 ± 1.0 at rest to 5.7 ± 2.2 L min−1 at 20 µg kg−1 min−1, while the ventricular performance (dP/dtmax) increased from 1588 ± 374 to 8004 ± 710 mmHg s−1. At baseline, the interventricular delay (in degrees) was −6.3 ± 2.6°, the left ventricle contraction preceding the right. The delay significantly increased to −21.6 ± 3.1° with dobutamine stress (p < 0.0001). On assessment of the left intraventricular synchrony, septal-to-lateral delay was −6.9 ± 5.1° at baseline which revealed a preceded contraction of the left lateral wall from the septum. Cardiac stress produced a significant modulation (p = 0.01), with an inversion of the contraction pattern, the septum contraction preceding the lateral wall contraction by 15.5 ± 5.6° at maximum dobutamine infusion; a significant linear trend (p < 0.001) was found between cardiac stress levels and septal-to-lateral delays. Cardiac activity levels modified the ventricular synchronism supporting the fact that optimizations of cardiac resynchronization devices could be improved by taking cardiac stress into account. (paper)

  15. Quantitative assessment of mitral and aortic insufficiency from effective systemic ejection fraction measured by radiocardiography and cardiac chambers scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparison between the effective systemic ejection fraction defined by radiocardiography and cardiac chambers scanning, and the whole left ventricular ejection fraction calculated by cineangiocardiography allows an accurate assessment of mitral and aortic regurgitation extent. In case of both mitral and aortic insufficiency, each regurgitation can be quantitatively dissociated by means of the aortic isotopic dilution curve recorded at the same time as the radiocardiogram

  16. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Costello BT; Nadel J.; Taylor AJ

    2016-01-01

    Benedict T Costello,1,2 James Nadel,3 Andrew J Taylor,1,21Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Alfred Hospital, 2Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, 3School of Medicine, University of Notre Dame, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Cardiac sarcoidosis is a rare but life-threatening condition, requiring a high degree of clinical suspicion and low threshold for investigation to make the diagnosis. The cardiac manifestations include heart failure, conducting syst...

  17. Measurement of canine pancreatic perfusion using dynamic computed tomography: Influence of input-output vessels on deconvolution and maximum slope methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, Miori, E-mail: miori@mx6.et.tiki.ne.jp [Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Nishi 2-11 Inada-cho, Obihiro 080-8555 (Japan); Tsuji, Yoshihisa, E-mail: y.tsuji@extra.ocn.ne.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Shogoinkawara-cho 54, Sakyo-ku 606-8507 (Japan); Katabami, Nana; Shimizu, Junichiro; Lee, Ki-Ja [Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Nishi 2-11 Inada-cho, Obihiro 080-8555 (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiroh [Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Saiwai-cho, 3-5-8, Fuchu 183-8509 (Japan); Miyake, Yoh-Ichi [Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Nishi 2-11 Inada-cho, Obihiro 080-8555 (Japan); Yazumi, Shujiro [Digestive Disease Center, Kitano Hospital, 2-4-20 Ougi-machi, Kita-ku, Osaka 530-8480 (Japan); Chiba, Tsutomu [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Shogoinkawara-cho 54, Sakyo-ku 606-8507 (Japan); Yamada, Kazutaka, E-mail: kyamada@obihiro.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Nishi 2-11 Inada-cho, Obihiro 080-8555 (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Objective: We investigated whether the prerequisite of the maximum slope and deconvolution methods are satisfied in pancreatic perfusion CT and whether the measured parameters between these algorithms are correlated. Methods: We examined nine beagles injected with iohexol (200 mgI kg{sup -1}) at 5.0 ml s{sup -1}. The abdominal aorta and splenic and celiac arteries were selected as the input arteries and the splenic vein, the output veins. For the maximum slope method, we determined the arterial contrast volume of each artery by measuring the area under the curve (AUC) and compared the peak enhancement time in the pancreas with the contrast appearance time in the splenic vein. For the deconvolution method, the artery-to-vein collection rate of contrast medium was calculated. We calculated the pancreatic tissue blood flow (TBF), tissue blood volume (TBV), and mean transit time (MTT) using both algorithms and investigated their correlation based on vessel selection. Results: The artery AUC significantly decreased as it neared the pancreas (P < 0.01). In all cases, the peak time of the pancreas (11.5 {+-} 1.6) was shorter than the appearance time (14.1 {+-} 1.6) in the splenic vein. The splenic artery-vein combination exhibited the highest collection rate (91.1%) and was the only combination that was significantly correlated between TBF, TBV, and MTT in both algorithms. Conclusion: Selection of a vessel nearest to the pancreas is considered as a more appropriate prerequisite. Therefore, vessel selection is important in comparison of the semi-quantitative parameters obtained by different algorithms.

  18. Measurement of canine pancreatic perfusion using dynamic computed tomography: Influence of input-output vessels on deconvolution and maximum slope methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: We investigated whether the prerequisite of the maximum slope and deconvolution methods are satisfied in pancreatic perfusion CT and whether the measured parameters between these algorithms are correlated. Methods: We examined nine beagles injected with iohexol (200 mgI kg-1) at 5.0 ml s-1. The abdominal aorta and splenic and celiac arteries were selected as the input arteries and the splenic vein, the output veins. For the maximum slope method, we determined the arterial contrast volume of each artery by measuring the area under the curve (AUC) and compared the peak enhancement time in the pancreas with the contrast appearance time in the splenic vein. For the deconvolution method, the artery-to-vein collection rate of contrast medium was calculated. We calculated the pancreatic tissue blood flow (TBF), tissue blood volume (TBV), and mean transit time (MTT) using both algorithms and investigated their correlation based on vessel selection. Results: The artery AUC significantly decreased as it neared the pancreas (P < 0.01). In all cases, the peak time of the pancreas (11.5 ± 1.6) was shorter than the appearance time (14.1 ± 1.6) in the splenic vein. The splenic artery-vein combination exhibited the highest collection rate (91.1%) and was the only combination that was significantly correlated between TBF, TBV, and MTT in both algorithms. Conclusion: Selection of a vessel nearest to the pancreas is considered as a more appropriate prerequisite. Therefore, vessel selection is important in comparison of the semi-quantitative parameters obtained by different algorithms.

  19. Nitroglycerin reduces augmentation index and central blood pressure independent of effects on cardiac preload

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mike; Saddon; Karen; McNeil; Philip; Chowienczyk

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine whether reduction in central pressure augmentation and central systolic blood pressure by nitroglycerine (NTG) results from effects on pre-load or is due to arterial dilation. Methods We compared effects of NTG with those of lower body negative pressure (LBNP). Hemodynamic measurements were made at rest,during LBNP (10,20 and 30 mmHg,each for 15 min) and after NTG (10,30 and 100 μg/min,each dose for 15 min) in ten healthy volunteers. Cardiac pre-load,stroke volume and cardiac output w...

  20. Cardiac factors in orthostatic hypotension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löllgen, H.; Dirschedl, P.; Koppenhagen, K.; Klein, K. E.

    Cardiac function is determined by preload, afterload, heart rate and contractility. During orthostatic stress, the footward blood shift is compensated for by an increase of afterload. LBNP is widely used to analyze effects of volume displacement during orthostatic stress. Comparisons of invasive ( right heart catheterization) and non-invasive approach (echocardiography) yielded similar changes. Preload and afterload change with graded LBNP, heart rate increases, and stroke volume and cardiac output decrease. Thus, the working point on the left ventricular function curve is shifted to the left and downward, similar to hypovolemia. However, position on the Frank-Starling curve, the unchanged ejection fraction, and the constant Vcf indicate a normal contractile state during LBNP. A decrease of arterial oxygen partial pressure during LBNP shwos impaired ventilation/perfusion ratio. Finally, LBNP induced cardiac and hemodynamic changes can be effectively countermeasured by dihydroergotamine, a potent venoconstrictor. Comparison of floating catheter data with that of echocardiography resulted in close correlation for cardiac output and stroke volume. In addition, cardiac dimensions changed in a similar way during LBNP. From our findings, echocardiography as a non-invasive procedure can reliably used in LBNP and orthostatic stress tests. Some informations can be obtained on borderline values indicating collaps or orthostatic syncope. Early fainters can be differentiated from late fainters by stroke volume changes.

  1. Measurement of mean cardiac dose for various breast irradiation techniques and corresponding risk of major cardiovascular event.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Rodrigo Merino Lara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available After breast conserving surgery, early stage breast cancer patients are currently treated with a wide range of radiation techniques including whole breast irradiation (WBI, accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI using high dose rate (HDR brachytherapy, or 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT. This study compares the mean heart’s doses for a left breast irradiated with different breast techniques.An anthropomorphic Rando phantom was modified with gelatin-based breast of different sizes and tumors located medially or laterally. The breasts were treated with WBI, 3D-CRT or HDR APBI. The heart’s mean doses were measured with Gafchromic films and controlled with optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs. Following the model reported by Darby (16, major cardiac were estimated assuming a linear risk increase with the mean dose to the heart of 7.4% per gray.Whole breast irradiation lead to the highest mean heart dose (2.99 Gy compared to 3D-CRT APBI, (0.51 Gy, multicatheter (1.58 Gy and balloon HDR (2.17 Gy for a medially located tumor. This translated into long-term coronary event increases of 22%, 3.8%, 11.7%, and 16% respectively. The sensitivity analysis showed that the tumor location had almost no effect on the mean heart dose for 3D-CRT APBI and a minimal impact for HDR APBI. For WBI large breast size and set-up errors lead to sharp increases of the mean heart dose. Its value reached 10.79 Gy for women with large breast and a set-up error of 1.5 cm. Such a high value could increase the risk of having long-term coronary events by 80%.Comparison among different irradiation techniques demonstrates that 3D-CRT APBI appears the safest one with less probability of having cardiovascular events in the future. A sensitivity analysis showed that WBI is the most challenging technique for patients with large breasts or when significant set-up errors are anticipated. In those cases additional heart shielding techniques are required.

  2. Detector to detector corrections: A comprehensive experimental study of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small radiotherapy beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azangwe, Godfrey, E-mail: g.azangwe@iaea.org; Grochowska, Paulina; Izewska, Joanna; Meghzifene, Ahmed [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, PO Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Georg, Dietmar; Hopfgartner, Johannes; Lechner, Wolfgang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University Vienna/AKH Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria and Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Andersen, Claus E.; Beierholm, Anders R.; Helt-Hansen, Jakob [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, Risø Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Mizuno, Hideyuki; Fukumura, Akifumi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi 263-8555 (Japan); Yajima, Kaori [Association for Nuclear Technology in Medicine, 7-16, Nihonbashikodenmacho, chuou-ku, Tokyo 103-0001 (Japan); Gouldstone, Clare; Sharpe, Peter [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Palmans, Hugo [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW, United Kingdom and EBG MedAustron GmbH, Medical Physics Department, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of the present study is to provide a comprehensive set of detector specific correction factors for beam output measurements for small beams, for a wide range of real time and passive detectors. The detector specific correction factors determined in this study may be potentially useful as a reference data set for small beam dosimetry measurements. Methods: Dose response of passive and real time detectors was investigated for small field sizes shaped with a micromultileaf collimator ranging from 0.6 × 0.6 cm{sup 2} to 4.2 × 4.2 cm{sup 2} and the measurements were extended to larger fields of up to 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}. Measurements were performed at 5 cm depth, in a 6 MV photon beam. Detectors used included alanine, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), stereotactic diode, electron diode, photon diode, radiophotoluminescent dosimeters (RPLDs), radioluminescence detector based on carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C), organic plastic scintillators, diamond detectors, liquid filled ion chamber, and a range of small volume air filled ionization chambers (volumes ranging from 0.002 cm{sup 3} to 0.3 cm{sup 3}). All detector measurements were corrected for volume averaging effect and compared with dose ratios determined from alanine to derive a detector correction factors that account for beam perturbation related to nonwater equivalence of the detector materials. Results: For the detectors used in this study, volume averaging corrections ranged from unity for the smallest detectors such as the diodes, 1.148 for the 0.14 cm{sup 3} air filled ionization chamber and were as high as 1.924 for the 0.3 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber. After applying volume averaging corrections, the detector readings were consistent among themselves and with alanine measurements for several small detectors but they differed for larger detectors, in particular for some small ionization chambers with volumes larger than 0.1 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: The results demonstrate

  3. Prognostic value of cardiac time intervals measured by tissue Doppler imaging M-mode in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Mogelvang, Rasmus; Jensen, Jan Skov

    2015-01-01

    -mode through the mitral leaflet. IVCT/ET, IVRT/ET and the myocardial performance index (MPI=(IVRT+IVCT)/ET) were calculated. RESULTS: During follow-up (median 10.8 years), 383 (20%) participants reached the combined endpoint MACE (ischaemic heart disease, heart failure or cardiac death). After multivariable...... adjustment for clinical predictors and conventional echocardiography, only the combined indexes, including information on both systolic and diastolic performance (IVRT/ET and MPI), remained significant prognosticators (p<0.05 for both). Adding IVRT/ET or MPI to a model already including all other...... echocardiographic parameters resulted in a significant increase in the c-statistics (0.76 vs 0.75 p<0.01 for both). IVRT/ET or MPI improved reclassification significantly when added to the clinical predictors (p<0.05 for both). CONCLUSIONS: In the general population, the combined cardiac time intervals that include...

  4. Input-output supervisor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The input-output supervisor is the program which monitors the flow of informations between core storage and peripheral equipments of a computer. This work is composed of three parts: 1 - Study of a generalized input-output supervisor. With sample modifications it looks like most of input-output supervisors which are running now on computers. 2 - Application of this theory on a magnetic drum. 3 - Hardware requirement for time-sharing. (author)

  5. Affect intensity and cardiac arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blascovich, J; Brennan, K; Tomaka, J; Kelsey, R M; Hughes, P; Coad, M L; Adlin, R

    1992-07-01

    Relationships between affect intensity and basal, evoked, and perceived cardiac arousal were investigated in 3 experiments. Affect intensity was assessed using Larsen and Diener's (1987) Affect Intensity Measure (AIM). Cardiac arousal was evoked with exercise in the 1st study and with mental arithmetic in the 2nd and 3rd. Perceived cardiac arousal was measured under optimal conditions using a standard heartbeat discrimination procedure. Women as a group scored higher on the AIM. Affect intensity was unrelated to basal or evoked cardiac arousal and was negatively related to perceived cardiac arousal in all 3 studies. Data suggest that affect intensity, although unrelated to actual physiological arousal, is negatively related to the accuracy with which individuals perceive their own arousal. Results are discussed within the context of an expanded arousal-regulation model (Blascovich, 1990). PMID:1494983

  6. Impact of High-Normal Blood Pressure Measured in Emergency Room on Adverse Cardiac Events in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Nam Sik; Jeong, Myung Ho; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Jong Hyun; Chae, Shung Chull; Kim, Young Jo; Hur, Seung Ho; Seong, In Whan; Hong, Taek Jong; Choi, Donghoon; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Chong Jin; Seung, Ki Bae; Chung, Wook Sung; Jang, Yang Soo

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Prehypertension according to JNC7 is common and is associated with increased vascular mortality. The importance of management in high-normal blood pressure (BP) is underemphasized. Subjects and Methods We analyzed major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry in normal BP (group I) and high-normal BP (group II) patients. Results Among 14871 patients, 159 (61±12.3 years, 122 males) satisfied the study indication. Six-month and ...

  7. Test–retest repeatability of quantitative cardiac 11C-meta-hydroxyephedrine measurements in rats by small animal positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The norepinephrine analogue 11C-meta-hydroxyephedrine (HED) has been used to interrogate sympathetic neuronal reuptake in cardiovascular disease. Application for longitudinal studies in small animal models of disease necessitates an understanding of test–retest variability. This study evaluated the repeatability of multiple quantitative cardiac measurements of HED retention and washout and the pharmacological response to reuptake blockade and enhanced norepinephrine levels. Methods: Small animal PET images were acquired over 60 min following HED administration to healthy male Sprague Dawley rats. Paired test and retest scans were undertaken in individual animals over 7 days. Additional HED scans were conducted following administration of norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor desipramine or continuous infusion of exogenous norepinephrine. HED retention was quantified by retention index, standardized uptake value (SUV), monoexponential and one-compartment washout. Plasma and cardiac norepinephrine were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Results: Test retest variability was lower for retention index (15% ± 12%) and SUV (19% ± 15%) as compared to monoexponential washout rates (21% ± 13%). Desipramine pretreatment reduced myocardial HED retention index by 69% and SUV by 85%. Chase treatment with desipramine increased monoexponential HED washout by 197% compared to untreated controls. Norepinephrine infusion dose-dependently reduced HED accumulation, reflected by both retention index and SUV, with a corresponding increase in monoexponential washout. Plasma and cardiac norepinephrine levels correlated with HED quantitative measurements. Conclusion: The repeatability of HED retention index, SUV, and monoexponential washout supports its suitability for longitudinal PET studies in rats. Uptake and washout of HED are sensitive to acute increases in norepinephrine concentration

  8. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  9. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  10. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedema, J.P.; Zondervan, P.E.; van Hagen, P.; ten Cate, F.J.; Bresser, P.; Doubell, A.F.; Pattynama, P.; Hoogsteden, H.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Symptomatic cardiac involvement occurs in approximately 5% of patients. The prevalence of sarcoidosis in the Netherlands is unknown, but estimated to be approximately 20 per 100,000 population (3200 patients). We report on five patients who presented with different manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis, and give a brief review on the current management of this condition. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be of great help in diagnosing this condition as well as in the follow-up of the response to therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:25696121

  11. The Acute Effect of Upper-Body Complex Training on Power Output of Martial Art Athletes as Measured by the Bench Press Throw Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Liossis, Loudovikos Dimitrios; Forsyth, Jacky; Liossis, Ceorge; Tsolakis, Charilaos

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute effect of upper body complex training on power output, as well as to determine the requisite preload intensity and intra-complex recovery interval needed to induce power output increases. Nine amateur-level combat/martial art athletes completed four distinct experimental protocols, which consisted of 5 bench press repetitions at either: 65% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) with a 4 min rest interval; 65% of 1RM with an 8 min rest; 85% of 1RM w...

  12. In vivo cardiac glucose metabolism in the high-fat fed mouse: Comparison of euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic clamp derived measures of glucose uptake with a dynamic metabolomic flux profiling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalski, Greg M., E-mail: greg.kowalski@deakin.edu.au [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia); De Souza, David P. [Metabolomics Australia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute of Molecular Science and Biotechnology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Risis, Steve [Cellular and Molecular Metabolism Laboratory, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria 3004 (Australia); Burch, Micah L. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Hamley, Steven [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia); Kloehn, Joachim [Metabolomics Australia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute of Molecular Science and Biotechnology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Selathurai, Ahrathy [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia); Lee-Young, Robert S. [Cellular and Molecular Metabolism Laboratory, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria 3004 (Australia); Tull, Dedreia; O' Callaghan, Sean; McConville, Malcolm J. [Metabolomics Australia, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Institute of Molecular Science and Biotechnology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Bruce, Clinton R. [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia)

    2015-08-07

    Rationale: Cardiac metabolism is thought to be altered in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our understanding of the regulation of cardiac substrate metabolism and insulin sensitivity has largely been derived from ex vivo preparations which are not subject to the same metabolic regulation as in the intact heart in vivo. Studies are therefore required to examine in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism under physiologically relevant conditions. Objective: To determine the temporal pattern of the development of cardiac insulin resistance and to compare with dynamic approaches to interrogate cardiac glucose and intermediary metabolism in vivo. Methods and results: Studies were conducted to determine the evolution of cardiac insulin resistance in C57Bl/6 mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for between 1 and 16 weeks. Dynamic in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism was determined following oral administration of [U-{sup 13}C] glucose. Hearts were collected after 15 and 60 min and flux profiling was determined by measuring {sup 13}C mass isotopomers in glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. Cardiac insulin resistance, determined by euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic clamp, was evident after 3 weeks of HFD. Despite the presence of insulin resistance, in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism following oral glucose administration was not compromised in HFD mice. This contrasts our recent findings in skeletal muscle, where TCA cycle activity was reduced in mice fed a HFD. Similar to our report in muscle, glucose derived pyruvate entry into the TCA cycle in the heart was almost exclusively via pyruvate dehydrogenase, with pyruvate carboxylase mediated anaplerosis being negligible after oral glucose administration. Conclusions: Under experimental conditions which closely mimic the postprandial state, the insulin resistant mouse heart retains the ability to stimulate glucose metabolism. - Highlights: • Insulin clamp was used to determine the evolution of cardiac

  13. In vivo cardiac glucose metabolism in the high-fat fed mouse: Comparison of euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic clamp derived measures of glucose uptake with a dynamic metabolomic flux profiling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rationale: Cardiac metabolism is thought to be altered in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our understanding of the regulation of cardiac substrate metabolism and insulin sensitivity has largely been derived from ex vivo preparations which are not subject to the same metabolic regulation as in the intact heart in vivo. Studies are therefore required to examine in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism under physiologically relevant conditions. Objective: To determine the temporal pattern of the development of cardiac insulin resistance and to compare with dynamic approaches to interrogate cardiac glucose and intermediary metabolism in vivo. Methods and results: Studies were conducted to determine the evolution of cardiac insulin resistance in C57Bl/6 mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for between 1 and 16 weeks. Dynamic in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism was determined following oral administration of [U-13C] glucose. Hearts were collected after 15 and 60 min and flux profiling was determined by measuring 13C mass isotopomers in glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. Cardiac insulin resistance, determined by euglycemic–hyperinsulinemic clamp, was evident after 3 weeks of HFD. Despite the presence of insulin resistance, in vivo cardiac glucose metabolism following oral glucose administration was not compromised in HFD mice. This contrasts our recent findings in skeletal muscle, where TCA cycle activity was reduced in mice fed a HFD. Similar to our report in muscle, glucose derived pyruvate entry into the TCA cycle in the heart was almost exclusively via pyruvate dehydrogenase, with pyruvate carboxylase mediated anaplerosis being negligible after oral glucose administration. Conclusions: Under experimental conditions which closely mimic the postprandial state, the insulin resistant mouse heart retains the ability to stimulate glucose metabolism. - Highlights: • Insulin clamp was used to determine the evolution of cardiac insulin

  14. World Input-Output Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Cerina

    Full Text Available Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries.

  15. World Input-Output Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerina, Federica; Zhu, Zhen; Chessa, Alessandro; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries. PMID:26222389

  16. Cardiac Pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete survey of physiological biophysical,clinical and engineering aspects of cardiac facing,including the history and an assessment of possible future developments.Among the topics studied are: pacemakers, energy search, heart stimulating with pacemakers ,mathematical aspects of the electric cardio stimulation chronic, pacemaker implants,proceeding,treatment and control

  17. Influence of vascular function and pulsatile hemodynamics on cardiac function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Vanessa; Mitchell, Gary F

    2015-09-01

    Interactions between cardiac and vascular structure and function normally are optimized to ensure delivery of cardiac output with modest pulsatile hemodynamic overhead. Aortic stiffening with age or disease impairs optimal ventricular-vascular coupling, increases pulsatile load, and contributes to left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, reduced systolic function, and impaired diastolic relaxation. Aortic pulse pressure and timing of peak systolic pressure are well-known measures of hemodynamic ventricular-vascular interaction. Recent work has elucidated the importance of direct, mechanical coupling between the aorta and the heart. LV systolic contraction results in displacement of aortic and mitral annuli, thereby producing longitudinal stretch in the ascending aorta and left atrium, respectively. Force associated with longitudinal stretch increases systolic load on the LV. However, the resulting energy stored in the elastic elements of the proximal aorta during systole facilitates early diastolic LV recoil and rapid filling. This review discusses current views on hemodynamics and mechanics of ventricular-vascular coupling. PMID:26164466

  18. The Analysis of Theoretical National Account Problems of the Measurement of Non-market Service Output%非市场服务产出核算理论问题研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金钰

    2003-01-01

    With the development of economy, services of every country have made rapid progress. However, despite the increasing importance of services, statistical theories of services, especially of non-market services, have developed very slowly. According to the edition of System of National Accounts issued in 1993 (SNA(1993) ), because of the unavailability of the market price, the output of non-market services is still obtained through input method, though the method is blamed widely. In this paper, the author has a further discussion on the issues concerning with the measurement of the output of non-market servicels.

  19. Output hardcopy devices

    CERN Document Server

    Durbeck, Robert

    1988-01-01

    Output Hardcopy Devices provides a technical summary of computer output hardcopy devices such as plotters, computer output printers, and CRT generated hardcopy. Important related technical areas such as papers, ribbons and inks, color techniques, controllers, and character fonts are also covered. Emphasis is on techniques primarily associated with printing, as well as the plotting capabilities of printing devices that can be effectively used for computer graphics in addition to their various printing functions. Comprised of 19 chapters, this volume begins with an introduction to vector and ras

  20. Non-invasive assessment of the left ventricular pressure to volume relationships during ejection period using a single cardiac probe system and tonometric measurement of radial arterial pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The left ventricular (LV) pressure to volume relationships are very sensitive parameters for the evaluation of the LV function. For measurement of LV pressure in an entire cardiac cycle, an invasive method is always needed. However, on the assumption that the LV pressure is similar to that of aorta and radial artery during ejection period, we have developed a new system for simple and non-invasive assessment of the LV pressure to volume relationships. The LV volume is estimated by ECG-gated radionuclide ventriculography using a single cardiac probe system and the data were collected every 10 msec. The radial arterial pressure was measured simultaneously every 10 msec by a tonometry system. These data were transferred to the personal computer through RS-232c cable. Then the pressure to volume curves during ejection phase was generated automatically. Emax was calculated from these curves. Moreover, the new parameter called the ejection rate of change of power (ERCP) can be calculated. These parameters are very useful for the evaluation of the effect of the drugs on the LV performance. (author)

  1. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Promotes Cardiac Inflammation and Heart Failure during Polymicrobial Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Lohner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aim was to elucidate the role of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 in cardiac inflammation and septic heart failure in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis. Methods. Sepsis was induced via colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP in C57BL/6 wild-type (WT and TLR9-deficient (TLR9-D mice. Bacterial load in the peritoneal cavity and cardiac expression of inflammatory mediators were determined at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 h. Eighteen hours after CASP cardiac function was monitored in vivo. Sarcomere length of isolated cardiomyocytes was measured at 0.5 to 10 Hz after incubation with heat-inactivated bacteria. Results. CASP led to continuous release of bacteria into the peritoneal cavity, an increase of cytokines, and differential regulation of receptors of innate immunity in the heart. Eighteen hours after CASP WT mice developed septic heart failure characterised by reduction of end-systolic pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output, and parameters of contractility. This coincided with reduced cardiomyocyte sarcomere shortening. TLR9 deficiency resulted in significant reduction of cardiac inflammation and a sustained heart function. This was consistent with reduced mortality in TLR9-D compared to WT mice. Conclusions. In polymicrobial sepsis TLR9 signalling is pivotal to cardiac inflammation and septic heart failure.

  2. VMS forms Output Tables

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These output tables contain parsed and format validated data from the various VMS forms that are sent from any given vessel, while at sea, from the VMS devices on...

  3. Output and error messages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the output data and output files that are produced by the SYVAC A/C 1.03 computer program. It also covers the error messages generated by incorrect input data, and the run classification procedure. SYVAC A/C 1.03 simulates the groundwater mediated movement of radionuclides from underground facilities for the disposal of low and intermediate level wastes to the accessible environment, and provides an estimate of the subsequent radiological risk to man. (author)

  4. In vitro assessment of cardiac performance after irradiation using an isolated working rat heart preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of irradiation on cardiac function was assessed using an isolated working rat heart preparation. The animals were given single doses of X-rays in the range 15-30 Gy to their hearts. Cardiac output (CO = aortic flow + coronary flow), heart weight and body weight were followed for a period of 10 months after treatment. Irradiation led to a decrease in cardiac function. This reduction was dose-dependent and progressive with time after treatment. The shape of the Frank-Starling curves constructed for irradiated hearts suggests a loss of contractile function of the myocardium. Coronary flow rates measured in 'working' hearts and in 'Langendorff' hearts were not significantly changed by the irradiation treatment. The isolated working rat heart preparation proved to be a simple and suitable animal model for the investigation of irradiation-induced cardiotoxicity. (author)

  5. Adding Emulsified Isoflurane to Cardioplegia Solution Produces Cardiac Protection in a Dog Cardiopulmonary Bypass Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Han; Zhou, Cheng; Liu, Jin; Song, Haibo; Qiu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether caridoplegia solution with Emulsified Isoflurane (EI) could improve cardiaoprotection in a dog CPB model of great similarity to clinical settings. Adult dogs were randomly assigned to receive one of the following cardioplegia solutions: St. Thomas with EI (group ST+EI), St. Thomas with 30% Intralipid (group ST+EL) and St. Thomas alone (group ST). The aorta was cross-clamped for two hours followed by reperfusion for another two hours, during which cardiac output was measured and dosages of positive inotropic agent to maintain normal hemodynamics were recorded. Serum level of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and CK-MB were measured. Deletion of cardiac mitochondrial DNA was examined at the end of reperfusion. Compared with ST, ST+EI decreased the requirement of dopamine support while animals receiving ST+EI had a significantly larger cardiac output. ST+EI reduced post-CPB release of cTnI and CK-MB. Mitochondrial DNA loss was observed in only one of the tested animals from group ST+EI while it was seen in all the tested animals from group ST+EL and ST. Addition of emulsified isoflurane into cardioplegia solution protects against myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. This protective effect might be mediated by preserving mitochondrial ultrastructure and DNA integrity. PMID:27121996

  6. Cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chlumský, Jaromír; Holá, Dana; Hlaváček, Karel; Michal, Michal; Švec, Alexander; Špatenka, Jaroslav; Dušek, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sarcoma is a very rare neoplasm and is difficult to diagnose. The case of a 51-year-old man with a left atrial tumour, locally recurrent three months after its surgical removal, is presented. Computed tomography showed metastatic spread to the lung parenchyma. On revised histology, the mass extirpated was a sarcoma. Because of the metastatic spread, further therapy was symptomatic only; the patient died 15 months after the first manifestation of his problems. Immunohistochemical stain...

  7. Cardiac Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Joorabian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a spectrum of different types of cardiac"ncalcifications with the importance and significance"nof each type of cardiac calcification, especially"ncoronary artery calcification. Radiologic detection of"ncalcifications within the heart is quite common. The"namount of coronary artery calcification correlates"nwith the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD."nCalcification of the aortic or mitral valve may indicate"nhemodynamically significant valvular stenosis."nMyocardial calcification is a sign of prior infarction,"nwhile pericardial calcification is strongly associated"nwith constrictive pericarditis. A spectrum of different"ntypes of cardiac calcifications (linear, annular,"ncurvilinear,... could be seen in chest radiography and"nother imaging modalities. So a carful inspection for"ndetection and reorganization of these calcifications"nshould be necessary. Numerous modalities exist for"nidentifying coronary calcification, including plain"nradiography, fluoroscopy, intravascular ultrasound,"nMRI, echocardiography, and conventional, helical and"nelectron-beam CT (EBCT. Coronary calcifications"ndetected on EBCT or helical CT can be quantifie,"nand a total calcification score (Cardiac Calcification"nScoring may be calculated. In an asymptomatic"npopulation and/or patients with concomitant risk"nfactors like diabetes mellitus, determination of the"npresence of coronary calcifications identifies the"npatients at risk for future myocardial infarction and"ncoronary artery disease. In patients without coronary"ncalcifications, future cardiovascular events could"nbe excluded. Therefore, detecting and recognizing"ncalcification related to the heart on chest radiography"nand other imaging modalities such as fluoroscopy, CT"nand echocardiography may have important clinical"nimplications.

  8. Effects of Exercise Training on Haematology and Maximal Cardiac Output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonne, Thomas Christian

    the heart ultra structure possibly also play a role for improving Qmax. Other mechanisms that can improve exercise capacity include hypoxia. It is universally accepted that hypoxia is a main stimulant of erythropoiesis and altitude training is considered a possibility to increase red blood cell volume...... of the exercise induced increase in Qmax whereas structural changes to the heart may require years of training to exert an effect. Classical altitude training has the potential to further increase Hbmass and BV through an elevation in RCV and a strong tendency towards improvements in performance was......Qmax may increase within a few weeks of exercise and the underlying mechanisms leading to this are likely to be multi-factorial. Plasma volume is generally thought to rapidly increase in response to exercise training driving an increase in Qmax and hence VO2max. Structural and functional changes to...

  9. Temperature dependence of intracellular free calcium in cardiac myocytes from rat and ground squirrel measured by confocal microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王世强; 周曾铨; 钱洪

    1999-01-01

    The temperature-dependence of infraeeliular free caleimn (Ca) was investigated in mdo-1 loaded ventricular myocytes from the ral, a non-hibernator, and from the ground squirrel, a hibernator. The dissociation constant of indo-l at different temperatures was calibrated both al pll-tat and at @-stat . and the result demonstrated that the @-stat ralibration should be prettrred . Analysis of the fluoreseent image showed a striking increase of Ca2 as well as spontaneous caleiuni waves in ral cells, indicating an overloaded cakuum. In contrast, cardiac myocytes of the ground sqnirraf were found to keep a constant (Ca2+) without caleium overload regardless of temperature variation. It is be-lieved that understanding of the mechanisms underlying the interccllular caleima homeostasis of hibrernators may lead to solutions of some medical questions .

  10. The Effect of Threshold Values and Weighting Factors on the Association between Entropy Measures and Mortality after Myocardial Infarction in the Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial (CAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Mayer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV is a non-invasive measurement based on the intervals between normal heart beats that characterize cardiac autonomic function. Decreased HRV is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events. Characterizing HRV using only moment statistics fails to capture abnormalities in regulatory function that are important aspects of disease risk. Thus, entropy measures are a promising approach to quantify HRV for risk stratification. The purpose of this study was to investigate this potential for approximate, corrected approximate, sample, fuzzy, and fuzzy measure entropy and its dependency on the parameter selection. Recently, published parameter sets and further parameter combinations were investigated. Heart rate data were obtained from the "Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression Trial (CAST RR Interval Sub-Study Database" (Physionet. Corresponding outcomes and clinical data were provided by one of the investigators. The use of previously-reported parameter sets on the pre-treatment data did not significantly add to the identification of patients at risk for cardiovascular death on follow-up. After arrhythmia suppression treatment, several parameter sets predicted outcomes for all patients and patients without coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. The strongest results were seen using the threshold parameter as a multiple of the data’s standard deviation ( r = 0 . 2 · σ . Approximate and sample entropy provided significant hazard ratios for patients without CABG and without diabetes for an entropy maximizing threshold approximation. Additional parameter combinations did not improve the results for pre-treatment data. The results of this study illustrate the influence of parameter selection on entropy measures’ potential for cardiovascular risk stratification and support the potential use of entropy measures in future studies.

  11. 脉搏指示连续心排血量监测技术在骨盆骨折合并失血性休克患者中的应用及护理%Nursing of pulse-indicated continuous cardiac output technique in pelvic fracture patients with hemorrhagic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵文静; 程人佳; 张庆红; 赵文州

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical nursing methods of pulse-indicated con-tinuous cardiac output(PICCO)system in pelvic fracture patients with hemorrhagic shock.Methods The clinical data of 82 pelvic fracture patients with hemorrhagic shock treated in emergency inten-sive care unit (EICU)were retrospectively analyzed.Results In 82 patients,74 improved patients transferred to other departments or discharged and 8 patients died including 6 patients with acute re-nal failure.Conclusion Pelvic fracture patients with hemorrhagic shock using PICCO technology can accurately reflect the volume state.The PICCO management and PICCO safety is the key to en-sure successful treatment.%目的:探讨脉搏指示连续心排血量监测技术(PICCO)在骨盆骨折合并失血性休克患者中的应用及护理方法。方法对急诊重症监护室(EICU)收治的82例骨盆骨折合并失血性休克患者的临床及护理资料进行回顾性分析。结果82例患者中,病情好转转科或出院74例,死亡8例,其中并发急性肾衰竭6例。结论骨盆骨折合并失血性休克患者采用 PICCO技术能精准反映患者的容量状态,在 PICCO 的管理和观察中保证 PICCO 监测安全有效是救治成功的关键。

  12. Oil output's changing fortunes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Petroleum Economist, previously the Petroleum Press Service, has been making annual surveys of output levels of petroleum in all the oil-producing countries since its founding in 1934. This article documents trends and changes in the major oil-producing countries output from 1934 until the present. This analysis is linked with the political and historical events accompanying these changes, notably the growth of Middle Eastern oil production, the North Sea finds and most recently, Iraq's invasion of Kuwait in 1990. (UK)

  13. Cardiac conduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cardiac conduction system is a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals ... to contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system are the SA node, AV node, bundle ...

  14. Cardiac surgery outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Linda S; Barnett, Scott D; Beachy, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Accrediting organizations and payers are demanding valid and reliable data that demonstrate the value of services. Federal agencies, healthcare industry groups, and healthcare watchdog groups are increasing the demand for public access to outcomes data. A new and growing outcomes dynamic is the information requested by prospective patients in an increasingly consumer-oriented business. Patients demand outcomes, and resources are developing to meet these demands. Physicians are increasingly confronted with requests for information about their mortality and morbidity rates, malpractice suits, and disciplinary actions received. For example, in Virginia, prospective patients have access to data provided by the nonprofit group Virginia Health Information. After numerous resolutions by the Virginia Senate since 1999, the prospective Virginia medical consumer now has access to several annual publications: Virginia Hospitals: A Consumer's Guide, 1999 Annual Report and Strategic Plan Update, and the 1999 Industry Report: Virginia Hospitals and Nursing Facilities. Consumers have access to cardiac outcomes data stratified by hospital, gender, and cardiac service line (cardiac surgery, noninvasive cardiology, and invasive cardiology). This is particularly relevant to IHI because Virginia Health Information specifically targets cardiac care. IHI has a sizable investment in cardiovascular outcomes and has found outcomes measurement and research are key to providing quality care. IHI's goal is to move from an outcomes management model to a disease management model. The hope is to incorporate all aspects of the patient's continuum of care, from preoperative and diagnostic services through cardiac interventions to postoperative rehabilitation. Furthermore, every step along the way will be supported with functional status and quality of life assessments. Although these goals are ambitious and expensive, the return on investment is high. PMID:14618772

  15. Treadmill performance and cardiac function in selected patients with coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the cardiac determinants of treadmill performance in patients able to exercise to volitional fatigue, 88 patients with coronary heart disease free of angina pectoris were tested. The exercise tests included supine bicycle radionuclide ventriculography, thallium scintigraphy and treadmill testing with expired gas analysis. The number of abnormal Q wave locations, ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, cardiac output, exercise-induced ST segment depression and thallium scar and ischemia scores were the cardiac variables considered. Rest and exercise ejection fractions were highly correlated to thallium scar score (r . -0.72 to -0.75, p less than 0.001), but not to maximal oxygen consumption (r . 0.19 to 0.25, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the variability in predicting treadmill time or estimated maximal oxygen consumption was explained by treadmill test-induced change in heart rate (39%), thallium ischemia score (12%) and cardiac output at rest (4%). The change in heart rate induced by the treadmill test explained only 27% of the variability in measured maximal oxygen consumption. Myocardial damage predicted ejection fraction at rest and the ability to increase heart rate with treadmill exercise appeared as an essential component of exercise capacity. Exercise capacity was only minimally affected by asymptomatic ischemia and was relatively independent of ventricular function

  16. Visualization of transcoronary ablation of septal hypertrophy in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy: a comparison between cardiac MRI, invasive measurements and echocardiography

    OpenAIRE

    Sohns, Christian; Sossalla, Samuel; Schmitto, Jan D; Jacobshagen, Claudius; Raab, Björn; Obenauer, Silvia; Maier, Lars S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is treated by surgical myectomy or transcoronary ablation of septal hypertrophy (TASH). The aim of this study was to visualize the feasibility, success and short-term results of TASH on the basis of cardiac MRI (CMR) in comparison with cardiac catheterization and echocardiography. Methods In this in vivo study, nine patients with HOCM were treated with TASH. Patients were evaluated by transthoracic echocardiography, invasive cardiac ang...

  17. A novel non invasive measurement of hemodynamic parameters: Comparison of single-chamber ventricular and dual-chamber pacemaker

    OpenAIRE

    Ingrid M. Pardede; Yoga Yuniadi

    2008-01-01

    We carried out a cross sectional study to analyze hemodynamic parameters of single-chamber ventricular pacemaker compared with dual-chamber pacemaker by using thoracic electrical bioimpedance monitoring method (Physio Flow™) - a novel simple non-invasive measurement. A total of 48 consecutive outpatients comprised of 27 single chamber pacemaker and 21 dual chamber were analyzed. We measured cardiac parameters: heart rate, stroke volume index, cardiac output index, estimated ejection fraction,...

  18. Acute kidney injury after cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Tujjar, Omar; Mineo, Giulia; Dell’Anna, Antonio; Poyatos-Robles, Belen; Donadello, Katia; Scolletta, Sabino; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Taccone, Fabio Silvio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and determinants of AKI in a large cohort of cardiac arrest patients. Methods We reviewed all patients admitted, for at least 48 hours, to our Dept. of Intensive Care after CA between January 2008 and October 2012. AKI was defined as oligo-anuria (daily urine output

  19. Simultaneous 13C/12C and (18)O/(16)O isotope ratio measurements on CO2 based on off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Hans-Jürg; Castrillo, Antonio; Wilson, H William

    2006-03-01

    A prototype off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer (OA-ICOS) utilizing two identical cavities together with a near-infrared (1.63 microm) external cavity tunable diode laser is described. The two-cavity design-one for a reference gas and one for a sample gas-takes advantage of classical double-beam infrared spectrometer characteristics in reducing uncertainties due to laser scan or power instabilities and major temperature variations by a factor of three or better compared with a single-cavity scheme. This is the first OA-ICOS instrument designed to determine 13C/12C and (18)O/(16)O ratios from CO2 rotation/vibration fine structure in three different combination bands. Preliminary results indicate that at 0.8 Hz a precision of 3.3 and 2.8 per thousand is obtained for delta13C and delta(18)O, respectively, over a period of 10 h and a pure CO2 gas sample at 26 hPa. By averaging 100 spectra over a subset of the data, we achieved a precision of 1.6 and 0.8 \\permil\\ for delta13C and delta(18)O, respectively. PMID:16500753

  20. Right and left ventricular volume measurements in an animal heart model in vitro: first experiences with cardiac MRI at 1.0 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy in quantifying right and left ventricular volumes using a 1.0-T system and commercially available, standard equipment. For exact comparison of MRI measurements and real volumes we used an animal heart model ex vivo. Eight pig hearts were explanted and prepared by removal of the atria. Aorta and pulmonary truncus were cannulated. Definable volumes were injected into the ventricles. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 1.0 T (Gyroscan T10 NT, Philips, Eindhoven, The Netherlands); sequence: fast field echo-echo planar (multishot EPI); body coil; MR software: Cardiac Application Package (Philips). Statistical analysis correlated the real volumes and MR measurements separately for both ventricles and two investigators (SAS, ANOVA). For both ventricles and both investigators the correlation between real volumes and MR measurements was greater than 0.99. There was no significant systematic false estimation for both ventricles. Magnetic resonance imaging at 1.0 T using standard hardware and software equipment enables the quantification of right and left ventricular volumes with high approximation to the real volumes in vitro. There is a clear restriction in translating these data into a clinical application because under experimental conditions no motion-induced artifacts existed. (orig.)

  1. Monte Carlo modeling of small photon fields: Quantifying the impact of focal spot size on source occlusion and output factors, and exploring miniphantom design for small-field measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy with which Monte Carlo models of photon beams generated by linear accelerators (linacs) can describe small-field dose distributions depends on the modeled width of the electron beam profile incident on the linac target. It is known that the electron focal spot width affects penumbra and cross-field profiles; here, the authors explore the extent to which source occlusion reduces linac output for smaller fields and larger spot sizes. A BEAMnrc Monte Carlo linac model has been used to investigate the variation in penumbra widths and small-field output factors with electron spot size. A formalism is developed separating head scatter factors into source occlusion and flattening filter factors. Differences between head scatter factors defined in terms of in-air energy fluence, collision kerma, and terma are explored using Monte Carlo calculations. Estimates of changes in kerma-based source occlusion and flattening filter factors with field size and focal spot width are obtained by calculating doses deposited in a narrow 2 mm wide virtual ''milliphantom'' geometry. The impact of focal spot size on phantom scatter is also explored. Modeled electron spot sizes of 0.4-0.7 mm FWHM generate acceptable matches to measured penumbra widths. However the 0.5 cm field output factor is quite sensitive to electron spot width, the measured output only being matched by calculations for a 0.7 mm spot width. Because the spectra of the unscattered primary (ΨΠ) and head-scattered (ΨΣ) photon energy fluences differ, miniphantom-based collision kerma measurements do not scale precisely with total in-air energy fluence Ψ=(ΨΠ+ΨΣ) but with (ΨΠ+1.2ΨΣ). For most field sizes, on-axis collision kerma is independent of the focal spot size; but for a 0.5 cm field size and 1.0 mm spot width, it is reduced by around 7% mostly due to source occlusion. The phantom scatter factor of the 0.5 cm field also shows some spot size dependence, decreasing by 6% (relative) as spot size is

  2. Cardiac MRI in Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, T.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is often used in athletes to image cardiac anatomy and function and is increasingly requested in the context of screening for pathology that can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD). In this thesis, patterns of cardiac adaptation to sports are investigated with C

  3. Estimating output fluence with MCNP4 for shaped fields and their comparison with measurements in the EPID system aS1000 for dosimetry 2D in-vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiotherapy dosimetry is a fundamental process in quality control of the treatments performed with this technique. Different systems exist to quantify radiation dose in radiotherapy, one of them is the Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID), which is widely used in IMRT to measure the output fluence of a radiation field for comparison with a predicted fluence in a planning system. The objective of this work was to simulate a Varian linear accelerator model Clinac i X using the MCNP4 code for obtaining curves of percentage depth dose (Pdd) and open fields dosimetric profiles of 5 x 5, 10 x 10, 20 x 20 and 30 x 30 cm2. The simulations were validated by comparing them with measurements made with ionization chamber. Then a mannequin of solid water (30 x 30 x 20 cm3) with an open field of 10 x 10 cm2 was irradiated to measure the output fluence with EPID aS1000 system of Varian. A simulation of the solid water mannequin under the same conditions of irradiation was conducted to estimate the output fluence. Tests of index gamma and percentage differences were calculated to compare that simulated with that measured. In all cases was found that more than 95% of the evaluated points passed the acceptance criteria (ΔD= 1% and ΔS= 1 mm for curves Pdd and profiles, and ΔD= 3% and ΔS= 3 mm for fluence two-dimensional). This paper will contribute to the implementation of in-vivo dosimetry three-dimensional with the EPID system. (Author)

  4. Assessment of radiochromic gel dosimeter based on Turnbull Blue dye for relative output factor measurements of the Leksell Gamma Knife® PerfexionTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to perform assessment of radiochromic gel dosimeter based on Turnbull blue dye formed by irradiation (TB gel dosimeter) for measurement of ROFs for 4 mm and 8 mm collimators for the Leksell Gamma Knife PerfexionTM. All measurements have been carried out using home-made spherical Perspex glass phantom of diameter 160 mm. TB gel dosimeters were scanned using homemade optical CT scanner. The results are compared with vendor recommended Monte Carlo calculated ROFs values of 0.814 and 0.900 for 4 mm and 8 mm collimators, respectively. The comparisons between the gel measurements and the treatment planning system (TPS) calculation are presented in the form of 2D isodoses for the central slices and 1D profile. Measured ROF 0.746 and 0.874 for 4 mm and 8 mm collimators respectively are in a reasonable agreement with vendor recommended values and measured relative dose distribution in a central slice and measured profiles of all shots show excellent correspondence with TPS

  5. Assessment of radiochromic gel dosimeter based on Turnbull Blue dye for relative output factor measurements of the Leksell Gamma Knife® PerfexionTM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozubikova, P.; Solc, J.; Novotny, J., Jr.; Pilarova, K.; Pipek, J.; Koncekova, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to perform assessment of radiochromic gel dosimeter based on Turnbull blue dye formed by irradiation (TB gel dosimeter) for measurement of ROFs for 4 mm and 8 mm collimators for the Leksell Gamma Knife PerfexionTM. All measurements have been carried out using home-made spherical Perspex glass phantom of diameter 160 mm. TB gel dosimeters were scanned using homemade optical CT scanner. The results are compared with vendor recommended Monte Carlo calculated ROFs values of 0.814 and 0.900 for 4 mm and 8 mm collimators, respectively. The comparisons between the gel measurements and the treatment planning system (TPS) calculation are presented in the form of 2D isodoses for the central slices and 1D profile. Measured ROF 0.746 and 0.874 for 4 mm and 8 mm collimators respectively are in a reasonable agreement with vendor recommended values and measured relative dose distribution in a central slice and measured profiles of all shots show excellent correspondence with TPS.

  6. Plasma cardiac troponin I concentrations in healthy neonates, children and adolescents measured with a high sensitive immunoassay method: High sensitive troponin I in pediatric age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselli, Chiara; Cangemi, Giuliana; Masotti, Silvia; Ragusa, Rosetta; Gennai, Iulian; Del Ry, Silvia; Prontera, Concetta; Clerico, Aldo

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 10years cardiac troponin (cTn) immunoassays have been improved in analytical sensitivity and precision thereby allowing the measurement of cTn in adult healthy subjects. However, there are currently substantial gaps in our knowledge on circulating levels of cTn in healthy children. The aim of this study is to evaluate the distribution of plasma troponin concentration in apparently healthy pediatric subjects using a high sensitive immunoassay for cTnI measurement (hs-cTnI). Blood samples were obtained from 357 healthy pediatric subjects [204 males; age range 0-18years; mean (SD): 8.7(6) years], including 36 subjects aged LOD value were 13.1%. cTnI plasma levels were highest in the first month of life with a progressive decline in the next years and were lower in female. At multivariate analysis, only age was predictor of hs-cTnI plasma levels. The age and sex of children influence normal and physiologically released circulating concentrations of hs-cTnI, suggesting the need of reference intervals specific for age and sex. PMID:27118089

  7. Endothelial Function as a Possible Significant Determinant of Cardiac Function during Exercise in Patients with Structural Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonpei Takase

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was investigated the role that endothelial function and systemic vascular resistance (SVR play in determining cardiac function reserve during exercise by a new ambulatory radionuclide monitoring system (VEST in patients with heart disease. The study population consisted of 32 patients. The patients had cardiopulmonary stress testing using the treadmill Ramp protocol and the VEST. The anaerobic threshold (AT was autodetermined using the V-slope method. The SVR was calculated by determining the mean blood pressure/cardiac output. Flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD was measured in the brachial artery to evaluate endotheilial function. FMD and the percent change f'rom rest to AT in SVR correlated with those from rest to AT in ejection fraction and peak ejection ratio by VEST, respectively. Our findings suggest that FMD in the brachial artery and the SVR determined by VEST in patients with heart disease can possibly reflect cardiac function reserve during aerobic exercise.

  8. Relationship of radionuclide measurements of left ventricular diastolic filling in patients with type I diabetes mellitus to subsequent clinical cardiac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates left ventricular diastolic filling (LVDF) in patients with type I diabetes mellitus (DM) in order to identify increased risk for subsequent cardiac events. The authors obtained radionuclide ventriculograms in 54 patients with type I DM. Median follow-up for cardiac complications was 63 months. We assessed peak filling rate (PFR; in end diastolic volume [EDV] per second), first 1/2 filling fraction (1/2 FF), and first 1/2 filling fraction/R-R interval (1/2 FF/R-R) by analysis of convariance to account for effects of age and R-R interval. Cardiac complications ere found in 15 of 54 patients

  9. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...

  10. Cardiac Vagal Regulation and Early Peer Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Paulo A.; Keane, Susan P.; Calkins, Susan D.

    2007-01-01

    A sample of 341 5 1/2-year-old children participating in an ongoing longitudinal study was the focus of a study on the relation between cardiac vagal regulation and peer status. To assess cardiac vagal regulation, resting measures of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and RSA change (suppression) to 3 cognitively and emotionally challenging tasks…

  11. Optoacoustic measurement of central venous oxygenation for assessment of circulatory shock: clinical study in cardiac surgery patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Irene Y.; Prough, Donald S.; Kinsky, Michael; Petrov, Yuriy; Petrov, Andrey; Henkel, S. Nan; Seeton, Roger; Salter, Michael G.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2014-03-01

    Circulatory shock is a dangerous medical condition, in which blood flow cannot provide the necessary amount of oxygen to organs and tissues. Currently, its diagnosis and therapy decisions are based on hemodynamic parameters (heart rate, blood pressure, blood gases) and mental status of a patient, which all have low specificity. Measurement of mixed or central venous blood oxygenation via catheters is more reliable, but highly invasive and associated with complications. Our previous studies in healthy volunteers demonstrated that optoacoustic systems provide non-invasive measurement of blood oxygenation in specific vessels, including central veins. Here we report our first results of a clinical study in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery patients. We used a medical-grade OPO-based optoacoustic system developed in our laboratory to measure in real time blood oxygenation in the internal jugular vein (IJV) of these patients. A clinical ultrasound imaging system (GE Vivid e) was used for IJV localization. Catheters were placed in the IJV as part of routine care and blood samples taken via the catheters were processed with a CO-oximeter. The optoacoustic oxygenation data were compared to the CO-oximeter readings. Good correlation between the noninvasive and invasive measurements was obtained. The results of these studies suggest that the optoacoustic system can provide accurate, noninvasive measurements of central venous oxygenation that can be used for patients with circulatory shock.

  12. Improving the recording of surgical drain output

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, Nicholas; Heron, Paul; Bethune, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the output from surgical drains is an important part of post-operative care and is often undertaken poorly. Failure to have accurate documentation of daily outputs may delay the removal of drains and increase the risk of complications. Following discussions with medical and nursing staff we listed eight key criteria that should be routinely monitored for surgical drains. A baseline measurement demonstrated only 20% compliance with these criteria. As such we decided to design a char...

  13. Receiver-Operating-Characteristic Analysis Reveals Superiority of Scale-Dependent Wavelet and Spectral Measures for Assessing Cardiac Dysfunction

    CERN Document Server

    Thurner, S; Lowen, S B; Teich, M C; Thurner, Stefan; Feurstein, Markus C.; Lowen, Steven B.; Teich, Malvin C.

    1998-01-01

    Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the suitability of various heart rate variability (HRV) measures for correctly classifying electrocardiogram records of varying lengths as normal or revealing the presence of heart failure. Scale-dependent HRV measures were found to be substantially superior to scale-independent measures (scaling exponents) for discriminating the two classes of data over a broad range of record lengths. The wavelet-coefficient standard deviation at a scale near 32 heartbeat intervals, and its spectral counterpart near 1/32 cycles per interval, provide reliable results using record lengths just minutes long. A jittered integrate-and-fire model built around a fractal Gaussian-noise kernel provides a realistic, though not perfect, simulation of heartbeat sequences.

  14. Cardiac status assessment with a multi-signal device for improved home-based congestive heart failure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlsteff, Jens; Carvalho, Paulo; Henriques, Jorge; Paiva, Rui P; Reiter, Harald

    2011-01-01

    State-of-the-Art disease management for Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) patients is still based on easy-to-acquire measures such as heart rate (HR), weight and blood pressure (BP). However, these measures respond late to changes of the patient health status and provide limited information to personalize and adapt medication therapy. This paper describes our concept called "Cardiac Status Assessment" we have been investigating within the European project "HeartCycle" towards next-generation home-based disease management of CHF. In our concept we analyze non-invasive surrogate measures of the cardio-vascular function in particular systolic time intervals and pulse wave characteristics to estimate Cardiac Output (CO) and Systemic Vascular Resistance (SVR) both are established clinical measures. We discuss the underlying concept, a developed measurement system and first results. PMID:22254450

  15. Measurement of Thermal Lens Focal Length and Its Effect on Laser Output Characteristics in LD End-pumped Nd∶YVO4 Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Chunming(万春明); WANG Hui(王慧)

    2002-01-01

    According to the resonator transform circle theory, the focal length of thermal lens of laser media in laser diode end-pumped solid-state lasers is analyzed and measured with a simple method. A 30W 808nm LD pumped YVO4 laser is developed and characterized.

  16. Investigation, development and application of optimal output feedback theory. Vol. 4: Measures of eigenvalue/eigenvector sensitivity to system parameters and unmodeled dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halyo, Nesim

    1987-01-01

    Some measures of eigenvalue and eigenvector sensitivity applicable to both continuous and discrete linear systems are developed and investigated. An infinite series representation is developed for the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a system. The coefficients of the series are coupled, but can be obtained recursively using a nonlinear coupled vector difference equation. A new sensitivity measure is developed by considering the effects of unmodeled dynamics. It is shown that the sensitivity is high when any unmodeled eigenvalue is near a modeled eigenvalue. Using a simple example where the sensor dynamics have been neglected, it is shown that high feedback gains produce high eigenvalue/eigenvector sensitivity. The smallest singular value of the return difference is shown not to reflect eigenvalue sensitivity since it increases with the feedback gains. Using an upper bound obtained from the infinite series, a procedure to evaluate whether the sensitivity to parameter variations is within given acceptable bounds is developed and demonstrated by an example.

  17. Sweat output measurement of the post-ganglion sudomotor response by Q-Sweat Test: a normative database of Chinese individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shu-Fang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Q-Sweat is a model used for evaluating the post-ganglionic sudomotor function by assessing sweat response. This study aimed to establish the normative database of Q-Sweat test among Chinese individuals since this type of information is currently lacking. Results One hundred and fifty (150 healthy volunteers, 76 men and 74 women with age range of 22–76 years were included. Skin temperature and sweat onset latency measured at the four sites (i.e., the forearm, proximal leg, distal leg, and the foot did not significantly correlate with age, gender, body height (BH, body weight (BW, and body mass index (BMI but the total sweat volume measured in all four sites significantly correlated with sex, BH, and BW. Except for the distal leg, the total sweat volume measured at the other three sites had a significant correlation with BMI. In terms of gender, men had larger total sweat volume, with median differences at the forearm, proximal leg, distal leg, and foot of 0.591 μl, 0.693 μl, 0.696 μl, and 0.358 μl, respectively. Regarding BW difference (≥62 and  Conclusion This is the first report to show the normative database of sweat response in Chinese participants evaluated using Q-Sweat device. This normative database can help guide further research on post-ganglionic sudomotor or related clinical practice involving a Chinese population.

  18. Cardiac perception and cardiac control. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, D

    1977-12-01

    The evidence regarding specific cardiac perception and discrimination, and its relationship to voluntary cardiac control, is critically reviewed. Studies are considered in three sections, depending on the method used to assess cardiac perception: questionnaire assessment, discrimination procedures, and heartbeat tracking. The heartbeat tracking procedure would appear to suffer least from interpretative difficulties. Recommendations are made regarding the style of analysis used to assess heartbeat perception in such tracking tasks. PMID:348240

  19. Iterative deconvolution of simultaneous 99mTc and 201Tl projection data measured on a CdZnTe-based cardiac SPECT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a method of correcting self-scatter and crosstalk effects in simultaneous technetium-99m/thallium-201 stress/rest myocardial perfusion (single photon emission computed tomography) SPECT scans. The method, which is in essence a hybrid between the triple energy window method and scatter modelling, is based on a model of spatial and spectral distribution of projection counts in several selected energy windows. The parameters of the model are determined from measurements of thin rod sources in air when no in-object scatter or attenuation effects are present. The model equations are solved using the iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm in the projection space to find estimates of the primary photopeak counts of both radionuclides. The method has been developed particularly for a novel dedicated cardiac camera based on CdZnTe pixellated detectors, although it can also be adapted to a conventional scintillator camera. The method has been validated in anthropomorphic phantom experiments. Significant improvement in defect contrast has been observed with only moderate increase in image noise. The application of the method to patient data is illustrated.

  20. Contemporary Breast Radiotherapy and Cardiac Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboa, Debra Nana; Evans, Suzanne Buckley

    2016-01-01

    Long-term cardiac effects are an important component of survivorship after breast radiotherapy. The pathophysiology of cardiotoxicity, history of breast radiotherapy, current methods of cardiac avoidance, modern outcomes, context of historical outcomes, quantifying cardiac effects, and future directions are reviewed in this article. Radiation-induced oxidative stress induces proinflammatory cytokines and is a process that potentiates late effects of fibrosis and intimal proliferation in endothelial vasculature. Breast radiation therapy has changed substantially in recent decades. Several modern technologies exist to improve cardiac avoidance such as deep inspiration breath hold, gating, accelerated partial breast irradiation, and use of modern 3-dimensional planning. Modern outcomes may vary notably from historical long-term cardiac outcomes given the differences in cardiac dose with modern techniques. Methods of quantifying radiation-related cardiotoxicity that correlate with future cardiac risks are needed with current data exploring techniques such as measuring computed tomography coronary artery calcium score, single-photon emission computed tomography imaging, and biomarkers. Placing historical data, dosimetric correlations, and relative cardiac risk in context are key when weighing the benefits of radiotherapy in breast cancer control and survival. Estimating present day cardiac risk in the modern treatment era includes challenges in length of follow-up and the use of confounding cardiotoxic agents such as evolving systemic chemotherapy and targeted therapies. Future directions in both multidisciplinary management and advancing technology in radiation oncology may provide further improvements in patient risk reduction and breast cancer survivorship. PMID:26617212

  1. A new nonlinear output tracking controller via output-feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun ZHANG; Yungang LIU; Yuqin DING

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the output tracking control is investigated for a class of nonlinear systems when only output is available for feedback. Based on the multivariable analog of circle criterion, an observer is first introduced. Then, the observer-based output tracking controller is constructively designed by using the integral backstepping approach together with completing square. It is shown that, under relatively mild conditions, all the closed-loop signals are uniformly bounded.Meanwhile the system output asymptotically tracks the desired output. A simulation example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  2. Output gaps: uses and limitation

    OpenAIRE

    Roc Armenter

    2011-01-01

    The concept of resource slack is central to understanding the dynamics between employment, output, and inflation. But what amount of slack is consistent with price stability? To answer this question, economists define baseline values for unemployment and output known as the natural rate of unemployment and potential output. The concepts of output and employment gaps can be useful to economists in several ways. First, they often guide the inflation forecasts of Federal Reserve staff and other ...

  3. In vivo MRI measurement of fetal blood oxygen saturation in cardiac ventricles of fetal sheep: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedegärtner, Ulrike; Kooijman, Hendrik; Yamamura, Jin; Frisch, Michael; Weber, Christoph; Buchert, Ralph; Huff, Anna; Hecher, Kurt; Adam, Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility to determine fetal blood oxygen saturation (sO(2)) with T(2)-weighted MR sequences using a fetal sheep model. T(2) measurements were performed on a 1.5-T scanner using a T(2) preparation pulse in combination with a three-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession sequence repeated at different echo times. Eight sheep fetuses were examined during a control, hypoxic, and recovery phase to perform T(2)-weighted scans of the fetal blood in the heart. Signal intensities in the left and right ventricle were measured to calculate the MR blood sO(2). During each phase, fetal carotid artery sO(2) was directly measured and correlated with MR sO(2). A Bland-Altman plot was performed. Fetal carotid artery sO(2) was 69% sO(2) during control, 16% sO(2) during hypoxemia, and 67% sO(2) during recovery. Mean values of the MR sO(2) were 49% sO(2) and 40% sO(2) for control, 6% sO(2) and 3% sO(2) for hypoxemia, and 51% sO(2) and 43% sO(2) for recovery in left ventricle and right ventricle, respectively. Mean values of fetal carotid artery sO(2) and MR sO(2) were highly correlated (left ventricle: r = 0.87, right ventricle: r = 0.89). According to the Bland-Altman plot, MR sO(2) was lower compared to fetal carotid artery sO(2) (left ventricle: 15%, right ventricle: 20%). Based on our preliminary results, it seems to be possible to assess fetal sO(2) with MR oximetry. PMID:20572133

  4. Cardiac Anxiety in people with and without Coronary Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Marker, Craig D.; Carmin, Cheryl N.; Ownby, Raymond L.

    2008-01-01

    Many studies have shown that cardiac anxiety when occurring in the absence of coronary artery disease is common and quite costly. The Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire (CAQ) is an 18 item self-report measure that assesses anxiety related to cardiac symptoms. In order to better understand the construct of cardiac anxiety, a factor analysis was conducted on CAQ data from 658 individuals who were self- or physician- referred for electron beam tomographic screening to determine whether clinically sig...

  5. Random output and hospital performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Pedro Pita

    2003-11-01

    Many countries are under pressure to reform health care financing and delivery. Hospital care is one part of the health system that is under scrutiny. Private management initiatives are a possible way to increase efficiency in health care delivery. This motivates the interest in developing methodologies to assess hospital performance, recognizing hospitals as a different sort of firm. We present a simple way to describe hospital production: hospital output as a change in the distribution of survival probabilities. This output definition allows us to separate hospital production from patients' characteristics. The notion of "better performance" has a precise meaning: (first-order) stochastic dominance of a distribution of survival probabilities over another distribution. As an illustration, we compare, for an important DRG, private and public management and find that private management performs better, mainly in the range of high-survival probabilities. The measured performance difference cannot be attributed to input prices or to economies of scale and/or scope. It reflects pure technological and organisational differences. PMID:14686628

  6. Scaling of global input-output networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Sai; Qi, Zhengling; Qu, Shen; Zhu, Ji; Chiu, Anthony S. F.; Jia, Xiaoping; Xu, Ming

    2016-06-01

    Examining scaling patterns of networks can help understand how structural features relate to the behavior of the networks. Input-output networks consist of industries as nodes and inter-industrial exchanges of products as links. Previous studies consider limited measures for node strengths and link weights, and also ignore the impact of dataset choice. We consider a comprehensive set of indicators in this study that are important in economic analysis, and also examine the impact of dataset choice, by studying input-output networks in individual countries and the entire world. Results show that Burr, Log-Logistic, Log-normal, and Weibull distributions can better describe scaling patterns of global input-output networks. We also find that dataset choice has limited impacts on the observed scaling patterns. Our findings can help examine the quality of economic statistics, estimate missing data in economic statistics, and identify key nodes and links in input-output networks to support economic policymaking.

  7. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chu

    correction factors for the MOSFET organ dose measurements in the following studies. Minor angular dependence (cardiac catheterization) was observed. Second, the cardiac dose for common fluoroscopic imaging techniques for pediatric patients in the two age groups was measured. Imaging technique settings with variations of individual key imaging parameters were tested to observe the quantitative effect of imaging optimization or lack thereof. Along with each measurement, the two standard system output indices, the Air Kerma (AK) and Dose-Area Product (DAP), were also recorded and compared to the measured cardiac and skin doses -- the lack of correlation between the indices and the organ doses shed light to the substantial limitation of the indices in representing patient radiation dose, at least within the scope of this dissertation. Third, the effective dose (ED) for Posterior-Anterior and Lateral fluoroscopic imaging techniques for pediatric patients in the two age groups was determined. In addition, the dosimetric effect of removing the anti-scatter grid was studied, for which a factor-of-two ED rate reduction was observed for the imaging techniques. The Clinical Component involved analytical research to develop a validated retrospective cardiac dose reconstruction formulation and to propose the new Optimization Index which evaluates the level of optimization of the clinician's imaging usage during a procedure; and small sample group of actual procedures were used to demonstrate applicability of these formulations. In its entirety, the research represents a first-of-its-kind comprehensive approach in radiation dosimetry for pediatric cardiac catheterization; and separately, it is also modular enough that each individual section can serve as study templates for small-scale dosimetric studies of similar purposes. The data collected and algorithmic formulations developed can be of use in areas of personalized patient dosimetry, clinician training, image quality studies and

  8. Investigation of abnormal negative threshold voltage shift under positive bias stress in input/output n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors with TiN/HfO2 structure using fast I-V measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This letter investigates abnormal negative threshold voltage shifts under positive bias stress in input/output (I/O) TiN/HfO2 n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors using fast I-V measurement. This phenomenon is attributed to a reversible charge/discharge effect in pre-existing bulk traps. Moreover, in standard performance devices, threshold-voltage (Vt) shifts positively during fast I-V double sweep measurement. However, in I/O devices, Vt shifts negatively since electrons escape from bulk traps to metal gate rather than channel electrons injecting to bulk traps. Consequently, decreasing pre-existing bulk traps in I/O devices, which can be achieved by adopting HfxZr1−xO2 as gate oxide, can reduce the charge/discharge effect

  9. Débito cardíaco e fração de ejeção fetal por meio do spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC: comparação entre fetos masculinos e femininos Fetal cardiac output and ejection fraction by spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC: comparison between male and female fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Simioni

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar do débito cardíaco (DC e a fração de ejeção (FE do coração de fetos masculinos e femininos obtidos por meio da ultrassonografia tridimensional, utilizando o spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC. MÉTODOS: Realizou-se um estudo de corte transversal com 216 fetos normais, entre 20 a 34 semanas de gestação, sendo 108 masculinos e 108 femininos. Os volumes ventriculares no final da sístole e diástole foram obtidos por meio do STIC, sendo as avaliações volumétricas realizadas pelo virtual organ computer-aided analysis (VOCAL com rotação de 30º. Para o cálculo do DC utilizou-se a fórmula: DC= volume sistólico/frequência cardíaca fetal, enquanto que para a FE utilizou-se a fórmula: FE= volume sistólico/volume diastólico final. O DC (combinado, feminino e masculino e a FE (masculina e feminina foram comparadas utilizando-se o teste t não pareado e ANCOVA. Foram criados gráficos de dispersão com os percentis 5, 50 e 95. RESULTADOS: A média do DC combinado, DC direito, DC esquerdo, FE direita e FE esquerda, para feminino e masculino, foram 240,07 mL/min; 122,67 mL/min; 123,40 mL/min; 72,84%; 67,22%; 270,56 mL/min; 139,22 mL/min; 131,34 mL/min; 70,73% e 64,76%, respectivamente; sem diferença estatística (P> 0,05. CONCLUSÕES: O DC e a FE fetal obtidos por meio da ultrassonografia tridimensional (STIC não apresentaram diferença significativa em relação ao gênero.OBJECTIVE: To compare the cardiac output (CO and ejection fraction (EF of the heart of male and female fetuses obtained by 3D-ultrasonography using spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study with 216 normal fetuses, between 20 and 34 weeks of gestation, 108 male and 108 female. Ventricular volumes at the end of systole and diastole were obtained by STIC, and the volumetric assessments performed by the virtual organ computer-aided analysis (VOCAL rotated 30º. To calculate the DC used the formula

  10. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  11. Cardiac oxygen limitation during an acute thermal challenge in the European perch: effects of chronic environmental warming and experimental hyperoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, Andreas; Brijs, Jeroen; Clark, Timothy D; Gräns, Albin; Jutfelt, Fredrik; Sandblom, Erik

    2016-08-01

    Oxygen supply to the heart has been hypothesized to limit cardiac performance and whole animal acute thermal tolerance (CTmax) in fish. We tested these hypotheses by continuously measuring venous oxygen tension (Pvo2) and cardiovascular variables in vivo during acute warming in European perch (Perca fluviatilis) from a reference area during summer (18°C) and a chronically heated area (Biotest enclosure) that receives warm effluent water from a nuclear power plant and is normally 5-10°C above ambient (24°C at the time of experiments). While CTmax was 2.2°C higher in Biotest compared with reference perch, the peaks in cardiac output and heart rate prior to CTmax occurred at statistically similar Pvo2 values (2.3-4.0 kPa), suggesting that cardiac failure occurred at a common critical Pvo2 threshold. Environmental hyperoxia (200% air saturation) increased Pvo2 across temperatures in reference fish, but heart rate still declined at a similar temperature. CTmax of reference fish increased slightly (by 0.9°C) in hyperoxia, but remained significantly lower than in Biotest fish despite an improved cardiac output due to an elevated stroke volume. Thus, while cardiac oxygen supply appears critical to elevate stroke volume at high temperatures, oxygen limitation may not explain the bradycardia and arrhythmia that occur prior to CTmax Acute thermal tolerance and its thermal plasticity can, therefore, only be partially attributed to cardiac failure from myocardial oxygen limitations, and likely involves limiting factors on multiple organizational levels. PMID:27280433

  12. A Wearable Contactless Sensor Suitable for Continuous Simultaneous Monitoring of Respiration and Cardiac Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano D. Gargiulo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A reliable system that can simultaneously and accurately monitor respiration and cardiac output would have great utility in healthcare applications. In this paper we present a novel approach to creating such a system. This noninvasive, low power, low cost, contactless sensor is suitable for continuous monitoring of respiration (tidal volume and cardiac stroke volume. Furthermore, it is capable of delivering this data in true volume (i.e., mL. The current embodiment, specifically designed for sleep monitoring applications, requires only 100 mW when powered by a 4.8 V battery pack and is based on the use of a single electroresistive band embedded in a T-shirt. Here, we describe the implementation of the device, explaining the rational and design choices for the electronic circuit and the physical garment together with the preliminary tests performed using one volunteer subject. Comparison of the device with a commercially available spirometer demonstrates that tidal volume can be monitored over extended periods with a precision of ±10%. We further demonstrate the utility of the device to measure cardiac output and respiration effort.

  13. Diffuse infiltrative cardiac tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the cardiac magnetic resonance images of an unusual form of cardiac tuberculosis. Nodular masses in a sheet-like distribution were seen to infiltrate the outer myocardium and pericardium along most of the cardiac chambers. The lesions showed significant resolution on antitubercular therapy

  14. SODIUM BICARBONATE INFUSION: TO PREVENT CARDIAC SURGERY - ASSOCIATED ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The incidence of cardiac surgery – associated acute kidney injury is 50% of patients and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. This study aimed to determine if perioperative urinary and plasma alkalization with sodium bicarbonate infusion re duces the incidence of cardiac surgery – associated acute kidney injury. SETTING AND DESIGN: This study is double blind randomized control trial conducted at U N Mehta Institute of Cardiology and Research Center , India. METHOD S AND RESULT: A total of 140 pat ients scheduled to undergo elective cardiac surgery , who were at increased risk of development of cardiac surgery – associated acute kidney injury using recognized risk factors. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either sodium bicarbonate (n = 70 o r sodium chloride (n = 70 infusion , commencing at the start of anesthesia , in a dose of 4 mmol/kg over 24 hour. The primary outcome measure was the number of patients with development of CSA - AKI , defined as an increase in creatinine greater than 25% from baseline to peak value within the first three postoperative days. Significant differences among the groups in both plasma and urinary pH were achieved 6 hours after commencement of the infusion , and these changes persisted for more than 24 hours. A total o f 7 out of 70(10% patients in the sodium bicarbonate group and 16 out of 70(22.85% patients in the sodium chloride group developed acute kidney injury within the first three postoperative days with p value of 0.06 which is statistically not significant . There were also no significant differences in ventilation hours , ICU or hospital length of stay , or mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Perioperative alkalization of blood and urine using an infusion of sodium bicarbonate did not result in a decrease in the incidence of acute kidney injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. KEYWORDS: Acute kidney injury; Cardiac surgery; Cardiopulmonary bypass; Creatinine

  15. Review paper: A reappraisal of concepts in heart failure: Central role of cardiac power reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon G. Williams

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Of all cardiological conditions, heart failure (HF is by far conceptually the most difficult to grasp. For over a century, it has been beset with a number of misconceptions, which require reappraisal. Central to these misleading concepts is the absence of a reliable means of evaluating what constitutes heart failure and how to assess and ameliorate its severity. To attain this necessitates our moving away from the easier assessments at rest to measurements at peak exercise. Taking the key function of the cardiac pump as the delivery of adequate hydraulic energy to maintain the requisite circulation, it becomes apparent that the parameter we require is cardiac power output reserve, which incorporates both the flow- and pressure-generating capacity of the heart. Evidence available so far has shown that this variable is a major determinant of exercise incapacity and prognosis in patients with heart failure.

  16. Cardiac contractility, central haemodynamics and blood pressure regulation during semistarvation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, K H; Breum, L; Astrup, A

    1991-01-01

    pressure (BP) declined. The fall in BP was caused by the reduction in cardiac output as the total peripheral resistance was unchanged. Finally, the decline in total blood volume was not significant. These findings together with a reduction in heart rate indicated that a reduced sympathetic tone via......Eight obese patients were studied before and after 2 weeks of treatment by a very-low-calorie diet (VLCD). Cardiac output and central blood volume (pulmonary blood volume and left atrial volume) were determined by indicator dilution (125I-albumin) and radionuclide angiocardiography (first pass and...... equilibrium technique by [99Tcm]red blood cells). Cardiac output decreased concomitantly with the reduction in oxygen uptake as the calculated systemic arteriovenous difference of oxygen was unaltered. There were no significant decreases in left ventricular contractility indices, i.e. the ejection fraction...

  17. Serial Input Output

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waite, Anthony; /SLAC

    2011-09-07

    Serial Input/Output (SIO) is designed to be a long term storage format of a sophistication somewhere between simple ASCII files and the techniques provided by inter alia Objectivity and Root. The former tend to be low density, information lossy (floating point numbers lose precision) and inflexible. The latter require abstract descriptions of the data with all that that implies in terms of extra complexity. The basic building blocks of SIO are streams, records and blocks. Streams provide the connections between the program and files. The user can define an arbitrary list of streams as required. A given stream must be opened for either reading or writing. SIO does not support read/write streams. If a stream is closed during the execution of a program, it can be reopened in either read or write mode to the same or a different file. Records represent a coherent grouping of data. Records consist of a collection of blocks (see next paragraph). The user can define a variety of records (headers, events, error logs, etc.) and request that any of them be written to any stream. When SIO reads a file, it first decodes the record name and if that record has been defined and unpacking has been requested for it, SIO proceeds to unpack the blocks. Blocks are user provided objects which do the real work of reading/writing the data. The user is responsible for writing the code for these blocks and for identifying these blocks to SIO at run time. To write a collection of blocks, the user must first connect them to a record. The record can then be written to a stream as described above. Note that the same block can be connected to many different records. When SIO reads a record, it scans through the blocks written and calls the corresponding block object (if it has been defined) to decode it. Undefined blocks are skipped. Each of these categories (streams, records and blocks) have some characteristics in common. Every stream, record and block has a name with the condition that each

  18. Comparative cardiac toxicity of anthracyclines in vitro and in vivo in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Toldo

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The antineoplastic efficacy of anthracyclines is limited by their cardiac toxicity. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of doxorubicin, non-pegylated liposomal-delivered doxorubicin, and epirubicin in HL-1 adult cardiomyocytes in culture as well as in the mouse in vivo. METHODS: The cardiomyocytes were incubated with the three anthracyclines (1 µM to assess reactive oxygen generation, DNA damage and apoptotic cell death. CF-1 mice (10/group received doxorubicin, epirubicin or non-pegylated liposomal-doxorubicin (10 mg/kg and cardiac function was monitored by Doppler echocardiography to measure left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, heart rate (HR and cardiac output (CO both prior to and 10 days after drug treatment. RESULTS: In HL-1 cells, non-pegylated liposomal-doxorubicin generated significantly less reactive oxygen species (ROS, as well as less DNA damage and apoptosis activation when compared with doxorubicin and epirubicin. Cultured breast tumor cells showed similar sensitivity to the three anthracyclines. In the healthy mouse, non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin showed a minimal and non-significant decrease in LVEF with no change in HR or CO, compared to doxorubicin and epirubicin. CONCLUSION: This study provides evidence for reduced cardiac toxicity of non-pegylated-liposomal doxorubicin characterized by attenuation of ROS generation, DNA damage and apoptosis in comparison to epirubicin and doxorubicin.

  19. A mechanical simulator of cardiac wall kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrì, Elena; Bagnoli, Paola; Marcelli, Emanuela; Biondi, Federico; Cercenelli, Laura; Costantino, Maria Laura; Plicchi, Gianni; Fumero, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Aim of this study is to develop a mechanical simulator (MS) reproducing cardiac wall kinematics [i.e., radial (R), longitudinal (L) and rotational (RT) motions] to test piezoelectric gyroscopic sensors (GS) that are able to measure cardiac torsion that has proved to be a sensitive index of cardiac performance. The MS consists of three brushless motors controlled by a dedicated software either separately or simultaneously reproducing the three main cardiac wall movements (R, L, RT) obtained by implementing different physiologic or pathologic velocity profiles derived from in vivo data. GS accuracy (max % error) was experimentally tested by connecting it to the MS driven in velocity in different working conditions [i.e., cardiac period (515-1030 ms), RT angle (4-16 degrees), GS axis inclination (0-90 degrees) with respect to the cardiac rotation axis]. The MS reproduced the tested velocity profiles well. The GS showed high accuracy in measuring both physiologic and pathologic RT velocity profiles, whereas they proved insensitive to R and L motions. GS axis inclination influenced measurements; however, it was possible to correct this taking the inclination angle cosine into account. The MS proved to be a useful tool to study cardiac wall kinematics and test GS reliability with a view to in vivo application. PMID:20404720

  20. Psychological stress measurement through voice output analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Older, H. J.; Jenney, L. L.

    1975-01-01

    Audio tape recordings of selected Skylab communications were processed by a psychological stress evaluator. Strip chart tracings were read blind and scores were assigned based on characteristics reported by the manufacturer to indicate psychological stress. These scores were analyzed for their empirical relationships with operational variables in Skylab judged to represent varying degrees of situational stress. Although some statistically significant relationships were found, the technique was not judged to be sufficiently predictive to warrant its use in assessing the degree of psychological stress of crew members in future space missions.