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Sample records for cardiac muscle myosin

  1. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase efficiently phosphorylates serine 15 of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josephson, Matthew P.; Sikkink, Laura A.; Penheiter, Alan R.; Burghardt, Thomas P.; Ajtai, Katalin

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) is phosphorylated at S15. ► Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase. ► It is a widely believed that MYL2 is a poor substrate for smMLCK. ► In fact, smMLCK efficiently and rapidly phosphorylates S15 in MYL2. ► Phosphorylation kinetics measured by novel fluorescence method without radioactivity. -- Abstract: Specific phosphorylation of the human ventricular cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) modifies the protein at S15. This modification affects MYL2 secondary structure and modulates the Ca 2+ sensitivity of contraction in cardiac tissue. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase prevalent in uterus and present in other contracting tissues including cardiac muscle. The recombinant 130 kDa (short) smMLCK phosphorylated S15 in MYL2 in vitro. Specific modification of S15 was verified using the direct detection of the phospho group on S15 with mass spectrometry. SmMLCK also specifically phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain S15 in porcine ventricular myosin and chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin (S20 in smooth muscle) but failed to phosphorylate the myosin regulatory light chain in rabbit skeletal myosin. Phosphorylation kinetics, measured using a novel fluorescence method eliminating the use of radioactive isotopes, indicates similar Michaelis–Menten V max and K M for regulatory light chain S15 phosphorylation rates in MYL2, porcine ventricular myosin, and chicken gizzard myosin. These data demonstrate that smMLCK is a specific and efficient kinase for the in vitro phosphorylation of MYL2, cardiac, and smooth muscle myosin. Whether smMLCK plays a role in cardiac muscle regulation or response to a disease causing stimulus is unclear but it should be considered a potentially significant kinase in cardiac tissue on the basis of its specificity, kinetics, and tissue expression.

  2. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase efficiently phosphorylates serine 15 of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josephson, Matthew P.; Sikkink, Laura A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Penheiter, Alan R. [Molecular Medicine Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Burghardt, Thomas P., E-mail: burghardt@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Ajtai, Katalin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) is phosphorylated at S15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is a widely believed that MYL2 is a poor substrate for smMLCK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In fact, smMLCK efficiently and rapidly phosphorylates S15 in MYL2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation kinetics measured by novel fluorescence method without radioactivity. -- Abstract: Specific phosphorylation of the human ventricular cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) modifies the protein at S15. This modification affects MYL2 secondary structure and modulates the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of contraction in cardiac tissue. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase prevalent in uterus and present in other contracting tissues including cardiac muscle. The recombinant 130 kDa (short) smMLCK phosphorylated S15 in MYL2 in vitro. Specific modification of S15 was verified using the direct detection of the phospho group on S15 with mass spectrometry. SmMLCK also specifically phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain S15 in porcine ventricular myosin and chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin (S20 in smooth muscle) but failed to phosphorylate the myosin regulatory light chain in rabbit skeletal myosin. Phosphorylation kinetics, measured using a novel fluorescence method eliminating the use of radioactive isotopes, indicates similar Michaelis-Menten V{sub max} and K{sub M} for regulatory light chain S15 phosphorylation rates in MYL2, porcine ventricular myosin, and chicken gizzard myosin. These data demonstrate that smMLCK is a specific and efficient kinase for the in vitro phosphorylation of MYL2, cardiac, and smooth muscle myosin. Whether smMLCK plays a role in cardiac muscle regulation or response to a disease causing stimulus is unclear but it should be considered a potentially significant

  3. Preparation of human cardiac anti-myosin: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, H.; Souza, I.T.T.

    1990-01-01

    The present communication is a review of the physicochemical characterization and immunological properties of myosin isolated from the cardiac muscle, the production of monoclonal antibody anti-myosin, the radiolabeling of this antibody and its applications as radiopharmaceuticals to imaging myocardial infarcts. The classical example of radioimmunologic diagnosis of non malignant tissues is the detection of myocardial infarction by radiolabeled antibodies to myosin. (author)

  4. Analysis of cardiac myosin binding protein-C phosphorylation in human heart muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, O'Neal; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Messer, Andrew E; Steinen, Ger J M; van der Velden, Jolanda; Marston, Steven B

    2010-12-01

    A unique feature of MyBP-C in cardiac muscle is that it has multiple phosphorylation sites. MyBP-C phosphorylation, predominantly by PKA, plays an essential role in modulating contractility as part of the cellular response to β-adrenergic stimulation. In vitro studies indicate MyBP-C can be phosphorylated at Serine 273, 282, 302 and 307 (mouse sequence) but little is known about the level of MyBP-C phosphorylation or the sites phosphorylated in heart muscle. Since current methodologies are limited in specificity and are not quantitative we have investigated the use of phosphate affinity SDS-PAGE together with a total anti MyBP-C antibody and a range of phosphorylation site-specific antibodies for the main sites (Ser-273, -282 and -302). With these newly developed methods we have been able to make a detailed quantitative analysis of MyBP-C phosphorylation in heart tissue in situ. We have found that MyBP-C is highly phosphorylated in non-failing human (donor) heart or mouse heart; tris and tetra-phosphorylated species predominate and less than 10% of MyBP-C is unphosphorylated (0, 9.3 ± 1%: 1P, 13.4 ± 2.7%: 2P, 10.5 ± 3.3%: 3P, 28.7 ± 3.7%: 4P, 36.4 ± 2.7%, n=21). Total phosphorylation was 2.7 ± 0.07 mol Pi/mol MyBP-C. In contrast in failing heart and in myectomy samples from HCM patients the majority of MyBP-C was unphosphorylated. Total phosphorylation levels were 23% of normal in failing heart myofibrils (0, 60.1 ± 2.8%: 1P, 27.8 ± 2.8%: 2P, 4.8 ± 2.0%: 3P, 3.7 ± 1.2%: 4P, 2.8 ± 1.3%, n=19) and 39% of normal in myectomy samples. The site-specific antibodies showed a distinctive distribution pattern of phosphorylation sites in the multiple phosphorylation level species. We found that phosphorylated Ser-273, Ser-282 and Ser-302 were all present in the 4P band of MyBP-C but none of them were significant in the 1P band, indicating that there must be at least one other site of MyBP-C phosphorylation in human heart. The pattern of phosphorylation at the

  5. Myosin heavy chain expression in rabbit masseter muscle during postnatal development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredman, J. J.; Weijs, W. A.; Korfage, H. A.; Brugman, P.; Moorman, A. F.

    1992-01-01

    The expression of isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MHC) during postnatal development was studied in the masseter muscle of the rabbit. Evidence is presented that in addition to adult fast and slow myosin, the rabbit masseter contains neonatal and 'cardiac' alpha-MHC. During postnatal growth myosin

  6. Multidimensional structure-function relationships in human β-cardiac myosin from population-scale genetic variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homburger, J.R. (Julian R.); Green, E.M. (Eric M.); Caleshu, C. (Colleen); Sunitha, M.S. (Margaret S.); Taylor, R.E. (Rebecca E.); Ruppel, K.M. (Kathleen M.); Metpally, R.P.R. (Raghu Prasad Rao); S.D. Colan (Steven); M. Michels (Michelle); Day, S.M. (Sharlene M.); I. Olivotto (Iacopo); Bustamante, C.D. (Carlos D.); Dewey, F.E. (Frederick E.); Ho, C.Y. (Carolyn Y.); Spudich, J.A. (James A.); Ashley, E.A. (Euan A.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMyosin motors are the fundamental force-generating elements of muscle contraction. Variation in the human β-cardiac myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) can lead to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a heritable disease characterized by cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and sudden cardiac

  7. Phosphorylation of human skeletal muscle myosin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, M.E.; Lingley, M.D.; Stuart, D.S.; Hoffman-Goetz, L.

    1986-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the P-light chains (phosphorylatable light chains) in human skeletal muscle myosin was studied in vitro and in vivo under resting an d contracted conditions. biopsy samples from rested vastus lateralis muscle of male and female subjects were incubated in oxygenated physiological solution at 30 0 C. Samples frozen following a quiescent period showed the presence of only unphosphorylated P-light chains designated LC2f (light chain two of fast myosin) CL2s and LC2s'(light chains two of slow myosin). Treatment with caffeine (10 mM) or direct electrical stimulation resulted in the appearance of three additional bands which were identified as the phosphorylated forms of the P-light chains i.e. LC2f-P, LC2s-P and LC2s'-P. The presence of phosphate was confirmed by prior incubation with ( 30 P) orthophosphate. Muscle samples rapidly frozen from resting vastus lateralis muscle revealed the presence of unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P-light chains in approximately equal ratios. Muscle samples rapidly frozen following a maximal 10 second isometric contraction showed virtually only phosphorylated fast and slow P-light chains. These results reveal that the P-light chains in human fast and slow myosin may be rapidly phosphorylated, but the basal level of phosphorylation in rested human muscle considerably exceeds that observed in animal muscles studied in vitro or in situ

  8. N-terminus of Cardiac Myosin Essential Light Chain Modulates Myosin Step-Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yihua; Ajtai, Katalin; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Burghardt, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle myosin cyclically hydrolyzes ATP to translate actin. Ventricular cardiac myosin (βmys) moves actin with three distinct unitary step-sizes resulting from its lever-arm rotation and with step-frequencies that are modulated in a myosin regulation mechanism. The lever-arm associated essential light chain (vELC) binds actin by its 43 residue N-terminal extension. Unitary steps were proposed to involve the vELC N-terminal extension with the 8 nm step engaging the vELC/actin bond facilitating an extra ~19 degrees of lever-arm rotation while the predominant 5 nm step forgoes vELC/actin binding. A minor 3 nm step is the unlikely conversion of the completed 5 to the 8 nm step. This hypothesis was tested using a 17 residue N-terminal truncated vELC in porcine βmys (Δ17βmys) and a 43 residue N-terminal truncated human vELC expressed in transgenic mouse heart (Δ43αmys). Step-size and step-frequency were measured using the Qdot motility assay. Both Δ17βmys and Δ43αmys had significantly increased 5 nm step-frequency and coincident loss in the 8 nm step-frequency compared to native proteins suggesting the vELC/actin interaction drives step-size preference. Step-size and step-frequency probability densities depend on the relative fraction of truncated vELC and relate linearly to pure myosin species concentrations in a mixture containing native vELC homodimer, two truncated vELCs in the modified homodimer, and one native and one truncated vELC in the heterodimer. Step-size and step-frequency, measured for native homodimer and at two or more known relative fractions of truncated vELC, are surmised for each pure species by using a new analytical method. PMID:26671638

  9. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation R58Q in the myosin regulatory light chain perturbs thick filament-based regulation in cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampourakis, Thomas; Ponnam, Saraswathi; Irving, Malcolm

    2018-04-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is frequently linked to mutations in the protein components of the myosin-containing thick filaments leading to contractile dysfunction and ultimately heart failure. However, the molecular structure-function relationships that underlie these pathological effects remain largely obscure. Here we chose an example mutation (R58Q) in the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) that is associated with a severe HCM phenotype and combined the results from a wide range of in vitro and in situ structural and functional studies on isolated protein components, myofibrils and ventricular trabeculae to create an extensive map of structure-function relationships. The results can be understood in terms of a unifying hypothesis that illuminates both the effects of the mutation and physiological signaling pathways. R58Q promotes an OFF state of the thick filaments that reduces the number of myosin head domains that are available for actin interaction and ATP utilization. Moreover this mutation uncouples two aspects of length-dependent activation (LDA), the cellular basis of the Frank-Starling relation that couples cardiac output to venous return; R58Q reduces maximum calcium-activated force with no significant effect on myofilament calcium sensitivity. Finally, phosphorylation of R58Q-RLC to levels that may be relevant both physiologically and pathologically restores the regulatory state of the thick filament and the effect of sarcomere length on maximum calcium-activated force and thick filament structure, as well as increasing calcium sensitivity. We conclude that perturbation of thick filament-based regulation may be a common mechanism in the etiology of missense mutation-associated HCM, and that this signaling pathway offers a promising target for the development of novel therapeutics. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Myosin Light Chain Kinase and the Role of Myosin Light Chain Phosphorylation in Skeletal Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Stull, James T.; Kamm, Kristine E.; Vandenboom, Rene

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase (skMLCK) is a dedicated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent serine-threonine protein kinase that phosphorylates the regulatory light chain (RLC) of sarcomeric myosin. It is expressed from the MYLK2 gene specifically in skeletal muscle fibers with most abundance in fast contracting muscles. Biochemically, activation occurs with Ca2+ binding to calmodulin forming a (Ca2+)4•calmodulin complex sufficient for activation with a diffusion limited, stoichiometic bindin...

  11. The expression of myosin genes in developing skeletal muscle in the mouse embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, G.E.; Ontell, M.; Cox, R.; Sassoon, D.; Buckingham, M.

    1990-01-01

    Using in situ hybridization, we have investigated the temporal sequence of myosin gene expression in the developing skeletal muscle masses of mouse embryos. The probes used were isoform-specific, 35S-labeled antisense cRNAs to the known sarcomeric myosin heavy chain and myosin alkali light chain gene transcripts. Results showed that both cardiac and skeletal myosin heavy chain and myosin light chain mRNAs were first detected between 9 and 10 d post coitum (p.c.) in the myotomes of the most rostral somites. Myosin transcripts appeared in more caudal somites at later stages in a developmental gradient. The earliest myosin heavy chain transcripts detected code for the embryonic skeletal (MHCemb) and beta-cardiac (MHC beta) isoforms. Perinatal myosin heavy chain (MHCpn) transcripts begin to accumulate at 10.5 d p.c., which is much earlier than previously reported. At this stage, MHCemb is the major MHC transcript. By 12.5 d p.c., MHCpn and MHCemb mRNAs are present to an equal extent, and by 15.5 d p.c. the MHCpn transcript is the major MHC mRNA detected. Cardiac MHC beta transcripts are always present as a minor component. In contrast, the cardiac MLC1A mRNA is initially more abundant than that encoding the skeletal MLC1F isoform. By 12.5 d p.c. the two MLC mRNAs are present at similar levels, and by 15.5 d p.c., MLC1F is the predominant MLC transcript detected. Transcripts for the ventricular/slow (MLC1V) and another fast skeletal myosin light chain (MLC3F) are not detected in skeletal muscle before 15 d p.c., which marks the beginning of the fetal stage of muscle development. This is the first stage at which we can detect differences in expression of myosin genes between developing muscle fibers. We conclude that, during the development of the myotome and body wall muscles, different myosin genes follow independent patterns of activation and acculumation

  12. Characterization of human cardiac myosin heavy chain genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi-Takihara, K.; Sole, M.J.; Liew, J.; Ing, D.; Liew, C.C.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have isolated and analyzed the structure of the genes coding for the α and β forms of the human cardiac myosin heavy chain (MYHC). Detailed analysis of four overlapping MYHC genomic clones shows that the α-MYHC and β-MYHC genes constitute a total length of 51 kilobases and are tandemly linked. The β-MYHC-encoding gene, predominantly expressed in the normal human ventricle and also in slow-twitch skeletal muscle, is located 4.5 kilobases upstream of the α-MYHC-encoding gene, which is predominantly expressed in normal human atrium. The authors have determined the nucleotide sequences of the β form of the MYHC gene, which is 100% homologous to the cardiac MYHC cDNA clone (pHMC3). It is unlikely that the divergence of a few nucleotide sequences from the cardiac β-MYHC cDNA clone (pHMC3) reported in a MYHC cDNA clone (PSMHCZ) from skeletal muscle is due to a splicing mechanism. This finding suggests that the same β form of the cardiac MYHC gene is expressed in both ventricular and slow-twitch skeletal muscle. The promoter regions of both α- and β-MYHC genes, as well as the first four coding regions in the respective genes, have also been sequenced. The sequences in the 5'-flanking region of the α- and β-MYHC-encoding genes diverge extensively from one another, suggesting that expression of the α- and β-MYHC genes is independently regulated

  13. Smitin, a novel smooth muscle titin-like protein, interacts with myosin filaments in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoungtae; Keller, Thomas C S

    2002-01-07

    Smooth muscle cells use an actin-myosin II-based contractile apparatus to produce force for a variety of physiological functions, including blood pressure regulation and gut peristalsis. The organization of the smooth muscle contractile apparatus resembles that of striated skeletal and cardiac muscle, but remains much more poorly understood. We have found that avian vascular and visceral smooth muscles contain a novel, megadalton protein, smitin, that is similar to striated muscle titin in molecular morphology, localization in a contractile apparatus, and ability to interact with myosin filaments. Smitin, like titin, is a long fibrous molecule with a globular domain on one end. Specific reactivities of an anti-smitin polyclonal antibody and an anti-titin monoclonal antibody suggest that smitin and titin are distinct proteins rather than differentially spliced isoforms encoded by the same gene. Smitin immunofluorescently colocalizes with myosin in chicken gizzard smooth muscle, and interacts with two configurations of smooth muscle myosin filaments in vitro. In physiological ionic strength conditions, smitin and smooth muscle myosin coassemble into irregular aggregates containing large sidepolar myosin filaments. In low ionic strength conditions, smitin and smooth muscle myosin form highly ordered structures containing linear and polygonal end-to-end and side-by-side arrays of small bipolar myosin filaments. We have used immunogold localization and sucrose density gradient cosedimentation analyses to confirm association of smitin with both the sidepolar and bipolar smooth muscle myosin filaments. These findings suggest that the titin-like protein smitin may play a central role in organizing myosin filaments in the contractile apparatus and perhaps in other structures in smooth muscle cells.

  14. Myosin Light Chain Kinase and the Role of Myosin Light Chain Phosphorylation in Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, James T.; Kamm, Kristine E.; Vandenboom, Rene

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase (skMLCK) is a dedicated Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent serine-threonine protein kinase that phosphorylates the regulatory light chain (RLC) of sarcomeric myosin. It is expressed from the MYLK2 gene specifically in skeletal muscle fibers with most abundance in fast contracting muscles. Biochemically, activation occurs with Ca2+ binding to calmodulin forming a (Ca2+)4•calmodulin complex sufficient for activation with a diffusion limited, stoichiometic binding and displacement of a regulatory segment from skMLCK catalytic core. The N-terminal sequence of RLC then extends through the exposed catalytic cleft for Ser15 phosphorylation. Removal of Ca2+ results in the slow dissociation of calmodulin and inactivation of skMLCK. Combined biochemical properties provide unique features for the physiological responsiveness of RLC phosphorylation, including (1) rapid activation of MLCK by Ca2+/calmodulin, (2) limiting kinase activity so phosphorylation is slower than contraction, (3) slow MLCK inactivation after relaxation and (4) much greater kinase activity relative to myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP). SkMLCK phosphorylation of myosin RLC modulates mechanical aspects of vertebrate skeletal muscle function. In permeabilized skeletal muscle fibers, phosphorylation-mediated alterations in myosin structure increase the rate of force-generation by myosin cross bridges to increase Ca2+-sensitivity of the contractile apparatus. Stimulation-induced increases in RLC phosphorylation in intact muscle produces isometric and concentric force potentiation to enhance dynamic aspects of muscle work and power in unfatigued or fatigued muscle. Moreover, RLC phosphorylation-mediated enhancements may interact with neural strategies for human skeletal muscle activation to ameliorate either central or peripheral aspects of fatigue. PMID:21284933

  15. Fast and slow myosins as markers of muscle injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, M; Guiu-Comadevall, M; Cadefau, J A; Parra, J; Balius, R; Estruch, A; Rodas, G; Bedini, J L; Cussó, R

    2008-07-01

    The diagnosis of muscular lesions suffered by athletes is usually made by clinical criteria combined with imaging of the lesion (ultrasonography and/or magnetic resonance) and blood tests to detect the presence of non-specific muscle markers. This study was undertaken to evaluate injury to fast and slow-twitch fibres using specific muscle markers for these fibres. Blood samples were obtained from 51 non-sports people and 38 sportsmen with skeletal muscle injury. Western blood analysis was performed to determine fast and slow myosin and creatine kinase (CK) levels. Skeletal muscle damage was diagnosed by physical examination, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance and biochemical markers. The imaging tests were found to be excellent for detecting and confirming grade II and III lesions. However, grade I lesions were often unconfirmed by these techniques. Grade I lesions have higher levels of fast myosin than slow myosin with a very small increase in CK levels. Grade II and III lesions have high values of both fast and slow myosin. The evaluation of fast and slow myosin in the blood 48 h after the lesion occurs is a useful aid for the detection of type I lesions in particular, since fast myosin is an exclusive skeletal muscle marker. The correct diagnosis of grade I lesions can prevent progression of the injury in athletes undergoing continual training sessions and competitions, thus aiding sports physicians in their decision making.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF TIGHTLY-ASSOCIATED SMOOTH MUSCLE MYOSIN-MYOSIN LIGHT CHAIN KINASE-CALMODULIN COMPLEXES*

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Feng; Haldeman, Brian D.; John, Olivia A.; Brewer, Paul D.; Wu, Yi-Ying; Ni, Shaowei; Wilson, David P.; Walsh, Michael P.; Baker, Jonathan E.; Cremo, Christine R.

    2009-01-01

    A current popular model to explain phosphorylation of smooth muscle myosin (SMM) by smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) proposes that MLCK is bound tightly to actin but weakly to SMM. We found that MLCK and calmodulin (CaM) co-purify with unphosphorylated SMM (up-SMM) from chicken gizzard, suggesting that they are tightly bound. Although the MLCK:SMM molar ratio in SMM preparations was well below stoichiometric (1:73 ± 9), the ratio was ~ 23–37% of that in gizzard tissue. Fifteen t...

  17. Myosin light chain kinase phosphorylation in tracheal smooth muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stull, J.T.; Hsu, L.C.; Tansey, M.G.; Kamm, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    Purified myosin light chain kinase from smooth muscle is phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C, and the multifunctional calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Because phosphorylation in a specific site (site A) by any one of these kinases desensitizes myosin light chain kinase to activation by Ca2+/calmodulin, kinase phosphorylation could play an important role in regulating smooth muscle contractility. This possibility was investigated in 32 P-labeled bovine tracheal smooth muscle. Treatment of tissues with carbachol, KCl, isoproterenol, or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate increased the extent of kinase phosphorylation. Six primary phosphopeptides (A-F) of myosin light chain kinase were identified. Site A was phosphorylated to an appreciable extent only with carbachol or KCl, agents which contract tracheal smooth muscle. The extent of site A phosphorylation correlated to increases in the concentration of Ca2+/calmodulin required for activation. These results show that cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C do not affect smooth muscle contractility by phosphorylating site A in myosin light chain kinase. It is proposed that phosphorylation of myosin light chain kinase in site A in contracting tracheal smooth muscle may play a role in the reported desensitization of contractile elements to activation by Ca2+

  18. Random myosin loss along thick-filaments increases myosin attachment time and the proportion of bound myosin heads to mitigate force decline in skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Bertrand C.W.; McNabb, Mark; Palmer, Bradley M.; Toth, Michael J.; Miller, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Diminished skeletal muscle performance with aging, disuse, and disease may be partially attributed to the loss of myofilament proteins. Several laboratories have found a disproportionate loss of myosin protein content relative to other myofilament proteins, but due to methodological limitations, the structural manifestation of this protein loss is unknown. To investigate how variations in myosin content affect ensemble cross-bridge behavior and force production we simulated muscle contraction in the half-sarcomere as myosin was removed either i) uniformly, from the Z-line end of thick-filaments, or ii) randomly, along the length of thick-filaments. Uniform myosin removal decreased force production, showing a slightly steeper force-to-myosin content relationship than the 1:1 relationship that would be expected from the loss of cross-bridges. Random myosin removal also decreased force production, but this decrease was less than observed with uniform myosin loss, largely due to increased myosin attachment time (ton) and fractional cross-bridge binding with random myosin loss. These findings support our prior observations that prolonged ton may augment force production in single fibers with randomly reduced myosin content from chronic heart failure patients. These simulation also illustrate that the pattern of myosin loss along thick-filaments influences ensemble cross-bridge behavior and maintenance of force throughout the sarcomere. PMID:24486373

  19. Preparation of monoclonal antibodies against cardiac myosin and some radiolabelling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bapat, K.; Venkatesh, M.; Pillai, M.R.A.; Sarma, H.D.; Sainis, K.B.

    1998-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against myosin, a specific indicator of myocardial infarction and labelled with 125 I and 99m Tc. Human cardiac myosin was isolated from normal human heart and was used for raising the monoclonal antibodies by the hybridoma technique. Antibody producing clones were identified by ELISA and cloning was done by the limiting dilution technique. Of the 13 clones obtained, 4 were deemed suitable for further studies. The antibodies were grown in ascites, purified, isotyped and their cross reactions with other forms of myosin were estimated. All the clones showed negligible cross reaction with rabbit myosin, but reacted to different extents with bovine skeletal myosin. The most avid antibody Mab-4G4 was chosen for further labelling studies. Mab-4G4 was labelled with 125 I using different oxidising agents such as iodogen, chloramine-T and lactoperoxidase. Purified radioiodinated antibody with radiochemical purity >95% could be obtained by gel filtration. Immunoreactivity was retained as tested by binding to myosin immobilised on a solid support. Mab-4G4 was also labelled with 99m Tc using stannous tartrate as the reducing agent. Radiolabelling yield was ∼60%, the purity was >95% and the immunoreactivity was retained. Both the labelled preparations were tested for bio-distribution in normal and infarcted rats. The activity accumulation in the infarcted region was ∼ 1.5 and 3.5 times as that in normal heart muscle for 125 I and 99m Tc labelled Mab-4G4 respectively. The major problem with the iodinated antibody was the in vivo deiodination resulting in very high percentage of activity in the thyroid. Although the fraction of the total activity associated with the infarcted heart is not very impressive, the fact that the activities with the infarcted and normal hearths are significantly different is heartening. With further optimisation of labelling and use of F(ab)'2 fragments, better delineation of the infarct sites is aspired. (author)

  20. The Kinetics of Myosin Light Chain Kinase Activation of Smooth Muscle Myosin in an In Vitro Model System

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Feng; Facemyer, Kevin C.; Carter, Michael S.; Jackson, Del R.; Haldeman, Brian D.; Ruana, Nick; Sutherland, Cindy; Walsh, Michael P.; Cremo, Christine R.; Baker, Josh E.

    2013-01-01

    During activation of smooth muscle contraction, one myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) molecule rapidly phosphorylates many smooth muscle myosin (SMM) molecules, suggesting that muscle activation rates are influenced by the kinetics of MLCK-SMM interactions. To determine the rate-limiting step underlying activation of SMM by MLCK, we measured the kinetics of calcium-calmodulin (Ca2+-CaM)-MLCK-mediated SMM phosphorylation and the corresponding initiation of SMM-based F-actin motility in an in vi...

  1. Stretch activates myosin light chain kinase in arterial smooth muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barany, K.; Rokolya, A.; Barany, M.

    1990-01-01

    Stretching of porcine carotid arterial muscle increased the phosphorylation of the 20 kDa myosin light chain from 0.23 to 0.68 mol [32P]phosphate/mol light chain, whereas stretching of phorbol dibutyrate treated muscle increased the phosphorylation from 0.30 to 0.91 mol/mol. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping was used to identify the enzyme involved in the stretch-induced phosphorylation. Quantitation of the [32P]phosphate content of the peptides revealed considerable light chain phosphorylation by protein kinase C only in the phorbol dibutyrate treated arterial muscle, whereas most of the light chain phosphorylation was attributable to myosin light chain kinase. Upon stretch of either the untreated or treated muscle, the total increment in [32P]phosphate incorporation into the light chain could be accounted for by peptides characteristic for myosin light chain kinase catalyzed phosphorylation, demonstrating that the stretch-induced phosphorylation is caused by this enzyme exclusively

  2. The structure of the actin-smooth muscle myosin motor domain complex in the rigor state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Chaity; Hu, Zhongjun; Huang, Zhong; Warrington, J Anthony; Taylor, Dianne W; Trybus, Kathleen M; Lowey, Susan; Taylor, Kenneth A

    2017-12-01

    Myosin-based motility utilizes catalysis of ATP to drive the relative sliding of F-actin and myosin. The earliest detailed model based on cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) and X-ray crystallography postulated that higher actin affinity and lever arm movement were coupled to closure of a feature of the myosin head dubbed the actin-binding cleft. Several studies since then using crystallography of myosin-V and cryoEM structures of F-actin bound myosin-I, -II and -V have provided details of this model. The smooth muscle myosin II interaction with F-actin may differ from those for striated and non-muscle myosin II due in part to different lengths of important surface loops. Here we report a ∼6 Å resolution reconstruction of F-actin decorated with the nucleotide-free recombinant smooth muscle myosin-II motor domain (MD) from images recorded using a direct electron detector. Resolution is highest for F-actin and the actin-myosin interface (3.5-4 Å) and lowest (∼6-7 Å) for those parts of the MD at the highest radius. Atomic models built into the F-actin density are quite comparable to those previously reported for rabbit muscle actin and show density from the bound ADP. The atomic model of the MD, is quite similar to a recently published structure of vertebrate non-muscle myosin II bound to F-actin and a crystal structure of nucleotide free myosin-V. Larger differences are observed when compared to the cryoEM structure of F-actin decorated with rabbit skeletal muscle myosin subfragment 1. The differences suggest less closure of the 50 kDa domain in the actin bound skeletal muscle myosin structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Association of cardiac myosin binding protein-C with the ryanodine receptor channel: putative retrograde regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanczyk, Paulina J; Seidel, Monika; White, Judith; Viero, Cedric; George, Christopher H; Zissimopoulos, Spyros; Lai, F Anthony

    2018-06-21

    The cardiac muscle ryanodine receptor-Ca 2+ release channel (RyR2) constitutes the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca 2+ efflux mechanism that initiates myocyte contraction, while cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) mediates regulation of acto-myosin cross-bridge cycling. In this report, we provide the first evidence for the presence of direct interaction between these two proteins, forming a RyR2:cMyBP-C complex. The C-terminus of cMyBP-C binds with the RyR2 N-terminus in mammalian cells and is not mediated by a fibronectin-like domain. Notably, we detected complex formation between both recombinant cMyBP-C and RyR2, as well as with the native proteins in cardiac tissue. Cellular Ca 2+ dynamics in HEK293 cells is altered upon co-expression of cMyBP-C and RyR2, with lowered frequency of RyR2-mediated spontaneous Ca 2+ oscillations, suggesting cMyBP-C exerts a potential inhibitory effect on RyR2-dependent Ca 2+ release. Discovery of a functional RyR2 association with cMyBP-C provides direct evidence for a putative mechanistic link between cytosolic soluble cMyBP-C and SR-mediated Ca 2+ release, via RyR2. Importantly, this interaction may have clinical relevance to the observed cMyBP-C and RyR2 dysfunction in cardiac pathologies, such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Congenital heart disease linked to maternal autoimmunity against cardiac myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Charles R; Yutzey, Katherine E; Brar, Anoop K; Goessling, Lisa S; Van Vickle-Chavez, Sarah J; Cunningham, Madeleine W; Eghtesady, Pirooz

    2014-05-01

    Structural congenital heart disease (CHD) has not previously been linked to autoimmunity. In our study, we developed an autoimmune model of structural CHD that resembles hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), a life-threatening CHD primarily affecting the left ventricle. Because cardiac myosin (CM) is a dominant autoantigen in autoimmune heart disease, we hypothesized that immunization with CM might lead to transplacental passage of maternal autoantibodies and a prenatal HLHS phenotype in exposed fetuses. Elevated anti-CM autoantibodies in maternal and fetal sera, as well as IgG reactivity in fetal myocardium, were correlated with structural CHD that included diminished left ventricular cavity dimensions in the affected progeny. Further, fetuses that developed a marked HLHS phenotype had elevated serum titers of anti-β-adrenergic receptor Abs, as well as increased protein kinase A activity, suggesting a potential mechanism for the observed pathological changes. Our maternal-fetal model presents a new concept linking autoimmunity against CM and cardiomyocyte proliferation with cardinal features of HLHS. To our knowledge, this report shows the first evidence in support of a novel immune-mediated mechanism for pathogenesis of structural CHD that may have implications in its future diagnosis and treatment.

  5. Sarcomere lattice geometry influences cooperative myosin binding in muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand C W Tanner

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In muscle, force emerges from myosin binding with actin (forming a cross-bridge. This actomyosin binding depends upon myofilament geometry, kinetics of thin-filament Ca(2+ activation, and kinetics of cross-bridge cycling. Binding occurs within a compliant network of protein filaments where there is mechanical coupling between myosins along the thick-filament backbone and between actin monomers along the thin filament. Such mechanical coupling precludes using ordinary differential equation models when examining the effects of lattice geometry, kinetics, or compliance on force production. This study uses two stochastically driven, spatially explicit models to predict levels of cross-bridge binding, force, thin-filament Ca(2+ activation, and ATP utilization. One model incorporates the 2-to-1 ratio of thin to thick filaments of vertebrate striated muscle (multi-filament model, while the other comprises only one thick and one thin filament (two-filament model. Simulations comparing these models show that the multi-filament predictions of force, fractional cross-bridge binding, and cross-bridge turnover are more consistent with published experimental values. Furthermore, the values predicted by the multi-filament model are greater than those values predicted by the two-filament model. These increases are larger than the relative increase of potential inter-filament interactions in the multi-filament model versus the two-filament model. This amplification of coordinated cross-bridge binding and cycling indicates a mechanism of cooperativity that depends on sarcomere lattice geometry, specifically the ratio and arrangement of myofilaments.

  6. Myosin binding protein-C activates thin filaments and inhibits thick filaments in heart muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampourakis, Thomas; Yan, Ziqian; Gautel, Mathias; Sun, Yin-Biao; Irving, Malcolm

    2014-12-30

    Myosin binding protein-C (MyBP-C) is a key regulatory protein in heart muscle, and mutations in the MYBPC3 gene are frequently associated with cardiomyopathy. However, the mechanism of action of MyBP-C remains poorly understood, and both activating and inhibitory effects of MyBP-C on contractility have been reported. To clarify the function of the regulatory N-terminal domains of MyBP-C, we determined their effects on the structure of thick (myosin-containing) and thin (actin-containing) filaments in intact sarcomeres of heart muscle. We used fluorescent probes on troponin C in the thin filaments and on myosin regulatory light chain in the thick filaments to monitor structural changes associated with activation of demembranated trabeculae from rat ventricle by the C1mC2 region of rat MyBP-C. C1mC2 induced larger structural changes in thin filaments than calcium activation, and these were still present when active force was blocked with blebbistatin, showing that C1mC2 directly activates the thin filaments. In contrast, structural changes in thick filaments induced by C1mC2 were smaller than those associated with calcium activation and were abolished or reversed by blebbistatin. Low concentrations of C1mC2 did not affect resting force but increased calcium sensitivity and reduced cooperativity of force and structural changes in both thin and thick filaments. These results show that the N-terminal region of MyBP-C stabilizes the ON state of thin filaments and the OFF state of thick filaments and lead to a novel hypothesis for the physiological role of MyBP-C in the regulation of cardiac contractility.

  7. Exploration of flexible phenylpropylurea scaffold as novel cardiac myosin activators for the treatment of systolic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Manoj; Jalani, Hitesh B; Pillaiyar, Thanigaimalai; Sharma, Niti; Boggu, Pulla Reddy; Venkateswararao, Eeda; Lee, You-Jung; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Jung, Sang-Hun

    2017-07-07

    A series of flexible urea derivatives have been synthesized and demonstrated as selective cardiac myosin ATPase activator. Among them 1-phenethyl-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea (1, cardiac myosin ATPase activation at 10 μM = 51.1%; FS = 18.90; EF = 12.15) and 1-benzyl-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea (9, cardiac myosin ATPase activation = 53.3%; FS = 30.04; EF = 18.27) showed significant activity in vitro and in vivo. The change of phenyl ring with tetrahydropyran-4-yl moiety viz., 1-(3-phenylpropyl)-3-((tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)methyl)urea (14, cardiac myosin ATPase activation = 81.4%; FS = 20.50; EF = 13.10), and morpholine moiety viz., 1-(2-morpholinoethyl)-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea (21, cardiac myosin ATPase activation = 44.0%; FS = 24.79; EF = 15.65), proved to be efficient to activate the cardiac myosin. The potent compounds 1, 9, 14 and 21 were found to be selective for cardiac myosin over skeletal and smooth myosins. Thus, these urea derivatives are potent scaffold to develop as a newer cardiac myosin activator for the treatment of systolic heart failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Myosin content of individual human muscle fibers isolated by laser capture microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Charles A; Stone, William L; Howell, Mary E A; Brannon, Marianne F; Hall, H Kenton; Gibson, Andrew L; Stone, Michael H

    2016-03-01

    Muscle fiber composition correlates with insulin resistance, and exercise training can increase slow-twitch (type I) fibers and, thereby, mitigate diabetes risk. Human skeletal muscle is made up of three distinct fiber types, but muscle contains many more isoforms of myosin heavy and light chains, which are coded by 15 and 11 different genes, respectively. Laser capture microdissection techniques allow assessment of mRNA and protein content in individual fibers. We found that specific human fiber types contain different mixtures of myosin heavy and light chains. Fast-twitch (type IIx) fibers consistently contained myosin heavy chains 1, 2, and 4 and myosin light chain 1. Type I fibers always contained myosin heavy chains 6 and 7 (MYH6 and MYH7) and myosin light chain 3 (MYL3), whereas MYH6, MYH7, and MYL3 were nearly absent from type IIx fibers. In contrast to cardiomyocytes, where MYH6 (also known as α-myosin heavy chain) is seen solely in fast-twitch cells, only slow-twitch fibers of skeletal muscle contained MYH6. Classical fast myosin heavy chains (MHC1, MHC2, and MHC4) were present in variable proportions in all fiber types, but significant MYH6 and MYH7 expression indicated slow-twitch phenotype, and the absence of these two isoforms determined a fast-twitch phenotype. The mixed myosin heavy and light chain content of type IIa fibers was consistent with its role as a transition between fast and slow phenotypes. These new observations suggest that the presence or absence of MYH6 and MYH7 proteins dictates the slow- or fast-twitch phenotype in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. The role of the myosin ATPase activity in adaptive thermogenesis by skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Roger

    2011-03-01

    Resting skeletal muscle is a major contributor to adaptive thermogenesis, i.e., the thermogenesis that changes in response to exposure to cold or to overfeeding. The identification of the "furnace" that is responsible for increased heat generation in resting muscle has been the subject of a number of investigations. A new state of myosin, the super relaxed state (SRX), with a very slow ATP turnover rate has recently been observed in skeletal muscle (Stewart et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 107:430-435, 2010). Inhibition of the myosin ATPase activity in the SRX was suggested to be caused by binding of the myosin head to the core of the thick filament in a structural motif identified earlier by electron microscopy. To be compatible with the basal metabolic rate observed in vivo for resting muscle, most myosin heads would have to be in the SRX. Modulation of the population of this state, relative to the normal relaxed state, was proposed to be a major contributor to adaptive thermogenesis in resting muscle. Transfer of only 20% of myosin heads from the SRX into the normal relaxed state would cause muscle thermogenesis to double. Phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain was shown to transfer myosin heads from the SRX into the relaxed state, which would increase thermogenesis. In particular, thermogenesis by myosin has been proposed to play a role in the dissipation of calories during overfeeding. Up-regulation of muscle thermogenesis by pharmaceuticals that target the SRX would provide new approaches to the treatment of obesity or high blood sugar levels.

  10. Effects of different activity and inactivity paradigms on myosin heavy chain gene expression in striated muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Haddad, F.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this mini-review is to summarize findings concerning the role that different models of muscular activity and inactivity play in altering gene expression of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) family of motor proteins in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscle. This was done in the context of examining parallel findings concerning the role that thyroid hormone (T(3), 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine) plays in MHC expression. Findings show that both cardiac and skeletal muscles of experimental animals are initially undifferentiated at birth and then undergo a marked level of growth and differentiation in attaining the adult MHC phenotype in a T(3)/activity level-dependent fashion. Cardiac MHC expression in small mammals is highly sensitive to thyroid deficiency, diabetes, energy deprivation, and hypertension; each of these interventions induces upregulation of the beta-MHC isoform, which functions to economize circulatory function in the face of altered energy demand. In skeletal muscle, hyperthyroidism, as well as interventions that unload or reduce the weight-bearing activity of the muscle, causes slow to fast MHC conversions. Fast to slow conversions, however, are seen under hypothyroidism or when the muscles either become chronically overloaded or subjected to intermittent loading as occurs during resistance training and endurance exercise. The regulation of MHC gene expression by T(3) or mechanical stimuli appears to be strongly regulated by transcriptional events, based on recent findings on transgenic models and animals transfected with promoter-reporter constructs. However, the mechanisms by which T(3) and mechanical stimuli exert their control on transcriptional processes appear to be different. Additional findings show that individual skeletal muscle fibers have the genetic machinery to express simultaneously all of the adult MHCs, e.g., slow type I and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb, in unique combinations under certain experimental conditions. This degree of

  11. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betapudi, Venkaiah

    2014-07-01

    Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC) belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  12. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkaiah eBetapudi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  13. A novel de novo mutation of β-cardiac myosin heavy chain gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-08-18

    Aug 18, 2014 ... It is one of the most important diseases causing a sud- den death in ... familial HCM encode contractile proteins such as β-cardiac myosin ... A previously healthy 12-year-old boy was admitted to our hospital for .... Maron B. J. 2002 Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: A systematic review. JAMA 287, 1308–1320.

  14. Expression of smooth muscle and non-muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovner, A.S.; Murphy, R.A.; Owens, G.K.

    1986-01-01

    Immunocytochemical studies of cultured smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have disagreed on the nature of myosin expression. This investigation was undertaken to test for the presence of heterogeneous myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms in cell culture as a possible explanation for these results. Previously, Rovner et al. detected two MHCs in intact smooth muscles which differed in molecular weight by ca. 4000 daltons (SM1 and SM2) using a 3-4% acrylamide gradient SDS gel system. When sub-confluent primary cultures of rat aorta SMCs were assayed by this system, SM1 and SM2 were seen, along with large amounts of a third, unique MHC, NM, which closely resembled the MHC from human platelet in size and antigenicity. Data from 35 S-methionine autoradiograms showed that the log growth phase SMC cultures were producing almost exclusively NM, but the growth arrest, post-confluent cultures synthesized increased relative amounts of the SM MHC forms and contained comparable amounts of SM1, SM2, and NM. The same patterns of MHC synthesis were seen in sub-passaged SMCs. The expression of the SM-specific forms of myosin in quiescent, post-confluent cultures parallels that of smooth muscle actin suggesting that density induced growth arrest promotes cytodifferentiation in cultured vascular SMCs

  15. Response of slow and fast muscle to hypothyroidism: maximal shortening velocity and myosin isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Herrick, R. E.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined both the shortening velocity and myosin isoform distribution of slow- (soleus) and fast-twitch (plantaris) skeletal muscles under hypothyroid conditions. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control (n = 7) or hypothyroid (n = 7). In both muscles, the relative contents of native slow myosin (SM) and type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) increased in response to the hypothyroid treatment. The effects were such that the hypothyroid soleus muscle expressed only the native SM and type I MHC isoforms while repressing native intermediate myosin and type IIA MHC. In the plantaris, the relative content of native SM and type I MHC isoforms increased from 5 to 13% and from 4 to 10% of the total myosin pool, respectively. Maximal shortening velocity of the soleus and plantaris as measured by the slack test decreased by 32 and 19%, respectively, in response to hypothyroidism. In contrast, maximal shortening velocity as estimated by force-velocity data decreased only in the soleus (-19%). No significant change was observed for the plantaris.

  16. Increased expression of Myosin binding protein H in the skeletal muscle of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients

    KAUST Repository

    Conti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe and fatal neurodegenerative disease of still unknown pathogenesis. Recent findings suggest that the skeletal muscle may play an active pathogenetic role. To investigate ALS\\'s pathogenesis and to seek diagnostic markers, we analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies with the differential expression proteomic approach. We studied skeletal muscle biopsies from healthy controls (CN), sporadic ALS (sALS), motor neuropathies (MN) and myopathies (M). Pre-eminently among several differentially expressed proteins, Myosin binding protein H (MyBP-H) expression in ALS samples was anomalously high. MyBP-H is a component of the thick filaments of the skeletal muscle and has strong affinity for myosin, but its function is still unclear. High MyBP-H expression level was associated with abnormal expression of Rho kinase 2 (ROCK2), LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1) and cofilin2, that might affect the actin-myosin interaction. We propose that MyBP-H expression level serves, as a putative biomarker in the skeletal muscle, to discriminate ALS from motor neuropathies, and that it signals the onset of dysregulation in actin-myosin interaction; this in turn might contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Increased expression of Myosin binding protein H in the skeletal muscle of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Antonio; Riva, Nilo; Pesca, Mariasabina; Iannaccone, Sandro; Cannistraci, Carlo V; Corbo, Massimo; Previtali, Stefano C; Quattrini, Angelo; Alessio, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe and fatal neurodegenerative disease of still unknown pathogenesis. Recent findings suggest that the skeletal muscle may play an active pathogenetic role. To investigate ALS's pathogenesis and to seek diagnostic markers, we analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies with the differential expression proteomic approach. We studied skeletal muscle biopsies from healthy controls (CN), sporadic ALS (sALS), motor neuropathies (MN) and myopathies (M). Pre-eminently among several differentially expressed proteins, Myosin binding protein H (MyBP-H) expression in ALS samples was anomalously high. MyBP-H is a component of the thick filaments of the skeletal muscle and has strong affinity for myosin, but its function is still unclear. High MyBP-H expression level was associated with abnormal expression of Rho kinase 2 (ROCK2), LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1) and cofilin2, that might affect the actin-myosin interaction. We propose that MyBP-H expression level serves, as a putative biomarker in the skeletal muscle, to discriminate ALS from motor neuropathies, and that it signals the onset of dysregulation in actin-myosin interaction; this in turn might contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Myosin light chain phosphorylation is critical for adaptation to cardiac stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Sonisha A; Briggs, Laura E; Zeng, Huadong; Chuang, Joyce; Chang, Eileen I; Terada, Ryota; Li, Moyi; Swanson, Maurice S; Lecker, Stewart H; Willis, Monte S; Spinale, Francis G; Maupin-Furlowe, Julie; McMullen, Julie R; Moss, Richard L; Kasahara, Hideko

    2012-11-27

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a common response to circulatory or neurohumoral stressors as a mechanism to augment contractility. When the heart is under sustained stress, the hypertrophic response can evolve into decompensated heart failure, although the mechanism(s) underlying this transition remain largely unknown. Because phosphorylation of cardiac myosin light chain 2 (MLC2v), bound to myosin at the head-rod junction, facilitates actin-myosin interactions and enhances contractility, we hypothesized that phosphorylation of MLC2v plays a role in the adaptation of the heart to stress. We previously identified an enzyme that predominantly phosphorylates MLC2v in cardiomyocytes, cardiac myosin light-chain kinase (cMLCK), yet the role(s) played by cMLCK in regulating cardiac function in health and disease remain to be determined. We found that pressure overload induced by transaortic constriction in wild-type mice reduced phosphorylated MLC2v levels by ≈40% and cMLCK levels by ≈85%. To examine how a reduction in cMLCK and the corresponding reduction in phosphorylated MLC2v affect function, we generated Mylk3 gene-targeted mice and transgenic mice overexpressing cMLCK specifically in cardiomyocytes. Pressure overload led to severe heart failure in cMLCK knockout mice but not in mice with cMLCK overexpression in which cMLCK protein synthesis exceeded degradation. The reduction in cMLCK protein during pressure overload was attenuated by inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation systems. Our results suggest the novel idea that accelerated cMLCK protein turnover by the ubiquitin-proteasome system underlies the transition from compensated hypertrophy to decompensated heart failure as a result of reduced phosphorylation of MLC2v.

  19. Myosin phosphorylation improves contractile economy of mouse fast skeletal muscle during staircase potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunda, Jordan; Gittings, William; Vandenboom, Rene

    2018-01-30

    Phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) by skeletal myosin light chain kinase (skMLCK) potentiates rodent fast twitch muscle but is an ATP-requiring process. Our objective was to investigate the effect of skMLCK-catalyzed RLC phosphorylation on the energetic cost of contraction and the contractile economy (ratio of mechanical output to metabolic input) of mouse fast twitch muscle in vitro (25°C). To this end, extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from wild-type (WT) and from skMLCK-devoid (skMLCK -/- ) mice were subjected to repetitive low-frequency stimulation (10 Hz for 15 s) to produce staircase potentiation of isometric twitch force, after which muscles were quick frozen for determination of high-energy phosphate consumption (HEPC). During stimulation, WT muscles displayed significant potentiation of isometric twitch force while skMLCK -/- muscles did not (i.e. 23% versus 5% change, respectively). Consistent with this, RLC phosphorylation was increased ∼3.5-fold from the unstimulated control value in WT but not in skMLCK -/- muscles. Despite these differences, the HEPC of WT muscles was not greater than that of skMLCK -/- muscles. As a result of the increased contractile output relative to HEPC, the calculated contractile economy of WT muscles was greater than that of skMLCK -/- muscles. Thus, our results suggest that skMLCK-catalyzed phosphorylation of the myosin RLC increases the contractile economy of WT mouse EDL muscle compared with skMLCK -/- muscles without RLC phosphorylation. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Electron tomography of cryofixed, isometrically contracting insect flight muscle reveals novel actin-myosin interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenping Wu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ.We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the "target zone", situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77°/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127° range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening.We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very

  1. Electron Tomography of Cryofixed, Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Reveals Novel Actin-Myosin Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C.; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the 'target zone', situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77 o /12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127 o range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very different from

  2. Interaction between cardiac myosin-binding protein C and formin Fhod3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Sho; Kage, Yohko; Fujimoto, Noriko; Ushijima, Tomoki; Tsuruda, Toshihiro; Kitamura, Kazuo; Shiose, Akira; Asada, Yujiro; Sumimoto, Hideki; Takeya, Ryu

    2018-05-08

    Mutations in cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) are a major cause of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Although cMyBP-C has been considered to regulate the cardiac function via cross-bridge arrangement at the C-zone of the myosin-containing A-band, the mechanism by which cMyBP-C functions remains unclear. We identified formin Fhod3, an actin organizer essential for the formation and maintenance of cardiac sarcomeres, as a cMyBP-C-binding protein. The cardiac-specific N-terminal Ig-like domain of cMyBP-C directly interacts with the cardiac-specific N-terminal region of Fhod3. The interaction seems to direct the localization of Fhod3 to the C-zone, since a noncardiac Fhod3 variant lacking the cMyBP-C-binding region failed to localize to the C-zone. Conversely, the cardiac variant of Fhod3 failed to localize to the C-zone in the cMyBP-C-null mice, which display a phenotype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The cardiomyopathic phenotype of cMyBP-C-null mice was further exacerbated by Fhod3 overexpression with a defect of sarcomere integrity, whereas that was partially ameliorated by a reduction in the Fhod3 protein levels, suggesting that Fhod3 has a deleterious effect on cardiac function under cMyBP-C-null conditions where Fhod3 is aberrantly mislocalized. Together, these findings suggest the possibility that Fhod3 contributes to the pathogenesis of cMyBP-C-related cardiomyopathy and that Fhod3 is critically involved in cMyBP-C-mediated regulation of cardiac function via direct interaction.

  3. Native myosin from adult rabbit skeletal muscle: isoenzymes and states of aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, J E; D'hahan, N; Taouil, K; Francin, M; Aguilar, A; Dalbiez, J P; Merah, Z; Grussaute, H; Hilbert, B; Ollagnon, F; Selva, G; Piot, F

    1998-04-21

    The globular heads of skeletal muscle myosin have been shown to exist as isoenzymes S1 (A1) and S1 (A2), and there are also isoforms of the heavy chains. Using capillary electrophoresis, we found two dominant isoenzymes of the whole native myosin molecule, in agreement with what has previously been found by various techniques for native and nondenatured myosin from adult rabbits. Findings about possible states of aggregation of myosin and its heads are contradictory. By analytical ultracentrifugation, we confirmed the existence of a tail-tail dimer. By laser light scattering, we found a head-head dimer in the presence of MgATP. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with analytical ultracentrifugation and laser light scattering led us to refine these results. We found tail-tail dimers in a conventional buffer. We found tail-tail and head-head dimers in the presence of 0.5 mM MgATP and pure head-head dimers in the presence of 6 mM MgATP. All the dimers were homodimers. Naming the dominant isoenzymes of myosin a and b, we observed tail-tail dimers with isoenzyme a (TaTa) and with isoenzyme b (TbTb) and also head-head dimers with isoenzyme a (HaHa) and with isoenzyme b (HbHb).

  4. [Myosin B ATPase activity of the intestinal smooth muscle in intestinal obstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, H

    1983-06-01

    Intestinal smooth myosin B was prepared from muscle layers around the lesion in dogs with experimental colonic stenosis and in patients with congenital intestinal obstruction. Mg2+-ATPase activity of the myosin B was compared between the proximal dilated segment and distal segment to obstruction. Experimental colonic stenosis: In early period after surgery, proximal colons showed higher activity of myosin B ATPase than distal colons, decreasing to less than distal colon as time passed. Congenital intestinal obstruction: In three cases, whose atresia might have occurred at earlier period of gestation, proximal bowels showed less activity of myosin B ATPase than distal bowels. However, in two cases, whose atresia might have occurred at later period of gestation, and two cases with intestinal stenosis, proximal bowels indicated higher activity of myosin B ATPase than distal bowels. These data suggested that the contractibility of the proximal intestine was depending on the duration of obstruction, and it was depressed in the former patients and was accelerated in the latter patients. These results suggested that the extensive resection of dilated proximal bowel in the congenital atresia is not always necessary to obtain good postoperative intestinal dynamics at the operation of the atresial lesions which may be induced at later period of gestation. They also suggested that surgery for intestinal obstruction should be performed before the depression of intestinal contractibility to get good bowel function.

  5. The Effect of Experimental Hyperthyroidism on Characteristics of Actin-Myosin Interaction in Fast and Slow Skeletal Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylova, G V; Shchepkin, D V; Bershitsky, S Y

    2018-05-01

    The molecular mechanism of the failure of contractile function of skeletal muscles caused by oxidative damage to myosin in hyperthyroidism is not fully understood. Using an in vitro motility assay, we studied the effect of myosin damage caused by oxidative stress in experimental hyperthyroidism on the actin-myosin interaction and its regulation by calcium. We found that hyperthyroidism-induced oxidation of myosin is accompanied by a decrease in the sliding velocity of the regulated thin filaments in the in vitro motility assay, and this effect is increased with the duration of the pathological process.

  6. Protective Effects of Clenbuterol against Dexamethasone-Induced Masseter Muscle Atrophy and Myosin Heavy Chain Transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Umeki

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid has a direct catabolic effect on skeletal muscle, leading to muscle atrophy, but no effective pharmacotherapy is available. We reported that clenbuterol (CB induced masseter muscle hypertrophy and slow-to-fast myosin heavy chain (MHC isoform transition through direct muscle β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Thus, we hypothesized that CB would antagonize glucocorticoid (dexamethasone; DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition.We examined the effect of CB on DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy by measuring masseter muscle weight, fiber diameter, cross-sectional area, and myosin heavy chain (MHC composition. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we used immunoblotting to study the effects of CB on muscle hypertrophic signaling (insulin growth factor 1 (IGF1 expression, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway, and calcineurin pathway and atrophic signaling (Akt/Forkhead box-O (FOXO pathway and myostatin expression in masseter muscle of rats treated with DEX and/or CB.Masseter muscle weight in the DEX-treated group was significantly lower than that in the Control group, as expected, but co-treatment with CB suppressed the DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy, concomitantly with inhibition of fast-to-slow MHC isoforms transition. Activation of the Akt/mTOR pathway in masseter muscle of the DEX-treated group was significantly inhibited compared to that of the Control group, and CB suppressed this inhibition. DEX also suppressed expression of IGF1 (positive regulator of muscle growth, and CB attenuated this inhibition. Myostatin protein expression was unchanged. CB had no effect on activation of the Akt/FOXO pathway. These results indicate that CB antagonizes DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition via modulation of Akt/mTOR activity and IGF1 expression. CB might be a useful pharmacological agent for treatment of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  7. Myosin isoform switching during assembly of the Drosophila flight muscle thick filament lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanos, Zacharias; Sparrow, John C

    2013-01-01

    During muscle development myosin molecules form symmetrical thick filaments, which integrate with the thin filaments to produce the regular sarcomeric lattice. In Drosophila indirect flight muscles (IFMs) the details of this process can be studied using genetic approaches. The weeP26 transgenic line has a GFP-encoding exon inserted into the single Drosophila muscle myosin heavy chain gene, Mhc. The weeP26 IFM sarcomeres have a unique MHC-GFP-labelling pattern restricted to the sarcomere core, explained by non-translation of the GFP exon following alternative splicing. Characterisation of wild-type IFM MHC mRNA confirmed the presence of an alternately spliced isoform, expressed earlier than the major IFM-specific isoform. The two wild-type IFM-specific MHC isoforms differ by the presence of a C-terminal 'tailpiece' in the minor isoform. The sequential expression and assembly of these two MHCs into developing thick filaments suggest a role for the tailpiece in initiating A-band formation. The restriction of the MHC-GFP sarcomeric pattern in weeP26 is lifted when the IFM lack the IFM-specific myosin binding protein flightin, suggesting that it limits myosin dissociation from thick filaments. Studies of flightin binding to developing thick filaments reveal a progressive binding at the growing thick filament tips and in a retrograde direction to earlier assembled, proximal filament regions. We propose that this flightin binding restricts myosin molecule incorporation/dissociation during thick filament assembly and explains the location of the early MHC isoform pattern in the IFM A-band.

  8. Myosin heavy chain composition of the human sternocleidomastoid muscle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvetko, E.; Karen, Petr; Eržen, I.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 194, č. 5 (2012), s. 467-472 ISSN 0940-9602 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) MEB090910; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : immunohistochemistry * MyHC isoforms * muscle fibre types * sternocleidomastoid muscle Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.960, year: 2012

  9. BMP-2 Overexpression Augments Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Motility by Upregulating Myosin Va via Erk Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The disruption of physiologic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC migration initiates atherosclerosis development. The biochemical mechanisms leading to dysfunctional VSMC motility remain unknown. Recently, cytokine BMP-2 has been implicated in various vascular physiologic and pathologic processes. However, whether BMP-2 has any effect upon VSMC motility, or by what manner, has never been investigated. Methods. VSMCs were adenovirally transfected to genetically overexpress BMP-2. VSMC motility was detected by modified Boyden chamber assay, confocal time-lapse video assay, and a colony wounding assay. Gene chip array and RT-PCR were employed to identify genes potentially regulated by BMP-2. Western blot and real-time PCR detected the expression of myosin Va and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (Erk1/2. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed myosin Va expression locale. Intracellular Ca2+ oscillations were recorded. Results. VSMC migration was augmented in VSMCs overexpressing BMP-2 in a dose-dependent manner. siRNA-mediated knockdown of myosin Va inhibited VSMC motility. Both myosin Va mRNA and protein expression significantly increased after BMP-2 administration and were inhibited by Erk1/2 inhibitor U0126. BMP-2 induced Ca2+ oscillations, generated largely by a “cytosolic oscillator”. Conclusion. BMP-2 significantly increased VSMCs migration and myosin Va expression, via the Erk signaling pathway and intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. We provide additional insight into the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, and inhibition of BMP-2-induced myosin Va expression may represent a potential therapeutic strategy.

  10. Human Masseter Muscle Fibers From the Elderly Express Less Neonatal Myosin Than Those of Young Adults

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvetko, E.; Karen, Petr; Janáček, Jiří; Kubínová, Lucie; Plasencia, A.L.; Eržen, I.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 295, č. 8 (2012), s. 1364-1372 ISSN 1932-8486 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA MŠk(CZ) MEB090910 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : aging * confocal microscopy * myosin heavy chain * immunohistochemistry * muscle fiber types Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.343, year: 2012

  11. Myosin light chain 2-based selection of human iPSC-derived early ventricular cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizy, Alexandra; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; Hu, Bin; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela; Willis, B Cicero; Zarzoso, Manuel; Ramirez, Rafael J; Sener, Michelle F; Mundada, Lakshmi V; Klos, Matthew; Devaney, Eric J; Vikstrom, Karen L; Herron, Todd J; Jalife, José

    2013-11-01

    Applications of human induced pluripotent stem cell derived-cardiac myocytes (hiPSC-CMs) would be strengthened by the ability to generate specific cardiac myocyte (CM) lineages. However, purification of lineage-specific hiPSC-CMs is limited by the lack of cell marking techniques. Here, we have developed an iPSC-CM marking system using recombinant adenoviral reporter constructs with atrial- or ventricular-specific myosin light chain-2 (MLC-2) promoters. MLC-2a and MLC-2v selected hiPSC-CMs were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and their biochemical and electrophysiological phenotypes analyzed. We demonstrate that the phenotype of both populations remained stable in culture and they expressed the expected sarcomeric proteins, gap junction proteins and chamber-specific transcription factors. Compared to MLC-2a cells, MLC-2v selected CMs had larger action potential amplitudes and durations. In addition, by immunofluorescence, we showed that MLC-2 isoform expression can be used to enrich hiPSC-CM consistent with early atrial and ventricular myocyte lineages. However, only the ventricular myosin light chain-2 promoter was able to purify a highly homogeneous population of iPSC-CMs. Using this approach, it is now possible to develop ventricular-specific disease models using iPSC-CMs while atrial-specific iPSC-CM cultures may require additional chamber-specific markers. © 2013.

  12. Characteristics of myosin profile in human vastus lateralis muscle in relation to training background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadowska, B; Majerczak, J; Semik, D; Karasinski, J; Kolodziejski, L; Kilarski, W M; Duda, K; Zoladz, J A

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-four male volunteers (mean +/- SD: age 25.4+/-5.8 years, height 178.6+/-5.5 cm, body mass 72.1+/-7.7 kg) of different training background were investigated and classified into three groups according to their physical activity and sport discipline: untrained students (group A), national and sub-national level endurance athletes (group B, 7.8+/-2.9 years of specialised training) and sprint-power athletes (group C, 12.8+/-8.7 years of specialised training). Muscle biopsies of vastus lateralis were analysed histochemically for mATPase and SDH activities, immunohistochemically for fast and slow myosin, and electrophoretically followed by Western immunoblotting for myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition. Significant differences (Pski-jumping, volleyball, soccer and modern dance. Furthermore, the relative amount of the fastest MyHCIIX isoform in vastus lateralis muscle was significantly lower in the athletes from group C than in students (group A). We conclude that the myosin profile in the athletes belonging to group C was unfavourable for their sport disciplines. This could be the reason why those athletes did not reach international level despite of several years of training.

  13. Double phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain during rigor mortis of bovine Longissimus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroya, Susumu; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Oe, Mika; Nakajima, Ikuyo; Shibata, Masahiro; Chikuni, Koichi

    2007-05-16

    To investigate changes in myosin light chains (MyLCs) during postmortem aging of the bovine longissimus muscle, we performed two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by identification with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The results of fluorescent differential gel electrophoresis showed that two spots of the myosin regulatory light chain (MyLC2) at pI values of 4.6 and 4.7 shifted toward those at pI values of 4.5 and 4.6, respectively, by 24 h postmortem when rigor mortis was completed. Meanwhile, the MyLC1 and MyLC3 spots did not change during the 14 days postmortem. Phosphoprotein-specific staining of the gels demonstrated that the MyLC2 proteins at pI values of 4.5 and 4.6 were phosphorylated. Furthermore, possible N-terminal region peptides containing one and two phosphoserine residues were detected in each mass spectrum of the MyLC2 spots at pI values of 4.5 and 4.6, respectively. These results demonstrated that MyLC2 became doubly phosphorylated during rigor formation of the bovine longissimus, suggesting involvement of the MyLC2 phosphorylation in the progress of beef rigor mortis. Bovine; myosin regulatory light chain (RLC, MyLC2); phosphorylation; rigor mortis; skeletal muscle.

  14. Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C Autoantibodies Are Potential Early Indicators of Cardiac Dysfunction and Patient Outcome in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Lynch, IVPhD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The degradation and release of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C upon cardiac damage may stimulate an inflammatory response and autoantibody (AAb production. We determined whether the presence of cMyBP-C-AAbs associated with adverse cardiac function in cardiovascular disease patients. Importantly, cMyBP-C-AAbs were significantly detected in acute coronary syndrome patient sera upon arrival to the emergency department, particularly in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients. Patients positive for cMyBP-C-AAbs had reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and elevated levels of clinical biomarkers of myocardial infarction. We conclude that cMyBP-C-AAbs may serve as early predictive indicators of deteriorating cardiac function and patient outcome in acute coronary syndrome patients prior to the infarction. Key Words: acute myocardial infarction, autoantibodies, cardiac myosin binding protein-c, cardiomyopathy

  15. Direct photoaffinity labeling by nucleotides of the apparent catalytic site on the heavy chains of smooth muscle and Acanthamoeba myosins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruta, H.; Korn, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    The heavy chains of Acanthamoeba myosins, IA, IB and II, turkey gizzard myosin, and rabbit skeletal muscle myosin subfragment-1 were specifically labeled by radioactive ATP, ADP, and UTP, each of which is a substrate or product of myosin ATPase activity, when irradiated with uv light at 0 0 C. With UTP, as much as 0.45 mol/mol of Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and 1 mol/mol of turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain was incorporated. Evidence that the ligands were associated with the catalytic site included the observations that reaction occurred only with nucleotides that are substrates or products of the ATPase activity; that the reaction was blocked by pyrophosphate which is an inhibitor of the ATPase activity; that ATP was bound as ADP; and that label was probably restricted to a single peptide following limited subtilisin proteolysis of labeled Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and extensive cleavage with CNBr and trypsin of labeled turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain

  16. Harmonic Force Spectroscopy Reveals a Force-Velocity Curve from a Single Human Beta Cardiac Myosin Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sung, Jongmin; Nag, Suman; Vestergaard, Christian L.

    2014-01-01

    human beta cardiac myosin S1. We also compare load-velocity curves for wild-type motors with load-velocity curves of mutant forms that cause hypertrophic or dilated-cardiomyopathy (HCM or DCM), in order to understand the effects of mutations on the contractile cycle at the single molecule level....

  17. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2010-01-01

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed to differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator-1 (PGC-1α) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.

  18. Effect of ageing on the myosin heavy chain composition of the human sternocleidomastoid muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meznaric, M; Eržen, I; Karen, P; Cvetko, E

    2018-03-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition of ageing limb muscles is transformed into a slower phenotype and expresses fast-twitch fibre type atrophy, presumably due to age-related motor unit remodelling and a change in the patterns of physical activity. It is not known if ageing affects the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) in a similar way. The goal of the study was to analyze the MyHC composition and the size of muscle fibres in the ageing SCM by immunohistochemical methods and quantitative analysis and stereology using our own software for morphometry. We hypothesize that with ageing the MyHC composition of SCM transforms similarly as in ageing limb muscles, but the size of the muscle fibres is less effected as in limb muscles. The study was performed on the autopsy samples of the SCM in 12 older males. The results were compared with those published in our previous study on 15 young adult males. An ageing SCM transforms into a slower MyHC profile: the percentage of slow-twitch fibres is enhanced (numerical proportion 44.6 vs. 31.5%, Pfibres is diminished (numerical proportion 14.1 vs. 26.8%, Pfast-twitch fibres expressing MyHC-2a and 2x is smaller (50.6 vs. 63.5%, Pfibres expressing the fastest myosin isoform MyHC-2x is smaller too (19.0 vs. 34.5%, Pfibres expressing the fastest MyHC-2x provide circumstantial evidence for: (i) more fast-twitch than slow-twitch motor units being lost; and (ii) reinnervation by the surviving motor units. There appears to be no significant influence on muscle fibre size, which is congruent with relatively unchanged SCM activity during life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiac, Skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I

    2014-01-01

    , skeletal, and smooth muscle was harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53±6 yrs) and mitochondrial respiration assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I+II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac, skeletal, to smooth muscle (54±1; 39±4; 15......±1 pmol•s(-1)•mg (-1), prespiration rates were normalized by CS (respiration...... per mitochondrial content), oxidative phosphorylation capacity was no longer different between the three muscle types. Interestingly, Complex I state 2 normalized for CS activity, an index of non-phosphorylating respiration per mitochondrial content, increased progressively from cardiac, skeletal...

  20. Enhanced protein electrophoresis technique for separating human skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamman, M. M.; Clarke, M. S.; Talmadge, R. J.; Feeback, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Talmadge and Roy (J. Appl. Physiol. 1993, 75, 2337-2340) previously established a sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) protocol for separating all four rat skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms (MHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb); however, when applied to human muscle, the type II MHC isoforms (Ila, IIx) are not clearly distinguished. In this brief paper we describe a modification of the SDS-PAGE protocol which yields distinct and consistent separation of all three adult human MHC isoforms (MHC I, IIa, IIx) in a minigel system. MHC specificity of each band was confirmed by Western blot using three monoclonal IgG antibodies (mAbs) immunoreactive against MHCI (mAb MHCs, Novacastra Laboratories), MHCI+IIa (mAb BF-35), and MHCIIa+IIx (mAb SC-71). Results provide a valuable SDS-PAGE minigel technique for separating MHC isoforms in human muscle without the difficult task of casting gradient gels.

  1. SNPs within the beta myosin heavy chain (MYH7 and the pyruvate kinase muscle (PKM2 genes in horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Russo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Two highly expressed skeletal muscle genes (the MYH7 gene encoding the myosin heavy chain slow/β-cardiac isoform and the PKM2 gene encoding the pyruvate kinase muscle isoforms were investigated with the objective to identify DNA markers in horses. A panel of DNA samples from different horse breeds was analysed using a PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP approach. Four and two alleles were identified for the MYH7 and PKM2 loci, respectively. Mendelian inheritance of alleles of the two investigated genes was confirmed analysing horse families. Sequencing of PCR products obtained from the MYH7 and PKM2 genes made it possible to characterise two SSCP alleles for each gene. The polymorphisms found in the MYH7 and PKM2 genes were further studied in 61 and 68 horses of three (Italian Heavy Draught Horse, Italian Saddler and Murgese and five (Franches-Montagnes, Haflinger, Italian Heavy Draught Horse, Murgese and Standardbred breeds, respectively. Allele frequencies of the two loci varied among the considered breeds. The SNPs discovery in MYH7 and PKM2 genes makes it possible to locate new molecular markers to ECA1. The identified markers could be used in association analysis with performance traits in horses.

  2. Bifunctional Rhodamine Probes of Myosin Regulatory Light Chain Orientation in Relaxed Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, Andrew S.; Brandmeier, Birgit D.; Ferguson, Roisean E.; Criddle, Susan; Dale, Robert E.; Irving, Malcolm

    2004-01-01

    The orientation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) region of the myosin heads in relaxed skinned fibers from rabbit psoas muscle was investigated by polarized fluorescence from bifunctional rhodamine (BR) probes cross-linking pairs of cysteine residues introduced into the RLC. Pure 1:1 BR-RLC complexes were exchanged into single muscle fibers in EDTA rigor solution for 30 min at 30°C; ∼60% of the native RLC was removed and stoichiometrically replaced by BR-RLC, and >85% of the BR-RLC was located in the sarcomeric A-bands. The second- and fourth-rank order parameters of the orientation distributions of BR dipoles linking RLC cysteine pairs 100-108, 100-113, 108-113, and 104-115 were calculated from polarized fluorescence intensities, and used to determine the smoothest RLC orientation distribution—the maximum entropy distribution—consistent with the polarized fluorescence data. Maximum entropy distributions in relaxed muscle were relatively broad. At the peak of the distribution, the “lever” axis, linking Cys707 and Lys843 of the myosin heavy chain, was at 70–80° to the fiber axis, and the “hook” helix (Pro830–Lys843) was almost coplanar with the fiber and lever axes. The temperature and ionic strength of the relaxing solution had small but reproducible effects on the orientation of the RLC region. PMID:15041671

  3. Mechanical Defects of Muscle Fibers with Myosin Light Chain Mutants that Cause Cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Roopnarine, Osha

    2003-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a disease caused by single mutations in several sarcomeric proteins, including the human myosin ventricular regulatory light chain (vRLC). The effects of four of these mutations (A13T, F18L, E22K, and P95A) in vRLC on force generation were determined as a function of Ca2+ concentration. The endogenous RLC was removed from skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers, and replaced with either rat wildtype vRLC or recombinant rat vRLC (G13T, F18L, E22K, and P95A). ...

  4. Orientation of spin-labeled light chain 2 of myosin heads in muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, T

    1990-07-20

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (e.p.r.) spectroscopy has been used to monitor the orientation of spin labels attached rigidly to a reactive SH residue on the light chain 2 (LC2) of myosin heads in muscle fibers. e.p.r. spectra from spin-labeled myosin subfragment-1 (S1), allowed to diffuse into unlabeled rigor (ATP-free) fibers, were roughly approximated by a narrow angular distribution of spin labels centered at 66 degrees relative to the fiber axis, indicating a uniform orientation of S1 bound to actin. On the other hand, spectra from spin-labeled heavy meromyosin (HMM) were roughly approximated by two narrow angular distributions centered at 42 degrees and 66 degrees, suggesting that the LC2 domains of the two HMM heads have different orientations. In contrast to S1 or HMM, the spectra from rigor fibers, in which LC2 of endogenous myosin heads was labeled, showed a random orientation which may be due to distortion imposed by the structure of the filament lattice and the mismatch of the helical periodicities of the thick and thin filaments. However, spectra from the fibers in the presence of ATP analog 5'-adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMPPNP) were approximated by two narrow angular distributions similar to those obtained with HMM. Thus, AMPPNP may cause the LC2 domain to be less flexible and/or the S2 portion to be more flexible, so as to release the distortion of the LC2 domain and make it return to its natural position. At high ionic strength, AMPPNP disoriented the spin labels as ATP did under relaxing conditions, suggesting that the myosin head is detached from and/or weakly (flexibly) attached to a thin filament.

  5. The force dependence of isometric and concentric potentiation in mouse muscle with and without skeletal myosin light chain kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittings, William; Aggarwal, Harish; Stull, James T; Vandenboom, Rene

    2015-01-01

    The isometric potentiation associated with myosin phosphorylation is force dependent. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of a pre-existing period of isometric force on the concentric force potentiation displayed by mouse muscles with and without the ability to phosphorylate myosin. We tested isometric (ISO) and concentric (CON) potentiation, as well as concentric potentiation after isometric force (ISO-CON), in muscles from wild-type (WT) and skeletal myosin light chain kinase-deficient (skMLCK(-/-)) mice. A conditioning stimulus increased (i.e., potentiated) mean concentric force in the ISO-CON and CON conditions to 1.31 ± 0.02 and 1.35 ± 0.02 (WT) and to 1.19 ± 0.02 and 1.21 ± 0.01 (skMLCK(-/-)) of prestimulus levels, respectively (data n = 6-8, p muscles.

  6. Cardiac myosin binding protein C phosphorylation affects cross-bridge cycle's elementary steps in a site-specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    Full Text Available Based on our recent finding that cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C phosphorylation affects muscle contractility in a site-specific manner, we further studied the force per cross-bridge and the kinetic constants of the elementary steps in the six-state cross-bridge model in cMyBP-C mutated transgenic mice for better understanding of the influence of cMyBP-C phosphorylation on contractile functions. Papillary muscle fibres were dissected from cMyBP-C mutated mice of ADA (Ala273-Asp282-Ala302, DAD (Asp273-Ala282-Asp302, SAS (Ser273-Ala282-Ser302, and t/t (cMyBP-C null genotypes, and the results were compared to transgenic mice expressing wide-type (WT cMyBP-C. Sinusoidal analyses were performed with serial concentrations of ATP, phosphate (Pi, and ADP. Both t/t and DAD mutants significantly reduced active tension, force per cross-bridge, apparent rate constant (2πc, and the rate constant of cross-bridge detachment. In contrast to the weakened ATP binding and enhanced Pi and ADP release steps in t/t mice, DAD mice showed a decreased ADP release without affecting the ATP binding and the Pi release. ADA showed decreased ADP release, and slightly increased ATP binding and cross-bridge detachment steps, whereas SAS diminished the ATP binding step and accelerated the ADP release step. t/t has the broadest effects with changes in most elementary steps of the cross-bridge cycle, DAD mimics t/t to a large extent, and ADA and SAS predominantly affect the nucleotide binding steps. We conclude that the reduced tension production in DAD and t/t is the result of reduced force per cross-bridge, instead of the less number of strongly attached cross-bridges. We further conclude that cMyBP-C is an allosteric activator of myosin to increase cross-bridge force, and its phosphorylation status modulates the force, which is regulated by variety of protein kinases.

  7. Major vault protein in cardiac and smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shults, Nataliia V; Das, Dividutta; Suzuki, Yuichiro J

    Major vault protein (MVP) is the major component of the vault particle whose functions are not well understood. One proposed function of the vault is to serve as a mechanism of drug transport, which confers drug resistance in cancer cells. We show that MVP can be found in cardiac and smooth muscle. In human airway smooth muscle cells, knocking down MVP was found to cause cell death, suggesting that MVP serves as a cell survival factor. Further, our laboratory found that MVP is S-glutathionylated in response to ligand/receptor-mediated cell signaling. The S-glutathionylation of MVP appears to regulate protein-protein interactions between MVP and a protein called myosin heavy chain 9 (MYH9). Through MYH9 and Vsp34, MVP may form a complex with Beclin-1 that regulates autophagic cell death. In pulmonary vascular smooth muscle, proteasome inhibition promotes the ubiquitination of MVP, which may function as a mechanism of proteasome inhibition-mediated cell death. Investigating the functions and the regulatory mechanisms of MVP and vault particles is an exciting new area of research in cardiovascular/pulmonary pathophysiology.

  8. Myosin Va Plays a Role in Nitrergic Smooth Muscle Relaxation in Gastric Fundus and Corpora Cavernosa of Penis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carew, Josephine A.; Goyal, Raj K.; Sullivan, Maryrose P.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular motor protein myosin Va is involved in nitrergic neurotransmission possibly by trafficking of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) within the nerve terminals. In this study, we examined the role of myosin Va in the stomach and penis, proto-typical smooth muscle organs in which nitric oxide (NO) mediated relaxation is critical for function. We used confocal microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation of tissue from the gastric fundus (GF) and penile corpus cavernosum (CCP) to localize myosin Va with nNOS and demonstrate their molecular interaction. We utilized in vitro mechanical studies to test whether smooth muscle relaxations during nitrergic neuromuscular neurotransmission is altered in DBA (dilute, brown, non-agouti) mice which lack functional myosin Va. Myosin Va was localized in nNOS-positive nerve terminals and was co-immunoprecipitated with nNOS in both GF and CCP. In comparison to C57BL/6J wild type (WT) mice, electrical field stimulation (EFS) of precontracted smooth muscles of GF and CCP from DBA animals showed significant impairment of nitrergic relaxation. An NO donor, Sodium nitroprusside (SNP), caused comparable levels of relaxation in smooth muscles of WT and DBA mice. These normal postjunctional responses to SNP in DBA tissues suggest that impairment of smooth muscle relaxation resulted from inhibition of NO synthesis in prejunctional nerve terminals. Our results suggest that normal physiological processes of relaxation of gastric and cavernosal smooth muscles that facilitate food accommodation and penile erection, respectively, may be disrupted under conditions of myosin Va deficiency, resulting in complications like gastroparesis and erectile dysfunction. PMID:24516539

  9. Characteristics of myosin profile in human vastus lateralis muscle in relation to training background.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J A Zoladz

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four male volunteers (mean +/- SD: age 25.4+/-5.8 years, height 178.6+/-5.5 cm, body mass 72.1+/-7.7 kg of different training background were investigated and classified into three groups according to their physical activity and sport discipline: untrained students (group A, national and sub-national level endurance athletes (group B, 7.8+/-2.9 years of specialised training and sprint-power athletes (group C, 12.8+/-8.7 years of specialised training. Muscle biopsies of vastus lateralis were analysed histochemically for mATPase and SDH activities, immunohistochemically for fast and slow myosin, and electrophoretically followed by Western immunoblotting for myosin heavy chain (MyHC composition. Significant differences (P<0.05 regarding composition of muscle fibre types and myosin heavy chains were found only between groups A (41.7+/-1.6% of MyHCI, 40.8+/-4.0% of MyHCIIA and 17.5+/-4.0% of MyHCIIX and B (64.3+/-0.8% of MyHCI, 34.0+/-1.4% of MyHCIIA and 1.7+/-1.4% of MyHCIIX and groups A and C (59.6+/-1.6% of MyHCI, 37.2+/-1.3% of MyHCIIA and 3.2+/-1.3% of MyHCIIX. Unexpectedly, endurance athletes (group B such as long-distance runners, cyclists and cross country skiers, did not differ from the athletes representing short term, high power output sports (group C such as ice hockey, karate, ski-jumping, volleyball, soccer and modern dance. Furthermore, the relative amount of the fastest MyHCIIX isoform in vastus lateralis muscle was significantly lower in the athletes from group C than in students (group A. We conclude that the myosin profile in the athletes belonging to group C was unfavourable for their sport disciplines. This could be the reason why those athletes did not reach international level despite of several years of training.

  10. Myosin heavy-chain isoforms in the flight and leg muscles of hummingbirds and zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velten, Brandy P; Welch, Kenneth C

    2014-06-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform complement is intimately related to a muscle's contractile properties, yet relatively little is known about avian MHC isoforms or how they may vary with fiber type and/or the contractile properties of a muscle. The rapid shortening of muscles necessary to power flight at the high wingbeat frequencies of ruby-throated hummingbirds and zebra finches (25-60 Hz), along with the varied morphology and use of the hummingbird hindlimb, provides a unique opportunity to understand how contractile and morphological properties of avian muscle may be reflected in MHC expression. Isoforms of the hummingbird and zebra finch flight and hindlimb muscles were electrophoretically separated and compared with those of other avian species representing different contractile properties and fiber types. The flight muscles of the study species operate at drastically different contraction rates and are composed of different histochemically defined fiber types, yet each exhibited the same, single MHC isoform corresponding to the chicken adult fast isoform. Thus, despite quantitative differences in the contractile demands of flight muscles across species, this isoform appears necessary for meeting the performance demands of avian powered flight. Variation in flight muscle contractile performance across species may be due to differences in the structural composition of this conserved isoform and/or variation within other mechanically linked proteins. The leg muscles were more varied in their MHC isoform composition across both muscles and species. The disparity in hindlimb MHC expression between hummingbirds and the other species highlights previously observed differences in fiber type composition and thrust production during take-off. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Myosin heavy chain composition of tiger (Panthera tigris) and cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) hindlimb muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Jon-Philippe K; Roy, Roland R; Rugg, Stuart; Talmadge, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Felids have a wide range of locomotor activity patterns and maximal running speeds, including the very fast cheetah (Acinonyx jubatas), the roaming tiger (Panthera tigris), and the relatively sedentary domestic cat (Felis catus). As previous studies have suggested a relationship between the amount and type of activity and the myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition of a muscle, we assessed the MHC isoform composition of selected hindlimb muscles from these three felid species with differing activity regimens. Using gel electrophoresis, western blotting, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry with MHC isoform-specific antibodies, we compared the MHC composition in the tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius (MG), plantaris (Plt), and soleus muscles of the tiger, cheetah, and domestic cat. The soleus muscle was absent in the cheetah. At least one slow (type I) and three fast (types IIa, IIx, and IIb) MHC isoforms were present in the muscles of each felid. The tiger had a high combined percentage of the characteristically slower isoforms (MHCs I and IIa) in the MG (62%) and the Plt (86%), whereas these percentages were relatively low in the MG (44%) and Plt (55%) of the cheetah. In general, the MHC isoform characteristics of the hindlimb muscles matched the daily activity patterns of these felids: the tiger has daily demands for covering long distances, whereas the cheetah has requirements for speed and power. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. The Intriguing Dual Lattices of the Myosin Filaments in Vertebrate Striated Muscles: Evolution and Advantage

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    Pradeep K. Luther

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Myosin filaments in vertebrate striated muscle have a long roughly cylindrical backbone with cross-bridge projections on the surfaces of both halves except for a short central bare zone. In the middle of this central region the filaments are cross-linked by the M-band which holds them in a well-defined hexagonal lattice in the muscle A-band. During muscular contraction the M-band-defined rotation of the myosin filaments around their long axes influences the interactions that the cross-bridges can make with the neighbouring actin filaments. We can visualise this filament rotation by electron microscopy of thin cross-sections in the bare-region immediately adjacent to the M-band where the filament profiles are distinctly triangular. In the muscles of teleost fishes, the thick filament triangular profiles have a single orientation giving what we call the simple lattice. In other vertebrates, for example all the tetrapods, the thick filaments have one of two orientations where the triangles point in opposite directions (they are rotated by 60° or 180° according to set rules. Such a distribution cannot be developed in an ordered fashion across a large 2D lattice, but there are small domains of superlattice such that the next-nearest neighbouring thick filaments often have the same orientation. We believe that this difference in the lattice forms can lead to different contractile behaviours. Here we provide a historical review, and when appropriate cite recent work related to the emergence of the simple and superlattice forms by examining the muscles of several species ranging back to primitive vertebrates and we discuss the functional differences that the two lattice forms may have.

  13. Maintenance of muscle myosin levels in adult C. elegans requires both the double bromodomain protein BET-1 and sumoylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Attenuation of RAS-mediated signalling is a conserved process essential to control cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Cooperative interactions between histone modifications such as acetylation, methylation and sumoylation are crucial for proper attenuation in C. elegans, implying that the proteins recognising these histone modifications could also play an important role in attenuation of RAS-mediated signalling. We sought to systematically identify these proteins and found BET-1. BET-1 is a conserved double bromodomain protein that recognises acetyl-lysines on histone tails and maintains the stable fate of various lineages. Unexpectedly, adults lacking both BET-1 and SUMO-1 are depleted of muscle myosin, an essential component of myofibrils. We also show that this muscle myosin depletion does not occur in all animals at a specific time, but rather that the penetrance of the phenotype increases with age. To gain mechanistic insights into this process, we sought to delay the occurrence of the muscle myosin depletion phenotype and found that it requires caspase activity and MEK-dependent signalling. We also performed transcription profiling on these mutants and found an up-regulation of the FGF receptor, egl-15, a tyrosine kinase receptor acting upstream of MEK. Consistent with a MEK requirement, we could delay the muscle phenotype by systemic or hypodermal knock down of egl-15. Thus, this work uncovered a caspase- and MEK-dependent mechanism that acts specifically on ageing adults to maintain the appropriate net level of muscle myosin.

  14. Determining the impact of oxidation on the motility of single muscle-fibres expressing different myosin isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanos, Dimitrios; Li, M.; Baron, Caroline P.

    2013-01-01

    heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms has not been previously investigated. Oxidation of myosin isolated from muscle fibres originating from various porcine muscles with a different metabolic profile was studied using a single muscle fibre in-vitro motility assay, allowing measurements of catalytic properties...... (motility speed) and force-generation capacity of specific MyHC isoforms. In the experimental procedure, single muscle fibres were split in different segments and each segment was exposed to a different concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Speed and force measurements were recorded and compared, to assess...... the effect of myosin oxidation on motility and force. The MyHC isoform expression in the single muscle fibre was subsequently determined on silver-stained gel SDS-PAGE. Preliminary results indicate a decrease of directionality and speed of the in-vitro motility as a result of an oxidative environment...

  15. Park7 expression influences myotube size and myosin expression in muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yu

    Full Text Available Callipyge sheep exhibit postnatal muscle hypertrophy due to the up-regulation of DLK1 and/or RTL1. The up-regulation of PARK7 was identified in hypertrophied muscles by microarray analysis and further validated by quantitative PCR. The expression of PARK7 in hypertrophied muscle of callipyge lambs was confirmed to be up-regulated at the protein level. PARK7 was previously identified to positively regulate PI3K/AKT pathway by suppressing the phosphatase activity of PTEN in mouse fibroblasts. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of PARK7 in muscle growth and protein accretion in response to IGF1. Primary myoblasts isolated from Park7 (+/+ and Park7 (-/- mice were used to examine the effect of differential expression of Park7. The Park7 (+/+ myotubes had significantly larger diameters and more total sarcomeric myosin expression than Park7 (-/- myotubes. IGF1 treatment increased the mRNA abundance of Myh4, Myh7 and Myh8 between 20-40% in Park7 (+/+ myotubes relative to Park7 (-/-. The level of AKT phosphorylation was increased in Park7 (+/+ myotubes at all levels of IGF1 supplementation. After removal of IGF1, the Park7 (+/+ myotubes maintained higher AKT phosphorylation through 3 hours. PARK7 positively regulates the PI3K/AKT pathway by inhibition of PTEN phosphatase activity in skeletal muscle. The increased PARK7 expression can increase protein synthesis and result in myotube hypertrophy. These results support the hypothesis that elevated expression of PARK7 in callipyge muscle would increase levels of AKT activity to cause hypertrophy in response to the normal IGF1 signaling in rapidly growing lambs. Increasing expression of PARK7 could be a novel mechanism to increase protein accretion and muscle growth in livestock or help improve muscle mass with disease or aging.

  16. Phosphorylated peptides occur in a non-helical portion of the tail of a catch muscle myosin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, L.; Elliott, B.W. Jr.; Cohen, C.

    1987-01-01

    Myosin from a molluscan catch muscle (the Anterior Byssus Retractor (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis) is unusual in being phosphorylated in the rod by an endogenous heavy-chain kinase. This phosphorylation enhances myosin solubility at low ionic strength and induces molecular folding of the myosin tail. Papain and chymotryptic cleavage of this myosin, phosphorylated with [γ- 32 P]ATP, indicates that the phosphorylated residues are associated with the carboxy-terminal end of the light meromyosin. Ion-exchange and reverse-phase HPLC of radiolabeled chymotryptic peptides allow the isolation of two different peptides with high specific activity. One of these peptides is rich in lysine and arginine residues, a finding consistent with the observation that basic residues often determine the substrate specificity of protein kinases. The second peptide contains proline residues. Taken together, these results suggest that, as in the case of Acanthamoeba myosin, phosphorylation occurs in a nonhelical portion of the rod that may also control solubility. Identification of the residues that are phosphorylated and their location in the rod may reveal how the phosphorylation-dependent changes observed in the myosin in vitro are related to changes in intermolecular interactions in the thick filaments in vivo

  17. Myosin dephosphorylation during rapid relaxation of hog carotid artery smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driska, S P; Stein, P G; Porter, R

    1989-02-01

    Changes in myosin light chain phosphorylation were measured during histamine-induced rhythmic contractions of hog carotid artery smooth muscle strips. Histamine made the muscle strips contract spontaneously every 1-5 min, and this allowed measurement of the time course of phosphorylation in relation to force development under conditions where diffusion of the agonist through tissue would not complicate the interpretation of the data. In the absence of histamine, phosphorylation was low [0.12 +/- 0.04 mol P/mol of the 20,000-Da light chain (LC 20)]. Phosphorylation was slightly (but not significantly) higher in the presence of 10 microM histamine in the relaxed state between contractions (0.20 +/- 0.03 mol P/mol LC 20). In muscle strips frozen during force development, when force had reached half of its peak value, phosphorylation was 0.38 +/- 0.06 mol P/mol LC 20. The highest levels of phosphorylation (0.49 +/- 0.04 mol P/mol LC 20) were found in strips frozen at the peak of the rhythmic contractions. Strips frozen when force had declined to half of the peak force showed low levels of phosphorylation (0.17 +/- 0.07 mol P/mol LC 20), indicating that the myosin light chain phosphatase activity was quite high. Mathematical modeling of the kinase and phosphatase reactions suggested that the apparent first-order phosphatase rate constant was at least 0.08 s-1 under these conditions. To obtain a better estimate of this rate constant, a second series of phosphorylation measurements were made early in the relaxation phase of the rhythmic contractions. The highest phosphatase rate constant obtained from these measurements was 0.23 s-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Zebrafish cardiac muscle thick filaments: isolation technique and three-dimensional structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Solá, Maryví; Al-Khayat, Hind A; Behra, Martine; Kensler, Robert W

    2014-04-15

    To understand how mutations in thick filament proteins such as cardiac myosin binding protein-C or titin, cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, it is important to determine the structure of the cardiac thick filament. Techniques for the genetic manipulation of the zebrafish are well established and it has become a major model for the study of the cardiovascular system. Our goal is to develop zebrafish as an alternative system to the mammalian heart model for the study of the structure of the cardiac thick filaments and the proteins that form it. We have successfully isolated thick filaments from zebrafish cardiac muscle, using a procedure similar to those for mammalian heart, and analyzed their structure by negative-staining and electron microscopy. The isolated filaments appear well ordered with the characteristic 42.9 nm quasi-helical repeat of the myosin heads expected from x-ray diffraction. We have performed single particle image analysis on the collected electron microscopy images for the C-zone region of these filaments and obtained a three-dimensional reconstruction at 3.5 nm resolution. This reconstruction reveals structure similar to the mammalian thick filament, and demonstrates that zebrafish may provide a useful model for the study of the changes in the cardiac thick filament associated with disease processes. Copyright © 2014 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of cyclic AMP sensor Epac1 in masseter muscle hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain transition induced by β2-adrenoceptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Umeki, Daisuke; Mototani, Yasumasa; Jin, Huiling; Cai, Wenqian; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Suita, Kenji; Saeki, Yasutake; Fujita, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2014-12-15

    The predominant isoform of β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) in skeletal muscle is β2-AR and that in the cardiac muscle is β1-AR. We have reported that Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1), a new protein kinase A-independent cAMP sensor, does not affect cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload or chronic isoproterenol (isoprenaline) infusion. However, the role of Epac1 in skeletal muscle hypertrophy remains poorly understood. We thus examined the effect of disruption of Epac1, the major Epac isoform in skeletal muscle, on masseter muscle hypertrophy induced by chronic β2-AR stimulation with clenbuterol (CB) in Epac1-null mice (Epac1KO). The masseter muscle weight/tibial length ratio was similar in wild-type (WT) and Epac1KO at baseline and was significantly increased in WT after CB infusion, but this increase was suppressed in Epac1KO. CB treatment significantly increased the proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIb at the expense of that of MHC IId/x in both WT and Epac1KO, indicating that Epac1 did not mediate the CB-induced MHC isoform transition towards the faster isoform. The mechanism of suppression of CB-mediated hypertrophy in Epac1KO is considered to involve decreased activation of Akt signalling. In addition, CB-induced histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) phosphorylation on serine 246 mediated by calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), which plays a role in skeletal muscle hypertrophy, was suppressed in Epac1KO. Our findings suggest that Epac1 plays a role in β2-AR-mediated masseter muscle hypertrophy, probably through activation of both Akt signalling and CaMKII/HDAC4 signalling. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  20. Cardiac-Specific Gene Expression Facilitated by an Enhanced Myosin Light Chain Promoter

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    Wolfgang Boecker

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adenoviral gene transfer has been shown to be effective in cardiac myocytes in vitro and in vivo. A major limitation of myocardial gene therapy is the extracardiac transgene expression. Methods: To minimize extracardiac gene expression, we have constructed a tissue-specific promoter for cardiac gene transfer, namely, the 250-bp fragment of the myosin light chain-2v (MLC-2v gene, which is known to be expressed in a tissue-specific manner in ventricular myocardium followed by a luciferase (luc reporter gene (Ad.4 × MLC250.Luc. Rat cardiomyocytes, liver and kidney cells were infected with Ad.4 × MLC.Luc or control vectors. For in vivo testing, Ad.4 × MLC250.Luc was injected into the myocardium or in the liver of rats. Kinetics of promoter activity were monitored over 8 days using a cooled CCD camera. Results: In vitro: By infecting hepatic versus cardiomyocyte cells, we found that the promoter specificity ratio (luc activity in cardiomyocytes per liver cells was 20.4 versus 0.9 (Ad.4 × MLC250.Luc vs. Ad.CMV. In vivo: Ad.4 × MLC250.Luc significantly reduced luc activity in liver (38.4-fold, lung (16.1-fold, and kidney (21.8-fold versus Ad.CMV (p = .01; whereas activity in the heart was only 3.8-fold decreased. The gene expression rate of cardiomyocytes versus hepatocytes was 7:1 (Ad.4 × MLC.Luc versus 1:1.4 (Ad.CMV.Luc. Discussion: This new vector may be useful to validate therapeutic approaches in animal disease models and offers the perspective for selective expression of therapeutic genes in the diseased heart.

  1. Myosin heavy chain expression in cranial, pectoral fin, and tail muscle regions of zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Mou-Yun; Wen, Hui-Ju; Shih, Li-Jane; Kuo, Ching-Ming; Hwang, Sheng-Ping L

    2002-12-01

    To investigate whether different myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms may constitute myofibrils in the trunk and tail musculature and if their respective expression may be regulated by spadetail (spt) and no tail (brachyury), we identified and characterized mRNA expression patterns of an embryonic- and tail muscle-specific MHC gene (named myhz2) during zebrafish development in wild type, spt, and ntl mutant embryos. The identified myhz2 MHC gene encodes a polypeptide containing 1,935 amino acids. Deduced amino acid comparisons showed that myhz2 MHC shared 92.6% sequence identity with that of carp fast skeletal MHC. Temporal and spatial myhz2 MHC mRNA expression patterns were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization using primer pairs and probes designed from the 3'-untranslated region (UTR). Temporally myhz2 MHC mRNA appears in pharyngula embryos and peaks in protruding-mouth larvae. The expression level decreased in 7-day-old hatching larvae, and mRNA expression was not detectable in adult fish. Spatially in pharyngula embryos, mRNA was localized only in the tail somite region, while in long-pec embryos, transcripts were also expressed in the two cranial muscle elements of the adductor mandibulae and medial rectus, as well as in pectoral fin muscles and the tail muscle region. Myhz2 MHC mRNA was expressed in most cranial muscle elements, pectoral fin muscles, and the tail muscle region of 3-day-old hatching larvae. In contrast, no expression of myhz2 MHC mRNA could be observed in spt prim-15 mutant embryos. In spt long-pec mutant embryos, transcripts were expressed in two cranial muscle elements and the tail muscle region, but not in pectoral fin muscles, while only trace amounts of myhz2 MHC mRNA were expressed in the remaining tail muscle region of 38 hpf and long-pec ntl mutant embryos. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Fluorescent modification and orientation of myosin sulfhydryl 2 in skeletal muscle fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajtai, K.; Burghardt, T.P.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe a protocol for the selective covalent labeling of the sulfhydryl 2 (SH2) on the myosin cross-bridge in glycerinated muscle fibers using the sulfhydryl-selective label 4-[N-[(iodoacetoxy)ethyl]-N-methylamino]-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (IANBD). The protocol promotes the specificity of IANBD by using the ability to protect sulfhydryl 1 (SH1) from modification by binding the cross-bridge to the actin filament and using cross-bridge-bound MgADP to promote the accessibility of SH2. They determined the specificity of the probe using fluorescence gel scanning of fiber-extracted proteins to isolate the probe on myosin subfragment 1 (S1), limited proteolysis of the purified S1 to isolate the probe on the 20-kilodalton fragment of S1, and titration of the free SH1's on purified S1 using the radiolabeled SH1-specific reagent [ 14 C]iodoacetamide or enzymatic activity measurements. They characterized the angular distribution of the IANBD on cross-bridges in fibers when the fibers are in rigor, in relaxation, in the presence of MgADP, and in isometric contraction using wavelength-dependent fluorescence polarization. They find that the SH2 probe distinguishes the different states of the fiber such that rigor and MgADP are ordered and maintain a similar orientation throughout the excitation wavelength domain. The relaxed cross-bridge is ordered and has an orientation that is distinct from the orientation of the cross-bridge in rigor and MgADP over the entire wavelength domain. The active isometric cross-bridge is also oriented differently from the other states, suggesting the presence of a predominant actin-bound cross-bridge state that precedes the power stroke during muscle contraction

  3. Drosophila UNC-45 prevents heat-induced aggregation of skeletal muscle myosin and facilitates refolding of citrate synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melkani, Girish C.; Lee, Chi F.; Cammarato, Anthony [Department of Biology and the Molecular Biology Institute, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-4614 (United States); Bernstein, Sanford I., E-mail: sbernst@sciences.sdsu.edu [Department of Biology and the Molecular Biology Institute, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-4614 (United States)

    2010-05-28

    UNC-45 belongs to the UCS (UNC-45, CRO1, She4p) domain protein family, whose members interact with various classes of myosin. Here we provide structural and biochemical evidence that Escherichia coli-expressed Drosophila UNC-45 (DUNC-45) maintains the integrity of several substrates during heat-induced stress in vitro. DUNC-45 displays chaperone function in suppressing aggregation of the muscle myosin heavy meromyosin fragment, the myosin S-1 motor domain, {alpha}-lactalbumin and citrate synthase. Biochemical evidence is supported by electron microscopy, which reveals the first structural evidence that DUNC-45 prevents inter- or intra-molecular aggregates of skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin caused by elevated temperatures. We also demonstrate for the first time that UNC-45 is able to refold a denatured substrate, urea-unfolded citrate synthase. Overall, this in vitro study provides insight into the fate of muscle myosin under stress conditions and suggests that UNC-45 protects and maintains the contractile machinery during in vivo stress.

  4. An endogenously produced fragment of cardiac myosin-binding protein C is pathogenic and can lead to heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaque, Md Abdur; Gupta, Manish; Osinska, Hanna; Gulick, James; Blaxall, Burns C; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2013-08-16

    A stable 40-kDa fragment is produced from cardiac myosin-binding protein C when the heart is stressed using a stimulus, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury. Elevated levels of the fragment can be detected in the diseased mouse and human heart, but its ability to interfere with normal cardiac function in the intact animal is unexplored. To understand the potential pathogenicity of the 40-kDa fragment in vivo and to investigate the molecular pathways that could be targeted for potential therapeutic intervention. We generated cardiac myocyte-specific transgenic mice using a Tet-Off inducible system to permit controlled expression of the 40-kDa fragment in cardiomyocytes. When expression of the 40-kDa protein is induced by crossing the responder animals with tetracycline transactivator mice under conditions in which substantial quantities approximating those observed in diseased hearts are reached, the double-transgenic mice subsequently experience development of sarcomere dysgenesis and altered cardiac geometry, and the heart fails between 12 and 17 weeks of age. The induced double-transgenic mice had development of cardiac hypertrophy with myofibrillar disarray and fibrosis, in addition to activation of pathogenic MEK-ERK pathways. Inhibition of MEK-ERK signaling was achieved by injection of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK inhibitor U0126. The drug effectively improved cardiac function, normalized heart size, and increased probability of survival. These results suggest that the 40-kDa cardiac myosin-binding protein C fragment, which is produced at elevated levels during human cardiac disease, is a pathogenic fragment that is sufficient to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and heart failure.

  5. Blebbistatin, a myosin II inhibitor, suppresses Ca(2+)-induced and "sensitized"-contraction of skinned tracheal muscles from guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Blebbistatin, a potent inhibitor of myosin II, has inhibiting effects on Ca(2+)-induced contraction and contractile filament organization without affecting the Ca(2+)-sensitivity to the force and phosphorylation level of myosin regulatory light chain (MLC20) in skinned (cell membrane permeabilized) taenia cecum from the guinea pig (Watanabe et al., Am J Physiol Cell Physiol. 2010; 298: C1118-26). In the present study, we investigated blebbistatin effects on the contractile force of skinned tracheal muscle, in which myosin filaments organization is more labile than that in the taenia cecum. Blebbistatin at 10 μM or higher suppressed Ca(2+)-induced tension development at any given Ca(2+) concentration, but had little effects on the Ca(2+)- induced myosin light chain phosphorylation. Also blebbistatin at 10 μM and higher significantly suppressed GTP-γS-induced "sensitized" force development. Since the force inhibiting effects of blebbistatin on the skinned trachea were much stronger than those in skinned taenia cecum, blebbistatin might directly affect myosin filaments organization.

  6. Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C Autoantibodies are Potential Early Indicators of Cardiac Dysfunction and Patient Outcome in Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Thomas L; Kuster, Diederik W D; Gonzalez, Beverly; Balasubramanian, Neelam; Nair, Nandini; Day, Sharlene; Calvino, Jenna E; Tan, Yanli; Liebetrau, Christoph; Troidl, Christian; Hamm, Christian W; Güçlü, Ahmet; McDonough, Barbara; Marian, Ali J; van der Velden, Jolanda; Seidman, Christine E; Huggins, Gordon S; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2017-04-01

    The degradation and release of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) upon cardiac damage may stimulate an inflammatory response and autoantibody (AAb) production. We determined whether the presence of cMyBP-C-AAbs associated with adverse cardiac function in CVD patients. Importantly, cMyBP-C-AAbs were significantly detected in ACS patient sera upon arrival to the emergency department, particularly in STEMI patients. Patients positive for cMyBP-C-AAbs had a reduced LVEF and elevated levels of clinical biomarkers of MI. We conclude that cMyBP-C-AAbs may serve as early predictive indicators of deteriorating cardiac function and patient outcome in ACS patients prior to the infarction.

  7. Age- and Activity-Related Differences in the Abundance of Myosin Essential and Regulatory Light Chains in Human Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James N. Cobley

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditional methods for phenotyping skeletal muscle (e.g., immunohistochemistry are labor-intensive and ill-suited to multixplex analysis, i.e., assays must be performed in a series. Addressing these concerns represents a largely unmet research need but more comprehensive parallel analysis of myofibrillar proteins could advance knowledge regarding age- and activity-dependent changes in human muscle. We report a label-free, semi-automated and time efficient LC-MS proteomic workflow for phenotyping the myofibrillar proteome. Application of this workflow in old and young as well as trained and untrained human skeletal muscle yielded several novel observations that were subsequently verified by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM. We report novel data demonstrating that human ageing is associated with lesser myosin light chain 1 content and greater myosin light chain 3 content, consistent with an age-related reduction in type II muscle fibers. We also disambiguate conflicting data regarding myosin regulatory light chain, revealing that age-related changes in this protein more closely reflect physical activity status than ageing per se. This finding reinforces the need to control for physical activity levels when investigating the natural process of ageing. Taken together, our data confirm and extend knowledge regarding age- and activity-related phenotypes. In addition, the MRM transitions described here provide a methodological platform that can be fine-tuned to suite multiple research needs and thus advance myofibrillar phenotyping.

  8. Muscle Contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, H Lee; Hammers, David W

    2018-02-01

    SUMMARYMuscle cells are designed to generate force and movement. There are three types of mammalian muscles-skeletal, cardiac, and smooth. Skeletal muscles are attached to bones and move them relative to each other. Cardiac muscle comprises the heart, which pumps blood through the vasculature. Skeletal and cardiac muscles are known as striated muscles, because the filaments of actin and myosin that power their contraction are organized into repeating arrays, called sarcomeres, that have a striated microscopic appearance. Smooth muscle does not contain sarcomeres but uses the contraction of filaments of actin and myosin to constrict blood vessels and move the contents of hollow organs in the body. Here, we review the principal molecular organization of the three types of muscle and their contractile regulation through signaling mechanisms and discuss their major structural and functional similarities that hint at the possible evolutionary relationships between the cell types. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  9. Botulinum Toxin Type A Inhibits α-Smooth Muscle Actin and Myosin II Expression in Fibroblasts Derived From Scar Contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minliang; Yan, Tongtong; Ma, Kui; Lai, Linying; Liu, Chang; Liang, Liming; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    Scar contracture (SC) is one of the most common complications resulting from major burn injuries. Numerous treatments are currently available but they do not always yield excellent therapeutic results. Recent reports suggest that botulinum toxin type A (BTXA) is effective at reducing SC clinically, but the molecular mechanism for this action is unknown. α-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and myosin II are the main components of stress fibers, which are the contractile structures of fibroblasts. The effects of BTXA on α-SMA and myosin II in SC are still unknown. This study aimed to explore the effect of BTXA on α-SMA and myosin II expression in fibroblasts derived from SC and to elucidate its actual mechanism further. Fibroblasts were isolated from tissue specimens of SC. Fibroblasts were cultured in Dulbecco modified Eagle medium with different concentrations of BTXA and their proliferation was analyzed through the tetrazolium-based colorimetric method at 1, 4, and 7 days. Proteins of α-SMA and myosin II were checked using Western blot in fibroblasts treated with different concentrations of BTXA at 1, 4, and 7 days. Fibroblasts without BTXA treatment had a higher proliferation than that in other groups, which indicated that the proliferation of fibroblasts was significantly inhibited by BTXA (P < 0.05). Proteins of α-SMA and myosin II between fibroblasts with BTXA and fibroblasts without BTXA are statistically significant (P < 0.05). These results suggest that BTXA effectively inhibited the growth of fibroblasts derived from SC and reduced the expression of α-SMA and myosin II, which provided theoretical support for the application of BTXA to control SC.

  10. Comparison of new ELISA method with established SDS-PAGE method for determination of muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Říčný, Jan; Soukup, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 6 (2011), s. 899-904 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256 Grant - others:EC(XE) LSH-CT-2004-511978 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscle fiber types * myosin heavy chains * SDS - PAGE * immunoreactions * thyroid hormones * ELISA Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.555, year: 2011

  11. Contractile properties, fiber types, and myosin isoforms in fast and slow muscles of hyperactive Japanese waltzing mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Asmussen, G.; Schmalbruch, I.; Soukup, Tomáš; Pette, D.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 184, č. 2 (2003), s. 758-766 ISSN 0014-4886 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/00/1653 Grant - others:Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) -; Sonderforschungsbereich(DE) 156; Schwerpunkt Muskelforschung(DE) As 74/1-2 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Japanese waltzing mouse * muscle contraction * myosin isoforms Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.676, year: 2003

  12. Cloning of skeletal myosin heavy chain gene family from adult pleopod muscle and whole larvae of shrimps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Hiroki; Piyapattanakorn, Sanit; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-06-01

    The physiological and biological properties of skeletal muscle in crustacea have not been well understood compared with those of vertebrates. The present study focused on myosin, the major protein in skeletal muscle, from shrimps. In our previous study, two full-length genes encoding myosin heavy chain (MHC), a large subunit of the myosin molecule, were cloned from abdominal fast skeletal muscle of kuruma Marsupenaeus japonicus, black tiger Penaeus monodon and Pacific white Penaeus vannamei shrimps, and named as MHCa and MHCb. In this study, we renamed these as MHC1 and MHC2, respectively, due to the presence of various isoforms newly identified. Partial MHC sequences were identified from pleopod muscle of these shrimps. Two MHCs, named MHC3 and MHC4, were identified from pleopod muscle of kuruma shrimp, whereas two MHCs, named MHC4 and MHC5, were cloned from Pacific white shrimp pleopod. MHC3 was cloned only from black tiger shrimp pleopod. Partial MHC sequences from zoea, mysis, and postlarvae of black tiger and Pacific white shrimps were also determined. The phylogenetic tree demonstrated that most MHCs from pleopod muscle and larval MHCs formed clades with MHC1 and MHC2, respectively. These MHCs were considered to be of fast type, since MHC1 and MHC2 are fast-type MHCs according to our previous study. MHC5 obtained from pleopod muscle of Pacific white shrimp in this study was monophyletic with American lobster Homarus americanus S2 slow tonic MHC previously reported, indicating that MHC5 from Pacific white shrimp is of slow type. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Cardiac muscle: a miracle of creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, S

    1989-09-01

    The paper proposes that energy conversion in muscle is a two-step process, chemical energy being first converted into electrical energy which is then converted into mechanical work. The chemo-electrical transducers are, in effect, minute voltaic cells--more precisely calcium-magnesium cells--with the magnesium electrodes on myosin heads and the calcium electrodes on the C subunits of troponin molecules associated with actin filaments. These cells are established when, after the passage of an action potential, calcium ions are admitted to the sarcomere. In an energy-consuming process, calcium ions are bound to troponin molecules, the energy for the process being supplied by hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate. The electro-mechanical transducer utilises the electrostatic field established between the oppositely charged electrodes of the voltaic cell. As the two are pulled towards each other, doing mechanical work, energy is supplied by the voltaic cells. In the course of this action, calcium ions go back into solution. The action ceases when, after the passage of an action potential, calcium ions are withdrawn into the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

  14. A Drosophila model of dominant inclusion body myopathy type 3 shows diminished myosin kinetics that reduce muscle power and yield myofibrillar defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggs, Jennifer A; Melkani, Girish C; Glasheen, Bernadette M; Detor, Mia M; Melkani, Anju; Marsan, Nathan P; Swank, Douglas M; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2017-06-01

    Individuals with inclusion body myopathy type 3 (IBM3) display congenital joint contractures with early-onset muscle weakness that becomes more severe in adulthood. The disease arises from an autosomal dominant point mutation causing an E706K substitution in myosin heavy chain type IIa. We have previously expressed the corresponding myosin mutation (E701K) in homozygous Drosophila indirect flight muscles and recapitulated the myofibrillar degeneration and inclusion bodies observed in the human disease. We have also found that purified E701K myosin has dramatically reduced actin-sliding velocity and ATPase levels. Since IBM3 is a dominant condition, we now examine the disease state in heterozygote Drosophila in order to gain a mechanistic understanding of E701K pathogenicity. Myosin ATPase activities in heterozygotes suggest that approximately equimolar levels of myosin accumulate from each allele. In vitro actin sliding velocity rates for myosin isolated from the heterozygotes were lower than the control, but higher than for the pure mutant isoform. Although sarcomeric ultrastructure was nearly wild type in young adults, mechanical analysis of skinned indirect flight muscle fibers revealed a 59% decrease in maximum oscillatory power generation and an approximately 20% reduction in the frequency at which maximum power was produced. Rate constant analyses suggest a decrease in the rate of myosin attachment to actin, with myosin spending decreased time in the strongly bound state. These mechanical alterations result in a one-third decrease in wing beat frequency and marginal flight ability. With aging, muscle ultrastructure and function progressively declined. Aged myofibrils showed Z-line streaming, consistent with the human heterozygote phenotype. Based upon the mechanical studies, we hypothesize that the mutation decreases the probability of the power stroke occurring and/or alters the degree of movement of the myosin lever arm, resulting in decreased in vitro

  15. A Drosophila model of dominant inclusion body myopathy type 3 shows diminished myosin kinetics that reduce muscle power and yield myofibrillar defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Suggs

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with inclusion body myopathy type 3 (IBM3 display congenital joint contractures with early-onset muscle weakness that becomes more severe in adulthood. The disease arises from an autosomal dominant point mutation causing an E706K substitution in myosin heavy chain type IIa. We have previously expressed the corresponding myosin mutation (E701K in homozygous Drosophila indirect flight muscles and recapitulated the myofibrillar degeneration and inclusion bodies observed in the human disease. We have also found that purified E701K myosin has dramatically reduced actin-sliding velocity and ATPase levels. Since IBM3 is a dominant condition, we now examine the disease state in heterozygote Drosophila in order to gain a mechanistic understanding of E701K pathogenicity. Myosin ATPase activities in heterozygotes suggest that approximately equimolar levels of myosin accumulate from each allele. In vitro actin sliding velocity rates for myosin isolated from the heterozygotes were lower than the control, but higher than for the pure mutant isoform. Although sarcomeric ultrastructure was nearly wild type in young adults, mechanical analysis of skinned indirect flight muscle fibers revealed a 59% decrease in maximum oscillatory power generation and an approximately 20% reduction in the frequency at which maximum power was produced. Rate constant analyses suggest a decrease in the rate of myosin attachment to actin, with myosin spending decreased time in the strongly bound state. These mechanical alterations result in a one-third decrease in wing beat frequency and marginal flight ability. With aging, muscle ultrastructure and function progressively declined. Aged myofibrils showed Z-line streaming, consistent with the human heterozygote phenotype. Based upon the mechanical studies, we hypothesize that the mutation decreases the probability of the power stroke occurring and/or alters the degree of movement of the myosin lever arm, resulting in

  16. Effects of BTS (N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide), an inhibitor for myosin-actin interaction, on myofibrillogenesis in skeletal muscle cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Maiko; Sato, Naruki; Obinata, Takashi

    2006-11-01

    Actin filaments align around myosin filaments in the correct polarity and in a hexagonal arrangement to form cross-striated structures. It has been postulated that this myosin-actin interaction is important in the initial phase of myofibrillogenesis. It was previously demonstrated that an inhibitor of actin-myosin interaction, BDM (2,3-butanedione monoxime), suppresses myofibril formation in muscle cells in culture. However, further study showed that BDM also exerts several additional effects on living cells. In this study, we further examined the role of actin-myosin interaction in myofibril assembly in primary cultures of chick embryonic skeletal muscle by applying a more specific inhibitor, BTS (N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide), of myosin ATPase and actin-myosin interaction. The assembly of sarcomeric structures from myofibrillar proteins was examined by immunocytochemical methods with the application of BTS to myotubes just after fusion. Addition of BTS (10-50 microM) significantly suppressed the organization of actin and myosin into cross-striated structures. BTS also interfered in the organization of alpha-actinin, C-protein (or MyBP-C), and connectin (or titin) into ordered striated structures, though the sensitivity was less. Moreover, when myotubes cultured in the presence of BTS were transferred to a control medium, sarcomeric structures were formed in 2-3 days, indicating that the inhibitory effect of BTS on myotubes is reversible. These results show that actin-myosin interaction plays a critical role in the process of myofibrillogenesis.

  17. Non-muscle myosin II in disease: mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Newell-Litwa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The actin motor protein non-muscle myosin II (NMII acts as a master regulator of cell morphology, with a role in several essential cellular processes, including cell migration and post-synaptic dendritic spine plasticity in neurons. NMII also generates forces that alter biochemical signaling, by driving changes in interactions between actin-associated proteins that can ultimately regulate gene transcription. In addition to its roles in normal cellular physiology, NMII has recently emerged as a critical regulator of diverse, genetically complex diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancers and vascular disease. In the context of these disorders, NMII regulatory pathways can be directly mutated or indirectly altered by disease-causing mutations. NMII regulatory pathway genes are also increasingly found in disease-associated copy-number variants, particularly in neuronal disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. Furthermore, manipulation of NMII-mediated contractility regulates stem cell pluripotency and differentiation, thus highlighting the key role of NMII-based pharmaceuticals in the clinical success of stem cell therapies. In this Review, we discuss the emerging role of NMII activity and its regulation by kinases and microRNAs in the pathogenesis and prognosis of a diverse range of diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancer and vascular disease. We also address promising clinical applications and limitations of NMII-based inhibitors in the treatment of these diseases and the development of stem-cell-based therapies.

  18. RUNX1-induced silencing of non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIB contributes to megakaryocyte polyploidization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordier, Larissa; Bluteau, Dominique; Jalil, Abdelali; Legrand, Céline; Pan, Jiajia; Rameau, Philippe; Jouni, Dima; Bluteau, Olivier; Mercher, Thomas; Leon, Catherine; Gachet, Christian; Debili, Najet; Vainchenker, William; Raslova, Hana; Chang, Yunhua

    2012-03-06

    Megakaryocytes are unique mammalian cells that undergo polyploidization (endomitosis) during differentiation, leading to an increase in cell size and protein production that precedes platelet production. Recent evidence demonstrates that endomitosis is a consequence of a late failure in cytokinesis associated with a contractile ring defect. Here we show that the non-muscle myosin IIB heavy chain (MYH10) is expressed in immature megakaryocytes and specifically localizes in the contractile ring. MYH10 downmodulation by short hairpin RNA increases polyploidization by inhibiting the return of 4N cells to 2N, but other regulators, such as of the G1/S transition, might regulate further polyploidization of the 4N cells. Conversely, re-expression of MYH10 in the megakaryocytes prevents polyploidization and the transition of 2N to 4N cells. During polyploidization, MYH10 expression is repressed by the major megakaryocyte transcription factor RUNX1. Thus, RUNX1-mediated silencing of MYH10 is required for the switch from mitosis to endomitosis, linking polyploidization with megakaryocyte differentiation.

  19. Dependence of myosin-ATPase on structure bound creatine kinase in cardiac myfibrils from rainbow trout and freshwater turtle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, L.; Jensen, D.H.; Gesser, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The influence of myofibrillar creatine kinase on the myosin-ATPase activity was examined in cardiac ventricular myofibrils isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and freshwater turtle (Trachemys scripta). The ATPase rate was assessed by recording the rephosphorylation of ADP by the pyr......The influence of myofibrillar creatine kinase on the myosin-ATPase activity was examined in cardiac ventricular myofibrils isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and freshwater turtle (Trachemys scripta). The ATPase rate was assessed by recording the rephosphorylation of ADP...... by the pyruvate kinase reaction alone or together with the amount of creatine formed, when myofibrillar bound creatine kinase was activated with phosphocreatine. The steady-state concentration of ADP in the solution was varied through the activity of pyruvate kinase added to the solution. For rainbow trout...... myofibrils at a high pyruvate kinase activity, creatine kinase competed for ADP but did not influence the total ATPase activity. When the ADP concentration was elevated within the physiological range by lowering the pyruvate kinase activity, creatine kinase competed efficiently and increased the ATPase...

  20. Head-head interactions of resting myosin crossbridges in intact frog skeletal muscles, revealed by synchrotron x-ray fiber diffraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanji Oshima

    Full Text Available The intensities of the myosin-based layer lines in the x-ray diffraction patterns from live resting frog skeletal muscles with full thick-thin filament overlap from which partial lattice sampling effects had been removed were analyzed to elucidate the configurations of myosin crossbridges around the thick filament backbone to nanometer resolution. The repeat of myosin binding protein C (C-protein molecules on the thick filaments was determined to be 45.33 nm, slightly longer than that of myosin crossbridges. With the inclusion of structural information for C-proteins and a pre-powerstroke head shape, modeling in terms of a mixed population of regular and perturbed regions of myosin crown repeats along the filament revealed that the myosin filament had azimuthal perturbations of crossbridges in addition to axial perturbations in the perturbed region, producing pseudo-six-fold rotational symmetry in the structure projected down the filament axis. Myosin crossbridges had a different organization about the filament axis in each of the regular and perturbed regions. In the regular region that lacks C-proteins, there were inter-molecular interactions between the myosin heads in axially adjacent crown levels. In the perturbed region that contains C-proteins, in addition to inter-molecular interactions between the myosin heads in the closest adjacent crown levels, there were also intra-molecular interactions between the paired heads on the same crown level. Common features of the interactions in both regions were interactions between a portion of the 50-kDa-domain and part of the converter domain of the myosin heads, similar to those found in the phosphorylation-regulated invertebrate myosin. These interactions are primarily electrostatic and the converter domain is responsible for the head-head interactions. Thus multiple head-head interactions of myosin crossbridges also characterize the switched-off state and have an important role in the regulation

  1. Formoterol attenuates increased oxidative stress and myosin protein loss in respiratory and limb muscles of cancer cachectic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Salazar-Degracia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Muscle mass loss and wasting are characteristic features of patients with chronic conditions including cancer. Therapeutic options are still scarce. We hypothesized that cachexia-induced muscle oxidative stress may be attenuated in response to treatment with beta2-adrenoceptor-selective agonist formoterol in rats. In diaphragm and gastrocnemius of tumor-bearing rats (108 AH-130 Yoshida ascites hepatoma cells inoculated intraperitoneally with and without treatment with formoterol (0.3 mg/kg body weight/day for seven days, daily subcutaneous injection, redox balance (protein oxidation and nitration and antioxidants and muscle proteins (1-dimensional immunoblots, carbonylated proteins (2-dimensional immunoblots, inflammatory cells (immunohistochemistry, and mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC complex activities were explored. In the gastrocnemius, but not the diaphragm, of cancer cachectic rats compared to the controls, protein oxidation and nitration levels were increased, several functional and structural proteins were carbonylated, and in both study muscles, myosin content was reduced, inflammatory cell counts were greater, while no significant differences were seen in MRC complex activities (I, II, and IV. Treatment of cachectic rats with formoterol attenuated all the events in both respiratory and limb muscles. In this in vivo model of cancer-cachectic rats, the diaphragm is more resistant to oxidative stress. Formoterol treatment attenuated the rise in oxidative stress in the limb muscles, inflammatory cell infiltration, and the loss of myosin content seen in both study muscles, whereas no effects were observed in the MRC complex activities. These findings have therapeutic implications as they demonstrate beneficial effects of the beta2 agonist through decreased protein oxidation and inflammation in cachectic muscles, especially the gastrocnemius.

  2. Characterisation of myosin heavy chain gene variants in the fast and slow muscle fibres of gammarid amphipods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, N M; Magnay, J L; McCleary, S J; Nia, S Khazraee; El Haj, A J; Rock, J

    2010-10-01

    Recent molecular work has revealed a large diversity of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) gene variants in the abdominal musculature of gammarid amphipods. An unusual truncated MyHC transcript from the loop 1 region (Variant A(3)) was consistently observed in multiple species and populations. The current study aimed to determine whether this MyHC variant is specific to a particular muscle fibre type, as a change in net charge to the loop 1 region of Variant A(3) could be functionally significant. The localisation of different fibre types within the abdominal musculature of several gammarid species revealed that the deep flexor and extensor muscles are fast-twitch muscle fibres. The dorsal superficial muscles were identified as slow fibres and the muscles extrinsic to the pleopods were identified as intermediate fibres. Amplification of loop 1 region mRNA from isolated superficial extensor and deep flexor muscles, and subsequent liquid chromatography and sequence analysis revealed that Variant A(3) was the primary MyHC variant in slow muscles, and the conserved A(1) sequence was the primary variant in fast muscles. The specific role of Variant A(3) in the slow muscles remains to be investigated. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Myosin helical pitch angle as a quantitative imaging biomarker for characterization of cardiac programming in fetal growth restriction measured by polarization second harmonic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat-Roldan, I.; Psilodimitrakopoulos, S.,; Eixarch, E.,; Torre, I.; Wotjas, B.; Crispi, F.; Figueras, F.; Artigas, D.,; Loza-Alvarez, P.; Gratacos, E.,

    2009-07-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) has recently shown a strong association with cardiac programming which predisposes to cardiovascular mortality in adulthood. Polarization Second Harmonic Microscopy can quantify molecular architecture changes with high sensitivity in cardiac myofibrils. In this work, we use myosin helical pitch angle as an example to quantify such alterations related to this high risk population. Importantly, this shows a potential use of the technique as an early diagnostic tool and an alternative method to understand pathophysiological processes.

  4. Alterations in rat cardiac myosin isozymes induced by whole-body irradiation are prevented by 3,5,3'-L-triiodothyronine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litten, R.Z.; Fein, H.G.; Gainey, G.T.; Walden, T.L.; Smallridge, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Changes in cardiac myosin isozymes and serum thyroid hormone levels were investigated in rats following 10 Gy whole-body gamma irradiation. The percent beta-myosin heavy chain increased from 21.3 ± 1.8 to 28.1 ± 6.8 (NS) at 3-day postirradiation, 37.7 ± 1.9 (P less than .001) at 6-day postirradiation, and 43.8 ± 3.3 (P less than .001) at 9-day postirradiation. Along with the change in myosin isozymes was a significant 53% decrease (P less than .001) in the serum thyroxine (T4) level by day 3 postirradiation, remaining depressed through day 9 postirradiation. The serum 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) level, however, was normal until day 9, when significant depression was also observed. In contrast, the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level was significantly increased by fourfold at day 3, returning to near normal values by day 9 postirradiation. Daily injections of physiological doses of T3 (0.3 microgram/100 g body weight) prevented the change in the myosin isozymes following whole-body irradiation. Daily pharmacological injections of T3 (3.0 micrograms/100 g body weight) to the irradiated rats produced a further decrease in the percent beta-myosin heavy chain (below control values) indicating tissue hyperthyroidism. Thus, this study suggests that the change in myosin isozymes following whole-body irradiation is caused by an alteration in thyroid hormone activity

  5. Myosin phosphorylation potentiates steady-state work output without altering contractile economy of mouse fast skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittings, William; Bunda, Jordan; Vandenboom, Rene

    2018-01-30

    Skeletal myosin light chain kinase (skMLCK)-catalyzed phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) increases (i.e. potentiates) mechanical work output of fast skeletal muscle. The influence of this event on contractile economy (i.e. energy cost/work performed) remains controversial, however. Our purpose was to quantify contractile economy of potentiated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from mouse skeletal muscles with (wild-type, WT) and without (skMLCK ablated, skMLCK -/- ) the ability to phosphorylate the RLC. Contractile economy was calculated as the ratio of total work performed to high-energy phosphate consumption (HEPC) during a period of repeated isovelocity contractions that followed a potentiating stimulus (PS). Consistent with genotype, the PS increased RLC phosphorylation measured during, before and after isovelocity contractions in WT but not in skMLCK -/- muscles (i.e. 0.65 and 0.05 mol phosphate mol -1 RLC, respectively). In addition, although the PS enhanced work during repeated isovelocity contractions in both genotypes, the increase was significantly greater in WT than in skMLCK -/- muscles (1.51±0.03 versus 1.10±0.05, respectively; all data P economy calculated for WT muscles was similar to that calculated for skMLCK -/- muscles (i.e. 5.74±0.67 and 4.61±0.71 J kg -1  μmol -1 P, respectively ( P economy. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Lessons from a tarantula: new insights into muscle thick filament and myosin interacting-heads motif structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Koubassova, Natalia; Pinto, Antonio; Gillilan, Richard; Tsaturyan, Andrey; Padrón, Raúl

    2017-10-01

    The tarantula skeletal muscle X-ray diffraction pattern suggested that the myosin heads were helically arranged on the thick filaments. Electron microscopy (EM) of negatively stained relaxed tarantula thick filaments revealed four helices of heads allowing a helical 3D reconstruction. Due to its low resolution (5.0 nm), the unambiguous interpretation of densities of both heads was not possible. A resolution increase up to 2.5 nm, achieved by cryo-EM of frozen-hydrated relaxed thick filaments and an iterative helical real space reconstruction, allowed the resolving of both heads. The two heads, "free" and "blocked", formed an asymmetric structure named the "interacting-heads motif" (IHM) which explained relaxation by self-inhibition of both heads ATPases. This finding made tarantula an exemplar system for thick filament structure and function studies. Heads were shown to be released and disordered by Ca 2+ -activation through myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation, leading to EM, small angle X-ray diffraction and scattering, and spectroscopic and biochemical studies of the IHM structure and function. The results from these studies have consequent implications for understanding and explaining myosin super-relaxed state and thick filament activation and regulation. A cooperative phosphorylation mechanism for activation in tarantula skeletal muscle, involving swaying constitutively Ser35 mono-phosphorylated free heads, explains super-relaxation, force potentiation and post-tetanic potentiation through Ser45 mono-phosphorylated blocked heads. Based on this mechanism, we propose a swaying-swinging, tilting crossbridge-sliding filament for tarantula muscle contraction.

  7. K-252a, a novel microbial product, inhibits smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, S.; Yamada, K.; Kase, H.; Nakamura, S.; Nonomura, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Effects of K-252a, purified from the culture broth of Nocardiopsis sp., on the activity of myosin (light chain kinase were investigated. 1) K-252a affected three characteristic properties of chicken gizzard myosin-B, natural actomyosin, to a similar degree: the Ca 2+ -dependent activity of ATPase, superprecipitation, and the phosphorylation of the myosin light chain. 2) K-252a inhibited the activities of the purified myosin light chain kinase and a Ca 2+ -independent form of the enzyme which was constructed by cross-linking of myosin light chain kinase and calmodulin using glutaraldehyde. The degrees of inhibition by 3 x 10 -6 M K-252a were 69 and 48% of the control activities with the purified enzyme and the cross-linked complex, respectively. Chlorpromazine (3 x 10 -4 M), a calmodulin antagonist, inhibited the native enzyme, but not the cross-linked one. These results suggested that K-252a inhibited myosin light chain kinase by direct interaction with the enzyme, whereas chlorpromazine suppressed the enzyme activation by interacting with calmodulin. 3) The inhibition by K-252a of the cross-linked kinase was affected by the concentration of ATP, a phosphate donor. The concentration causing 50% inhibition was two orders magnitude lowere in the presence of 100 μM ATP than in the presence of 2 mM ATP. 4) Kinetic analyses using [γ- 32 P]ATP indicated that the inhibitory mode of K-252a was competitive with respect to ATP. These results suggest that K-252a interacts at the ATP-binding domain of myosin light chain kinase

  8. Probing muscle myosin motor action: x-ray (m3 and m6) interference measurements report motor domain not lever arm movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knupp, Carlo; Offer, Gerald; Ranatunga, K W; Squire, John M

    2009-07-10

    The key question in understanding how force and movement are produced in muscle concerns the nature of the cyclic interaction of myosin molecules with actin filaments. The lever arm of the globular head of each myosin molecule is thought in some way to swing axially on the actin-attached motor domain, thus propelling the actin filament past the myosin filament. Recent X-ray diffraction studies of vertebrate muscle, especially those involving the analysis of interference effects between myosin head arrays in the two halves of the thick filaments, have been claimed to prove that the lever arm moves at the same time as the sliding of actin and myosin filaments in response to muscle length or force steps. It was suggested that the sliding of myosin and actin filaments, the level of force produced and the lever arm angle are all directly coupled and that other models of lever arm movement will not fit the X-ray data. Here, we show that, in addition to interference across the A-band, which must be occurring, the observed meridional M3 and M6 X-ray intensity changes can all be explained very well by the changing diffraction effects during filament sliding caused by heads stereospecifically attached to actin moving axially relative to a population of detached or non-stereospecifically attached heads that remain fixed in position relative to the myosin filament backbone. Crucially, and contrary to previous interpretations, the X-ray interference results provide little direct information about the position of the myosin head lever arm; they are, in fact, reporting relative motor domain movements. The implications of the new interpretation are briefly assessed.

  9. Comparative genomic analysis of the arthropod muscle myosin heavy chain genes allows ancestral gene reconstruction and reveals a new type of 'partially' processed pseudogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollmar Martin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing of mutually exclusive exons is an important mechanism for increasing protein diversity in eukaryotes. The insect Mhc (myosin heavy chain gene produces all different muscle myosins as a result of alternative splicing in contrast to most other organisms of the Metazoa lineage, that have a family of muscle genes with each gene coding for a protein specialized for a functional niche. Results The muscle myosin heavy chain genes of 22 species of the Arthropoda ranging from the waterflea to wasp and Drosophila have been annotated. The analysis of the gene structures allowed the reconstruction of an ancient muscle myosin heavy chain gene and showed that during evolution of the arthropods introns have mainly been lost in these genes although intron gain might have happened in a few cases. Surprisingly, the genome of Aedes aegypti contains another and that of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus two further muscle myosin heavy chain genes, called Mhc3 and Mhc4, that contain only one variant of the corresponding alternative exons of the Mhc1 gene. Mhc3 transcription in Aedes aegypti is documented by EST data. Mhc3 and Mhc4 inserted in the Aedes and Culex genomes either by gene duplication followed by the loss of all but one variant of the alternative exons, or by incorporation of a transcript of which all other variants have been spliced out retaining the exon-intron structure. The second and more likely possibility represents a new type of a 'partially' processed pseudogene. Conclusion Based on the comparative genomic analysis of the alternatively spliced arthropod muscle myosin heavy chain genes we propose that the splicing process operates sequentially on the transcript. The process consists of the splicing of the mutually exclusive exons until one exon out of the cluster remains while retaining surrounding intronic sequence. In a second step splicing of introns takes place. A related mechanism could be responsible for

  10. Myosin heavy chain profile of equine gluteus medius muscle following prolonged draught-exercise training and detraining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, A L; Rivero, J L

    2000-04-01

    Fourteen 4-year old Andalusian mares were used to examine the plasticity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition in horse skeletal muscle with heavy draught-exercise training and detraining. Seven horses underwent a training programme based on carriage exercises for 8 months. Afterwards, they were kept in paddocks for 3 months. The remaining seven animals were used as control horses. Three gluteus medius muscle biopsies were removed at depths of 20, 40 and 60 mm from each horse before (month 0), during the training (months 3 and 8) and after detraining (month 11). Myosin heavy chain composition was analysed by electrophoresis and immunohistochemically with anti-MHC monoclonal antibodies. Fibre areas, oxidative capacity and capillaries were studied histochemically. After 8 months of training, MHC-IIX and IIX fibres decreased whereas MHC-I and type I and I + IIA fibres increased. Neither MHC-IIA nor the percentage of IIA fibres changed when the data were considered as a whole, but the proportion of MHC-IIA increased in the superficial region of the muscle after 8 months of training. Mean areas of type II fibres were not affected by training and detraining, but the cross-sectional of type I fibres increased after 3 month of training and not further increases were recorded afterward. The percentage of high-oxidative capacity fibres and the number of capillaries per mm2 increased with training. Most of these muscular adaptations reverted after detraining. These results indicate that long term draught-exercise training induces a reversible transition of MHC composition in equine muscle in the order IIX --> IIA --> I. The physiological implication of these changes is an impact on the velocity of shortening and fatigue resistance of muscle fibres.

  11. The influence of temperature on the distribution and intensity of the reaction product in rat muscle fibers obtained with the histochemical method for myosin ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Tuxen, A

    1989-01-01

    The influence of temperature in the incubation medium on the localization and intensity of myosin ATPase was investigated in striated muscles from the rat using a conventional histochemical technique. It was found that the enzyme reaction was temperature-dependent since the activity in some fibers...... was raised and in others was depressed by alteration of the incubation temperature. There was no obvious correlation between the temperature sensitivity of ATPase in the muscle fibers and their activity for succinic dehydrogenase. It is proposed that the histochemical method for myosin ATPase can be used...

  12. Cross-talk between cardiac muscle and coronary vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhof, Nico; Boer, Christa; Lamberts, Regis R; Sipkema, Pieter

    2006-10-01

    The cardiac muscle and the coronary vasculature are in close proximity to each other, and a two-way interaction, called cross-talk, exists. Here we focus on the mechanical aspects of cross-talk including the role of the extracellular matrix. Cardiac muscle affects the coronary vasculature. In diastole, the effect of the cardiac muscle on the coronary vasculature depends on the (changes in) muscle length but appears to be small. In systole, coronary artery inflow is impeded, or even reversed, and venous outflow is augmented. These systolic effects are explained by two mechanisms. The waterfall model and the intramyocardial pump model are based on an intramyocardial pressure, assumed to be proportional to ventricular pressure. They explain the global effects of contraction on coronary flow and the effects of contraction in the layers of the heart wall. The varying elastance model, the muscle shortening and thickening model, and the vascular deformation model are based on direct contact between muscles and vessels. They predict global effects as well as differences on flow in layers and flow heterogeneity due to contraction. The relative contributions of these two mechanisms depend on the wall layer (epi- or endocardial) and type of contraction (isovolumic or shortening). Intramyocardial pressure results from (local) muscle contraction and to what extent the interstitial cavity contracts isovolumically. This explains why small arterioles and venules do not collapse in systole. Coronary vasculature affects the cardiac muscle. In diastole, at physiological ventricular volumes, an increase in coronary perfusion pressure increases ventricular stiffness, but the effect is small. In systole, there are two mechanisms by which coronary perfusion affects cardiac contractility. Increased perfusion pressure increases microvascular volume, thereby opening stretch-activated ion channels, resulting in an increased intracellular Ca2+ transient, which is followed by an increase in Ca

  13. /sup 99m/Tc labeling of antibodies to cardiac myosin Fab and to human fibrinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaw, B.A.; Strauss, H.W.; Carvalho, A.; Locke, E.; Gold, H.K.; Haber, E.

    1982-01-01

    We have developed a method of labeling biologically active labile macromolecules, such as human fibrinogen (HF) and anticardiac-myosin Fab (AM-Fab), with /sup 99m/Tc at neutral pH. This method uses dithionite reduction of pertechnetate and subsequent labeling, to test the method with acid-labile macromolecules. Complexes of diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid with macromolecules such as human fibrinogen (D-HF) and anticardiac-myosin Fab (D-AM-Fab) were labeled and utilized in in vitro and in vivo studies. In biodistribution studies, the /sup 99m/Tc D-HF had a two-component blood clearance (half-times 1 hr and 15 hr) and was 80--88% coagulable. The /sup 99m/Tc AM-Fab retained its immunoreactivity as tested by affinity chromatography; also during in vivo localization in experimental myocardial infarction. This labeling technique provides an easy and efficient approach to the /sup 99m/Tc labeling of other biologically active and acid-labile macromolecules

  14. Technetium-99m labeling of antibodies to cardiac myosin Fab and to human fibrinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaw, B.A.; Strauss, H.W.; Carvalho, A.; Locke, E.; Gold, H.K.; Haber, E.

    1982-01-01

    A method of labeling biologically active labile macromolecules, such as human fibrinogen (HF) and anticardiac-myosin Fab (AM-Fab), with Tc-99m at neutral pH was developed. This method uses dithionite reduction of pertechnetate and subsequent labeling to test the method with acid-labile macromolecules. Complexes of diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid with macromolecules such as human fibrinogen (D-HF) and anticardiac-myosin Fab (D-AM-Fab) were labeled and utilized in in vitro and in vivo studies. In biodistribution studies, the Tc-99m D-HF had a two-component blood clearance (half-times 1 hr and 15 hr) and was 80-88% coagulable. The Tc-99m AM-Fab retained its immunoreactivity as tested by affinity chromatography; also during in vivo localization in experimental myocardial infarction. This labeling technique provides an easy and efficient approach to the Tc-99m labeling of other biologically active and acid-labile macromolecules

  15. Expression of developmental myosin and morphological characteristics in adult rat skeletal muscle following exercise-induced injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H K; Plyley, M J; Rodgers, C D; McKee, N H

    1999-07-01

    The extent and stability of the expression of developmental isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MHCd), and their association with cellular morphology, were determined in adult rat skeletal muscle fibres following injury induced by eccentrically-biased exercise. Adult female Wistar rats [274 (10) g] were either assigned as non-exercised controls or subjected to 30 min of treadmill exercise (grade, -16 degrees; speed, 15 m x min(-1)), and then sacrificed following 1, 2, 4, 7, or 12 days of recovery (n = 5-6 per group). Histologically and immunohistologically stained serial, transverse cryosections of the soleus (S), vastus intermedius (VI), and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were examined using light microscopy and digital imaging. Fibres staining positively for MHCd (MHCd+) were seldom detected in the TA. In the VI and S, higher proportions of MHCd+ fibres (0.8% and 2.5%, respectively) were observed in rats at 4 and 7 days post-exercise, in comparison to all other groups combined (0.2%, 1.2%; P < or = 0.01). In S, MHCd+ fibres were observed less frequently by 12 days (0.7%) than at 7 days (2.6%) following exercise. The majority (85.1%) of the MHCd+ fibres had morphological characteristics indicative of either damage, degeneration, repair or regeneration. Most of the MHCd+ fibres also expressed adult slow, and/or fast myosin heavy chain. Quantitatively, the MHCd+ fibres were smaller (< 2500 microm2) and more angular than fibres not expressing MHCd. Thus, there was a transient increase in a small, but distinct population of MHCd+ fibres following unaccustomed, functional exercise in adult rat S and VI muscles. The observed close coupling of MHCd expression with morphological changes within muscle fibres suggests that these characteristics have a common, initial exercise-induced injury-related stimulus.

  16. [Changes in titin and myosin heavy chain isoform composition in skeletal muscles of Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) after 12-day spaceflight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuneva, A D; Vikhliantsev, I M; Shpagina, M D; Rogachevskiĭ, V V; Khutsian, S S; Poddubnaia, Z A; Grigor'ev, A I

    2012-01-01

    Changes of titin and myosin heavy chain isoform composition in skeletal muscles (m. soleus, m. gastrocnemius, m. tibialis anterior, m. psoas major) in Mongolian Gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus ) were investigated after 12-day spaceflight on board of Russian space vehicle "Foton-M3". In m. psoas and m. soleus in the gerbils from "Flight" group the expected increase in the content of fast myosin heavy chain isoforms (IIxd and IIa, respectively) were observed. No significant differences were found in the content of IIxd and IIa isoforms of myosin heavy chain in m. tibialis anterior in the gerbils from control group as compared to that in "Flight" group. An unexpected increase in the content of slow myosin heavy chain I isoform and a decrease in the content of fast IIx/d isoform in m. gastrocnemius of the gerbils from "Flight" group were observed. In skeletal muscles of the gerbils from "Flight" group the relative content of titin N2A-isoform was reduced (by 1,2-1,7 times), although the content of its NT-isoform, which was revealed in striated muscles of mammals in our experiments earlier, remained the same. When the content of titin N2A-isoform was decreased, no predictable abnormalities in sarcomeric structure and contractile ability of skeletal muscles in the gerbils from "Flight" group were found. An assumption on the leading role of titin NT-isoform in maintenance of structural and functional properties of striated muscles of mammals was made.

  17. Morphometry, ultrastructure, myosin isoforms, and metabolic capacities of the "mini muscles" favoured by selection for high activity in house mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guderley, Helga; Houle-Leroy, Philippe; Diffee, Gary M; Camp, Dana M; Garland, Theodore

    2006-07-01

    Prolonged selective breeding of mice (Mus musculus) for high levels of voluntary wheel running has favoured an unusual phenotype ("mini muscles"), apparently caused by a single Mendelian recessive allele, in which most hind-limb muscles are markedly reduced in mass, but have increased mass-specific activities of mitochondrial enzymes. We examined whether these changes reflect changes in fibre size, number or ultrastructure in normal and "mini-muscle" mice within the two (of four) selectively bred lines (lab designations L3 and L6) that exhibit the phenotype at generations 26 and 27. In both lines, the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles are smaller in mass (by >50% and 20%, respectively) in affected individuals. The mass-specific activities of mitochondrial enzymes in the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles were increased in the mini phenotype in both lines, with stronger effects in the gastrocnemius muscle. In the gastrocnemius, the % myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIb was reduced by 50% in L3 and by 30% in L6, whereas the % MHC IIa and I were higher, particularly in L3. Fibre number in the plantaris muscle did not significantly differ between mini and normal muscles, although muscle mass was a significant positive correlate of fibre number. Small fibres were more abundant in mini than normal muscles in L3. Mitochondrial volume density was significantly higher in mini than normal muscle fibres in L3, but not in L6. Microscopy revealed a surprising attribute of the mini muscles: an abundance of small, minimally differentiated, myofibril-containing cells positioned in a disorderly fashion, particularly in the surface layer. We hypothesise that these unusual cells may be satellite cells or type IIb fibres that did not complete their differentiation. Together, these observations suggest that mice with the mini phenotype have reduced numbers of type IIb fibres in many of their hind-limb muscles, leading to a decrease in mass and an increase in mass-specific aerobic capacity

  18. Clinical features and prognostic implications of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy related to the cardiac myosin-binding protein C gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, P; Dubourg, O; Desnos, M; Bennaceur, M; Carrier, L; Camproux, A C; Isnard, R; Hagege, A; Langlard, J M; Bonne, G; Richard, P; Hainque, B; Bouhour, J B; Schwartz, K; Komajda, M

    1998-06-09

    Little information is available on phenotype-genotype correlations in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy that are related to the cardiac myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) gene. The aim of this study was to perform this type of analysis. We studied 76 genetically affected subjects from nine families with seven recently identified mutations (SASint20, SDSint7, SDSint23, branch point int23, Glu542Gln, a deletion in exon 25, and a duplication/deletion in exon 33) in the MYBPC3 gene. Detailed clinical, ECG, and echocardiographic parameters were analyzed. An intergene analysis was performed by comparing the MYBPC3 group to seven mutations in the beta-myosin heavy-chain gene (beta-MHC) group (n=52). There was no significant phenotypic difference among the different mutations in the MYBPC3 gene. However, in the MYBPC3 group compared with the beta-MHC group, (1) prognosis was significantly better (P<0.0001), and no deaths occurred before the age of 40 years; (2) the age at onset of symptoms was delayed (41+/-19 versus 35+/-17 years, P<0.002); and (3) before 30 years of age, the phenotype was particularly mild because penetrance was low (41% versus 62%), maximal wall thicknesses lower (12+/-4 versus 16+/-7 mm, P<0.03), and abnormal T waves less frequent (9% versus 45%, P<0.02). These results are consistent with specific clinical features related to the MYBPC3 gene: onset of the disease appears delayed and the prognosis is better than that associated with the beta-MHC gene. These findings could be particularly important for the purpose of clinical management and genetic counseling in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

  19. Calcineurin regulates slow myosin, but not fast myosin or metabolic enzymes, during fast-to-slow transformation in rabbit skeletal muscle cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meißner, Joachim D; Gros, Gerolf; Scheibe, Renate J; Scholz, Michael; Kubis, Hans-Peter

    2001-01-01

    The addition of cyclosporin A (500 ng ml−1) - an inhibitor of the Ca2+-calmodulin-regulated serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin - to primary cultures of rabbit skeletal muscle cells had no influence on the expression of fast myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms MHCIIa and MHCIId at the level of protein and mRNA, but reduced the expression of slow MHCI mRNA. In addition, no influence of cyclosporin A on the expression of citrate synthase (CS) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) mRNA was found. The level of enzyme activity of CS was also not affected. When the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 (4 × 10−7m) was added to the medium, a partial fast-to-slow transformation occurred. The level of MHCI mRNA increased, and the level of MHCIId mRNA decreased. Cotreatment with cyclosporin A was able to prevent the upregulation of MHCI at the level of mRNA as well as protein, but did not reverse the decrease in MHCIId expression. The expression of MHCIIa was also not influenced by cyclosporin A. Cyclosporin A was not able to prevent the upregulation of CS mRNA under Ca2+ ionophore treatment and failed to reduce the increased enzyme activity of CS. The expression of GAPDH mRNA was reduced under Ca2+ ionophore treatment and was not altered under cotreatment with cyclosporin A. When the myotubes in the primary muscle culture were electrostimulated at 1 Hz for 15 min periods followed by pauses of 30 min, a partial fast-to-slow transformation was induced. Again, cotreatment with cyclosporin A prevented the upregulation of MHCI at the level of mRNA and protein without affecting MHCIId expression. The nuclear translocation of the calcineurin-regulated transcription factor nuclear factor of activated thymocytes (NFATc1) during treatment with Ca2+ ionophore, and the prevention of the translocation in the presence of cyclosporin A, were demonstrated immunocytochemically in the myotubes of the primary culture. The effects of cyclosporin A demonstrate the involvement of

  20. ATPase activity and contraction in porcine and human cardiac muscle

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Griffiths, P. J.; Isackson, H.; Redwood, C.; Marston, S.; Pelc, Radek; Funari, S.; Watkins, H.; Ashley, C. C.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 29, 6-8 (2008), s. 277-277 ISSN 0142-4319. [European Muscle Conference of the European Society for Muscle Research /37./. 13.09.2008-16.09.2008, Oxford] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Grant - others:EC(XE) RII3-CT-2004-506008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpo1 * ATP-asa * cardiac muscle * molecular motor Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  1. Alterations in rat cardiac myosin isozymes induced by whole-body irradiation are prevented by 3,5,3'-L-triiodothyronine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litten, R.Z.; Fein, H.G.; Gainey, G.T.; Walden, T.L.; Smallridge, R.C. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Changes in cardiac myosin isozymes and serum thyroid hormone levels were investigated in rats following 10 Gy whole-body gamma irradiation. The percent beta-myosin heavy chain increased from 21.3 {plus minus} 1.8 to 28.1 {plus minus} 6.8 (NS) at 3-day postirradiation, 37.7 {plus minus} 1.9 (P less than .001) at 6-day postirradiation, and 43.8 {plus minus} 3.3 (P less than .001) at 9-day postirradiation. Along with the change in myosin isozymes was a significant 53% decrease (P less than .001) in the serum thyroxine (T4) level by day 3 postirradiation, remaining depressed through day 9 postirradiation. The serum 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) level, however, was normal until day 9, when significant depression was also observed. In contrast, the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level was significantly increased by fourfold at day 3, returning to near normal values by day 9 postirradiation. Daily injections of physiological doses of T3 (0.3 microgram/100 g body weight) prevented the change in the myosin isozymes following whole-body irradiation. Daily pharmacological injections of T3 (3.0 micrograms/100 g body weight) to the irradiated rats produced a further decrease in the percent beta-myosin heavy chain (below control values) indicating tissue hyperthyroidism. Thus, this study suggests that the change in myosin isozymes following whole-body irradiation is caused by an alteration in thyroid hormone activity.

  2. Standardization of metachromatic staining method of myofibrillar ATPase activity of myosin to skeletal striated muscle of mules and donkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora H.F. D'Angelis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at standardizing the pre-incubation and incubation pH and temperature used in the metachromatic staining method of myofibrillar ATPase activity of myosin (mATPase used for asses and mules. Twenty four donkeys and 10 mules, seven females and three males, were used in the study. From each animal, fragments from the Gluteus medius muscle were collected and percutaneous muscle biopsy was performed using a 6.0-mm Bergström-type needle. In addition to the metachromatic staining method of mATPase, the technique of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide tetrazolium reductase (NADH-TR was also performed to confirm the histochemical data. The histochemical result of mATPase for acidic pre-incubation (pH=4.50 and alkaline incubation (pH=10.50, at a temperature of 37ºC, yielded the best differentiation of fibers stained with toluidine blue. Muscle fibers were identified according to the following colors: type I (oxidative, light blue, type IIA (oxidative-glycolytic, intermediate blue and type IIX (glycolytic, dark blue. There are no reports in the literature regarding the characterization and distribution of different types of muscle fibers used by donkeys and mules when performing traction work, cargo transportation, endurance sports (horseback riding and marching competitions. Therefore, this study is the first report on the standardization of the mATPase technique for donkeys and mules.

  3. Gene transfer, expression, and sarcomeric incorporation of a headless myosin molecule in cardiac myocytes: evidence for a reserve in myofilament motor function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenboom, Rene; Herron, Todd; Favre, Elizabeth; Albayya, Faris P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement a living myocyte in vitro model system to test whether a motor domain-deleted headless myosin construct could be incorporated into the sarcomere and affect contractility. To this end we used gene transfer to express a “headless” myosin heavy chain (headless-MHC) in complement with the native full-length myosin motors in the cardiac sarcomere. An NH2-terminal Flag epitope was used for unique detection of the motor domain-deleted headless-MHC. Total MHC content (i.e., headless-MHC + endogenous MHC) remained constant, while expression of the headless-MHC in transduced myocytes increased from 24 to 72 h after gene transfer until values leveled off at 96 h after gene transfer, at which time the headless-MHC comprised ∼20% of total MHC. Moreover, immunofluorescence labeling and confocal imaging confirmed expression and demonstrated incorporation of the headless-MHC in the A band of the cardiac sarcomere. Functional measurements in intact myocytes showed that headless-MHC modestly reduced amplitude of dynamic twitch contractions compared with controls (P < 0.05). In chemically permeabilized myocytes, maximum steady-state isometric force and the tension-pCa relationship were unaltered by the headless-MHC. These data suggest that headless-MHC can express to 20% of total myosin and incorporate into the sarcomere yet have modest to no effects on dynamic and steady-state contractile function. This would indicate a degree of functional tolerance in the sarcomere for nonfunctional myosin molecules. PMID:21112946

  4. Increased specificity in human cardiac-myosin radioimmunoassay utilizing two monoclonal antibodies in a double sandwich assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katus, H.A.; Hurrell, J.G.; Matsueda, G.R.; Ehrlich, P.; Zurawski, V.R. Jr.; Khaw, B.-A.; Haber, E.

    1982-01-01

    An immunoradiometric assay that simultaneously measured two different epitopes on the same molecule was devised to differential between cardiac- and skeletal-myosin light chains. Three monoclonal antibodies were examined that were 100% (lC5), 25% (2B9) and 17% (4F10) cross reactive, respectively, between the two antigens. One antibody of the pair to be studied was immobilized to cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B while the other was iodinated with 125 I using the lactoperoxidase method. The antigen was mixed with the immobilized antibody, the labeled antibody was added and the precipitate then washed and counted in a gamma counter. When both antibodies of the pair to be studied (immobilized and labeled) were the same (2B9), no radioactivity above background was bound to the precipitate, indicating that the second antibody could not bind to an already occupied epitope. When two different antibodies were employed, the specificity of the assay increased over that of a single antibody. The cross reactivity of a pair approximated the product of the cross reactivities of the individual antibodies. Thus, lC5 and 2B9 were 25% cross reactive together, lC5 and 4F10 17% cross reactive, and 2B9 and 4F10 4.3% cross reactive. (author)

  5. Acceleration of the sliding movement of actin filaments with the use of a non-motile mutant myosin in in vitro motility assays driven by skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Iwase

    Full Text Available We examined the movement of an actin filament sliding on a mixture of normal and genetically modified myosin molecules that were attached to a glass surface. For this purpose, we used a Dictyostelium G680V mutant myosin II whose release rates of Pi and ADP were highly suppressed relative to normal myosin, leading to a significantly extended life-time of the strongly bound state with actin and virtually no motility. When the mixing ratio of G680V mutant myosin II to skeletal muscle HMM (heavy myosin was 0.01%, the actin filaments moved intermittently. When they moved, their sliding velocities were about two-fold faster than the velocity of skeletal HMM alone. Furthermore, sliding movements were also faster when the actin filaments were allowed to slide on skeletal muscle HMM-coated glass surfaces in the motility buffer solution containing G680V HMM. In this case no intermittent movement was observed. When the actin filaments used were copolymerized with a fusion protein consisting of Dictyostelium actin and Dictyostelium G680V myosin II motor domain, similar faster sliding movements were observed on skeletal muscle HMM-coated surfaces. The filament sliding velocities were about two-fold greater than the velocities of normal actin filaments. We found that the velocity of actin filaments sliding on skeletal muscle myosin molecules increased in the presence of a non-motile G680V mutant myosin motor.

  6. Electrophoretic Mobility of Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms Revisited: Application of MALDI TOF/TOF Analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arnoštová, P.; Jedelsky, P. L.; Soukup, Tomáš; Žurmanová, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2011, - (2011), e634253 ISSN 1110-7243 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX01110901; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cardiac MyHC isoforms * MyHC isoform mobility * effect of thyroid hormones * mass spectrometry * SDS-PAGE and western blot Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.436, year: 2011

  7. Small cardiac lesions: fibrosis of papillary muscles and focal cardiac myocytolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steer, A [Hijiyanna Park, Hiroshima JP; Nakashima, N; Kawashima, T; Lee, K K; Danzig, M D; Robertson, T L; Dock, D S

    1977-11-01

    Three types of small cardiac lesions were described and illustrated: (1) focal type of papillary muscle fibrosis, evidently a healed infarct of the papillary muscle present in 13% of the autopsies, is a histologically characteristic lesion associated with coronary artery disease and healed myocardial infarction; (2) diffuse type of papillary muscle fibrosis, probably an aging change present in almost half of the autopsies, is associated with sclerosis of the arteries in the papillary muscle, is identifiable histologically; and apparently is not associated with any cardiac abnormality; and (3) focal cardiac myocytolysis, a unique histologic lesion, usually multifocal without predilection for any area of the heart, is associated with ischemic heart disease, death due to cancer complicated by non-bacterial thrombotic endocarditis and microthrombi in small cardiac arteries as well as with other diseases. Differentiation of the 2 types of papillary muscle fibrosis is important in the study of papillary muscle and mitral valve dysfunction. Focal cardiac myocytolysis may contribute to the fatal extension of myocardial infarcts.

  8. Small cardiac lesions: fibrosis of papillary muscles and focal cardiac myocytolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steer, A; Nakashima, T; Kawashima, T; Lee, K K; Danzig, M D; Robertson, T L; Dock, D S

    1977-11-01

    Three types of small cardiac lesions were described and illustrated: (1) focal type of papillary muscle fibrosis, evidently a healed infarct of the papillary muscle present in 13% of the autopsies, is a histologically characteristic lesion associated with coronary artery disease and healed myocardial infarction, (2) diffuse type of papillary muscle fibrosis, probably an aging change present in almost half of the autopsies, is associated with sclerosis of the arteries in the papillary muscle, is identifiable histologically, and apparently is not associated with any cardiac abnormality, and (3) focal cardiac myochtolysis, a unique histologic lesion, usually multifocal without predilection for any area of the heart, is associated with ischemic heart disease, death due to cancer complicated by nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis and microthrombi in small cardiac arteries as well as with other diseases. Differentiation of the 2 types of papillary muscle fibrosis is important in the study of papillary muscle and mitral valve dysfunction. Focal cardiac myocytolysis may contribute to the fatal extension of myocardial infarcts.

  9. Myosin heavy chain isoform expression in adult and juvenile mini-muscle mice bred for high-voluntary wheel running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmadge, Robert J; Acosta, Wendy; Garland, Theodore

    2014-11-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform composition of locomotor and non-locomotor muscles of mini-muscle mice were assessed at the protein and mRNA levels in both adult and juvenile (21 day old) mice. Mini-muscle mice are one outcome of a replicated artificial selection experiment in which four lines of mice were bred for high voluntary wheel running (HR lines). Two of the lines responded with an increase in frequency of a single nucleotide polymorphism in an intron in the MyHC-2b gene (myh4) that when homozygous causes a dramatic reduction in triceps surae mass. We found that both locomotor and non-locomotor muscles of adult mini-muscle mice displayed robust reductions, but not elimination, of the MyHC-2b isoform at both the protein and mRNA levels, with commensurate increases in MyHC-2x and sometimes MyHC-2a, as compared with either a line of HR mice that does not display the mini-muscle phenotype or inbred C57Bl6 mice. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that locomotor muscles of mini-muscle mice contain fibers that express the MyHC-2b isoform, which migrates normally in SDS-PAGE gels. However, these MyHC-2b positive fibers are generally smaller than the surrounding fibers and smaller than the MyHC-2b positive fibers of non-mini-muscle mice, resulting in characteristically fast muscles that lack a substantial MyHC-2b positive (superficial) region. In contrast, the masseter, a non-locomotor muscle of mini-muscle mice contained MyHC-2b positive fibers that stained more lightly for MyHC-2b, but appeared normal in size and distribution. In adults, many of the MyHC-2b positive fibers in the mini-muscle mice also display central nuclei. Only a small proportion of small MyHC-2b fibers in mini-muscle mice stained positive for the neural cell adhesion molecule, suggesting that anatomical innervation was not compromised. In addition, weanling (21 day old), but not 5 day old mice, displayed alterations in MyHC isoform content at both the protein and mRNA levels, including

  10. Engineering Cardiac Muscle Tissue: A Maturating Field of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Florian; Mannhardt, Ingra; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2017-04-28

    Twenty years after the initial description of a tissue engineered construct, 3-dimensional human cardiac tissues of different kinds are now generated routinely in many laboratories. Advances in stem cell biology and engineering allow for the generation of constructs that come close to recapitulating the complex structure of heart muscle and might, therefore, be amenable to industrial (eg, drug screening) and clinical (eg, cardiac repair) applications. Whether the more physiological structure of 3-dimensional constructs provides a relevant advantage over standard 2-dimensional cell culture has yet to be shown in head-to-head-comparisons. The present article gives an overview on current strategies of cardiac tissue engineering with a focus on different hydrogel methods and discusses perspectives and challenges for necessary steps toward the real-life application of cardiac tissue engineering for disease modeling, drug development, and cardiac repair. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. The importance of subfragment 2 and C-terminus of myosin heavy chain for thick filament assembly in skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Koichi; Oe, Mika; Nakajima, Ikuyo; Shibata, Masahiro; Muroya, Susumu; Chikuni, Koichi; Hattori, Akihito; Nishimura, Takanori

    2015-04-01

    In skeletal muscle cells, myofibrillar proteins are highly organized into sarcomeres in which thick filaments interdigitate with thin filaments to generate contractile force. The size of thick filaments, which consist mainly of myosin molecules, is strictly controlled. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which myosin molecules assemble into thick filaments. Here, we assessed the ability of each domain of myosin heavy chain (Myh) to form thick filaments. We showed that exogenously expressed subfragment 2 (S2) + light meromyosin (LMM) of Myh was efficiently incorporated into thick filaments in muscle cells, although neither solely expressed S2 nor LMM targeted to thick filaments properly. In nonmuscle COS7 cells, S2+LMM formed more enlarged filaments/speckles than LMM. These results suggest that Myh filament formation is induced by S2 accompanying LMM. We further examined the effects of Myh C-terminus on thick filament assembly. C-terminal deletion mutants were incorporated not into entire thick filaments but rather into restricted regions of thick filaments. Our findings suggest that the elongation of myosin filaments to form thick filaments is regulated by S2 as well as C-terminus of LMM. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  12. Cold exposure increases slow-type myosin heavy chain 1 (MyHC1) composition of soleus muscle in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizunoya, Wataru; Iwamoto, Yohei; Sato, Yusuke; Tatsumi, Ryuichi; Ikeuchi, Yoshihide

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of cold exposure on rat skeletal muscle fiber type, according to myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform and metabolism-related factors. Male Wistar rats (7 weeks old) were housed individually at 4 ± 2°C as a cold-exposed group or at room temperature (22 ± 2°C) as a control group for 4 weeks. We found that cold exposure significantly increased the slow-type MyHC1 content in the soleus muscle (a typical slow-type fiber), while the intermediate-type MyHC2A content was significantly decreased. In contrast to soleus, MyHC composition of extensor digitorum longus (EDL, a typical fast-type fiber) and gastrocnemius (a mix of slow-type and fast-type fibers) muscle did not change from cold exposure. Cold exposure increased mRNA expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) in both the soleus and EDL. Cold exposure also increased mRNA expression of myoglobin, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α (PGC1α) and forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) in the soleus. Upregulation of UCP3 and PGC1α proteins were observed with Western blotting in the gastrocnemius. Thus, cold exposure increased metabolism-related factors in all muscle types that were tested, but MyHC isoforms changed only in the soleus. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  13. Protein kinase C activation and myosin light chain phosphorylation in 32P-labeled arterial smooth muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments using 32P-labeled strips of swine carotid artery medial smooth muscle were performed to define the relative contribution of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation as an activation mechanism mediating contractile responses stimulated by phorbol dibutyrate (PDB). Tryptic phosphopeptide mapping of phosphorylated MLC indicated that near-maximal force responses were associated with increases in functional MLC phosphorylation of less than 10% of the total MLC content following tonic (45 min) stimulation by PDB. Significant phosphorylation of MLC residues, consistent with the specificity of protein kinase C, occurred in response to high concentrations of PDB (greater than 0.1 microM). Histamine (10 microM)-induced MLC phosphorylation after 2 min (72.5% of total MLC) or 45 min (61.7%) was restricted to serine residues on peptides thought to contain serine19. Although agonist (histamine)-induced responses were eliminated under conditions of Ca2+ depletion, near-maximal force in response to 10 microM PDB (89.4% of a standard KCl response) was associated with monophosphorylation of less than 9% of the total MLC on peptides interpreted as containing serine19. A substantial fraction of this was localized to threonine residues. The quantitative analysis of the relation between PDB-stimulated force and the residues in MLC phosphorylated supports the concept that PDB stimulation results in activation of arterial smooth muscle cross bridges by MLC-phosphorylation-independent mechanisms

  14. Responses of Myosin Heavy Chain Phenotypes and Gene Expressions in Neck Muscle to Micro- an Hyper-Gravity in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Tomotaka; Ohira, Takashi; Kawano, F.; Shibaguchi, T.; Okabe, H.; Ohno, Y.; Nakai, N.; Ochiai, T.; Goto, K.; Ohira, Y.

    2013-02-01

    Neck muscles are known to play important roles in the maintenance of head posture against gravity. However, it is not known how the properties of neck muscle are influenced by gravity. Therefore, the current study was performed to investigate the responses of neck muscle (rhomboideus capitis) in mice to inhibition of gravity and/or increase to 2-G for 3 months to test the hypothesis that the properties of neck muscles are regulated in response to the level of mechanical load applied by the gravitational load. Three male wild type C57BL/10J mice (8 weeks old) were launched by space shuttle Discovery (STS-128) and housed in Japanese Experimental Module “KIBO” on the International Space Station in mouse drawer system (MDS) project, which was organized by Italian Space Agency. Only 1 mouse returned to the Earth alive after 3 months by space shuttle Atlantis (STS-129). Neck muscles were sampled from both sides within 3 hours after landing. Cage and laboratory control experiments were also performed on the ground. Further, 3-month ground-based control experiments were performed with 6 groups, i.e. pre-experiment, 3-month hindlimb suspension, 2-G exposure by using animal centrifuge, and vivarium control (n=5 each group). Five mice were allowed to recover from hindlimb suspension (including 5 cage control) for 3 months in the cage. Neck muscles were sampled bilaterally before and after 3-month suspension and 2-G exposure, and at the end of 3-month ambulation recovery. Spaceflight-associated shift of myosin heavy chain phenotype from type I to II and atrophy of type I fibers were observed. In response to spaceflight, 17 genes were up-regulated and 13 genes were down-regulated vs. those in the laboratory control. Expression of 6 genes were up-regulated and that of 88 genes were down-regulated by 3-month exposure to 2-G vs. the age-matched cage control. In response to chronic hindlimb suspension, 4 and 20 genes were up- or down-regulated. Further, 98 genes responded

  15. Cardiac troponin T and fast skeletal muscle denervation in ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zherong; Feng, Xin; Dong, Juan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Lee, Jingyun; Furdui, Cristina; Files, Daniel Clark; Beavers, Kristen M; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Milligan, Carolanne; Jin, Jian-Ping; Delbono, Osvaldo; Zhang, Tan

    2017-10-01

    Ageing skeletal muscle undergoes chronic denervation, and the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), the key structure that connects motor neuron nerves with muscle cells, shows increased defects with ageing. Previous studies in various species have shown that with ageing, type II fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibres show more atrophy and NMJ deterioration than type I slow-twitch fibres. However, how this process is regulated is largely unknown. A better understanding of the mechanisms regulating skeletal muscle fibre-type specific denervation at the NMJ could be critical to identifying novel treatments for sarcopenia. Cardiac troponin T (cTnT), the heart muscle-specific isoform of TnT, is a key component of the mechanisms of muscle contraction. It is expressed in skeletal muscle during early development, after acute sciatic nerve denervation, in various neuromuscular diseases and possibly in ageing muscle. Yet the subcellular localization and function of cTnT in skeletal muscle is largely unknown. Studies were carried out on isolated skeletal muscles from mice, vervet monkeys, and humans. Immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and mass spectrometry were used to analyse protein expression, real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to measure gene expression, immunofluorescence staining was performed for subcellular distribution assay of proteins, and electromyographic recording was used to analyse neurotransmission at the NMJ. Levels of cTnT expression in skeletal muscle increased with ageing in mice. In addition, cTnT was highly enriched at the NMJ region-but mainly in the fast-twitch, not the slow-twitch, muscle of old mice. We further found that the protein kinase A (PKA) RIα subunit was largely removed from, while PKA RIIα and RIIβ are enriched at, the NMJ-again, preferentially in fast-twitch but not slow-twitch muscle in old mice. Knocking down cTnT in fast skeletal muscle of old mice: (i) increased PKA RIα and reduced PKA RIIα at the NMJ; (ii

  16. Myonuclear domain size and myosin isoform expression in muscle fibres from mammals representing a 100,000-fold difference in body size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Xia; Höglund, Anna-Stina; Karlsson, Patrick; Lindblad, Joakim; Qaisar, Rizwan; Aare, Sudhakar; Bengtsson, Ewert; Larsson, Lars

    2009-01-01

    This comparative study of myonuclear domain (MND) size in mammalian species representing a 100,000-fold difference in body mass, ranging from 25 g to 2500 kg, was undertaken to improve our understanding of myonuclear organization in skeletal muscle fibres. Myonuclear domain size was calculated from three-dimensional reconstructions in a total of 235 single muscle fibre segments at a fixed sarcomere length. Irrespective of species, the largest MND size was observed in muscle fibres expressing fast myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms, but in the two smallest mammalian species studied (mouse and rat), MND size was not larger in the fast-twitch fibres expressing the IIA MyHC isofom than in the slow-twitch type I fibres. In the larger mammals, the type I fibres always had the smallest average MND size, but contrary to mouse and rat muscles, type IIA fibres had lower mitochondrial enzyme activities than type I fibres. Myonuclear domain size was highly dependent on body mass in the two muscle fibre types expressed in all species, i.e. types I and IIA. Myonuclear domain size increased in muscle fibres expressing both the beta/slow (type I; r = 0.84, P fast IIA MyHC isoform (r = 0.90; P muscle fibre type, independent of species. However, myosin isoform expression is not the sole protein determining MND size, and other protein systems, such as mitochondrial proteins, may be equally or more important determinants of MND size.

  17. Increased expression of Myosin binding protein H in the skeletal muscle of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients

    KAUST Repository

    Conti, Antonio; Riva, Nilo; Pesca, Mariasabina Sabina; Iannaccone, Sandro; Cannistraci, Carlo; Corbo, Massimo; Previtali, Stefano Carlo; Quattrini, Angelo; Alessio, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe and fatal neurodegenerative disease of still unknown pathogenesis. Recent findings suggest that the skeletal muscle may play an active pathogenetic role. To investigate ALS's pathogenesis and to seek

  18. A novel dynamic cardiac simulator utilizing pneumatic artificial muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Yan, Jie; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Li, Hongyi; Li, Changji

    2013-01-01

    With the development of methods and skills of minimally invasive surgeries, equipments for doctors' training and practicing are in high demands. Especially for the cardiovascular surgeries, operators are requested to be familiar with the surgical environment of a beating heart. In this paper, we present a new dynamic cardiac simulator utilizing pneumatic artificial muscle to realize heartbeat. It's an artificial left ventricular of which the inner chamber is made of thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) with an anatomical structure of the real human heart. It is covered by another layer of material forming the artificial muscle which actuates the systole and diastole uniformly and omnidirectionally as the cardiac muscle does. Preliminary experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the simulator. The results indicated that the pressure at the terminal of the aorta could be controlled within the range of normal human systolic pressure, which quantitatively validated the new actuating mode of the heart-beating is effective.

  19. Passive Repetitive Stretching for a Short Duration within a Week Increases Myogenic Regulatory Factors and Myosin Heavy Chain mRNA in Rats' Skeletal Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurie Kamikawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stretching is a stimulation of muscle growth. Stretching for hours or days has an effect on muscle hypertrophy. However, differences of continuous stretching and repetitive stretching to affect muscle growth are not well known. To clarify the difference of continuous and repetitive stretching within a short duration, we investigated the gene expression of muscle-related genes on stretched skeletal muscles. We used 8-week-old male Wistar rats ( for this study. Animals medial gastrocnemius muscle was stretched continuously or repetitively for 15 min daily and 4 times/week under anesthesia. After stretching, muscles were removed and total RNA was extracted. Then, reverse transcriptional quantitative real-time PCR was done to evaluate the mRNA expression of MyoD, myogenin, and embryonic myosin heavy chain (MyHC. Muscles, either stretched continuously or repetitively, increased mRNA expression of MyoD, myogenin, and embryonic MyHC more than unstretched muscles. Notably, repetitive stretching resulted in more substantial effects on embryonic MyHC gene expression than continuous stretching. In conclusion, passive stretching for a short duration within a week is effective in increasing myogenic factor expression, and repetitive stretching had more effects than continuous stretching for skeletal muscle on muscle growth. These findings are applicable in clinical muscle-strengthening therapy.

  20. Reduction in beta-myosin heavy chains in stunned myocardium as assessed by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, S C; Pomblum, V J; Gams, E; Rupp, H; Schipke, J D

    2007-09-01

    Myosin plays a key role in the structure and function of cardiac muscle. Three myosin isoenzymes (V(1), V(2), and V(3)) with different ATPase activities have been identified in mammalian ventricles based on their heavy chain constituents. The relative amount of myosin isoenzymes changes under physiological and pathological conditions. Until now, myosin isoenzymes have frequently been determined using either tube gel (nondenaturing) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), or gradient or uniform sodium dodecyl sulfate (denaturing) PAGE. Both methods have disadvantages, e.g., a long running time. We developed, therefore, a uniform, nondenaturing PAGE with slab minigel format for analyzing the myosin isoenzymes in normoxic and stunned rabbit hearts. In normoxic hearts of adult rabbits, V(3) predominated over V(1) (46 vs 41%). In turn, in the stunned hearts, V(1) predominated over V(3) (70 vs 30%), and the heterodimeric V(2) was not anymore detectable. This alteration appears to result from a selective loss of myosin heavy chain (MHC)-beta. In parallel, the biochemical markers troponin I and creatine kinase were increased in the stunned hearts. We suggest that alterations of myosin isoenzymes in stunned myocardium can be monitored with native PAGE. The present analysis of myosin isoenzyme appears thus as a new tool for evaluating defects in MHC dimer formation in postischemic hearts.

  1. Cardiac cachexia and muscle wasting: definition, physiopathology, and clinical consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okoshi MP

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Marina P Okoshi,1 Fernando G Romeiro,1 Paula F Martinez,1,2 Silvio A Oliveira Jr,1,2 Bertha F Polegato,1 Katashi Okoshi11Internal Medicine Department, Botucatu Medical School, Sao Paulo State University, UNESP, Sao Paulo, Brazil; 2School of Physiotherapy, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, BrazilAbstract: Cachexia and muscle wasting are frequently observed in heart failure patients. Cachexia is a predictor of reduced survival, independent of important parameters such as age, heart failure functional class, and functional capacity. Muscle and fat wasting can also predict adverse outcome during cardiac failure. Only more recently were these conditions defined in International Consensus. Considering that heart failure is an inflammatory disease, cardiac cachexia has been diagnosed by finding a body weight loss >5%, in the absence of other diseases and independent of other criteria. Muscle wasting has been defined as lean appendicular mass corrected for height squared of 2 standard deviations or more below the mean for healthy individuals between 20 years and 30 years old from the same ethnic group. The etiology of heart failure-associated cachexia and muscle wasting is multifactorial, and the underlying physiopathological mechanisms are not completely understood. The most important factors are reduced food intake, gastrointestinal alterations, immunological activation, neurohormonal abnormalities, and an imbalance between anabolic and catabolic processes. Cachexia and muscle wasting have clinical consequences in several organs and systems including the gastrointestinal and erythropoietic systems, and the heart, previously affected by the primary disease. We hope that a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in their physiopathology will allow the development of pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies to effectively prevent and treat heart failure-induced cachexia and muscle wasting before significant body

  2. Myosin content of single muscle fibers following short-term disuse and active recovery in young and old healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Lars G; Brocca, Lorenza; Ørtenblad, Niels

    2017-01-01

    healthy men. Following disuse, myosin content decreased (p... young and old in both fiber types, with MHC 2a fibers demonstrating an overshooting in young (+31%, pStrong correlations were observed between myosin content and single fiber SF in both young and old, with greater slope steepness in MHC 2a vs 1 fibers indicating an enhanced intrinsic...

  3. Dlc1 interaction with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9 and Rac1 activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad G. Sabbir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Deleted in liver cancer 1 (Dlc1 gene codes for a Rho GTPase-activating protein that also acts as a tumour suppressor gene. Several studies have consistently found that overexpression leads to excessive cell elongation, cytoskeleton changes and subsequent cell death. However, none of these studies have been able to satisfactorily explain the Dlc1-induced cell morphological phenotypes and the function of the different Dlc1 isoforms. Therefore, we have studied the interacting proteins associated with the three major Dlc1 transcriptional isoforms using a mass spectrometric approach in Dlc1 overexpressing cells. We have found and validated novel interacting partners in constitutive Dlc1-expressing cells. Our study has shown that Dlc1 interacts with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9, plectin and spectrin proteins in different multiprotein complexes. Overexpression of Dlc1 led to increased phosphorylation of Myh9 protein and activation of Rac1 GTPase. These data support a role for Dlc1 in induced cell elongation morphology and provide some molecular targets for further analysis of this phenotype.

  4. Differences in mitochondrial gene expression profiles, enzyme activities and myosin heavy chain types in yak versus bovine skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y Q; Xu, Y O; Yue, Y; Jin, S Y; Qu, Y; Dong, F; Li, Y P; Zheng, Y C

    2012-08-29

    Hypoxia can affect energy metabolism. We examined gene expression and enzyme activity related to mitochondrial energy metabolism, as well as myosin heavy chain (MyHC) types in yaks (Bos grunniens) living at high altitudes. Real-time quantitative PCR assays indicated that the yak has significantly lower levels of carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) mRNA in the biceps femoris and lower levels of uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) mRNA in both biceps femoris and longissimus dorsi than in Yellow cattle. No significant differences between yak and Yellow cattle were observed in the activities of mitochondrial β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase in the same muscles. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that the MyHC 1 mRNA levels in yak biceps femoris was lower than in Yellow cattle. We conclude that the yak has significantly lower mRNA levels of CPT, UCP3, and MyHC 1 in biceps femoris than in Yellow cattle, suggesting that the yak biceps femoris has lower fatty acid oxidation capacity and greater glycolytic metabolic potential.

  5. Effect of experimental hyperthyroidism on protein turnover in skeletal and cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, W J; Van Der Weijden Benjamin, W S; Faas, F H

    1980-10-01

    Since experimental hyperthyroidism reduces skeletal muscle mass while simultaneously increasing cardiac muscle mass, the effect of hyperthyroidism on muscle protein degradation was compared in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Pulse-labeling studies using (3H) leucine and (14C) carboxyl labeled aspartate and glutamate were carried out. Hyperthyroidism caused a 25%-29% increase in protein breakdown in both sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar fractions of skeletal muscle. Increased muscle protein degradation may be a major factor in the development of skeletal muscle wasting and weakness in hyperthyroidism. In contrast, protein breakdown appeared to be reduced 22% in the sarcoplasmic fraction of hyperthyroid heart muscle and was unchanged in the myofibrillar fraction. Possible reasons for the contrasting effects of hyperthyroidism on skeletal and cardiac muscle include increased sensitivity of the hyperthyroid heart to catecholamines, increased cardiac work caused by the hemodynamic effects of hyperthyroidism, and a different direct effect of thyroid hormone at the nuclear level in cardiac as opposed to skeletal muscle.

  6. Effects of a myosin-II inhibitor (N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide, BTS) on contractile characteristics of intact fast-twitch mammalian muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinniger, G J; Bruton, J D; Westerblad, H; Ranatunga, K W

    2005-01-01

    We have examined the effects of N-benzyl-p-toluene sulphonamide (BTS), a potent and specific inhibitor of fast muscle myosin-II, using small bundles of intact fibres or single fibres from rat foot muscle. BTS decreased tetanic tension reversibly in a concentration-dependent manner with half-maximal inhibition at approximately approximately 2 microM at 20 degrees C. The inhibition of tension with 10 microM BTS was marked at the three temperatures examined (10, 20 and 30 degrees C), but greatest at 10 degrees C. BTS decreased active muscle stiffness to a lesser extent than tetanic tension indicating that not all of the tension inhibition was due to a reduced number of attached cross-bridges. BTS-induced inhibition of active tension was not accompanied by any change in the free myoplasmic Ca2+ transients. The potency and specificity of BTS make it a very suitable myosin inhibitor for intact mammalian fast muscle and should be a useful tool for the examination of outstanding questions in muscle contraction.

  7. Drastic increase of myosin light chain MLC-2 in senescent skeletal muscle indicates fast-to-slow fibre transition in sarcopenia of old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Joan; Doran, Philip; Kirwan, Anne; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2009-11-01

    The age-dependent decline in skeletal muscle mass and function is believed to be due to a multi-factorial pathology and represents a major factor that blocks healthy aging by increasing physical disability, frailty and loss of independence in the elderly. This study has focused on the comparative proteomic analysis of contractile elements and revealed that the most striking age-related changes seem to occur in the protein family representing myosin light chains (MLCs). Comparative screening of total muscle extracts suggests a fast-to-slow transition in the aged MLC population. The mass spectrometric analysis of the myofibril-enriched fraction identified the MLC2 isoform of the slow-type MLC as the contractile protein with the most drastically changed expression during aging. Immunoblotting confirmed an increased abundance of slow MLC2, concomitant with a switch in fast versus slow myosin heavy chains. Staining of two-dimensional gels of crude extracts with the phospho-specific fluorescent dye ProQ-Diamond identified the increased MLC2 spot as a muscle protein with a drastically enhanced phosphorylation level in aged fibres. Comparative immunofluorescence microscopy, using antibodies to fast and slow myosin isoforms, confirmed a fast-to-slow transformation process during muscle aging. Interestingly, the dramatic increase in slow MLC2 expression was restricted to individual senescent fibres. These findings agree with the idea that aged skeletal muscles undergo a shift to more aerobic-oxidative metabolism in a slower-twitching fibre population and suggest the slow MLC2 isoform as a potential biomarker for fibre type shifting in sarcopenia of old age.

  8. Redox regulation of calcium release in skeletal and cardiac muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CECILIA HIDALGO

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In skeletal and cardiac muscle cells, specific isoforms of the Ryanodine receptor channels mediate Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. These channels are highly susceptible to redox modifications, which regulate channel activity. In this work, we studied the effects of Ca2+ (endogenous agonist and Mg2+ (endogenous inhibitor on the kinetics of Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from skeletal or cardiac mammalian muscle. Native skeletal vesicles exhibited maximal stimulation of release kinetics by 10-20 µM [Ca2+], whereas in native cardiac vesicles, maximal stimulation of release required only 1 µM [Ca2+]. In 10 µM [Ca2+], free [Mg2+] < 0.1 mM produced marked inhibition of release from skeletal vesicles but free [Mg2+] ­ 0.8 mM did not affect release from cardiac vesicles. Incubation of skeletal or cardiac vesicles with the oxidant thimerosal increased their susceptibility to stimulation by Ca2+ and decreased the inhibitory effect of Mg2+ in skeletal vesicles. Sulfhydryl-reducing agents fully reversed the effects of thimerosal. The endogenous redox species, glutathione disulfide and S-nitrosoglutathione, also stimulated release from skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. In 10 µM [Ca2+], 35S-nitrosoglutathione labeled a protein fraction enriched in release channels through S-glutathiolation. Free [Mg2+] 1 mM or decreasing free [Ca2+] to the nM range prevented this reaction. Possible physiological and pathological consequences of redox modification of release channels on Ca2+ signaling in heart and muscle cells are discussed

  9. Placental Growth Factor Promotes Cardiac Muscle Repair via Enhanced Neovascularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Zhang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs improves post-injury cardiac muscle repair using ill-defined mechanisms. Recently, we have shown that production and secretion of placental growth factor (PLGF by MSCs play a critical role in the MSCs-mediated post-injury cardiac muscle repair. In this study, we addressed the underlying molecular mechanisms, focusing specifically on the interactions between MSCs, macrophages and endothelial cells. Methods: We isolated macrophages (BM-MΦ from mouse bone-marrow derived cells based on F4/80 expression by flow cytometry. BM-MΦ were treated with different doses of PLGF. Cell number was analyzed by a MTT assay. Macrophage polarization was examined based on CD206 expression by flow cytometry. PLGF levels in macrophage subpopulations were analyzed by RT-qPCR and ELISA. Effects of macrophages on vascularization were evaluated by a collagen gel assay using Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs co-cultured with PLGF-treated macrophages. Results: PLGF did not increase macrophage number, but dose-dependently polarized macrophages into a M2 subpopulation. M2 macrophages expressed high levels of PLGF. PLGF-polarized M2 macrophages significantly increased tubular structures in the collagen gel assay. Conclusion: Our data suggest that MSCs-derived PLGF may induce macrophage polarization into a M2 subpopulation, which in turn releases more PLGF to promote local neovascularization for augmenting post-injury cardiac muscle repair. This study thus sheds novel light on the role of PLGF in cardiac muscle regeneration.

  10. In utero undernutrition programs skeletal and cardiac muscle metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany eBeauchamp

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In utero undernutrition is associated with increased risk for insulin resistance, obesity, and cardiovascular disease during adult life. A common phenotype associated with low birth weight is reduced skeletal muscle mass. Given the central role of skeletal muscle in whole body metabolism, alterations in its mass as well as its metabolic characteristics may contribute to disease risk. This review highlights the metabolic alterations in cardiac and skeletal muscle associated with in utero undernutrition and low birth weight. These tissues have high metabolic demands and are known to be sites of major metabolic dysfunction in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Recent research demonstrates that mitochondrial energetics are decreased in skeletal and cardiac muscles of adult offspring from undernourished mothers. These effects apparently lead to the development of a thrifty phenotype, which may represent overall a compensatory mechanism programmed in utero to handle times of limited nutrient availability. However, in an environment characterized by food abundance, the effects are maladaptive and increase adulthood risks of metabolic disease.

  11. Genes influenced by the non-muscle isoform of Myosin light chain kinase impact human cancer prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhou

    Full Text Available The multifunctional non-muscle isoform of myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK is critical to the rapid dynamic coordination of the cytoskeleton involved in cancer cell proliferation and migration. We identified 45 nmMLCK-influenced genes by bioinformatic filtering of genome-wide expression in wild type and nmMLCK knockout (KO mice exposed to preclinical models of murine acute inflammatory lung injury, pathologies that are well established to include nmMLCK as an essential participant. To determine whether these nmMLCK-influenced genes were relevant to human cancers, the 45 mouse genes were matched to 38 distinct human orthologs (M38 signature (GeneCards definition and underwent Kaplan-Meier survival analysis in training and validation cohorts. These studies revealed that in training cohorts, the M38 signature successfully identified cancer patients with poor overall survival in breast cancer (P<0.001, colon cancer (P<0.001, glioma (P<0.001, and lung cancer (P<0.001. In validation cohorts, the M38 signature demonstrated significantly reduced overall survival for high-score patients of breast cancer (P = 0.002, colon cancer (P = 0.035, glioma (P = 0.023, and lung cancer (P = 0.023. The association between M38 risk score and overall survival was confirmed by univariate Cox proportional hazard analysis of overall survival in the both training and validation cohorts. This study, providing a novel prognostic cancer gene signature derived from a murine model of nmMLCK-associated lung inflammation, strongly supports nmMLCK-involved pathways in tumor growth and progression in human cancers and nmMLCK as an attractive candidate molecular target in both inflammatory and neoplastic processes.

  12. Multiple skeletal muscle metastases revealing a cardiac intimal sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crombe, Amandine [Institut Bergonie, Department of Radiology, Bordeaux (France); Lintingre, Pierre-Francois; Dallaudiere, Benjamin [Clinique du Sport de Bordeaux-Merignac, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Merignac (France); Le Loarer, Francois [Institut Bergonie, Department of Pathology, Bordeaux (France); Lachatre, Denis [Dupuytren University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Limoges (France)

    2018-01-15

    We report the case of a 59-year-old female with progressive bilateral painful swelling of the thighs. MRI revealed multiple intramuscular necrotic masses with similar morphologic patterns. Whole-body CT and 18-FDG PET-CT scans demonstrated additional hypermetabolic muscular masses and a lobulated lesion within the left atrial cavity. As biopsy of a muscular mass was compatible with a poorly differentiated sarcoma with MDM2 oncogene amplification, two diagnoses were discussed: a dedifferentiated liposarcoma with muscle and heart metastases or a primary cardiac sarcoma, mainly a cardiac intimal sarcoma, with muscular metastases, which was finally confirmed by array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) in a sarcoma reference center. This case emphasizes the potential for intimal sarcoma to disseminate in skeletal muscle prior to any other organ and the need for a genomic approach in addition to classical radiopathologic analyses to distinguish primary from secondary locations facing simultaneous tumors of the heart and skeletal muscles with MDM2 amplification. (orig.)

  13. Increased cardiac alpha-myosin heavy chain in left atria and decreased myocardial insulin-like growth factor (Igf-I) expression accompany low heart rate in hibernating grizzly bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, N D; Nelson, O L; Robbins, C T; Rourke, B C

    2011-01-01

    Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) tolerate extended periods of extremely low heart rate during hibernation without developing congestive heart failure or cardiac chamber dilation. Left ventricular atrophy and decreased left ventricular compliance have been reported in this species during hibernation. We evaluated the myocardial response to significantly reduced heart rate during hibernation by measuring relative myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform expression and expression of a set of genes important to muscle plasticity and mass regulation in the left atria and left ventricles of active and hibernating bears. We supplemented these data with measurements of systolic and diastolic function via echocardiography in unanesthetized grizzly bears. Atrial strain imaging revealed decreased atrial contractility, decreased expansion/reservoir function (increased atrial stiffness), and decreased passive-filling function (increased ventricular stiffness) in hibernating bears. Relative MyHC-α protein expression increased significantly in the atrium during hibernation. The left ventricle expressed 100% MyHC-β protein in both groups. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) mRNA expression was reduced by ∼50% in both chambers during hibernation, consistent with the ventricular atrophy observed in these bears. Interestingly, mRNA expression of the atrophy-related ubiquitin ligases Muscle Atrophy F-box (MAFBx) and Muscle Ring Finger 1 did not increase, nor did expression of myostatin or hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α). We report atrium-specific decreases of 40% and 50%, respectively, in MAFBx and creatine kinase mRNA expression during hibernation. Decreased creatine kinase expression is consistent with lowered energy requirements and could relate to reduced atrial emptying function during hibernation. Taken together with our hemodynamic assessment, these data suggest a potential downregulation of atrial chamber function during hibernation to prevent fatigue and dilation

  14. Effects of chronic Akt/mTOR inhibition by rapamycin on mechanical overload-induced hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain transition in masseter muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeki, Daisuke; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Mototani, Yasumasa; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Fujita, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshiki; Saeki, Yasutake; Okumura, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    To examine the effects of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway on masseter muscle hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain (MHC) transition in response to mechanical overload, we analyzed the effects of bite-opening (BO) on the hypertrophy and MHC composition of masseter muscle of BO-rats treated or not treated with rapamycin (RAPA), a selective mTOR inhibitor. The masseter muscle weight in BO-rats was significantly greater than that in controls, and this increase was attenuated by RAPA treatment. Expression of slow-twitch MHC isoforms was significantly increased in BO-rats with/without RAPA treatment, compared with controls, but the magnitude of the increase was much smaller in RAPA-treated BO-rats. Phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK (ERK1/2), which preserves fast-twitch MHC isoforms in skeletal muscle, was significantly decreased in BO-rats, but the decrease was abrogated by RAPA treatment. Calcineurin signaling is known to be important for masseter muscle hypertrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition, but expression of known calcineurin activity modulators was unaffected by RAPA treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that the Akt/mTOR pathway is involved in both development of masseter muscle hypertrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition in response to mechanical overload with inhibition of the ERK1/2 pathway and operates independently of the calcineurin pathway.

  15. Myosin Binding Protein-C Slow Phosphorylation is Altered in Duchenne Dystrophy and Arthrogryposis Myopathy in Fast-Twitch Skeletal Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Maegen A; Ward, Christopher W; Gurnett, Christina; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, Aikaterini

    2015-08-19

    Myosin Binding Protein-C slow (sMyBP-C), encoded by MYBPC1, comprises a family of regulatory proteins of skeletal muscles that are phosphorylated by PKA and PKC. MYBPC1 missense mutations are linked to the development of Distal Arthrogryposis-1 (DA-1). Although structure-function details for this myopathy are evolving, function is undoubtedly driven by sequence variations and post-translational modifications in sMyBP-C. Herein, we examined the phosphorylation profile of sMyBP-C in mouse and human fast-twitch skeletal muscles. We used Flexor Digitorum Brevis (FDB) isolated from young (~2-months old) and old (~14-months old) wild type and mdx mice, and human Abductor Hallucis (AH) and gastrocnemious muscles carrying the DA-1 mutations. Our results indicate both constitutive and differential phosphorylation of sMyBP-C in aged and diseased muscles. We report a 7-35% reduction in the phosphorylation levels of select sites in old wild type and young or old mdx FDB mouse muscles, compared to young wild type tissue. Similarly, we observe a 30-70% decrease in the phosphorylation levels of all PKA and PKC phospho-sites in the DA-1 AH, but not gastrocnemius, muscle. Overall, our studies show that the phosphorylation pattern of sMyBP-C is differentially regulated in response to age and disease, suggesting that phosphorylation plays important roles in these processes.

  16. Effects of growth hormone on morphology of cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle and hormone levels in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ping; Liu Cong; Meng Fanbo; Zhu Jinming; Ni Jinsong; Zhou Hong; Tang Yubo

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of growth hormone (GH) on morphology of cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle and hormone levels in Wistar rats. Methods: The GH was given with subcutaneous injection for 15 days, the level of serum GH was determined by radiation-immune method; the body weight and the ratio of organ weight to body weight were determined; the cell appearances of cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle were observed under microscope. the control group was set up. Results; The level of serum GH and rat body weight in experimental group were obviously higher than that in the control group, but the ratio of organ weight to body weight was not obviously different in two groups; musculature hypertrophy and cell nucleolus increasing were observed under microscopy, there were no capillary vessel hyperplasia and inflammatory soakage. Conclusion: GH can induce hypertrophy of cardiac muscle cells and skeletal muscle cells but not interstitial proliferation. (authors)

  17. The HCM-linked W792R mutation in cardiac myosin-binding protein C reduces C6 FnIII domain stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelter, Dan F; de Lange, Willem J; Cai, Wenxuan; Ge, Ying; Ralphe, J Carter

    2018-06-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is a functional sarcomeric protein that regulates contractility in response to contractile demand, and many mutations in cMyBP-C lead to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). To gain insight into the effects of disease-causing cMyBP-C missense mutations on contractile function, we expressed the pathogenic W792R mutation (substitution of a highly conserved tryptophan residue by an arginine residue at position 792) in mouse cardiomyocytes lacking endogenous cMyBP-C and studied the functional effects using three-dimensional engineered cardiac tissue constructs (mECTs). Based on complete conservation of tryptophan at this location in fibronectin type II (FnIII) domains, we hypothesized that the W792R mutation affects folding of the C6 FnIII domain, destabilizing the mutant protein. Adenoviral transduction of wild-type (WT) and W792R cDNA achieved equivalent mRNA transcript abundance, but not equivalent protein levels, with W792R compared with WT controls. mECTs expressing W792R demonstrated abnormal contractile kinetics compared with WT mECTs that were nearly identical to cMyBP-C-deficient mECTs. We studied whether common pathways of protein degradation were responsible for the rapid degradation of W792R cMyBP-C. Inhibition of both ubiquitin-proteasome and lysosomal degradation pathways failed to increase full-length mutant protein abundance to WT equivalence, suggesting rapid cytosolic degradation. Bacterial expression of WT and W792R protein fragments demonstrated decreased mutant stability with altered thermal denaturation and increased susceptibility to trypsin digestion. These data suggest that the W792R mutation destabilizes the C6 FnIII domain of cMyBP-C, resulting in decreased full-length protein expression. This study highlights the vulnerability of FnIII-like domains to mutations that alter domain stability and further indicates that missense mutations in cMyBP-C can cause disease through a mechanism of

  18. Immunolabelling, histochemistry and in situ hybridisation in human skeletal muscle fibres to detect myosin heavy chain expression at the protein and mRNA level

    Science.gov (United States)

    SERRANO, A. L.; PÉREZ, MARGARITA; LUCÍA, A.; CHICHARRO, J. L.; QUIROZ-ROTHE, E.; RIVERO, J. L. L.

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of muscle fibres classified on the basis of their content of different myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms was analysed in vastus lateralis muscle biopsies of 15 young men (with an average age of 22 y) by correlating immunohistochemistry with specific anti-MHC monoclonal antibodies, myofibrillar ATPase (mATPase) histochemistry and in situ hybridisation with probes specific for MHC β-slow, MHC-IIA and MHC-IIX. The characterisation of a large number of individual fibres was compared and correlated on a fibre-to-fibre basis. The panel of monoclonal antibodies used in the study allowed classification of human skeletal muscle fibres into 5 categories according to the MHC isoform they express at the protein level, types I, I+IIA, IIA, IIAX and IIX. Hybrid fibres coexpressing two isoforms represented a considerable proportion of the fibre composition (about 14%) and were clearly underestimated by mATPase histochemistry. For a very high percentage of fibres there was a precise correspondence between the MHC protein isoforms and mRNA transcripts. The integrated methods used demonstrate a high degree of precision of the immunohistochemical procedure used for the identification and quantification of human skeletal muscle fibre types. The monoclonal antibody S5-8H2 is particularly useful for identifying hybrid IIAX fibres. This protocol offers new prospects for muscle fibre classification in human experimental studies. PMID:11554510

  19. Functional Effects of Hyperthyroidism on Cardiac Papillary Muscle in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabricio Furtado Vieira

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Hyperthyroidism is currently recognized to affect the cardiovascular system, leading to a series of molecular and functional changes. However, little is known about the functional influence of hyperthyroidism in the regulation of cytoplasmic calcium and on the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX in the cardiac muscle. Objectives: To evaluate the functional changes in papillary muscles isolated from animals with induced hyperthyroidism. Methods: We divided 36 Wistar rats into a group of controls and another of animals with hyperthyroidism induced by intraperitoneal T3 injection. We measured in the animals' papillary muscles the maximum contraction force, speed of contraction (+df/dt and relaxation (-df/dt, contraction and relaxation time, contraction force at different concentrations of extracellular sodium, post-rest potentiation (PRP, and contraction force induced by caffeine. Results: In hyperthyroid animals, we observed decreased PRP at all rest times (p < 0.05, increased +df/dt and -df/dt (p < 0.001, low positive inotropic response to decreased concentration of extracellular sodium (p < 0.001, reduction of the maximum force in caffeine-induced contraction (p < 0.003, and decreased total contraction time (p < 0.001. The maximal contraction force did not differ significantly between groups (p = 0.973. Conclusion: We hypothesize that the changes observed are likely due to a decrease in calcium content in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, caused by calcium leakage, decreased expression of NCX, and increased expression of a-MHC and SERCA2.

  20. Functional Effects of Hyperthyroidism on Cardiac Papillary Muscle in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Fabricio Furtado; Olivoto, Robson Ruiz; Silva, Priscyla Oliveira da; Francisco, Julio Cesar; Fogaça, Rosalvo Tadeu Hochmuller

    2016-12-01

    Hyperthyroidism is currently recognized to affect the cardiovascular system, leading to a series of molecular and functional changes. However, little is known about the functional influence of hyperthyroidism in the regulation of cytoplasmic calcium and on the sodium/calcium exchanger (NCX) in the cardiac muscle. To evaluate the functional changes in papillary muscles isolated from animals with induced hyperthyroidism. We divided 36 Wistar rats into a group of controls and another of animals with hyperthyroidism induced by intraperitoneal T3 injection. We measured in the animals' papillary muscles the maximum contraction force, speed of contraction (+df/dt) and relaxation (-df/dt), contraction and relaxation time, contraction force at different concentrations of extracellular sodium, post-rest potentiation (PRP), and contraction force induced by caffeine. In hyperthyroid animals, we observed decreased PRP at all rest times (p < 0.05), increased +df/dt and -df/dt (p < 0.001), low positive inotropic response to decreased concentration of extracellular sodium (p < 0.001), reduction of the maximum force in caffeine-induced contraction (p < 0.003), and decreased total contraction time (p < 0.001). The maximal contraction force did not differ significantly between groups (p = 0.973). We hypothesize that the changes observed are likely due to a decrease in calcium content in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, caused by calcium leakage, decreased expression of NCX, and increased expression of a-MHC and SERCA2.

  1. Exercise training in Tgαq*44 mice during the progression of chronic heart failure: cardiac vs. peripheral (soleus muscle) impairments to oxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Bruno; Majerczak, Joanna; Bardi, Eleonora; Buso, Alessia; Comelli, Marina; Chlopicki, Stefan; Guzik, Magdalena; Mavelli, Irene; Nieckarz, Zenon; Salvadego, Desy; Tyrankiewicz, Urszula; Skórka, Tomasz; Bottinelli, Roberto; Zoladz, Jerzy A; Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta

    2017-08-01

    Cardiac function, skeletal (soleus) muscle oxidative metabolism, and the effects of exercise training were evaluated in a transgenic murine model (Tgα q *44) of chronic heart failure during the critical period between the occurrence of an impairment of cardiac function and the stage at which overt cardiac failure ensues (i.e., from 10 to 12 mo of age). Forty-eight Tgα q *44 mice and 43 wild-type FVB controls were randomly assigned to control groups and to groups undergoing 2 mo of intense exercise training (spontaneous running on an instrumented wheel). In mice evaluated at the beginning and at the end of training we determined: exercise performance (mean distance covered daily on the wheel); cardiac function in vivo (by magnetic resonance imaging); soleus mitochondrial respiration ex vivo (by high-resolution respirometry); muscle phenotype [myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform content; citrate synthase (CS) activity]; and variables related to the energy status of muscle fibers [ratio of phosphorylated 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to unphosphorylated AMPK] and mitochondrial biogenesis and function [peroxisome proliferative-activated receptor-γ coactivator-α (PGC-1α)]. In the untrained Tgα q *44 mice functional impairments of exercise performance, cardiac function, and soleus muscle mitochondrial respiration were observed. The impairment of mitochondrial respiration was related to the function of complex I of the respiratory chain, and it was not associated with differences in CS activity, MHC isoforms, p-AMPK/AMPK, and PGC-1α levels. Exercise training improved exercise performance and cardiac function, but it did not affect mitochondrial respiration, even in the presence of an increased percentage of type 1 MHC isoforms. Factors "upstream" of mitochondria were likely mainly responsible for the improved exercise performance. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Functional impairments in exercise performance, cardiac function, and soleus muscle mitochondrial respiration

  2. Influence of injection of Chinese botulinum toxin type A on the histomorphology and myosin heavy chain composition of rat gastrocnemius muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bin; Chen, Min; Hu, Xing-yue

    2013-11-01

    Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) is a metalloprotease that blocks synaptic transmission via the cleavage of a synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25). It has gained widespread use as a treatment for cerebral palsy and skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In China, Chinese botulinum toxin type A (CBTX-A), a type of BoNT/A, is in widespread clinical use. However, the changes in the morphological and biochemical properties of treated muscles and in remote muscles from the CBTX-A injection site are relatively unknown. Therefore, we investigated the changes in histomorphology and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform composition and distribution in rat gastrocnemius muscles after intramuscular injection of CBTX-A. The weakness of the injected muscles was assessed periodically to identify their functional deficiency. Muscle slices were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase). MyHC isoform composition was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) to uncover changes in morphological and biochemical properties. Our findings demonstrate that following injection of CBTX-A 5 U into rat gastrocnemius muscles, shifts in MyHC isoform composition emerged on the third day after injection and peaked in the fourth week. The composition remained distinctly different from that of the control group after the twelfth week. More specifically, there was a decrease in the proportion of the type IIb isoform and an increase in the proportions of type IIx, type IIa, and type I isoforms. Data revealed that CBTX-A led to a shift in MyHC composition towards slower isoforms and that the MyHC composition remained far from normal six months after a single injection. However, no noticeable remote muscle weakness was induced.

  3. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration: are all mitochondria created equal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Song-Young; Gifford, Jayson R; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Trinity, Joel D; Hyngstrom, John R; Garten, Ryan S; Diakos, Nikolaos A; Ives, Stephen J; Dela, Flemming; Larsen, Steen; Drakos, Stavros; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-08-01

    Unlike cardiac and skeletal muscle, little is known about vascular smooth muscle mitochondrial respiration. Therefore, the present study examined mitochondrial respiratory rates in smooth muscle of healthy human feed arteries and compared with that of healthy cardiac and skeletal muscles. Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscles were harvested from a total of 22 subjects (53 ± 6 yr), and mitochondrial respiration was assessed in permeabilized fibers. Complex I + II, state 3 respiration, an index of oxidative phosphorylation capacity, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (54 ± 1, 39 ± 4, and 15 ± 1 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P respiration rates were normalized by CS (respiration per mitochondrial content), oxidative phosphorylation capacity was no longer different between the three muscle types. Interestingly, complex I state 2 normalized for CS activity, an index of nonphosphorylating respiration per mitochondrial content, increased progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles, such that the respiratory control ratio, state 3/state 2 respiration, fell progressively from cardiac to skeletal to smooth muscles (5.3 ± 0.7, 3.2 ± 0.4, and 1.6 ± 0.3 pmol·s(-1)·mg(-1), P respiration highlight the existence of intrinsic functional differences between these muscle mitochondria. This likely influences the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation and could potentially alter ROS production.

  4. Genotype phenotype correlations of cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain mutations in Indian patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Taranjit Singh; Ahmad, Shamim; Bahl, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine the frequency of mutations in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) in a cohort of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and their families, and to investigate correlations between genotype and phenotype. About 130...... consecutive patients diagnosed with HCM or DCM (69 with HCM and 61 with DCM) attending the cardiology clinic of Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research were screened for mutations in the MYH7 gene. The control group for genetic studies consisted of 100 healthy subjects. We report 14...... mutations in 6 probands (5 probands in HCM and 1 proband in DCM) and their family members. Out of these 6 mutations, 3 are new and are being reported for the first time. One known mutation (p.Gly716Arg) was found to be "de novo" which resulted in severe asymmetric septal hypertrophy (31 mm) and resulted...

  5. The Correlation of Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle Dysfunction in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Andrew D; Soslow, Jonathan H; Burnette, W Bryan; Bian, Aihua; Shintani, Ayumi; Sawyer, Douglas B; Markham, Larry W

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by progressive skeletal muscle and cardiac dysfunction. While skeletal muscle dysfunction precedes cardiomyopathy, the relationship between the progressive decline in skeletal and cardiac muscle function is unclear. This relationship is especially important given that the myocardial effects of many developing DMD therapies are largely unknown. Our objective was to assess the relationship between progression of skeletal muscle weakness and onset of cardiac dysfunction in DMD. A total of 77 DMD subjects treated at a single referral center were included. Demographic information, quantitative muscle testing (QMT), subjective muscle strength, cardiac function, and current and retrospective medications were collected. A Spearman rank correlation was used to evaluate for an association between subjective strength and fractional shortening. The effects of total QMT and arm QMT on fractional shortening were examined in generalized least square with and without adjustments for age, ambulatory status, and duration of corticosteroids and cardiac specific medications. We found a significant correlation between maintained subjective skeletal muscle arm and leg strength and maintained cardiac function as defined by fractional shortening (rho=0.47, p=0.004 and rho=0.48, p=0.003, respectively). We also found a significant association between QMT and fractional shortening among non-ambulatory DMD subjects (p=0.03), while this association was not significant in ambulatory subjects. Our findings allow us to conclude that in this population, there exists a significant relationship between skeletal muscle and cardiac function in non-ambulatory DMD patients. While this does not imply a causal relationship, a possible association between skeletal and cardiac muscle function suggests that researchers should carefully monitor cardiac function, even when the primary outcome measures are not cardiac in nature.

  6. Effects of hypothyroidism on myosin heavy chain composition and fibre types of fast skeletal muscles in a small marsupial, Antechinus flavipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Wendy W H; Withers, Kerry W; Hoh, Joseph F Y

    2010-04-01

    Effects of drug-induced hypothyroidism on myosin heavy chain (MyHC) content and fibre types of fast skeletal muscles were studied in a small marsupial, Antechinus flavipes. SDS-PAGE of MyHCs from the tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius revealed four isoforms, 2B, 2X, 2A and slow, in that order of decreasing abundance. After 5 weeks treatment with methimazole, the functionally fastest 2B MyHC significantly decreased, while 2X, 2A and slow MyHCs increased. Immunohistochemistry using monospecific antibodies to each of the four MyHCs revealed decreased 2b and 2x fibres, and increased 2a and hybrid fibres co-expressing two or three MyHCs. In the normally homogeneously fast superficial regions of these muscles, evenly distributed slow-staining fibres appeared, resembling the distribution of slow primary myotubes in fast muscles during development. Hybrid fibres containing 2A and slow MyHCs were virtually absent. These results are more detailed but broadly similar to the earlier studies on eutherians. We hypothesize that hypothyroidism essentially reverses the effects of thyroid hormone on MyHC gene expression of muscle fibres during myogenesis, which differ according to the developmental origin of the fibre: it induces slow MyHC expression in 2b fibres derived from fast primary myotubes, and shifts fast MyHC expression in fibres of secondary origin towards 2A, but not slow, MyHC.

  7. Tissue-specific and substrate-specific mitochondrial bioenergetics in feline cardiac and skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Liselotte Bruun; Dela, Flemming; Koch, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    fibers. Biopsies of left ventricular cardiac muscle and soleus muscle, a type I-rich oxidative skeletal muscle, were obtained from 15 healthy domestic cats. Enzymatic activity of citrate synthase (CS), a biomarker of mitochondrial content, was measured. Mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity with various kinds...

  8. Coupling between myosin head conformation and the thick filament backbone structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongjun; Taylor, Dianne W; Edwards, Robert J; Taylor, Kenneth A

    2017-12-01

    The recent high-resolution structure of the thick filament from Lethocerus asynchronous flight muscle shows aspects of thick filament structure never before revealed that may shed some light on how striated muscles function. The phenomenon of stretch activation underlies the function of asynchronous flight muscle. It is most highly developed in flight muscle, but is also observed in other striated muscles such as cardiac muscle. Although stretch activation is likely to be complex, involving more than a single structural aspect of striated muscle, the thick filament itself, would be a prime site for regulatory function because it must bear all of the tension produced by both its associated myosin motors and any externally applied force. Here we show the first structural evidence that the arrangement of myosin heads within the interacting heads motif is coupled to the structure of the thick filament backbone. We find that a change in helical angle of 0.16° disorders the blocked head preferentially within the Lethocerus interacting heads motif. This observation suggests a mechanism for how tension affects the dynamics of the myosin heads leading to a detailed hypothesis for stretch activation and shortening deactivation, in which the blocked head preferentially binds the thin filament followed by the free head when force production occurs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of myosin heavy chain mRNAs, protein isoforms and fiber type proportions in the rat slow and fast muscles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žurmanová, J.; Soukup, Tomáš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 4 (2013), s. 445-453 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/1228; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB12SK158; GA MŠk(CZ) LH12058 Grant - others:EC(XE) LSH-CT-2004-511978 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : rat * soleus * extensor digitorum longus * myosin heavy chain isoforms * muscle gene expression * quantitative Real Time RT-PCR * SDS - PAGE * fiber type analysis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.487, year: 2013

  10. The muscle contraction mode determines lymphangiogenesis differentially in rat skeletal and cardiac muscles by modifying local lymphatic extracellular matrix microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiwe, L; Vinck, M; Suhr, F

    2016-05-01

    Lymphatic vessels are of special importance for tissue homeostasis, and increases of their density may foster tissue regeneration. Exercise could be a relevant tool to increase lymphatic vessel density (LVD); however, a significant lack of knowledge remains to understand lymphangiogenesis in skeletal muscles upon training. Interestingly, training-induced lymphangiogenesis has never been studied in the heart. We studied lymphangiogenesis and LVD upon chronic concentric and chronic eccentric muscle contractions in both rat skeletal (Mm. Edl and Sol) and cardiac muscles. We found that LVD decreased in both skeletal muscles specifically upon eccentric training, while this contraction increased LVD in cardiac tissue. These observations were supported by opposing local remodelling of lymphatic vessel-specific extracellular matrix components in skeletal and cardiac muscles and protein levels of lymphatic markers (Lyve-1, Pdpn, Vegf-C/D). Confocal microscopy further revealed transformations of lymphatic vessels into vessels expressing both blood (Cav-1) and lymphatic (Vegfr-3) markers upon eccentric training specifically in skeletal muscles. In addition and phenotype supportive, we found increased inflammation (NF-κB/p65, Il-1β, Ifn-γ, Tnf-α and MPO(+) cells) in eccentrically stressed skeletal, but decreased levels in cardiac muscles. Our data provide novel mechanistic insights into lymphangiogenic processes in skeletal and cardiac muscles upon chronic muscle contraction modes and demonstrate that both tissues adapt in opposing manners specifically to eccentric training. These data are highly relevant for clinical applications, because eccentric training serves as a sufficient strategy to increase LVD and to decrease inflammation in cardiac tissue, for example in order to reduce tissue abortion in transplantation settings. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The effect of malaria and anti-malarial drugs on skeletal and cardiac muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrelli, Mauro Toledo; Brotto, Marco

    2016-11-02

    Malaria remains one of the most important infectious diseases in the world, being a significant public health problem associated with poverty and it is one of the main obstacles to the economy of an endemic country. Among the several complications, the effects of malaria seem to target the skeletal muscle system, leading to symptoms, such as muscle aches, muscle contractures, muscle fatigue, muscle pain, and muscle weakness. Malaria cause also parasitic coronary artery occlusion. This article reviews the current knowledge regarding the effect of malaria disease and the anti-malarial drugs on skeletal and cardiac muscles. Research articles and case report publications that addressed aspects that are important for understanding the involvement of malaria parasites and anti-malarial therapies affecting skeletal and cardiac muscles were analysed and their findings summarized. Sequestration of red blood cells, increased levels of serum creatine kinase and reduced muscle content of essential contractile proteins are some of the potential biomarkers of the damage levels of skeletal and cardiac muscles. These biomarkers might be useful for prevention of complications and determining the effectiveness of interventions designed to protect cardiac and skeletal muscles from malaria-induced damage.

  12. Skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain isoform content in relation to gonadal hormones and anabolic-catabolic balance in trained and untrained men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandys, Marcin; Majerczak, Joanna; Karasinski, Janusz; Kulpa, Jan; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2012-12-01

    Gonadal hormones and anabolic-catabolic hormone balance have potent influence on skeletal muscle tissue, but little is known about their action with regard to myosin heavy chain (MHC) transformation in humans. We investigated the relationship between skeletal muscle MHC isoform content in the vastus lateralis muscle and basal testosterone (T) concentration in 3 groups of subjects: endurance trained (E), sprint/strength trained (S), and untrained (U) young men. We have also determined basal sex hormone-binding globulin and cortisol (C) concentrations in untrained subjects to examine the relationship between MHC composition and the anabolic-catabolic hormone balance. Moreover, basal free testosterone (fT) and bioavailable testosterone (bio-T) concentrations were calculated for this subgroup. Despite significant differences in MHC isoform content (69.4 ± 2.39%, 61.4 ± 8.04%, and 37.5 ± 13.80% of MHC-2 for groups S, U, and E, respectively, Kruskal-Wallis: H = 18.58, p 0.5). We have also found that in the U group, type 2 MHC in the vastus lateralis muscle is positively correlated with basal fT:C ratio (r = 0.63, p = 0.01). It is concluded that the differences in the training history and training specificity can be distinguished with regard to the MHC composition but not with regard to the basal T concentration. Simultaneously, it has been shown that MHC isoform content in human vastus lateralis muscle may be related to basal anabolic-catabolic hormone balance, and this hypothesis needs further investigation.

  13. Myostatin from the heart: local and systemic actions in cardiac failure and muscle wasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbart, Astrid; Auger-Messier, Mannix; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2011-01-01

    A significant proportion of heart failure patients develop skeletal muscle wasting and cardiac cachexia, which is associated with a very poor prognosis. Recently, myostatin, a cytokine from the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family and a known strong inhibitor of skeletal muscle growth, has been identified as a direct mediator of skeletal muscle atrophy in mice with heart failure. Myostatin is mainly expressed in skeletal muscle, although basal expression is also detectable in heart and adipose tissue. During pathological loading of the heart, the myocardium produces and secretes myostatin into the circulation where it inhibits skeletal muscle growth. Thus, genetic elimination of myostatin from the heart reduces skeletal muscle atrophy in mice with heart failure, whereas transgenic overexpression of myostatin in the heart is capable of inducing muscle wasting. In addition to its endocrine action on skeletal muscle, cardiac myostatin production also modestly inhibits cardiomyocyte growth under certain circumstances, as well as induces cardiac fibrosis and alterations in ventricular function. Interestingly, heart failure patients show elevated myostatin levels in their serum. To therapeutically influence skeletal muscle wasting, direct inhibition of myostatin was shown to positively impact skeletal muscle mass in heart failure, suggesting a promising strategy for the treatment of cardiac cachexia in the future. PMID:21421824

  14. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsic, Nikola; Mamaeva, Daria; Lamb, Ned J; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-04-01

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal beta III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders.

  15. Muscle-derived stem cells isolated as non-adherent population give rise to cardiac, skeletal muscle and neural lineages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsic, Nikola; Mamaeva, Daria; Lamb, Ned J.; Fernandez, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells with the ability to differentiate in specialized cell types can be extracted from a wide array of adult tissues including skeletal muscle. Here we have analyzed a population of cells isolated from skeletal muscle on the basis of their poor adherence on uncoated or collagen-coated dishes that show multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. When analysed under proliferative conditions, these cells express stem cell surface markers Sca-1 (65%) and Bcrp-1 (80%) but also MyoD (15%), Neuronal β III-tubulin (25%), GFAP (30%) or Nkx2.5 (1%). Although capable of growing as non-attached spheres for months, when given an appropriate matrix, these cells adhere giving rise to skeletal muscle, neuronal and cardiac muscle cell lineages. A similar cell population could not be isolated from either bone marrow or cardiac tissue suggesting their specificity to skeletal muscle. When injected into damaged muscle, these non-adherent muscle-derived cells are retrieved expressing Pax7, in a sublaminar position characterizing satellite cells and participate in forming new myofibers. These data show that a non-adherent stem cell population can be specifically isolated and expanded from skeletal muscle and upon attachment to a matrix spontaneously differentiate into muscle, cardiac and neuronal lineages in vitro. Although competing with resident satellite cells, these cells are shown to significantly contribute to repair of injured muscle in vivo supporting that a similar muscle-derived non-adherent cell population from human muscle may be useful in treatment of neuromuscular disorders

  16. Auxotonic to isometric contraction transitioning in a beating heart causes myosin step-size to down shift.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Burghardt

    Full Text Available Myosin motors in cardiac ventriculum convert ATP free energy to the work of moving blood volume under pressure. The actin bound motor cyclically rotates its lever-arm/light-chain complex linking motor generated torque to the myosin filament backbone and translating actin against resisting force. Previous research showed that the unloaded in vitro motor is described with high precision by single molecule mechanical characteristics including unitary step-sizes of approximately 3, 5, and 8 nm and their relative step-frequencies of approximately 13, 50, and 37%. The 3 and 8 nm unitary step-sizes are dependent on myosin essential light chain (ELC N-terminus actin binding. Step-size and step-frequency quantitation specifies in vitro motor function including duty-ratio, power, and strain sensitivity metrics. In vivo, motors integrated into the muscle sarcomere form the more complex and hierarchically functioning muscle machine. The goal of the research reported here is to measure single myosin step-size and step-frequency in vivo to assess how tissue integration impacts motor function. A photoactivatable GFP tags the ventriculum myosin lever-arm/light-chain complex in the beating heart of a live zebrafish embryo. Detected single GFP emission reports time-resolved myosin lever-arm orientation interpreted as step-size and step-frequency providing single myosin mechanical characteristics over the active cycle. Following step-frequency of cardiac ventriculum myosin transitioning from low to high force in relaxed to auxotonic to isometric contraction phases indicates that the imposition of resisting force during contraction causes the motor to down-shift to the 3 nm step-size accounting for >80% of all the steps in the near-isometric phase. At peak force, the ATP initiated actomyosin dissociation is the predominant strain inhibited transition in the native myosin contraction cycle. The proposed model for motor down-shifting and strain sensing involves ELC N

  17. Effect of pedaling rates and myosin heavy chain composition in the vastus lateralis muscle on the power generating capability during incremental cycling in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerczak, J; Szkutnik, Z; Duda, K; Komorowska, M; Kolodziejski, L; Karasinski, J; Zoladz, J A

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we have determined power output reached at maximal oxygen uptake during incremental cycling exercise (P(I, max)) performed at low and at high pedaling rates in nineteen untrained men with various myosin heavy chain composition (MyHC) in the vastus lateralis muscle. On separate days, subjects performed two incremental exercise tests until exhaustion at 60 rev min(-1) and at 120 rev min(-1). In the studied group of subjects P(I, max) reached during cycling at 60 rev min(-1) was significantly higher (p=0.0001) than that at 120 rev min(-1) (287+/-29 vs. 215+/-42 W, respectively for 60 and 120 rev min(-1)). For further comparisons, two groups of subjects (n=6, each) were selected according to MyHC composition in the vastus lateralis muscle: group H with higher MyHC II content (56.8+/-2.79 %) and group L with lower MyHC II content in this muscle (28.6+/-5.8 %). P(I, max) reached during cycling performed at 60 rev min(-1) in group H was significantly lower than in group L (p=0.03). However, during cycling at 120 rev min(-1), there was no significant difference in P(I, max) reached by both groups of subjects (p=0.38). Moreover, oxygen uptake (VO(2)), blood hydrogen ion [H(+)], plasma lactate [La(-)] and ammonia [NH(3)] concentrations determined at the four highest power outputs completed during the incremental cycling performed at 60 as well as 120 rev min(-1), in the group H were significantly higher than in group L. We have concluded that during an incremental exercise performed at low pedaling rates the subjects with lower content of MyHC II in the vastus lateralis muscle possess greater power generating capabilities than the subjects with higher content of MyHC II. Surprisingly, at high pedaling rate, power generating capabilities in the subjects with higher MyHC II content in the vastus lateralis muscle did not differ from those found in the subjects with lower content of MyHC II in this muscle, despite higher blood [H(+)], [La(-)] and [NH(3

  18. Postoperative loss of skeletal muscle mass, complications and quality of life in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Venrooij, Lenny M. W.; Verberne, Hein J.; de Vos, Rien; Borgmeijer-Hoelen, Mieke M. M. J.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe postoperative undernutrition in terms of postoperative losses of appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASMM) with respect to complications, quality of life, readmission, and 1-y mortality after cardiac surgery. Methods: Patients undergoing cardiac

  19. Non-Muscle Myosin II Isoforms Have Different Functions in Matrix Rearrangement by MDA-MB-231 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget Hindman

    Full Text Available The role of a stiffening extra-cellular matrix (ECM in cancer progression is documented but poorly understood. Here we use a conditioning protocol to test the role of nonmuscle myosin II isoforms in cell mediated ECM arrangement using collagen constructs seeded with breast cancer cells expressing shRNA targeted to either the IIA or IIB heavy chain isoform. While there are several methods available to measure changes in the biophysical characteristics of the ECM, we wanted to use a method which allows for the measurement of global stiffness changes as well as a dynamic response from the sample over time. The conditioning protocol used allows the direct measurement of ECM stiffness. Using various treatments, it is possible to determine the contribution of various construct and cellular components to the overall construct stiffness. Using this assay, we show that both the IIA and IIB isoforms are necessary for efficient matrix remodeling by MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, as loss of either isoform changes the stiffness of the collagen constructs as measured using our conditioning protocol. Constructs containing only collagen had an elastic modulus of 0.40 Pascals (Pa, parental MDA-MB-231 constructs had an elastic modulus of 9.22 Pa, while IIA and IIB KD constructs had moduli of 3.42 and 7.20 Pa, respectively. We also calculated the cell and matrix contributions to the overall sample elastic modulus. Loss of either myosin isoform resulted in decreased cell stiffness, as well as a decrease in the stiffness of the cell-altered collagen matrices. While the total construct modulus for the IIB KD cells was lower than that of the parental cells, the IIB KD cell-altered matrices actually had a higher elastic modulus than the parental cell-altered matrices (4.73 versus 4.38 Pa. These results indicate that the IIA and IIB heavy chains play distinct and non-redundant roles in matrix remodeling.

  20. Contractile properties of motor units and expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in rat fast-type muscle after volitional weight-lifting training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łochyński, Dawid; Kaczmarek, Dominik; Mrówczyński, Włodzimierz; Warchoł, Wojciech; Majerczak, Joanna; Karasiński, Janusz; Korostyński, Michał; Zoladz, Jerzy A; Celichowski, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Dynamic resistance training increases the force and speed of muscle contraction, but little is known about modifications to the contractile properties of the main physiological types of motor units (MUs) that contribute to these muscle adaptations. Although the contractile profile of MU muscle fibers is tightly coupled to myosin heavy chain (MyHC) protein expression, it is not well understood if MyHC transition is a prerequisite for modifications to the contractile characteristics of MUs. In this study, we examined MU contractile properties, the mRNA expression of MyHC, parvalbumin, and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ pump isoforms, as well as the MyHC protein content after 5 wk of volitional progressive weight-lifting training in the medial gastrocnemius muscle in rats. The training had no effect on MyHC profiling or Ca 2+ -handling protein gene expression. Maximum force increased in slow (by 49%) and fast (by 21%) MUs. Within fast MUs, the maximum force increased in most fatigue-resistant and intermediate but not most fatigable MUs. Twitch contraction time was shortened in slow and fast fatigue-resistant MUs. Twitch half-relaxation was shortened in fast most fatigue-resistant and intermediate MUs. The force-frequency curve shifted rightward in fast fatigue-resistant MUs. Fast fatigable MUs fatigued less within the initial 15 s while fast fatigue-resistant units increased the ability to potentiate the force within the first minute of the standard fatigue test. In conclusion, at the early stage of resistance training, modifications to the contractile characteristics of MUs appear in the absence of MyHC transition and the upregulation of Ca 2+ -handling genes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Construction and characterization of the alpha form of a cardiac myosin heavy chain cDNA clone and its developmental expression in the Syrian hamster.

    OpenAIRE

    Liew, C C; Jandreski, M A

    1986-01-01

    A cDNA clone, pVHC1, was isolated from a Syrian hamster heart cDNA library and was compared to the rat alpha (pCMHC21) and beta (pCMHC5) ventricular myosin heavy chain cDNA clones. The DNA sequence and amino acid sequence deducted from the DNA show more homology with pCMHC21 than pCMHC5. This indicates that pVHC1 is an alpha ventricular myosin heavy chain cDNA clone. However, even though pVHC1 shows a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid conservation with the rat myosin heavy chain sequen...

  2. Accessory papillary muscles and papillary muscle hypertrophy are associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jae-Sun; Youn, Jong-Chan; Lee, Hye-Jeong; Park, Junbeom; Park, Jin-Kyu; Shim, Chi Young; Hong, Geu-Ru; Joung, Boyoung; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung

    2015-10-15

    The present study was performed for elucidating the associations between the morphology of the papillary muscles (PMs) and sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). We retrospectively reviewed history, laboratory data, electrocardiography, echocardiography, coronary angiography, and cardiac CT/MRI for 190 patients with SCA. The prevalence of accessory PMs and PM hypertrophy in patients with SCA of unknown cause was compared with that in patients with SCA of known causes and 98 age- and sex-matched patients without SCA. An accessory PM was defined as a PM with origins separated from the anterolateral and posteromedial PMs, or a PM that branched into two or three bellies at the base of the anterolateral or posteromedial PM. PM hypertrophy was defined as at least one of the two PMs having a diameter of ≥1.1cm. In 49 patients (age 49.9±15.9years; 38 men) the cause of SCA was unknown, whereas 141 (age 54.2±16.6years; 121 men) had a known cause. The prevalence of accessory PMs was significantly higher in the unknown-cause group than in the known-cause group (24.5% and 7.8%, respectively; p=0.002) or the no-SCA group (7.1%, p=0.003). The same was true for PM hypertrophy (unknown-cause 12.2%, known-cause 2.1%, p=0.010; no SCA group 1.0%, p=0.006). By logistic regression, accessory PM and PM hypertrophy were independently associated with sudden cardiac arrest of unknown cause. An accessory PM and PM hypertrophy are associated with SCA of unknown cause. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Unfolding transitions in myosin give rise to the double-hyperbolic force-velocity relation in muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    This work presents an extension to a recent model of muscle contraction that was based on entropic elasticity (Nielsen 2002 J. Theor Biol. 219 99-119). By using entropic elasticity as the origin of muscle force, various possibilities emerge that can account for the presence of the double......-hyperbolic force-velocity relation in muscle that was observed by Edman (1988 J. Physiol. 404 301-21). In the present work, it will be argued that a slight change (elongation) of the contour length of the entropic springs involved in their high-force regions is sufficient to produce such a double...

  4. Levels of myosin heavy chain mRNA transcripts and protein isoforms in the fast extensor digitorum longus muscle of 7-month-old rats with chronic thyroid status alterations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vadászová, Adriana; Hudecová, S.; Križanová, O.; Soukup, Tomáš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 6 (2006), s. 707-710 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/0327 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 2/4106; NATO(XE) 979876; SAV(SK) APVT-51-027404; MYORES(XE) 511978 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : myosin heavy chain isoforms * thyroid hormones * muscle differentiation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.093, year: 2006

  5. Alpha-cardiac myosin heavy chain (MYH6) mutations affecting myofibril formation are associated with congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados-Riveron, Javier T; Ghosh, Tushar K; Pope, Mark; Bu'Lock, Frances; Thornborough, Christopher; Eason, Jacqueline; Kirk, Edwin P; Fatkin, Diane; Feneley, Michael P; Harvey, Richard P; Armour, John A L; David Brook, J

    2010-10-15

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) are collectively the most common form of congenital malformation. Studies of human cases and animal models have revealed that mutations in several genes are responsible for both familial and sporadic forms of CHD. We have previously shown that a mutation in MYH6 can cause an autosomal dominant form of atrial septal defect (ASD), whereas others have identified mutations of the same gene in patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy. In the present study, we report a mutation analysis of MYH6 in patients with a wide spectrum of sporadic CHD. The mutation analysis of MYH6 was performed in DNA samples from 470 cases of isolated CHD using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography and sequence analysis to detect point mutations and small deletions or insertions, and multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization to detect partial or complete copy number variations. One non-sense mutation, one splicing site mutation and seven non-synonymous coding mutations were identified. Transfection of plasmids encoding mutant and non-mutant green fluorescent protein-MYH6 fusion proteins in mouse myoblasts revealed that the mutations A230P and A1366D significantly disrupt myofibril formation, whereas the H252Q mutation significantly enhances myofibril assembly in comparison with the non-mutant protein. Our data indicate that functional variants of MYH6 are associated with cardiac malformations in addition to ASD and provide a novel potential mechanism. Such phenotypic heterogeneity has been observed in other genes mutated in CHD.

  6. Radioimmunoassay of myosin heavy beta chains in human serum for the evaluation of the size of myocardial infarction: correlation with myocardial Tl-201 SPECT and cardiac angioscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facello, A.; Gries, P.; Demangeat, C.; Brunot, B.; Roul, G.; Demangeat, J.L.; Moulichon, M.; Bareiss, P.; Sacrez, A.; Constantinesco, A.

    1990-01-01

    To determine the relationship between serum levels of myosin heavy beta chains assessed by an IRMA technique and other radionuclide and enzymatic parameters in the evaluation of the size of myocardial infarction, we studied 22 patients with acute myocardial infarction. Blood samples taken daily between 1st to 13th day of evolution allow the determination of peak and integral of myosine release that showed a good correlation (p [fr

  7. Respiratory muscle strength is not decreased in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urell, Charlotte; Emtner, Margareta; Hedenstrom, Hans; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2016-03-31

    Postoperative pulmonary impairments are significant complications after cardiac surgery. Decreased respiratory muscle strength could be one reason for impaired lung function in the postoperative period. The primary aim of this study was to describe respiratory muscle strength before and two months after cardiac surgery. A secondary aim was to describe possible associations between respiratory muscle strength and lung function. In this prospective observational study 36 adult cardiac surgery patients (67 ± 10 years) were studied. Respiratory muscle strength and lung function were measured before and two months after surgery. Pre- and postoperative respiratory muscle strength was in accordance with predicted values; MIP was 78 ± 24 cmH2O preoperatively and 73 ± 22 cmH2O at two months follow-up (p = 0.19). MEP was 122 ± 33 cmH2O preoperatively and 115 ± 38 cmH2O at two months follow-up (p = 0.18). Preoperative lung function was in accordance with predicted values, but was significantly decreased postoperatively. At two-months follow-up there was a moderate correlation between MIP and FEV1 (r = 0.43, p = 0.009). Respiratory muscle strength was not impaired, either before or two months after cardiac surgery. The reason for postoperative lung function alteration is not yet known. Interventions aimed at restore an optimal postoperative lung function should focus on other interventions then respiratory muscle strength training.

  8. All-trans retinoic acid increases the expression of oxidative myosin heavy chain through the PPARδ pathway in bovine muscle cells derived from satellite cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongkyoo; Wellmann, Kimberly B; Smith, Zachary K; Johnson, Bradley J

    2018-04-24

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has been associated with various physiological phenomenon in mammalian adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that ATRA may affect skeletal muscle fiber type in bovine satellite cell culture through various transcriptional processes. Bovine primary satellite cell (BSC) culture experiments were conducted to determine dose effects of ATRA on expression of genes and protein levels related to skeletal muscle fiber type and metabolism. The semimembranosus from crossbred steers (n = 2 steers), aged approximately 24 months, were used to isolate BSC for 3 separate assays. Myogenic differentiation was induced using 3% horse serum upon cultured BSC with increasing doses (0, 1, 10, 100, 1000 nM) of ATRA. After 96 h of incubation, cells were harvested and used to measure the gene expression of protein kinase B (Akt), AMP-activated protein kinase alpha (AMPK), glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4), myogenin, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), myosin heavy chain (MHC) I, MHC IIA,MHC IIX, insulin like growth factor -1 (IGF-1), Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), PPARδ, and Smad transcription factor 3 (SMAD3) mRNA relative to ribosomal protein subunit 9 (RPS9). The mRNA expression of LPL was increased (P < 0.05) with 100 and 1000nM of ATRA. Expression of GLUT4 was altered (P < 0.05) by ATRA. The treatment of ATRA (1000nM) also increased (P < 0.05) mRNA gene expression of SMAD3. The gene expression of both PPARδ and PPARγ were increased (P < 0.05) with 1000nM of ATRA. Protein level of PPARδ was also affected (P < 0.05) by 1000nM of ATRA and resulted in a greater (P < 0.05) protein level of PPARδ compared to CON. All-trans retinoic acid (10nM) increased gene expression of MHC I (P < 0.05) compared to CON. Expression of MHC IIA was also influenced (P < 0.05) by ATRA. The mRNA expression of MHC IIX was decreased (P < 0.05) with 100 and 1000nM of ATRA.In muscle cells, ATRA may cause muscle fibers to transition towards the MHC

  9. Critical role of non-muscle myosin light chain kinase in thrombin-induced endothelial cell inflammation and lung PMN infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Fabeha; Bijli, Kaiser M; Murrill, Matthew; Leonard, Antony; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Anwar, Khandaker N; Finkelstein, Jacob N; Watterson, D Martin; Rahman, Arshad

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI) involves bidirectional cooperation and close interaction between inflammatory and coagulation pathways. A key molecule linking coagulation and inflammation is the procoagulant thrombin, a serine protease whose concentration is elevated in plasma and lavage fluids of patients with ALI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, little is known about the mechanism by which thrombin contributes to lung inflammatory response. In this study, we developed a new mouse model that permits investigation of lung inflammation associated with intravascular coagulation. Using this mouse model and in vitro approaches, we addressed the role of non-muscle myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK) in thrombin-induced endothelial cell (EC) inflammation and lung neutrophil (PMN) infiltration. Our in vitro experiments revealed a key role of nmMLCK in ICAM-1 expression by its ability to control nuclear translocation and transcriptional capacity of RelA/p65 in EC. When subjected to intraperitoneal thrombin challenge, wild type mice showed a marked increase in lung PMN infiltration via expression of ICAM-1. However, these responses were markedly attenuated in mice deficient in nmMLCK. These results provide mechanistic insight into lung inflammatory response associated with intravascular coagulation and identify nmMLCK as a critical target for modulation of lung inflammation.

  10. Length dependence of force generation exhibit similarities between rat cardiac myocytes and skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanft, Laurin M; McDonald, Kerry S

    2010-08-01

    According to the Frank-Starling relationship, increased ventricular volume increases cardiac output, which helps match cardiac output to peripheral circulatory demand. The cellular basis for this relationship is in large part the myofilament length-tension relationship. Length-tension relationships in maximally calcium activated preparations are relatively shallow and similar between cardiac myocytes and skeletal muscle fibres. During twitch activations length-tension relationships become steeper in both cardiac and skeletal muscle; however, it remains unclear whether length dependence of tension differs between striated muscle cell types during submaximal activations. The purpose of this study was to compare sarcomere length-tension relationships and the sarcomere length dependence of force development between rat skinned left ventricular cardiac myocytes and fast-twitch and slow-twitch skeletal muscle fibres. Muscle cell preparations were calcium activated to yield 50% maximal force, after which isometric force and rate constants (k(tr)) of force development were measured over a range of sarcomere lengths. Myofilament length-tension relationships were considerably steeper in fast-twitch fibres compared to slow-twitch fibres. Interestingly, cardiac myocyte preparations exhibited two populations of length-tension relationships, one steeper than fast-twitch fibres and the other similar to slow-twitch fibres. Moreover, myocytes with shallow length-tension relationships were converted to steeper length-tension relationships by protein kinase A (PKA)-induced myofilament phosphorylation. Sarcomere length-k(tr) relationships were distinct between all three cell types and exhibited patterns markedly different from Ca(2+) activation-dependent k(tr) relationships. Overall, these findings indicate cardiac myocytes exhibit varied length-tension relationships and sarcomere length appears a dominant modulator of force development rates. Importantly, cardiac myocyte length

  11. Alternative S2 Hinge Regions of the Myosin Rod Affect Myofibrillar Structure and Myosin Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Mark S.; Dambacher, Corey M.; Knowles, Aileen F.; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Swank, Douglas M.; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Maughan, David W.; (RPI); (IIT); (SDSU); (Vermont)

    2009-07-01

    The subfragment 2/light meromyosin 'hinge' region has been proposed to significantly contribute to muscle contraction force and/or speed. Transgenic replacement of the endogenous fast muscle isovariant hinge A (exon 15a) in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle with the slow muscle hinge B (exon 15b) allows examination of the structural and functional changes when only this region of the myosin molecule is different. Hinge B was previously shown to increase myosin rod length, increase A-band and sarcomere length, and decrease flight performance compared to hinge A. We applied additional measures to these transgenic lines to further evaluate the consequences of modifying this hinge region. Structurally, the longer A-band and sarcomere lengths found in the hinge B myofibrils appear to be due to the longitudinal addition of myosin heads. Functionally, hinge B, although a significant distance from the myosin catalytic domain, alters myosin kinetics in a manner consistent with this region increasing myosin rod length. These structural and functional changes combine to decrease whole fly wing-beat frequency and flight performance. Our results indicate that this hinge region plays an important role in determining myosin kinetics and in regulating thick and thin filament lengths as well as sarcomere length.

  12. Regulation of an antisense RNA with the transition of neonatal to IIb myosin heavy chain during postnatal development and hypothyroidism in rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandorf, Clay E; Jiang, Weihua; Qin, Anqi X; Bodell, Paul W; Baldwin, Kenneth M; Haddad, Fadia

    2012-04-01

    Postnatal development of fast skeletal muscle is characterized by a transition in expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms, from primarily neonatal MHC at birth to primarily IIb MHC in adults, in a tightly coordinated manner. These isoforms are encoded by distinct genes, which are separated by ∼17 kb on rat chromosome 10. The neonatal-to-IIb MHC transition is inhibited by a hypothyroid state. We examined RNA products [mRNA, pre-mRNA, and natural antisense transcript (NAT)] of developmental and adult-expressed MHC genes (embryonic, neonatal, I, IIa, IIx, and IIb) at 2, 10, 20, and 40 days after birth in normal and thyroid-deficient rat neonates treated with propylthiouracil. We found that a long noncoding antisense-oriented RNA transcript, termed bII NAT, is transcribed from a site within the IIb-Neo intergenic region and across most of the IIb MHC gene. NATs have previously been shown to mediate transcriptional repression of sense-oriented counterparts. The bII NAT is transcriptionally regulated during postnatal development and in response to hypothyroidism. Evidence for a regulatory mechanism is suggested by an inverse relationship between IIb MHC and bII NAT in normal and hypothyroid-treated muscle. Neonatal MHC transcription is coordinately expressed with bII NAT. A comparative phylogenetic analysis also suggests that bII NAT-mediated regulation has been a conserved trait of placental mammals for most of the eutherian evolutionary history. The evidence in support of the regulatory model implicates long noncoding antisense RNA as a mechanism to coordinate the transition between neonatal and IIb MHC during postnatal development.

  13. Rapid switch-off of the human myosin heavy chain IIX gene after heavy load muscle contractions is sustained for at least four days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, J L; Gruschy-Knudsen, T

    2018-02-01

    Long-term heavy load contractions decrease the relative amount of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIX isoform in human skeletal muscle, but the timing of the down-regulation in the short term is unknown. Untrained subjects performed two resistance bouts, in two consecutive days, with one leg, the other leg serving as a control (age 24±1, n=5). Muscle biopsies were obtained in both legs before, immediately after, and 24, 54, and 96 hours after exercise. Serial cryosection analysis combined immunohistochemistry and ATPase histochemistry with In Situ hybridization to identify the distribution of MHC isoforms and their corresponding transcripts, enabling identification of transitional fibers. Fibers positive solely for MHC IIX mRNA decreased in the exercised leg throughout the study period. At 96 hours post-exercise, no fibers solely expressed MHC IIX mRNA. In contrast, the number of fibers expressing MHC IIA mRNA increased throughout the study period. The percentage of fibers expressing mRNA for MHC I was unchanged in both legs at all time points. Pronounced depletion of glycogen in the MHC IIX fibers of the exercised leg verifies that the type IIX fibers were active during the heavy load contractions. Major mismatch between MHC at the mRNA and protein levels was only found in the fibers of the exercised leg. These data provide unequivocal in situ evidence of an immediate shutdown of the MHC IIX gene after resistance exercise. A further novel finding was that the silencing of the MHC IIX gene is sustained at least 4 days after removal of the stimulus. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Distribution of fast myosin heavy chain-based muscle fibres in the gluteus medius of untrained horses: mismatch between antigenic and ATPase determinants

    Science.gov (United States)

    LINNANE, LINDA; SERRANO, A. L.; RIVERO, J. L. L.

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of muscle fibres classified on the basis of their content of different myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms was analysed in muscle biopsies from the gluteus medius of adult untrained horses by correlating immunohistochemistry with specific anti-MHC monoclonal antibodies and standard myofibrillar ATPase (mATPase) histochemistry. Percutaneous needle biopsies were taken at 3 depths (20, 40 and 60 mm) from 4 4-y-old Andalusian stallions. The percentage of ‘pure’ I MHC fibres increased whereas that for pure IIX MHC fibres decreased from the most superficial to the deepest sampling site. Within the fast fibres, types IIA and IIAX MHC-classified fibres were proportionately more abundant in the deepest sampling site than in the superficial region of the muscle. The immunohistochemical and histochemical characterisation of a large number of single fibres (n=1375) was compared and correlated on a fibre-to-fibre basis. The results showed that 40% of the fibres analysed were pure type I (expressing only MHC-I); they showed correct matching between their antigenic and mATPase determinants. In contrast, within the fast fibres, a considerable proportion of fibres were found showing a mismatch between their immunohistochemical and mATPase profiles. The most common mismatched fibre phenotypes comprised fibres displaying coexpression of both fast MHCs when analysed by immunocytochemistry, but showing an mATPase profile similar to typical IIX fibres (moderate mATPase reaction after preincubation at pH 4.4). Considered altogether, the total mismatched fibres represented only 4.2% of the whole fast fibre population in the superficial region of the muscle, but their proportion increased to 15.6% and 38.4% in the middle and deep regions, respectively, of gluteus medius. It is concluded that a considerable number of hybrid fast MHC IIAX fibres are present in the gluteus medius of untrained horses, suggesting that equine type II fibres have probably been misclassified in

  15. Myosin heavy chain composition in the vastus lateralis muscle in relation to oxygen uptake and heart rate during cycling in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerczak, J; Nieckarz, Z; Karasinski, J; Zoladz, J A

    2014-04-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between fast myosin heavy chain (MyHC2) content in the vastus lateralis and the rate of oxygen uptake (VO2) and heart rate (HR) increase during an incremental exercise in 38, young, healthy men. Prior to the exercise test, muscle biopsies were taken in order to evaluate the MyHC composition. It was found that during cycling performed below the lactate threshold (LT), a positive relationship between MyHC2 and the intercept of the oxygen uptake and power output (VO2-PO) relationship existed (r=0.49, P=0.002), despite no correlation between MyHC2 and the slope value of the VO2-PO relationship (r= -0.18, P=0.29). During cycling performed above the LT, MyHC2 correlated positively with the magnitude of the nonlinearity in the VO2-PO relationship; i.e. with the accumulated VO2'excess' (r=0.44, P=0.006) and peak VO2'excess' (r=0.44, P=0.006), as well as with the slope of the HR-PO relationship (r=0.49, P=0.002). We have concluded that a greater MyHC2 content in the vastus lateralis is accompanied by a higher oxygen cost of cycling during exercise performed below the LT. This seems to be related to the higher energy cost of the non-cross-bridge activities in the muscles possessing a greater proportion of MyHC2 content. In the case of heavy-intensity exercise, a higher MyHC2 content in the vastus lateralis is accompanied by greater non-linearity in the VO2-PO relationship, as well as a steeper increase in HR in the function of an increase of PO. This relationship can be explained by greater disturbances in metabolic stability in type II muscle fibres during exercise, resulting in a decrease of muscle mechanical efficiency and greater increase of heart rate at a given power output. Therefore, MyHC composition has an impact on the oxygen cost of cycling both below and above the LT.

  16. 17β-Estradiol-induced interaction of estrogen receptor α and human atrial essential myosin light chain modulates cardiac contractile function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duft, Karolin; Schanz, Miriam; Pham, Hang; Abdelwahab, Ahmed; Schriever, Cindy; Kararigas, Georgios; Dworatzek, Elke; Davidson, Mercy M; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Morano, Ingo; Mahmoodzadeh, Shokoufeh

    2017-01-01

    Chronic increased workload of the human heart causes ventricular hypertrophy, re-expression of the atrial essential myosin light chain (hALC-1), and improved contractile function. Although hALC-1 is an important positive inotropic regulator of the human heart, little is known about its regulation. Therefore, we investigated the role of the sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) on hALC-1 gene expression, the underlying molecular mechanisms, and the impact of this regulatory process on cardiac contractile function. We showed that E2 attenuated hALC-1 expression in human atrial tissues of both sexes and in human ventricular AC16 cells. E2 induced the nuclear translocation of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and hALC-1 in AC16 cells, where they cooperatively regulate the transcriptional activity of hALC-1 gene promoter. E2-activated ERα required the estrogen response element (ERE) motif within the hALC-1 gene promoter to reduce its transcriptional activity (vehicle: 15.55 ± 4.80 vs. E2: 6.51 ± 3.69; ~2 fold). This inhibitory effect was potentiated in the presence of hALC-1 (vehicle: 11.13 ± 3.66 vs. E2: 2.18 ± 1.10; ~5 fold), and thus, hALC-1 acts as a co-repressor of ERα-mediated transcription. Yeast two-hybrid screening of a human heart cDNA library revealed that ERα interacts physically with hALC-1 in the presence of E2. This interaction was confirmed by Co-Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence in human atrium. As a further novel effect, we showed that chronic E2-treatment of adult mouse cardiomyocytes overexpressing hALC-1 resulted in reduced cell-shortening amplitude and twitching kinetics of these cells independent of Ca 2+ activation levels. Together, our data showed that the expression of hALC-1 gene is, at least partly, regulated by E2/ERα, while hALC-1 acts as a co-repressor. The inotropic effect of hALC-1 overexpression in cardiomyocytes can be significantly repressed by E2.

  17. Early remodeling of rat cardiac muscle induced by swimming training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verzola R.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present investigation was to study the effect of acute swimming training with an anaerobic component on matrix metallopeptidase (MMP activity and myosin heavy chain gene expression in the rat myocardium. Animals (male Wistar rats, weighing approximately 180 g were trained for 6 h/day in 3 sessions of 2 h each for 1 to 5 consecutive days (N = 5 rats per group. Rats swam in basins 47 cm in diameter and 60 cm deep filled with water at 33 to 35ºC. After the training period a significant increase (P < 0.05 was observed in the heart weight normalized to body weight by about 22 and 35% in the groups that trained for 96 and 120 h, respectively. Blood lactate levels were significantly increased (P < 0.05 in all groups after all training sessions, confirming an anaerobic component. However, lactate levels decreased (P < 0.05 with days of training, suggesting that the animals became adapted to this protocol. Myosin heavy chain-ß gene expression, analyzed by real time PCR and normalized with GAPDH gene expression, showed a significant two-fold increase (P < 0.01 after 5 days of training. Zymography analysis of myocardium extracts indicated a single ~60-kDa activity band that was significantly increased (P < 0.05 after 72, 96, and 120 h, indicating an increased expression of MMP-2 and suggesting precocious remodeling. Furthermore, the presence of MMP-2 was confirmed by Western blot analysis, but not the presence of MMP-1 and MMP-3. Taken together, our results indicate that in these training conditions, the rat heart undergoes early biochemical and functional changes required for the adaptation to the new physiological condition by tissue remodeling.

  18. [Artificial muscle and its prospect in application for direct cardiac compression assist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jing; Yang, Ming; Zheng, Zhejun; Yan, Guozheng

    2008-12-01

    Artificial heart is an effective device in solving insufficient native heart supply for heart transplant, and the research and application of novel actuators play an important role in the development of artificial heart. In this paper, artificial muscle is introduced as the actuators of direct cardiac compression assist, and some of its parameters are compared with those of native heart muscle. The open problems are also discussed.

  19. Myosin heavy-chain isoform distribution, fibre-type composition and fibre size in skeletal muscle of patients on haemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molsted, Stig; Eidemak, Inge; Sorensen, Helle Tauby

    2007-01-01

    of age-, gender- and BMI-matched untrained control subjects. The aerobic work capacity of the patients was also determined. Results. The MHC composition for I, IIA and IIX isoforms was found to be 35.3%±18.2%, 35.9%±7.1% and 28.9%±15.6%, respectively, findings supported by the ATPase histochemically...... determined fibre-type composition of the vastus lateralis muscle. The mean fibre area of type 1 and 2 fibres was 3283±873 and 3594±1483 µm2, respectively. The MHC composition and the size of the type 1 fibres of the patients on HD were significantly different from those of the control subjects. Conclusions....... The data demonstrate relatively fewer type 1 and consequently more type 2x fibres, with a corresponding change in MHC isoforms (MHC I and MHC IIX) in the skeletal muscle of patiens on HD. Several patients on HD were found to have type 1 (or relative percentage of MHC I) fibres. Such a low percentage...

  20. Analysis of the multiple forms of the 20,000-dalton myosin light, chain from uterine arterial smooth muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barany, K.; Csabina, S.; Mougios, V.; Barany, M.

    1986-01-01

    2D gel electrophoresis resolved the light chain (LC) in four spots, three spots were phosphorylated. Phosphorylation was determined by densitometry (S) and [ 32 P]phosphate incorporation (P). Molar [ 32 P]phosphate incorporation was quantitated for each LC spot. Phosphorylation was low in resting or drug-relaxed muscles and high in contracting or stretched muscles. At low phosphorylation S > P, this discrepancy can be explained by the presence of unphosphorylated isoforms in the phosphorylated spots. Indeed, unphosphorylated uterine LC exhibited three spots on electrophoretograms (distribution: 0, 13, 7, 80%), whereas arterial LC showed two spots (0, 15, 0, 85%). At high phosphorylation P > S, this aberration is caused by diphosphorylation. In the intact tissue of uterus, the ratio of Thr-P to Ser-P, and the level of diphosphorylation are higher than in artery. The molecular weight and isoelectric points of uterine and arterial LC are the same, but the percentage distribution of the unphosphorylated isoforms, the molar phosphate incorporation in the phosphorylated spots, and the extent of diphosphorylation are different

  1. Myostatin promotes distinct responses on protein metabolism of skeletal and cardiac muscle fibers of rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, L H; Paula-Gomes, S; Zanon, N M; Kettelhut, I C

    2017-10-19

    Myostatin is a novel negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. Myostatin expression is also found in heart in a much less extent, but it can be upregulated in pathological conditions, such as heart failure. Myostatin may be involved in inhibiting protein synthesis and/or increasing protein degradation in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Herein, we used cell cultures and isolated muscles from rats to determine protein degradation and synthesis. Muscles incubated with myostatin exhibited an increase in proteolysis with an increase of Atrogin-1, MuRF1 and LC3 genes. Extensor digitorum longus muscles and C2C12 myotubes exhibited a reduction in protein turnover. Cardiomyocytes showed an increase in proteolysis by activating autophagy and the ubiquitin proteasome system, and a decrease in protein synthesis by decreasing P70S6K. The effect of myostatin on protein metabolism is related to fiber type composition, which may be associated to the extent of atrophy mediated effect of myostatin on muscle.

  2. Structural characterization of the interactions between calmodulin and skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase: Effect of peptide (576-594)G binding on the Ca2+-binding domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeholzer, S.H.; Wand, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    Calcium-containing calmodulin (CaM) and its complex with a peptide corresponding to the calmodulin-binding domain of skeletal muscle myosin light chain kinase [skMLCK(576-594)G] have been studied by one- and two-dimensional 1 H NMR techniques. Resonances arising from the antiparallel β-sheet structures associated with the calcium-binding domains of CaM and their counterparts in the CaM-skMLCK(576-594)G complex have been assigned. The assignments were initiated by application of the main chain directed assignment strategy. It is found that, despite significant changes in chemical shifts of resonances arising from amino acid residues in this region upon binding of the peptide, the β-sheets have virtually the same structure in the complex as in CaM. Hydrogen exchange rates of amide NH within the β-sheet structures are significantly slowed upon binding of peptide. These data, in conjunction with the observed nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) patterns and relative intensities and the downfield shifts of associated amide and α resonances upon binding of peptide, show that the peptide stabilizes the Ca 2+ -bound state of calmodulin. The observed pattern of NOEs within the β-sheets and their structural similarity correspond closely to those predicted by the crystal structure. These findings imply that the apparent inconsistency of the crystal structure with recently reported low-angle X-ray scattering profiles of CaM may lie within the putative central helix bridging the globular domains

  3. Single molecule fluorescence image patterns linked to dipole orientation and axial position: application to myosin cross-bridges in muscle fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Burghardt

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Photoactivatable fluorescent probes developed specifically for single molecule detection extend advantages of single molecule imaging to high probe density regions of cells and tissues. They perform in the native biomolecule environment and have been used to detect both probe position and orientation.Fluorescence emission from a single photoactivated probe captured in an oil immersion, high numerical aperture objective, produces a spatial pattern on the detector that is a linear combination of 6 independent and distinct spatial basis patterns with weighting coefficients specifying emission dipole orientation. Basis patterns are tabulated for single photoactivated probes labeling myosin cross-bridges in a permeabilized muscle fiber undergoing total internal reflection illumination. Emitter proximity to the glass/aqueous interface at the coverslip implies the dipole near-field and dipole power normalization are significant affecters of the basis patterns. Other characteristics of the basis patterns are contributed by field polarization rotation with transmission through the microscope optics and refraction by the filter set. Pattern recognition utilized the generalized linear model, maximum likelihood fitting, for Poisson distributed uncertainties. This fitting method is more appropriate for treating low signal level photon counting data than χ(2 minimization.Results indicate that emission dipole orientation is measurable from the intensity image except for the ambiguity under dipole inversion. The advantage over an alternative method comparing two measured polarized emission intensities using an analyzing polarizer is that information in the intensity spatial distribution provides more constraints on fitted parameters and a single image provides all the information needed. Axial distance dependence in the emission pattern is also exploited to measure relative probe position near focus. Single molecule images from axial scanning fitted

  4. Polymorphisms in the non-muscle myosin heavy chain gene (MYH9 are associated with lower glomerular filtration rate in mixed ancestry diabetic subjects from South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandi Edith Matsha

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Though single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the non-muscle myosin gene (MYH9 have been reported to explain most of the excess risk of nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD, in African-Americans, some studies have also shown associations with diabetic end-stage renal disease. We investigated the association of MYH9 SNPs with renal traits in a mixed-ancestry South African population prone to diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Three SNPs known to be associated with CKD (rs4821480, rs5756152 and rs12107 were genotyped using Taqman assay in 716 adults (198 with diabetes from the Bellville-South community, Cape Town. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated (eGFR and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR assessed. Multivariable regressions were used to relate the SNPs with renal traits. RESULTS: Mean age was 53.6 years, with the expected differences observed in characteristics by diabetic status. Significant associations were found between rs575152 and serum creatinine, and eGFR in the total population, and in diabetic participants (all p≤0.003, but not in non-diabetics (all p≥0.16, with significant interactions by diabetes status (interaction-p≤0.009. The association with ACR was borderline in diabetic participants (p = 0.05 and non-significant in non-diabetics (p = 0.85, with significant interaction (interaction p = 0.02. rs12107 was associated with fasting-, 2-hour glucose and HbA1c in diabetic participants only (interaction-p≤0.003, but not with renal traits. CONCLUSION: MYH9 SNPs were associated with renal traits only in diabetic participants in this population. Our findings and other studies suggest that MYH9 may have a broader genetic risk effect on kidney diseases.

  5. Translating golden retriever muscular dystrophy microarray findings to novel biomarkers for cardiac/skeletal muscle function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, Cristi L; Soslow, Jonathan H; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L; Gupte, Manisha; Smith, Holly M; Sengsayadeth, Seng; Sawyer, Douglas B; Benson, D Woodrow; Kornegay, Joe N; Markham, Larry W

    2016-04-01

    In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), abnormal cardiac function is typically preceded by a decade of skeletal muscle disease. Molecular reasons for differences in onset and progression of these muscle groups are unknown. Human biomarkers are lacking. We analyzed cardiac and skeletal muscle microarrays from normal and golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) dogs (ages 6, 12, or 47+ mo) to gain insight into muscle dysfunction and to identify putative DMD biomarkers. These biomarkers were then measured using human DMD blood samples. We identified GRMD candidate genes that might contribute to the disparity between cardiac and skeletal muscle disease, focusing on brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) and osteopontin (OPN/SPP1, hereafter indicated as SPP1). BDNF was elevated in cardiac muscle of younger GRMD but was unaltered in skeletal muscle, while SPP1 was increased only in GRMD skeletal muscle. In human DMD, circulating levels of BDNF were inversely correlated with ventricular function and fibrosis, while SPP1 levels correlated with skeletal muscle function. These results highlight gene expression patterns that could account for differences in cardiac and skeletal disease in GRMD. Most notably, animal model-derived data were translated to DMD and support use of BDNF and SPP1 as biomarkers for cardiac and skeletal muscle involvement, respectively.

  6. Functions of PDE3 Isoforms in Cardiac Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movsesian, Matthew; Ahmad, Faiyaz

    2018-01-01

    Isoforms in the PDE3 family of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases have important roles in cyclic nucleotide-mediated signalling in cardiac myocytes. These enzymes are targeted by inhibitors used to increase contractility in patients with heart failure, with a combination of beneficial and adverse effects on clinical outcomes. This review covers relevant aspects of the molecular biology of the isoforms that have been identified in cardiac myocytes; the roles of these enzymes in modulating cAMP-mediated signalling and the processes mediated thereby; and the potential for targeting these enzymes to improve the profile of clinical responses. PMID:29415428

  7. Design considerations in coiled-coil fusion constructs for the structural determination of a problematic region of the human cardiac myosin rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreas, Michael P.; Ajay, Gautam; Gellings, Jaclyn A.; Rayment, Ivan (UW)

    2017-12-01

    X-ray structural determination of segments of the myosin rod has proved difficult because of the strong salt-dependent aggregation properties and repeating pattern of charges on the surface of the coiled-coil that lead to the formation of paracrystals. This problem has been resolved in part through the use of globular assembly domains that improve protein folding and prevent aggregation. The primary consideration now in designing coiled-coil fusion constructs for myosin is deciding where to truncate the coiled-coil and which amino acid residues to include from the folding domain. This is especially important for myosin that contains numerous regions of low predicted coiled-coil propensity. Here we describe the strategy adopted to determine the structure of the region that extends from Arg1677 – Leu1797 that included two areas that do not show a strong sequence signature of a conventional left-handed coiled coil or canonical heptad repeat. This demonstrates again that, with careful choice of fusion constructs, overlapping structures exhibit very similar conformations for the myosin rod fragments in the canonical regions. However, conformational variability is seen around Leu1706 which is a hot spot for cardiomyopathy mutations suggesting that this might be important for function.

  8. The morphological development of the locomotor and cardiac muscles of the migratory barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bishop, CM; Butler, PJ; ElHaj, AJ; Egginton, S; Loonen, MJJE

    The masses of the locomotor and cardiac muscles of wild barnacle goose goslings, from a migratory population, were examined systematically during development and their values compared to those of pre-migratory geese. Pre-flight development was typified by approximately linear increases of body, leg,

  9. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity depends on cardiac output during exercise with a large muscle mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ide, K.; Pott, F.; van Lieshout, J. J.; Secher, N. H.

    1998-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that pharmacological reduction of the increase in cardiac output during dynamic exercise with a large muscle mass would influence the cerebral blood velocity/perfusion. We studied the relationship between changes in cerebral blood velocity (transcranial Doppler), rectus

  10. Elevated Plasma Cardiac Troponin T Levels Caused by Skeletal Muscle Damage in Pompe Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wens, Stephan C A; Schaaf, Gerben J; Michels, Michelle; Kruijshaar, Michelle E; van Gestel, Tom J M; In 't Groen, Stijn; Pijnenburg, Joon; Dekkers, Dick H W; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Verdijk, Lex B; Brusse, Esther; van Schaik, Ron H N; van der Ploeg, Ans T; van Doorn, Pieter A; Pijnappel, W W M Pim

    2016-02-01

    Elevated plasma cardiac troponin T (cTnT) levels in patients with neuromuscular disorders may erroneously lead to the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction or myocardial injury. In 122 patients with Pompe disease, the relationship between cTnT, cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase (CK), CK-myocardial band levels, and skeletal muscle damage was assessed. ECG and echocardiography were used to evaluate possible cardiac disease. Patients were divided into classic infantile, childhood-onset, and adult-onset patients. cTnT levels were elevated in 82% of patients (median 27 ng/L, normal values normal in all patients, whereas CK-myocardial band levels were increased in 59% of patients. cTnT levels correlated with CK levels in all 3 subgroups (Pmass index measured with echocardiography was normal in all the 3 subgroups. cTnT mRNA expression in skeletal muscle was not detectable in controls but was strongly induced in patients with Pompe disease. cTnT protein was identified by mass spectrometry in patient-derived skeletal muscle tissue. Elevated plasma cTnT levels in patients with Pompe disease are associated with skeletal muscle damage, rather than acute myocardial injury. Increased cTnT levels in Pompe disease and likely other neuromuscular disorders should be interpreted with caution to avoid unnecessary cardiac interventions. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. A Novel Alpha Cardiac Actin (ACTC1 Mutation Mapping to a Domain in Close Contact with Myosin Heavy Chain Leads to a Variety of Congenital Heart Defects, Arrhythmia and Possibly Midline Defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Augière

    Full Text Available A Lebanese Maronite family presented with 13 relatives affected by various congenital heart defects (mainly atrial septal defects, conduction tissue anomalies and midline defects. No mutations were found in GATA4 and NKX2-5.A set of 399 poly(AC markers was used to perform a linkage analysis which peaked at a 2.98 lod score on the long arm of chromosome 15. The haplotype analysis delineated a 7.7 meganucleotides genomic interval which included the alpha-cardiac actin gene (ACTC1 among 36 other protein coding genes. A heterozygous missense mutation was found (c.251T>C, p.(Met84Thr in the ACTC1 gene which changed a methionine residue conserved up to yeast. This mutation was absent from 1000 genomes and exome variant server database but segregated perfectly in this family with the affection status. This mutation and 2 other ACTC1 mutations (p.(Glu101Lys and p.(Met125Val which result also in congenital heart defects are located in a region in close apposition to a myosin heavy chain head region by contrast to 3 other alpha-cardiac actin mutations (p.(Ala297Ser,p.(Asp313His and p.(Arg314His which result in diverse cardiomyopathies and are located in a totally different interaction surface.Alpha-cardiac actin mutations lead to congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathies and eventually midline defects. The consequence of an ACTC1 mutation may in part be dependent on the interaction surface between actin and myosin.

  12. Effects of protein-calorie restriction on mechanical function of hypertrophied cardiac muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Carlos Cicogna

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of food restriction (FR on hypertrophied cardiac muscle in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. METHODS: Isolated papillary muscle preparations of the left ventricle (LV of 60-day-old SHR and of normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rats were studied. The rats were fed either an unrestricted diet or FR diet (50% of the intake of the control diet for 30 days. The mechanical function of the muscles was evaluated through monitoring isometric and isotonic contractions. RESULTS: FR caused: 1 reduction in the body weight and LV weight of SHR and WKY rats; 2 increase in the time to peak shortening and the time to peak developed tension (DT in the hypertrophied myocardium of the SHR; 3 diverging changes in the mechanical function of the normal cardiac muscles of WKY rats with reduction in maximum velocity of isotonic shortening and of the time for DT to decrease 50% of its maximum value, and increase of the resting tension and of the rate of tension decline. CONCLUSION: Short-term FR causes prolongation of the contraction time of hypertrophied muscles and paradoxal changes in mechanical performance of normal cardiac fibers, with worsening of the shortening indices and of the resting tension, and improvement of the isometric relaxation.

  13. Multipotent embryonic isl1+ progenitor cells lead to cardiac, smooth muscle, and endothelial cell diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Alessandra; Caron, Leslie; Nakano, Atsushi; Lam, Jason T; Bernshausen, Alexandra; Chen, Yinhong; Qyang, Yibing; Bu, Lei; Sasaki, Mika; Martin-Puig, Silvia; Sun, Yunfu; Evans, Sylvia M; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Chien, Kenneth R

    2006-12-15

    Cardiogenesis requires the generation of endothelial, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells, thought to arise from distinct embryonic precursors. We use genetic fate-mapping studies to document that isl1(+) precursors from the second heart field can generate each of these diverse cardiovascular cell types in vivo. Utilizing embryonic stem (ES) cells, we clonally amplified a cellular hierarchy of isl1(+) cardiovascular progenitors, which resemble the developmental precursors in the embryonic heart. The transcriptional signature of isl1(+)/Nkx2.5(+)/flk1(+) defines a multipotent cardiovascular progenitor, which can give rise to cells of all three lineages. These studies document a developmental paradigm for cardiogenesis, where muscle and endothelial lineage diversification arises from a single cell-level decision of a multipotent isl1(+) cardiovascular progenitor cell (MICP). The discovery of ES cell-derived MICPs suggests a strategy for cardiovascular tissue regeneration via their isolation, renewal, and directed differentiation into specific mature cardiac, pacemaker, smooth muscle, and endothelial cell types.

  14. Distinct functional interactions between actin isoforms and nonsarcomeric myosins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Müller

    Full Text Available Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments.

  15. Clinical assessment of serum myosin light chain I in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, Takashi; Izumi, Tohru; Shibata, Akira (Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-08-01

    Serum cardiac myosin light chain I (LCI) levels were quantitated using a radioimmunoassay kit in patients suspected of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). In this study, 55 patients were evaluated between 1986 and 1991. They were composed of 40 males and 15 females, and their age was 27-75 years (51[+-]11 years). The patients with renal dysfunction were excluded due to their serum creatinine levels (>2.0 mg/dl). After cardiac catheterization, endomyocardial biopsy and echocardiography, 44 patients were diagnosed as DCM, 2 as ischemic heart disease, 2 as chronic myocarditis, 1 as restrictive cardiomyopathy, 1 as dilated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 1 as cardiac amyloidosis, 2 as myopathy, 1 as polymyositis and 1 as hypothyroidism. Only two patients with DCM had elevated LCI. Besides, two patients with myopathy or hypothyroidism had elevated LCI. In the follow-up, one patient died suddenly 6 months later and another showed normal value of LCI four years later. LCI elevation in DCM was not related to either the severity of heart failure or cardiac function and it showed no finding of [sup 201]Tl myocardial defect or elevated CPK. The mechanism for elevated LCI in myopathy is related to a crossreaction with myosin light chain in the skeletal muscle. In hypothyroidism, it may be related to decreased clearance of normal LCI concentration or increased myosin light chain from damaged skeletal muscle. In conclusion, it is evident that the measurement of LCI is not helpful in clinical assessment of patients with DCM, but may be useful in detection of secondary cardiomyopathy. (author).

  16. Clinical assessment of serum myosin light chain I in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Takashi; Izumi, Tohru; Shibata, Akira

    1992-01-01

    Serum cardiac myosin light chain I (LCI) levels were quantitated using a radioimmunoassay kit in patients suspected of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). In this study, 55 patients were evaluated between 1986 and 1991. They were composed of 40 males and 15 females, and their age was 27-75 years (51±11 years). The patients with renal dysfunction were excluded due to their serum creatinine levels (>2.0 mg/dl). After cardiac catheterization, endomyocardial biopsy and echocardiography, 44 patients were diagnosed as DCM, 2 as ischemic heart disease, 2 as chronic myocarditis, 1 as restrictive cardiomyopathy, 1 as dilated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 1 as cardiac amyloidosis, 2 as myopathy, 1 as polymyositis and 1 as hypothyroidism. Only two patients with DCM had elevated LCI. Besides, two patients with myopathy or hypothyroidism had elevated LCI. In the follow-up, one patient died suddenly 6 months later and another showed normal value of LCI four years later. LCI elevation in DCM was not related to either the severity of heart failure or cardiac function and it showed no finding of 201 Tl myocardial defect or elevated CPK. The mechanism for elevated LCI in myopathy is related to a crossreaction with myosin light chain in the skeletal muscle. In hypothyroidism, it may be related to decreased clearance of normal LCI concentration or increased myosin light chain from damaged skeletal muscle. In conclusion, it is evident that the measurement of LCI is not helpful in clinical assessment of patients with DCM, but may be useful in detection of secondary cardiomyopathy. (author)

  17. Regular physical exercise improves cardiac autonomic and muscle vasodilatory responses to isometric exercise in healthy elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Adriana de Oliveira; Santos, Amilton da Cruz; Trombetta, Ivani Credidio; Dantas, Marciano Moacir; Oliveira Marques, Ana Cristina; do Nascimento, Leone Severino; Barbosa, Bruno Teixeira; Dos Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues; Andrade, Maria do Amparo; Jaguaribe-Lima, Anna Myrna; Brasileiro-Santos, Maria do Socorro

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiac autonomic control and muscle vasodilation response during isometric exercise in sedentary and physically active older adults. Twenty healthy participants, 10 sedentary and 10 physically active older adults, were evaluated and paired by gender, age, and body mass index. Sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac activity (spectral and symbolic heart rate analysis) and muscle blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography) were measured for 10 minutes at rest (baseline) and during 3 minutes of isometric handgrip exercise at 30% of the maximum voluntary contraction (sympathetic excitatory maneuver). Variables were analyzed at baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric exercise. Cardiac autonomic parameters were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Mann–Whitney tests. Muscle vasodilatory response was analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Sedentary older adults had higher cardiac sympathetic activity compared to physically active older adult subjects at baseline (63.13±3.31 vs 50.45±3.55 nu, P=0.02). The variance (heart rate variability index) was increased in active older adults (1,438.64±448.90 vs 1,402.92±385.14 ms, P=0.02), and cardiac sympathetic activity (symbolic analysis) was increased in sedentary older adults (5,660.91±1,626.72 vs 4,381.35±1,852.87, P=0.03) during isometric handgrip exercise. Sedentary older adults showed higher cardiac sympathetic activity (spectral analysis) (71.29±4.40 vs 58.30±3.50 nu, P=0.03) and lower parasympathetic modulation (28.79±4.37 vs 41.77±3.47 nu, P=0.03) compared to physically active older adult subjects during isometric handgrip exercise. Regarding muscle vasodilation response, there was an increase in the skeletal muscle blood flow in the second (4.1±0.5 vs 3.7±0.4 mL/min per 100 mL, P=0.01) and third minute (4.4±0.4 vs 3.9±0.3 mL/min per 100 mL, P=0.03) of handgrip exercise in active older adults. The results indicate that

  18. Cardiac supporting device using artificial rubber muscle: preliminary study to active dynamic cardiomyoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Goto, Takeshi; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic cardiomyoplasty is a surgical treatment that utilizes the patient's skeletal muscle to support circulation. To overcome the limitations of autologous skeletal muscles in dynamic cardiomyoplasty, we studied the use of a wrapped-type cardiac supporting device using pneumatic muscles. Four straight rubber muscles (Fluidic Muscle, FESTO, Esslingen, Germany) were used and connected to pressure sensors, solenoid valves, a controller and an air compressor. The driving force was compressed air. A proportional-integral-derivative system was employed to control the device movement. An overflow-type mock circulation system was used to analyze the power and the controllability of this new device. The device worked powerfully with pumped flow against afterload of 88 mmHg, and the beating rate and contraction/dilatation time were properly controlled using simple software. Maximum pressure inside the ventricle and maximum output were 187 mmHg and 546.5 ml/min, respectively, in the setting of 50 beats per minute, a contraction/dilatation ratio of 1:2, a preload of 18 mmHg, and an afterload of 88 mmHg. By changing proportional gain, contraction speed could be modulated. This study showed the efficacy and feasibility of a pneumatic muscle for use in a cardiac supporting device.

  19. Wnt signaling balances specification of the cardiac and pharyngeal muscle fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Amrita; Holowiecki, Andrew; Song, Yuntao Charlie; Waxman, Joshua S.

    2017-01-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin (Wnt) signaling plays multiple conserved roles during fate specification of cardiac progenitors in developing vertebrate embryos. Although lineage analysis in ascidians and mice has indicated there is a close relationship between the cardiac second heart field (SHF) and pharyngeal muscle (PM) progenitors, the signals underlying directional fate decisions of the cells within the cardio-pharyngeal muscle field in vertebrates are not yet understood. Here, we examined the temporal requirements of Wnt signaling in cardiac and PM development. In contrast to a previous report in chicken embryos that suggested Wnt inhibits PM development during somitogenesis, we find that in zebrafish embryos Wnt signaling is sufficient to repress PM development during anterior-posterior patterning. Importantly, the temporal sensitivity of dorso-anterior PMs to increased Wnt signaling largely overlaps with when Wnt signaling promotes specification of the adjacent cardiac progenitors. Furthermore, we find that excess early Wnt signaling can cell autonomously promote expansion of the first heart field (FHF) progenitors at the expense of PM and SHF within the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM). Our study provides insight into an antagonistic developmental mechanism that balances the sizes of the adjacent cardiac and PM progenitor fields in early vertebrate embryos. PMID:28087459

  20. Fatty acid oxidation in skeletal and cardiac muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glatz, J.F.C.

    1983-01-01

    The biochemical investigations described in this thesis deal with two aspects of fatty acid oxidation in muscle: a comparison of the use of cell-free and cellular systems for oxidation measurements, and studies on the assay and the role of the fatty acid binding protein in fatty acid metabolism. The fatty acid oxidation rates are determined radiochemically by the sum of 14 CO 2 and 14 C-labeled acid-soluble products formed during oxidation of [ 14 C]-fatty acids. A radiochemical procedure for the assay of fatty acid binding by proteins is described. (Auth.)

  1. Effects of experimental hyperthyroidism on protein turnover in skeletal and cardiac muscle as measured by [14C]tyrosine infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, W J; Benjamin, W S; Faas, F H

    1982-04-15

    The effect of T3 (3,3',5-tri-iodothyronine) on protein turnover in skeletal and cardiac muscle was measured in intact rats by means of a 6 h [14C]tyrosine-infusion technique. Treatment with 25-30 micrograms of T3/100 g body wt. daily for 4-7 days increased the fractional rate of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. Since the fractional growth rate of the muscle was decreased or unchanged, T3 treatment increased the rate of muscle protein breakdown. These findings suggest that increased protein degradation is an important factor in decreasing skeletal-muscle mass in hyperthyroidism. In contrast with skeletal muscle, T3 treatment for 7 days caused an equivalent increase in the rate of cardiac muscle growth and protein synthesis. This suggests that hyperthyroidism does not increase protein breakdown in heart muscle as it does in skeletal muscle. The failure of T3 to increase proteolysis in heart muscle may be due to a different action on the cardiac myocyte or to systemic effects of T3 which increase cardiac work.

  2. Stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms of slow muscle-specific myosin heavy chain gene expression in fish: Transient and transgenic analysis of torafugu MYHM86-2 promoter in zebrafish embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaduzzaman, Md.; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Bhuiyan, Sharmin Siddique; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain gene, MYH M86-2 , exhibited restricted expression in slow muscle fibers of torafugu embryos and larvae, suggesting its functional roles for embryonic and larval muscle development. However, the transcriptional mechanisms involved in its expression are still ambiguous. The present study is the first extensive analysis of slow muscle-specific MYH M86-2 promoter in fish for identifying the cis-elements that are crucial for its expression. Combining both transient transfection and transgenic approaches, we demonstrated that the 2614 bp 5′-flanking sequences of MYH M86-2 contain a sufficient promoter activity to drive gene expression specific to superficial slow muscle fibers. By cyclopamine treatment, we also demonstrated that the differentiation of such superficial slow muscle fibers depends on hedgehog signaling activity. The deletion analyses defined an upstream fragment necessary for repressing ectopic MYH M86-2 expression in the fast muscle fibers. The transcriptional mechanism that prevents MYH M86-2 expression in the fast muscle fibers is mediated through Sox6 binding elements. We also demonstrated that Sox6 may function as a transcriptional repressor of MYH M86-2 expression. We further discovered that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) binding elements plays a key role and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) binding elements participate in the transcriptional regulation of MYH M86-2 expression. - Highlights: ► MYH M86-2 is highly expressed in slow muscle fibers of torafugu embryos and larvae. ► MYH M86-2 promoter activity depends on the hedgehog signaling. ► Sox6 binding elements inhibits MYH M86-2 expression in fast muscle fibers. ► Sox6 elements function as transcriptional repressor of MYH M86-2 promoter activity. ► NFAT and MEF2 binding elements play a key role for directing MYH M86-2 expression

  3. Arginine metabolism by macrophages promotes cardiac and muscle fibrosis in mdx muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Wehling-Henricks

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common, lethal disease of childhood. One of 3500 new-born males suffers from this universally-lethal disease. Other than the use of corticosteroids, little is available to affect the relentless progress of the disease, leading many families to use dietary supplements in hopes of reducing the progression or severity of muscle wasting. Arginine is commonly used as a dietary supplement and its use has been reported to have beneficial effects following short-term administration to mdx mice, a genetic model of DMD. However, the long-term effects of arginine supplementation are unknown. This lack of knowledge about the long-term effects of increased arginine metabolism is important because elevated arginine metabolism can increase tissue fibrosis, and increased fibrosis of skeletal muscles and the heart is an important and potentially life-threatening feature of DMD.We use both genetic and nutritional manipulations to test whether changes in arginase metabolism promote fibrosis and increase pathology in mdx mice. Our findings show that fibrotic lesions in mdx muscle are enriched with arginase-2-expressing macrophages and that muscle macrophages stimulated with cytokines that activate the M2 phenotype show elevated arginase activity and expression. We generated a line of arginase-2-null mutant mdx mice and found that the mutation reduced fibrosis in muscles of 18-month-old mdx mice, and reduced kyphosis that is attributable to muscle fibrosis. We also observed that dietary supplementation with arginine for 17-months increased mdx muscle fibrosis. In contrast, arginine-2 mutation did not reduce cardiac fibrosis or affect cardiac function assessed by echocardiography, although 17-months of dietary supplementation with arginine increased cardiac fibrosis. Long-term arginine treatments did not decrease matrix metalloproteinase-2 or -9 or increase the expression of utrophin, which have been reported as beneficial

  4. Respiratory muscle strength in relation to sarcopenia in elderly cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Watanabe, Satoshi; Oka, Koichiro; Kasahara, Yusuke; Morio, Yuji; Hiraki, Koji; Hirano, Yasuyuki; Omori, Yutaka; Suzuki, Norio; Kida, Keisuke; Suzuki, Kengo; Akashi, Yoshihiro J

    2016-12-01

    Little information exists on the relation between respiratory muscle strength such as maximum inspiratory muscle pressure (MIP) and sarcopenia in elderly cardiac patients. The present study aimed to determine the differences in MIP, and cutoff values for MIP according to sarcopenia in elderly cardiac patients. We enrolled 63 consecutive elderly male patients aged ≥65 years with cardiac disease in this cross-sectional study. Sarcopenia was defined based on the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People algorithm, and, accordingly, the patients were divided into two groups: the sarcopenia group (n = 24) and non-sarcopenia group (n = 39). The prevalence of sarcopenia in cardiac patients and MIP in the patients with and without sarcopenia were assessed to determine cutoff values of MIP. After adjustment for body mass index, the MIP in the sarcopenia group was significantly lower than that in the non-sarcopenia group (54.7 ± 36.8 cmH 2 O; 95 % CI 42.5-72.6 vs. 80.7 ± 34.7 cmH 2 O; 95 % CI 69.5-92.0; F = 4.89, p = 0.029). A receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis of patients with and without sarcopenia identified a cutoff value for MIP of 55.6 cmH 2 O, with a sensitivity of 0.76, 1-specificity of 0.37, and AUC of 0.70 (95 % CI 0.56-0.83; p = 0.01) in the study patients. Compared with elderly cardiac patients without sarcopenia, MIP in those with sarcopenia may be negatively affected. The MIP cutoff value reported here may be a useful minimum target value for identifying elderly male cardiac patients with sarcopenia.

  5. Absence of acute skeletal and cardiac muscle injuries in amateur triathletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos C. Jovita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Creatine kinase (CK and creatine kinase muscle-brain fraction (CK-MB might be associated with damage to muscle and cardiac tissue, respectively, as a consequence of intense prolonged exercise. The objective of the present study was to determine whether acute changes in CK and CK-MB reflect some risk of damage to skeletal and cardiac muscles in amateur athletes after Ironman 70.3. The sample consisted of 10 male athlete volunteers (age: 34.0 ± 9.2 years. A venous blood sample (2 mL was collected before and after the competition. The volunteers completed the race in 5h20min to 6 h. CK and CK-MB were analyzed by an enzymatic method using Wiener labreagent in an automatic spectrophotometer (Targa bt 3000. The nonparametric Wilcoxon test showed significant differences (p < .05 in the variables studied before and after the competition. Mean CK was 112.23 ± 34.9 and 458.0 ± 204.9 U/L (Δ% = 418.2, and mean CK-MB was 7.4 ± 2.6 and 10.8 ± 3.9 U/L (Δ% = 153.3 before and after the event, respectively. The relative variation in CK-MB compared to CK before (6.9% and after (2.5% the competition showed that the former is not a factor of concern during intense prolonged exercise such as Ironman 70.3. In conclusion, the acute increase in CK after the end of intense prolonged exercise indicates skeletal muscle damage which, however, is considered to be normal for athletes. With respect to CK-MB, cardiac muscle injury was inexistent.

  6. Myofibril ATPase activity of cardiac and skeletal muscle of exhaustively exercised rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcastro, A N; Turcotte, R; Rossiter, M; Secord, D; Maybank, P E

    1984-01-01

    The activation characteristics of Mg-ATP and Ca2+ on cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibril ATPase activity were studied in rats following a run to exhaustion. In addition, the effect of varying ionic strength was determined on skeletal muscle from exhausted animals. The exhausted group (E) ran at a speed of 25 m min-1 with an 8% incline. Myofibril ATPase activities for control (C) and E were determined with 1, 3 and 5 mM Mg-ATP and 1 and 10 microM Ca2+ at pH 7.0 and 30 degrees C. For control skeletal muscle, at 1 and 10 microM Ca2+, there was an increase in ATPase activity from 1 to 5 mM Mg-ATP (P less than 0.05). For E animals the myofibril ATPase activities at 10 microM Ca2+ and all Mg-ATP concentrations were similar to C (P greater than 0.05). At 1.0 microM Ca2+ and all Mg-ATP concentrations were similar to C (P greater than 0.05). At 1.0 microM Ca2+ the activities at 3 and 5 mM Mg-ATP were greater for the E animals (P less than 0.05). Increasing KCl concentrations resulted in greater inhibition for E animals. With cardiac muscle, the myofibril ATPase activities at 1.0 microM free Ca2+ were lower for E at all Mg-ATP levels (P less than 0.05). In contrast, at 10 microM Ca2+, the E group exhibited an elevated myofibril ATPase activity. The results indicate that Mg-ATP and Ca2+ activation of cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibril ATPase is altered with exhaustive exercise.

  7. Rbfox-regulated alternative splicing is critical for zebrafish cardiac and skeletal muscle function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Thomas L.; Arribere, Joshua A.; Geurts, Paul A.; Exner, Cameron R. T.; McDonald, Kent L.; Dill, Kariena K.; Marr, Henry L.; Adkar, Shaunak S.; Garnett, Aaron T.; Amacher, Sharon L.; Conboy, John G.

    2012-01-01

    Rbfox RNA binding proteins are implicated as regulators of phylogenetically-conserved alternative splicing events important for muscle function. To investigate the function of rbfox genes, we used morpholino-mediated knockdown of muscle-expressed rbfox1l and rbfox2 in zebrafish embryos. Single and double morphant embryos exhibited changes in splicing of overlapping sets of bioinformatically-predicted rbfox target exons, many of which exhibit a muscle-enriched splicing pattern that is conserved in vertebrates. Thus, conservation of intronic Rbfox binding motifs is a good predictor of Rbfox-regulated alternative splicing. Morphology and development of single morphant embryos was strikingly normal; however, muscle development in double morphants was severely disrupted. Defects in cardiac muscle were marked by reduced heart rate and in skeletal muscle by complete paralysis. The predominance of wavy myofibers and abnormal thick and thin filaments in skeletal muscle revealed that myofibril assembly is defective and disorganized in double morphants. Ultra-structural analysis revealed that although sarcomeres with electron dense M- and Z-bands are present in muscle fibers of rbfox1l/rbox2 morphants, they are substantially reduced in number and alignment. Importantly, splicing changes and morphological defects were rescued by expression of morpholino-resistant rbfox cDNA. Additionally, a target-blocking MO complementary to a single UGCAUG motif adjacent to an rbfox target exon of fxr1 inhibited inclusion in a similar manner to rbfox knockdown, providing evidence that Rbfox regulates the splicing of target exons via direct binding to intronic regulatory motifs. We conclude that Rbfox proteins regulate an alternative splicing program essential for vertebrate heart and skeletal muscle function. PMID:21925157

  8. Rbfox-regulated alternative splicing is critical for zebrafish cardiac and skeletal muscle functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Thomas L; Arribere, Joshua A; Geurts, Paul A; Exner, Cameron R T; McDonald, Kent L; Dill, Kariena K; Marr, Henry L; Adkar, Shaunak S; Garnett, Aaron T; Amacher, Sharon L; Conboy, John G

    2011-11-15

    Rbfox RNA binding proteins are implicated as regulators of phylogenetically-conserved alternative splicing events important for muscle function. To investigate the function of rbfox genes, we used morpholino-mediated knockdown of muscle-expressed rbfox1l and rbfox2 in zebrafish embryos. Single and double morphant embryos exhibited changes in splicing of overlapping sets of bioinformatically-predicted rbfox target exons, many of which exhibit a muscle-enriched splicing pattern that is conserved in vertebrates. Thus, conservation of intronic Rbfox binding motifs is a good predictor of Rbfox-regulated alternative splicing. Morphology and development of single morphant embryos were strikingly normal; however, muscle development in double morphants was severely disrupted. Defects in cardiac muscle were marked by reduced heart rate and in skeletal muscle by complete paralysis. The predominance of wavy myofibers and abnormal thick and thin filaments in skeletal muscle revealed that myofibril assembly is defective and disorganized in double morphants. Ultra-structural analysis revealed that although sarcomeres with electron dense M- and Z-bands are present in muscle fibers of rbfox1l/rbox2 morphants, they are substantially reduced in number and alignment. Importantly, splicing changes and morphological defects were rescued by expression of morpholino-resistant rbfox cDNA. Additionally, a target-blocking MO complementary to a single UGCAUG motif adjacent to an rbfox target exon of fxr1 inhibited inclusion in a similar manner to rbfox knockdown, providing evidence that Rbfox regulates the splicing of target exons via direct binding to intronic regulatory motifs. We conclude that Rbfox proteins regulate an alternative splicing program essential for vertebrate heart and skeletal muscle functions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Characterization of myosin light chain in shrimp hemocytic phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fang; Wang, Zhiyong; Wang, Xiaoqing

    2010-11-01

    Myosin light chain, a well-known cytoskeleton gene, regulates multiple processes that are involved in material transport, muscle shrink and cell division. However, its function in phagocytosis against invading pathogens in crustacean remains unknown. In this investigation, a myosin light chain gene was obtained from Marsupenaeus japonicus shrimp. The full-length cDNA of this gene was of 766 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 462 bp encoding a polypeptide of 153 amino acids. The myosin light chain protein was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Subsequently the specific antibody was raised using the purified GST fusion protein. As revealed by immuno-electron microscopy, the myosin light chain protein was only expressed in the dark bands of muscle. In the present study, the myosin light chain gene was up-regulated in the WSSV-resistant shrimp as revealed by real-time PCR and western blot. And the phagocytic percentage and phagocytic index using FITC-labeled Vibrio parahemolyticus were remarkably increased in the WSSV-resistant shrimp, suggesting that the myosin light chain protein was essential in hemocytic phagocytosis. On the other hand, RNAi assays indicated that the phagocytic percentage and phagocytic index were significantly decreased when the myosin light chain gene was silenced by sequence-specific siRNA. These findings suggested that myosin light chain protein was involved in the regulation of hemocytic phagocytosis of shrimp. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Myostatin promotes distinct responses on protein metabolism of skeletal and cardiac muscle fibers of rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.H. Manfredi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Myostatin is a novel negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass. Myostatin expression is also found in heart in a much less extent, but it can be upregulated in pathological conditions, such as heart failure. Myostatin may be involved in inhibiting protein synthesis and/or increasing protein degradation in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Herein, we used cell cultures and isolated muscles from rats to determine protein degradation and synthesis. Muscles incubated with myostatin exhibited an increase in proteolysis with an increase of Atrogin-1, MuRF1 and LC3 genes. Extensor digitorum longus muscles and C2C12 myotubes exhibited a reduction in protein turnover. Cardiomyocytes showed an increase in proteolysis by activating autophagy and the ubiquitin proteasome system, and a decrease in protein synthesis by decreasing P70S6K. The effect of myostatin on protein metabolism is related to fiber type composition, which may be associated to the extent of atrophy mediated effect of myostatin on muscle.

  11. Lead reduces tension development and the myosin ATPase activity of the rat right ventricular myocardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Vassallo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Lead (Pb2+ poisoning causes hypertension, but little is known regarding its acute effects on cardiac contractility. To evaluate these effects, force was measured in right ventricular strips that were contracting isometrically in 45 male Wistar rats (250-300 g before and after the addition of increasing concentrations of lead acetate (3, 7, 10, 30, 70, 100, and 300 µM to the bath. Changes in rate of stimulation (0.1-1.5 Hz, relative potentiation after pauses of 15, 30, and 60 s, effect of Ca2+ concentration (0.62, 1.25, and 2.5 mM, and the effect of isoproterenol (20 ng/mL were determined before and after the addition of 100 µM Pb2+. Effects on contractile proteins were evaluated after caffeine treatment using tetanic stimulation (10 Hz and measuring the activity of the myosin ATPase. Pb2+ produced concentration-dependent force reduction, significant at concentrations greater than 30 µM. The force developed in response to increasing rates of stimulation became smaller at 0.5 and 0.8 Hz. Relative potentiation increased after 100 µM Pb2+ treatment. Extracellular Ca2+ increment and isoproterenol administration increased force development but after 100 µM Pb2+ treatment the force was significantly reduced suggesting an effect of the metal on the sarcolemmal Ca2+ influx. Concentration of 100 µM Pb2+ also reduced the peak and plateau force of tetanic contractions and reduced the activity of the myosin ATPase. Results showed that acute Pb2+ administration, although not affecting the sarcoplasmic reticulum activity, produces a concentration-dependent negative inotropic effect and reduces myosin ATPase activity. Results suggest that acute lead administration reduced myocardial contractility by reducing sarcolemmal calcium influx and the myosin ATPase activity. These results also suggest that lead exposure is hazardous and has toxicological consequences affecting cardiac muscle.

  12. Biotin carboxylases in mitochondria and the cytosol from skeletal and cardiac muscle as detected by avidin binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirkeby, S.; Moe, D.; Bøg-Hansen, T. C.; van Noorden, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Biotin carboxylases in mammalian cells are regulatory enzymes in lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis. In this study, endogenous biotin in skeletal and cardiac muscle was detected using avidin conjugated with alkaline phosphatase and applied in high concentrations to muscle sections. The avidin binding

  13. Pesquisa de marcadores para os genes da cadeia pesada da beta-miosina cardíaca e da proteína C de ligação à miosina em familiares de pacientes com cardiomiopatia hipertrófica Research of markers for the genes of the heavy chain of cardiac beta-myosin and myosin binding protein C in relatives of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Paula Tirone

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar os marcadores moleculares para os genes da cadeia pesada da beta-miosina cardíaca e da proteína-C de ligação à miosina em familiares de portadores de cardiomiopatia hipertrófica. MÉTODOS: Foram estudadas 12 famílias que realizaram anamnese, exame físico, eletrocardiograma, ecocardiograma e coleta de sangue para o estudo genético através da reação em cadeia da polimerasse. RESULTADOS: Dos 227 familiares 25% eram acometidos, sendo 51% do sexo masculino com idade média de 35±19 (2 a 95 anos. A análise genética mostrou ligação com o gene da b-miosina cardíaca em uma família e, em outra, ligação com o gene da proteína C de ligação à miosina. Em cinco famílias foram excluídas ligações com os dois genes; em duas, a ligação com o gene da proteína C de ligação à miosina, porém para o gene da b-miosina os resultados foram inconclusivos; em duas famílias os resultados foram inconclusivos para os dois genes e em uma foi excluída ligação para o gene da b-miosina mas ficou inconclusivo para o gene da proteína C de ligação à miosina. CONCLUSÃO: Em nosso meio, talvez predominem outros genes que não aqueles descritos na literatura, ou que existam outras diferenças genéticas relacionadas com a origem de nossa população e/ou fatores ambientais.OBJECTIVE: To study the molecular markers for the genes of the heavy chain of cardiac beta-myosin and the myosin binding protein C in relatives of carriers of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. METHODS: Twelve families who had anamnesis, physical exam, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and blood collection for the genetic study through the chain reaction of polymerase. RESULTS: From the 227 relatives, 25% were ill-taken, with 51% men, with an average age of 35±19 (2 to 95 years old. The genetic analysis showed a connection with the gene of the cardiac b-myosin in a family and, in another, a connection with the gene of the myosin-binding protein C. In five

  14. Analysis of myofibrillar proteins and transcripts in adult skeletal muscles of the American lobster Homarus americanus: variable expression of myosins, actin and troponins in fast, slow-twitch and slow-tonic fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Scott; Mykles, Donald L

    2003-10-01

    Skeletal muscles are diverse in their contractile properties, with many of these differences being directly related to the assemblages of myofibrillar isoforms characteristic of different fibers. Crustacean muscles are similar to other muscles in this respect, although the majority of information about differences in muscle organization comes from vertebrate species. In the present study, we examined the correlation between myofibrillar protein isoforms and the patterns of myofibrillar gene expression in fast, slow-phasic (S(1)) and slow-tonic (S(2)) fibers of the American lobster Homarus americanus. SDS-PAGE and western blotting were used to identify isoform assemblages of myosin heavy chain (MHC), P75, troponin T (TnT) and troponin I (TnI). RT-PCR was used to monitor expression of fast and slow (S(1)) MHC, P75 and actin in different fiber types, and the MHC and actin levels were quantified by real-time PCR. Fast and slow fibers from the claw closers predominantly expressed fast and S(1) MHC, respectively, but also lower levels of the alternate MHC. By contrast, fast fibers from the deep abdominal muscle expressed fast MHC exclusively. In addition, slow muscles expressed significantly higher levels of actin than fast fibers. A distal bundle of fibers in the cutter claw closer muscle was found to be composed of a mixture of S(1) and S(2) fibers, many of which possessed a mixture of S(1) and S(2) MHC isoforms. This pattern supports the idea that S(1) and S(2) fibers represent extremes in a continuum of slow muscle phenotype. Overall, these patterns demonstrate that crustacean skeletal muscles cannot be strictly categorized into discrete fiber types, but a muscle's properties probably represent a point on a continuum of fiber types. This trend may result from differences in innervation pattern, as each muscle is controlled by a unique combination of phasic, tonic or both phasic and tonic motor nerves. In this respect, future studies examining how muscle phenotype

  15. Regular physical exercise improves cardiac autonomic and muscle vasodilatory responses to isometric exercise in healthy elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmento AO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Adriana de Oliveira Sarmento,1–3 Amilton da Cruz Santos,1,4 Ivani Credidio Trombetta,2,5 Marciano Moacir Dantas,1 Ana Cristina Oliveira Marques,1,4 Leone Severino do Nascimento,1,4 Bruno Teixeira Barbosa,1,2 Marcelo Rodrigues Dos Santos,2 Maria do Amparo Andrade,3 Anna Myrna Jaguaribe-Lima,3,6 Maria do Socorro Brasileiro-Santos1,3,4 1Laboratory of Physical Training Studies Applied to Health, Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Paraiba, João Pessoa, Brazil; 2Unit of Cardiovascular Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology – Heart Institute (InCor/HC-FMUSP, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Graduate Program in Physiotherapy, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil; 4Associate Graduate Program in Physical Education UPE/UFPB, João Pessoa, Brazil; 5Graduate Program in Medicine, Universidade Nove de Julho (UNINOVE, São Paulo, Brazil; 6Department of Morphology and Animal Physiology, Federal Rural University of Pernambuco, Recife, Brazil Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiac autonomic control and muscle vasodilation response during isometric exercise in sedentary and physically active older adults. Twenty healthy participants, 10 sedentary and 10 physically active older adults, were evaluated and paired by gender, age, and body mass index. Sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac activity (spectral and symbolic heart rate analysis and muscle blood flow (venous occlusion plethysmography were measured for 10 minutes at rest (baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric handgrip exercise at 30% of the maximum voluntary contraction (sympathetic excitatory maneuver. Variables were analyzed at baseline and during 3 minutes of isometric exercise. Cardiac autonomic parameters were analyzed by Wilcoxon and Mann–Whitney tests. Muscle vasodilatory response was analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Tukey’s post hoc test. Sedentary older adults had higher cardiac

  16. Neonatal epicardial-derived progenitors aquire myogenic traits in skeletal muscle, but not cardiac muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte C; Jensen, Charlotte H; Skovrind, Ida

    2016-01-01

    heart missing regenerative signals essential for directed differentiation of EPDCs. Herein, we aimed to evaluate the myogenic potential of neonatal EPDCs in adult and neonatal mouse myocardium, as well as in skeletal muscle. The two latter tissues have an intrinsic capability to develop and regenerate......, in contrast to the adult heart. METHODS: Highly purified mouse EPDCs were transplanted into damaged neonatal and adult myocardium as well as regenerating skeletal muscle. Co-cultures with skeletal myoblasts were used to distinguish fusion independent myogenic conversion. RESULTS: No donor EPDC...... that EPDCs may be more myogenic than previously anticipated. But, the heart may lack factors for induction of myogenesis of EPDCs, a scenario that should be taken into consideration when aiming for repair of damaged myocardium by stem cell transplantation....

  17. NAD+ : A big player in cardiac and skeletal muscle remodeling and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2018-03-01

    In the past decade, NAD+ has gained importance for its beneficial effects as antioxidant and anti-aging molecule. A paper in science by Zhang et al. () has described that NAD+ when replenished, ameliorates muscle dystrophy in mice by improving mitochondrial function. NAD+ was also demonstrated by the authors to improve the life span of mice. Cox et al. () demonstrated the cardiac effects of NAD+ which mitigated chronic heart failure via mitochondrial redox state mechanism. Cox et al. () also demonstrated that NAD+ is provided in the drinking water, it improves cardiac relaxation in volume overload model of heart failure. Although NAD+ has a profound anti-aging and anti-oxidant effects, its effect on humans and use as a dietary supplement needs more exploration. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Myosin heavy chain and Na+,K+-ATPase isoforms in equine skeletal muscle : Comparison of mRNA and protein expression profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Burg, M.M.M.

    2009-01-01

    Adaptations to training and exercise can be measured in blood, muscle, and bones and are also reflected in behavior. Since equine total muscle mass represents approximately 42% of total body weight, a major role for skeletal muscle in adaptation to training can be expected. The plasticity of

  19. Effects of experimental hyperthyroidism on protein turnover in skeletal and cardiac muscle as measured by [14C]tyrosine infusion.

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, W J; Benjamin, W S; Faas, F H

    1982-01-01

    The effect of T3 (3,3',5-tri-iodothyronine) on protein turnover in skeletal and cardiac muscle was measured in intact rats by means of a 6 h [14C]tyrosine-infusion technique. Treatment with 25-30 micrograms of T3/100 g body wt. daily for 4-7 days increased the fractional rate of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. Since the fractional growth rate of the muscle was decreased or unchanged, T3 treatment increased the rate of muscle protein breakdown. These findings suggest that increased prote...

  20. Electron microscopic evidence for the myosin head lever arm mechanism in hydrated myosin filaments using the gas environmental chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minoda, Hiroki; Okabe, Tatsuhiro; Inayoshi, Yuhri; Miyakawa, Takuya; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru; Katayama, Eisaku; Wakabayashi, Takeyuki; Akimoto, Tsuyoshi; Sugi, Haruo

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We succeeded in recording structural changes of hydrated myosin cross-bridges. → We succeeded in position-marking the cross-bridges with site-directed antibodies. → We recorded cross-bridge movement at different regions in individual cross-bridge. → The movement was smallest at the cross-bridge-subfragment two boundary. → The results provide evidence for the cross-bridge lever arm mechanism. -- Abstract: Muscle contraction results from an attachment-detachment cycle between the myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and the sites on actin filaments. The myosin head first attaches to actin together with the products of ATP hydrolysis, performs a power stroke associated with release of hydrolysis products, and detaches from actin upon binding with new ATP. The detached myosin head then hydrolyses ATP, and performs a recovery stroke to restore its initial position. The strokes have been suggested to result from rotation of the lever arm domain around the converter domain, while the catalytic domain remains rigid. To ascertain the validity of the lever arm hypothesis in muscle, we recorded ATP-induced movement at different regions within individual myosin heads in hydrated myosin filaments, using the gas environmental chamber attached to the electron microscope. The myosin head were position-marked with gold particles using three different site-directed antibodies. The amplitude of ATP-induced movement at the actin binding site in the catalytic domain was similar to that at the boundary between the catalytic and converter domains, but was definitely larger than that at the regulatory light chain in the lever arm domain. These results are consistent with the myosin head lever arm mechanism in muscle contraction if some assumptions are made.

  1. Changes in cardiac and muscle biomarkers following an uphill-only marathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Ponte, Alessandro; Giovanelli, Nicola; Antonutto, Guglielmo; Nigris, Daniele; Curcio, Francesco; Cortese, Pietro; Lazzer, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate changes in cardiac troponin I levels (cTnI) and the main biomarkers of skeletal muscle damage after an uphill-only marathon, along with its relationship with athletes' physiological parameters. Twenty-two runners participated in the "Supermaratona dell'Etna" (43 km, 0-2850 m AMSL). Before and immediately after the race, body mass and hydration status were measured together with blood sampling. At the end of the race, mean cTnI increased significantly in all athletes (mean +900%), and in 52% of them the cTnI values were over the normal range. Mean creatinine and cortisol increased significantly (by 30.5% and 291.4%), while C-reactive protein levels did not change significantly. Then, an uphill-only marathon showed a significant increase in cardiac and skeletal muscle blood biomarkers of injury, and cTnI levels were not significantly correlated with age, body mass index, V̇O 2 max, training status, ultra-endurance training experience, race time and blood parameters.

  2. Electron Microscopic Recording of the Power and Recovery Strokes of Individual Myosin Heads Coupled with ATP Hydrolysis: Facts and Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruo Sugi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The most straightforward way to get information on the performance of individual myosin heads producing muscle contraction may be to record their movement, coupled with ATP hydrolysis, electron-microscopically using the gas environmental chamber (EC. The EC enables us to visualize and record ATP-induced myosin head movement in hydrated skeletal muscle myosin filaments. When actin filaments are absent, myosin heads fluctuate around a definite neutral position, so that their time-averaged mean position remains unchanged. On application of ATP, myosin heads are found to move away from, but not towards, the bare region, indicating that myosin heads perform a recovery stroke (average amplitude, 6 nm. After exhaustion of ATP, myosin heads return to their neutral position. In the actin–myosin filament mixture, myosin heads form rigor actin myosin linkages, and on application of ATP, they perform a power stroke by stretching adjacent elastic structures because of a limited amount of applied ATP ≤ 10 µM. The average amplitude of the power stroke is 3.3 nm and 2.5 nm at the distal and the proximal regions of the myosin head catalytic domain (CAD, respectively. The power stroke amplitude increases appreciably at low ionic strength, which is known to enhance Ca2+-activated force in muscle. In both the power and recovery strokes, myosin heads return to their neutral position after exhaustion of ATP.

  3. Glutaredoxin-2 is required to control oxidative phosphorylation in cardiac muscle by mediating deglutathionylation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Xuan, Jian Ying; McBride, Skye; Maharsy, Wael; Thorn, Stephanie; Holterman, Chet E; Kennedy, Christopher R J; Rippstein, Peter; deKemp, Robert; da Silva, Jean; Nemer, Mona; Lou, Marjorie; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2014-05-23

    Glutaredoxin-2 (Grx2) modulates the activity of several mitochondrial proteins in cardiac tissue by catalyzing deglutathionylation reactions. However, it remains uncertain whether Grx2 is required to control mitochondrial ATP output in heart. Here, we report that Grx2 plays a vital role modulating mitochondrial energetics and heart physiology by mediating the deglutathionylation of mitochondrial proteins. Deletion of Grx2 (Grx2(-/-)) decreased ATP production by complex I-linked substrates to half that in wild type (WT) mitochondria. Decreased respiration was associated with increased complex I glutathionylation diminishing its activity. Tissue glucose uptake was concomitantly increased. Mitochondrial ATP output and complex I activity could be recovered by restoring the redox environment to that favoring the deglutathionylated states of proteins. Grx2(-/-) hearts also developed left ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis, and mice became hypertensive. Mitochondrial energetics from Grx2 heterozygotes (Grx2(+/-)) were also dysfunctional, and hearts were hypertrophic. Intriguingly, Grx2(+/-) mice were far less hypertensive than Grx2(-/-) mice. Thus, Grx2 plays a vital role in modulating mitochondrial metabolism in cardiac muscle, and Grx2 deficiency leads to pathology. As mitochondrial ATP production was restored by the addition of reductants, these findings may be relevant to novel redox-related therapies in cardiac disease. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Actin and myosin contribute to mammalian mitochondrial DNA maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, A.; He, J.; Mao, C. C.; Bailey, L. J.; Di Re, M.; Sembongi, H.; Kazak, L.; Dzionek, K.; Holmes, J. B.; Cluett, T. J.; Harbour, M. E.; Fearnley, I. M.; Crouch, R. J.; Conti, M. A.; Adelstein, R. S.; Walker, J. E.; Holt, I. J.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA maintenance and segregation are dependent on the actin cytoskeleton in budding yeast. We found two cytoskeletal proteins among six proteins tightly associated with rat liver mitochondrial DNA: non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA and β-actin. In human cells, transient gene silencing of MYH9 (encoding non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA), or the closely related MYH10 gene (encoding non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIB), altered the topology and increased the copy number of mitochondrial DNA; and the latter effect was enhanced when both genes were targeted simultaneously. In contrast, genetic ablation of non-muscle myosin IIB was associated with a 60% decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, compared to control cells. Gene silencing of β-actin also affected mitochondrial DNA copy number and organization. Protease-protection experiments and iodixanol gradient analysis suggest some β-actin and non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA reside within human mitochondria and confirm that they are associated with mitochondrial DNA. Collectively, these results strongly implicate the actomyosin cytoskeleton in mammalian mitochondrial DNA maintenance. PMID:21398640

  5. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra, E-mail: jmartyn@partners.org [Department of Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Shriners Hospitals for Children, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [{sup 3}H]glucose and 2-deoxy[{sup 14}C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats.

  6. Anesthesia with propofol induces insulin resistance systemically in skeletal and cardiac muscles and liver of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fukushima, Yuji; Kaneki, Masao; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Propofol, as a model anesthetic drug, induced whole body insulin resistance. ► Propofol anesthesia decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. ► Propofol decreased insulin-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal and cardiac muscles. ► Propofol increased hepatic glucose output confirming hepatic insulin resistance. -- Abstract: Hyperglycemia together with hepatic and muscle insulin resistance are common features in critically ill patients, and these changes are associated with enhanced inflammatory response, increased susceptibility to infection, muscle wasting, and worsened prognosis. Tight blood glucose control by intensive insulin treatment may reduce the morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. Although some anesthetics have been shown to cause insulin resistance, it remains unknown how and in which tissues insulin resistance is induced by anesthetics. Moreover, the effects of propofol, a clinically relevant intravenous anesthetic, also used in the intensive care unit for sedation, on insulin sensitivity have not yet been investigated. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study was performed in rats anesthetized with propofol and conscious unrestrained rats. To evaluate glucose uptake in tissues and hepatic glucose output [ 3 H]glucose and 2-deoxy[ 14 C]glucose were infused during the clamp study. Anesthesia with propofol induced a marked whole-body insulin resistance compared with conscious rats, as reflected by significantly decreased glucose infusion rate to maintain euglycemia. Insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake was decreased in skeletal muscle and heart, and hepatic glucose output was increased in propofol anesthetized rats. Anesthesia with propofol induces systemic insulin resistance along with decreases in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal and heart muscle and attenuation of the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic glucose output in rats

  7. Proportions of myosin heavy chain mRNAs, protein isoforms and fiber types in the slow and fast skeletal muscles are maintained after alterations of thyroid status in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, T; Diallo, M

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we have established that slow soleus (SOL) and fast extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of euthyroid (EU) Lewis rats posses the same proportions between their four myosin heavy chain (MyHC) mRNAs, protein isoforms and fiber types as determined by real time RT-PCR, SDS-PAGE and 2-D stereological fiber type analysis, respectively. In the present paper we investigated if these proportions are maintained in adult Lewis rats with hyperthyroid (HT) and hypothyroid (HY) status. Although HT and HY states change MyHC isoform expression, results from all three methods showed that proportion between MyHC mRNA-1, 2a, -2x/d, -2b, protein isoforms MyHC-1, -2a, -2x/d, -2b and to lesser extent also fiber types 1, 2A, 2X/D, 2B were preserved in both SOL and EDL muscles. Furthermore, in the SOL muscle mRNA expression of slow MyHC-1 remained up to three orders higher compared to fast MyHC transcripts, which explains the predominance of MyHC-1 isoform and fiber type 1 even in HT rats. Although HT status led in the SOL to increased expression of MyHC-2a mRNA, MyHC-2a isoform and 2A fibers, it preserved extremely low expression of MyHC-2x and -2b mRNA and protein isoforms, which explains the absence of pure 2X/D and 2B fibers. HY status, on the other hand, almost completely abolished expression of all three fast MyHC mRNAs, MyHC protein isoforms and fast fiber types in the SOL muscle. Our data present evidence that a correlation between mRNA, protein content and fiber type composition found in EU status is also preserved in HT and HY rats.

  8. Evaluation of skeletal and cardiac muscle function after chronic administration of thymosin beta-4 in the dystrophin deficient mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Spurney

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta-4 (Tbeta4 is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. We studied the effects of chronic administration of Tbeta4 on the skeletal and cardiac muscle of dystrophin deficient mdx mice, the mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Female wild type (C57BL10/ScSnJ and mdx mice, 8-10 weeks old, were treated with 150 microg of Tbeta4 twice a week for 6 months. To promote muscle pathology, mice were exercised for 30 minutes twice a week. Skeletal and cardiac muscle function were assessed via grip strength and high frequency echocardiography. Localization of Tbeta4 and amount of fibrosis were quantified using immunohistochemistry and Gomori's tri-chrome staining, respectively. Mdx mice treated with Tbeta4 showed a significant increase in skeletal muscle regenerating fibers compared to untreated mdx mice. Tbeta4 stained exclusively in the regenerating fibers of mdx mice. Although untreated mdx mice had significantly decreased skeletal muscle strength compared to untreated wild type, there were no significant improvements in mdx mice after treatment. Systolic cardiac function, measured as percent shortening fraction, was decreased in untreated mdx mice compared to untreated wild type and there was no significant difference after treatment in mdx mice. Skeletal and cardiac muscle fibrosis were also significantly increased in untreated mdx mice compared to wild type, but there was no significant improvement in treated mdx mice. In exercised dystrophin deficient mice, chronic administration of Tbeta4 increased the number of regenerating fibers in skeletal muscle and could have a potential role in treatment of skeletal muscle disease in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  9. Relation between the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Score and Muscle Strength in Post-Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Kasahara, Yusuke; Hiraki, Koji; Hirano, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Satoshi

    2017-11-27

    Background: The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire is a valid and reliable patient-reported outcome measure. DASH can be assessed by self-reported upper extremity disability and symptoms. We aimed to examine the relationship between the physiological outcome of muscle strength and the DASH score after cardiac surgery. Methods: This cross-sectional study assessed 50 consecutive cardiac patients that were undergoing cardiac surgery. Physiological outcomes of handgrip strength and knee extensor muscle strength and the DASH score were measured at one month after cardiac surgery and were assessed. Results were analyzed using Spearman correlation coefficients. Results: The final analysis comprised 43 patients (men: 32, women: 11; age: 62.1 ± 9.1 years; body mass index: 22.1 ± 4.7 kg/m²; left ventricular ejection fraction: 53.5 ± 13.7%). Respective handgrip strength, knee extensor muscle strength, and DASH score were 27.4 ± 8.3 kgf, 1.6 ± 0.4 Nm/kg, and 13.3 ± 12.3, respectively. The DASH score correlated negatively with handgrip strength ( r = -0.38, p = 0.01) and with knee extensor muscle strength ( r = -0.32, p = 0.04). Conclusion: Physiological outcomes of both handgrip strength and knee extensor muscle strength correlated negatively with the DASH score. The DASH score appears to be a valuable tool with which to assess cardiac patients with poor physiological outcomes, particularly handgrip strength as a measure of upper extremity function, which is probably easier to follow over time than lower extremity function after patients complete cardiac rehabilitation.

  10. Relation between the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Score and Muscle Strength in Post-Cardiac Surgery Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro P. Izawa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH questionnaire is a valid and reliable patient-reported outcome measure. DASH can be assessed by self-reported upper extremity disability and symptoms. We aimed to examine the relationship between the physiological outcome of muscle strength and the DASH score after cardiac surgery. Methods: This cross-sectional study assessed 50 consecutive cardiac patients that were undergoing cardiac surgery. Physiological outcomes of handgrip strength and knee extensor muscle strength and the DASH score were measured at one month after cardiac surgery and were assessed. Results were analyzed using Spearman correlation coefficients. Results: The final analysis comprised 43 patients (men: 32, women: 11; age: 62.1 ± 9.1 years; body mass index: 22.1 ± 4.7 kg/m2; left ventricular ejection fraction: 53.5 ± 13.7%. Respective handgrip strength, knee extensor muscle strength, and DASH score were 27.4 ± 8.3 kgf, 1.6 ± 0.4 Nm/kg, and 13.3 ± 12.3, respectively. The DASH score correlated negatively with handgrip strength (r = −0.38, p = 0.01 and with knee extensor muscle strength (r = −0.32, p = 0.04. Conclusion: Physiological outcomes of both handgrip strength and knee extensor muscle strength correlated negatively with the DASH score. The DASH score appears to be a valuable tool with which to assess cardiac patients with poor physiological outcomes, particularly handgrip strength as a measure of upper extremity function, which is probably easier to follow over time than lower extremity function after patients complete cardiac rehabilitation.

  11. Cardiac muscle organization revealed in 3-D by imaging whole-mount mouse hearts using two-photon fluorescence and confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaguru, Mayandi; Fried, Glenn; Sivaguru, Barghav S; Sivaguru, Vignesh A; Lu, Xiaochen; Choi, Kyung Hwa; Saif, M Taher A; Lin, Brian; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2015-11-01

    The ability to image the entire adult mouse heart at high resolution in 3-D would provide enormous advantages in the study of heart disease. However, a technique for imaging nuclear/cellular detail as well as the overall structure of the entire heart in 3-D with minimal effort is lacking. To solve this problem, we modified the benzyl alcohol:benzyl benzoate (BABB) clearing technique by labeling mouse hearts with periodic acid Schiff (PAS) stain. We then imaged the hearts with a combination of two-photon fluorescence microscopy and automated tile-scan imaging/stitching. Utilizing the differential spectral properties of PAS, we could identify muscle and nuclear compartments in the heart. We were also able to visualize the differences between a 3-month-old normal mouse heart and a mouse heart that had undergone heart failure due to the expression of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) gene mutation (t/t). Using 2-D and 3-D morphometric analysis, we found that the t/t heart had anomalous ventricular shape, volume, and wall thickness, as well as a disrupted sarcomere pattern. We further validated our approach using decellularized hearts that had been cultured with 3T3 fibroblasts, which were tracked using a nuclear label. We were able to detect the 3T3 cells inside the decellularized intact heart tissue, achieving nuclear/cellular resolution in 3-D. The combination of labeling, clearing, and two-photon microscopy together with tiling eliminates laborious and time-consuming physical sectioning, alignment, and 3-D reconstruction.

  12. Poorly Understood Aspects of Striated Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alf Månsson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle contraction results from cyclic interactions between the contractile proteins myosin and actin, driven by the turnover of adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Despite intense studies, several molecular events in the contraction process are poorly understood, including the relationship between force-generation and phosphate-release in the ATP-turnover. Different aspects of the force-generating transition are reflected in the changes in tension development by muscle cells, myofibrils and single molecules upon changes in temperature, altered phosphate concentration, or length perturbations. It has been notoriously difficult to explain all these events within a given theoretical framework and to unequivocally correlate observed events with the atomic structures of the myosin motor. Other incompletely understood issues include the role of the two heads of myosin II and structural changes in the actin filaments as well as the importance of the three-dimensional order. We here review these issues in relation to controversies regarding basic physiological properties of striated muscle. We also briefly consider actomyosin mutation effects in cardiac and skeletal muscle function and the possibility to treat these defects by drugs.

  13. Autophagic signaling and proteolytic enzyme activity in cardiac and skeletal muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats following chronic aerobic exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott M McMillan

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a cardiovascular disease associated with deleterious effects in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Autophagy is a degradative process essential to muscle health. Acute exercise can alter autophagic signaling. Therefore, we aimed to characterize the effects of chronic endurance exercise on autophagy in skeletal and cardiac muscle of normotensive and hypertensive rats. Male Wistar Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR were assigned to a sedentary condition or 6 weeks of treadmill running. White gastrocnemius (WG of hypertensive rats had higher (p<0.05 caspase-3 and proteasome activity, as well as elevated calpain activity. In addition, skeletal muscle of hypertensive animals had elevated (p<0.05 ATG7 and LC3I protein, LAMP2 mRNA, and cathepsin activity, indicative of enhanced autophagic signaling. Interestingly, chronic exercise training increased (p<0.05 Beclin-1, LC3, and p62 mRNA as well as proteasome activity, but reduced (p<0.05 Beclin-1 and ATG7 protein, as well as decreased (p<0.05 caspase-3, calpain, and cathepsin activity. Left ventricle (LV of hypertensive rats had reduced (p<0.05 AMPKα and LC3II protein, as well as elevated (p<0.05 p-AKT, p-p70S6K, LC3I and p62 protein, which collectively suggest reduced autophagic signaling. Exercise training had little effect on autophagy-related signaling factors in LV; however, exercise training increased (p<0.05 proteasome activity but reduced (p<0.05 caspase-3 and calpain activity. Our results suggest that autophagic signaling is altered in skeletal and cardiac muscle of hypertensive animals. Regular aerobic exercise can effectively alter the proteolytic environment in both cardiac and skeletal muscle, as well as influence several autophagy-related factors in skeletal muscle of normotensive and hypertensive rats.

  14. Effect of Ca2+ overload on phosphoinositide (PI) metabolism in cardiac muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, H.; Otani, H.; Engelman, R.M.; Das, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    The investigated the relationship between Ca 2+ load and PI metabolism in isolated rat papillary muscle labeled with [ 3 H]inositol. Increase in [Ca 2+ ]/sub o/ from 0-3.6 mM reduced the incorporation of [ 3 H] inositol into PI moderately and increased the resting tension slightly. The incorporation of the label into PI was unchanged by 10 μm A-23187 at 1.8 mM [Ca 2+ ]/sub o/ that increased the contractility by 70% without a significant change in the resting tension. However, either 10.8 mM [Ca 2+ ]/sub o/ or 0.3 mM ouabain at 1.8 mM [Ca 2+ ]/sub o/ markedly decreased the PI labeling with corresponding increase in the resting tension while inclusion of excess EGTA greatly enhanced the radioactivity in PI. Determination of the PI breakdown and the inositol phosphates production by pulse-chase experiments revealed that the reduced PI turnover in the Ca 2+ -overload muscle was due to both inhibition of the synthesis and stimulation of the breakdown of this lipid that accounted for 30% decrease in the labeled PI from the muscle during 45 min without significant loss of the net PI pool size, suggesting the presence of a relatively smaller compartment of PI pool undergoing a rapid breakdown during Ca 2+ overload. The authors propose that alteration of Ca 2+ homeostasis may modulate the production of putative second messengers, inositol trisphosphate and diacylglycerol, which feed back to regulate [Ca 2+ ]/sub i/ in cardiac muscle

  15. Effect of Skeletal Muscle Na+ Channel Delivered Via a Cell Platform on Cardiac Conduction and Arrhythmia Induction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boink, Gerard J. J.; Lu, Jia; Driessen, Helen E.; Duan, Lian; Sosunov, Eugene A.; Anyukhovsky, Evgeny P.; Shlapakova, Iryna N.; Lau, David H.; Rosen, Tove S.; Danilo, Peter; Jia, Zhiheng; Ozgen, Nazira; Bobkov, Yevgeniy; Guo, Yuanjian; Brink, Peter R.; Kryukova, Yelena; Robinson, Richard B.; Entcheva, Emilia; Cohen, Ira S.; Rosen, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Background-In depolarized myocardial infarct epicardial border zones, the cardiac sodium channel is largely inactivated, contributing to slow conduction and reentry. We have demonstrated that adenoviral delivery of the skeletal muscle Na+ channel (SkM1) to epicardial border zones normalizes

  16. Estrogen-Induced Maldevelopment of the Penis Involves Down-Regulation of Myosin Heavy Chain 11 (MYH11) Expression, a Biomarker for Smooth Muscle Cell Differentiation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumu, L.A.; Bruinton, Sequoia; Braden, Tim D.; Simon, Liz; Goyal, Hari O.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cavernous smooth muscle cells are essential components in penile erection. In this study, we investigated effects of estrogen exposure on biomarkers for smooth muscle cell differentiation in the penis. Neonatal rats received diethylstilbestrol (DES), with or without the estrogen receptor (ESR) antagonist ICI 182,780 (ICI) or the androgen receptor (AR) agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT), from Postnatal Days 1 to 6. Tissues were collected at 7, 10, or 21 days of age. The smooth muscle cell biomarker MYH11 was studied in depth because microarray data showed it was significantly down-regulated, along with other biomarkers, in DES treatment. Quantitative real time-PCR and Western blot analyses showed 50%–80% reduction (P ≤ 0.05) in Myh11 expression in DES-treated rats compared to that in controls; and ICI and DHT coadministration mitigated the decrease. Temporally, from 7 to 21 days of age, Myh11 expression was onefold increased (P ≥ 0.05) in DES-treated rats versus threefold increased (P ≤ 0.001) in controls, implying the long-lasting inhibitory effect of DES on smooth muscle cell differentiation. Immunohistochemical localization of smooth muscle alpha actin, another biomarker for smooth muscle cell differentiation, showed fewer cavernous smooth muscle cells in DES-treated animals than in controls. Additionally, DES treatment significantly up-regulated Esr1 mRNA expression and suppressed the neonatal testosterone surge by 90%, which was mitigated by ICI coadministration but not by DHT coadministration. Collectively, results provided evidence that DES treatment in neonatal rats inhibited cavernous smooth muscle cell differentiation, as shown by down-regulation of MYH11 expression at the mRNA and protein levels and by reduced immunohistochemical staining of smooth muscle alpha actin. Both the ESR and the AR pathways probably mediate this effect. PMID:22976277

  17. Atomic force microscope observation of branching in single transcript molecules derived from human cardiac muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, Jason; Hsueh, Carlin; Gimzewski, James K; Mishra, Bud

    2008-01-01

    We have used an atomic force microscope to examine a clinically derived sample of single-molecule gene transcripts, in the form of double-stranded cDNA, (c: complementary) obtained from human cardiac muscle without the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. We observed a log-normal distribution of transcript sizes, with most molecules being in the range of 0.4-7.0 kilobase pairs (kb) or 130-2300 nm in contour length, in accordance with the expected distribution of mRNA (m: messenger) sizes in mammalian cells. We observed novel branching structures not previously known to exist in cDNA, and which could have profound negative effects on traditional analysis of cDNA samples through cloning, PCR and DNA sequencing

  18. Chronic impairment of leg muscle blood flow following cardiac catheterization in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skovranek, J.; Samanek, M.

    1979-01-01

    In 99 patients with congenital heart defects or chronic respiratory disease without clinical symptoms of disturbances in peripheral circulation, resting and maximal blood flow in the anterior tibial muscle of both extremities were investigated 2.7 yrs (average) after cardiac catheterization. The method used involved 133 Xe clearance. Resting blood flow was normal and no difference could be demonstrated between the extremity originally used for catheterization and the contralateral control extremity. No disturbance in maximal blood flow could be proved in the extremity used for catheterization by the venous route only. Maximal blood flow was significantly lower in that extremity where the femoral artery had been catheterized or cannulated for pressure measurement and blood sampling. The disturbance in maximal flow was shown regardless of whether the arterial catheterization involved the Seldinger percutaneous technique, arteriotomy, or mere cannulation of the femoral artery. The values in the involved extremity did not differ significantly from the values in a healthy population

  19. Morphometric and biochemical characteristics of short-term effects of ethanol on rat cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailović, D; Nikolić, J; Bjelaković, B B; Stanković, B N; Bjelaković, G

    1999-11-01

    Alcoholism is a very important cause of congestive cardiomyopathy in man. The aim of this study was to examine a short-term effect of ethanol in rat cardiac muscle, using histologic, morphometric and biochemical methods. Experiments were carried out in Wistar male albino rats, divided into two groups: the control group consisting of eight animals receiving tap water, and the experimental group comprising eight animals received ethyl alcohol for ten days, in a single daily dose of 3 g ethanol/kg body weight, per os, using esophageal intubation. The mean volume weighted nuclear volume of cardiac myocytes was estimated by point sampled intercept method, by objective x 100. The mean cubed nuclear intercept length was multiplied by pi and divided by 3. For biochemical analysis, a 10% water tissue homogenate from the left ventricle was made. In the experimental group, the mean volume-weighted nuclear volume (15.08 +/- 5.20 microm3) was significantly lower than in the control group (51.32 +/- 7.83 microm3) (p energy production.

  20. Inhibitory effects of tiamulin on contractile and electrical responses in isolated thoracic aorta and cardiac muscle of guinea-pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajyo, S; Hara, Y; Hirano, S; Agata, N; Shimizu, K; Urakawa, N

    1992-09-01

    The inhibitory effect of tiamulin, an antibiotic produced by Pleurotus mutilis, on contractile and electrical responses in isolated thoracic aorta and cardiac muscle of guinea-pigs was studied. In the thoracic aorta, tiamulin with an IC50 of 9.7 x 10(-6) M inhibited sustained contractions induced by isosmotically added 60 mM KCl. The inhibitory effect of tiamulin on a Ca(2+)-induced contraction in a depolarized muscle was competitively antagonized by raising external Ca2+ concentration. Bay K 8644 (10(-7) M) antagonized tiamulin's inhibition of the Ca(2+)-induced contraction. Tiamulin (2 x 10(-5) M) decreased the elevated cytoplasmic Ca2+ level measured by the fura 2 AM method in the depolarized muscle. In high K(+)-isoprenaline-treated left atria, tiamulin (2 x 10(-5)-2 x 10(-4) M) produced negative inotropic effects. On the other hand in the membrane action potential of papillary muscles, tiamulin (2 x 10(-6)-2 x 10(-4) M) produced decreases in action potential and durations and 2 x 10(-4) M tiamulin depressed the slow response action potential in depolarized muscles. Tiamulin produced prolongations of the PR interval in ECG, negative chrono- and inotropic effects, and an increase in perfusion flow in guinea-pig isolated and perfused hearts. These effects of tiamulin on the aorta or cardiac muscle were similar to those of verapamil and nifedipine. These results suggest that both the inhibitory action of tiamulin on the high K(+)-induced contraction in the aorta and the negative inotropic effect of tiamulin on the cardiac muscle are due to an inhibition of Ca2+ entry through the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels of cells of both these muscles.

  1. Overview of the Muscle Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Christine A.; Gomez, Christopher G.; Novak, Stefanie M.; Mi-Mi, Lei; Gregorio, Carol C.

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac and skeletal striated muscles are intricately designed machines responsible for muscle contraction. Coordination of the basic contractile unit, the sarcomere, and the complex cytoskeletal networks are critical for contractile activity. The sarcomere is comprised of precisely organized individual filament systems that include thin (actin), thick (myosin), titin, and nebulin. Connecting the sarcomere to other organelles (e.g., mitochondria and nucleus) and serving as the scaffold to maintain cellular integrity are the intermediate filaments. The costamere, on the other hand, tethers the sarcomere to the cell membrane. Unique structures like the intercalated disc in cardiac muscle and the myotendinous junction in skeletal muscle help synchronize and transmit force. Intense investigation has been done on many of the proteins that make up these cytoskeletal assemblies. Yet the details of their function and how they interconnect have just started to be elucidated. A vast number of human myopathies are contributed to mutations in muscle proteins; thus understanding their basic function provides a mechanistic understanding of muscle disorders. In this review, we highlight the components of striated muscle with respect to their interactions, signaling pathways, functions, and connections to disease. PMID:28640448

  2. Smyd3 is required for the development of cardiac and skeletal muscle in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Fujii

    Full Text Available Modifications of histone tails are involved in the regulation of a wide range of biological processes including cell cycle, cell survival, cell division, and cell differentiation. Among the modifications, histone methylation plays a critical role in cardiac and skeletal muscle differentiation. In our earlier studies, we found that SMYD3 has methyltransferase activity to histone H3 lysine 4, and that its up-regulation is involved in the tumorigenesis of human colon, liver, and breast. To clarify the role of Smyd3 in development, we have studied its expression patterns in zebrafish embryos and the effect of its suppression on development using Smyd3-specific antisense morpholino-oligonucleotides. We here show that transcripts of smyd3 were expressed in zebrafish embryos at all developmental stages examined and that knockdown of smyd3 in embryos resulted in pericardial edema and defects in the trunk structure. In addition, these phenotypes were associated with abnormal expression of three heart-chamber markers including cmlc2, amhc and vmhc, and abnormal expression of myogenic regulatory factors including myod and myog. These data suggest that Smyd3 plays an important role in the development of heart and skeletal muscle.

  3. GRAF1 deficiency blunts sarcolemmal injury repair and exacerbates cardiac and skeletal muscle pathology in dystrophin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Kaitlin C; O'Neill, Thomas J; Cheng, Zhaokang; Dee, Rachel; Demonbreun, Alexis R; Li, Jianbin; Xiao, Xiao; McNally, Elizabeth M; Mack, Christopher P; Taylor, Joan M

    2015-01-01

    The plasma membranes of striated muscle cells are particularly susceptible to rupture as they endure significant mechanical stress and strain during muscle contraction, and studies have shown that defects in membrane repair can contribute to the progression of muscular dystrophy. The synaptotagmin-related protein, dysferlin, has been implicated in mediating rapid membrane repair through its ability to direct intracellular vesicles to sites of membrane injury. However, further work is required to identify the precise molecular mechanisms that govern dysferlin targeting and membrane repair. We previously showed that the bin-amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR)-pleckstrin homology (PH) domain containing Rho-GAP GTPase regulator associated with focal adhesion kinase-1 (GRAF1) was dynamically recruited to the tips of fusing myoblasts wherein it promoted membrane merging by facilitating ferlin-dependent capturing of intracellular vesicles. Because acute membrane repair responses involve similar vesicle trafficking complexes/events and because our prior studies in GRAF1-deficient tadpoles revealed a putative role for GRAF1 in maintaining muscle membrane integrity, we postulated that GRAF1 might also play an important role in facilitating dysferlin-dependent plasma membrane repair. We used an in vitro laser-injury model to test whether GRAF1 was necessary for efficient muscle membrane repair. We also generated dystrophin/GRAF1 doubledeficient mice by breeding mdx mice with GRAF1 hypomorphic mice. Evans blue dye uptake and extensive morphometric analyses were used to assess sarcolemmal integrity and related pathologies in cardiac and skeletal muscles isolated from these mice. Herein, we show that GRAF1 is dynamically recruited to damaged skeletal and cardiac muscle plasma membranes and that GRAF1-depleted muscle cells have reduced membrane healing abilities. Moreover, we show that dystrophin depletion exacerbated muscle damage in GRAF1-deficient mice and that mice with dystrophin/GRAF1

  4. Localization of Myosin and Actin in the Pelage and Whisker Hair Follicles of Rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Kiyokazu; Matsuzaki, Toshiyuki; Takata, Kuniaki

    2006-01-01

    The combined effects of myosin II and actin enable muscle and nonmuscle cells to generate forces required for muscle contraction, cell division, cell migration, cellular morphological changes, the maintenance of cellular tension and polarity, and so on. However, except for the case of muscle contraction, the details are poorly understood. We focus on nonmuscle myosin and actin in the formation and maintenance of hair and skin, which include highly active processes in mammalian life with respect to the cellular proliferation, differentiation, and movement. The localization of nonmuscle myosin II and actin in neonatal rat dorsal skin, mystacial pad, hair follicles, and vibrissal follicles was studied by immunohistochemical technique to provide the basis for the elucidation of the roles of these proteins. Specificities of the antibodies were verified by using samples from the relevant tissues and subjecting them to immunoblotting test prior to morphological analyses. The myosin and actin were abundant and colocalized in the spinous and granular layers but scarce in the basal layer of the dorsal and mystacial epidermis. In hair and vibrissal follicles, nonmuscle myosin and actin were colocalized in the outer root sheath and some hair matrix cells adjoining dermal papillae. In contrast, most areas of the inner root sheath and hair matrix appeared to comprise very small amounts of myosin and actin. Hair shaft may comprise significant myosin during the course of its keratinization. These results suggest that the actin-myosin system plays a part in cell movement, differentiation, protection and other key functions of skin and hair cells

  5. Expression of multiple slow myosin heavy chain genes reveals a diversity of zebrafish slow twitch muscle fibres with differing requirements for Hedgehog and Prdm1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elworthy, Stone; Hargrave, Murray; Knight, Robert; Mebus, Katharina; Ingham, Philip W

    2008-06-01

    The zebrafish embryo develops a series of anatomically distinct slow twitch muscle fibres that characteristically express genes encoding lineage-specific isoforms of sarcomeric proteins such as MyHC and troponin. We show here that different subsets of these slow fibres express distinct members of a tandem array of slow MyHC genes. The first slow twitch muscle fibres to differentiate, which are specified by the activity of the transcription factor Prdm1 (also called Ubo or Blimp1) in response to Hedgehog (Hh) signalling, express the smyhc1 gene. Subsequently, secondary slow twitch fibres differentiate in most cases independently of Hh activity. We find that although some of these later-forming fibres also express smyhc1, others express smyhc2 or smyhc3. We show that the smyhc1-positive fibres express the ubo (prdm1) gene and adopt fast twitch fibre characteristics in the absence of Prdm1 activity, whereas those that do not express smyhc1 can differentiate independently of Prdm1 function. Conversely, some smyhc2-expressing fibres, although independent of Prdm1 function, require Hh activity to form. The adult trunk slow fibres express smyhc2 and smyhc3, but lack smyhc1 expression. The different slow fibres in the craniofacial muscles variously express smyhc1, smyhc2 and smyhc3, and all differentiate independently of Prdm1.

  6. Cardiac pathological changes of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) affected with heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yousaf, Muhammad Naveed; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Skjødt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI) is a disease of marine farmed Atlantic salmon where the pathological changes associated with the disease involve necrosis and an infiltration of inflammatory cells into different regions of the heart and skeletal muscle. The aim of this work...... with the cardiac pathology consisted of mainly CD3(+) T lymphocytes, moderate numbers of macrophages and eosinophilic granulocytes. Proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immuno-reaction identified significantly increased nuclear and cytoplasmic staining as well as identifying hypertrophic nuclei. Strong...

  7. Squalene Modulates Radiation-Induced Structural, Ultrastructural And Biochemical Changes In Cardiac Muscles Of Male Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REZK, R.G.; YACOUB, S.F.; ABDEL AZIZ, N.

    2009-01-01

    The failing heart represents an enormous clinical problem and is a major cause of death throughout the world. Hyperlipidemia and oxidative stress have been shown to contribute to heart failure. Squalene is a remarkable bioactive substance that belongs to a class of antioxidants called isoprenoids, which neutralize the harmful effect of excessive free radicals production in the body.The present study was designed to determine the possible protective effect of squalene against oxidative cardiac muscle damage induced by gamma irradiation.Rats were treated daily by gavage with 0.4 ml/kg squalene for 42 days before whole body gamma irradiation at a dose of 4 Gy and continued until animals were sacrificed 3 days post irradiation.Histological examination of cardiac muscles sections by using light and electron microscopes showed that exposure of rats to ionizing radiation has provoked a severe architecture damage such as necrotic nuclei, nuclei located at the periphery, alteration in chromatin distribution, ruptured cell and mitochondrial membranes, cristae of mitochondria disappeared, sticking mitochondria and ruptured myofibers. Structural and ultra-structural changes were associated with severe oxidative stress. Significant increase of lipid peroxidation products (malondialdehyde) (MDA) along with reduction in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalse (CAT), and glutathione content (GSH), were recorded.Treatment of rats with squalene has significantly attenuated the radiation-induced oxidative damage and histopathological changes in cardiac muscle which was substantiated by a significant amelioration in the activity of plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and aspartate transaminase (AST). Furthermore, administration of squalene to rats has adjusted the radiation-induced increase in plasma triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C). Based on these results, it

  8. Polymer microfiber meshes facilitate cardiac differentiation of c-kit{sup +} human cardiac stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kan, Lijuan [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Thayer, Patrick [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Fan, Huimin [Research Institute of Heart Failure, Shanghai East Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Ledford, Benjamin; Chen, Miao [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Goldstein, Aaron [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Cao, Guohua [School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); He, Jia-Qiang, E-mail: jiahe@vt.edu [Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2016-09-10

    Electrospun microfiber meshes have been shown to support the proliferation and differentiation of many types of stem cells, but the phenotypic fate of c-kit{sup +} human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs) have not been explored. To this end, we utilized thin (~5 µm) elastomeric meshes consisting of aligned 1.7 µm diameter poly (ester-urethane urea) microfibers as substrates to examine their effect on hCSC viability, morphology, proliferation, and differentiation relative to cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). The results showed that cells on microfiber meshes displayed an elongated morphology aligned in the direction of fiber orientation, lower proliferation rates, but increased expressions of genes and proteins majorly associated with cardiomyocyte phenotype. The early (NK2 homeobox 5, Nkx2.5) and late (cardiac troponin I, cTnI) cardiomyocyte genes were significantly increased on meshes (Nkx=2.5 56.2±13.0, cTnl=2.9±0.56,) over TCPS (Nkx2.5=4.2±0.9, cTnl=1.6±0.5, n=9, p<0.05 for both groups) after differentiation. In contrast, expressions of smooth muscle markers, Gata6 and myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC), were decreased on meshes. Immunocytochemical analysis with cardiac antibody exhibited the similar pattern of above cardiac differentiation. We conclude that aligned microfiber meshes are suitable for guiding cardiac differentiation of hCSCs and may facilitate stem cell-based therapies for treatment of cardiac diseases. - Highlights: • First study to characterize c-kit{sup +} human cardiac stem cells on microfiber meshes. • Microfiber meshes seem reducing cell proliferation, but no effect on cell viability. • Microfiber meshes facilitate the elongation of human cardiac stem cells in culture. • Cardiac but not smooth muscle differentiation were enhanced on microfiber meshes. • Microfiber meshes may be used as cardiac patches in cell-based cardiac therapy.

  9. Effect of voluntary physical activity initiated at age 7 months on skeletal hindlimb and cardiac muscle function in mdx mice of both genders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, Arnaud; Benchaouir, Rachid; Joanne, Pierre; Peat, Rachel A; Mougenot, Nathalie; Agbulut, Onnik; Butler-Browne, Gillian

    2015-11-01

    The effects of voluntary activity initiated in adult mdx (C57BL/10ScSc-DMD(mdx) /J) mice on skeletal and cardiac muscle function have not been studied extensively. We studied the effects of 3 months of voluntary wheel running initiated at age 7 months on hindlimb muscle weakness, increased susceptibility to muscle contraction-induced injury, and left ventricular function in mdx mice. We found that voluntary wheel running did not worsen the deficit in force-generating capacity and the force drop after lengthening contractions in either mdx mouse gender. It increased the absolute maximal force of skeletal muscle in female mdx mice. Moreover, it did not affect left ventricular function, structural heart dimensions, cardiac gene expression of inflammation, fibrosis, or remodeling markers. These results indicate that voluntary activity initiated at age 7 months had no detrimental effects on skeletal or cardiac muscles in either mdx mouse gender. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Comparison of the calcium release channel of cardiac and skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum by target inactivation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrew, S.G.; Inui, Makoto; Chadwick, C.C.; Boucek, R.J. Jr.; Jung, C.Y.; Fleischer, S.

    1989-01-01

    The calcium release channel of sarcoplasmic reticulum which triggers muscle contraction in excitation-contraction coupling has recently been isolated. The channel has been found to be morphologically identical with the feet structures of the junctional face membrane of terminal cisternae and consists of an oligomer of a unique high molecular weight polypeptide. In this study, the authors compare the target size of the calcium release channel from heart and skeletal muscle using target inactivation analysis. The target molecular weights of the calcium release channel estimated by measuring ryanodine binding after irradiation are similar for heart (139,000) and skeletal muscle (143,000) and are smaller than the monomeric unit (estimated to be about 360,000). The target size, estimated by measuring polypeptide remaining after irradiation, was essentially the same for heart and skeletal muscle, 1,061,000 and 1,070,000, respectively, indicating an oligomeric association of protomers. Thus, the calcium release channel of both cardiac and skeletal muscle reacts uniquely with regard to target inactivation analysis in that (1) the size by ryanodine binding is smaller than the monomeric unit and (2) a single hit leads to destruction of more than one polypeptide, by measuring polypeptide remaining. The target inactivation analysis studies indicate that heart and skeletal muscle receptors are structurally very similar

  11. C0 and C1 N-terminal Ig domains of myosin binding protein C exert different effects on thin filament activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Samantha P; Belknap, Betty; Van Sciver, Robert E; White, Howard D; Galkin, Vitold E

    2016-02-09

    Mutations in genes encoding myosin, the molecular motor that powers cardiac muscle contraction, and its accessory protein, cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C), are the two most common causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Recent studies established that the N-terminal domains (NTDs) of cMyBP-C (e.g., C0, C1, M, and C2) can bind to and activate or inhibit the thin filament (TF). However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which NTDs modulate interaction of myosin with the TF remains unknown and the contribution of each individual NTD to TF activation/inhibition is unclear. Here we used an integrated structure-function approach using cryoelectron microscopy, biochemical kinetics, and force measurements to reveal how the first two Ig-like domains of cMyPB-C (C0 and C1) interact with the TF. Results demonstrate that despite being structural homologs, C0 and C1 exhibit different patterns of binding on the surface of F-actin. Importantly, C1 but not C0 binds in a position to activate the TF by shifting tropomyosin (Tm) to the "open" structural state. We further show that C1 directly interacts with Tm and traps Tm in the open position on the surface of F-actin. Both C0 and C1 compete with myosin subfragment 1 for binding to F-actin and effectively inhibit actomyosin interactions when present at high ratios of NTDs to F-actin. Finally, we show that in contracting sarcomeres, the activating effect of C1 is apparent only once low levels of Ca(2+) have been achieved. We suggest that Ca(2+) modulates the interaction of cMyBP-C with the TF in the sarcomere.

  12. Integration of miRNA and mRNA expression profiles reveals microRNA-regulated networks during muscle wasting in cardiac cachexia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moraes, Leonardo N; Fernandez, Geysson J; Vechetti-Júnior, Ivan J

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac cachexia (CC) is a common complication of heart failure (HF) associated with muscle wasting and poor patient prognosis. Although different mechanisms have been proposed to explain muscle wasting during CC, its pathogenesis is still not understood. Here, we described an integrative analysis...

  13. Do interindividual differences in cardiac output during submaximal exercise explain differences in exercising muscle oxygenation and ratings of perceived exertion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Robert F; Jones, Joshua H; Hirai, Daniel M; Zelt, Joel T; Giles, Matthew D; Raleigh, James P; Quadrilatero, Joe; Gurd, Brendon J; Neder, J Alberto; Tschakovsky, Michael E

    2018-01-01

    Considerable interindividual differences in the Q˙-V˙O2 relationship during exercise have been documented but implications for submaximal exercise tolerance have not been considered. We tested the hypothesis that these interindividual differences were associated with differences in exercising muscle deoxygenation and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) across a range of submaximal exercise intensities. A total of 31 (21 ± 3 years) healthy recreationally active males performed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion 24 h following a resting muscle biopsy. Cardiac output (Q˙ L/min; inert gas rebreathe), oxygen uptake (V˙O2 L/min; breath-by-breath pulmonary gas exchange), quadriceps saturation (near infrared spectroscopy) and exercise tolerance (6-20; Borg Scale RPE) were measured. The Q˙-V˙O2 relationship from 40 to 160 W was used to partition individuals post hoc into higher (n = 10; 6.3 ± 0.4) versus lower (n = 10; 3.7 ± 0.4, P exercise (all P > 0.4). Lower cardiac responders had greater leg (P = 0.027) and whole body (P = 0.03) RPE only at 185 W, but this represented a higher %peak V˙O2 in lower cardiac responders (87 ± 15% vs. 66 ± 12%, P = 0.005). Substantially lower Q˙-V˙O2 in the lower responder group did not result in altered RPE or exercising muscle deoxygenation. This suggests substantial recruitment of blood flow redistribution in the lower responder group as part of protecting matching of exercising muscle oxygen delivery to demand. © 2018 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  14. Propagation velocity profile in a cross-section of a cardiac muscle bundle from PSpice simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperelakis Nicholas

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effect of depth on propagation velocity within a bundle of cardiac muscle fibers is likely to be an important factor in the genesis of some heart arrhythmias. Model and methods The velocity profile of simulated action potentials propagated down a bundle of parallel cardiac muscle fibers was examined in a cross-section of the bundle using a PSpice model. The model (20 × 10 consisted of 20 chains in parallel, each chain being 10 cells in length. All 20 chains were stimulated simultaneously at the left end of the bundle using rectangular current pulses (0.25 nA, 0.25 ms duration applied intracellularly. The simulated bundle was symmetrical at the top and bottom (including two grounds, and voltage markers were placed intracellularly only in cells 1, 5 and 10 of each chain to limit the total number of traces to 60. All electrical parameters were standard values; the variables were (1 the number of longitudinal gap-junction (G-j channels (0, 1, 10, 100, (2 the longitudinal resistance between the parallel chains (Rol2 (reflecting the closeness of the packing of the chains, and (3 the bundle termination resistance at the two ends of the bundle (RBT. The standard values for Rol2 and RBT were 200 KΩ. Results The velocity profile was bell-shaped when there was 0 or only 1 gj-channel. With standard Rol2 and RBT values, the velocity at the surface of the bundle (θ1 and θ20 was more than double (2.15 × that at the core of the bundle (θ10, θ11. This surface:core ratio of velocities was dependent on the values of Rol2 and RBT. When Rol2 was lowered 10-fold, θ1 increased slightly and θ2decreased slightly. When there were 100 gj-channels, the velocity profile was flat, i.e. the velocity at the core was about the same as that at the surface. Both velocities were more than 10-fold higher than in the absence of gj-channels. Varying Rol2 and RBT had almost no effect. When there were 10 gj-channels, the cross-sectional velocity profile

  15. Overexpression of the muscle-specific protein, melusin, protects from cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, Claudia; Brancaccio, Mara; Tullio, Francesca; Rubinetto, Cristina; Perrelli, Maria-Giulia; Angotti, Carmelina; Pagliaro, Pasquale; Tarone, Guido

    2014-07-01

    Melusin is a muscle-specific protein which interacts with β1 integrin cytoplasmic domain and acts as chaperone protein. Its overexpression induces improved resistance to cardiac overload delaying left ventricle dilation and reducing the occurrence of heart failure. Here, we investigated possible protective effect of melusin overexpression against acute ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury with or without Postconditioning cardioprotective maneuvers. Melusin transgenic (Mel-TG) mice hearts were subjected to 30-min global ischemia followed by 60-min reperfusion. Interestingly, infarct size was reduced in Mel-TG mice hearts compared to wild-type (WT) hearts (40.3 ± 3.5 % Mel-TG vs. 59.5 ± 3.8 % WT hearts; n = 11 animals/group; P level of AKT, ERK1/2 and GSK3β phosphorylation, and displayed increased phospho-kinases level after I/R compared to WT mice. Post-ischemic Mel-TG hearts displayed also increased levels of the anti-apoptotic factor phospho-BAD. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of PI3K/AKT (Wortmannin) and ERK1/2 (U0126) pathways abrogated the melusin protective effect. Notably, HSP90, a chaperone known to protect heart from I/R injury, showed high levels of expression in the heart of Mel-TG mice suggesting a possible collaboration of this molecule with AKT/ERK/GSK3β pathways in the melusin-induced protection. Postconditioning, known to activate AKT/ERK/GSK3β pathways, significantly reduced IS and LDH release in WT hearts, but had no additive protective effects in Mel-TG hearts. These findings implicate melusin as an enhancer of AKT and ERK pathways and as a novel player in cardioprotection from I/R injury.

  16. The mode of inotropic action of ciguatoxin on guinea-pig cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seino, A.; Kobayashi, M.; Momose, K.; Yasumoto, T.; Ohizumi, Y.

    1988-01-01

    1. Ciguatoxin (CTX) caused a dose-dependent increase in the contractile force of the guinea-pig isolated left atria at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 ng ml-1 with the ED50 value of 0.5 ng ml-1. 2. In the atria, tetrodotoxin (5 x 10(-7) M) inhibited markedly the inotropic action of CTX. The inotropic effect of CTX at low concentrations was abolished by practolol (10(-5) M) and reserpine (2 mg kg-1 daily, for 3 days), whereas that of CTX at high concentrations was partially inhibited by both drugs. 3. In single atrial cells, CTX (3 ng ml-1) produced a marked increase in the amplitude of longitudinal contractions. 4. CTX (3 ng ml-1) caused marked prolongation in the falling phase of action potentials of atrial strips without affecting the maximum rate of rise of action potentials and membrane resting potentials. The effect of CTX on action potentials was abolished by tetrodotoxin (10(-6) M). 5. The whole-cell patch-clamp experiments on myocytes revealed that CTX (20 ng ml-1) shifted the current-voltage curve of Na inward currents by 40 mV in the negative direction. CTX caused a small sustained Na inward current even at resting membrane potentials. 6. These results suggest that the inotropic action of lower concentrations of CTX is primarily due to an indirect action via noradrenaline release, whereas that of higher concentrations is caused not only by an indirect action but also by a direct action on voltage-dependent Na channels of cardiac muscle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3207997

  17. Changes in the contractile state, fine structure and metabolism of cardiac muscle cells during the development of rigor mortis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderwee, M A; Humphrey, S M; Gavin, J B; Armiger, L C

    1981-01-01

    Transmural slices from the left anterior papillary muscle of dog hearts were maintained for 120 min in a moist atmosphere at 37 degrees C. At 15-min intervals tissue samples were taken for estimation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) and for electron microscopic examination. At the same time the deformability under standard load of comparable regions of an adjacent slice of tissue was measured. ATP levels fell rapidly during the first 45 to 75 min after excision of the heart. During a subsequent further decline in ATP, the mean deformability of myocardium fell from 30 to 12% indicating the development of rigor mortis. Conversely, G6P levels increased during the first decline in adenosine triphosphate but remained relatively steady thereafter. Whereas many of the myocardial cells fixed after 5 min contracted on contact with glutaraldehyde, all cells examined after 15 to 40 min were relaxed. A progressive increase in the proportion of contracted cells was observed during the rapid increase in myocardial rigidity. During this late contraction the cells showed morphological evidence of irreversible injury. These findings suggest that ischaemic myocytes contract just before actin and myosin become strongly linked to maintain the state of rigor mortis.

  18. Adult fast myosin pattern and Ca2+-induced slow myosin pattern in primary skeletal muscle culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubis, Hans-Peter; Haller, Ernst-August; Wetzel, Petra; Gros, Gerolf

    1997-01-01

    A primary muscle cell culture derived from newborn rabbit muscle and growing on microcarriers in suspension was established. When cultured for several weeks, the myotubes in this model develop the completely adult pattern of fast myosin light and heavy chains. When Ca2+ ionophore is added to the culture medium on day 11, raising intracellular [Ca2+] about 10-fold, the myotubes develop to exhibit properties of an adult slow muscle by day 30, expressing slow myosin light as well as heavy chains, elevated citrate synthase, and reduced lactate dehydrogenase. The remarkable plasticity of these myotubes becomes apparent, when 8 days after withdrawal of the ionophore a marked slow-to-fast transition, as judged from the expression of isomyosins and metabolic enzymes, occurs. PMID:9108130

  19. Evaluation of microRNAs − 208 and 133a/b as differential biomarkers of acute cardiac and skeletal muscle toxicity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvano, Jacqueline, E-mail: Jacqueline.Calvano@bms.com [Drug Safety Evaluation, Bristol-Myers Squibb, 1 Squibb Drive, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Achanzar, William; Murphy, Bethanne [Drug Safety Evaluation, Bristol-Myers Squibb, 1 Squibb Drive, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); DiPiero, Janet [Discovery Toxicology, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Route 206 and Province Line Road, Lawrenceville, NJ 08540 (United States); Hixson, Clifford; Parrula, Cecilia; Burr, Holly; Mangipudy, Raja; Tirmenstein, Mark [Drug Safety Evaluation, Bristol-Myers Squibb, 1 Squibb Drive, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Conventional circulating biomarkers of cardiac and skeletal muscle (SKM) toxicity lack specificity and/or have a short half-life. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are currently being assessed as biomarkers of tissue injury based on their long half-life in blood and selective expression in certain tissues. To assess the utility of miRNAs as biomarkers of cardiac and SKM injury, male Sprague–Dawley rats received a single dose of isoproterenol (ISO); metaproterenol (MET); allylamine (AAM); mitoxantrone (MIT); acetaminophen (APAP) or vehicle. Blood and tissues were collected from rats in each group at 4, 24 and 48 h. ISO, MET, and AAM induced cardiac and SKM lesions and APAP induced liver specific lesions. There was no evidence of tissue injury with MIT by histopathology. Serum levels of candidate miRNAs were compared to conventional serum biomarkers of SKM/cardiac toxicity. Increases in heart specific miR-208 only occurred in rats with cardiac lesions alone and were increased for a longer duration than cardiac troponin and FABP3 (cardiac biomarkers). ISO, MET and AAM induced increases in MyL3 and skeletal muscle troponin (sTnl) (SKM biomarkers). MIT induced large increases in sTnl indicative of SKM toxicity, but sTnl levels were also increased in APAP-treated rats that lacked SKM toxicity. Serum levels of miR-133a/b (enriched in cardiac and SKM) increased following ISO, MET, AAM and MIT treatments but were absent in APAP-treated rats. Our results suggest that miR-133a/b are sensitive and specific markers of SKM and cardiac toxicity and that miR-208 used in combination with miR-133a/b can be used to differentiate cardiac from SKM toxicity. - Highlights: • MiR-208 is specifically expressed in rat hearts. • MiR-133a/b are enriched in rat cardiac/skeletal muscle. • MiR-133a/b are sensitive and specific markers of muscle/cardiac toxicity. • MiR-208 can be used to differentiate cardiac toxicity from skeletal muscle toxicity.

  20. GH administration changes myosin heavy chain isoforms in skeletal muscle but does not augment muscle strength or hypertrophy, either alone or combined with resistance exercise training in healthy elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Kai Henrik Wiborg; Andersen, Jesper Løvind; Beyer, Nina

    2002-01-01

    GH administration, either alone or combined with resistance exercise training (RT), has attracted interest as a means of increasing muscle mass and strength in the elderly. In the present study, 31 healthy, elderly men [age, 74 +/- 1 yr (mean +/- SEM)] were assigned to either RT [3 sessions/wk, 3...

  1. Dynamics of myosin II organization into contractile networks and fibers at the medial cell cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Wei

    The cellular morphology of adhered cells depends crucially on the formation of a contractile meshwork of parallel and cross-linked stress fibers along the contacting surface. The motor activity and mini-filament assembly of non-muscle myosin II is an important component of cell-level cytoskeletal remodeling during mechanosensing. To monitor the dynamics of non-muscle myosin II, we used confocal microscopy to image cultured HeLa cells that stably express myosin regulatory light chain tagged with GFP (MRLC-GFP). MRLC-GFP was monitored in time-lapse movies at steady state and during the response of cells to varying concentrations of blebbistatin (which disrupts actomyosin stress fibers). Using image correlation spectroscopy analysis, we quantified the kinetics of disassembly and reassembly of actomyosin networks and compared to studies by other groups. This analysis suggested the following processes: myosin minifilament assembly and disassembly; aligning and contraction; myosin filament stabilization upon increasing contractile tension. Numerical simulations that include those processes capture some of the main features observed in the experiments. This study provides a framework to help interpret how different cortical myosin remodeling kinetics may contribute to different cell shape and rigidity depending on substrate stiffness. We discuss methods to monitor myosin reorganization using non-linear imaging methods.

  2. Myosin isoform determines the conformational dynamics and cooperativity of actin filaments in the strongly bound actomyosin complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochniewicz, Ewa; Chin, Harvey F.; Henn, Arnon; Hannemann, Diane E.; Olivares, Adrian O.; Thomas, David D.; De La Cruz, Enrique M.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY We have used transient phosphorescence anisotropy (TPA) to detect the microsecond rotational dynamics of erythrosin iodoacetamide (ErIA)-labeled actin strongly bound to single-headed fragments of muscle myosin (muscle S1) and non-muscle myosin V (MV). The conformational dynamics of actin filaments in solution are markedly influenced by the isoform of bound myosin. Both myosins increase the final anisotropy of actin at sub-stoichiometric binding densities, indicating long-range, non-nearest neighbor cooperative restriction of filament rotational dynamics amplitude, but the cooperative unit is larger with MV than muscle S1. Both myosin isoforms also cooperatively affect the actin filament rotational correlation time, but with opposite effects; muscle S1 decreases rates of intrafilament torsional motion, while binding of MV increases the rates of motion. The cooperative effects on the rates of intrafilament motions correlate with the kinetics of myosin binding to actin filaments such that MV binds more rapidly, and muscle myosin more slowly, to partially decorated filaments than to bare filaments. The two isoforms also differ in their effects on the phosphorescence lifetime of the actin-bound ErIA; while muscle S1 increases the lifetime, suggesting decreased aqueous exposure of the probe, MV does not induce a significant change. We conclude that the dynamics and structure of actin in the strongly bound actomyosin complex is determined by the isoform of the bound myosin, in a manner likely to accommodate the diverse functional roles of actomyosin in muscle and non-muscle cells. PMID:19962990

  3. Azidoblebbistatin, a photoreactive myosin inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Képiró, Miklós; Várkuti, Boglárka H.; Bodor, Andrea; Hegyi, György; Drahos, László; Kovács, Mihály; Málnási-Csizmadia, András

    2012-01-01

    Photoreactive compounds are important tools in life sciences that allow precisely timed covalent crosslinking of ligands and targets. Using a unique technique we have synthesized azidoblebbistatin, which is a derivative of blebbistatin, the most widely used myosin inhibitor. Without UV irradiation azidoblebbistatin exhibits identical inhibitory properties to those of blebbistatin. Using UV irradiation, azidoblebbistatin can be covalently crosslinked to myosin, which greatly enhances its in vitro and in vivo effectiveness. Photo-crosslinking also eliminates limitations associated with the relatively low myosin affinity and water solubility of blebbistatin. The wavelength used for photo-crosslinking is not toxic for cells and tissues, which confers a great advantage in in vivo tests. Because the crosslink results in an irreversible association of the inhibitor to myosin and the irradiation eliminates the residual activity of unbound inhibitor molecules, azidoblebbistatin has a great potential to become a highly effective tool in both structural studies of actomyosin contractility and the investigation of cellular and physiological functions of myosin II. We used azidoblebbistatin to identify previously unknown low-affinity targets of the inhibitor (EC50 ≥ 50 μM) in Dictyostelium discoideum, while the strongest interactant was found to be myosin II (EC50 = 5 μM). Our results demonstrate that azidoblebbistatin, and potentially other azidated drugs, can become highly useful tools for the identification of strong- and weak-binding cellular targets and the determination of the apparent binding affinities in in vivo conditions. PMID:22647605

  4. Phosphorylation of Tropomyosin Extends Cooperative Binding of Myosin Beyond a Single Regulatory Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Vijay S.; Marongelli, Ellisha N.; Guilford, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is one of the major phosphoproteins comprising the thin filament of muscle. However, the specific role of Tm phosphorylation in modulating the mechanics of actomyosin interaction has not been determined. Here we show that Tm phosphorylation is necessary for long-range cooperative activation of myosin binding. We used a novel optical trapping assay to measure the isometric stall force of an ensemble of myosin molecules moving actin filaments reconstituted with either natively ...

  5. Hearts of dystonia musculorum mice display normal morphological and histological features but show signs of cardiac stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin G Boyer

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Dystonin is a giant cytoskeletal protein belonging to the plakin protein family and is believed to crosslink the major filament systems in contractile cells. Previous work has demonstrated skeletal muscle defects in dystonin-deficient dystonia musculorum (dt mice. In this study, we show that the dystonin muscle isoform is localized at the Z-disc, the H zone, the sarcolemma and intercalated discs in cardiac tissue. Based on this localization pattern, we tested whether dystonin-deficiency leads to structural defects in cardiac muscle. Desmin intermediate filament, microfilament, and microtubule subcellular organization appeared normal in dt hearts. Nevertheless, increased transcript levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF, 66% beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MHC, 95% and decreased levels of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump isoform 2A (SERCA2a, 26%, all signs of cardiac muscle stress, were noted in dt hearts. Hearts from two-week old dt mice were assessed for the presence of morphological and histological alterations. Heart to body weight ratios as well as left ventricular wall thickness and left chamber volume measurements were similar between dt and wild-type control mice. Hearts from dt mice also displayed no signs of fibrosis or calcification. Taken together, our data provide new insights into the intricate structure of the sarcomere by situating dystonin in cardiac muscle fibers and suggest that dystonin does not significantly influence the structural organization of cardiac muscle fibers during early postnatal development.

  6. Catalytic strategy used by the myosin motor to hydrolyze ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2014-07-22

    Myosin is a molecular motor responsible for biological motions such as muscle contraction and intracellular cargo transport, for which it hydrolyzes adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Early steps of the mechanism by which myosin catalyzes ATP hydrolysis have been investigated, but still missing are the structure of the final ADP·inorganic phosphate (Pi) product and the complete pathway leading to it. Here, a comprehensive description of the catalytic strategy of myosin is formulated, based on combined quantum-classical molecular mechanics calculations. A full exploration of catalytic pathways was performed and a final product structure was found that is consistent with all experiments. Molecular movies of the relevant pathways show the different reorganizations of the H-bond network that lead to the final product, whose γ-phosphate is not in the previously reported HPγO4(2-) state, but in the H2PγO4(-) state. The simulations reveal that the catalytic strategy of myosin employs a three-pronged tactic: (i) Stabilization of the γ-phosphate of ATP in a dissociated metaphosphate (PγO3(-)) state. (ii) Polarization of the attacking water molecule, to abstract a proton from that water. (iii) Formation of multiple proton wires in the active site, for efficient transfer of the abstracted proton to various product precursors. The specific role played in this strategy by each of the three loops enclosing ATP is identified unambiguously. It explains how the precise timing of the ATPase activation during the force generating cycle is achieved in myosin. The catalytic strategy described here for myosin is likely to be very similar in most nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes.

  7. Hypoxia activates muscle-restricted coiled-coil protein (MURC) expression via transforming growth factor-β in cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Kou-Gi; Cheng, Wen-Pin; Wang, Bao-Wei; Chang, Hang

    2014-03-01

    The expression of MURC (muscle-restricted coiled-coil protein), a hypertrophy-regulated gene, increases during pressure overload. Hypoxia can cause myocardial hypertrophy; however, how hypoxia affects the regulation of MURC in cardiomyocytes undergoing hypertrophy is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that hypoxia induces MURC expression in cardiomyocytes during hypertrophy. The expression of MURC was evaluated in cultured rat neonatal cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia and in an in vivo model of AMI (acute myocardial infarction) to induce myocardial hypoxia in adult rats. MURC protein and mRNA expression were significantly enhanced by hypoxia. MURC proteins induced by hypoxia were significantly blocked after the addition of PD98059 or ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) siRNA 30 min before hypoxia. Gel-shift assay showed increased DNA-binding activity of SRF (serum response factor) after hypoxia. PD98059, ERK siRNA and an anti-TGF-β (transforming growth factor-β) antibody abolished the SRF-binding activity enhanced by hypoxia or exogenous administration of TGF-β. A luciferase promoter assay demonstrated increased transcriptional activity of SRF in cardiomyocytes by hypoxia. Increased βMHC (β-myosin heavy chain) and BNP (B-type natriuretic peptide) protein expression and increased protein synthesis was identified after hypoxia with the presence of MURC in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. MURC siRNA inhibited the hypertrophic marker protein expression and protein synthesis induced by hypoxia. AMI in adult rats also demonstrated increased MURC protein expression in the left ventricular myocardium. In conclusion, hypoxia in cultured rat neonatal cardiomyocytes increased MURC expression via the induction of TGF-β, SRF and the ERK pathway. These findings suggest that MURC plays a role in hypoxia-induced hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes.

  8. Co-regulation of the atrial natriuretic factor and cardiac myosin light chain-2 genes during alpha-adrenergic stimulation of neonatal rat ventricular cells. Identification of cis sequences within an embryonic and a constitutive contractile protein gene which mediate inducible expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, K U; Baracchini, E; Ross, R S; Harris, A N; Henderson, S A; Evans, S M; Glembotski, C C; Chien, K R

    1991-04-25

    To study the mechanisms which mediate the transcriptional activation of cardiac genes during alpha adrenergic stimulation, the present study examined the regulated expression of three cardiac genes, a ventricular embryonic gene (atrial natriuretic factor, ANF), a constitutively expressed contractile protein gene (cardiac MLC-2), and a cardiac sodium channel gene. alpha 1-Adrenergic stimulation activates the expression and release of ANF from neonatal ventricular cells. As assessed by RNase protection analyses, treatment with alpha-adrenergic agonists increases the steady-state levels of ANF mRNA by greater than 15-fold. However, a rat cardiac sodium channel gene mRNA is not induced, indicating that alpha-adrenergic stimulation does not lead to an increase in the expression of all cardiac genes. Studies employing a series of rat ANF luciferase and rat MLC-2 luciferase fusion genes identify 315- and 92-base pair cis regulatory sequences within an embryonic gene (ANF) and a constitutively expressed contractile protein gene (MLC-2), respectively, which mediate alpha-adrenergic-inducible gene expression. Transfection of various ANF luciferase reporters into neonatal rat ventricular cells demonstrated that upstream sequences which mediate tissue-specific expression (-3003 to -638) can be segregated from those responsible for inducibility. The lack of inducibility of a cardiac Na+ channel gene, and the segregation of ANF gene sequences which mediate cardiac specific from those which mediate inducible expression, provides further insight into the relationship between muscle-specific and inducible expression during cardiac myocyte hypertrophy. Based on these results, a testable model is proposed for the induction of embryonic cardiac genes and constitutively expressed contractile protein genes and the noninducibility of a subset of cardiac genes during alpha-adrenergic stimulation of neonatal rat ventricular cells.

  9. Recipient origin of neointimal vascular smooth muscle cells in cardiac allografts with transplant arteriosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebrands, JL; van den Hurk, BMH; Klatter, FA; Popa, ER; Nieuwenhuis, P; Rozing, J

    2000-01-01

    Background: Coronary artery disease is today's most important post-heart transplantation problem after the first perioperative year. Histologically, coronary artery disease is characterized by transplant arteriosclerosis. The current view on this vasculopathy is that vascular smooth muscle (VSM)

  10. The giant protein titin regulates the length of the striated muscle thick filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonino, Paola; Kiss, Balazs; Strom, Josh; Methawasin, Mei; Smith, John E; Kolb, Justin; Labeit, Siegfried; Granzier, Henk

    2017-10-19

    The contractile machinery of heart and skeletal muscles has as an essential component the thick filament, comprised of the molecular motor myosin. The thick filament is of a precisely controlled length, defining thereby the force level that muscles generate and how this force varies with muscle length. It has been speculated that the mechanism by which thick filament length is controlled involves the giant protein titin, but no conclusive support for this hypothesis exists. Here we show that in a mouse model in which we deleted two of titin's C-zone super-repeats, thick filament length is reduced in cardiac and skeletal muscles. In addition, functional studies reveal reduced force generation and a dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) phenotype. Thus, regulation of thick filament length depends on titin and is critical for maintaining muscle health.

  11. Transient gestational and neonatal hypothyroidism-induced specific changes in androgen receptor expression in skeletal and cardiac muscles of adult rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annapoorna, K; Anbalagan, J; Neelamohan, R; Vengatesh, G; Stanley, J; Amudha, G; Aruldhas, M M

    2013-03-01

    The present study aims to identify the association between androgen status and metabolic activity in skeletal and cardiac muscles of adult rats with transient gestational/neonatal-onset hypothyroidism. Pregnant and lactating rats were made hypothyroid by exposing to 0.05% methimazole in drinking water; gestational exposure was from embryonic day 9-14 (group II) or 21 (group III), lactational exposure was from postnatal day 1-14 (group IV) or 29 (group V). Serum was collected for hormone assay. Androgen receptor status, Glu-4 expression, and enzyme activities were assessed in the skeletal and cardiac muscles. Serum testosterone and estradiol levels decreased in adult rats of groups II and III, whereas testosterone remained normal but estradiol increased in group IV and V, when compared to coeval control. Androgen receptor ligand binding activity increased in both muscle phenotypes with a consistent increase in the expression level of its mRNA and protein expressions except in the forelimb of adult rats with transient hypothyroidism (group II-V). Glut-4 expression remained normal in skeletal and cardiac muscle of experimental rats. Specific activity of hexokinase and lactate dehydrogenase increased in both muscle phenotypes whereas, creatine kinase activity increased in skeletal muscles alone. It is concluded that transient gestational/lactational exposure to methimazole results in hypothyroidism during prepuberal life whereas it increases AR status and glycolytic activity in skeletal and cardiac muscles even at adulthood. Thus, the present study suggests that euthyroid status during prenatal and early postnatal life is essential to have optimal AR status and metabolic activity at adulthood. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Influence of fast and slow alkali myosin light chain isoforms on the kinetics of stretch-induced force transients of fast-twitch type IIA fibres of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andruchov, Oleg; Galler, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    This study contributes to understand the physiological role of slow myosin light chain isoforms in fast-twitch type IIA fibres of skeletal muscle. These isoforms are often attached to the myosin necks of rat type IIA fibres, whereby the slow alkali myosin light chain isoform MLC1s is much more frequent and abundant than the slow regulatory myosin light chain isoform MLC2s. In the present study, single-skinned rat type IIA fibres were maximally Ca(2+) activated and subjected to stepwise stretches for causing a perturbation of myosin head pulling cycles. From the time course of the resulting force transients, myosin head kinetics was deduced. Fibres containing MLC1s exhibited slower kinetics independently of the presence or absence of MLC2s. At the maximal MLC1s concentration of about 75%, the slowing was about 40%. The slowing effect of MLC1s is possibly due to differences in the myosin heavy chain binding sites of the fast and slow alkali MLC isoforms, which changes the rigidity of the myosin neck. Compared with the impact of myosin heavy chain isoforms in various fast-twitch fibre types, the influence of MLC1s on myosin head kinetics of type IIA fibres is much smaller. In conclusion, the physiological role of fast and slow MLC isoforms in type IIA fibres is a fine-tuning of the myosin head kinetics.

  13. Comparative cardiac pathological changes of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) affected with heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI), cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) and pancreas disease (PD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yousaf, Muhammad Naveed; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Skjødt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    The heart is considered the powerhouse of the cardiovascular system. Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI), cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) and pancreas disease (PD) are cardiac diseases of marine farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) which commonly affect the heart in addition to the skeletal...

  14. Dynamics of myosin II organization into cortical contractile networks and fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Wei; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Ou-Yang, Daniel; Jedlicka, Sabrina; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2014-03-01

    The morphology of adhered cells critically depends on the formation of a contractile meshwork of parallel and cross-linked stress fibers along the contacting surface. The motor activity and mini-filament assembly of non-muscle myosin II is an important component of cell-level cytoskeletal remodeling during mechanosensing. To monitor the dynamics of myosin II, we used confocal microscopy to image cultured HeLa cells that stably express myosin regulatory light chain tagged with GFP (MRLC-GFP). MRLC-GFP was monitored in time-lapse movies at steady state and during the response of cells to varying concentrations of blebbistatin which disrupts actomyosin stress fibers. Using image correlation spectroscopy analysis, we quantified the kinetics of disassembly and reassembly of actomyosin networks and compared them to studies by other groups. This analysis suggested that the following processes contribute to the assembly of cortical actomyosin into fibers: random myosin mini-filament assembly and disassembly along the cortex; myosin mini-filament aligning and contraction; stabilization of cortical myosin upon increasing contractile tension. We developed simple numerical simulations that include those processes. The results of simulations of cells at steady state and in response to blebbistatin capture some of the main features observed in the experiments. This study provides a framework to help interpret how different cortical myosin remodeling kinetics may contribute to different cell shape and rigidity depending on substrate stiffness.

  15. Sirtuins as Mediator of the Anti-Ageing Effects of Calorie Restriction in Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Zullo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fighting diseases and controlling the signs of ageing are the major goals of biomedicine. Sirtuins, enzymes with mainly deacetylating activity, could be pivotal targets of novel preventive and therapeutic strategies to reach such aims. Scientific proofs are accumulating in experimental models, but, to a minor extent, also in humans, that the ancient practice of calorie restriction could prove an effective way to prevent several degenerative diseases and to postpone the detrimental signs of ageing. In the present review, we summarize the evidence about the central role of sirtuins in mediating the beneficial effects of calorie restriction in skeletal and cardiac muscle since these tissues are greatly damaged by diseases and advancing years. Moreover, we entertain the possibility that the identification of sirtuin activators that mimic calorie restriction could provide the benefits without the inconvenience of this dietary style.

  16. Chiral recognition of pinacidil and its 3-pyridyl isomer by canine cardiac and smooth muscle: Antagonism by sulfonylureas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, M.I.; Wiest, S.A.; Zimmerman, K.M.; Ertel, P.J.; Bemis, K.G.; Robertson, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Pinacidil, a potassium channel opener (PCO), relaxes vascular smooth muscle by increasing potassium ion membrane conductance, thereby causing membrane hyperpolarization. PCOs also act on cardiac muscle to decrease action potential duration (APD) selectively. To examine the enantiomeric selectivity of pinacidil, the stereoisomers of pinacidil (a 4-pyridylcyanoguanidine) and its 3-pyridyl isomer (LY222675) were synthesized and studied in canine Purkinje fibers and cephalic veins. The (-)-enantiomers of both pinacidil and LY222675 were more potent in relaxing phenylephrine-contracted cephalic veins and decreasing APD than were their corresponding (+)-enantiomers. The EC50 values for (-)-pinacidil and (-)-LY222675 in relaxing cephalic veins were 0.44 and 0.09 microM, respectively. In decreasing APD, the EC50 values were 3.2 microM for (-)-pinacidil and 0.43 microM for (-)-LY222675. The eudismic ratio was greater for the 3-pyridyl isomer than for pinacidil in both cardiac (71 vs. 22) and vascular (53 vs. 17) tissues. (-)-LY222675 and (-)-pinacidil (0.1-30 microM) also increased 86Rb efflux from cephalic veins to a greater extent than did their respective optical antipodes. The antidiabetic sulfonylurea, glyburide (1-30 microM), shifted the vascular concentration-response curve of (-)-pinacidil to the right by a similar extent at each inhibitor concentration. Glipizide also antagonized the response to (-)-pinacidil, but was about 1/10 as potent with a maximal shift occurring at 10 and 30 microM. Glyburide antagonized the vascular relaxant effects of 0.3 microM (-)-LY222675 (EC50, 2.3 microM) and reversed the decrease in APD caused by 3 microM (-)-LY222675 (EC50, 1.9 microM). Nitroprusside did not alter 86Rb efflux, and vascular relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside was unaffected by sulfonylureas

  17. Greater adenosine A2A receptor densities in cardiac and skeletal muscle in endurance-trained men: a [11C]TMSX PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Masaki; Kimura, Yuichi; Tokizawa, Ken; Ishii, Kenji; Oda, Keiichi; Sasaki, Toru; Nakamura, Yoshio; Muraoka, Isao; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2005-01-01

    We examined the densities of adenosine A 2A receptors in cardiac and skeletal muscles between untrained and endurance-trained subjects using positron emission tomography (PET) and [7-methyl- 11 C]-(E)-8-(3,4,5-trimethoxystyryl)-1,3,7-trimethylxanthine ([ 11 C]TMSX), a newly developed radioligand for mapping adenosine A 2A receptors. Five untrained and five endurance-trained subjects participated in this study. The density of adenosine A 2A receptors was evaluated as the distribution volume of [ 11 C]TMSX in cardiac and triceps brachii muscles in the resting state using PET. The distribution volume of [ 11 C]TMSX in the myocardium was significantly greater than in the triceps brachii muscle in both groups. Further, distribution volumes [ 11 C]TMSX in the trained subjects were significantly grater than those in untrained subjects (myocardium, 3.6±0.3 vs. 3.1±0.4 ml g -1 ; triceps brachii muscle, 1.7±0.3 vs. 1.2±0.2 ml g -1 , respectively). These results indicate that the densities of adenosine A 2A receptors in the cardiac and skeletal muscles are greater in the endurance-trained men than in the untrained men

  18. MUSCLEMOTION: A Versatile Open Software Tool to Quantify Cardiomyocyte and Cardiac Muscle Contraction In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Luca; van Meer, Berend J; Tertoolen, Leon G J; Bakkers, Jeroen; Bellin, Milena; Davis, Richard P; Denning, Chris; Dieben, Michel A E; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Giacomelli, Elisa; Grandela, Catarina; Hansen, Arne; Holman, Eduard R; Jongbloed, Monique R M; Kamel, Sarah M; Koopman, Charlotte D; Lachaud, Quentin; Mannhardt, Ingra; Mol, Mervyn P H; Mosqueira, Diogo; Orlova, Valeria V; Passier, Robert; Ribeiro, Marcelo C; Saleem, Umber; Smith, Godfrey L; Burton, Francis L; Mummery, Christine L

    2018-02-02

    There are several methods to measure cardiomyocyte and muscle contraction, but these require customized hardware, expensive apparatus, and advanced informatics or can only be used in single experimental models. Consequently, data and techniques have been difficult to reproduce across models and laboratories, analysis is time consuming, and only specialist researchers can quantify data. Here, we describe and validate an automated, open-source software tool (MUSCLEMOTION) adaptable for use with standard laboratory and clinical imaging equipment that enables quantitative analysis of normal cardiac contraction, disease phenotypes, and pharmacological responses. MUSCLEMOTION allowed rapid and easy measurement of movement from high-speed movies in (1) 1-dimensional in vitro models, such as isolated adult and human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes; (2) 2-dimensional in vitro models, such as beating cardiomyocyte monolayers or small clusters of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes; (3) 3-dimensional multicellular in vitro or in vivo contractile tissues, such as cardiac "organoids," engineered heart tissues, and zebrafish and human hearts. MUSCLEMOTION was effective under different recording conditions (bright-field microscopy with simultaneous patch-clamp recording, phase contrast microscopy, and traction force microscopy). Outcomes were virtually identical to the current gold standards for contraction measurement, such as optical flow, post deflection, edge-detection systems, or manual analyses. Finally, we used the algorithm to quantify contraction in in vitro and in vivo arrhythmia models and to measure pharmacological responses. Using a single open-source method for processing video recordings, we obtained reliable pharmacological data and measures of cardiac disease phenotype in experimental cell, animal, and human models. © 2017 The Authors.

  19. Decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content, not myofilament function, contributes to muscle twitch force decline in isolated cardiac trabeculae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Brunello, Lucia; Gyorke, Sándor; Janssen, Paul M.L.

    2014-01-01

    We set out to determine the factors responsible for twitch force decline in isolated intact rat cardiac trabeculae. The contractile force of trabeculae declined over extended periods of isometric twitch contractions. The force-frequency relationship within the frequency range of 4–8 Hz, at 37 °C, became more positive and the frequency optimum shifted to higher rates with this decline in baseline twitch tensions. The post-rest potentiation (37 °C), a phenomenon highly dependent on calcium handling mechanisms, became more pronounced with decrease in twitch tensions. We show that the main abnormality during muscle run-down was not due to a deficit in the myofilaments; maximal tension achieved using a K+ contracture protocol was either unaffected or only slightly decreased. Conversely, the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content, as assessed by rapid cooling contractures (from 27 °C to 0 °C), decreased, and had a close association with the declining twitch tensions (R2 ~ 0.76). SR Ca2+-ATPase, relative to Na+/Ca2+ exchanger activity, was not altered as there was no significant change in paired rapid cooling contracture ratios. Furthermore, confocal microscopy detected no abnormalities in the overall structure of the cardiomyocytes and t-tubules in the cardiac trabeculae (~23 °C). Overall, the data indicates that the primary mechanism responsible for force run-down in multi-cellular cardiac preparations is a decline in the SR calcium content and not the maximal tension generation capability of the myofilaments. PMID:25056841

  20. Hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis activity and function of cardiac muscle in energy deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Lachowicz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Frequently repeated statement that energy restriction is a factor that improves cardiovascular system function seems to be not fully truth. Low energy intake modifies the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis activity and thyroid hormone peripheral metabolism. Thyroid hormones, as modulators of the expression and activity of many cardiomyocyte proteins, control heart function. Decreased thyroid hormone levels and their disturbanced conversion and action result in alternation of cardiac remodeling, disorder of calcium homeostasis and diminish myocardial contractility. This review provides a summary of the current state of knowledge about the mechanisms of energy restriction effects on thyroidal axis activity, thyroid hormone peripheral metabolism and action in target tissues, especially in cardiac myocytes. We also showed the existence of energy restriction-thyroid-heart pathway.

  1. Effect of sildenafil on skeletal and cardiac muscle in Becker muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witting, Nanna; Kruuse, Christina; Nyhuus, Bo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy lack neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). nNOS mediates physiological sympatholysis, thus ensuring adequate blood supply to working muscle. In mice lacking dystrophin, restoration of nNOS effects...

  2. Three-dimensional stochastic model of actin–myosin binding in the sarcomere lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijailovich, Srboljub M.; Kayser-Herold, Oliver; Stojanovic, Boban; Nedic, Djordje; Irving, Thomas C.; Geeves, MA (Harvard); (IIT); (U. Kent); (Kragujevac)

    2016-11-18

    The effect of molecule tethering in three-dimensional (3-D) space on bimolecular binding kinetics is rarely addressed and only occasionally incorporated into models of cell motility. The simplest system that can quantitatively determine this effect is the 3-D sarcomere lattice of the striated muscle, where tethered myosin in thick filaments can only bind to a relatively small number of available sites on the actin filament, positioned within a limited range of thermal movement of the myosin head. Here we implement spatially explicit actomyosin interactions into the multiscale Monte Carlo platform MUSICO, specifically defining how geometrical constraints on tethered myosins can modulate state transition rates in the actomyosin cycle. The simulations provide the distribution of myosin bound to sites on actin, ensure conservation of the number of interacting myosins and actin monomers, and most importantly, the departure in behavior of tethered myosin molecules from unconstrained myosin interactions with actin. In addition, MUSICO determines the number of cross-bridges in each actomyosin cycle state, the force and number of attached cross-bridges per myosin filament, the range of cross-bridge forces and accounts for energy consumption. At the macroscopic scale, MUSICO simulations show large differences in predicted force-velocity curves and in the response during early force recovery phase after a step change in length comparing to the two simplest mass action kinetic models. The origin of these differences is rooted in the different fluxes of myosin binding and corresponding instantaneous cross-bridge distributions and quantitatively reflects a major flaw of the mathematical description in all mass action kinetic models. Consequently, this new approach shows that accurate recapitulation of experimental data requires significantly different binding rates, number of actomyosin states, and cross-bridge elasticity than typically used in mass action kinetic models to

  3. Levels of myosin heavy chain mRNA transcripts and content of protein isoforms in the slow soleus muscle of 7 month-old rats with altered thyroid status

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vadászová, Adriana; Hudecová, S.; Križanová, O.; Soukup, Tomáš

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 2 (2006), s. 221-225 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD305/03/H148; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/05/0327 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 2/6078; SAV(SK) APVT-51-027404; NATO(XE) 979876; MYORES(XE) 511978 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : myosin heavy chain * thyroid hormones status * mRNA transcripts Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.093, year: 2006

  4. The cardiac muscle duplex as a method to study myocardial heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyova, O.; Katsnelson, L.B.; Konovalov, P.V.; Kursanov, A.G.; Vikulova, N.A.; Kohl, P.; Markhasin, V.S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the development and application of paired muscle preparations, called duplex, for the investigation of mechanisms and consequences of intra-myocardial electro-mechanical heterogeneity. We illustrate the utility of the underlying combined experimental and computational approach for conceptual development and integration of basic science insight with clinically relevant settings, using previously published and new data. Directions for further study are identified. PMID:25106702

  5. Assessment of muscle tissue oxygen saturation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Jean-Christophe; Scarlatti, Audrey; Danin, Pierre-Eric; Dellamonica, Jean; Bernardin, Gilles; Ichai, Carole

    2015-12-01

    Pathophysiology of cardiac arrest corresponds to an ischemia-reperfusion syndrome with deep impairment of microcirculation. Muscular tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) is a noninvasive method of evaluation of microcirculation. Our study was aimed at assessing the prognosis value of muscular StO2 in patients admitted for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and treated with hypothermia. We conducted a prospective bicentric observational study including OHCA patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Baseline StO2, derived variables (desaturation and resaturation slopes), and lactate levels were compared at different times between patients with good and poor outcomes. Prognosis was assessed by the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score at 6 months after admission (CPC 1-2, good outcome; CPC 3-5, poor outcome). Forty-four patients were included, 17 good and 27 poor outcomes at 6 months. At admission, StO2 and lactate levels were lower in good outcome patients. Desaturation and resaturation slopes did not differ between groups. After an OHCA treated with therapeutic hypothermia, StO2 was correlated with outcome. Further research is needed to better understand the pathophysiological process underlying our results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Trkb signaling in pericytes is required for cardiac microvessel stabilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustin Anastasia

    Full Text Available Pericyte and vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC recruitment to the developing vasculature is an important step in blood vessel maturation. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, expressed by endothelial cells, activates the receptor tyrosine kinase TrkB to stabilize the cardiac microvasculature in the perinatal period. However, the effects of the BDNF/TrkB signaling on pericytes/SMCs and the mechanisms downstream of TrkB that promote vessel maturation are unknown. To confirm the involvement of TrkB in vessel maturation, we evaluated TrkB deficient (trkb (-/- embryos and observed severe cardiac vascular abnormalities leading to lethality in late gestation to early prenatal life. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrates that trkb(-/- embryos exhibit defects in endothelial cell integrity and perivascular edema. As TrkB is selectively expressed by pericytes and SMCs in the developing cardiac vasculature, we generated mice deficient in TrkB in these cells. Mice with TrkB deficiency in perivascular cells exhibit reduced pericyte/SMC coverage of the cardiac microvasculature, abnormal endothelial cell ultrastructure, and increased vascular permeability. To dissect biological actions and the signaling pathways downstream of TrkB in pericytes/SMCs, human umbilical SMCs were treated with BDNF. This induced membranous protrusions and cell migration, events dependent on myosin light chain phosphorylation. Moreover, inhibition of Rho GTPase and the Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK prevented membrane protrusion and myosin light chain phosphorylation in response to BDNF. These results suggest an important role for BDNF in regulating migration of TrkB-expressing pericytes/SMCs to promote cardiac blood vessel ensheathment and functional integrity during development.

  7. Ayurvedic preparation of Zingiber officinale Roscoe: effects on cardiac and on smooth muscle parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, Alberto; Budriesi, Roberta; Poli, Ferruccio; Lianza, Mariacaterina; Graziadio, Alessandra; Venturini, Alice; Broccoli, Massimiliano; Micucci, Matteo

    2017-08-28

    The rhizome of the Zingiber officinale Roscoe, a biennial herb growing in South Asia, is commonly known as ginger. Ginger is used in clinical disorders, such as constipation, dyspepsia, diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting and its use is also recommended by the traditional medicine for cardiopathy, high blood pressure, palpitations and as a vasodilator to improve the circulation. The decoction of ginger rhizome is widely used in Ayurvedic medicine. In this papery by high-performance liquid chromatography, we have seen that its main phytomarkers were 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol and 6-shogaol and we report the effects of the decoction of ginger rhizome on cardiovascular parameters and on vascular and intestinal smooth muscle. In our experimental models, the decoction of ginger shows weak negative inotropic and chronotropic intrinsic activities but a significant intrinsic activity on smooth muscle with a potency on ileum is greater than on aorta: EC 50  = 0.66 mg/mL versus EC 50  = 1.45 mg/mL.

  8. Predicting Effects of Tropomyosin Mutations on Cardiac Muscle Contraction through Myofilament Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Rakesh Sewanan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Point mutations to the human gene TPM1 have been implicated in the development of both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Such observations have led to studies investigating the link between single residue changes and the biophysical behavior of the tropomyosin molecule. However, the degree to which these molecular perturbations explain the performance of intact sarcomeres containing mutant tropomyosin remains uncertain. Here, we present a modeling approach that integrates various aspects of tropomyosin’s molecular properties into a cohesive paradigm representing their impact on muscle function. In particular, we considered the effects of tropomyosin mutations on (1 persistence length, (2 equilibrium between thin filament blocked and closed regulatory states, and (3 the crossbridge duty cycle. After demonstrating the ability of the new model to capture Ca-dependent myofilament responses during both dynamic and steady-state activation, we used it to capture the effects of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM related E180G and D175N mutations on skinned myofiber mechanics. Our analysis indicates that the fiber-level effects of the two mutations can be accurately described by a combination of changes to the three tropomyosin properties represented in the model. Subsequently, we used the model to predict mutation effects on muscle twitch. Both mutations led to increased twitch contractility as a consequence of diminished cooperative inhibition between thin filament regulatory units. Overall, simulations suggest that a common twitch phenotype for HCM-linked tropomyosin mutations includes both increased contractility and elevated diastolic tension.

  9. Actin-myosin network is required for proper assembly of influenza virus particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumakura, Michiko; Kawaguchi, Atsushi, E-mail: ats-kawaguchi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Nagata, Kyosuke, E-mail: knagata@md.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2015-02-15

    Actin filaments are known to play a central role in cellular dynamics. After polymerization of actin, various actin-crosslinking proteins including non-muscle myosin II facilitate the formation of spatially organized actin filament networks. The actin-myosin network is highly expanded beneath plasma membrane. The genome of influenza virus (vRNA) replicates in the cell nucleus. Then, newly synthesized vRNAs are nuclear-exported to the cytoplasm as ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), followed by transport to the beneath plasma membrane where virus particles assemble. Here, we found that, by inhibiting actin-myosin network formation, the virus titer tends to be reduced and HA viral spike protein is aggregated on the plasma membrane. These results indicate that the actin-myosin network plays an important role in the virus formation. - Highlights: • Actin-myosin network is important for the influenza virus production. • HA forms aggregations at the plasma membrane in the presence of blebbistatin. • M1 is recruited to the budding site through the actin-myosin network.

  10. Actin-myosin network is required for proper assembly of influenza virus particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, Michiko; Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2015-01-01

    Actin filaments are known to play a central role in cellular dynamics. After polymerization of actin, various actin-crosslinking proteins including non-muscle myosin II facilitate the formation of spatially organized actin filament networks. The actin-myosin network is highly expanded beneath plasma membrane. The genome of influenza virus (vRNA) replicates in the cell nucleus. Then, newly synthesized vRNAs are nuclear-exported to the cytoplasm as ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), followed by transport to the beneath plasma membrane where virus particles assemble. Here, we found that, by inhibiting actin-myosin network formation, the virus titer tends to be reduced and HA viral spike protein is aggregated on the plasma membrane. These results indicate that the actin-myosin network plays an important role in the virus formation. - Highlights: • Actin-myosin network is important for the influenza virus production. • HA forms aggregations at the plasma membrane in the presence of blebbistatin. • M1 is recruited to the budding site through the actin-myosin network

  11. Muscle protein analysis. II. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of normal and diseased human skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giometti, C.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Barany, M.; Danon, M.J.; Anderson, N.G.

    1980-07-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to analyze the major proteins of normal and pathological human-muscle samples. The normal human-muscle pattern contains four myosin light chains: three that co-migrate with the myosin light chains from rabbit fast muscle (extensor digitorum longus), and one that co-migrates with the light chain 2 from rabbit slow muscle (soleus). Of seven Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples, four yielded patterns with decreased amounts of actin and myosin relative to normal muscle, while three samples gave patterns comparable to that for normal muscle. Six samples from patients with myotonic dystrophy also gave normal patterns. In nemaline rod myopathy, in contrast, the pattern was deficient in two of the fast-type myosin light chains.

  12. Long-term administration of the TNF blocking drug Remicade (cV1q) to mdx mice reduces skeletal and cardiac muscle fibrosis, but negatively impacts cardiac function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolova, N.E.; Martinez, L.; Vetrone, S.A.; Jordan, M. C.; Roos, K. .P.; Sweeney, H.L.; Spencer, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a degenerative skeletal muscle disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin (DYS). Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of DMD since short-term treatment of mdx mice with TNF blocking drugs proved beneficial; however, it is not clear whether long-term treatment will also improve long-term outcomes of fibrosis and cardiac health. In this investigation, short and long-term dosing studies were carried out using the TNF blocking drug Remicade and a variety of outcome measures were assessed. Here we show no demonstrable benefit to muscle strength or morphology with 10mg/kg or 20 mg/kg Remicade; however, 3mg/kg produced positive strength benefits. Remicade treatment correlated with reductions in myostatin mRNA in the heart, and concomitant reductions in cardiac and skeletal fibrosis. Surprisingly, although Remicade treated mdx hearts were less fibrotic, reductions in LV mass and ejection fraction were also observed, and these changes coincided with reductions in AKT phosphorylation on threonine 308. Thus, TNF blockade benefits mdx skeletal muscle strength and fibrosis, but negatively impacts AKT activation, leading to deleterious changes to dystrophic heart function. These studies uncover a previously unknown relationship between TNF blockade and alteration of muscle growth signaling pathways. PMID:24844454

  13. Suppression of skeletal muscle signal using a crusher coil: A human cardiac (31) p-MR spectroscopy study at 7 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Benoit; Clarke, William T; Neubauer, Stefan; Robson, Matthew D; Rodgers, Christopher T

    2016-03-01

    The translation of sophisticated phosphorus MR spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS) protocols to 7 Tesla (T) is particularly challenged by the issue of radiofrequency (RF) heating. Legal limits on RF heating make it hard to reliably suppress signals from skeletal muscle that can contaminate human cardiac (31)P spectra at 7T. We introduce the first surface-spoiling crusher coil for human cardiac (31)P-MRS at 7T. A planar crusher coil design was optimized with simulations and its performance was validated in phantoms. Crusher gradient pulses (100 μs) were then applied during human cardiac (31)P-MRS at 7T. In a phantom, residual signals were 50 ± 10% with BISTRO (B1 -insensitive train to obliterate signal), and 34 ± 8% with the crusher coil. In vivo, residual signals in skeletal muscle were 49 ± 4% using BISTRO, and 24 ± 5% using the crusher coil. Meanwhile, in the interventricular septum, spectral quality and metabolite quantification did not differ significantly between BISTRO (phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate [PCr/ATP] = 2.1 ± 0.4) and the crusher coil (PCr/ATP = 1.8 ± 0.4). However, the specific absorption rate (SAR) decreased from 96 ± 1% of the limit (BISTRO) to 16 ± 1% (crusher coil). A crusher coil is an SAR-efficient alternative for selectively suppressing skeletal muscle during cardiac (31)P-MRS at 7T. A crusher coil allows the use of sequence modules that would have been SAR-prohibitive, without compromising skeletal muscle suppression. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Medicine in Resonance.

  14. Suppression of skeletal muscle signal using a crusher coil: A human cardiac 31p‐MR spectroscopy study at 7 tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, William T.; Neubauer, Stefan; Robson, Matthew D.; Rodgers, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The translation of sophisticated phosphorus MR spectroscopy (31P‐MRS) protocols to 7 Tesla (T) is particularly challenged by the issue of radiofrequency (RF) heating. Legal limits on RF heating make it hard to reliably suppress signals from skeletal muscle that can contaminate human cardiac 31P spectra at 7T. We introduce the first surface‐spoiling crusher coil for human cardiac 31P‐MRS at 7T. Methods A planar crusher coil design was optimized with simulations and its performance was validated in phantoms. Crusher gradient pulses (100 μs) were then applied during human cardiac 31P‐MRS at 7T. Results In a phantom, residual signals were 50 ± 10% with BISTRO (B1‐insensitive train to obliterate signal), and 34 ± 8% with the crusher coil. In vivo, residual signals in skeletal muscle were 49 ± 4% using BISTRO, and 24 ± 5% using the crusher coil. Meanwhile, in the interventricular septum, spectral quality and metabolite quantification did not differ significantly between BISTRO (phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate [PCr/ATP] = 2.1 ± 0.4) and the crusher coil (PCr/ATP = 1.8 ± 0.4). However, the specific absorption rate (SAR) decreased from 96 ± 1% of the limit (BISTRO) to 16 ± 1% (crusher coil). Conclusion A crusher coil is an SAR‐efficient alternative for selectively suppressing skeletal muscle during cardiac 31P‐MRS at 7T. A crusher coil allows the use of sequence modules that would have been SAR‐prohibitive, without compromising skeletal muscle suppression. Magn Reson Med 75:962–972, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Medicine in Resonance. PMID:25924813

  15. Prolonged Cre expression driven by the α-myosin heavy chain promoter can be cardiotoxic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugach, Emily K; Richmond, Phillip A; Azofeifa, Joseph G; Dowell, Robin D; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2015-09-01

    Studying the importance of genetic factors in a desired cell type or tissue necessitates the use of precise genetic tools. With the introduction of bacteriophage Cre recombinase/loxP mediated DNA editing and promoter-specific Cre expression, it is feasible to generate conditional knockout mice in which particular genes are disrupted in a cell type-specific manner in vivo. In cardiac myocytes, this is often achieved through α-myosin heavy chain promoter (αMyHC)-driven Cre expression in conjunction with a loxP-site flanked gene of interest. Recent studies in other cell types demonstrate toxicity of Cre expression through induction of DNA damage. However, it is unclear to what extent the traditionally used αMyHC-Cre line [1] may exhibit cardiotoxicity. Further, the genotype of αMyHC-Cre(+/-) is not often included as a control group in cardiac myocyte-specific knockout studies. Here we present evidence that these αMyHC-Cre(+/-) mice show molecular signs of cardiac toxicity by 3months of age and exhibit decreased cardiac function by 6months of age compared to wild-type littermates. Hearts from αMyHC-Cre(+/-) mice also display evidence of fibrosis, inflammation, and DNA damage. Interestingly, some of the early functional changes observed in αMyHC-Cre(+/-) mice are sexually dimorphic. Given the high level of Cre recombinase expression resulting from expression from the αMyHC promoter, we asked if degenerate loxP-like sites naturally exist in the mouse genome and if so, whether they are affected by Cre in the absence of canonical loxP-sites. Using a novel bioinformatics search tool, we identified 619 loxP-like sites with 4 or less mismatches to the canonical loxP-site. 227 sites overlapped with annotated genes and 55 of these genes were expressed in cardiac muscle. Expression of ~26% of the 27 genes tested was disrupted in αMyHC-Cre(+/-) mice indicating potential targeting by Cre. Taken together, these results highlight both the importance of using αMyHC-Cre mice

  16. The Complex Role of Store Operated Calcium Entry Pathways and Related Proteins in the Function of Cardiac, Skeletal and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Avila-Medina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac, skeletal, and smooth muscle cells shared the common feature of contraction in response to different stimuli. Agonist-induced muscle's contraction is triggered by a cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration increase due to a rapid Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and a transmembrane Ca2+ influx, mainly through L-type Ca2+ channels. Compelling evidences have demonstrated that Ca2+ might also enter through other cationic channels such as Store-Operated Ca2+ Channels (SOCCs, involved in several physiological functions and pathological conditions. The opening of SOCCs is regulated by the filling state of the intracellular Ca2+ store, the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which communicates to the plasma membrane channels through the Stromal Interaction Molecule 1/2 (STIM1/2 protein. In muscle cells, SOCCs can be mainly non-selective cation channels formed by Orai1 and other members of the Transient Receptor Potential-Canonical (TRPC channels family, as well as highly selective Ca2+ Release-Activated Ca2+ (CRAC channels, formed exclusively by subunits of Orai proteins likely organized in macromolecular complexes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the complex role of Store Operated Calcium Entry (SOCE pathways and related proteins in the function of cardiac, skeletal, and vascular smooth muscle cells.

  17. The Rho kinases I and II regulate different aspects of myosin II activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John R

    2005-01-01

    The homologous mammalian rho kinases (ROCK I and II) are assumed to be functionally redundant, based largely on kinase construct overexpression. As downstream effectors of Rho GTPases, their major substrates are myosin light chain and myosin phosphatase. Both kinases are implicated in microfilament...... bundle assembly and smooth muscle contractility. Here, analysis of fibroblast adhesion to fibronectin revealed that although ROCK II was more abundant, its activity was always lower than ROCK I. Specific reduction of ROCK I by siRNA resulted in loss of stress fibers and focal adhesions, despite...

  18. Radioimmunoassay of myosin heavy beta chains in human serum for the evaluation of the size of myocardial infarction: correlation with myocardial Tl-201 SPECT and cardiac angioscintigraphy. Le dosage des chaines lourdes beta de la myosine serique dans l'approche de la taille de l'infarctus du myocarde: correlation avec la tomoscintigraphie myocardique au Tl-201 et l'angioscintigraphie cardiaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facello, A.; Gries, P.; Demangeat, C.; Brunot, B.; Roul, G.; Demangeat, J.L.; Moulichon, M.; Bareiss, P.; Sacrez, A.; Constantinesco, A. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Hautepierre, 67 - Strasbourg (FR))

    1990-01-01

    To determine the relationship between serum levels of myosin heavy beta chains assessed by an IRMA technique and other radionuclide and enzymatic parameters in the evaluation of the size of myocardial infarction, we studied 22 patients with acute myocardial infarction. Blood samples taken daily between 1st to 13th day of evolution allow the determination of peak and integral of myosine release that showed a good correlation (p<0.01) with myocardial underperfusion score in T1-201 SPECT, left ventricular ejection fractions at 1st day and at the pre-discharge study, just as CPK peak. This new assay is an interesting mean to evaluate the size of myocardial infarction.

  19. Autophagy plays an important role in Sunitinib-mediated cell death in H9c2 cardiac muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yuqin; Xue Tao; Yang Xiaochun; Zhu Hong; Ding Xiaofei; Lou Liming; Lu Wei; Yang Bo; He Qiaojun

    2010-01-01

    Sunitinib, which is a multitargeted tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, exhibits antiangiogenic and antitumor activity, and extends survival of patients with metastatic renal-cell carcinoma (mRCC) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). This molecule has also been reported to be associated with cardiotoxicity at a high frequency, but the mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, we observed that Sunitinib showed high anti-proliferative effect on H9c2 cardiac muscle cells measured by PI staining and the MTT assay. But apoptotic markers (PARP cleavage, caspase 3 cleavage and chromatin condensation) were uniformly negative in H9c2 cells after Sunitinib treatment for 48 h, indicating that another cell death pathway may be involved in Sunitinib-induced cardiotoxicity. Here we found Sunitinib dramatically increased autophagic flux in H9c2 cells. Acidic vesicle fluorescence and high expression of LC3-II in H9c2 cells identified autophagy as a Sunitinib-induced process that might be associated with cytotoxicity. Furthermore, knocking down Beclin 1 by RNA-interference to block autophagy in H9c2 cells revealed that the death rate was decreased when treated with Sunitinib in comparison to control cells. These results confirmed that autophagy plays an important role in Sunitinib-mediated H9c2 cells cytotoxicity. Taken together, the data presented here strongly suggest that autophagy is associated with Sunitinib-induced cardiotoxicity, and that inhibition of autophagy constitutes a viable strategy for reducing Sunitinib-induced cardiomyocyte death thereby alleviating Sunitinib cardiotoxicity.

  20. Inhibition of doxorubicin-induced senescence by PPARδ activation agonists in cardiac muscle cells: cooperation between PPARδ and Bcl6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Altieri

    Full Text Available Senescence and apoptosis are two distinct cellular programs that are activated in response to a variety of stresses. Low or high doses of the same stressor, i.e., the anticancer drug doxorubicin, may either induce apoptosis or senescence, respectively, in cardiac muscle cells. We have demonstrated that PPARδ, a ligand-activated transcriptional factor that controls lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity and inflammation, is also involved in the doxorubicin-induced senescence program. This occurs through its interference with the transcriptional repressor protein B cell lymphoma-6 (Bcl6. Low doses of doxorubicin increase the expression of PPARδ that sequesters Bcl6, thus preventing it from exerting its anti-senescent effects. We also found that L-165041, a specific PPARδ activator, is highly effective in protecting cardiomyocytes from doxorubicin-induced senescence through a Bcl6 related mechanism. In fact, L-165041 increases Bcl6 expression via p38, JNK and Akt activation, and at the same time it induces the release of Bcl6 from PPARδ, thereby enabling Bcl6 to bind to its target genes. L-165041 also prevented apoptosis induced by higher doses of doxorubicin. However, while experiments performed with siRNA analysis techniques very clearly showed the weight of Bcl6 in the cellular senescence program, no role was found for Bcl6 in the anti-apoptotic effects of L-165041, thus confirming that senescence and apoptosis are two very distinct stress response cellular programs. This study increases our understanding of the molecular mechanism of anthracycline cardiotoxicity and suggests a potential role for PPARδ agonists as cardioprotective agents.

  1. CALIX[4]ARENE C-99 INHIBITS MYOSIN ATPase ACTIVITY AND CHANGES THE ORGANIZATION OF CONTRACTILE FILAMENTS OF MYOMETRIUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labyntseva, R D; Bevza, A A; Lul'ko, A O; Cherenok, S O; Kalchenko, V I; Kosterin, S O

    2015-01-01

    Calix[4]arenes are cup-like macrocyclic (polyphenolic) compounds, they are regarded as promising molecular "platforms" for the design of new physiologically active compounds. We have earlier found that calix[4]arene C-99 inhibits the ATPase activity of actomyosin and myosin subfragment-1 of pig uterus in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of calix[4]arene C-99 with myosin from rat uterine myocytes. It was found that the ATPase activity of myosin prepared from pre-incubated with 100 mM of calix[4]arene C-99 myocytes was almost 50% lower than in control. Additionally, we have revealed the effect of calix[4]arene C-99 on the subcellular distribution of actin and myosin in uterus myocytes by the method of confocal microscopy. This effect can be caused by reorganization of the structure of the contractile smooth muscle cell proteins due to their interaction with calix[4]arene. The obtained results demonstrate the ability of calix[4]arene C-99 to penetrate into the uterus muscle cells and affect not only the myosin ATPase activity, but also the structure of the actin and myosin filaments in the myometrial cells. Demonstrated ability of calix[4]arene C-99 can be used for development of new pharmacological agents for efficient normalization of myometrial contractile hyperfunction.

  2. Calix[4]arene C-99 inhibits myosin ATPase activity and changes the organization of contractile filaments of myometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Labyntseva,

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Calix[4]arenes are cup-like macrocyclic (polyphenolic compounds, they are regarded as promising molecular “platforms” for the design of new physiologically active compounds. We have earlier found that сalix[4]arenе C-99 inhibits the ATPase activity of actomyosin and myosin subfragment-1 of pig uterus іn vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of calix[4]arene C-99 with myosin from rat uterine myocytes. It was found that the ATPase activity of myosin prepared from pre-incubated with 100 mM of calix[4]arene C-99 myocytes was almost 50% lower than in control. Additionally, we have revealed the effect of calix[4]arene C-99 on the subcellular distribution of actin and myosin in uterus myocytes by the method of confocal microscopy. This effect can be caused by reorganization of the structure of the contractile smooth muscle cell proteins due to their interaction with calix[4]arene. The obtained results demonstrate the ability of calix[4]arene C-99 to penetrate into the uterus muscle cells and affect not only the myosin ATPase activity, but also the structure of the actin and myosin filaments in the myometrial cells. Demonstrated ability of calix[4]arene C-99 can be used for development of new pharmacological agents for efficient normalization of myometrial contractile hyperfunction.

  3. The relationship between the hypokalaemic response to adrenaline, beta-adrenoceptors, and Na(+)-K+ pumps in skeletal and cardiac muscle membranes in the rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfellah, M.S.; Reid, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The hypokalaemic response to adrenaline and the involvement of beta-adrenoceptors and Na(+)-K+ pumps were investigated in control rabbits and animals chronically pretreated with adrenaline. The hypokalaemic response to acute intravenous infusion of adrenaline was significantly reduced when rabbits were chronically pretreated with adrenaline for 10 days. Chronic pretreatment of rabbits with adrenaline significantly reduced the densities for [125I]cyanopindolol and [3H]ouabain binding sites in skeletal muscle and heart. Furthermore, there was a strong positive correlation (r = 0.97, p less than 0.001) between the Bmax for ICYP and [3H]ouabain, in the rabbit heart. Ouabain-sensitive 86Rb uptake and the activity of 3-O-methylfluorescein phosphate phosphatase were used to assess the function of the Na(+)-K+ pump in skeletal and cardiac muscle. There was no significant difference in these functional indices of the Na(+)-K+ pump between the control and adrenaline-pretreated animals, in skeletal or cardiac muscle. Thus, downregulation of the [3H]ouabain binding sites did not appear to be accompanied by reduced function of the Na(+)-K+ pump. Additional investigations are required to confirm further the dissociation between the function of the pump and the ouabain binding sites

  4. The Effects of Hsp90α1 Mutations on Myosin Thick Filament Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiuxia; Liu, Kechun; Tian, Zhenjun; Du, Shao Jun

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90α plays a key role in myosin folding and thick filament assembly in muscle cells. To assess the structure and function of Hsp90α and its potential regulation by post-translational modification, we developed a combined knockdown and rescue assay in zebrafish embryos to systematically analyze the effects of various mutations on Hsp90α function in myosin thick filament organization. DNA constructs expressing the Hsp90α1 mutants with altered putative ATP binding, phosphorylation, acetylation or methylation sites were co-injected with Hsp90α1 specific morpholino into zebrafish embryos. Myosin thick filament organization was analyzed in skeletal muscles of the injected embryos by immunostaining. The results showed that mutating the conserved D90 residue in the Hsp90α1 ATP binding domain abolished its function in thick filament organization. In addition, phosphorylation mimicking mutations of T33D, T33E and T87E compromised Hsp90α1 function in myosin thick filament organization. Similarly, K287Q acetylation mimicking mutation repressed Hsp90α1 function in myosin thick filament organization. In contrast, K206R and K608R hypomethylation mimicking mutations had not effect on Hsp90α1 function in thick filament organization. Given that T33 and T87 are highly conserved residues involved post-translational modification (PTM) in yeast, mouse and human Hsp90 proteins, data from this study could indicate that Hsp90α1 function in myosin thick filament organization is potentially regulated by PTMs involving phosphorylation and acetylation.

  5. Functions of myosin motors tailored for parasitism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, Christina; Graindorge, Arnault; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Myosin motors are one of the largest protein families in eukaryotes that exhibit divergent cellular functions. Their roles in protozoans, a diverse group of anciently diverged, single celled organisms with many prominent members known to be parasitic and to cause diseases in human and livestock......, are largely unknown. In the recent years many different approaches, among them whole genome sequencing, phylogenetic analyses and functional studies have increased our understanding on the distribution, protein architecture and function of unconventional myosin motors in protozoan parasites. In Apicomplexa......, myosins turn out to be highly specialized and to exhibit unique functions tailored to accommodate the lifestyle of these parasites....

  6. Transient up- and down-regulation of expression of myosin light chain 2 and myostatin mRNA mark the changes from stratified hyperplasia to muscle fiber hypertrophy in larvae of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Stella; Alami-Durante, Hélène; Power, Deborah M; Sarropoulou, Elena; Mamuris, Zissis; Moutou, Katerina A

    2016-02-01

    Hyperplasia and hypertrophy are the two mechanisms by which muscle develops and grows. We study these two mechanisms, during the early development of white muscle in Sparus aurata, by means of histology and the expression of structural and regulatory genes. A clear stage of stratified hyperplasia was identified early in the development of gilthead sea bream but ceased by 35 dph when hypertrophy took over. Mosaic recruitment of new white fibers began as soon as 60 dph. The genes mlc2a and mlc2b were expressed at various levels during the main phases of hyperplasia and hypertrophy. The genes myog and mlc2a were significantly up-regulated during the intensive stratified formation of new fibers and their expression was significantly correlated. Expression of mstn1 and igf1 increased at 35 dph, appeared to regulate the hyperplasia-to-hypertrophy transition, and may have stimulated the expression of mlc2a, mlc2b and col1a1 at the onset of mosaic hyperplasia. The up-regulation of mstn1 at transitional phases in muscle development indicates a dual regulatory role of myostatin in fish larval muscle growth.

  7. Forward Programming of Cardiac Stem Cells by Homogeneous Transduction with MYOCD plus TBX5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Belian

    Full Text Available Adult cardiac stem cells (CSCs express many endogenous cardiogenic transcription factors including members of the Gata, Hand, Mef2, and T-box family. Unlike its DNA-binding targets, Myocardin (Myocd-a co-activator not only for serum response factor, but also for Gata4 and Tbx5-is not expressed in CSCs. We hypothesised that its absence was a limiting factor for reprogramming. Here, we sought to investigate the susceptibility of adult mouse Sca1+ side population CSCs to reprogramming by supplementing the triad of GATA4, MEF2C, and TBX5 (GMT, and more specifically by testing the effect of the missing co-activator, Myocd. Exogenous factors were expressed via doxycycline-inducible lentiviral vectors in various combinations. High throughput quantitative RT-PCR was used to test expression of 29 cardiac lineage markers two weeks post-induction. GMT induced more than half the analysed cardiac transcripts. However, no protein was detected for the induced sarcomeric genes Actc1, Myh6, and Myl2. Adding MYOCD to GMT affected only slightly the breadth and level of gene induction, but, importantly, triggered expression of all three proteins examined (α-cardiac actin, atrial natriuretic peptide, sarcomeric myosin heavy chains. MYOCD + TBX was the most effective pairwise combination in this system. In clonal derivatives homogenously expressing MYOCD + TBX at high levels, 93% of cardiac transcripts were up-regulated and all five proteins tested were visualized.(1 GMT induced cardiac genes in CSCs, but not cardiac proteins under the conditions used. (2 Complementing GMT with MYOCD induced cardiac protein expression, indicating a more complete cardiac differentiation program. (3 Homogeneous transduction with MYOCD + TBX5 facilitated the identification of differentiating cells and the validation of this combinatorial reprogramming strategy. Together, these results highlight the pivotal importance of MYOCD in driving CSCs toward a cardiac muscle fate.

  8. Evidence towards improved estimation of respiratory muscle effort from diaphragm mechanomyographic signals with cardiac vibration interference using sample entropy with fixed tolerance values.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Sarlabous

    Full Text Available The analysis of amplitude parameters of the diaphragm mechanomyographic (MMGdi signal is a non-invasive technique to assess respiratory muscle effort and to detect and quantify the severity of respiratory muscle weakness. The amplitude of the MMGdi signal is usually evaluated using the average rectified value or the root mean square of the signal. However, these estimations are greatly affected by the presence of cardiac vibration or mechanocardiographic (MCG noise. In this study, we present a method for improving the estimation of the respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals that is robust to the presence of MCG. This method is based on the calculation of the sample entropy using fixed tolerance values (fSampEn, that is, with tolerance values that are not normalized by the local standard deviation of the window analyzed. The behavior of the fSampEn parameter was tested in synthesized mechanomyographic signals, with different ratios between the amplitude of the MCG and clean mechanomyographic components. As an example of application of this technique, the use of fSampEn was explored also in recorded MMGdi signals, with different inspiratory loads. The results with both synthetic and recorded signals indicate that the entropy parameter is less affected by the MCG noise, especially at low signal-to-noise ratios. Therefore, we believe that the proposed fSampEn parameter could improve estimates of respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals with the presence of MCG interference.

  9. Formation of contractile networks and fibers in the medial cell cortex through myosin-II turnover, contraction, and stress-stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Wei; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Ou-Yang, H Daniel; Jedlicka, Sabrina S; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of adhered cells depends crucially on the formation of a contractile meshwork of parallel and cross-linked fibers along the contacting surface. The motor activity and minifilament assembly of non-muscle myosin-II is an important component of cortical cytoskeletal remodeling during mechanosensing. We used experiments and computational modeling to study cortical myosin-II dynamics in adhered cells. Confocal microscopy was used to image the medial cell cortex of HeLa cells stably expressing myosin regulatory light chain tagged with GFP (MRLC-GFP). The distribution of MRLC-GFP fibers and focal adhesions was classified into three types of network morphologies. Time-lapse movies show: myosin foci appearance and disappearance; aligning and contraction; stabilization upon alignment. Addition of blebbistatin, which perturbs myosin motor activity, leads to a reorganization of the cortical networks and to a reduction of contractile motions. We quantified the kinetics of contraction, disassembly and reassembly of myosin networks using spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS). Coarse-grained numerical simulations include bipolar minifilaments that contract and align through specified interactions as basic elements. After assuming that minifilament turnover decreases with increasing contractile stress, the simulations reproduce stress-dependent fiber formation in between focal adhesions above a threshold myosin concentration. The STICS correlation function in simulations matches the function measured in experiments. This study provides a framework to help interpret how different cortical myosin remodeling kinetics may contribute to different cell shape and rigidity depending on substrate stiffness. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Proportions of myosin heavy chain mRNAs, protein isoforms and fiber types in the slow and fast skeletal muscles are maintained after alterations of thyroid status in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, Tomáš; Diallo, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 1 (2015), s. 111-118 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB12SK158; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK123; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Grant - others:EC(XE) LSH-CT-2004-511978 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : thyroid hormones * muscle gene expression * MyHC isoforms and muscle fiber types * quantitative real time RT-PCR * SDS-PAGE and 2-D Stereological analysis Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.643, year: 2015

  11. MURC, a muscle-restricted coiled-coil protein that modulates the Rho/ROCK pathway, induces cardiac dysfunction and conduction disturbance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Takehiro; Ueyama, Tomomi; Isodono, Koji; Tagawa, Masashi; Takehara, Naofumi; Kawashima, Tsuneaki; Harada, Koichiro; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Shioi, Tetsuo; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Oh, Hidemasa

    2008-05-01

    We identified a novel muscle-restricted putative coiled-coil protein, MURC, which is evolutionarily conserved from frog to human. MURC was localized to the cytoplasm with accumulation in the Z-line of the sarcomere in the murine adult heart. MURC mRNA expression in the heart increased during the developmental process from the embryonic stage to adulthood. In response to pressure overload, MURC mRNA expression increased in the hypertrophied heart. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we identified the serum deprivation response (SDPR) protein, a phosphatidylserine-binding protein, as a MURC-binding protein. MURC induced activation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway, which modulated serum response factor-mediated atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) expression and myofibrillar organization. SDPR augmented MURC-induced transactivation of the ANP promoter in cardiomyocytes, and RNA interference of SDPR attenuated the action of MURC on the ANP promoter. Transgenic mice expressing cardiac-specific MURC (Tg-MURC) exhibited cardiac contractile dysfunction and atrioventricular (AV) conduction disturbances with atrial chamber enlargement, reduced thickness of the ventricular wall, and interstitial fibrosis. Spontaneous episodes of atrial fibrillation and AV block were observed in Tg-MURC mice. These findings indicate that MURC modulates RhoA signaling and that MURC plays an important role in the development of cardiac dysfunction and conduction disturbance with increased vulnerability to atrial arrhythmias.

  12. MURC, a Muscle-Restricted Coiled-Coil Protein That Modulates the Rho/ROCK Pathway, Induces Cardiac Dysfunction and Conduction Disturbance▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Takehiro; Ueyama, Tomomi; Isodono, Koji; Tagawa, Masashi; Takehara, Naofumi; Kawashima, Tsuneaki; Harada, Koichiro; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Shioi, Tetsuo; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Oh, Hidemasa

    2008-01-01

    We identified a novel muscle-restricted putative coiled-coil protein, MURC, which is evolutionarily conserved from frog to human. MURC was localized to the cytoplasm with accumulation in the Z-line of the sarcomere in the murine adult heart. MURC mRNA expression in the heart increased during the developmental process from the embryonic stage to adulthood. In response to pressure overload, MURC mRNA expression increased in the hypertrophied heart. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we identified the serum deprivation response (SDPR) protein, a phosphatidylserine-binding protein, as a MURC-binding protein. MURC induced activation of the RhoA/ROCK pathway, which modulated serum response factor-mediated atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) expression and myofibrillar organization. SDPR augmented MURC-induced transactivation of the ANP promoter in cardiomyocytes, and RNA interference of SDPR attenuated the action of MURC on the ANP promoter. Transgenic mice expressing cardiac-specific MURC (Tg-MURC) exhibited cardiac contractile dysfunction and atrioventricular (AV) conduction disturbances with atrial chamber enlargement, reduced thickness of the ventricular wall, and interstitial fibrosis. Spontaneous episodes of atrial fibrillation and AV block were observed in Tg-MURC mice. These findings indicate that MURC modulates RhoA signaling and that MURC plays an important role in the development of cardiac dysfunction and conduction disturbance with increased vulnerability to atrial arrhythmias. PMID:18332105

  13. [Experimental study on potential for cardiac assist by latissimus dorsi myograft--an importance of muscle ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, K; Koyanagi, K; Sakamoto, Y; Wakabayashi, K; Tanaka, K; Horikoshi, S; Matsui, M; Arai, T

    1991-03-01

    We have studied contractile property and fatigue rates of skeletal muscle ventricle (SMV) constructed using the latissimus dorsi muscles of 11 dogs. The role of early interruption of collateral blood supply in the prevention of muscle ischemia and SMV fatigue was evaluated. Systolic function of SMV was measured in a hydraulic test system; afterload was set at 70 mmHg and preload 15 or 25 mmHg. Control SMV (GI: N = 7), which was fashioned immediately after interruption of collateral blood supply, generated an initial SMV pressure of 222 +/- 50 mmHg and stroke volume of 15 +/- 7 ml/beat with muscle stimulation at a burst-frequency of 50 Hz, but could sustain flow for only 3.5 +/- 0.8 minutes. SMV subjected to a vascular delay (Group II: N = 4) demonstrated improvement of fatigue rates; duration of flow 32.4 +/- 14.0 and sufficient contractile property (initial SMV pressure 182 +/- 17 mmHg, stroke volume 1- +/- 2 ml/beat). Thermography surface temperature mapping revealed remarkable improvement of blood distribution in GII muscles. Flow rates of thoracodorsal artery were significantly greater in GII muscles compared to those in GI muscles (15.0 +/- 3.7 ml/min/LD 100 g, 10.1 +/- 3.1 ml/min/LD 100 g, p less than 0.05, respectively). Despite significant improvement of functional durability in GII muscles, the ratio of oxygen consumption to lactate output was not different between 2 groups. These results suggest that early interruption of collateral blood supply can minimize muscle ischemia, resulting in diminishing fatigue of latissimus dorsi muscles without changes in skeletal muscle metabolism.

  14. Exome Sequencing Identified a Splice Site Mutation in FHL1 that Causes Uruguay Syndrome, an X-Linked Disorder With Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy and Premature Cardiac Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuan; Schoser, Benedikt; Rao, Aliz R; Quadrelli, Roberto; Vaglio, Alicia; Rupp, Verena; Beichler, Christine; Nelson, Stanley F; Schapacher-Tilp, Gudrun; Windpassinger, Christian; Wilcox, William R

    2016-04-01

    Previously, we reported a rare X-linked disorder, Uruguay syndrome in a single family. The main features are pugilistic facies, skeletal deformities, and muscular hypertrophy despite a lack of exercise and cardiac ventricular hypertrophy leading to premature death. An ≈19 Mb critical region on X chromosome was identified through identity-by-descent analysis of 3 affected males. Exome sequencing was conducted on one affected male to identify the disease-causing gene and variant. A splice site variant (c.502-2A>G) in the FHL1 gene was highly suspicious among other candidate genes and variants. FHL1A is the predominant isoform of FHL1 in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Sequencing cDNA showed the splice site variant led to skipping of exons 6 of the FHL1A isoform, equivalent to the FHL1C isoform. Targeted analysis showed that this splice site variant cosegregated with disease in the family. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis of muscle from the proband showed a significant decrease in protein expression of FHL1A. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of different isoforms of FHL1 demonstrated that the FHL1C is markedly increased. Mutations in the FHL1 gene have been reported in disorders with skeletal and cardiac myopathy but none has the skeletal or facial phenotype seen in patients with Uruguay syndrome. Our data suggest that a novel FHL1 splice site variant results in the absence of FHL1A and the abundance of FHL1C, which may contribute to the complex and severe phenotype. Mutation screening of the FHL1 gene should be considered for patients with uncharacterized myopathies and cardiomyopathies. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Mediates Myosin-Dependent Collagen Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno M. Coelho

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1 is a tyrosine kinase collagen adhesion receptor that mediates cell migration through association with non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA. Because DDR1 is implicated in cancer fibrosis, we hypothesized that DDR1 interacts with NMIIA to enable collagen compaction by traction forces. Mechanical splinting of rat dermal wounds increased DDR1 expression and collagen alignment. In periodontal ligament of DDR1 knockout mice, collagen mechanical reorganization was reduced >30%. Similarly, cultured cells with DDR1 knockdown or expressing kinase-deficient DDR1d showed 50% reduction of aligned collagen. Tractional remodeling of collagen was dependent on DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction of the DDR1 C-terminal kinase domain with NMIIA filaments. Collagen remodeling by traction forces, DDR1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and myosin light chain phosphorylation were increased on stiff versus soft substrates. Thus, DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction with NMIIA filaments enhance the collagen tractional remodeling that is important for collagen compaction in fibrosis.

  16. Skeletal, cardiac, and respiratory muscle function and histopathology in the P448Lneo- mouse model of FKRP-deficient muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Morales, Melissa; Li, Ning; Fritz, Alexander G; Ruobing, Ren; Blaeser, Anthony; Francois, Ershia; Lu, Qi-Long; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Spurney, Christopher F

    2018-04-06

    Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) mutations are the most common cause of dystroglycanopathies known to cause both limb girdle and congenital muscular dystrophy. The P448Lneo- mouse model has a knock-in mutation in the FKRP gene and develops skeletal, respiratory, and cardiac muscle disease. We studied the natural history of the P448Lneo- mouse model over 9 months and the effects of twice weekly treadmill running. Forelimb and hindlimb grip strength (Columbus Instruments) and overall activity (Omnitech Electronics) assessed skeletal muscle function. Echocardiography was performed using VisualSonics Vevo 770 (FujiFilm VisualSonics). Plethysmography was performed using whole body system (ADInstruments). Histological evaluations included quantification of inflammation, fibrosis, central nucleation, and fiber size variation. P448Lneo- mice had significantly increased normalized tissue weights compared to controls at 9 months of age for the heart, gastrocnemius, soleus, tibialis anterior, quadriceps, and triceps. There were no significant differences seen in forelimb or hindlimb grip strength or activity monitoring in P448Lneo- mice with or without exercise compared to controls. Skeletal muscles demonstrated increased inflammation, fibrosis, central nucleation, and variation in fiber size compared to controls (p muscular dystrophies.

  17. Cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP) expression in human and murine atherosclerotic lesions - Activin induces carp in smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waard, Vivian; van Achterberg, Tanja A. E.; Beauchamp, Nicholas J.; Pannekoek, Hans; de Vries, Carlie J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective-Cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP) is a transcription factor-related protein that has been studied most extensively in the heart. In the present study, we investigated the expression and the potential function of CARP in human and murine atherosclerosis. Methods and Results-CARP

  18. Triple-resonance multidimensional NMR study of calmodulin complexed with the binding domain of skeletal muscle myosin light-chain kinase: Indication of a conformational change in the central helix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Kay, L.E.; Bax, A.; Krinks, M.

    1991-01-01

    Heteronuclear 3D and 4D NMR experiments have been used to obtain 1 H, 13 C, and 15 N backbone chemical shift assignments in Ca 2+ -loaded clamodulin complexed with a 26-residue synthetic peptide (M13) corresponding to the calmodulin-bionding domain (residues 577-602) of rabbit skeletal muscle muosin light-chain kinase. Comparison of the chemical shift values with those observed in peptide-free calmodulin shows that binding of M13 peptide induces substantial chemical shift changes that are not localized in one particular region of the protein. The largest changes are found in the first helix of the Ca 2+ -binding site 1 (E11-E14), the N-terminal portion of the central helix (M72-D78), and the second helix of the Ca 2+ -binding site 4 (F141-M145). Analysis of backbone NOE connectivities indicates a change from α-helical to an extended conformation for residues 75-77 upon complexation with M13. Upon complexation with M13, a significant decrease in the amide exchange rate is observed for residues T110, L112, G113, and E114 at the end of the second helix of site 3

  19. [Analysis of surgical treatment with pectoralis major muscle flap for deep sternal infection after cardiac surgery: a case series of 189 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Wang, Wenzhang; Cai, Aibing; Han, Zhiyi; Li, Xiyuan; Ma, Jiagui

    2015-03-01

    To analyze and summarize the clinical features and experience in surgical treatment of deep sternal infection (DSWI). This was a retrospective study. From January 2008 to December 2013, 189 patients with secondary DSWI after cardiac surgery underwent the pectoralis major muscle flap transposition in our department. There were 116 male and 73 female patients. The mean age was (54 ± 21) years, the body mass index was (26. 1 ± 1. 3) kg/m2. The incidence of postoperation DSWI were after isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in 93 patients, after other heart surgery plus CABG in 13 patients, after valve surgery in 47 patients, after thoracic aortic surgery in 16 patients, after congenital heart disease in 18 patients, and after cardiac injury in 2 patients. Clean patients' wound and extract secretions, clear the infection thoroughly by surgery and select antibiotics based on susceptibility results, and then repair the wound with appropriate muscle flap, place drain tube with negative pressure. Of all the 189 patients, 184 used isolate pectoralis, 1 used isolate rectus, and 4 used pectoralis plus rectus. The operative wounds of 179 patients were primary healing (94. 7%). Hospital discharge was postponed by 1 week for 7 patients, due to subcutaneous wound infection. Subcutaneous wound infection occurred again in 8 patients 1 week after hospital discharge, and their wounds healed after wound dressing. Nine patients (4. 7%) did not recover, due to residue of the sequestrum and costal chondritis, whom were later cured by undergoing a second treatment of debridement and pectoralis major muscle flap transposition. Eight patients died, in which 2 died of respiratory failure, 2 died of bacterial endocarditis with septicemia, 2 died of renal failure, 1 died of intraoperative bleeding leading to brain death and the 1 died of heart failure. The mortality rate was 4. 2% . The average length of postoperative hospital stay was (14 ± 5) days. The longest postoperative

  20. Myosin heavy chain composition of single fibres from m. biceps brachii of male body builders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, H; Zhou, M.-Y.; Richter, Erik

    1990-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition of single fibres from m. biceps brachii of young sedentary men (28 +/- 0.4 years, mean +/- SE, n = 4) and male body builders (25 +/- 2.0 years, n = 4) was analysed with a sensitive one-dimensional electrophoretic technique. Compared with sedentary men...... expression of MHC isoforms within histochemical type II fibres of human skeletal muscle with body building. Furthermore, in human skeletal muscle differences in expression of MHC isoforms may not always be reflected in the traditional histochemical classification of types I, IIa, IIb and IIc fibres....

  1. Interrelation between the changes of phase functions of cardiac muscle contraction and biochemical processes as an algorithm for identifying local pathologies in cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury V. Fedosov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims The interrelation between hemodynamic changes, functions of the cardiovascular system and biochemical reactions in the cells of the heart muscle is investigated in the present paper. Materials and methods Several methods were used to influence the metabolism processes in the myocardium. The changes in the phase functions of contraction of different cardiac muscles were recorded. In order to have comprehensive influence on the metabolism processes, normalization of the acid-base balance was performed. L-carnitine and octolipen were used to affect the lipid metabolism. Results Phase blood volumes that are characteristic of hemodynamics changed in the course of treatment to reach their nornal values. The ECG shape during the heart cycle phases also changed to reach the norm. The initial ECG shape describing Brugada syndrome almost reached its normal value. Extrasystole disappeared therewith. Conclusion The method of the heart cycle phase analysis enables monitoring any changes in hemodynamics and functions of the cardiovascular system. The method can be used for identifying the original cause of pathologies and efficient monitoring of the treatment progress.

  2. MUSCLEMOTION : A Versatile Open Software Tool to Quantify Cardiomyocyte and Cardiac Muscle Contraction In Vitro and In Vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sala, Luca; van Meer, Berend J; Tertoolen, Leon T; Bakkers, Jeroen; Bellin, Milena; Davis, Richard P; Denning, Chris N; Dieben, Michel A; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Giacomelli, Elisa; Grandela, Catarina; Hansen, Arne; Holman, Eduard; Jongbloed, Monique R; Kamel, Sarah M; Koopman, Charlotte D; Lachaud, Quentin; Mannhardt, Ingra; Mol, Mervyn P; Mosqueira, Diogo; Orlova, Valeria V; Passier, Robert; Ribeiro, Marcelo C; Saleem, Umber; Smith, Godfrey; Burton, Francis L L; Mummery, Christine L

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: There are several methods to measure cardiomyocyte (CM) and muscle contraction but these require customized hardware, expensive apparatus and advanced informatics or can only be used in single experimental models. Consequently, data and techniques have been difficult to reproduce across

  3. Preparation and Characterization of Myosin Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Elizabeth; Eftink, Maurice R.

    1985-01-01

    Students complete five experimental projects at the end of a senior-level biochemistry course which involves the isolation and characterization of myosin and its water-soluble subfragments. Procedures used and results obtained are provided for such projects as viscosity and ATPase measurements and gel electrophoresis experiments. (JN)

  4. Molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of angiotensin II-induced muscle wasting: potential therapeutic targets for cardiac cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Tabony, A. Michael; Galvez, Sarah; Mitch, William E.; Higashi, Yusuke; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Cachexia is a serious complication of many chronic diseases, such as congestive heart failure (CHF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Many factors are involved in the development of cachexia, and there is increasing evidence that angiotensin II (Ang II), the main effector molecule of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), plays an important role in this process. Patients with advanced CHF or CKD often have increased Ang II levels and cachexia, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor treatment improves weight loss. In rodent models, an increase in systemic Ang II leads to weight loss through increased protein breakdown, reduced protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and decreased appetite. Ang II activates the ubiquitin-proteasome system via generation of reactive oxygen species and via inhibition of the insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling pathway. Furthermore, Ang II inhibits 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and disrupts normal energy balance. Ang II also increases cytokines and circulating hormones such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, serum amyloid-A, glucocorticoids and myostatin, which regulate muscle protein synthesis and degradation. Ang II acts on hypothalamic neurons to regulate orexigenic/anorexigenic neuropeptides, such as neuropeptide-Y, orexin and corticotropin-releasing hormone, leading to reduced appetite. Also, Ang II may regulate skeletal muscle regenerative processes. Several clinical studies have indicated that blockade of Ang II signaling via ACE inhibitors or Ang II type 1 receptor blockers prevents weight loss and improves muscle strength. Thus the RAS is a promising target for the treatment of muscle atrophy in patients with CHF and CKD. PMID:23769949

  5. Myosin II dynamics are regulated by tension in intercalating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Simoes, Sérgio de Matos; Röper, Jens-Christian; Eaton, Suzanne; Zallen, Jennifer A

    2009-11-01

    Axis elongation in Drosophila occurs through polarized cell rearrangements driven by actomyosin contractility. Myosin II promotes neighbor exchange through the contraction of single cell boundaries, while the contraction of myosin II structures spanning multiple pairs of cells leads to rosette formation. Here we show that multicellular actomyosin cables form at a higher frequency than expected by chance, indicating that cable assembly is an active process. Multicellular cables are sites of increased mechanical tension as measured by laser ablation. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments show that myosin II is stabilized at the cortex in regions of increased tension. Myosin II is recruited in response to an ectopic force and relieving tension leads to a rapid loss of myosin, indicating that tension is necessary and sufficient for cortical myosin localization. These results demonstrate that myosin II dynamics are regulated by tension in a positive feedback loop that leads to multicellular actomyosin cable formation and efficient tissue elongation.

  6. Fatal cardiac arrhythmia and long-QT syndrome in a new form of congenital generalized lipodystrophy with muscle rippling (CGL4 due to PTRF-CAVIN mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rajab

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated eight families with a novel subtype of congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL4 of whom five members had died from sudden cardiac death during their teenage years. ECG studies revealed features of long-QT syndrome, bradycardia, as well as supraventricular and ventricular tachycardias. Further symptoms comprised myopathy with muscle rippling, skeletal as well as smooth-muscle hypertrophy, leading to impaired gastrointestinal motility and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in some children. Additionally, we found impaired bone formation with osteopenia, osteoporosis, and atlanto-axial instability. Homozygosity mapping located the gene within 2 Mbp on chromosome 17. Prioritization of 74 candidate genes with GeneDistiller for high expression in muscle and adipocytes suggested PTRF-CAVIN (Polymerase I and transcript release factor/Cavin as the most probable candidate leading to the detection of homozygous mutations (c.160delG, c.362dupT. PTRF-CAVIN is essential for caveolae biogenesis. These cholesterol-rich plasmalemmal vesicles are involved in signal-transduction and vesicular trafficking and reside primarily on adipocytes, myocytes, and osteoblasts. Absence of PTRF-CAVIN did not influence abundance of its binding partner caveolin-1 and caveolin-3. In patient fibroblasts, however, caveolin-1 failed to localize toward the cell surface and electron microscopy revealed reduction of caveolae to less than 3%. Transfection of full-length PTRF-CAVIN reestablished the presence of caveolae. The loss of caveolae was confirmed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM in combination with fluorescent imaging. PTRF-CAVIN deficiency thus presents the phenotypic spectrum caused by a quintessential lack of functional caveolae.

  7. Myosin heavy chain-like localizes at cell contact sites during Drosophila myoblast fusion and interacts in vitro with Rolling pebbles 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonn, Bettina R.; Rudolf, Anja; Hornbruch-Freitag, Christina; Daum, Gabor; Kuckwa, Jessica; Kastl, Lena; Buttgereit, Detlev [Developmental Biology, Department of Biology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Karl-von-Frisch-Strasse 8, 35037 Marburg (Germany); Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate, E-mail: renkawit@biologie.uni-marburg.de [Developmental Biology, Department of Biology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Karl-von-Frisch-Strasse 8, 35037 Marburg (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Besides representing the sarcomeric thick filaments, myosins are involved in many cellular transport and motility processes. Myosin heavy chains are grouped into 18 classes. Here we show that in Drosophila, the unconventional group XVIII myosin heavy chain-like (Mhcl) is transcribed in the mesoderm of embryos, most prominently in founder cells (FCs). An ectopically expressed GFP-tagged Mhcl localizes in the growing muscle at cell–cell contacts towards the attached fusion competent myoblast (FCM). We further show that Mhcl interacts in vitro with the essential fusion protein Rolling pebbles 7 (Rols7), which is part of a protein complex established at cell contact sites (Fusion-restricted Myogenic-Adhesive Structure or FuRMAS). Here, branched F-actin is likely needed to widen the fusion pore and to integrate the myoblast into the growing muscle. We show that the localization of Mhcl is dependent on the presence of Rols7, and we postulate that Mhcl acts at the FuRMAS as an actin motor protein. We further show that Mhcl deficient embryos develop a wild-type musculature. We thus propose that Mhcl functions redundantly to other myosin heavy chains in myoblasts. Lastly, we found that the protein is detectable adjacent to the sarcomeric Z-discs, suggesting an additional function in mature muscles. - Highlights: ► The class XVIII myosin encoding gene Mhcl is transcribed in the mesoderm. ► Mhcl localization at contact sites of fusing myoblasts depends on Rols7. ► Mhcl interacts in vitro with Rols7 which is essential for myogenesis. ► Functional redundancy with other myosins is likely as mutants show no muscle defects. ► Mhcl localizes adjacent to Z-discs of sarcomeres and might support muscle integrity.

  8. Myosin heavy chain-like localizes at cell contact sites during Drosophila myoblast fusion and interacts in vitro with Rolling pebbles 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonn, Bettina R.; Rudolf, Anja; Hornbruch-Freitag, Christina; Daum, Gabor; Kuckwa, Jessica; Kastl, Lena; Buttgereit, Detlev; Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate

    2013-01-01

    Besides representing the sarcomeric thick filaments, myosins are involved in many cellular transport and motility processes. Myosin heavy chains are grouped into 18 classes. Here we show that in Drosophila, the unconventional group XVIII myosin heavy chain-like (Mhcl) is transcribed in the mesoderm of embryos, most prominently in founder cells (FCs). An ectopically expressed GFP-tagged Mhcl localizes in the growing muscle at cell–cell contacts towards the attached fusion competent myoblast (FCM). We further show that Mhcl interacts in vitro with the essential fusion protein Rolling pebbles 7 (Rols7), which is part of a protein complex established at cell contact sites (Fusion-restricted Myogenic-Adhesive Structure or FuRMAS). Here, branched F-actin is likely needed to widen the fusion pore and to integrate the myoblast into the growing muscle. We show that the localization of Mhcl is dependent on the presence of Rols7, and we postulate that Mhcl acts at the FuRMAS as an actin motor protein. We further show that Mhcl deficient embryos develop a wild-type musculature. We thus propose that Mhcl functions redundantly to other myosin heavy chains in myoblasts. Lastly, we found that the protein is detectable adjacent to the sarcomeric Z-discs, suggesting an additional function in mature muscles. - Highlights: ► The class XVIII myosin encoding gene Mhcl is transcribed in the mesoderm. ► Mhcl localization at contact sites of fusing myoblasts depends on Rols7. ► Mhcl interacts in vitro with Rols7 which is essential for myogenesis. ► Functional redundancy with other myosins is likely as mutants show no muscle defects. ► Mhcl localizes adjacent to Z-discs of sarcomeres and might support muscle integrity

  9. Obesity-associated cardiac pathogenesis in broiler breeder hens: Development of metabolic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C Y; Huang, Y F; Ko, Y J; Liu, Y J; Chen, Y H; Walzem, R L; Chen, S E

    2017-07-01

    Feed intake is typically restricted (R) in broiler hens to avoid obesity and improve egg production and livability. To determine whether improved heart health contributes to improved livability, fully adult 45-week-old R hens were allowed to consume feed to appetite (ad libitum; AL) up to 10 wk (70 d). Mortality, contractile functions, and morphology at 70 d, and measurements of cardiac hypertrophic remodeling at 7 d and 21 d were made and compared between R and AL hens. Outcomes for cardiac electrophysiology and mortality, reported separately, found increased mortality in AL hens in association with cardiac pathological hypertrophy and contractile dysfunction. The present study aimed to delineate metabolic cardiomyopathies underlying the etiology of obesity-associated cardiac pathology. Metabolic measurements were made in hens continued on R rations or assigned to AL feeding after 7 d and 21 days. AL feeding increased plasma insulin, glucose, and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations by 21 d (P hens was confirmed by cardiac triacylglycerol (TG) and ceramide accumulation consistent with up-regulation of related enzyme gene expressions, and by increased indices of oxidation stress (P hens, cardiac pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity and glucose transporter (GLUT) gene expressions increased progressively while carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) transcript levels in AL hens declined from 7 d to 21 d (P hens was further indicated by increased leukocyte infiltrates, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6 production, cellular apoptosis, interstitial fibrosis, and expression of the heart failure marker myosin heavy chain (MHC-β; cardiac muscle beta) (P hens. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  10. Dynamic muscle O2 saturation response is impaired during major non-cardiac surgery despite goal-directed haemodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldheiser, A; Hunsicker, O; Kaufner, L; Köhler, J; Sieglitz, H; Casans Francés, R; Wernecke, K-D; Sehouli, J; Spies, C

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy combined with a vascular occlusion test (VOT) could indicate an impairment of microvascular reactivity (MVR) in septic patients by detecting changes in dynamic variables of muscle O2 saturation (StO2). However, in the perioperative context the consequences of surgical trauma on dynamic variables of muscle StO2 as indicators of MVR are still unknown. This study is a sub-analysis of a randomised controlled trial in patients with metastatic primary ovarian cancer undergoing debulking surgery, during which a goal-directed haemodynamic algorithm was applied using oesophageal Doppler. During a 3 min VOT, near-infrared spectroscopy was used to assess dynamic variables arising from changes in muscle StO2. At the beginning of surgery, values of desaturation and recovery slope were comparable to values obtained in healthy volunteers. During the course of surgery, both desaturation and recovery slope showed a gradual decrease. Concomitantly, the study population underwent a transition to a surgically induced systemic inflammatory response state shown by a gradual increase in norepinephrine administration, heart rate, and Interleukin-6, with a peak immediately after the end of surgery. Higher rates of norepinephrine and a higher heart rate were related to a faster decline in StO2 during vascular occlusion. Using near-infrared spectroscopy combined with a VOT during surgery showed a gradual deterioration of MVR in patients treated with optimal haemodynamic care. The deterioration of MVR was accompanied by the transition to a surgically induced systemic inflammatory response state. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. [Parameters of cardiac muscle repolarization on the electrocardiogram when changing anatomical and electric position of the heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaĭkovskiĭ, I A; Baum, O V; Popov, L A; Voloshin, V I; Budnik, N N; Frolov, Iu A; Kovalenko, A S

    2014-01-01

    While discussing the diagnostic value of the single channel electrocardiogram a set of theoretical considerations emerges inevitably, one of the most important among them is the question about dependence of the electrocardiogram parameters from the direction of electrical axis of heart. In other words, changes in what of electrocardiogram parameters are in fact liable to reflect pathological processes in myocardium, and what ones are determined by extracardiac factors, primarily by anatomic characteristics of patients. It is arguable that while analyzing electrocardiogram it is necessary to orient to such physiologically based informative indexes as ST segment displacement. Also, symmetry of the T wave shape is an important parameter which is independent of patients anatomic features. The results obtained are of interest for theoretical and applied aspects of the biophysics of the cardiac electric field.

  12. The effect of transcutaneous application of carbon dioxide (CO2) on skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oe, Keisuke; Ueha, Takeshi; Sakai, Yoshitada; Niikura, Takahiro; Lee, Sang Yang; Koh, Akihiro; Hasegawa, Takumi; Tanaka, Masaya; Miwa, Masahiko; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → PGC-1α is up-regulated as a result of exercise such as mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle fiber-type switching, and up-regulation of VEGF. → We demonstrated transcutaneous application of CO 2 up-regulated the gene expression of PGC-1α, SIRT1 and VEGF, and instance of muscle fiber switching. → Transcutaneous application of CO 2 may cause similar effect to aerobic exercise in skeletal muscle. -- Abstract: In Europe, carbon dioxide therapy has been used for cardiac disease and skin problems for a long time. However there have been few reports investigating the effects of carbon dioxide therapy on skeletal muscle. Peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1α) is up-regulated as a result of exercise and mediates known responses to exercise, such as mitochondrial biogenesis and muscle fiber-type switching, and neovascularization via up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). It is also known that silent mating type information regulation 2 homologs 1 (SIRT1) enhances PGC-1α-mediated muscle fiber-type switching. Previously, we demonstrated transcutaneous application of CO 2 increased blood flow and a partial increase of O 2 pressure in the local tissue known as the Bohr effect. In this study, we transcutaneously applied CO 2 to the lower limbs of rats, and investigated the effect on the fast muscle, tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. The transcutaneous CO 2 application caused: (1) the gene expression of PGC-1α, silent mating type information regulation 2 homologs 1 (SIRT1) and VEGF, and increased the number of mitochondria, as proven by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, (2) muscle fiber switching in the TA muscle, as proven by isolation of myosin heavy chain and ATPase staining. Our results suggest the transcutaneous application of CO 2 may have therapeutic potential for muscular strength recovery resulting from disuse atrophy in post-operative patients and the elderly population.

  13. Interaction of c-Cbl with myosin IIA regulates Bleb associated macropinocytosis of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohanan Valiya Veettil

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available KSHV is etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, an angioproliferative endothelial cell malignancy. Macropinocytosis is the predominant mode of in vitro entry of KSHV into its natural target cells, human dermal microvascular endothelial (HMVEC-d cells. Although macropinocytosis is known to be a major route of entry for many viruses, the molecule(s involved in the recruitment and integration of signaling early during macropinosome formation is less well studied. Here we demonstrate that tyrosine phosphorylation of the adaptor protein c-Cbl is required for KSHV induced membrane blebbing and macropinocytosis. KSHV induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of c-Cbl as early as 1 min post-infection and was recruited to the sites of bleb formation. Infection also led to an increase in the interaction of c-Cbl with PI3-K p85 in a time dependent manner. c-Cbl shRNA decreased the formation of KSHV induced membrane blebs and macropinocytosis as well as virus entry. Immunoprecipitation of c-Cbl followed by mass spectrometry identified the interaction of c-Cbl with a novel molecular partner, non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA (myosin IIA, in bleb associated macropinocytosis. Phosphorylated c-Cbl colocalized with phospho-myosin light chain II in the interior of blebs of infected cells and this interaction was abolished by c-Cbl shRNA. Studies with the myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin demonstrated that myosin IIA is a biologically significant component of the c-Cbl signaling pathway and c-Cbl plays a new role in the recruitment of myosin IIA to the blebs during KSHV infection. Myosin II associates with actin in KSHV induced blebs and the absence of actin and myosin ubiquitination in c-Cbl ShRNA cells suggested that c-Cbl is also responsible for the ubiquitination of these proteins in the infected cells. This is the first study demonstrating the role of c-Cbl in viral entry as well as macropinocytosis, and provides the evidence that a signaling complex

  14. Noninvasive, near infrared spectroscopic-measured muscle pH and PO2 indicate tissue perfusion for cardiac surgical patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, Babs R.; Idwasi, Patrick O.; Balaguer, Jorge; Levin, Steven; Simsir, Sinan A.; Vander Salm, Thomas J.; Collette, Helen; Heard, Stephen O.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether near infrared spectroscopic measurement of tissue pH and Po2 has sufficient accuracy to assess variation in tissue perfusion resulting from changes in blood pressure and metabolic demand during cardiopulmonary bypass. DESIGN: Prospective clinical study. SETTING: Academic medical center. SUBJECTS: Eighteen elective cardiac surgical patients. INTERVENTION: Cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: A near infrared spectroscopic fiber optic probe was placed over the hypothenar eminence. Reference Po2 and pH sensors were inserted in the abductor digiti minimi (V). Data were collected every 30 secs during surgery and for 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass. Calibration equations developed from one third of the data were used with the remaining data to investigate sensitivity of the near infrared spectroscopic measurement to physiologic changes resulting from cardiopulmonary bypass. Near infrared spectroscopic and reference pH and Po2 measurements were compared for each subject using standard error of prediction. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 at baseline were compared with values during cardiopulmonary bypass just before rewarming commenced (hypotensive, hypothermic), after rewarming (hypotensive, normothermic) just before discontinuation of cardiopulmonary bypass, and at 6 hrs following cardiopulmonary bypass (normotensive, normothermic) using mixed-model analysis of variance. Near infrared spectroscopic pH and Po2 were well correlated with the invasive measurement of pH (R2 =.84) and Po2 (R 2 =.66) with an average standard error of prediction of 0.022 +/- 0.008 pH units and 6 +/- 3 mm Hg, respectively. The average difference between the invasive and near infrared spectroscopic measurement was near zero for both the pH and Po2 measurements. Near infrared spectroscopic Po2 significantly decreased 50% on initiation of cardiopulmonary bypass and remained depressed throughout the bypass and

  15. Human skeletal muscle mitochondrial capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, U F; Rasmussen, H N

    2000-04-01

    Under aerobic work, the oxygen consumption and major ATP production occur in the mitochondria and it is therefore a relevant question whether the in vivo rates can be accounted for by mitochondrial capacities measured in vitro. Mitochondria were isolated from human quadriceps muscle biopsies in yields of approximately 45%. The tissue content of total creatine, mitochondrial protein and different cytochromes was estimated. A number of activities were measured in functional assays of the mitochondria: pyruvate, ketoglutarate, glutamate and succinate dehydrogenases, palmitoyl-carnitine respiration, cytochrome oxidase, the respiratory chain and the ATP synthesis. The activities involved in carbohydrate oxidation could account for in vivo oxygen uptakes of 15-16 mmol O2 min-1 kg-1 or slightly above the value measured at maximal work rates in the knee-extensor model of Saltin and co-workers, i.e. without limitation from the cardiac output. This probably indicates that the maximal oxygen consumption of the muscle is limited by the mitochondrial capacities. The in vitro activities of fatty acid oxidation corresponded to only 39% of those of carbohydrate oxidation. The maximal rate of free energy production from aerobic metabolism of glycogen was calculated from the mitochondrial activities and estimates of the DeltaG or ATP hydrolysis and the efficiency of the actin-myosin reaction. The resultant value was 20 W kg-1 or approximately 70% of the maximal in vivo work rates of which 10-20% probably are sustained by the anaerobic ATP production. The lack of aerobic in vitro ATP synthesis might reflect termination of some critical interplay between cytoplasm and mitochondria.

  16. Fucoidan promotes early step of cardiac differentiation from human embryonic stem cells and long-term maintenance of beating areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Sofiane; Letourneur, Didier; Aid-Launais, Rachida; Di Stefano, Antonio; Vainchenker, William; Norol, Françoise; Le Visage, Catherine

    2014-04-01

    Somatic stem cells require specific niches and three-dimensional scaffolds provide ways to mimic this microenvironment. Here, we studied a scaffold based on Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide known to influence morphogen gradients during embryonic development, to support human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) differentiation toward the cardiac lineage. A macroporous (pore 200 μm) Fucoidan scaffold was selected to support hESCs attachment and proliferation. Using a protocol based on the cardiogenic morphogen bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP2) and transforming growth factor (TGFβ) followed by tumor necrosis factor (TNFα), an effector of cardiopoietic priming, we examined the cardiac differentiation in the scaffold compared to culture dishes and embryoid bodies (EBs). At day 8, Fucoidan scaffolds supported a significantly higher expression of the 3 genes encoding for transcription factors marking the early step of embryonic cardiac differentiation NKX2.5 (prelease TGFβ and TNFα was confirmed by Luminex technology. We also found that Fucoidan scaffolds supported the late stage of embryonic cardiac differentiation marked by a significantly higher atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) expression (pstress in the soft hydrogel impaired sarcomere formation, as confirmed by molecular analysis of the cardiac muscle myosin MYH6 and immunohistological staining of sarcomeric α-actinin. Nevertheless, Fucoidan scaffolds contributed to the development of thin filaments connecting beating areas through promotion of smooth muscle cells, thus enabling maintenance of beating areas for up to 6 months. In conclusion, Fucoidan scaffolds appear as a very promising biomaterial to control cardiac differentiation from hESCs that could be further combined with mechanical stress to promote sarcomere formation at terminal stages of differentiation.

  17. Neuromuscular partitioning, architectural design, and myosin fiber types of the M. vastus lateralis of the llama (Lama glama).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziotti, Guillermo H; Palencia, Pablo; Delhon, Gustavo; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2004-11-01

    The llama (Lama glama) is one of the few mammals of relatively large body size in which three fast myosin heavy chain isoforms (i.e., IIA, IIX, IIB) are extensively expressed in their locomotory muscles. This study was designed to gain insight into the morphological and functional organization of skeletal musculature in this peculiar animal model. The neuromuscular partitioning, architectural design, and myosin fiber types were systematically studied in the M. vastus lateralis of adult llamas (n = 15). Four nonoverlapping neuromuscular partitions or compartments were identified macroscopically (using a modified Sihler's technique for muscle depigmentation), although they did not conform strictly to the definitions of "neuromuscular compartments." Each neuromuscular partition was innervated by primary branches of the femoral nerve and was arranged within the muscle as paired partitions, two in parallel (deep-superficial compartmentalization) and the other two in-series (proximo-distal compartmentalization). These neuromuscular partitions of the muscle varied in their respective architectural designs (studied after partial digestion with diluted nitric acid) and myosin fiber type characteristics (identified immunohistochemically with specific anti-myosin monoclonal antibodies, then examined by quantitative histochemistry and image analysis). The deep partitions of the muscle had longer fibers, with lower angles of pinnation, and higher percentages of fast-glycolytic fibers than the superficial partitions of the muscle. These differences clearly suggest a division of labor in the whole M. vastus lateralis of llamas, with deep partitions exhibiting features well adapted for dynamic activities in the extension of stifle, whereas superficial portions seem to be related to the antigravitational role of the muscle in preserving the extension of the stifle during standing and stance phase of the stride. This peculiar structural and functional organization of the llama M

  18. [Cardiac cachexia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miján, Alberto; Martín, Elvira; de Mateo, Beatriz

    2006-05-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF), especially affecting the right heart, frequently leads to malnutrition. If the latter is severe and is combined to other factors, it may lead to cardiac cachexia. This one is associated to increased mortality and lower survival of patients suffering from it. The causes of cardiac cachexia are diverse, generally associated to maintenance of a negative energy balance, with increasing evidence of its multifactorial origin. Neurohumoral, inflammatory, immunological, and metabolic factors, among others, are superimposed in the patient with CHF, leading to involvement and deterioration of several organs and systems, since this condition affects both lean (or active cellular) mass and adipose and bone tissue osteoporosis. Among all, the most pronounced deterioration may be seen at skeletal muscle tissue, at both structural and functional levels, the heart not being spared. As for treatment, it should be based on available scientific evidence. Assessment of nutritional status of any patient with CHF is a must, with the requirement of nutritional intervention in case of malnutrition. In this situation, especially if accompanied by cardiac cachexia, it is required to modify energy intake and oral diet quality, and to consider the indication of specific complementary or alternative artificial nutrition. Besides, the causal relationship of the beneficial role of moderate physical exertion is increasing, as well as modulation of metabolic and inflammatory impairments observed in cardiac cachexia with several drugs, leading to a favorable functional and structural response in CHF patients.

  19. Action of fractionated X-irradiation, continuous and a combination of continuous and acute (Co60) γ-irradiation on the catechol-amine content of the cardiac muscle of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpovich, N.V.

    1976-01-01

    Changes in the catechol amine content of the cardiac muscle of white rats have been studied in the course and after the exposure to low-dose X- and gamma radiation. The data obtained show that the changes in the catechol amine content depend not merely on the cumulative dose of the ionizing radiation but also on its type and the time that has passed after irradiation

  20. Regulation of nonmuscle myosin II during 3-methylcholanthrene induced dedifferentiation of C2C12 myotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Sumit K.; Saha, Shekhar; Das, Provas; Das, Mahua R.; Jana, Siddhartha S., E-mail: bcssj@iacs.res.in

    2014-08-01

    3-Methylcholanthrene (3MC) induces tumor formation at the site of injection in the hind leg of mice within 110 days. Recent reports reveal that the transformation of normal muscle cells to atypical cells is one of the causes for tumor formation, however the molecular mechanism behind this process is not well understood. Here, we show in an in vitro study that 3MC induces fragmentation of multinucleate myotubes into viable mononucleates. These mononucleates form colonies when they are seeded into soft agar, indicative of cellular transformation. Immunoblot analysis reveals that phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC{sub 20}) is 5.6±0.5 fold reduced in 3MC treated myotubes in comparison to vehicle treated myotubes during the fragmentation of myotubes. In contrast, levels of myogenic factors such as MyoD, Myogenin and cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D, Cyclin E1 remain unchanged as assessed by real-time PCR array and reverse transcriptase PCR analysis, respectively. Interestingly, addition of the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, ML-7, enhances the fragmentation, whereas phosphatase inhibitor perturbs the 3MC induced fragmentation of myotubes. These results suggest that decrease in RLC{sub 20} phosphorylation may be associated with the fragmentation step of dedifferentiation. - Highlights: • 3-Methylcholanthrene induces fragmentation of C2C12-myotubes. • Dedifferentiation can be divided into two steps – fragmentation and proliferation. • Fragmentation is associated with rearrangement of nonmuscle myosin II. • Genes associated with differentiation and proliferation are not altered during fragmentation. • Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain is reduced during fragmentation.

  1. Aldosterone Blockade Reduces Mortality without Changing Cardiac Remodeling in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo D.M. Cezar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of aldosterone blockers during transition from long-term compensated hypertrophy to dilated failure is not completely understood. In this study we evaluated the effects of early administration of spironolactone on cardiac remodeling, myocardial function, and mortality in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. Methods: Sixteen-month-old SHR received no treatment (SHR-C, n=72 or spironolactone (SHR-SPR, 20 mg/kg/day, n=34 for six months. Echocardiogram was performed before and after treatment. Myocardial function was analyzed in left ventricular (LV papillary muscle preparations. Myocardial collagen and hydroxyproline concentration were evaluated by morphometry and spectrophotometry, respectively. LV gene expression was assessed by real time RT-PCR. Statistics: Student's t test; Log rank test (Kaplan Meyer. Results: SHR-C and SHR-SPR presented mortality rates of 71 and 38%, respectively (p=0.004. Systolic arterial pressure did not differ between groups (SHR-C 199±43; SHR-SPR 200±35 mmHg. Initial and final echocardiograms did not show significant differences in cardiac structures or LV function between groups. Myocardial function was similar between groups at basal and after inotropic stimulation. Collagen fractional area, hydroxyproline concentration, gene expression for α- and β-myosin heavy chain, atrial natriuretic peptide, and Serca2a were not different between groups. Conclusion: Early spironolactone administration reduces mortality without changing cardiac remodeling in spontaneous hypertensive rats.

  2. The Protective Effect of Proponyl-L-Carnitine Against Ultrastructural Alterations in Cardiac Muscle of Irradiated and / or diabetic Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Nour, S.M.; Abdel-Azeem, M.G.; El-Nashar, D.E.M.

    2011-01-01

    Heart dysfunction in chronic diabetes has been observed to be associated with depressed myofibrillar adenosine triphosphatase activities. Oxidative stress a factor implicated in the heart injury may contribute towards some of these alterations. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of L-carnitine on gamma radiation and diabetes induced oxidative damage in the heart by investigating alterations in the ultrastructural level. Streptozotocin was intraperitoneally injected (i.p) to rats at a dose of 28 mg/Kg b.wt / day for 2 weeks pre-irradiation. In irradiated groups, animals were exposed to 6.5 Gy whole body gamma radiation. L-carnitine was intraperitoneally injected (i.p) to rats at a dose of 250 mg/Kg b.wt/day for 2 weeks pre-irradiation. Animals were sacrificed on the 7th day after irradiation. The results demonstrated that the whole body exposure of rats to ionizing radiation induce oxidative stress which showed alterations on the ultrastructural level included dis organization with mayofibrillolysis relatively intact z-band (Z), fibrosis, swollen mitochondria, apoptotic nuclei and thickened walls of capillaries. In diabetic rats cardio muscle focal loss of myofilaments, also swelling of mitochondria and rupture of sacroplasmic reticulum, apoptotic nuclei with dilation of capillaries were evident. Administration of L-carnitine pre-irradiation has improved the ultrastructural alterations of the heart tissue. It is proposed that the oxidative stress is associated with a deficit in the status of the antioxidant defense system which may play a critical role in subcellular remodeling, calcium-handling abnormalities and subsequent diabetic cardiomyopathy

  3. Thick filament mechano-sensing is a calcium-independent regulatory mechanism in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusi, L; Brunello, E; Yan, Z; Irving, M

    2016-10-31

    Recent X-ray diffraction studies on actively contracting fibres from skeletal muscle showed that the number of myosin motors available to interact with actin-containing thin filaments is controlled by the stress in the myosin-containing thick filaments. Those results suggested that thick filament mechano-sensing might constitute a novel regulatory mechanism in striated muscles that acts independently of the well-known thin filament-mediated calcium signalling pathway. Here we test that hypothesis using probes attached to the myosin regulatory light chain in demembranated muscle fibres. We show that both the extent and kinetics of thick filament activation depend on thick filament stress but are independent of intracellular calcium concentration in the physiological range. These results establish direct control of myosin motors by thick filament mechano-sensing as a general regulatory mechanism in skeletal muscle that is independent of the canonical calcium signalling pathway.

  4. Oxidation of myosin by haem proteins generates myosin radicals and protein cross-links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lametsch, Marianne Lund; Luxford, Catherine; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2008-01-01

    of thiyl and tyrosyl radicals is consistent with the observed consumption of cysteine and tyrosine residues, the detection of di-tyrosine by HPLC and the detection of both reducible (disulfide bond) and non-reducible cross-links between myosin molecules by SDS/PAGE. The time course of radical formation...

  5. Remodeling of repolarization and arrhythmia susceptibility in a myosin-binding protein C knockout mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toib, Amir; Zhang, Chen; Borghetti, Giulia; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Wallner, Markus; Yang, Yijun; Troupes, Constantine D; Kubo, Hajime; Sharp, Thomas E; Feldsott, Eric; Berretta, Remus M; Zalavadia, Neil; Trappanese, Danielle M; Harper, Shavonn; Gross, Polina; Chen, Xiongwen; Mohsin, Sadia; Houser, Steven R

    2017-09-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is one of the most common genetic cardiac diseases and among the leading causes of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in the young. The cellular mechanisms leading to SCD in HCM are not well known. Prolongation of the action potential (AP) duration (APD) is a common feature predisposing hypertrophied hearts to SCD. Previous studies have explored the roles of inward Na + and Ca 2+ in the development of HCM, but the role of repolarizing K + currents has not been defined. The objective of this study was to characterize the arrhythmogenic phenotype and cellular electrophysiological properties of mice with HCM, induced by myosin-binding protein C (MyBPC) knockout (KO), and to test the hypothesis that remodeling of repolarizing K + currents causes APD prolongation in MyBPC KO myocytes. We demonstrated that MyBPC KO mice developed severe hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction compared with wild-type (WT) control mice. Telemetric electrocardiographic recordings of awake mice revealed prolongation of the corrected QT interval in the KO compared with WT control mice, with overt ventricular arrhythmias. Whole cell current- and voltage-clamp experiments comparing KO with WT mice demonstrated ventricular myocyte hypertrophy, AP prolongation, and decreased repolarizing K + currents. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed decreased mRNA levels of several key K + channel subunits. In conclusion, decrease in repolarizing K + currents in MyBPC KO ventricular myocytes contributes to AP and corrected QT interval prolongation and could account for the arrhythmia susceptibility. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Ventricular myocytes isolated from the myosin-binding protein C knockout hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mouse model demonstrate decreased repolarizing K + currents and action potential and QT interval prolongation, linking cellular repolarization abnormalities with arrhythmia susceptibility and the risk for sudden cardiac death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2017

  6. Interaction of thyroid state and denervation on skeletal myosin heavy chain expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, F.; Arnold, C.; Zeng, M.; Baldwin, K.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of altered thyroid state and denervation (Den) on skeletal myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in the plantaris and soleus muscles. Rats were subjected to unilateral denervation (Den) and randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) euthyroid; (2) hyperthyroid; (3) and hypothyroid. Denervation caused severe muscle atrophy and muscle-type specific MHC transformation. Denervation transformed the soleus to a faster muscle, and its effects required the presence of circulating thyroid hormone. In contrast, denervation transformed the plantaris to a slower muscle independently of thyroid state. Furthermore, thyroid hormone effects did not depend upon innervation status in the soleus, while they required the presence of the nerve in the plantaris. Collectively, these findings suggest that both thyroid hormone and intact nerve (a) differentially affect MHC transformations in fast and slow muscle; and (b) are important factors in regulating the optimal expression of both type I and IIB MHC genes. This research suggests that for patients with nerve damage and/or paralysis, both muscle mass and biochemical properties can also be affected by the thyroid state.

  7. Effects of inorganic phosphate and ADP on calcium handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum in rat skinned cardiac muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, J Z; Kentish, J C

    1995-03-01

    The aim was to investigate whether, and how, increases in inorganic phosphate (Pi) and ADP, similar to those occurring intracellularly during early myocardial ischaemia, affect the calcium handling of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Rat ventricular trabeculae were permeabilised with saponin. The physiological process of calcium induced calcium release (CICR) from the muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum was triggered via flash photolysis of the "caged Ca2+", nitr-5. Alternatively, calcium release was induced by rapid application of caffeine to give an estimate of sarcoplasmic reticular calcium loading. The initial rate of sarcoplasmic reticular calcium pumping was also assessed by photolysis of caged ATP at saturating [Ca2+]. Myoplasmic [Ca2+] (using fluo-3) and isometric force were measured. Pi (2-20 mM) significantly depressed the magnitude of CICR and the associated force transient. Sarcoplasmic reticular calcium loading was inhibited even more than CICR by Pi, suggesting that reduced calcium loading could account for all of the inhibitory effect of Pi on CICR and that Pi may slightly activate the calcium release mechanism. The reduced sarcoplasmic reticular calcium loading seemed to be due to a fall in the free energy of ATP hydrolysis (delta GATP) available for the calcium pump, since equal decreases in delta GATP produced by adding both Pi and ADP in various ratios caused similar falls in the calcium loading of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The caged ATP experiments indicated that Pi (20 mM) did not affect the rate constant of sarcoplasmic reticular calcium uptake. ADP (10 mM) alone, or with 1 mM Pi, inhibited calcium loading. In spite of this, ADP (10 mM) did not alter CICR and, when 1 mM Pi was added, ADP increased CICR above control. An increase in intracellular Pi reduces sarcoplasmic reticular calcium loading and thus depresses the CICR. This could be an important contributing factor in the hypoxic or ischaemic contractile failure of the myocardium. However the

  8. Robust mechanobiological behavior emerges in heterogeneous myosin systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Paul F.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Ehrlicher, Allen J.; Weitz, David A.; Schunn, Christian; Cagan, Jonathan; LeDuc, Philip

    2017-09-01

    Biological complexity presents challenges for understanding natural phenomenon and engineering new technologies, particularly in systems with molecular heterogeneity. Such complexity is present in myosin motor protein systems, and computational modeling is essential for determining how collective myosin interactions produce emergent system behavior. We develop a computational approach for altering myosin isoform parameters and their collective organization, and support predictions with in vitro experiments of motility assays with α-actinins as molecular force sensors. The computational approach models variations in single myosin molecular structure, system organization, and force stimuli to predict system behavior for filament velocity, energy consumption, and robustness. Robustness is the range of forces where a filament is expected to have continuous velocity and depends on used myosin system energy. Myosin systems are shown to have highly nonlinear behavior across force conditions that may be exploited at a systems level by combining slow and fast myosin isoforms heterogeneously. Results suggest some heterogeneous systems have lower energy use near stall conditions and greater energy consumption when unloaded, therefore promoting robustness. These heterogeneous system capabilities are unique in comparison with homogenous systems and potentially advantageous for high performance bionanotechnologies. Findings open doors at the intersections of mechanics and biology, particularly for understanding and treating myosin-related diseases and developing approaches for motor molecule-based technologies.

  9. Human muscle proteins: analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giometti, C.S.; Danon, M.J.; Anderson, N.G.

    1983-09-01

    Proteins from single frozen sections of human muscle were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and detected by fluorography or Coomassie Blue staining. The major proteins were identical in different normal muscles obtained from either sex at different ages, and in Duchenne and myotonic dystrophy samples. Congenital myopathy denervation atrophy, polymyositis, and Becker's muscular dystrophy samples, however, showed abnormal myosin light chain compositions, some with a decrease of fast-fiber myosin light chains and others with a decrease of slow-fiber light chains. These protein alterations did not correlate with any specific disease, and may be cause by generalized muscle-fiber damage.

  10. Polymorphism of myofibrillar proteins of rabbit skeletal-muscle fibres. An electrophoretic study of single fibres.

    OpenAIRE

    Salviati, G; Betto, R; Danieli Betto, D

    1982-01-01

    Rabbit predominantly fast-twitch-fibre and predominantly slow-twitch-fibre skeletal muscles of the hind limbs, the psoas, the diaphragm and the masseter muscles were fibre-typed by one-dimensional polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis of the myofibrillar proteins of chemically skinned single fibres. Investigation of the distribution of fast-twitch-fibre and slow-twitch-fibre isoforms of myosin light chains and the type of myosin heavy chains, based on peptide 'maps' published in Cleveland. Fisch...

  11. Myosin VIIa as a common component of cilia and microvilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfrum, U; Liu, X; Schmitt, A; Udovichenko, I P; Williams, D S

    1998-01-01

    The distribution of myosin VIIa, which is defective or absent in Usher syndrome 1B, was studied in a variety of tissues by immunomicroscopy. The primary aim was to determine whether this putative actin-based mechanoenzyme is a common component of cilia. Previously, it has been proposed that defective ciliary function might be the basis of some forms of Usher syndrome. Myosin VIIa was detected in cilia from cochlear hair cells, olfactory neurons, kidney distal tubules, and lung bronchi. It was also found to cofractionate with the axonemal fraction of retinal photoreceptor cells. Immunolabeling appeared most concentrated in the periphery of the transition zone of the cilia. This general presence of a myosin in cilia is surprising, given that cilia are dominated by microtubules, and not actin filaments. In addition to cilia, myosin VIIa was also found in actin-rich microvilli of different types of cell. We conclude that myosin VIIa is a common component of cilia and microvilli.

  12. Effects of proteolysis on the adenosinetriphosphatase activities of thymus myosin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, N.D.; Wagner, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    Limited proteolysis was used to identify regions on the heavy chains of calf thymus myosin which may be involved in ATP and actin binding. Assignments of the various proteolytic fragments to different parts of the myosin heavy chain were based on solubility, gel filtration, electron microscopy, and binding of 32 P-labeled regulatory light chains. Chymotrypsin rapidly cleaved within the head of thymus myosin to give a 70,000-dalton N-terminal fragment and a 140,000-dalton C-terminal fragment. These two fragments did not dissociate under nondenaturing conditions. Cleavage within the myosin tail to give heavy meromyosin occurred more slowly. Cleavage at the site 70,000 daltons from the N-terminus of the heavy chain caused about a 30-fold decrease in the actin concentration required to achieve half-maximal stimulation of the magnesium-adenosinetriphosphatase (Mg-ATPase) activity of unphosphorylated thymus myosin. The actin-activated ATPase activity of this digested myosin was only slightly affected by light chain phosphorylation. Actin inhibited the cleavage at this site by chymotrypsin. In the presence of ATP, chymotrypsin rapidly cleaved the thymus myosin heavy chain at an additional site about 4000 daltons from the N-terminus. Cleavage at this site caused a 2-fold increase in the ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-ATPase activity and 3-fold decreases in the Ca 2+ - and Mg-ATPase activities of thymus myosin. Thus, cleavage at the N-terminus of thymus myosin was affected by ATP, and this cleavage altered ATPase activity. Papain cleaved the thymus myosin heavy chain about 94,000 daltons from the N-terminus to give subfragment 1. Although this subfragment 1 contained intact light chains, its actin-activated ATPase activity was not affected by light chain phosphorylation

  13. Histochemical and functional fibre typing of the rabbit masseter muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredman, J. J.; Weijs, W. A.; Moorman, A. F.; Brugman, P.

    1990-01-01

    The fibre-type distribution of the masseter muscle of the rabbit was studied by means of the myosin-ATPase and succinate dehydrogenase reactions. Six different fibre types were found and these were unequally distributed between and within the anatomical compartments of the muscle. Most of the

  14. MOTOR UNIT TERRITORIES AND FIBER TYPES IN RABBIT MASSETER MUSCLE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WEIJS, WA; JUCH, PJW; KWA, SHS; KORFAGE, JAM

    1993-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) content and spatial distribution of the fibers of 11 motor units (MUs) of the rabbit masseter muscle were determined. The fibers of single MUs were visualized in whole-muscle serial sections by a negative periodic acid/Schiff reaction for glycogen after they had been

  15. Neural/Bayes network predictor for inheritable cardiac disease pathogenicity and phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghardt, Thomas P; Ajtai, Katalin

    2018-04-11

    The cardiac muscle sarcomere contains multiple proteins contributing to contraction energy transduction and its regulation during a heartbeat. Inheritable heart disease mutants affect most of them but none more frequently than the ventricular myosin motor and cardiac myosin binding protein c (mybpc3). These co-localizing proteins have mybpc3 playing a regulatory role to the energy transducing motor. Residue substitution and functional domain assignment of each mutation in the protein sequence decides, under the direction of a sensible disease model, phenotype and pathogenicity. The unknown model mechanism is decided here using a method combing neural and Bayes networks. Missense single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are clues for the disease mechanism summarized in an extensive database collecting mutant sequence location and residue substitution as independent variables that imply the dependent disease phenotype and pathogenicity characteristics in 4 dimensional data points (4ddps). The SNP database contains entries with the majority having one or both dependent data entries unfulfilled. A neural network relating causes (mutant residue location and substitution) and effects (phenotype and pathogenicity) is trained, validated, and optimized using fulfilled 4ddps. It then predicts unfulfilled 4ddps providing the implicit disease model. A discrete Bayes network interprets fulfilled and predicted 4ddps with conditional probabilities for phenotype and pathogenicity given mutation location and residue substitution thus relating the neural network implicit model to explicit features of the motor and mybpc3 sequence and structural domains. Neural/Bayes network forecasting automates disease mechanism modeling by leveraging the world wide human missense SNP database that is in place and expanding. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Rigid microenvironments promote cardiac differentiation of mouse and human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshi, Armin; Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Nakano, Haruko; Eaimkhong, Sarayoot; Evseenko, Denis; Reed, Jason; Stieg, Adam Z.; Gimzewski, James K.; Nakano, Atsushi

    2013-04-01

    While adult heart muscle is the least regenerative of tissues, embryonic cardiomyocytes are proliferative, with embryonic stem (ES) cells providing an endless reservoir. In addition to secreted factors and cell-cell interactions, the extracellular microenvironment has been shown to play an important role in stem cell lineage specification, and understanding how scaffold elasticity influences cardiac differentiation is crucial to cardiac tissue engineering. Though previous studies have analyzed the role of matrix elasticity on the function of differentiated cardiomyocytes, whether it affects the induction of cardiomyocytes from pluripotent stem cells is poorly understood. Here, we examine the role of matrix rigidity on cardiac differentiation using mouse and human ES cells. Culture on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates of varied monomer-to-crosslinker ratios revealed that rigid extracellular matrices promote a higher yield of de novo cardiomyocytes from undifferentiated ES cells. Using a genetically modified ES system that allows us to purify differentiated cardiomyocytes by drug selection, we demonstrate that rigid environments induce higher cardiac troponin T expression, beating rate of foci, and expression ratio of adult α- to fetal β- myosin heavy chain in a purified cardiac population. M-mode and mechanical interferometry image analyses demonstrate that these ES-derived cardiomyocytes display functional maturity and synchronization of beating when co-cultured with neonatal cardiomyocytes harvested from a developing embryo. Together, these data identify matrix stiffness as an independent factor that instructs not only the maturation of already differentiated cardiomyocytes but also the induction and proliferation of cardiomyocytes from undifferentiated progenitors. Manipulation of the stiffness will help direct the production of functional cardiomyocytes en masse from stem cells for regenerative medicine purposes.

  17. Time course of myosin heavy chain transitions in neonatal rats: importance of innervation and thyroid state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, G. R.; McCue, S. A.; Zeng, M.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1999-01-01

    During the postnatal period, rat limb muscles adapt to weight bearing via the replacement of embryonic (Emb) and neonatal (Neo) myosin heavy chains (MHCs) by the adult isoforms. Our aim was to characterize this transition in terms of the six MHC isoforms expressed in skeletal muscle and to determine the importance of innervation and thyroid hormone status on the attainment of the adult MHC phenotype. Neonatal rats were made hypothyroid via propylthiouracil (PTU) injection. In normal and PTU subgroups, leg muscles were unilaterally denervated at 15 days of age. The MHC profiles of plantaris (PLN) and soleus (Sol) muscles were determined at 7, 14, 23, and 30 days postpartum. At day 7, the Sol MHC profile was 55% type I, 30% Emb, and 10% Neo; in the PLN, the pattern was 60% Neo and 25% Emb. By day 30 the Sol and PLN had essentially attained an adult MHC profile in the controls. PTU augmented slow MHC expression in the Sol, whereas in the PLN it markedly repressed IIb MHC by retaining neonatal MHC expression. Denervation blunted the upregulation of IIb in the PLN and of Type I in the Sol and shifted the pattern to greater expression of IIa and IIx MHCs in both muscles. In contrast to previous observations, these findings collectively suggest that both an intact thyroid and innervation state are obligatory for the attainment of the adult MHC phenotype, particularly in fast-twitch muscles.

  18. Structural insight into the UNC-45–myosin complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fratev, Filip; Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Pajeva, Ilza

    2013-01-01

    The UNC-45 chaperone protein interacts with and affects the folding, stability, and the ATPase activity of myosins. It plays a critical role in the cardiomyopathy development and in the breast cancer tumor growth. Here we propose the first structural model of the UNC-45–myosin complex using various...... is mainly stabilized by electrostatic interactions. Remarkably, the contact surface area is similar to that of the myosinactin complex. A significant interspecies difference in the myosin binding epitope is observed. Our results reveal the structural basis of MYH7 exons 15–16 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy...... mutations and provide directions for drug targeting. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  19. Composition of Muscle Fiber Types in Rat Rotator Cuff Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yongjun; Pan, Feng; Mi, Jingyi

    2016-10-01

    The rat is a suitable model to study human rotator cuff pathology owing to the similarities in morphological anatomy structure. However, few studies have reported the composition muscle fiber types of rotator cuff muscles in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and distribution in rotator cuff muscles of the rat. It was found that rotator cuff muscles in the rat were of mixed fiber type composition. The majority of rotator cuff fibers labeled positively for MyHCII. Moreover, the rat rotator cuff muscles contained hybrid fibers. So, compared with human rotator cuff muscles composed partly of slow-twitch fibers, the majority of fast-twitch fibers in rat rotator cuff muscles should be considered when the rat model study focus on the pathological process of rotator cuff muscles after injury. Gaining greater insight into muscle fiber types in rotator cuff muscles of the rat may contribute to elucidate the mechanism of pathological change in rotator cuff muscles-related diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1397-1401, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Zinc-induced cardiomyocyte relaxation in a rat model of hyperglycemia is independent of myosin isoform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ting

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been reported previously that diabetic cardiomyopathy can be inhibited or reverted with chronic zinc supplementation. In the current study, we hypothesized that total cardiac calcium and zinc content is altered in early onset diabetes mellitus characterized in part as hyperglycemia (HG and that exposure of zinc ion (Zn2+ to isolated cardiomyocytes would enhance contraction-relaxation function in HG more so than in nonHG controls. To better control for differential cardiac myosin isoform expression as occurs in rodents after β-islet cell necrosis, hypothyroidism was induced in 16 rats resulting in 100% β-myosin heavy chain expression in the heart. β-Islet cell necrosis was induced in half of the rats by streptozocin administration. After 6 wks of HG, both HG and nonHG controls rats demonstrated similar myofilament performance measured as thin filament calcium sensitivity, native thin filament velocity in the myosin motility assay and contractile velocity and power. Extracellular Zn2+ reduced cardiomyocyte contractile function in both groups, but enhanced relaxation function significantly in the HG group compared to controls. Most notably, a reduction in diastolic sarcomere length with increasing pacing frequencies, i.e., incomplete relaxation, was more pronounced in the HG compared to controls, but was normalized with extracellular Zn2+ application. This is a novel finding implicating that the detrimental effect of HG on cardiomyocyte Ca2+ regulation can be amelioration by Zn2+. Among the many post-translational modifications examined, only phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor (RyR at S-2808 was significantly higher in HG compared to nonHG. We did not find in our hypothyroid rats any differentiating effects of HG on myofibrillar protein phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine and advanced glycated end-products, which are often implicated as complicating factors in cardiac performance due to HG. Our

  1. Myosin phosphatase Fine-tunes Zebrafish Motoneuron Position during Axonogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Bremer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available During embryogenesis the spinal cord shifts position along the anterior-posterior axis relative to adjacent tissues. How motor neurons whose cell bodies are located in the spinal cord while their axons reside in adjacent tissues compensate for such tissue shift is not well understood. Using live cell imaging in zebrafish, we show that as motor axons exit from the spinal cord and extend through extracellular matrix produced by adjacent notochord cells, these cells shift several cell diameters caudally. Despite this pronounced shift, individual motoneuron cell bodies stay aligned with their extending axons. We find that this alignment requires myosin phosphatase activity within motoneurons, and that mutations in the myosin phosphatase subunit mypt1 increase myosin phosphorylation causing a displacement between motoneuron cell bodies and their axons. Thus, we demonstrate that spinal motoneurons fine-tune their position during axonogenesis and we identify the myosin II regulatory network as a key regulator.

  2. PLASTICITY OF SKELETAL MUSCLE STUDIED BY STEREOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Eržen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The present contribution provides an overview of stereological methods applied in the skeletal muscle research at the Institute of Anatomy of the Medical Faculty in Ljubljana. Interested in skeletal muscle plasticity we studied three different topics: (i expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in slow and fast muscles under experimental conditions, (ii frequency of satellite cells in young and old human and rat muscles and (iii capillary supply of rat fast and slow muscles. We analysed the expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms within slow rat soleus and fast extensor digitorum longus muscles after (i homotopic and heterotopic transplantation of both muscles, (ii low frequency electrical stimulation of the fast muscle and (iii transposition of the fast nerve to the slow muscle. The models applied were able to turn the fast muscle into a completely slow muscle, but not vice versa. One of the indicators for the regenerative potential of skeletal muscles is its satellite cell pool. The estimated parameters, number of satellite cells per unit fibre length, corrected to the reference sarcomere length (Nsc/Lfib and number of satellite cells per number of nuclei (myonuclei and satellite cell nuclei (Nsc/Nnucl indicated that the frequency of M-cadherin stained satellite cells declines in healthy old human and rat muscles compared to young muscles. To access differences in capillary densities among slow and fast muscles and slow and fast muscle fibres, we have introduced Slicer and Fakir methods, and tested them on predominantly slow and fast rat muscles. Discussing three different topics that require different approach, the present paper reflects the three decades of the development of stereological methods: 2D analysis by simple point counting in the 70's, the disector in the 80's and virtual spatial probes in the 90's. In all methods the interactive computer assisted approach was utilised.

  3. Topology of interaction between titin and myosin thick filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermayer, Miklós; Sziklai, Dominik; Papp, Zsombor; Decker, Brennan; Lakatos, Eszter; Mártonfalvi, Zsolt

    2018-05-05

    Titin is a giant protein spanning between the Z- and M-lines of the sarcomere. In the A-band titin is associated with the myosin thick filament. It has been speculated that titin may serve as a blueprint for thick-filament formation due to the super-repeat structure of its A-band domains. Accordingly, titin might provide a template that determines the length and structural periodicity of the thick filament. Here we tested the titin ruler hypothesis by mixing titin and myosin at in situ stoichiometric ratios (300 myosins per 12 titins) in buffers of different ionic strength (KCl concentration range 100-300 mM). The topology of the filamentous complexes was investigated with atomic force microscopy. We found that the samples contained distinct, segregated populations of titin molecules and myosin thick filaments. We were unable to identify complexes in which myosin molecules were regularly associated to either mono- or oligomeric titin in either relaxed or stretched states of the titin filaments. Thus, the electrostatically driven self-association is stronger in both myosin and titin than their binding to each other, and it is unlikely that titin functions as a geometrical template for thick-filament formation. However, when allowed to equilibrate configurationally, long myosin thick filaments appeared with titin oligomers attached to their surface. The titin meshwork formed on the thick-filament surface may play a role in controlling thick-filament length by regulating the structural dynamics of myosin molecules and placing a mechanical limit on the filament length. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative Statistical Mechanics of Muscle and Non-Muscle Contractile Systems: Stationary States of Near-Equilibrium Systems in A Linear Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Lecarpentier

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A. Huxley’s equations were used to determine the mechanical properties of muscle myosin II (MII at the molecular level, as well as the probability of the occurrence of the different stages in the actin–myosin cycle. It was then possible to use the formalism of statistical mechanics with the grand canonical ensemble to calculate numerous thermodynamic parameters such as entropy, internal energy, affinity, thermodynamic flow, thermodynamic force, and entropy production rate. This allows us to compare the thermodynamic parameters of a non-muscle contractile system, such as the normal human placenta, with those of different striated skeletal muscles (soleus and extensor digitalis longus as well as the heart muscle and smooth muscles (trachea and uterus in the rat. In the human placental tissues, it was observed that the kinetics of the actin–myosin crossbridges were considerably slow compared with those of smooth and striated muscular systems. The entropy production rate was also particularly low in the human placental tissues, as compared with that observed in smooth and striated muscular systems. This is partly due to the low thermodynamic flow found in the human placental tissues. However, the unitary force of non-muscle myosin (NMII generated by each crossbridge cycle in the myofibroblasts of the human placental tissues was similar in magnitude to that of MII in the myocytes of both smooth and striated muscle cells. Statistical mechanics represents a powerful tool for studying the thermodynamics of all contractile muscle and non-muscle systems.

  5. Dynamic Regulation of Sarcomeric Actin Filaments in Striated Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2010-01-01

    In striated muscle, the actin cytoskeleton is differentiated into myofibrils. Actin and myosin filaments are organized in sarcomeres and specialized for producing contractile forces. Regular arrangement of actin filaments with uniform length and polarity is critical for the contractile function. However, the mechanisms of assembly and maintenance of sarcomeric actin filaments in striated muscle are not completely understood. Live imaging of actin in striated muscle has revealed that actin sub...

  6. Myosin isoform fiber type and fiber size in the tail of the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazimihalis, P J; Gorvet, M A; Butcher, M T

    2013-01-01

    Muscle fiber type is a well studied property in limb muscles, however, much less is understood about myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform expression in caudal muscles of mammalian tails. Didelphid marsupials are an interesting lineage in this context as all species have prehensile tails, but show a range of tail-function depending on either their arboreal or terrestrial locomotor habits. Differences in prehensility suggest that MHC isoform fiber types may also be different, in that terrestrial opossums may have a large distribution of oxidative fibers for object carrying tasks instead of faster, glycolytic fiber types expected in mammals with long tails. To test this hypothesis, MHC isoform fiber type and their regional distribution (proximal/transitional/distal) were determined in the tail of the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana). Fiber types were determined by a combination of myosin-ATPase histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and SDS-PAGE. Results indicate a predominance of the fast MHC-2A and -2X isoforms in each region of the tail. The presence of two fast isoforms, in addition to the slow MHC-1 isoform, was confirmed by SDS-PAGE analysis. The overall MHC isoform fiber type distribution for the tail was: 25% MHC-1, 71% MHC-2A/X hybrid, and 4% MHC-1/2A hybrid. Oxidative MHC-2A/X isoform fibers were found to be relatively large in cross-section compared to slow, oxidative MHC-1 and MHC-1/2A hybrid fibers. A large percentage of fast MHC-2A/X hybrids fibers may be suggestive of an evolutionary transition in MHC isoform distribution (fast-to-slow fiber type) in the tail musculature of an opossum with primarily a terrestrial locomotor habit and adaptive tail-function. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A Role for Myosin Va in Human Cytomegalovirus Nuclear Egress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Adrian R; Sharma, Mayuri; Pesola, Jean M; Ericsson, Maria; Fernandez, Rosio; Coen, Donald M

    2018-03-15

    Herpesviruses replicate and package their genomes into capsids in replication compartments within the nuclear interior. Capsids then move to the inner nuclear membrane for envelopment and release into the cytoplasm in a process called nuclear egress. We previously found that nuclear F-actin is induced upon infection with the betaherpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and is important for nuclear egress and capsid localization away from replication compartment-like inclusions toward the nuclear rim. Despite these and related findings, it has not been shown that any specific motor protein is involved in herpesvirus nuclear egress. In this study, we have investigated whether the host motor protein, myosin Va, could be fulfilling this role. Using immunofluorescence microscopy and coimmunoprecipitation, we observed associations between a nuclear population of myosin Va and the viral major capsid protein, with both concentrating at the periphery of replication compartments. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that nearly 40% of assembled nuclear capsids associate with myosin Va. We also found that myosin Va and major capsid protein colocalize with nuclear F-actin. Importantly, antagonism of myosin Va with RNA interference or a dominant negative mutant revealed that myosin Va is important for the efficient production of infectious virus, capsid accumulation in the cytoplasm, and capsid localization away from replication compartment-like inclusions toward the nuclear rim. Our results lead us to suggest a working model whereby human cytomegalovirus capsids associate with myosin Va for movement from replication compartments to the nuclear periphery during nuclear egress. IMPORTANCE Little is known regarding how newly assembled and packaged herpesvirus capsids move from the nuclear interior to the periphery during nuclear egress. While it has been proposed that an actomyosin-based mechanism facilitates intranuclear movement of alphaherpesvirus capsids, a functional role for

  8. Treatment with the anti-IL-6 receptor antibody attenuates muscular dystrophy via promoting skeletal muscle regeneration in dystrophin-/utrophin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Eiji; Tanihata, Jun; Iwamura, Akira; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2017-10-27

    Chronic increases in the levels of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum and skeletal muscle are thought to contribute to the progression of muscular dystrophy. Dystrophin/utrophin double-knockout (dKO) mice develop a more severe and progressive muscular dystrophy than the mdx mice, the most common murine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In particular, dKO mice have smaller body sizes and muscle diameters, and develop progressive kyphosis and fibrosis in skeletal and cardiac muscles. As mdx mice and DMD patients, we found that IL-6 levels in the skeletal muscle were significantly increased in dKO mice. Thus, in this study, we aimed to analyze the effects of IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) blockade on the muscle pathology of dKO mice. Male dKO mice were administered an initial injection (200 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.)) of either the anti-IL-6R antibody MR16-1 or an isotype-matched control rat IgG at the age of 14 days, and were then given weekly injections (25 mg/kg i.p.) until 90 days of age. Treatment of dKO mice with the MR16-1 antibody successfully inhibited the IL-6 pathway in the skeletal muscle and resulted in a significant reduction in the expression levels of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in the skeletal muscle. Pathologically, a significant increase in the area of embryonic myosin heavy chain-positive myofibers and muscle diameter, and reduced fibrosis in the quadriceps muscle were observed. These results demonstrated the therapeutic effects of IL-6R blockade on promoting muscle regeneration. Consistently, serum creatine kinase levels were decreased. Despite these improvements observed in the limb muscles, degeneration of the diaphragm and cardiac muscles was not ameliorated by the treatment of mice with the MR16-1 antibody. As no adverse effects of treatment with the MR16-1 antibody were observed, our results indicate that the anti-IL-6R antibody is a potential therapy for muscular dystrophy

  9. An adhesome comprising laminin, dystroglycan and myosin IIA is required during notochord development in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisson, Nicolas; Sirour, Cathy; Moreau, Nicole; Denker, Elsa; Le Bouffant, Ronan; Goullancourt, Aline; Darribère, Thierry; Bello, Valérie

    2014-12-01

    Dystroglycan (Dg) is a transmembrane receptor for laminin that must be expressed at the right time and place in order to be involved in notochord morphogenesis. The function of Dg was examined in Xenopus laevis embryos by knockdown of Dg and overexpression and replacement of the endogenous Dg with a mutated form of the protein. This analysis revealed that Dg is required for correct laminin assembly, for cell polarization during mediolateral intercalation and for proper differentiation of vacuoles. Using mutations in the cytoplasmic domain, we identified two sites that are involved in cell polarization and are required for mediolateral cell intercalation, and a site that is required for vacuolation. Furthermore, using a proteomic analysis, the cytoskeletal non-muscle myosin IIA has been identified for the first time as a molecular link between the Dg-cytoplasmic domain and cortical actin. The data allowed us to identify the adhesome laminin-Dg-myosin IIA as being required to maintain the cortical actin cytoskeleton network during vacuolation, which is crucial to maintain the shape of notochordal cells. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Conformational distributions and proximity relationships in the rigor complex of actin and myosin subfragment-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyitrai, M; Hild, G; Lukács, A; Bódis, E; Somogyi, B

    2000-01-28

    Cyclic conformational changes in the myosin head are considered essential for muscle contraction. We hereby show that the extension of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer method described originally by Taylor et al. (Taylor, D. L., Reidler, J., Spudich, J. A., and Stryer, L. (1981) J. Cell Biol. 89, 362-367) allows determination of the position of a labeled point outside the actin filament in supramolecular complexes and also characterization of the conformational heterogeneity of an actin-binding protein while considering donor-acceptor distance distributions. Using this method we analyzed proximity relationships between two labeled points of S1 and the actin filament in the acto-S1 rigor complex. The donor (N-[[(iodoacetyl)amino]ethyl]-5-naphthylamine-1-sulfonate) was attached to either the catalytic domain (Cys-707) or the essential light chain (Cys-177) of S1, whereas the acceptor (5-(iodoacetamido)fluorescein) was attached to the actin filament (Cys-374). In contrast to the narrow positional distribution (assumed as being Gaussian) of Cys-707 (5 +/- 3 A), the positional distribution of Cys-177 was found to be broad (102 +/- 4 A). Such a broad positional distribution of the label on the essential light chain of S1 may be important in accommodating the helically arranged acto-myosin binding relative to the filament axis.

  11. Single-fiber myosin heavy chain polymorphism during postnatal development: modulation by hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Maso, N. A.; Caiozzo, V. J.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2000-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to follow the developmental time course of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform transitions in single fibers of the rodent plantaris muscle. Hypothyroidism was used in conjunction with single-fiber analyses to better describe a possible linkage between the neonatal and fast type IIB MHC isoforms during development. In contrast to the general concept that developmental MHC isoform transitions give rise to muscle fibers that express only a single MHC isoform, the single-fiber analyses revealed a very high degree of MHC polymorphism throughout postnatal development. In the adult state, MHC polymorphism was so pervasive that the rodent plantaris muscles contained approximately 12-15 different pools of fibers (i.e., fiber types). The degree of polymorphism observed at the single-fiber level made it difficult to determine specific developmental schemes analogous to those observed previously for the rodent soleus muscle. However, hypothyroidism was useful in that it confirmed a possible link between the developmental regulation of the neonatal and fast type IIB MHC isoforms.

  12. Technetium-99m labeled 1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-4-(2-mercapto-2-methyl-4-azapentyl)-4- (2-mercapto-2-methylp ropylamino)-piperidine and iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine for studying cardiac adrenergic function: a comparison of the uptake characteristics in vascular smooth muscle cells and neonatal cardiac myocytes, and an investigation in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samnick, Samuel; Scheuer, Claudia; Muenks, Sven; El-Gibaly, Amr M.; Menger, Michael D.; Kirsch, Carl-Martin

    2004-01-01

    In developing technetium-99m-based radioligands for in vivo studies of cardiac adrenergic neurons, we compared the uptake characteristics of the 99m Tc-labeled 1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-4-(2-mercapto-2-methyl-4-azapentyl)-4- (2-mercapto-2-methylpropylamino)-piperidine ( 99m Tc-FBPBAT) with those of the clinically established meta-[ 123 I]iodobenzylguanidine ( 123 I-MIBG) in rat vascular smooth muscle cells and neonatal cardiac myocytes. Furthermore, the cardiac and extracardiac uptake of both radiopharmaceuticals was assessed in intact rats and in rats pretreated with various α- and β-adrenoceptor drugs, and adrenergic reuptake blocking agents. The uptake of 99m Tc-FBPBAT and 123 I-MIBG into vascular smooth muscle cells and neonatal cardiac myocytes was rapid; more than 85% of the radioactivity accumulation into the cells occurring within the first 3 minutes. Radioactivity uptake after a 60-minute incubation at 37 degree sign C (pH 7.4) varied from 15% to 65% of the total loaded activity per million cells. In all cases, 99m Tc-FBPBAT showed the higher uptake, relative to 123 I-MIBG, at any given cell concentration. The cellular uptake of 99m Tc-FBPBAT was lower at 4 degree sign C and 20 degree sign C than at 37 degree sign C. In contrast, the 123 I-MIBG uptake was only slightly temperature dependent. Inhibition experiments confirmed that the cellular uptake of 123 I-MIBG is mediated by the uptake-I carrier, whereas α 1 - and β 1 -adrenoceptors were predominantly involved in the uptake of 99m Tc-FBPBAT into the cardiovascular tissues. Biodistribution studies in rats showed that 99m Tc-FBPBAT accumulated in myocardium after intravenous injection. Radioactivity in rat heart amounted to 2.32% and 1.91% of the injected dose per gram at 15 and 60 minutes postinjection, compared with 3.10% and 2.21% injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g) in the experiment with 123 I-MIBG, respectively. Prazosin, urapidil, and metoprolol were as effective as treatment with other adrenergic

  13. Technetium-99m labeled 1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-4-(2-mercapto-2-methyl-4-azapentyl)-4- (2-mercapto-2-methylp ropylamino)-piperidine and iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine for studying cardiac adrenergic function: a comparison of the uptake characteristics in vascular smooth muscle cells and neonatal cardiac myocytes, and an investigation in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samnick, Samuel E-mail: rassam@uniklinik-saarland.de; Scheuer, Claudia; Muenks, Sven; El-Gibaly, Amr M.; Menger, Michael D.; Kirsch, Carl-Martin

    2004-05-01

    In developing technetium-99m-based radioligands for in vivo studies of cardiac adrenergic neurons, we compared the uptake characteristics of the {sup 99m}Tc-labeled 1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-4-(2-mercapto-2-methyl-4-azapentyl)-4- (2-mercapto-2-methylpropylamino)-piperidine ({sup 99m}Tc-FBPBAT) with those of the clinically established meta-[{sup 123}I]iodobenzylguanidine ({sup 123}I-MIBG) in rat vascular smooth muscle cells and neonatal cardiac myocytes. Furthermore, the cardiac and extracardiac uptake of both radiopharmaceuticals was assessed in intact rats and in rats pretreated with various {alpha}- and {beta}-adrenoceptor drugs, and adrenergic reuptake blocking agents. The uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-FBPBAT and {sup 123}I-MIBG into vascular smooth muscle cells and neonatal cardiac myocytes was rapid; more than 85% of the radioactivity accumulation into the cells occurring within the first 3 minutes. Radioactivity uptake after a 60-minute incubation at 37 degree sign C (pH 7.4) varied from 15% to 65% of the total loaded activity per million cells. In all cases, {sup 99m}Tc-FBPBAT showed the higher uptake, relative to {sup 123}I-MIBG, at any given cell concentration. The cellular uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-FBPBAT was lower at 4 degree sign C and 20 degree sign C than at 37 degree sign C. In contrast, the {sup 123}I-MIBG uptake was only slightly temperature dependent. Inhibition experiments confirmed that the cellular uptake of {sup 123}I-MIBG is mediated by the uptake-I carrier, whereas {alpha}{sub 1}- and {beta}{sub 1}-adrenoceptors were predominantly involved in the uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-FBPBAT into the cardiovascular tissues. Biodistribution studies in rats showed that {sup 99m}Tc-FBPBAT accumulated in myocardium after intravenous injection. Radioactivity in rat heart amounted to 2.32% and 1.91% of the injected dose per gram at 15 and 60 minutes postinjection, compared with 3.10% and 2.21% injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g) in the experiment with {sup 123}I

  14. Excited hydrogen bonds in the molecular mechanism of muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalova, S V; Tolpygo, K B

    1991-11-21

    The mechanism of muscle contraction is considered. The hydrolysis of an ATP molecule is assumed to produce the excitation of hydrogen bonds A--H...B between electronegative atoms A and B, which are contained in the myosin head and actin filament. This excitation energy epsilon f depends on the interatomic distance AB = R and generates the tractive force f = -delta epsilon f/delta R, that makes atoms AB approach each other. The swing of the myosin head results in macroscopic mutual displacement of actin and myosin polymers. The motion of the actin filament under the action of this force is studied. The conditions under which a considerable portion of the excitation energy converts into the potential tension energy of the actin filament are analysed, and the probability of higher muscle efficiency existence is discussed.

  15. Exercise Physiology of Zebrafish: Swimming Effects on Skeletal and Cardiac Muscle Growth, on the Immune Systeme, and the Involvement of the Stress Axis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, A.P.; Schaaf, M.; Planas, J.V.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have established zebrafish as a novel exercise model and demonstrated the stimulation of growth by exercise. Exercise may also induce cardiac hypertrophy and cardiomyocyte proliferation in zebrafish making it an important model to study vertebrate heart regeneration and improved

  16. Severe isolated tricuspid insufficiency due to tricuspid papillary muscle rupture after a fall from a horse: treatment with port access minimally invasive cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, Kürsad; Mayeran, Yousef; Van Praet, Frank; Codens, Jose; Vanerman, Hugo

    2014-04-01

    We report on the successful treatment of tricuspid valve insufficiency due to blunt chest injury using port-access minimally invasive cardiac surgery. The optimal surgical treatment of traumatic valvular insufficiency is discussed, including a brief review of the relevant literature.

  17. Quantitative cardiac computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, M.; Dueber, C.; Wolff, P.; Erbel, R.; Hoffmann, T.

    1985-06-01

    The scope and limitations of quantitative cardiac CT have been evaluated in a series of experimental and clinical studies. The left ventricular muscle mass was estimated by computed tomography in 19 dogs (using volumetric methods, measurements in two axes and planes and reference volume). There was good correlation with anatomical findings. The enddiastolic volume of the left ventricle was estimated in 22 patients with cardiomyopathies; using angiography as a reference, CT led to systematic under-estimation. It is also shown that ECG-triggered magnetic resonance tomography results in improved visualisation and may be expected to improve measurements of cardiac morphology.

  18. Excessive Myosin Activity in Mbs Mutants Causes Photoreceptor Movement Out of the Drosophila Eye Disc Epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Arnold; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2004-01-01

    Neuronal cells must extend a motile growth cone while maintaining the cell body in its original position. In migrating cells, myosin contraction provides the driving force that pulls the rear of the cell toward the leading edge. We have characterized the function of myosin light chain phosphatase, which down-regulates myosin activity, in Drosophila photoreceptor neurons. Mutations in the gene encoding the myosin binding subunit of this enzyme cause photoreceptors to drop out of the eye disc e...

  19. Why muscle is an efficient shock absorber.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Ferenczi

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscles power body movement by converting free energy of ATP hydrolysis into mechanical work. During the landing phase of running or jumping some activated skeletal muscles are subjected to stretch. Upon stretch they absorb body energy quickly and effectively thus protecting joints and bones from impact damage. This is achieved because during lengthening, skeletal muscle bears higher force and has higher instantaneous stiffness than during isometric contraction, and yet consumes very little ATP. We wish to understand how the actomyosin molecules change their structure and interaction to implement these physiologically useful mechanical and thermodynamical properties. We monitored changes in the low angle x-ray diffraction pattern of rabbit skeletal muscle fibers during ramp stretch compared to those during isometric contraction at physiological temperature using synchrotron radiation. The intensities of the off-meridional layer lines and fine interference structure of the meridional M3 myosin x-ray reflection were resolved. Mechanical and structural data show that upon stretch the fraction of actin-bound myosin heads is higher than during isometric contraction. On the other hand, the intensities of the actin layer lines are lower than during isometric contraction. Taken together, these results suggest that during stretch, a significant fraction of actin-bound heads is bound non-stereo-specifically, i.e. they are disordered azimuthally although stiff axially. As the strong or stereo-specific myosin binding to actin is necessary for actin activation of the myosin ATPase, this finding explains the low metabolic cost of energy absorption by muscle during the landing phase of locomotion.

  20. Polygons and adhesion plaques and the disassembly and assembly of myofibrils in cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Z X; Holtzer, S; Schultheiss, T; Murray, J; Masaki, T; Fischman, D A; Holtzer, H

    1989-06-01

    Successive stages in the disassembly of myofibrils and the subsequent assembly of new myofibrils have been studied in cultures of dissociated chick cardiac myocytes. The myofibrils in trypsinized and dispersed myocytes are sequentially disassembled during the first 3 d of culture. They split longitudinally and then assemble into transitory polygons. Multiples of single sarcomeres, the cardiac polygons, are analogous to the transitory polygonal configurations assumed by stress fibers in spreading fibroblasts. They differ from their counterparts in fibroblasts in that they consist of muscle alpha-actinin vertices and muscle myosin heavy chain struts, rather than of the nonmuscle contractile protein isoforms of stress fiber polygons. EM sections reveal the vertices and struts in cardiac polygons to be typical Z and A bands. Most cardiac polygons are eliminated by day 5 of culture. Concurrent with the disassembly and elimination of the original myofibrils new myofibrils are rapidly assembled elsewhere in the same myocyte. Without exception both distal tips of each nascent myofibril terminate in adhesion plaques. The morphology and composition of the adhesion plaques capping each end of each myofibril are similar to those of the termini of stress fibers in fibroblasts. However, whereas the adhesion complexes involving stress fibers in fibroblasts consist of vinculin/nonmuscle alpha-actinin/beta- and gamma-actins, the analogous structures in myocytes involving myofibrils consist of vinculin/muscle alpha-actinin/alpha-actin. The addition of 1.7-2.0 microns sarcomeres to the distal tips of an elongating myofibril, irrespective of whether the myofibril consists of 1, 10, or several hundred tandem sarcomeres, occurs while the myofibril appears to remain linked to its respective adhesion plaques. The adhesion plaques in vitro are the equivalent of the in vivo intercalated discs, both in terms of their molecular composition and with respect to their functioning as initiating

  1. Association of expression levels in skeletal muscle and a SNP in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dicted breeding value for rib eye area in two experiments using 100 sires (P ... In the real-time PCR-based analysis, we used skeletal muscle tissues of eight JB .... mediates recruitment of muscle-type creatine kinase (CK) to myosin. Biochem.

  2. Diverse functions of myosin VI elucidated by an isoform-specific α-helix domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollscheid, Hans-Peter; Biancospino, Matteo; He, Fahu; Magistrati, Elisa; Molteni, Erika; Lupia, Michela; Soffientini, Paolo; Rottner, Klemens; Cavallaro, Ugo; Pozzoli, Uberto; Mapelli, Marina; Walters, Kylie J; Polo, Simona

    2016-04-01

    Myosin VI functions in endocytosis and cell motility. Alternative splicing of myosin VI mRNA generates two distinct isoform types, myosin VI(short) and myosin VI(long), which differ in the C-terminal region. Their physiological and pathological roles remain unknown. Here we identified an isoform-specific regulatory helix, named the α2-linker, that defines specific conformations and hence determines the target selectivity of human myosin VI. The presence of the α2-linker structurally defines a new clathrin-binding domain that is unique to myosin VI(long) and masks the known RRL interaction motif. This finding is relevant to ovarian cancer, in which alternative myosin VI splicing is aberrantly regulated, and exon skipping dictates cell addiction to myosin VI(short) in tumor-cell migration. The RRL interactor optineurin contributes to this process by selectively binding myosin VI(short). Thus, the α2-linker acts like a molecular switch that assigns myosin VI to distinct endocytic (myosin VI(long)) or migratory (myosin VI(short)) functional roles.

  3. Species selective resistance of cardiac muscle voltage gated sodium channels: characterization of brevetoxin and ciguatoxin binding sites in rats and fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechraoui, Marie-Yasmine Bottein; Wacksman, Jeremy J; Ramsdell, John S

    2006-11-01

    Brevetoxins (PbTxs) and ciguatoxins (CTXs) are two suites of dinoflagellate derived marine polyether neurotoxins that target the voltage gated sodium channel (VGSC). PbTxs are commonly responsible for massive fish kills and unusual mortalities in marine mammals. CTXs, more often noted for human intoxication, are suspected causes of fish and marine mammal intoxication, although this has never been reported in the field. VGSCs, present in the membrane of all excitable cells including those found in skeletal muscle, nervous and heart tissues, are found as isoforms with differential expression within species and tissues. To investigate the tissue and species susceptibility to these biotoxins, we determined the relative affinity of PbTx-2 and -3 and P-CTX-1 to native VGSCs in the brain, heart, and skeletal muscle of rat and the marine teleost fish Centropristis striata by competitive binding in the presence of [(3)H]PbTx-3. No differences between rat and fish were observed in the binding of PbTxs and CTX to either brain or skeletal muscle. However, [(3)H]PbTx-3 showed substantial lower affinity to rat heart tissue while in the fish it bound with the same affinity to heart than to brain or skeletal muscle. These new insights into PbTxs and CTXs binding in fish and mammalian excitable tissues indicate a species related resistance of heart VGSC in the rat; yet, with comparable sensitivity between the species for brain and skeletal muscle.

  4. Quantitative PCR Analysis of Laryngeal Muscle Fiber Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Daele, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    Voice and swallowing dysfunction as a result of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis can be improved with vocal fold injections or laryngeal framework surgery. However, denervation atrophy can cause late-term clinical failure. A major determinant of skeletal muscle physiology is myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression, and previous protein analyses…

  5. Morphology and histochemistry of primary flight muscles in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preincubation staining protocol for myosin ATPase. The primary flight muscles, serratus ventralis included type I, type IIa and type IIb fibers. Type I fibers were highly oxidative, as stained dark for NADHTR. Type IIa fibers exhibited relatively weak staining properties for NADH-TR and SDH, indicating an intermediate oxidative ...

  6. Mouse nuclear myosin I knock-out shows interchangeability and redundancy of myosin isoforms in the cell nucleus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Venit, Tomáš; Dzijak, Rastislav; Kalendová, Alžběta; Kahle, Michal; Rohožková, Jana; Schmidt, V.; Rülicke, T.; Rathkolb, B.; Hans, W.; Bohla, A.; Eickelberg, O.; Stoeger, T.; Wolf, E.; Yildirim, A.Ö.; Gailus-Durner, V.; Fuchs, H.; de Angelis, M.H.; Hozák, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2013), e61406 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/11/2232; GA TA ČR TE01020022; GA MŠk LH12143; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : nuclear myosin * myosin isoforms * cell nucleus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  7. Evaluation of 10 genes encoding cardiac proteins in Doberman Pinschers with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, M Lynne; O'Grady, Michael R; Pyle, W Glen; Dawson, John F

    2011-07-01

    To identify a causative mutation for dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in Doberman Pinschers by sequencing the coding regions of 10 cardiac genes known to be associated with familial DCM in humans. 5 Doberman Pinschers with DCM and congestive heart failure and 5 control mixed-breed dogs that were euthanized or died. RNA was extracted from frozen ventricular myocardial samples from each dog, and first-strand cDNA was synthesized via reverse transcription, followed by PCR amplification with gene-specific primers. Ten cardiac genes were analyzed: cardiac actin, α-actinin, α-tropomyosin, β-myosin heavy chain, metavinculin, muscle LIM protein, myosinbinding protein C, tafazzin, titin-cap (telethonin), and troponin T. Sequences for DCM-affected and control dogs and the published canine genome were compared. None of the coding sequences yielded a common causative mutation among all Doberman Pinscher samples. However, 3 variants were identified in the α-actinin gene in the DCM-affected Doberman Pinschers. One of these variants, identified in 2 of the 5 Doberman Pinschers, resulted in an amino acid change in the rod-forming triple coiled-coil domain. Mutations in the coding regions of several genes associated with DCM in humans did not appear to consistently account for DCM in Doberman Pinschers. However, an α-actinin variant was detected in some Doberman Pinschers that may contribute to the development of DCM given its potential effect on the structure of this protein. Investigation of additional candidate gene coding and noncoding regions and further evaluation of the role of α-actinin in development of DCM in Doberman Pinschers are warranted.

  8. Correlation of trabeculae and papillary muscles with clinical and cardiac characteristics and impact on CMR measures of LV anatomy and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chuang, Michael L.; Gona, Philimon; Hautvast, Gilion L T F; Salton, Carol J.; Blease, Susan J.; Yeon, Susan B.; Breeuwer, Marcel; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Manning, Warren J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of this study was to assess the relationship of left ventricular (LV) trabeculae and papillary muscles (TPM) with clinical characteristics in a community-based, free-living adult cohort and to determine the effect of TPM on quantitative measures of LV volume, mass, and ejection

  9. Chronic ischemic mitral regurgitation and papillary muscle infarction detected by late gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, Wobbe; Willemsen, Hendrik M.; Lexis, Chris P. H.; Prakken, Niek H.; Lipsic, Erik; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Mariani, Massimo A.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.

    2016-01-01

    Both papillary muscle infarction (PMI) and chronic ischemic mitral regurgitation (CIMR) are associated with reduced survival after myocardial infarction. The influence of PMI on CIMR and factors influencing both entities are incompletely understood. We sought to determine the influence of PMI on

  10. Animal models of cardiac cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Francesca; Malara, Natalia; Mollace, Vincenzo; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Elisabetta

    2016-09-15

    Cachexia is the loss of body weight associated with several chronic diseases including chronic heart failure (CHF). The cachectic condition is mainly due to loss of skeletal muscle mass and adipose tissue depletion. The majority of experimental in vivo studies on cachexia rely on animal models of cancer cachexia while a reliable and appropriate model for cardiac cachexia has not yet been established. A critical issue in generating a cardiac cachexia model is that genetic modifications or pharmacological treatments impairing the heart functionality and used to obtain the heart failure model might likely impair the skeletal muscle, this also being a striated muscle and sharing with the myocardium several molecular and physiological mechanisms. On the other hand, often, the induction of heart damage in the several existing models of heart failure does not necessarily lead to skeletal muscle loss and cachexia. Here we describe the main features of cardiac cachexia and illustrate some animal models proposed for cardiac cachexia studies; they include the genetic calsequestrin and Dahl salt-sensitive models, the monocrotaline model and the surgical models obtained by left anterior descending (LAD) ligation, transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and ascending aortic banding. The availability of a specific animal model for cardiac cachexia is a crucial issue since, besides the common aspects of cachexia in the different syndromes, each disease has some peculiarities in its etiology and pathophysiology leading to cachexia. Such peculiarities need to be unraveled in order to find new targets for effective therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Engineering controllable bidirectional molecular motors based on myosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Nakamura, Muneaki; Schindler, Tony D.; Parker, David; Bryant, Zev

    2012-04-01

    Cytoskeletal motors drive the transport of organelles and molecular cargoes within cells and have potential applications in molecular detection and diagnostic devices. Engineering molecular motors with controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in living cells and provide optimized device components for tasks such as molecular sorting and directed assembly. Biological motors have previously been modified by introducing activation/deactivation switches that respond to metal ions and other signals. Here, we show that myosin motors can be engineered to reversibly change their direction of motion in response to a calcium signal. Building on previous protein engineering studies and guided by a structural model for the redirected power stroke of myosin VI, we have constructed bidirectional myosins through the rigid recombination of structural modules. The performance of the motors was confirmed using gliding filament assays and single fluorophore tracking. Our strategy, in which external signals trigger changes in the geometry and mechanics of myosin lever arms, should make it possible to achieve spatiotemporal control over a range of motor properties including processivity, stride size and branchpoint turning.

  12. The fungal myosin I is essential for Fusarium toxisome formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangfei Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Myosin-I molecular motors are proposed to function as linkers between membranes and the actin cytoskeleton in several cellular processes, but their role in the biosynthesis of fungal secondary metabolites remain elusive. Here, we found that the myosin I of Fusarium graminearum (FgMyo1, the causal agent of Fusarium head blight, plays critical roles in mycotoxin biosynthesis. Inhibition of myosin I by the small molecule phenamacril leads to marked reduction in deoxynivalenol (DON biosynthesis. FgMyo1 also governs translation of the DON biosynthetic enzyme Tri1 by interacting with the ribosome-associated protein FgAsc1. Disruption of the ATPase activity of FgMyo1 either by the mutation E420K, down-regulation of FgMyo1 expression or deletion of FgAsc1 results in reduced Tri1 translation. The DON biosynthetic enzymes Tri1 and Tri4 are mainly localized to subcellular structures known as toxisomes in response to mycotoxin induction and the FgMyo1-interacting protein, actin, participates in toxisome formation. The actin polymerization disruptor latrunculin A inhibits toxisome assembly. Consistent with this observation, deletion of the actin-associated proteins FgPrk1 and FgEnd3 also results in reduced toxisome formation. Unexpectedly, the FgMyo1-actin cytoskeleton is not involved in biosynthesis of another secondary metabolite tested. Taken together, this study uncovers a novel function of myosin I in regulating mycotoxin biosynthesis in filamentous fungi.

  13. The fungal myosin I is essential for Fusarium toxisome formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guangfei; Chen, Yun; Xu, Jin-Rong; Kistler, H Corby; Ma, Zhonghua

    2018-01-01

    Myosin-I molecular motors are proposed to function as linkers between membranes and the actin cytoskeleton in several cellular processes, but their role in the biosynthesis of fungal secondary metabolites remain elusive. Here, we found that the myosin I of Fusarium graminearum (FgMyo1), the causal agent of Fusarium head blight, plays critical roles in mycotoxin biosynthesis. Inhibition of myosin I by the small molecule phenamacril leads to marked reduction in deoxynivalenol (DON) biosynthesis. FgMyo1 also governs translation of the DON biosynthetic enzyme Tri1 by interacting with the ribosome-associated protein FgAsc1. Disruption of the ATPase activity of FgMyo1 either by the mutation E420K, down-regulation of FgMyo1 expression or deletion of FgAsc1 results in reduced Tri1 translation. The DON biosynthetic enzymes Tri1 and Tri4 are mainly localized to subcellular structures known as toxisomes in response to mycotoxin induction and the FgMyo1-interacting protein, actin, participates in toxisome formation. The actin polymerization disruptor latrunculin A inhibits toxisome assembly. Consistent with this observation, deletion of the actin-associated proteins FgPrk1 and FgEnd3 also results in reduced toxisome formation. Unexpectedly, the FgMyo1-actin cytoskeleton is not involved in biosynthesis of another secondary metabolite tested. Taken together, this study uncovers a novel function of myosin I in regulating mycotoxin biosynthesis in filamentous fungi.

  14. Calcium and cargoes as regulators of myosin 5a activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellers, James R.; Thirumurugan, Kavitha; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Hammer, John A.; Knight, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Myosin 5a is a two-headed actin-dependent motor that transports various cargoes in cells. Its enzymology and mechanochemistry have been extensively studied in vitro. It is a processive motor that takes multiple 36 nm steps on actin. The enzymatic activity of myosin 5 is regulated by an intramolecular folding mechanism whereby its lever arms fold back against the coiled-coil tail such that the motor domains directly bind the globular tail domains. We show that the structure seen in individual folded molecules is consistent with electron density map of two-dimensional crystals of the molecule. In this compact state, the actin-activated MgATPase activity of the molecule is markedly inhibited and the molecule cannot move processively on surface bound actin filaments. The actin-activated MgATPase activity of myosin 5a is activated by increasing the calcium concentration or by binding of a cargo-receptor molecule, melanophilin, in vitro. However, calcium binding to the calmodulin light chains results in dissociation of some of the calmodulin which disrupts the ability of myosin 5a to move on actin filaments in vitro. Thus we propose that the physiologically relevant activation pathway in vivo involves binding of cargo-receptor proteins

  15. The fungal myosin I is essential for Fusarium toxisome formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most frequently detected secondary metabolite produced by Fusarium graminearum and other Fusarium spp. To date, relatively few studies have addressed how mycotoxin biosynthesis occurs in fungal cells. Here we found that myosin I governs translation of DON bi...

  16. Engineering controllable bidirectional molecular motors based on myosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Nakamura, Muneaki; Schindler, Tony D.; Parker, David; Bryant, Zev

    2012-01-01

    Cytoskeletal motors drive the transport of organelles and molecular cargoes within cells1, and have potential applications in molecular detection and diagnostic devices2,3. Engineering molecular motors with dynamically controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in living cells, and yield optimized device components for complex tasks such as molecular sorting and directed assembly3. Biological motors have previously been modified by introducing activation/deactivation switches that respond to metal ions4,5 and other signals6. Here we show that myosin motors can be engineered to reversibly change their direction of motion in response to a calcium signal. Building on previous protein engineering studies7–11 and guided by a structural model12 for the redirected power stroke of myosin VI, we constructed bidirectional myosins through the rigid recombination of structural modules. The performance of the motors was confirmed using gliding filament assays and single fluorophore tracking. Our general strategy, in which external signals trigger changes in the geometry and mechanics of myosin lever arms, should enable spatiotemporal control over a range of motor properties including processivity, stride size13, and branchpoint turning14. PMID:22343382

  17. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rehab; Heart failure - cardiac rehab References Anderson L, Taylor RS. Cardiac rehabilitation for people with heart disease: ... of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  18. Caractérisation des différents types de fibres musculaires dans plusieurs espèces : production et utilisation d'anticorps monoclonaux dirigés contre les chaînes lourdes de myosine rapide IIa et IIb

    OpenAIRE

    Société Biocytex; Picard, Brigitte; Lefaucheur, Louis; Fauconneau, Benoit; Rémignon, Hervé; Cherel, Yan; Barrey, Eric; Nédelec, J.

    1998-01-01

    Des anticorps monoclonaux dirigés contre les chaînes lourdes de myosine (MHC : myosin heavy chain) de différentes espèces d’animaux : bovin, porc, poisson, poulet, dinde, cheval ont été produits. Ils ont été testés par immunohistologie sur des coupes de muscle squelettique chez le bovin, le porc, le poisson, le poulet et la dinde et par ELISA chez le cheval. Les différents anticorps retenus dans ce projet permettent de nouvelles applications pour l’étude du muscle squelettique. En particulier...

  19. AN INTEGRATIVE WAY OF TEACHING MOLECULAR CELL BIOLOGY AND PROTEIN CHEMISTRY USING ACTIN IMMOBILIZATION ON CHITIN FOR PURIFYING MYOSIN II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Souza

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Our intent is to present our experience on teaching Molecular Cell Biology andProtein Chemistry at UNIRIO through an innovative approach that includes myosin IIextraction and purification. We took advantage of the properties of muscle contractionand propose a simple method for purifying myosin II by affinity chromatography. Thisoriginal method is based on the preparation of an affinity column containing actinmolecules covalently bound to chitin particles. We propose a three-week syllabus thatincludes lectures and bench experimental work. The syllabus favors the activelearning of protein extraction and purification, as well as, of scientific concepts suchas muscle contraction, cytoskeleton structure and its importance for the living cell. Italso promotes the learning of the biotechnological applications of chitin and theapplications of protein immobilization in different industrial fields. Furthermore, theactivities also target the development of laboratorial technical abilities, thedevelopment of problem solving skills and the ability to write up a scientific reportfollowing the model of a scientific article. It is very important to mention that thissyllabus can be used even in places where a facility such as ultra-centrifugation islacking.

  20. An animal model for human masseter muscle: histochemical characterization of mouse, rat, rabbit, cat, dog, pig, and cow masseter muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuxen, A; Kirkeby, S

    1990-01-01

    The masseter muscle of several animal species was investigated by use of a histochemical method for the demonstration of acid-stable and alkali-stable myosin adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase). The following subdivisions of fiber types were used: Type I fibers show weak ATPase activity at pH 9...... II and I fibers, with type II predominating. Cow masseter muscle consisted mainly of type I fibers, although some cow masseter muscles contained a very small number of type II fibers. Pig masseter muscle had both type I, II, and IM fibers. One of the characteristics of human masseter muscle is type...... IM fibers, which are rarely seen in muscles other than the masticatory muscles. Therefore, pig masseter muscle might be a suitable animal model for experimental studies, such as an investigation of the distribution and diameter of fiber types in the masticatory muscles before and after orthognathic...

  1. Vascular O-GlcNAcylation augments reactivity to constrictor stimuli by prolonging phosphorylated levels of the myosin light chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, V.V. [Instituto de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, MT (Brazil); Lobato, N.S.; Filgueira, F.P. [Curso de Medicina, Setor de Fisiologia Humana, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Jataí, GO (Brazil); Webb, R.C. [Department of Physiology, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (United States); Tostes, R.C. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Giachini, F.R. [Instituto de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, MT (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    O-GlcNAcylation is a modification that alters the function of numerous proteins. We hypothesized that augmented O-GlcNAcylation levels enhance myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and reduce myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity, leading to increased vascular contractile responsiveness. The vascular responses were measured by isometric force displacement. Thoracic aorta and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from rats were incubated with vehicle or with PugNAc, which increases O-GlcNAcylation. In addition, we determined whether proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation. PugNAc enhanced phenylephrine (PE) responses in rat aortas (maximal effect, 14.2±2 vs 7.9±1 mN for vehicle, n=7). Treatment with an MLCP inhibitor (calyculin A) augmented vascular responses to PE (13.4±2 mN) and abolished the differences in PE-response between the groups. The effect of PugNAc was not observed when vessels were preincubated with ML-9, an MLCK inhibitor (7.3±2 vs 7.5±2 mN for vehicle, n=5). Furthermore, our data showed that differences in the PE-induced contractile response between the groups were abolished by the activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AICAR; 6.1±2 vs 7.4±2 mN for vehicle, n=5). PugNAc increased phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT-1) and protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitor protein of 17 kDa (CPI-17), which are involved in RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated inhibition of myosin phosphatase activity. PugNAc incubation produced a time-dependent increase in vascular phosphorylation of myosin light chain and decreased phosphorylation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase, which decreased the affinity of MLCK for Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin. Our data suggest that proteins that play an important role in the regulation of MLCK and MLCP activity are directly affected by O-GlcNAcylation, favoring vascular contraction.

  2. Seasonal changes in isoform composition of giant proteins of thick and thin filaments and titin (connectin) phosphorylation level in striated muscles of bears (Ursidae, Mammalia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmov, N N; Vikhlyantsev, I M; Ulanova, A D; Gritsyna, Yu V; Bobylev, A G; Saveljev, A P; Makariushchenko, V V; Maksudov, G Yu; Podlubnaya, Z A

    2015-03-01

    Seasonal changes in the isoform composition of thick and thin filament proteins (titin, myosin heavy chains (MyHCs), nebulin), as well as in the phosphorylation level of titin in striated muscles of brown bear (Ursus arctos) and hibernating Himalayan black bear (Ursus thibetanus ussuricus) were studied. We found that the changes that lead to skeletal muscle atrophy in bears during hibernation are not accompanied by a decrease in the content of nebulin and intact titin-1 (T1) isoforms. However, a decrease (2.1-3.4-fold) in the content of T2 fragments of titin was observed in bear skeletal muscles (m. gastrocnemius, m. longissimus dorsi, m. biceps) during hibernation. The content of the stiffer N2B titin isoform was observed to increase relative to the content of its more compliant N2BA isoform in the left ventricles of hibernating bears. At the same time, in spite of the absence of decrease in the total content of T1 in the myocardium of hibernating brown bear, the content of T2 fragments decreased ~1.6-fold. The level of titin phosphorylation only slightly increased in the cardiac muscle of hibernating brown bear. In the skeletal muscles of brown bear, the level of titin phosphorylation did not vary between seasons. However, changes in the composition of MyHCs aimed at increasing the content of slow (I) and decreasing the content of fast (IIa) isoforms of this protein during hibernation of brown bear were detected. Content of MyHCs I and IIa in the skeletal muscles of hibernating Himalayan black bear corresponded to that in the skeletal muscles of hibernating brown bear.

  3. Muscle after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Kristensen, Ida Bruun; Kjaer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    years after the injury. There is a progressive drop in the proportion of slow myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform fibers and a rise in the proportion of fibers that coexpress both the fast and slow MHC isoforms. The oxidative enzymatic activity starts to decline after the first few months post-SCI. Muscles......The morphological and contractile changes of muscles below the level of the lesion after spinal cord injury (SCI) are dramatic. In humans with SCI, a fiber-type transformation away from type I begins 4-7 months post-SCI and reaches a new steady state with predominantly fast glycolytic IIX fibers...... from individuals with chronic SCI show less resistance to fatigue, and the speed-related contractile properties change, becoming faster. These findings are also present in animals. Future studies should longitudinally examine changes in muscles from early SCI until steady state is reached in order...

  4. Blebbistain, a myosin II inhibitor, as a novel strategy to regulate detrusor contractility in a rat model of partial bladder outlet obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Zhang

    Full Text Available Partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO, a common urologic pathology mostly caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia, can coexist in 40-45% of patients with overactive bladder (OAB and is associated with detrusor overactivity (DO. PBOO that induces DO results in alteration in bladder myosin II type and isoform composition. Blebbistatin (BLEB is a myosin II inhibitor we recently demonstrated potently relaxed normal detrusor smooth muscle (SM and reports suggest varied BLEB efficacy for different SM myosin (SMM isoforms and/or SMM vs nonmuscle myosin (NMM. We hypothesize BLEB inhibition of myosin II as a novel contraction protein targeted strategy to regulate DO. Using a surgically-induced male rat PBOO model, organ bath contractility, competitive and Real-Time-RT-PCR were performed. It was found that obstructed-bladder weight significantly increased 2.74-fold while in vitro contractility of detrusor to various stimuli was impaired ∼50% along with decreased shortening velocity. Obstruction also altered detrusor spontaneous activities with significantly increased amplitude but depressed frequency. PBOO switched bladder from a phasic-type to a more tonic-type SM. Expression of 5' myosin heavy chain (MHC alternatively spliced isoform SM-A (associated with tonic-type SM increased 3-fold while 3' MHC SM1 and essential light chain isoform MLC(17b also exhibited increased relative expression. Total SMMHC expression was decreased by 25% while the expression of NMM IIB (SMemb was greatly increased by 4.5-fold. BLEB was found to completely relax detrusor strips from both sham-operated and PBOO rats pre-contracted with KCl, carbachol or electrical field stimulation although sensitivity was slightly decreased (20% only at lower doses for PBOO. Thus we provide the first thorough characterization of the response of rat bladder myosin to PBOO and demonstrate complete BLEB-induced PBOO bladder SM relaxation. Furthermore, the present study provides valuable

  5. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...

  6. Acute cardiac failure in neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sparrow, Patrick

    2012-02-03

    We present a case of rapid onset acute cardiac failure developing as part of neuroleptic malignant syndrome in a 35-year-old woman following treatment with thioridazine and lithium. Post mortem histology of cardiac and skeletal muscle showed similar changes of focal cellular necrosis and vacuolation suggesting a common disease process.

  7. Stem cell sources for cardiac regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roccio, M.; Goumans, M. J.; Sluijter, J. P. G.; Doevendans, P. A.

    Cell-based cardiac repair has the ambitious aim to replace the malfunctioning cardiac muscle developed after myocardial infarction, with new contractile cardiomyocytes and vessels. Different stem cell populations have been intensively studied in the last decade as a potential source of new

  8. Slit and Netrin-1 guide cranial motor axon pathfinding via Rho-kinase, myosin light chain kinase and myosin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drescher Uwe

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the developing hindbrain, cranial motor axon guidance depends on diffusible repellent factors produced by the floor plate. Our previous studies have suggested that candidate molecules for mediating this effect are Slits, Netrin-1 and Semaphorin3A (Sema3A. It is unknown to what extent these factors contribute to floor plate-derived chemorepulsion of motor axons, and the downstream signalling pathways are largely unclear. Results In this study, we have used a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to identify the components of floor plate chemorepulsion and their downstream signalling pathways. Using in vitro motor axon deflection assays, we demonstrate that Slits and Netrin-1, but not Sema3A, contribute to floor plate repulsion. We also find that the axon pathways of dorsally projecting branchiomotor neurons are disrupted in Netrin-1 mutant mice and in chick embryos expressing dominant-negative Unc5a receptors, indicating an in vivo role for Netrin-1. We further demonstrate that Slit and Netrin-1 signalling are mediated by Rho-kinase (ROCK and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK, which regulate myosin II activity, controlling actin retrograde flow in the growth cone. We show that MLCK, ROCK and myosin II are required for Slit and Netrin-1-mediated growth cone collapse of cranial motor axons. Inhibition of these molecules in explant cultures, or genetic manipulation of RhoA or myosin II function in vivo causes characteristic cranial motor axon pathfinding errors, including the inability to exit the midline, and loss of turning towards exit points. Conclusions Our findings suggest that both Slits and Netrin-1 contribute to floor plate-derived chemorepulsion of cranial motor axons. They further indicate that RhoA/ROCK, MLCK and myosin II are components of Slit and Netrin-1 signalling pathways, and suggest that these pathways are of key importance in cranial motor axon navigation.

  9. Changes in myosin S1 orientation and force induced by a temperature increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Peter J; Bagni, Maria A; Colombini, Barbara; Amenitsch, Heinz; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Ashley, Christopher C; Cecchi, Giovanni; Ameritsch, Heinz

    2002-04-16

    Force generation in myosin-based motile systems is thought to result from an angular displacement of the myosin subfragment 1 (S1) tail domain with respect to the actin filament axis. In muscle, raised temperature increases the force generated by S1, implying a greater change in tail domain angular displacement. We used time-resolved x-ray diffraction to investigate the structural corollary of this force increase by measuring M3 meridional reflection intensity during sinusoidal length oscillations. This technique allows definition of S1 orientation with respect to the myofilament axis. M3 intensity changes were approximately sinusoid at low temperatures but became increasingly distorted as temperature was elevated, with the formation of a double intensity peak at maximum shortening. This increased distortion could be accounted for by assuming a shift in orientation of the tail domain of actin-bound S1 toward the orientation at which M3 intensity is maximal, which is consistent with a tail domain rotation model of force generation in which the tail approaches a more perpendicular projection from the thin filament axis at higher temperatures. In power stroke simulations, the angle between S1 tail mean position during oscillations and the position at maximum intensity decreased by 4.7 degrees, corresponding to a mean tail displacement toward the perpendicular of 0.73 nm for a temperature-induced force increase of 0.28 P(0) from 4 to 22 degrees C. Our findings suggest that at least 62% of crossbridge compliance is associated with the tail domain.

  10. The expression of HSP in human skeletal muscle. Effects of muscle fiber phenotype and training background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Mattias; Mackey, Abigail L; Langberg, Henning

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Exercise-induced adaptations of skeletal muscle are related to training mode and can be muscle fibre type specific. This study aimed to investigate heat shock protein expression in type I and type II muscle fibres in resting skeletal muscle of subjects with different training backgrounds...... myosin heavy chain I and IIA, αB-crystallin, HSP27, HSP60 and HSP70. RESULTS: In ACT and RES, but not in END, a fibre type specific expression with higher staining intensity in type I than type II fibres was seen for αB-crystallin. The opposite (II>I) was found for HSP27 in subjects from ACT (6 of 12...... HSPs in human skeletal muscle is influenced by muscle fibre phenotype. The fibre type specific expression of HSP70 is influenced by resistance and endurance training whereas those of αB-crystallin and HSP27 are influenced only by endurance training suggesting the existence of a training...

  11. Calcium ion in skeletal muscle: its crucial role for muscle function, plasticity, and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berchtold, M W; Brinkmeier, H; Müntener, M

    2000-01-01

    in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition, a multitude of Ca(2+)-binding proteins is present in muscle tissue including parvalbumin, calmodulin, S100 proteins, annexins, sorcin, myosin light chains, beta-actinin, calcineurin, and calpain. These Ca(2+)-binding proteins may either exert an important role in Ca(2......Mammalian skeletal muscle shows an enormous variability in its functional features such as rate of force production, resistance to fatigue, and energy metabolism, with a wide spectrum from slow aerobic to fast anaerobic physiology. In addition, skeletal muscle exhibits high plasticity that is based...... on the potential of the muscle fibers to undergo changes of their cytoarchitecture and composition of specific muscle protein isoforms. Adaptive changes of the muscle fibers occur in response to a variety of stimuli such as, e.g., growth and differentition factors, hormones, nerve signals, or exercise...

  12. Striated Muscle Function, Regeneration, and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadrin, I.Y.; Khodabukus, A.; Bursac, N.

    2016-01-01

    As the only striated muscle tissues in the body, skeletal and cardiac muscle share numerous structural and functional characteristics, while exhibiting vastly different size and regenerative potential. Healthy skeletal muscle harbors a robust regenerative response that becomes inadequate after large muscle loss or in degenerative pathologies and aging. In contrast, the mammalian heart loses its regenerative capacity shortly after birth, leaving it susceptible to permanent damage by acute injury or chronic disease. In this review, we compare and contrast the physiology and regenerative potential of native skeletal and cardiac muscles, mechanisms underlying striated muscle dysfunction, and bioengineering strategies to treat muscle disorders. We focus on different sources for cellular therapy, biomaterials to augment the endogenous regenerative response, and progress in engineering and application of mature striated muscle tissues in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we discuss the challenges and perspectives in translating muscle bioengineering strategies to clinical practice. PMID:27271751

  13. Twitchin can regulate the ATPase cycle of actomyosin in a phosphorylation-dependent manner in skinned mammalian skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrova, Stanislava V; Rysev, Nikita A; Matusovsky, Oleg S; Shelud'ko, Nikolay S; Borovikov, Yurii S

    2012-05-01

    The effect of twitchin, a thick filament protein of molluscan muscles, on the actin-myosin interaction at several mimicked sequential steps of the ATPase cycle was investigated using the polarized fluorescence of 1.5-IAEDANS bound to myosin heads, FITC-phalloidin attached to actin and acrylodan bound to twitchin in the glycerol-skinned skeletal muscle fibres of mammalian. The phosphorylation-dependent multi-step changes in mobility and spatial arrangement of myosin SH1 helix, actin subunit and twitchin during the ATPase cycle have been revealed. It was shown that nonphosphorylated twitchin inhibited the movements of SH1 helix of the myosin heads and actin subunits and decreased the affinity of myosin to actin by freezing the position and mobility of twitchin in the muscle fibres. The phosphorylation of twitchin reverses this effect by changing the spatial arrangement and mobility of the actin-binding portions of twitchin. In this case, enhanced movements of SH1 helix of the myosin heads and actin subunits are observed. The data imply a novel property of twitchin incorporated into organized contractile system: its ability to regulate the ATPase cycle in a phosphorylation-dependent fashion by changing the affinity and spatial arrangement of the actin-binding portions of twitchin. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Distribution and evolution of stable single α-helices (SAH domains in myosin motor proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Simm

    Full Text Available Stable single-alpha helices (SAHs are versatile structural elements in many prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins acting as semi-flexible linkers and constant force springs. This way SAH-domains function as part of the lever of many different myosins. Canonical myosin levers consist of one or several IQ-motifs to which light chains such as calmodulin bind. SAH-domains provide flexibility in length and stiffness to the myosin levers, and may be particularly suited for myosins working in crowded cellular environments. Although the function of the SAH-domains in human class-6 and class-10 myosins has well been characterised, the distribution of the SAH-domain in all myosin subfamilies and across the eukaryotic tree of life remained elusive. Here, we analysed the largest available myosin sequence dataset consisting of 7919 manually annotated myosin sequences from 938 species representing all major eukaryotic branches using the SAH-prediction algorithm of Waggawagga, a recently developed tool for the identification of SAH-domains. With this approach we identified SAH-domains in more than one third of the supposed 79 myosin subfamilies. Depending on the myosin class, the presence of SAH-domains can range from a few to almost all class members indicating complex patterns of independent and taxon-specific SAH-domain gain and loss.

  15. Beneficial effects of GH/IGF-1 on skeletal muscle atrophy and function in experimental heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Libera, Luciano; Ravara, Barbara; Volterrani, Maurizio; Gobbo, Valerio; Della Barbera, Mila; Angelini, Annalisa; Danieli Betto, Daniela; Germinario, Elena; Vescovo, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    Muscle atrophy is a determinant of exercise capacity in heart failure (CHF). Myocyte apoptosis, triggered by tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or its second messenger sphingosine (SPH), is one of the causes of atrophy. Growth hormone (GH) improves hemodynamic and cardiac trophism in several experimental models of CHF, but its effect on skeletal muscle in CHF is not yet clear. We tested the hypothesis that GH can prevent skeletal muscle apoptosis in rats with CHF. CHF was induced by injecting monocrotaline. After 2 wk, 2 groups of rats were treated with GH (0.2 mg.kg(-1).day(-1) and 1.0 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) subcutaneously. A third group of controls had saline. After 2 additional weeks, rats were killed. Tibialis anterior cross-sectional area, myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition, and a study on myocyte apoptosis and serum levels of TNF-alpha and SPH were carried out. The number of apoptotic nuclei, muscle atrophy, and serum levels of TNF-alpha and SPH were decreased with GH at high but not at low doses compared with CHF rats. Bcl-2 was increased, whereas activated caspases and bax were decreased. The MHC pattern in GH-treated animals was similar to that of controls. Monocrotaline slowed down both contraction and relaxation but did not affect specific tetanic force, whereas absolute force was decreased. GH treatment restored contraction and relaxation to control values and brought muscle mass and absolute twitch and tetanic tension to normal levels. These findings may provide an insight into the therapeutic strategy of GH given to patients with CHF to improve exercise capacity.

  16. A global, myosin light chain kinase-dependent increase in myosin II contractility accompanies the metaphase-anaphase transition in sea urchin eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Amy; Stack, Christianna; Bresnick, Anne R; Shuster, Charles B

    2006-09-01

    Myosin II is the force-generating motor for cytokinesis, and although it is accepted that myosin contractility is greatest at the cell equator, the temporal and spatial cues that direct equatorial contractility are not known. Dividing sea urchin eggs were placed under compression to study myosin II-based contractile dynamics, and cells manipulated in this manner underwent an abrupt, global increase in cortical contractility concomitant with the metaphase-anaphase transition, followed by a brief relaxation and the onset of furrowing. Prefurrow cortical contractility both preceded and was independent of astral microtubule elongation, suggesting that the initial activation of myosin II preceded cleavage plane specification. The initial rise in contractility required myosin light chain kinase but not Rho-kinase, but both signaling pathways were required for successful cytokinesis. Last, mobilization of intracellular calcium during metaphase induced a contractile response, suggesting that calcium transients may be partially responsible for the timing of this initial contractile event. Together, these findings suggest that myosin II-based contractility is initiated at the metaphase-anaphase transition by Ca2+-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity and is maintained through cytokinesis by both MLCK- and Rho-dependent signaling. Moreover, the signals that initiate myosin II contractility respond to specific cell cycle transitions independently of the microtubule-dependent cleavage stimulus.

  17. A Global, Myosin Light Chain Kinase-dependent Increase in Myosin II Contractility Accompanies the Metaphase–Anaphase Transition in Sea Urchin Eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Amy; Stack, Christianna; Bresnick, Anne R.

    2006-01-01

    Myosin II is the force-generating motor for cytokinesis, and although it is accepted that myosin contractility is greatest at the cell equator, the temporal and spatial cues that direct equatorial contractility are not known. Dividing sea urchin eggs were placed under compression to study myosin II-based contractile dynamics, and cells manipulated in this manner underwent an abrupt, global increase in cortical contractility concomitant with the metaphase–anaphase transition, followed by a brief relaxation and the onset of furrowing. Prefurrow cortical contractility both preceded and was independent of astral microtubule elongation, suggesting that the initial activation of myosin II preceded cleavage plane specification. The initial rise in contractility required myosin light chain kinase but not Rho-kinase, but both signaling pathways were required for successful cytokinesis. Last, mobilization of intracellular calcium during metaphase induced a contractile response, suggesting that calcium transients may be partially responsible for the timing of this initial contractile event. Together, these findings suggest that myosin II-based contractility is initiated at the metaphase–anaphase transition by Ca2+-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) activity and is maintained through cytokinesis by both MLCK- and Rho-dependent signaling. Moreover, the signals that initiate myosin II contractility respond to specific cell cycle transitions independently of the microtubule-dependent cleavage stimulus. PMID:16837551

  18. Increased myosin heavy chain-beta with atrial expression of ventricular light chain-2 in canine cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Geraldine A; Bicer, Sabahattin; Hamlin, Robert L; Yamaguchi, Mamoru; Reiser, Peter J

    2007-10-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a naturally occurring disease in humans and dogs. Human studies have shown increased levels of myosin heavy chain (MHC)-beta in failing ventricles and the left atria (LA) and of ventricular light chain (VLC)-2 in the right atria in dilated cardiomyopathy. This study evaluates the levels of MHC-beta in all heart chambers in prolonged canine right ventricular pacing. In addition, we determined whether levels of VLC2 were altered in these hearts. Failing hearts demonstrated significantly increased levels of MHC-beta in the right atria, right atrial appendage, LA, left atrial appendage (LAA), and right ventricle compared with controls. Significant levels of VLC2 were detected in the right atria of paced hearts. Differences in MHC-beta expression were observed between the LA and the LAA of paced and control dogs. MHC-beta expression was significantly greater in the LA of paced and control dogs compared with their respective LAA. The cardiac myosin isoform shifts in this study were similar to those observed in end-stage human heart failure and more severe than those reported in less prolonged pacing models, supporting the use of this model for further study of end-stage human heart failure. The observation of consistent differences between sampling sites, especially LA versus LAA, indicates the need for rigorous sampling consistency in future studies.

  19. Development of heart muscle-cell diversity: a help or a hindrance for phenotyping embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijnvandraat, Arnoud C.; Lekanne Deprez, Ronald H.; Moorman, Antoon F. M.

    2003-01-01

    Despite the advances in cardiovascular treatment, cardiac disease remains a major cause of morbidity in all industrialized countries. The extraordinary potential of (embryonic) stem cells for therapeutic purposes has revolutionized ideas about cardiac repair of diseased cardiac muscle to exciting

  20. Up-regulation of alpha-smooth muscle actin in cardiomyocytes from non-hypertrophic and non-failing transgenic mouse hearts expressing N-terminal truncated cardiac troponin I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Kern

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that a restrictive N-terminal truncation of cardiac troponin I (cTnI-ND is up-regulated in the heart in adaptation to hemodynamic stresses. Over-expression of cTnI-ND in the hearts of transgenic mice revealed functional benefits such as increased relaxation and myocardial compliance. In the present study, we investigated the subsequent effect on myocardial remodeling. The alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA isoform is normally expressed in differentiating cardiomyocytes and is a marker for myocardial hypertrophy in adult hearts. Our results show that in cTnI-ND transgenic mice of between 2 and 3 months of age (young adults, a significant level of α-SMA is expressed in the heart as compared with wild-type animals. Although blood vessel density was increased in the cTnI-ND heart, the mass of smooth muscle tissue did not correlate with the increased level of α-SMA. Instead, immunocytochemical staining and Western blotting of protein extracts from isolated cardiomyocytes identified cardiomyocytes as the source of increased α-SMA in cTnI-ND hearts. We further found that while a portion of the up-regulated α-SMA protein was incorporated into the sarcomeric thin filaments, the majority of SMA protein was found outside of myofibrils. This distribution pattern suggests dual functions for the up-regulated α-SMA as both a contractile component to affect contractility and as possible effector of early remodeling in non-hypertrophic, non-failing cTnI-ND hearts.

  1. Stress generation by myosin minifilaments in actin bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasanayake, Nilushi L; Carlsson, Anders E

    2013-01-01

    Forces and stresses generated by the action of myosin minifilaments are analyzed in idealized computer-generated actin bundles, and compared to results for isotropic actin networks. The bundles are generated as random collections of actin filaments in two dimensions with constrained orientations, crosslinked and attached to two fixed walls. Myosin minifilaments are placed on actin filament pairs and allowed to move and deform the network so that it exerts forces on the walls. The vast majority of simulation runs end with contractile minifilament stress, because minifilaments rotate into energetically stable contractile configurations. This process is aided by the bending and stretching of actin filaments, which accomodate minifilament rotation. Stresses for bundles are greater than those for isotropic networks, and antiparallel filaments generate more tension than parallel filaments. The forces transmitted by the actin network to the walls of the simulation cell often exceed the tension in the minifilament itself. (paper)

  2. Metal cation controls phosphate release in the myosin ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jinghua; Huang, Furong; Nesmelov, Yuri E

    2017-11-01

    Myosin is an enzyme that utilizes ATP to produce a conformational change generating a force. The kinetics of the myosin reverse recovery stroke depends on the metal cation complexed with ATP. The reverse recovery stroke is slow for MgATP and fast for MnATP. The metal ion coordinates the γ phosphate of ATP in the myosin active site. It is accepted that the reverse recovery stroke is correlated with the phosphate release; therefore, magnesium "holds" phosphate tighter than manganese. Magnesium and manganese are similar ions in terms of their chemical properties and the shell complexation; hence, we propose to use these ions to study the mechanism of the phosphate release. Analysis of octahedral complexes of magnesium and manganese show that the partial charge of magnesium is higher than that of manganese and the slightly larger size of manganese ion makes its ionic potential smaller. We hypothesize that electrostatics play a role in keeping and releasing the abstracted γ phosphate in the active site, and the stronger electric charge of magnesium ion holds γ phosphate tighter. We used stable myosin-nucleotide analog complex and Raman spectroscopy to examine the effect of the metal cation on the relative position of γ phosphate analog in the active site. We found that in the manganese complex, the γ phosphate analog is 0.01 nm further away from ADP than in the magnesium complex. We conclude that the ionic potential of the metal cation plays a role in the retention of the abstracted phosphate. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  3. Cardiac Cachexia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Raposo André

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is a chronic, progressive, and incurable disease. Cardiac cachexia is a strong predictor of poor prognosis, regardless of other important variables. This review intends to gather evidence to enable recognition of cardiac cachexia, identification of early stages of muscle waste and sarcopenia, and improve identification of patients with terminal heart failure in need of palliative care, whose symptoms are no longer controlled by usual medical measures. The pathophysiology is complex and multifactorial. There are many treatment options to prevent or revert muscle waste and sarcopenia; although, these strategies are less effective in advanced stages of cardiac cachexia. In these final stages, symptomatic palliation plays an important role, focussing on the patient’s comfort and avoiding the ‘acute model’ treatment of aggressive, disproportionate, and inefficient care. In order to provide adequate care and attempt to prevent this syndrome, thus reducing its impact on healthcare, there should be improved communication between general practitioners, internal medicine physicians, cardiologists, and palliative care specialists since heart failure has an unforeseeable course and is associated with an increasing number of deaths and different levels of suffering.

  4. Actin-myosin contractility is responsible for the reduced viability of dissociated human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guokai; Hou, Zhonggang; Gulbranson, Daniel R; Thomson, James A

    2010-08-06

    Human ESCs are the pluripotent precursor of the three embryonic germ layers. Human ESCs exhibit basal-apical polarity, junctional complexes, integrin-dependent matrix adhesion, and E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion, all characteristics shared by the epiblast epithelium of the intact mammalian embryo. After disruption of epithelial structures, programmed cell death is commonly observed. If individualized human ESCs are prevented from reattaching and forming colonies, their viability is significantly reduced. Here, we show that actin-myosin contraction is a critical effector of the cell death response to human ESC dissociation. Inhibition of myosin heavy chain ATPase, downregulation of myosin heavy chain, and downregulation of myosin light chain all increase survival and cloning efficiency of individualized human ESCs. ROCK inhibition decreases phosphorylation of myosin light chain, suggesting that inhibition of actin-myosin contraction is also the mechanism through which ROCK inhibitors increase cloning efficiency of human ESCs. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Discovery and progress of direct cardiac reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hidenori; Ieda, Masaki

    2017-06-01

    Cardiac disease remains a major cause of death worldwide. Direct cardiac reprogramming has emerged as a promising approach for cardiac regenerative therapy. After the discovery of MyoD, a master regulator for skeletal muscle, other single cardiac reprogramming factors (master regulators) have been sought. Discovery of cardiac reprogramming factors was inspired by the finding that multiple, but not single, transcription factors were needed to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts. We first reported a combination of cardiac-specific transcription factors, Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GMT), that could convert mouse fibroblasts into cardiomyocyte-like cells, which were designated as induced card