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Sample records for cardiac muscarinic receptor

  1. Cardiac Muscarinic Receptor Overexpression in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Livolsi, Angelo; Niederhoffer, Nathalie; Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Rambaud, Caroline; Olexa, Catherine; Mokni, Walid; Gies, Jean-Pierre; Bousquet, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Background Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) remains the leading cause of death among infants less than 1 year of age. Disturbed expression of some neurotransmitters and their receptors has been shown in the central nervous system of SIDS victims but no biological abnormality of the peripheral vago-cardiac system has been demonstrated to date. The present study aimed to seek vago-cardiac abnormalities in SIDS victims. The cardiac level of expression of muscarinic receptors, as well as acety...

  2. Positive allosteric action of eburnamonine on cardiac muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proska, J; Tucek, S

    1996-06-01

    It was discovered recently that alcuronium and strychnine (which is a precursor of alcuronium) allosterically increase the affinity of cardiac muscarinic receptors for the antagonist, N-methylscopolamine. We have now investigated the effects of l-eburnamonine and vincamine, which are both closely related to strychnine. In experiments on rat heart atria, l-eburnamonine was found to increase the binding of [3H]N-methylscopolamine with Ehlert's cooperativity coefficient alpha = 0.35, which indicates that the strength of its allosteric action is close to that of alcuronium and strychnine (alpha = 0.31 and 0.44, respectively). However, the affinity of l-eburnamonine for the cardiac muscarinic receptors is lower than the affinities of alcuronium and strychnine (KAR = 22.6 microM, 0.15 microM, and 3.4 microM, respectively). In spite of its extremely close similarity to l-eburnamonine, vincamine has a negative allosteric effect on the binding of [3H]N-methylscopolamine (alpha = 4.1; KAR = 22.8 microM). It is likely that a systematic investigation of the allosteric effects of the analogues of strychnine will not only yield new allosteric effectors on muscarinic receptors, but also clarify the structural features responsible for the direction (positive or negative) of their allosteric effect. PMID:8813554

  3. Autoantibodies enhance agonist action and binding to cardiac muscarinic receptors in chronic Chagas' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Ciria C; Nascimento, Jose H; Chaves, Elen A; Costa, Patricia C; Masuda, Masako O; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Campos DE Carvalho, Antonio C; Gimenez, Luis E

    2008-01-01

    Chronic Chagasic patient immunoglobulins (CChP-IgGs) recognize an acidic amino acid cluster at the second extracellular loop (el2) of cardiac M(2)-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M(2)AChRs). These residues correspond to a common binding site for various allosteric agents. We characterized the nature of the M(2)AChR/CChP-IgG interaction in functional and radioligand binding experiments applying the same mainstream strategies previously used for the characterization of other allosteric agents. Dose-response curves of acetylcholine effect on heart rate were constructed with data from isolated heart experiments in the presence of CChP or normal blood donor (NBD) sera. In these experiments, CChP sera but not NBD sera increased the efficacy of agonist action by augmenting the onset of bradyarrhythmias and inducing a Hill slope of 2.5. This effect was blocked by gallamine, an M(2)AChR allosteric antagonist. Correspondingly, CChP-IgGs increased acetylcholine affinity twofold and showed negative cooperativity for [(3)H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([(3)H]-NMS) in allosterism binding assays. A peptide corresponding to the M(2)AChR-el2 blocked this effect. Furthermore, dissociation assays showed that the effect of gallamine on the [(3)H]-NMS off-rate was reverted by CChP-IgGs. Finally, concentration-effect curves for the allosteric delay of W84 on [(3)H]-NMS dissociation right shifted from an IC(50) of 33 nmol/L to 78 nmol/L, 992 nmol/L, and 1670 nmol/L in the presence of 6.7 x 10(- 8), 1.33 x 10(- 7), and 2.0 x 10(- 7) mol/L of anti-el2 affinity-purified CChP-IgGs. Taken together, these findings confirmed a competitive interplay of these ligands at the common allosteric site and revealed the novel allosteric nature of the interaction of CChP-IgGs at the M(2)AChRs as a positive cooperativity effect on acetylcholine action. PMID:18702010

  4. Autoantibodies Enhance Agonist Action and Binding to Cardiac Muscarinic Receptors in Chronic Chagas’ Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ciria C.; Nascimento, José H.; Chaves, Elen A.; Costa, Patrícia C.; Masuda, Masako O.; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Campos de Carvalho, Antônio C.; Giménez, Luis E.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic Chagasic patient immunoglobulins (CChP-IgGs) recognize an acidic amino acid cluster at the second extracellular loop (el2) of cardiac M2-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M2AChRs). These residues correspond to a common binding site for various allosteric agents. We characterized the nature of the M2AChR/CChP-IgG interaction in functional and radioligand binding experiments applying the same mainstream strategies previously used for the characterization of other allosteric agents. Dose-response curves of acetylcholine effect on heart rate were constructed with data from isolated heart experiments in the presence of CChP or normal blood donor (NBD) sera. In these experiments, CChP sera but not NBD sera increased the efficacy of agonist action by augmenting the onset of bradyarrhythmias and inducing a Hill slope of 2.5. This effect was blocked by gallamine, an M2AChR allosteric antagonist. Correspondingly, CChP-IgGs increased acetylcholine affinity twofold and showed negative cooperativity for [3H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([3H]-NMS) in allosterism binding assays. A peptide corresponding to the M2AChR-el2 blocked this effect. Furthermore, dissociation assays showed that the effect of gallamine on the [3H]-NMS off-rate was reverted by CChP-IgGs. Finally, concentration-effect curves for the allosteric delay of W84 on [3H]-NMS dissociation right shifted from an IC50 of 33 nmol/L to 78 nmol/L, 992 nmol/L, and 1670 nmol/L in the presence of 6.7 × 10−8, 1.33 × 10−7, and 2.0 × 10−7 mol/L of anti-el2 affinity-purified CChP-IgGs. Taken together, these findings confirmed a competitive interplay of these ligands at the common allosteric site and revealed the novel allosteric nature of the interaction of CChP-IgGs at the M2AChRs as a positive cooperativity effect on acetylcholine action. PMID:18702010

  5. Constitutive inhibitory action of muscarinic receptors on adenylyl cyclase in cardiac membranes and its stereospecific suppression by hyoscyamine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Říčný, Jan; Gualtieri, F.; Tuček, Stanislav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2002), s. 131-137. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7011910; GA ČR GA309/99/0214 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * adenylyl cyclase * constitutive activity of receptors Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 0.984, year: 2002

  6. Radioligand Binding at Muscarinic Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    El-Fakahany, E. E.; Jakubík, Jan

    New York: Springer, 2016 - (Mysliveček, J.; Jakubík, J.), s. 37-68. (Neuromethods. 107). ISBN 978-1-4939-2857-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * radioligand binding Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  7. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    New York: Springer, 2016 - (Mysliveček, J.; Jakubík, J.), s. 95-130. (Neuromethods. 107). ISBN 978-1-4939-2857-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * allosteric modulation * radioligand binding functional response Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi infection induces up-regulation of cardiac muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Peraza-Cruces

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of chagasic cardiomyopathy is not completely understood, but it has been correlated with parasympathetic denervation (neurogenic theory and inflammatory activity (immunogenic theory that could affect heart muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR expression. In order to further understand whether neurogenic and/or immunogenic alterations are related to changes in mAChR expression, we studied two models of Trypanosoma cruzi infection: 1 in 3-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats chronically infected with T. cruzi and 2 isolated primary cardiomyocytes co-cultured with T. cruzi and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. Using [³H]-quinuclidinylbenzilate ([³H]-QNB binding assays, we evaluated mAChR expression in homogenates from selected cardiac regions, PBMC, and cultured cardiomyocytes. We also determined in vitro protein expression and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in serum and cell culture medium by ELISA. Our results showed that: 1 mAChR were significantly (P < 0.05 up-regulated in right ventricular myocardium (means ± SEM; control: 58.69 ± 5.54, N = 29; Chagas: 72.29 ± 5.79 fmol/mg, N = 34 and PBMC (control: 12.88 ± 2.45, N = 18; Chagas: 20.22 ± 1.82 fmol/mg, N = 19, as well as in cardiomyocyte transmembranes cultured with either PBMC/T. cruzi co-cultures (control: 24.33 ± 3.83; Chagas: 43.62 ± 5.08 fmol/mg, N = 7 for both or their conditioned medium (control: 37.84 ± 3.84, N = 4; Chagas: 54.38 ± 6.28 fmol/mg, N = 20; 2 [³H]-leucine uptake was increased in cardiomyocytes co-cultured with PBMC/T. cruzi-conditioned medium (Chagas: 21,030 ± 2321; control 10,940 ± 2385 dpm, N = 7 for both; P < 0.05; 3 plasma IL-6 was increased in chagasic rats, IL-1β, was increased in both plasma of chagasic rats and in the culture medium, and TNF-α level was decreased in the culture medium. In conclusion, our results suggest that cytokines are involved in the up-regulation of mAChR in chronic Chagas disease.

  9. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

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    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  10. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  11. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer

  12. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esam E. El-Fakahany

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available An allosteric modulator is a ligand that binds to an allosteric site on the receptor and changes receptor conformation to produce increase (positive cooperativity or decrease (negative cooperativity in the binding or action of an orthosteric agonist (e.g., acetylcholine. Since the identification of gallamine as the first allosteric modulator of muscarinic receptors in 1976, this unique mode of receptor modulation has been intensively studied by many groups. This review summarizes over 30 years of research on the molecular mechanisms of allosteric interactions of drugs with the receptor and for new allosteric modulators of muscarinic receptors with potential therapeutic use. Identification of positive modulators of acetylcholine binding and function that enhance neurotransmission and the discovery of highly selective allosteric modulators are mile-stones on the way to novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and other disorders involving impaired cognitive function.

  13. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 9 (2010), s. 2838-2860. ISSN 1424-8247 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/09/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * allosteric modulation * Alzheimer ´s disease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  14. Convulsant bicuculline modifies CNS muscarinic receptor affinity

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    Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz Georgina

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous work from this laboratory has shown that the administration of the convulsant drug 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MP, a GAD inhibitor, modifies not only GABA synthesis but also binding of the antagonist [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB to central muscarinic receptors, an effect due to an increase in affinity without modifications in binding site number. The cholinergic system has been implicated in several experimental epilepsy models and the ability of acetylcholine to regulate neuronal excitability in the neocortex is well known. To study the potential relationship between GABAergic and cholinergic systems with seizure activity, we analyzed the muscarinic receptor after inducing seizure by bicuculline (BIC, known to antagonize the GABA-A postsynaptic receptor subtype. Results We analyzed binding of muscarinic antagonist [3H]-QNB to rat CNS membranes after i.p. administration of BIC at subconvulsant (1.0 mg/kg and convulsant (7.5 mg/kg doses. Subconvulsant BIC dose failed to develop seizures but produced binding alteration in the cerebellum and hippocampus with roughly 40% increase and 10% decrease, respectively. After convulsant BIC dose, which invariably led to generalized tonic-clonic seizures, binding increased 36% and 15% to cerebellar and striatal membranes respectively, but decreased 12% to hippocampal membranes. Kd value was accordingly modified: with the subconvulsant dose it decreased 27% in cerebellum whereas it increased 61% in hippocampus; with the convulsant dose, Kd value decreased 33% in cerebellum but increased 85% in hippocampus. No change in receptor number site was found, and Hill number was invariably close to unity. Conclusion Results indicate dissimilar central nervous system area susceptibility of muscarinic receptor to BIC. Ligand binding was modified not only by a convulsant BIC dose but also by a subconvulsant dose, indicating that changes are not attributable to the seizure process

  15. Muscarinic receptor signaling and colon cancer progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guofeng Xie; Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2016-01-01

    Due to the lack of effective treatments, advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Emerging evidence supports the observation that muscarinic receptor (MR) signaling plays a critical role in growth and progression of CRC. MR activation by acetylcholine and bile acids results in transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) and post-EGFR signal transduction that enhances cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Here, the authors review recent progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying MR-mediated CRC progression and its therapeutic implications.

  16. Heterologously expressed serotonin 1A receptors couple to muscarinic K+ channels in heart

    OpenAIRE

    Karschin, A; Ho, B Y; Labarca, C; Elroy-Stein, O; Moss, B; Davidson, N.; Lester, H A

    1991-01-01

    In cardiac atrial cells, muscarinic acetylcholine receptors activate a K+ current directly via a guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein). Serotonin type 1A receptors may activate a similar pathway in hippocampal neurons. To develop a system in which receptor/G protein/K+ channel coupling can be experimentally manipulated, we have used a highly efficient recombinant vaccinia virus vector system to express human serotonin 1A receptors in primary cultures of rat atrial myocytes. The expre...

  17. Comparative Effects of Oral Chlorpyrifos Exposure on Cholinesterase Activity and Muscarinic Receptor Binding in Neonatal and Adult Rat Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, Marcia D.; Mirajkar, Nikita; Karanth, Subramanya; Pope, Carey N.

    2007-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides elicit acute toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE), the enzyme responsible for inactivating acetylcholine (ACh) at cholinergic synapses. A number of OP toxicants have also been reported to interact directly with muscarinic receptors, in particular the M2 muscarinic subtype. Parasympathetic innervation to the heart primarily regulates cardiac function by activating M2 receptors in the sinus node, atrial-ventricular node and conducting tissues. Thus...

  18. Pet measurements of postsynaptic muscarinic and beta adrenergic receptors in the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is ample evidence from both experimental and clinical studies that changes in β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptor density can be associated with such cardiac diseases as congestive heart failure, myocardial ischemia and infarction, cardiomyopathy, diabetes, or thyroid-induced muscle disease. Changes in B-adrenergic density also have been shown in the denervated transplanted heart. These alterations of cardiac receptors have been demonstrated in vitro on homogenates from samples collected mainly during surgery or post mortem. Recent developments of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) techniques and of radioligands suitable for cardiac receptor binding studies in vivo have made possible both the imaging and the measurement of receptor density. From these studies, important information is now available concerning physiologic and pathologic conditions, as well as alterations induced by treatment. For the investigation of myocardial B-adrenergic receptors we have used [11C] CGP 12177, a potent hydrophilic antagonist of the 3-adrenergic receptor. The quantification of myocardial muscarinic receptors in vivo has been obtained with [11C] MQNB, a nonmetabolized hydrophilic antagonist of the muscarinic receptor. Receptor density and affinity have been measured by a kinetic, nonequilibrium approach in an experimental protocol that provides sufficient data to determine values for all parameters from a single experiment

  19. Effects of cyproheptadine and pizotifen on central muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, M H

    1991-04-01

    The affinities of cyproheptadine, pizotifen and (+/-)-quinuclidinyl xanthane-9-carboxylate hemioxylate (QNX) were determined at muscarinic autoreceptors and postsynaptic (IP1 formation) receptors in rat hippocampal slices. The affinity values for QNX were 8.2 and 8.5 respectively. Cyproheptadine and pizotifen were less potent than QNX. Pizotifen was slightly (2-fold) less active at antagonizing IP1 formation than blocking the autoreceptors whereas cyproheptadine was equally active at antagonizing the two hippocampal muscarinic receptors. PMID:1868883

  20. Muscarinic receptor activation elicits sustained, recurring depolarizations in reticulospinal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, R W; Alford, S; Dubuc, R

    2007-05-01

    In lampreys, brain stem reticulospinal (RS) neurons constitute the main descending input to the spinal cord and activate the spinal locomotor central pattern generators. Cholinergic nicotinic inputs activate RS neurons, and consequently, induce locomotion. Cholinergic muscarinic agonists also induce locomotion when applied to the brain stem of birds. This study examined whether bath applications of muscarinic agonists could activate RS neurons and initiate motor output in lampreys. Bath applications of 25 microM muscarine elicited sustained, recurring depolarizations (mean duration of 5.0 +/- 0.5 s recurring with a mean period of 55.5 +/- 10.3 s) in intracellularly recorded rhombencephalic RS neurons. Calcium imaging experiments revealed that muscarine induced oscillations in calcium levels that occurred synchronously within the RS neuron population. Bath application of TTX abolished the muscarine effect, suggesting the sustained depolarizations in RS neurons are driven by other neurons. A series of lesion experiments suggested the caudal half of the rhombencephalon was necessary. Microinjections of muscarine (75 microM) or the muscarinic receptor (mAchR) antagonist atropine (1 mM) lateral to the rostral pole of the posterior rhombencephalic reticular nucleus induced or prevented, respectively, the muscarinic RS neuron response. Cells immunoreactive for muscarinic receptors were found in this region and could mediate this response. Bath application of glutamatergic antagonists (6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione/D-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid) abolished the muscarine effect, suggesting that glutamatergic transmission is needed for the effect. Ventral root recordings showed spinal motor output coincides with RS neuron sustained depolarizations. We propose that unilateral mAchR activation on specific cells in the caudal rhombencephalon activates a circuit that generates synchronous sustained, recurring depolarizations in bilateral populations of RS neurons. PMID

  1. Muscarinic receptor compensation in hippocampus of alzheimer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity of the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) (presynaptic marker) and number of muscarine-like receptor binding sites have been measured in the hippocampus from eight individuals with senile dementia of Alzheimer type (SDAT) and ten controls. A negative correlation (r=0.80; p<0.05) was found between the ChAT activity and the number of muscarine-like receptors in the SDAT group but not in the controls. The findings might indicate an ongoing compensatory receptor mechanism as a response to changes in presynaptic cholinergic activity. (Author)

  2. Flavonoids with M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding Activity

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    Meyyammai Swaminathan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-active compounds have potential for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, a series of natural and synthetic flavones and flavonols was assayed in vitro for their ability to inhibit radioligand binding at human cloned M1 muscarinic receptors. Several compounds were found to possess competitive binding affinity (Ki = 40–110 µM, comparable to that of acetylcholine (Ki = 59 µM. Despite the fact that these compounds lack a positively-charged ammonium group under physiological conditions, molecular modelling studies suggested that they bind to the orthosteric site of the receptor, mainly through non-polar interactions.

  3. Molecular alteration of a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor system during synaptogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biochemical properties of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor system of the avian retina were found to change during the period when synapses form in ovo. Comparison of ligand binding to membranes obtained before and after synaptogenesis showed a significant increase in the affinity, but not proportion, of the high affinity agonist-binding state. There was no change in receptor sensitivity to antagonists during this period. Pirenzepine binding, which can discriminate muscarinic receptor subtypes, showed the presence of a single population of low affinity sites (M2) before and after synaptogenesis. The change in agonist binding was not due to the late development of receptor function. However, detergent-solubilization of membranes eliminated differences in agonist binding between receptors from embryos and hatched chicks, suggesting a developmental change in interactions of the receptor with functionally related membrane components. A possible basis for altered interactions was obtained from isoelectric point data showing that the muscarinic receptor population underwent a transition from a predominantly low pI form (4.25) in 13 day embryos to a predominantly high pI form (4.50) in newly hatched chicks. The possibility that biochemical changes in the muscarinic receptor play a role in differentiation of the system by controlling receptor position on the surface of nerve cells is discussed

  4. The role of muscarinic receptors in the beneficial effects of adenosine against myocardial reperfusion injury in rats.

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    Lei Sun

    Full Text Available Adenosine, a catabolite of ATP, displays a wide variety of effects in the heart including regulation of cardiac response to myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. Nonetheless, the precise mechanism of adenosine-induced cardioprotection is still elusive. Isolated Sprague-Dawley rat hearts underwent 30 min global ischemia and 120 min reperfusion using a Langendorff apparatus. Both adenosine and acetylcholine treatment recovered the post-reperfusion cardiac function associated with adenosine and muscarinic receptors activation. Simultaneous administration of adenosine and acetylcholine failed to exert any additive protective effect, suggesting a shared mechanism between the two. Our data further revealed a cross-talk between the adenosine and acetylcholine receptor signaling in reperfused rat hearts. Interestingly, the selective M(2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist methoctramine significantly attenuated the cardioprotective effect of adenosine. In addition, treatment with adenosine upregulated the expression and the maximal binding capacity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, which were inhibited by the selective A(1 adenosine receptor antagonist 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME. These data suggested a possible functional coupling between the adenosine and muscarinic receptors behind the observed cardioprotection. Furthermore, nitric oxide was found involved in triggering the response to each of the two receptor agonist. In summary, there may be a cross-talk between the adenosine and muscarinic receptors in ischemic/reperfused myocardium with nitric oxide synthase might serve as the distal converging point. In addition, adenosine contributes to the invigorating effect of adenosine on muscarinic receptor thereby prompting to regulation of cardiac function. These findings argue for a potentially novel mechanism behind the adenosine

  5. Functional partial agonism at cloned human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R;

    1996-01-01

    of maximal response, depending on the molar ratio of agonist and antagonist used. Using recombinant human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (m1 and m5) and the functional assay, receptor selection and amplification technology (R-SAT), we have now shown that co-administration of the full agonist...

  6. *118494 CHOLINERGIC RECEPTOR, MUSCARINIC, 3; CHRM3 [OMIM

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FIELD NO 118494 FIELD TI 118494 CHOLINERGIC RECEPTOR, MUSCARINIC, 3; CHRM3 ;;ACETYLCHOLINE RECEP ... tones, and unilateral kidney dysfunction. He had a lean ... habitus since childhood. Urologic testing revealed ... scarinic acetylcholine receptor are hypophagic and lean . Nature 410: 207-212, 2001. FIELD CN Ada Hamosh - ...

  7. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes: localization and structure/function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brann, M R; Ellis, J; Jørgensen, H;

    1993-01-01

    Based on the sequence of the five cloned muscarinic receptor subtypes (m1-m5), subtype selective antibody and cDNA probes have been prepared. Use of these probes has demonstrated that each of the five subtypes has a markedly distinct distribution within the brain and among peripheral tissues. The...... are described, as well as the implied structures of these functional domains....

  8. Subtype Differences in Pre-Coupling of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Janíčková, Helena; Randáková, Alena; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 11 (2011), e27732. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : acetylcholine muscarinic receptors * G proteins * subtype differences Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.092, year: 2011

  9. Outline of therapeutic interventions with muscarinic receptor-mediated transmission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Šantrůčková, Eva; Randáková, Alena; Janíčková, Helena; Zimčík, Pavel; Rudajev, Vladimír; Michal, Pavel; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, Suppl.1 (2014), S177-S189. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/0259; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10060 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cholinergic transmission * muscarinic receptors * therapy * Alzheimer 's disease, * schizophrenia Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014

  10. Muscarinic Receptors in Amygdala Control Trace Fear Conditioning

    OpenAIRE

    Baysinger, Amber N.; Kent, Brianne A.; Brown, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Intelligent behavior requires transient memory, which entails the ability to retain information over short time periods. A newly-emerging hypothesis posits that endogenous persistent firing (EPF) is the neurophysiological foundation for aspects or types of transient memory. EPF is enabled by the activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and is triggered by suprathreshold stimulation. EPF occurs in several brain regions, including the lateral amygdala (LA). The present study ex...

  11. Ligands for SPECT and PET imaging of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors of the heart and brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H. [and others

    1995-06-01

    Interest in the potential use of cerebral SPECT and PET imaging for determination of the density and activity of muscarinic-cholinergic receptors (mAChR) has been stimulated by the changes in these receptors which occur in many neurological diseases. In addition, the important involvement of mAChR in modulating negative inotropic cardiac activity suggests that such receptor ligands may have important applications in evaluation of changes which may occur in cardiac disease. In this paper, the properties of several key muscarinic receptor ligands being developed or which have been used for clinical SPECT and PET are discussed. In addition, the ORNL development of the new iodinated IQNP ligand based on QNB and the results of in vivo biodistribution studies in rats, in vitro competitive binding studies and ex vivo autoradiographic experiments are described. The use of radioiodinated IQNP may offer several advantages in comparison to IQNB because of its easy and high yield preparation and high brain uptake and the potential usefulness of the {open_quotes}partial{close_quotes} subtype selective IONP isomers. We also describe the development of new IQNP-type analogues which offer the opportunity for radiolabeling with positron-emitting radioisotopes (carbon-11, fluorine-18 and bromine-76) for potential use with PET.

  12. Soman- or kainic acid-induced convulsions decrease muscarinic receptors but not benzodiazepine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [3H]Quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) binding to muscarinic receptors decreased in the rat forebrain after convulsions induced by a single dose of either soman, a potent inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, or kainic acid, an excitotoxin. A Rosenthal plot revealed that the receptors decreased in number rather than affinity. When the soman-induced convulsions were blocked, the decrease in muscarinic receptors at 3 days was less extensive than when convulsions occurred and at 10 days they approached control levels in most of the brain areas. The most prominent decrements in QNB binding were in the piriform cortex where the decline in QNB binding is probably related to the extensive convulsion-associated neuropathology. The decrements in QNB binding after convulsions suggest that the convulsive state leads to a down-regulation of muscarinic receptors in some brain areas. In contrast to the decrease in QNB binding after convulsions, [3H]flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptors did not change even in the piriform cortex where the loss in muscarinic receptors was most prominent. Thus, it appears that those neuronal processes that bear muscarinic receptors are more vulnerable to convulsion-induced change than those with benzodiazepine receptors

  13. Decrease in the Sensitivity of Myocardium to M3 Muscarinic Receptor Stimulation during Postnatal Ontogenisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapilina, S V; Abramochkin, D V

    2016-01-01

    Type 3 muscarinic receptors (M3 receptors) participate in the mediation of cholinergic effects in mammalian myocardium, along with M2 receptors. However, myocardium of adult mammals demonstrates only modest electrophysiological effects in response to selective stimulation of M3 receptors which are hardly comparable to the effects produced by M2 stimulation. In the present study, the effects of selective M3 stimulation induced by application of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine (10 μM) in the presence of the selective M2 blocker methoctramine (100 nM) on the action potential (AP) waveform were investigated in isolated atrial and ventricular preparations from newborn and 3-week-old rats and compared to those in preparations from adult rats. In the atrial myocardium, stimulation of M3 receptors produced a comparable reduction of AP duration in newborn and adult rats, while in 3-week-old rats the effect was negligible. In ventricular myocardial preparations from newborn rats, the effect of M3 stimulation was more than 3 times stronger compared to that from adult rats, while preparations from 3-week old rats demonstrated no definite effect, similarly to atrial preparations. In all studied types of cardiac preparations, the effects of M3 stimulation were eliminated by the selective M3 antagonist 4-DAMP (10 nM). The results of RT-PCR show that the amount of product of the M3 receptor gene decreases with the maturation of animals both in atrial and ventricular myocardium. We concluded that the contribution of M3 receptors to the mediation of cardiac cholinergic responses decreases during postnatal ontogenesis. These age-related changes may be associated with downregulation of M3 receptor gene expression. PMID:27437147

  14. Stimulation of brain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors acutely reverses radiogenic hypodipsia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sufficiently large dose of ionizing radiation produces changes in water consumption. However, the direction, durations, and physiological substrates of these alterations remain in question. Here we report a 5-d hypodipsia in rats exposed to 600 rads 60Co but a more transient, albeit larger, reduction in drinking after 1000 60Co. Brain cholinergic neurons have been implicated as mediators of thirst. Therefore, we explored the role of hypothalamic muscarinic receptors in the production of radiation-induced hypodipsia. This was accomplished through the intrahypothalamic injection of carbachol (a muscarinic agonist) or atropine (a muscarinic antagonist) in irradiated rats. Intracranial carbachol produced acute reversal of radiogenic hypodipsia while atropine potentiated the hypodipsia. These post-irradiation drug-induced behaviors were similar to those observed after the same drug treatments before irradiation. Since cholinergic neuronal functions persist and are labile (can be pharmacologically stimulated and blocked) after irradiation, this suggests that other neuronal systems and/or neurochemicals may be more prominently involved in radiogenic hypodipsia

  15. Xanomeline binding to and activation of muscarinic receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Machová, Eva; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    Pianoro: Medimond, 2009 - (Fisher, A.; Hanin, I.), s. 145-148 ISBN 978-88-7587-528-2. [International Conference Alzheimer ´s diseases/Parkinson´s diseases /9./. Praha (CZ), 11.05.2009-15.05.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703; GA ČR GA305/09/0681; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant ostatní: EC(XE) LiPiDiDiet 211696 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : xanomeline * muscarinic receptors * signal transduction Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  16. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig;

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus....... More importantly, we tested the hypothesis that muscarinic receptor agonists with varied receptor subtype selectivity can blunt cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects; we hypothesized a critical role for the M(1) and/or M(4) receptor subtypes in this modulation. Mice were trained to...... discriminate cocaine from saline, or to self-administer intravenous cocaine chronically. The nonselective muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and methylscopolamine, the nonselective muscarinic agonists oxotremorine and pilocarpine, the M(1)/M(4)-preferring agonist xanomeline, the putative M(1)-selective agonist...

  17. Carbachol dimers as homobivalent modulators of muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matucci, Rosanna; Nesi, Marta; Martino, Maria Vittoria; Bellucci, Cristina; Manetti, Dina; Ciuti, Elisa; Mazzolari, Angelica; Dei, Silvia; Guandalini, Luca; Teodori, Elisabetta; Vistoli, Giulio; Romanelli, Maria Novella

    2016-05-15

    A series of homodimers of the well-known cholinergic agonist carbachol have been synthesized, showing the two agonist units symmetrically connected through a methylene chain of variable length. The new compounds have been tested on the five cloned muscarinic receptors (hM1-5) expressed in CHO cells by means of equilibrium binding studies, showing an increase in affinity by rising the number of methylene units up to 7 and 9. Functional experiments on guinea-pig ileum and assessment of ERK1/2 phosphorylation on hM1, hM2 and hM3 on CHO cells have shown that the new compounds are endowed with muscarinic antagonistic properties. Kinetic binding studies have revealed that some of the tested compounds are able to slow the rate of dissociation of NMS, suggesting a bitopic behavior. Docking simulations, performed on the hM1 and hM2 receptors, give a sound rationalization of the experimental data revealing how these compounds are able to interact with both orthosteric and allosteric binding sites depending on the length of their connecting chain. PMID:26996304

  18. Localization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in plant guard cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), as an important neurotransmitter in animals, also plays a significant role in various kinds of physiological functions in plants. But relatively little is known about its receptors in plants. A green fluorescence BODIPY FL-labeled ABT, which is a high affinity ligand of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), was used to localize mAChR in plant guard cells. In Vicia faba L. and Pisum sativum L., mAChR was found both on the plasma membrane of guard cells. mAChR may also be distributed on guard cell chloroplast membrane of Vicia faba L. The evidence that mAChR localizes in the guard cells provides a new possible signal transduction pathway in ACh mediated stomata movement.

  19. Physiological and biochemical studies of newly synthesized muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in embryonic chicken heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of either chicken embryos in ovo or cultured embryonic chicken cardiac cells in vitro to the muscarinic agonist carbachol results in a 70-90% decrease in the number of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) expressed in cardiac cells. Block of agonist-receptor interactions in ovo with the antagonist atropine or removal of the agonist in vitro results in a gradual increase in mAChR number, reaching the control level in 14 hr. Measurements of physiological sensitivity of atria or cultured cells show that, even after the complete recovery of receptor number, the sensitivity to agonist is reduced. The sensitivity of the mAChR-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase is also decreased at this time. Newly synthesized mAChR which appear following affinity alkylation in cultured cells are also poorly coupled to the stimulation of 86Rb+ efflux, indicating that decreased physiological sensitivity is not due to an unknown effect of long-term agonist exposure on general cellular function, but rather reflects an intrinsic property of newly synthesized mAChR. This increase in sensitivity is also not blocked by cycloheximide. The increase in sensitivity of the mAChR-mediated responses is due neither to a lack of expression of newly synthesized mAChR on the surface nor to reduced agonist affinity of the mAChR. The diminished sensitivity and subsequent maturation observed in cells containing newly synthesized receptors is due either to a small change in mAChR, or to a change in an as-yet-undefined component of the mAChR transduction system; this alteration represents a novel locus for modulation of cholinergic signals in the heart

  20. Antipsychotic-like effect of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist BuTAC in non-human primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Maibritt B; Croy, Carrie Hughes; Dencker, Ditte;

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic, muscarinic receptor agonists exhibit functional dopamine antagonism and muscarinic receptors have been suggested as possible future targets for the treatment of schizophrenia and drug abuse. The muscarinic ligand (5R,6R)-6-(3-butylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane...

  1. Two types of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila and other arthropods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collin, Caitlin Alexis; Hauser, Frank; Gonzalez de Valdivia, Ernesto I; Li, Shizhong; Reisenberger, Julia; Carlsen, Eva M.M.; Khan, Zaid; Hansen, Niels Ø.; Puhm, Florian; Søndergaard, Leif; Niemiec, Justyna; Heninger, Magdalena; Ren, Guilin Robin; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play a central role in the mammalian nervous system. These receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are activated by the agonists acetylcholine and muscarine, and blocked by a variety of antagonists. Mammals have five mAChRs (m1-m5). In ...... (Hydra), had two A-type mAChRs. From these data we propose a model for the evolution of mAChRs....

  2. Hypoxia increases exercise heart rate despite combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, Christoph; Rasmussen, Peter; Sørensen, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia increases the heart rate (HR) response to exercise but the mechanism(s) remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during separate but not combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors. Nine subjects performed incremental exercise...... to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (FIO2 = 12%) after intravenous administration of either i) no drugs (CONT), ii) propranolol (PROP), iii) glycopyrrolate (GLYC), or iv) PROP and GLYC (PROP+GLYC). HR increased with exercise in all drug conditions (p ...)). Cardiac output was enhanced by hypoxia (p 0.4) but larger during PROP (3.4 ± 1.6 l min(-1), p=0.004). Our results demonstrate that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia during exercise...

  3. Effect of organophosphorus insecticides on phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuyin Li; Liming Zou; Carry Pope

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organophosphorus insecticides may promote the accumulation of acetylcholine at synapses and the neuromuscular junction by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity to cause disturbance of neural signal conduction and induce a toxic reaction. Organophosphorus insecticides may act on M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, whose combination with G proteins is regulated by phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of organophosphorus insecticides on the phosphorylation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2-mediated M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors and to reveal other possible actions of organophosphorus insecticides.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An observational study, which was performed in the Central Laboratory of Shenyang Medical College, and Department of Physiological Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oklahoma State University from June 2002 to December 2004.METHODS: The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor was extracted and purified from pig brain using affinity chromatography. Subsequently, the purified M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2, and [OP32] ATP were incubated with different concentrations of paraoxon and chlorpyrifos oxon together. The mixture then underwent polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the gel film was dried and radioactively autographed to detect phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. Finally, the radio-labeled phosphorylated M2 receptor protein band was excised for counting with an isotope liquid scintillation counter.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Effects of chlorpyrifos oxon, paraoxon, chlorpyrifos, and parathion in different concentrations on the phosphorylation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor; effects of chlorpyrifos oxon on the phosphorylation of the adrenergic receptor.CONCLUSION: Different kinds of organophosphorus insecticides have different effects on the phosphorylation of the G protein

  4. Affinity profiles of hexahydro-sila-difenidol analogues at muscarinic receptor subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Lambrecht, G.; Feifel, R.; Wagner-Röder, M.; Strohmann, C.; Zilch, H.; Tacke, Reinhold; Waelbroeck, M.; Christophe, J; Boddeke, H.; Mutschler, E.

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to assess the structural requirements of hexahydro-sila-difenidol for potency and selectivity, a series of analogues modified in the amino group and the phenyl ring were investigated for their affinity to muscarinic M1- (rabbit vas deferens), Mr (guinea-pig atria) and Mr (guinea-pig ileum) receptors. All compounds were competitive antagonists in the three tissues. Their affinities to the three muscarinic receptor subtypes differed by more than two orders of magnitude and the obs...

  5. Bovine pancreatic polypeptide as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In dispersed acini from rat pancreas, it was found that bovine pancreatic polypeptide (BPP) and its C-fragment hexapeptide amide (PP-6), at concentrations of 0.1 and 30 μM, respectively, could significantly inhibit amylase secretion stimulated by carbachol, and this inhibition by BPP was dose dependent. 45Ca outflux induced by carbachol was also inhibited by BPP or PP-6, but they had no effect on cholecystokinin octapeptide- (CCK-8) or A23187-stimulated 45Ca outflux. BPP was also capable of displacing the specific binding of [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate to its receptors, and it possessed a higher affinity (K/sub i/35nM) than carbachol (K/sub i/ 1.8 μM) in binding with M-receptors. It is concluded from this study that BPP acts as an antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat pancreatic acini. In addition, BPP inhibited the potentiation of amylase secretion caused by the combination of carbachol plus secretin or vasoactive intestinal peptide. This may be a possible explanation of the inhibitory effect of BPP on secretin-induced pancreatic enzyme secretion shown in vivo, since pancreatic enzyme secretion stimulated by secretin under experimental conditions may be the result of potentiation of enzyme release produced by the peptide in combination with a cholinergic stimulant

  6. Fluorinated azabicycloesters as muscarinic receptor ligands for application with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (MAR) play an important role in a number of physiological and behavioral responses. A correlation has been established between changes in the MAR density and human memory as well as to other specific neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's chorea or Alzheimer's dementia. MAR density has been observed, also, to decrease under the effect of several chemical agents such as organophosphorus compounds, barbiturates, ethanol or antidepressants. Most of the studies on human MAR were done on post-mortem samples obtained at autopsy and stored for variable times which may not reflect the actual in vivo status of such receptors. To carry out preliminary in vivo studies, the choice will be directed primarily to experimental animals. However, animal models for many of the neurodegenerative disorders may be inadequate. Several studies showed a dramatically increasing number of dementia cases which is leading to decreased survival among this group. Such a dramatic increase in Alzheimer's dementia cases and the inability to determine the density and distribution of MAR in vivo have stimulated the interest of many researchers to investigate MAR mapping

  7. A new family of insect muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, R-Y; Li, M-Q; Wu, Y-S; Qi, Y-X; Ye, G-Y; Huang, J

    2016-08-01

    Most currently used insecticides are neurotoxic chemicals that target a limited number of sites and insect cholinergic neurotransmission is the major target. A potential target for insecticide development is the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), which is a metabotropic G-protein-coupled receptor. Insects have A- and B-type mAChRs and the five mammalian mAChRs are close to the A-type. We isolated a cDNA (CG12796) from the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. After heterologous expression in Chinese hamster ovary K1 cells, CG12796 could be activated by acetylcholine [EC50 (half maximal effective concentration), 73 nM] and the mAChR agonist oxotremorine M (EC50 , 48.2 nM) to increase intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Thus, the new mAChR is coupled to Gq/11 but not Gs and Gi/o . The classical mAChR antagonists atropine and scopolamine N-butylbromide at 100 μM completely blocked the acetylcholine-induced responses. The orthologues of CG12796 can also be found in the genomes of other insects, but not in the genomes of the honeybee or parasitoid wasps. Knockdown of CG12796 in the central nervous system had no effect on male courtship behaviours. We suggest that CG12796 represents the first recognized member of a novel mAChR class. PMID:27003873

  8. VISUALIZATION OF CHOLINOCEPTIVE NEURONS IN THE RAT NEOCORTEX - COLOCALIZATION OF MUSCARINIC AND NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; STREEFLAND, C; STROSBERG, AD; SCHRODER, H; LUITEN, PGM

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of immunofluores

  9. Visualization of cholinoceptive neurons in the rat neocortex : colocalization of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Streefland, C.; Strosberg, A.D.; Schröder, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of immunofluores

  10. Attenuation of cocaine's reinforcing and discriminative stimulus effects via muscarinic M1 acetylcholine receptor stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig;

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus......) conferred lesser nonspecific rate-suppressing effects, with no rate suppression for TBPB. In mutant mice lacking M(1) and M(4) receptors, xanomeline failed to diminish cocaine discrimination while rate-decreasing effects were intact. Our data suggest that central M(1) receptor activation attenuates cocaine...

  11. Increased amphetamine-induced locomotor activity, sensitization, and accumbal dopamine release in M5 muscarinic receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lene S; Miller, Anthony D; Lester, Deranda B;

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Muscarinic M(5) receptors are the only muscarinic receptor subtype expressed by dopamine-containing neurons of the ventral tegmental area. These cells play an important role for the reinforcing properties of psychostimulants and M(5) receptors modulate their activity. Previous studi...

  12. Ultrastructural localization of cholinergic muscarinic receptors in rat brain cortical capillaries

    OpenAIRE

    Luiten, PGM; DEJONG, GI; VANDERZEE, EA; vanDijken, H; van Dijken, H.

    1996-01-01

    Cholinergic innervation of the cerebrovasculature is known to regulate vascular tone, perfusion rate and permeability of the microvascular wall. Notably the cholinergic innervation of cerebral capillaries is of interest since these capillaries form the blood-brain barrier. Although there is a general consensus as to the presence of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in the domain of the capillary wall, their precise anatomical position is unknown. The subcellular localization of muscarinic re...

  13. M2 Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor modulates rat airway smooth muscle cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Placeres-Uray, Fabiola A; Febres-Aldana, Christopher A; Fernandez-Ruiz, Ruth; Gonzalez de Alfonzo, Ramona; Lippo de Becemberg, Itala A; Alfonzo, Marcelo J

    2013-01-01

    Airways chronic inflammatory conditions in asthma and COPD are characterized by tissue remodeling, being smooth muscle hyperplasia, the most important feature. Non-neuronal and neuronal Acetylcholine acting on muscarinic receptors (MAChRs) has been postulated as determinant of tissue remodeling in asthma and COPD by promoting proliferation and phenotypic changes of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC). The objective was to evaluate proliferative responses to muscarinic agonist as carbamylcholine...

  14. Use of intact rat brain cells as a model to study regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.H.; El-Fakahany, E.E.

    1985-08-12

    Intact rat brain cells were dissociated and used to study the regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors upon exposure to muscarinic receptor agonists. Incubation of cells with carbamylcholine resulted in a time-dependent decrease in subsequent (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine specific binding, an effect which reached a steady state after 3 hr at 37/sup 0/C. This effect of carbamylcholine was dependent on the concentration of the agonist in the incubation medium and was due to a reduction in the maximal binding capacity of the receptor with no decrease in the affinity of the remaining receptors. This preparation might be useful in future studies to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the central nervous system. 20 references, 3 tables.

  15. Alkylating derivatives of oxotremorine have irreversible actions on muscarinic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe some irreversible muscarinic receptor binding characteristics of BM 123 and MB 130, as well as the persistent inhibitory effect of BM 123 on acetylcholine release from the myenteric plexus of the ginea pig ileum. Binding assays were run on homogenates of the cerebral cortex and heart from male Sprague Dawley rate and the longitudinal muscle of the ileum from male guinea pigs. The minced hear and ileum were homogenized and the final pellets were frozen and thawed for measurement of specific tritium-30quinuclidinyl benzilate. The pellets from cerebral cortex, ileum, and heart were re-suspended to a concentration representing 10, 20, and 100 mg original wet tissue weight per ml 0.05 M phosphate buffer, respectively. The results of tritium-QNB binding measurements made at a single tritium-ligand concentration of 0.4 nM in homogenates of the rat cerebral cortex and heart and the longitudinal muscle of the guinea pig ileum that had been exposed to the indicated concentrations of BM 123 and BM 130 for 20 min

  16. Enhanced sensitivity of muscarinic cholinergic receptor associated with dopaminergic receptor subsensitivity after chronic antidepressant treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chronic effects of antidepressant treatment on striatal dopaminergic (DA) and muscarinic cholinergic (mACh) receptors of the rat brain have been examined comparatively in this study using 3H-spiroperidol (3H-SPD) and 3H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (3H-QNB) as the respective radioactive ligands. Imipramine and desipramine were used as prototype antidepressants. Although a single administration of imipramine or desipramine did not affect each receptor sensitivity, chronic treatment with each drug caused a supersensitivity of mACh receptor subsequent to DA receptor subsensitivity. Furthermore, it has been suggested that anti-mACh properties of imipramine or desipramine may not necessarily be related to the manifestation of mACh receptor supersensitivity and that sustained DA receptor subsensitivity may play some role in the alterations of mACh receptor sensitivity

  17. Muscarinic Receptor Activation Elicits Sustained, Recurring Depolarizations in Reticulospinal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Smetana, R. W.; Alford, S.; Dubuc, R.

    2007-01-01

    In lampreys, brain stem reticulospinal (RS) neurons constitute the main descending input to the spinal cord and activate the spinal locomotor central pattern generators. Cholinergic nicotinic inputs activate RS neurons, and consequently, induce locomotion. Cholinergic muscarinic agonists also induce locomotion when applied to the brain stem of birds. This study examined whether bath applications of muscarinic agonists could activate RS neurons and initiate motor output in lampreys. Bath appli...

  18. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. ► Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. ► Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers – this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre-treatment with anti-MMP1 antibody. This study contributes to understanding

  19. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jraufman@medicine.umaryland.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  20. Spontaneous Synaptic Activation of Muscarinic Receptors by Striatal Cholinergic Neuron Firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamaligas, Aphroditi A; Ford, Christopher P

    2016-08-01

    Cholinergic interneurons (CHIs) play a major role in motor and learning functions of the striatum. As acetylcholine does not directly evoke postsynaptic events at most striatal synapses, it remains unclear how postsynaptic cholinergic receptors encode the firing patterns of CHIs in the striatum. To examine the dynamics of acetylcholine release, we used optogenetics and paired recordings from CHIs and medium spiny neurons (MSNs) virally overexpressing G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels. Due to the efficient coupling between endogenous muscarinic receptors and GIRK channels, we found that firing of individual CHIs resulted in monosynaptic spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) in MSNs. Paired CHI-MSN recordings revealed that the high probability of acetylcholine release at these synapses allowed muscarinic receptors to faithfully encode physiological activity patterns from individual CHIs without failure. These results indicate that muscarinic receptors in striatal output neurons reliably decode CHI firing. PMID:27373830

  1. Enhanced self-administration of alcohol in muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Cour, Cecilie; Sørensen, Gunnar; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2015-01-01

    Modulation of cholinergic neurotransmission via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is known to alter alcohol-drinking behavior. It is not known if muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes have similar effects. The muscarinic M4 receptor is highly expressed in the brain reinforcement system and i......4+/+ littermates. The highest alcohol concentration used (10%) did not immediately result in divergent drinking patterns, but after 4 weeks of 10% alcohol self-administration, baseline levels as well as a pattern of M4-/- mice consuming more alcohol than their M4+/+ controls were re...... as a potential target for pharmacological (positive allosteric modulators or future agonists) treatment of alcohol use disorders....

  2. Increased amphetamine-induced locomotor activity, sensitization and accumbal dopamine release in M5 muscarinic receptor knockout mice

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Lene S.; Miller, Anthony D.; Lester, Deranda B.; Bay-Richter, Cecilie; Schülein, Christina; Schmidt, Henriette F.; Wess, Jürgen; Blaha, Charles D.; Woldbye, David P.D.; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Wortwein, Gitta

    2009-01-01

    Muscarinic M5 receptors are the only muscarinic receptor subtype expressed by dopamine-containing neurons of the ventral tegmental area. These cells play an important role for the reinforcing properties of psychostimulants and M5 receptors modulate their activity. Previous studies showed that M5 receptor knockout (M5−/−) mice are less sensitive to the reinforcing properties of addictive drugs. Here we investigate the role of M5 receptors in the effects of amphetamine and cocaine on locomotor ...

  3. Visualization of cholinoceptive neurons in the rat neocortex: colocalization of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Zee, E.A. van der; Streefland, C.; Strosberg, A D; Schröder, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1992-01-01

    The present investigation analyzes the cellular distribution of muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in rat neocortex, by use of monoclonal antibodies raised against purified receptor proteins. The degree of colocalization of both types of receptors was determined by way of immunofluorescent double-labeling techniques. For both classes of receptors, pyramidal and nonpyramidal cells were found immunostained and an identical laminar distribution pattern of immunopositive neurons in ...

  4. Muscarinic inhibition of cardiac norepinephrine and neuropeptide Y release during ischemia and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haunstetter, A; Haass, M; Yi, X; Krüger, C; Kübler, W

    1994-12-01

    It was the aim of the present study to characterize the modulatory effect of muscarinic agonists on the overflow of norepinephrine and neuropeptide Y (NPY) from the in situ perfused guinea pig heart, induced by electrical stimulation of the left stellate ganglion (6 Hz, 5 V, 1 min). The muscarinic agonists oxotremorine (0.01-1 microM) and carbachol (0.1-10 microM) reduced norepinephrine and NPY overflow in a concentration-dependent manner to approximately 30% of control. The inhibitory effect of carbachol was antagonized by the unspecific muscarinic antagonist atropine (1 microM) but not by the nicotinic antagonist hexamethonium (100 microM). The M2-specific antagonist AF-DX-116BS was 25 times more potent than the M1-specific antagonist pirenzepine in antagonizing the inhibitory effect of carbachol [50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) = 0.2 microM for AF-DX-116BS; IC50 = 5.0 microM for pirenzepine]. These findings indicate that presynaptic muscarinic inhibition of stimulated norepinephrine and NPY release from the guinea pig heart is mediated mainly by activation of M2 receptors. As early as 2 min after stop-flow ischemia, the inhibitory effect of carbachol (10 microM) on the stimulation-evoked overflow of norepinephrine and NPY was lost. On reperfusion with oxygenated buffer after 10 min of stop-flow ischemia the inhibitory effect of carbachol (10 microM) on stimulation-induced norepinephrine and NPY overflow recovered within 3 min. PMID:7810765

  5. Functional effects of the muscarinic receptor agonist, xanomeline, at 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, J.; Brough, S.; Coldwell, M C; Gager, T; Ho, M; Hunter, A. J.; Jerman, J; Middlemiss, D. N.; Riley, G J; Brown, A M

    1998-01-01

    Xanomeline [3(3-hexyloxy-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1-methylpyridine] has been reported to act as a functionally selective muscarinic partial agonist with potential use in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. This study examined the functional activity of xanomeline at 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors in native tissue and/or human cloned receptors.Xanomeline had affinity for muscarinic receptors in rat cortical membranes where the ratio of the displacement affinity of [3H]-Quinuclidi...

  6. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors elicits pigment granule dispersion in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crittenden Elizabeth L

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In fish, melanin pigment granules in the retinal pigment epithelium disperse into apical projections as part of the suite of responses the eye makes to bright light conditions. This pigment granule dispersion serves to reduce photobleaching and occurs in response to neurochemicals secreted by the retina. Previous work has shown that acetylcholine may be involved in inducing light-adaptive pigment dispersion. Acetylcholine receptors are of two main types, nicotinic and muscarinic. Muscarinic receptors are in the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily, and five different muscarinic receptors have been molecularly cloned in human. These receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase, calcium mobilization and ion channel activation. To determine the receptor pathway involved in eliciting pigment granule migration, we isolated retinal pigment epithelium from bluegill and subjected it to a battery of cholinergic agents. Results The general cholinergic agonist carbachol induces pigment granule dispersion in isolated retinal pigment epithelium. Carbachol-induced pigment granule dispersion is blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine, by the M1 antagonist pirenzepine, and by the M3 antagonist 4-DAMP. Pigment granule dispersion was also induced by the M1 agonist 4-[N-(4-chlorophenyl carbamoyloxy]-4-pent-2-ammonium iodide. In contrast the M2 antagonist AF-DX 116 and the M4 antagonist tropicamide failed to block carbachol-induced dispersion, and the M2 agonist arecaidine but-2-ynyl ester tosylate failed to elicit dispersion. Conclusions Our results suggest that carbachol-mediated pigment granule dispersion occurs through the activation of Modd muscarinic receptors, which in other systems couple to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and elevation of intracellular calcium. This conclusion must be corroborated by molecular studies, but suggests Ca2+-dependent pathways may be involved in light-adaptive pigment dispersion.

  7. MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR-EXPRESSION IN ASTROCYTES IN THE CORTEX OF YOUNG AND AGED RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; DEJONG, GI; STROSBERG, AD; LUITEN, PGM

    1993-01-01

    The present report describes the cellular and subcellular distribution pattern of immunoreactivity to M35, a monoclonal antibody raised against purified muscarinic acetylcholine receptor protein, in astrocytes in the cerebral cortex of young and aged rats. Most M35-positive astrocytes were localized

  8. Characterization of muscarinic receptors on isolated swine tracheal submucosal gland cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscarinic receptors play an important role in the regulation of tracheobronchial secretion. Tracheal epithelium was cut into small pieces (∼10 mm2) and dissociated using collagenase in HEPES-Ringer solution at 370C. After dissociation the glands cells were isolated by discontinuous Percoll density gradient centrifugation. Submucosal gland cells concentrated above the layers with densities of 1.084 and 1.057 g/ml after centrifugation at x 500 g for 10 min at 150C. Cell viability was > 95% as determined by exclusion of trypan blue. Over 98% of the isolated cells were identified by periodic acid Schiff staining method to be gland cells. Muscarinic receptors on intact gland cells were characterized using the binding of specific muscarinic antagonist [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]QNB) binding. Scatchard plot analysis of saturation isotherms, showed that the maximal receptor density (B/sub max/) and dissociation constant (K/sub D/) were 7400 +/- 200 sites/cell and 100 +/- 20 pM, respectively (n = 3). These two parameters were less than those from cat tracheal gland cells, B/sub max/ = 42,000 sites/cell and K/sub D/ = 200 pM. In conclusion, this study provided a useful method to isolate tracheal gland cells and characterized the presence of muscarinic receptors on isolated intact cells

  9. A specific multi-nutrient formulation enhances M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor responses in vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Savelkoul, P.J.M.; Janíčková, Helena; Kuipers, A.A.M.; Hageman, R.J.J.; Kamphuis, P.J.; Doležal, Vladimír; Broersen, L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 4 (2012), s. 631-640. ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic receptor * docosahexaenoic acid * Alzheimer’s disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.973, year: 2012

  10. Quantitative autoradiography of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors in the forebrain of the turtle, Pseudemys scripta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of muscarinic and benzodiazepine receptors was investigated in the turtle forebrain by the technique of in vitro receptor autoradiography. Muscarinic binding sites were labeled with 1 nM 3H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (3H-QNB), and benzodiazepine sites were demonstrated with the aid of 1 nM 3H-flunitrazepam (3H-FLU). Autoradiograms generated on 3H-Ultrofilm apposed to tissue slices revealed regionally specific distributions of muscarinic and benzodiazepine binding sites that are comparable with those for mammalian brain. Dense benzodiazepine binding was found in the anterior olfactory nucleus, the lateral and dorsal cortices, and the dorsal ventricular ridge (DVR), a structure with no clear mammalian homologue. Muscarinic binding sites were most dense in the striatum, accumbens, DVR, lateral geniculate, and the anterior olfactory nucleus. Cortical binding sites were studied in greater detail by quantitative analysis of autoradiograms generated by using emulsion-coated coverslips. Laminar gradients of binding were observed that were specific for each radioligand; 3H-QNB sites were most dense in the inner molecular layer in all cortical regions, whereas 3H-FLU binding was generally most concentrated in the outer molecular layer and was least dense through all layers in the dorsomedial cortex. Because pyramidal cells are arranged in register in turtle cortex, the laminar patterns of receptor binding may reflect different receptor density gradients along pyramidal cell dendrites

  11. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor down-regulation limits the extent of inhibition of cell cycle progression in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Detjen, K.; Yang, J; Logsdon, C D

    1995-01-01

    Cellular desensitization is believed to be important for growth control but direct evidence is lacking. In the current study we compared effects of wild-type and down-regulation-resistant mutant m3 muscarinic receptors on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cell desensitization, proliferation, and transformation. We found that down-regulation of m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was the principal mechanism of desensitization of receptor-activated inositol phosphate phospholipid hydrolysis in t...

  12. The M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor play a key role in the control of murine hair follicle cycling and pigmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Hasse, Sybille; Chernyavsky, Alex I; Grando, Sergei A.; Paus, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    Cholinergic receptors of the muscarinic class (M1-M5) are expressed in epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes as well as in the hair follicle. Knockout (KO) mice of all five receptors have been created and resulted in different phenotypes. KO mice with a deletion of the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M4R) present a striking hair phenotype, which we have analyzed here in greater detail by quantitative histomorphometry. Earlier studies revealed a retarded hair follicle morphogenesis in ...

  13. Functional comparison of muscarinic partial agonists at muscarinic receptor subtypes hM1, hM2, hM3, hM4 and hM5 using microphysiometry

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Martyn D.; Murkitt, Karen L; Ho, Michael; Watson, Jeannette M; Brown, Frank; Hunter, A Jacqueline; Middlemiss, Derek N

    1999-01-01

    This study describes the pharmacological comparison of the muscarinic partial agonists sabcomeline, xanomeline and milameline at human cloned muscarinic receptor subtypes (hM1–5).Radioligand binding studies at the hM1–5 muscarinic receptor subtypes were compared with functional studies using microphysiometry using carbachol as the standard full agonist.In binding assays none of the compounds studied displayed preferential affinity for the M1,3,4 or M5 subtypes although carbachol was less pote...

  14. Muscarinic receptor subtypes mediating the mucosal response to neural stimulation of guinea pig ileum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscarinic receptors involved in the secretory response evoked by electrical stimulation of submucosal neutrons were investigated in muscle-stripped flat sheets of guinea pig ileum set up in flux chambers. Neural stimulation produced a biphasic increase in short-circuit current due to active chloride secretion. Atropine and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperadine methiodide (4-DAMP) (10-7 M) were more potent inhibitors of the cholinergic phase of the response than was pirenzepine. Dose-dependent increases in base-line short-circuit current were evoked by carbachol and bethanechol; 4-hydroxy-2-butynyl trimethylammonium chloride (McN A343) produced a much smaller effect. Tetrodotoxin abolished the effects of McN A343 but did not alter the responses of carbachol and bethanechol. McN A343 significantly reduced the cholinergic phase of the neurally evoked response and caused a rightward shift of the carbachol dose-response curve. All muscarinic compounds inhibited [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate binding to membranes from muscosal scrapings, with a rank order of potency of 4-DAMP > pirenzepine > McN A343 > carbachol > bethanechol. These results suggest that acetylcholine released from submucosal neurons mediates chloride secretion by interacting with muscarinic cholinergic receptors that display a high binding affinity for 4-DAMP. Activation of neural muscarinic receptors makes a relatively small contribution to the overall secretory response

  15. On homology modeling of the M-2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Doležal, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 6 (2013), s. 525-538. ISSN 0920-654X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptor * G-protein coupled receptor * homology energy estimation * MM-GBSA Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.782, year: 2013

  16. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S.; Dencker, Ditte; Schülein, Christina; Wess, Jürgen; Wörtwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P.D.

    2011-01-01

    A delicate balance exists between the central dopaminergic and cholinergic neurotransmitter systems with respect to motor function. An imbalance can result in motor dysfunction as observed in Parkinson’s disease patients and in patients treated with antipsychotic compounds. Cholinergic receptor antagonists can alleviate extrapyramidal symptoms in Parkinson’s disease and motor side effects induced by antipsychotics. The effects of anticholinergics are mediated by muscarinic receptors of which ...

  17. Negative cooperativity in binding of muscarinic receptor agonists and GDP as a measure of agonist efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Jakubík, J; Janíčková, H; El-Fakahany, EE; Doležal, V

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Conventional determination of agonist efficacy at G-protein coupled receptors is measured by stimulation of guanosine-5′-γ−thiotriphosphate (GTPγS) binding. We analysed the role of guanosine diphosphate (GDP) in the process of activation of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and provide evidence that negative cooperativity between agonist and GDP binding is an alternative measure of agonist efficacy. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Filtration and scintillation proximity ass...

  18. CaMKIIα, a modulator of M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Ming-Lei; Liu, Zhenguo; Chu, Xiang-Ping; Mao, Li-Min; WANG, John Q.

    2010-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are subject to the regulation by protein kinases. By controlling the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation balance, protein kinases actively modify GPCR expression and function. In a recent study, we have identified a novel phosphorylation-dependent regulation of Gαi/o-coupled muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. A synapse-enriched protein kinase, Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIα), binds directly and selectively to second intracellular loops ...

  19. Methanol extract ofDesmodium gangeticumDC root mimetic post-conditioning effect in isolated perfused rat heart by stimulating muscarinic receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gino A Kurian; Jose Paddikkala

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate pharmacological mimetic action of herbal extractDesmodium gangeticum (DG) roots on ischemia reperfusion injury.Methods:With the help of Langendroff perfusion technique, ischemic post condition (POC) mimetic action of DG methanol root extract was evaluated and compared by using standard drugs that acts as muscarinic receptor agonist and antagonist, namely acetylcholine (Ach) and atropine (Atr) respectively in an isolated rat heart. Results:The physiological parameters like left ventricular developed pressure, end diastolic pressure and working index of isolated rat heart showed significant recovery in DG root extract administrated rat heart, similar to the recovery by POC. Kymogram results showed muscarinic receptor agonist like action for DG methanol root extract, confirmed in rat heart by muscarnic receptor agonist (acetylcholine) and anatoginst (atropine). Administration of DG root extract prior to reperfusion showed better antioxidant status in myocardial tissue homogenate and mitochondrial, complemented by the levels of cardiac specific marker proteins in myocardial tissue and perfusate. Even though DG methanol root extract mimics its action similar to that of Ach, the myocardial protection mediated by the extract was superior to Ach, due to the presence of antioxidants in the crude extract.Conclusions: DG methanol root extract provides myocardial protection towards IRI by stimulating muscarinic receptors.

  20. Positive cooperativity of acetylcholine and other agonists with allosteric ligands on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubík, J; Bacáková, L; El-Fakahany, E E; Tucek, S

    1997-07-01

    It is well known that allosteric modulators of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors can both diminish and increase the affinity of receptors for their antagonists. We investigated whether the allosteric modulators can also increase the affinity of receptors for their agonists. Twelve agonists and five allosteric modulators were tested in experiments on membranes of CHO cells that had been stably transfected with genes for the M1-M4 receptor subtypes. Allosterically induced changes in the affinities for agonists were computed from changes in the ability of a fixed concentration of each agonist to compete with [3H]N-methylscopolamine for the binding to the receptors in the absence and the presence of varying concentrations of allosteric modulators. The effects of allosteric modulators varied greatly depending on the agonists and the subtypes of receptors. The affinity for acetylcholine was augmented by (-)-eburnamonine on the M2 and M4 receptors and by brucine on the M1 and M3 receptors. Brucine also enhanced the affinities for carbachol, bethanechol, furmethide, methylfurmethide, pilocarpine, 3-(3-pentylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1- methylpyridine (pentylthio-TZTP), oxotremorine-M, and McN-A-343 on the M1, M3, and M4 receptors, for pentylthio-TZTP on the M2 receptors, and for arecoline on the M3 receptors. (-)-Eburnamonine enhanced the affinities for carbachol, bethanechol, furmethide, methylfurmethide, pentylthio-TZTP, pilocarpine, oxotremorine and oxotremorine-M on the M2 receptors and for pilocarpine on the M4 receptors. Vincamine, strychnine, and alcuronium displayed fewer positive allosteric interactions with the agonists, but each allosteric modulator displayed positive cooperativity with at least one agonist on at least one muscarinic receptor subtype. The highest degrees of positive cooperativity were observed between (-)-eburnamonine and pilocarpine and (-)-eburnamonine and oxotremorine-M on the M2 receptors (25- and 7-fold increases in

  1. Regional distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the telencephalon of the pigeon (Columba livia f. domestica)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was studied autoradiographically in croystat sections of the pigeon telencephalon using 3H-quinuclidinylbenzylate as a ligand. Highest receptor density was observed in the hyperstriatum ventrale, palaeostriatum augmentatum, septum, and parts of the archistriatum. In sites of known sensory input of neostriatum (field L) and ectostriatum low receptor binding was observed. Acetylcholinesterase distribution is in good agreement with the receptor picture only in the basal telencephalon. In the pallium differences in the pattern of these two components can be seen. (author)

  2. Cholinergic muscarinic receptor activation augments murine intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously, we showed that M3 muscarinic receptor (M3R; gene name Chrm3) deficiency attenuates murine intestinal neoplasia, supporting the hypothesis that muscarinic receptors play an important role in intestinal tumorigenesis. To test this hypothesis, in the present study we treated mice with bethanechol, a non-selective muscarinic receptor agonist without nicotinic receptor activity, and examined its effects on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon neoplasia. Mice were provided with drinking water containing 400 μg/mL bethanechol chloride or water without additions (control) for a total of 20 weeks, a period that included the initial 6 weeks when mice received intraperitoneal injections of AOM. When euthanized at week 20, control mice had 8.0 ± 1.3 tumors per animal, whereas bethanechol-treated mice had 10.4 ± 1.5 tumors per mouse (mean ± SE; P = 0.023), a 30% increase. Strikingly, tumor volume per animal was increased 52% in bethanechol-treated compared with control mice (179.7 ± 21.0 vs. 111. 8 ± 22.4 mm3; P = 0.047). On histological examination, bethenechol-treated mice also had more adenocarcinomas per animal (8.0 ± 1.0 vs. 4.1 ± 0.6 for control mice, P = 0.0042). Cell proliferation in both normal mucosa and adenocarcinomas was increased in bethanechol-treated compared to control mice. Also, in tumors, bethanechol treatment increased expression of Chrm3, Egfr and post-Egfr signaling molecules Myc and cyclin D1. Bethanechol treatment increased the thickness of normal colonic mucosa and the expression of selected matrix metalloproteinase (Mmp) genes, including Mmp7, Mmp10 and Mmp13. These findings support a prominent role for muscarinic receptors in colon neoplasia, and identify post-receptor signaling molecules as potential therapeutic targets

  3. Decreased ipsilateral [123I]iododexetimide binding to cortical muscarinic receptors in unilaterally 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Dysfunction of the cholinergic neurotransmitter system is present in Parkinson’s disease, Parkinson’s disease related dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, and is thought to contribute to cognitive deficits in these patients. In vivo imaging of the cholinergic system in these diseases may be of value to monitor central cholinergic disturbances and to select cases in which treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors could be beneficial. The muscarinic receptor tracer [123I]iododexetimide, predominantly reflecting M1 receptor binding, may be an appropriate tool for imaging of the cholinergic system by means of SPECT. In this study, we used [123I]iododexetimide to study the effects of a 6-hydroxydopamine lesion (an animal model of Parkinson’s disease) on the muscarinic receptor availability in the rat brain. Methods: Rats (n = 5) were injected in vivo at 10–13 days after a confirmed unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. Muscarinic receptor availability was measured bilaterally in multiple brain areas on storage phosphor images by region of interest analysis. Results: Autoradiography revealed a consistent and statistically significant lower [123I]iododexetimide binding in all examined neocortical areas on the ipsilateral side of the lesion as compared to the contralateral side. In hippocampal and subcortical areas, such asymmetry was not detected. Conclusions: This study suggests that evaluation of muscarinic receptor availability in dopamine depleted brains using [123I]iododexetimide is feasible. We conclude that 6-hydroxydopamine lesions induce a decrease of neocortical muscarinic receptor availability. We hypothesize that this arises from down regulation of muscarinic postsynaptic M1 receptors due to hyperactivation of the cortical cholinergic system in response to dopamine depletion. Advances in knowledge: In rats, dopamine depletion provokes a decrease in neocortical muscarinic receptor availability, which is evaluable by [123I

  4. Involvement of a subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the antipsychotic-like effects of the M1/M4 preferring muscarinic receptor agonist xanomeline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Wörtwein, Gitta; Weikop, Pia;

    2011-01-01

    Disturbances in central dopaminergic neurotransmission are believed to be centrally involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Central dopaminergic and cholinergic systems interact and the cholinergic muscarinic agonist xanomeline has shown antipsychotic effects in clinical studies. Preclinical...... xanomeline in amphetamine-induced hyperactivity and apomorphine-induced climbing. Interestingly, the antipsychotic-like effects of xanomeline in the two models were almost completely abolished in D1-M4-KO mice, suggesting that M(4) mAChRs colocalized with D(1) dopamine receptors are centrally involved in...

  5. Association of genetic variants of the histamine H1 and muscarinic M3 receptors with BMI and HbA1c values in patients on antipsychotic medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehof, Jelle; Risselada, Arne J.; Al Hadithy, Asmar F. Y.; Burger, Huibert; Snieder, Harold; Wilffert, Bob; Arends, Johan; Wunderink, Lex; Knegtering, Henrikus; Wiersma, Durk; Cohen, Dan; Mulder, Hans; Bruggeman, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Antipsychotic affinity for the histamine H1 receptor and the muscarinic M3 receptor have been associated with the side effects weight gain, and development of diabetes, respectively. We investigated polymorphisms of the histamine H1 (HRH1) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3 (CHRM3) receptor ge

  6. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtypes as Potential Drug Targets for the Treatment of Schizophrenia, Drug Abuse and Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Thomsen, Morgane; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2011-01-01

    's disease and drug abuse. Dopaminergic systems are regulated by cholinergic, especially muscarinic, input. Not surprisingly, increasing evidence implicates muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated pathways as potential targets for the treatment of these disorders classically viewed as "dopamine based......) acetylcholine binding site. Such agents may lead to the development of novel classes of drugs useful for the treatment of psychosis, drug abuse and Parkinson's disease. The present review highlights recent studies carried out using muscarinic receptor knock-out mice and new subtype-selective allosteric ligands...... to assess the roles of M(1), M(4), and M(5) receptors in various central processes that are under strong dopaminergic control. The outcome of these studies opens new perspectives for the use of novel muscarinic drugs for several severe disorders of the CNS....

  7. Comparison of human and porcine gastric clasp and sling fiber contraction by M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Vegesna, Anil K.; Braverman, Alan S.; Miller, Larry S.; Tallarida, Ronald J.; Tiwana, Mansoor I.; Khayyam, Umar; RUGGIERI, MICHAEL R.

    2010-01-01

    To compare the gastroesophageal junction of the human with the pig, M2 and M3 receptor densities and the potencies of M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor subtype selective antagonists were determined in gastric clasp and sling smooth muscle fibers. Total muscarinic and M2 receptors are higher in pig than human clasp and sling fibers. M3 receptors are higher in human compared with pig sling fibers but lower in human compared with pig clasp fibers. Clasp fibers have fewer M3 receptors than sling fibe...

  8. Muscarinic inhibitory receptors in pulmonary parasympathetic nerves in the guinea-pig.

    OpenAIRE

    Fryer, A D; Maclagan, J.

    1984-01-01

    In anaesthetized guinea-pigs, gallamine produced a dose-related potentiation of the bronchoconstriction induced by electrical stimulation of the cervical vagus nerves; (+)-tubocurarine and suxamethonium lacked this effect. The bronchoconstriction produced by intravenous injection of acetylcholine or histamine, however, was not potentiated by gallamine. Vagally-induced bradycardia was abolished by gallamine, confirming antagonism of the effect of acetylcholine on muscarinic receptors in the he...

  9. The effects of p-chloromercuribenzoate on muscarinic receptors in the cerebral cortex.

    OpenAIRE

    Birdsall, N. J.; Burgen, A S; Hulme, E. C.; Wong, E. H.

    1983-01-01

    The action of p-chloromercuribenzoate (PCMB) on the ligand binding properties of the muscarinic receptors in the rat cerebral cortex has been examined. At low concentrations, PCMB produces a selective change in the binding of agonists without any effect on the binding of antagonists. At higher concentrations, the structure-binding profile for binding antagonists is changed. The affinity of agonists is greatly reduced and the heterogeneity of binding eliminated. The effects of both high and lo...

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Methoctramine Binding and Selectivity at Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Zimčík, Pavel; Randáková, Alena; Fuksová, Květoslava; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 2 (2014), s. 180-192. ISSN 0026-895X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/0259; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * selectivity * methoctramine * allosteric * FRET Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.128, year: 2014

  11. Negative cooperativity in binding of muscarinic receptor agonists and GDP as a measure of agonist efficacy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Janíčková, Helena; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 162, č. 5 (2011), s. 1029-1044. ISSN 0007-1188 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : acetylcholine * muscarinic receptor * GDP Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.409, year: 2011

  12. Classical and atypical agonists activate M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors through common mechanisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Randáková, Alena; Dolejší, Eva; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Jakubík, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 97, Jul 2015 (2015), s. 27-39. ISSN 1043-6618 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptors * atypical agonists * xanomeline * activation mechanism Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.408, year: 2014

  13. Uncoupling of M1 muscarinic receptor/G-protein interaction by amyloid beta(1-42)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janíčková, Helena; Rudajev, Vladimír; Zimčík, Pavel; Jakubík, Jan; Tanila, H.; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 67, April (2013), s. 272-283. ISSN 0028-3908 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Alzheimer ´s Disease * muscarinic receptors * G-proteins Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.819, year: 2013

  14. Effect of Chronic Neuroleptic Treatment on Central and Peripheral Muscarinic Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Cawley, Thomas A.; Shickley, Timothy J.; Ruggieri, Michael R.; LUTHIN, GARY R.

    1993-01-01

    The regulation of muscarinic acetyicholine receptor (MAChR) subtypes in rat striatum, bladder and heart was examined following a 14-day administration of neuroleptics (clozapine or fluphenazine), anticholinergics (atropine) or a combination of anticholinergics and neuroleptics. Levels of MAChRs were ascertained by the use of immunoprecipitation and radioligand binding. The combined treatment of fluphenazine and atropine produced an increase in all MAChR subtype levels in striatum with m1 rece...

  15. Utilization of Superfused Cerebral Slices in Probing Muscarinic Receptor Autoregulation of Acetylcholine Release

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alquicer, Glenda; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    New York: Springer, 2016 - (Mysliveček, J.; Jakubík, J.), s. 221-233. (Neuromethods. 107). ISBN 978-1-4939-2857-6 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05696S; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * acetylcholine release * autoregulation * superfusion Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  16. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor (M2) plays a crucial role in the development of myopia in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Kwan, Jia Lin; Tan, Queenie S. W.; Weon, Sung Rhan; Seet, Li Fong; Goh, Liang Kee; Vithana, Eranga N.; Beuerman, Roger W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Myopia is a huge public health problem worldwide, reaching the highest incidence in Asia. Identification of susceptible genes is crucial for understanding the biological basis of myopia. In this paper, we have identified and characterized a functional myopia-associated gene using a specific mouse-knockout model. Mice lacking the muscarinic cholinergic receptor gene (M2 ; also known as Chrm2) were less susceptible to lens-induced myopia compared with wild-type mice, which showed signif...

  17. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor (M2) plays a crucial role in the development of myopia in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Jia Lin Kwan; Tan, Queenie S. W.; Sung Rhan Weon; Li Fong Seet; Liang Kee Goh; Vithana, Eranga N.; Beuerman, Roger W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Myopia is a huge public health problem worldwide, reaching the highest incidence in Asia. Identification of susceptible genes is crucial for understanding the biological basis of myopia. In this paper, we have identified and characterized a functional myopia-associated gene using a specific mouse-knockout model. Mice lacking the muscarinic cholinergic receptor gene (M2; also known as Chrm2) were less susceptible to lens-induced myopia compared with wild-type mice, which showed sign...

  18. Crystal structures of the M1 and M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thal, David M; Sun, Bingfa; Feng, Dan; Nawaratne, Vindhya; Leach, Katie; Felder, Christian C; Bures, Mark G; Evans, David A; Weis, William I; Bachhawat, Priti; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Sexton, Patrick M; Kobilka, Brian K; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2016-03-17

    Muscarinic M1-M5 acetylcholine receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that regulate many vital functions of the central and peripheral nervous systems. In particular, the M1 and M4 receptor subtypes have emerged as attractive drug targets for treatments of neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia, but the high conservation of the acetylcholine-binding pocket has spurred current research into targeting allosteric sites on these receptors. Here we report the crystal structures of the M1 and M4 muscarinic receptors bound to the inverse agonist, tiotropium. Comparison of these structures with each other, as well as with the previously reported M2 and M3 receptor structures, reveals differences in the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites that contribute to a role in drug selectivity at this important receptor family. We also report identification of a cluster of residues that form a network linking the orthosteric and allosteric sites of the M4 receptor, which provides new insight into how allosteric modulation may be transmitted between the two spatially distinct domains. PMID:26958838

  19. The muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and atropine are competitive antagonists at 5-HT3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Martin; Thompson, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Scopolamine is a high affinity muscarinic antagonist that is used for the prevention of post-operative nausea and vomiting. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are used for the same purpose and are structurally related to scopolamine. To examine whether 5-HT3 receptors are affected by scopolamine we examined the effects of this drug on the electrophysiological and ligand binding properties of 5-HT3A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells, respectively. 5-HT3 receptor-responses were reversibly inhibited by scopolamine with an IC50 of 2.09 μM. Competitive antagonism was shown by Schild plot (pA2 = 5.02) and by competition with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists [(3)H]granisetron (Ki = 6.76 μM) and G-FL (Ki = 4.90 μM). The related molecule, atropine, similarly inhibited 5-HT evoked responses in oocytes with an IC50 of 1.74 μM, and competed with G-FL with a Ki of 7.94 μM. The reverse experiment revealed that granisetron also competitively bound to muscarinic receptors (Ki = 6.5 μM). In behavioural studies scopolamine is used to block muscarinic receptors and induce a cognitive deficit, and centrally administered concentrations can exceed the IC50 values found here. It is therefore possible that 5-HT3 receptors are also inhibited. Studies that utilise higher concentrations of scopolamine should be mindful of these potential off-target effects. PMID:27108935

  20. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor (M2 plays a crucial role in the development of myopia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veluchamy A. Barathi

    2013-09-01

    Myopia is a huge public health problem worldwide, reaching the highest incidence in Asia. Identification of susceptible genes is crucial for understanding the biological basis of myopia. In this paper, we have identified and characterized a functional myopia-associated gene using a specific mouse-knockout model. Mice lacking the muscarinic cholinergic receptor gene (M2; also known as Chrm2 were less susceptible to lens-induced myopia compared with wild-type mice, which showed significantly increased axial length and vitreous chamber depth when undergoing experimental induction of myopia. The key findings of this present study are that the sclera of M2 mutant mice has higher expression of collagen type I and lower expression of collagen type V than do wild-type mice and mice that are mutant for other muscarinic subtypes, and, therefore, M2 mutant mice were resistant to the development of experimental myopia. Pharmacological blockade of M2 muscarinic receptor proteins retarded myopia progression in the mouse. These results suggest for the first time a role of M2 in growth-related changes in extracellular matrix genes during myopia development in a mammalian model. M2 receptor antagonists might thus provide a targeted therapeutic approach to the management of this refractive error.

  1. Effect of aging on airway remodeling and muscarinic receptors in a murine acute asthma model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang JY

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ji Young Kang, Sook Young Lee, Chin Kook Rhee, Seung Joon Kim, Soon Seog Kwon, Young Kyoon KimDepartment of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, KoreaBackground and objectives: The influence of aging on the development of asthma has not been studied thoroughly. The aim of this study was to investigate age-related airway responses involving lung histology and expression of muscarinic receptors in a murine model of acute asthma. Methods: Female BALB/c mice at the ages of 6 weeks and 6, 9, and 12 months were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA for 1 month (n = 8–12 per group. We analyzed inflammatory cells and T-helper (Th2 cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid and parameters of airway remodeling and expression of muscarinic receptors in lung tissue. Results: Among the OVA groups, total cell and eosinophil numbers in BAL fluid were significantly higher in the older (6-, 9-, and 12-month-old mice than in the young (6-week-old mice. Interleukin (IL 4 (IL-4 concentration increased, but IL-5 and IL-13 concentrations showed a decreased tendency, with age. IL-17 concentration tended to increase with age, which did not reach statistical significance. periodic acid-Schiff (PAS staining area, peribronchial collagen deposition, and area of α-smooth muscle staining were significantly higher in the 6-month older OVA group than in the young OVA group. The expression of the M3 and M2 muscarinic receptors tended to increase and decrease, respectively, with age. Conclusion: The aged mice showed an active and unique pattern not only on airway inflammation, but also on airway remodeling and expression of the muscarinic receptors during the development of acute asthma compared with the young mice. These findings suggest that the aging process affects the pathogenesis of acute asthma and age-specific approach might be more appropriate for better asthma control in a clinical practice.Keywords: aging, asthma

  2. Expression of the rat muscarinic receptor gene m3 in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voith, G; Kramm, H; Zündorf, I; Winkler, T; Dingermann, T

    1998-10-01

    We functionally expressed the rat muscarinic m3 receptor (rm3) in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum under the control of the homologous discoidin I gamma promoter. Cells transfected with the authentic rm3 receptor gene expressed about 100 functional receptor molecules per cell, corresponding to a Bmax for [3H]-NMS of 36 +/- 9 fmol/mg of protein in isolated membranes. Genetic fusion of the Dictyostelium contact site A (csA) leader peptide to the amino terminus of rm3 increased the receptor expression by about 17-fold. Remarkable, in [3H]-NMS ligand binding experiments performed with whole cells no characteristic saturable binding was observed and there was no significant difference in [3H]-NMS binding to whole cells of rm3 and csA/rm3 transformants. The recombinant rm3 receptor showed an about 10-fold higher affinity to the M3-selective antagonist p-F-HHSiD compared to the M2-selective antagonist AQ-RA 741, suggesting that membranes derived from transgenic D. discoideum cells may be useful for the search of new subtype-specific muscarinic receptor ligands. PMID:9812338

  3. EVALUATION OF A PURIFICATION PROCEDURE FOR THE MUSCARINIC RECEPTOR FOR THE PURPOSE OF QUANTITATIVE RECEPTOR ASSAYS OF ANTICHOLINERGICS .B. THE SOLUBILIZED RECEPTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMISTEROVA, J; ENSING, K; DEBOER, J; DEZEEUW, RA

    1995-01-01

    For the purpose of quantitative receptor assays, a three-step solubilization procedure including three optimization sets for muscarinic receptor from calf striatum was developed. The first step includes the extraction of the P2-pellet with n-hexane and consequently with 2 M NaCl. By the latter, 39%

  4. Activation of muscarinic receptors inhibits glutamate-induced GSK-3β overactivation in PC12 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke MA; Li-min YANG; Hong-zhuan CHEN; Yang LU

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the actions of the muscarinic agonist carbachol on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells,and the underlying mechanisms.Methods:PC12 cells were treated with different concentrations of glutamate for 24 or 48 h.The cell viability was measured using MTT assay,and the expression and activation of GSK-3β were detected with Western blot.β-Catenin translocation was detected using immunofluorescence.Luciferase reporter assay and real-time PCR were used to analyze the transcriptional activity of β-catenin.Results:Glutamate (1,3,and 10 mmol/L) induced PC12 cell death in a dose-dependent manner.Moreover,treatment of the cells with glutamate (1 mmol/L) caused significant overactivation of GSK-3β and prevented β-catenin translocation to the nucleus.Pretreatment with carbachol (0.01 μmol/L) blocked glutamate-induced cell death and GSK-3β overactivation,and markedly enhanced β-catenin transcriptional activity.Conclusion:Activation of muscarinic receptors exerts neuroprotection in PC12 cells by attenuating glutamate-induced GSK-3β overactivation,suggesting potential benefits of muscarinic agonists for Alzheimer's disease.

  5. An allosteric enhancer of M4muscarinic acetylcholine receptor function inhibits behavioral and neurochemical effects of cocaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Weikop, Pia; Sørensen, Gunnar;

    2012-01-01

    The mesostriatal dopamine system plays a key role in mediating the reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs like cocaine. The muscarinic M4 acetylcholine receptor subtype is centrally involved in the regulation of dopamine release in striatal areas. Consequently, striatal M4 receptors could be...

  6. A subpopulation of neuronal M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors plays a critical role in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeon, Jongrye; Nielsen, Ditte Dencker; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M(1)-M(5) mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M(4) mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M(4) mAChRs are coexpres...

  7. Effects of dopamine D1-like and D2-like antagonists on cocaine discrimination in muscarinic receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Morgane; Caine, Simon Barak

    2016-04-01

    Muscarinic and dopamine brain systems interact intimately, and muscarinic receptor ligands, like dopamine ligands, can modulate the reinforcing and discriminative stimulus (S(D)) effects of cocaine. To enlighten the dopamine/muscarinic interactions as they pertain to the S(D) effects of cocaine, we evaluated whether muscarinic M1, M2 or M4 receptors are necessary for dopamine D1 and/or D2 antagonist mediated modulation of the S(D) effects of cocaine. Knockout mice lacking M1, M2, or M4 receptors, as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline in a food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. Effects of pretreatments with the dopamine D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and the dopamine D2 antagonist eticlopride were evaluated. In intact mice, both SCH 23390 and eticlopride attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect, as expected. SCH 23390 similarly attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect in M1 knockout mice, but not in mice lacking M2 or M4 receptors. The effects of eticlopride were comparable in each knockout strain. These findings demonstrate differences in the way that D1 and D2 antagonists modulate the S(D) effects of cocaine, D1 modulation being at least partially dependent upon activity at the inhibitory M2/M4 muscarinic subtypes, while D2 modulation appeared independent of these systems. PMID:26874213

  8. Short-term regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: An assessment utilizing mouse brain and mouse neuroblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cioffi, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of muscarinic agonists and diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) on muscarinic receptor density and muscarinic receptor-mediated responses was assessed in mouse brain and mouse neuroblastoma cells (clone N1E-115). Utilizing the antagonist ({sup 3}H)quinuclidinyl benzilate (({sup 3}H)QNB), there was no difference in the maximal binding capacity (B{sub max}) or equilibrium dissociation constant (K{sub d}) between untreated and 24 hour DFP-treated mice. However, one administration of DFP produced a 24% and 33% decrease in B{sub max} measured by ({sup 3}H)N-methylscopolamine (({sup 3}H)NMS) after 18 and 24 hours which was rapidly reversible within 36 hours after DFP treatment. The loss of ({sup 3}H)NMS binding sites following acute DFP treatment was not accompanied by a change in a particular muscarinic receptor binding conformation. Furthermore, the magnitude of muscarinic receptor-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis was unchanged following short-term DFP treatment.

  9. Association of genetic variants of the histamine H1 and muscarinic M3 receptors with BMI and HbA1c values in patients on antipsychotic medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Vehof (Jelle); A.J. Risselada (Arne); A.F.Y. Al Hadithy (Asmar); H. Burger (Herman); H. Snieder (Harold); B. Wilffert (Bob); J. Arends (Johan); L. Wunderink (Lex); H. Knegtering (Henrikus); D. Wiersma (Durk); D. Cohen (Daniel); H. Mulder (Hans Sipko); R. Bruggeman (Richard)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractRationale: Antipsychotic affinity for the histamine H1 receptor and the muscarinic M3 receptor have been associated with the side effects weight gain, and development of diabetes, respectively. Objectives: We investigated polymorphisms of the histamine H1 (HRH1) and muscarinic acetylchol

  10. Presynaptic muscarinic receptors: Change of sensitivity during long-term drug treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors investigate some of the characteristics of auto- and heteroreceptors from different brain areas in male rats; their alteration in sensitivity following chronic drug treatment is monitored. The synaptosomes were prelabeled with tritium-choline or tritium-dopamine and the release of tritium-acetylcholine and tritium-DA was studied in superfusion. It is shown that the difference in susceptibility between auto- and heteroreceptors with respect to changes of sensitivity may represent a further criterion to discriminate between muscarinic receptor subtypes

  11. Effect of sabcomeline on muscarinic and dopamine receptor binding in intact mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabcomeline [(R-(Z)-(+)-α-(methoxyiamino)- 1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]octane-3-acetonitrile)] is a potent and functionally selective muscarinic M1 receptor partial agonist. However, little is known of the binding properties of sabcomeline under in vivo conditions. In this study, muscarinic receptor occupancy by sabcomeline in mouse brain regions and heart was estimated using [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and [3H]N-methylpiperidyl benzilate (NMPB) as radioligands. In the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and striatum, the estimated IC50 value of sabcomeline for [3H]NMPB binding was almost 0.2 mg/kg. Sabcomeline was not a selective ligand to M1 receptors as compared with biperiden in vivo. In the cerebral cortex, maximum receptor occupancy was observed about 1 hr after intravenous injection of sabcomeline (0.3 mg/kg), and the binding availability of mACh receptors had almost returned to the control level by 3-4 hr. These findings indicated that the binding kinetics of sabcomeline is rather rapid in mouse brain. Examination of dopamine D2 receptor binding revealed that sabcomeline affected the kinetics of both [3H]raclopride and [3H]N-methylspiperone (NMSP) binding in the striatum. It significantly decreased the k3 and k4 of [3H]raclopride binding resulting in an increase in binding potential (BP=k3/k4=Bmax/Kd) in sabcomeline-treated mice, and an approximately 15% decrease in k3 of [3H]NMSP binding was also observed. Although the mechanism is still unclear, sabcomeline altered dopamine D2 receptor affinity or availability by modulations via neural networks. (author)

  12. Cholinergic stimulation of pancreatic amylase release and muscarinic receptors: effect of ionophore A23187

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dispersed rat pancreatic acini were incubated in 0.5 mM calcium medium with increasing concentrations of carbamylcholine, with or without the ionophore A23187 (10-6M). Addition of the ionophore reduced maximal amylase release, increased the maximal effective concentration of carbamylcholine and dramatically impaired the agonist's capacity to induce enzyme secretion at low concentration. The ionophore also abolished the inhibition of secretion observed at high carbamylcholine concentrations. These effects of the ionophore on the cholinergic secretory response cannot be explained by interaction at the muscarinic receptor since neither the Bmax, the affinity of the receptor for the [3H]QNB nor the binding of carbamylcholine were affected by the ionophore. It is suggested that for the conditions studied, the ionophore can interact with the secretory process at one or several points ulterior to the initial recognition site of carbamylcholine on its receptor. 30 references, 3 figures

  13. Increased cocaine self-administration in M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lene Sørensen; Thomsen, Morgane; Weikop, Pia;

    2011-01-01

    Rationale The reinforcing effects of cocaine are mediated by the mesolimbic dopamine system. Behavioral and neurochemical studies have shown that the cholinergic muscarinic M4 receptor subtype plays an important role in regulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission. Objectives Here we investigated...... for the first time the involvement of M4 receptors in the reinforcing effects of cocaine using chronic intravenous cocaine self-administration in extensively backcrossed M4 receptor knockout (M4 -/-) mice. Methods We evaluated acquisition of cocaine self-administration in experimentally naïve mice....... Both cocaine self-administration and food-maintained operant behavior were evaluated under fixed ratio 1 (FR 1) and progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement. In addition, cocaine-induced dopamine release and cocaine-induced hyperactivity were evaluated. Results M4 -/- mice earned significantly...

  14. Hypoxia increases exercise heart rate despite combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebenmann, C; Rasmussen, P; Sørensen, H; Bonne, T C; Zaar, M; Aachmann-Andersen, N J; Nordsborg, N B; Secher, N H; Lundby, C

    2015-06-15

    Hypoxia increases the heart rate response to exercise, but the mechanism(s) remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during separate, but not combined, inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors. Nine subjects performed incremental exercise to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (fraction of inspired O2 = 12%) after intravenous administration of 1) no drugs (Cont), 2) propranolol (Prop), 3) glycopyrrolate (Glyc), or 4) Prop + Glyc. HR increased with exercise in all drug conditions (P hypoxia than normoxia (P hypoxia and normoxia was 19.8 ± 13.8 beats/min during Cont and similar (17.2 ± 7.7 beats/min, P = 0.95) during Prop but smaller (P hypoxia (P 0.4) but larger during Prop (3.4 ± 1.6 l/min, P = 0.004). Our results demonstrate that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia during exercise partially relies on vagal withdrawal. Conversely, sympathoexcitation either does not contribute or increases heart rate through mechanisms other than β-adrenergic transmission. A potential candidate is α-adrenergic transmission, which could also explain why a tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during combined β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptor inhibition. PMID:25888515

  15. Muscarinic and nicotinic ACh receptor activation differentially mobilize Ca2+ in rat intracardiac ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beker, Friederike; Weber, Martin; Fink, Rainer H A; Adams, David J

    2003-09-01

    The origin of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) transients stimulated by nicotinic (nAChR) and muscarinic (mAChR) receptor activation was investigated in fura-2-loaded neonatal rat intracardiac neurons. ACh evoked [Ca2+]i increases that were reduced to approximately 60% of control in the presence of either atropine (1 microM) or mecamylamine (3 microM) and to <20% in the presence of both antagonists. Removal of external Ca2+ reduced ACh-induced responses to 58% of control, which was unchanged in the presence of mecamylamine but reduced to 5% of control by atropine. The nAChR-induced [Ca2+]i response was reduced to 50% by 10 microM ryanodine, whereas the mAChR-induced response was unaffected by ryanodine, suggesting that Ca2+ release from ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ stores may only contribute to the nAChR-induced [Ca2+]i responses. Perforated-patch whole cell recording at -60 mV shows that the rise in [Ca2+]i is concomitant with slow outward currents on mAChR activation and with rapid inward currents after nAChR activation. In conclusion, different signaling pathways mediate the rise in [Ca2+]i and membrane currents evoked by ACh binding to nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in rat intracardiac neurons. PMID:12761283

  16. Permanent alterations in muscarinic receptors and pupil size produced by chronic atropinization in kittens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic mydriasis was induced in six kittens (four monocular, two binocular) and two adult cats (both monocular) by the daily topical application of atropine. Both the kittens and the adult cats were atropinized for a 13-week period with the treatment regimen beginning at the time of eye opening for the kittens. Pupil size measurements, obtained 1 year after the atropinization were discontinued, revealed that, although the pupils of the adult cats were normal, the pupils of the kittens' treated eyes were consistently smaller than pupils in control eyes. The status of the muscarinic receptors in the kittens' irides was investigated using 3H-QNB binding assays. In comparison with iris muscle homogenates from the control eyes, those from the treated eyes demonstrated an eightfold increase in the number of receptor binding sites. The results indicate that pupil size can be altered permanently by chronic mydriasis initiated early in the life of a kitten and that the permanent change in pupil size may result, in part, from a type of permanent supersensitivity response in the muscle following chronic blockade of muscarinic transmission by atropine

  17. Muscarinic receptors participation in angiogenic response induced by macrophages from mammary adenocarcinoma-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of macrophages in tumor progression has generated contradictory evidence. We had previously demonstrated the ability of peritoneal macrophages from LMM3 murine mammary adenocarcinoma-bearing mice (TMps) to increase the angiogenicity of LMM3 tumor cells, mainly through polyamine synthesis. Here we investigate the ability of the parasympathetic nervous system to modulate angiogenesis induced by TMps through the activation of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAchR). Peritoneal macrophages from female BALB/c mice bearing a 7-day LMM3 tumor were inoculated intradermally (3 × 105 cells per site) into syngeneic mice. Before inoculation, TMps were stimulated with the muscarinic agonist carbachol in the absence or presence of different muscarinic antagonists or enzyme inhibitors. Angiogenesis was evaluated by counting vessels per square millimeter of skin. The expression of mAchR, arginase and cyclo-oxygenase (COX) isoforms was analyzed by Western blotting. Arginase and COX activities were evaluated by urea and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, respectively. TMps, which stimulate neovascularization, express functional mAchR, because carbachol-treated TMps potently increased new blood vessels formation. This response was completely blocked by preincubating TMps with pirenzepine and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine (4-DAMP), M1 and M3 receptor antagonists, and partly by the M2 receptor antagonist methoctramine. M1 receptor activation by carbachol in TMps triggers neovascularization through arginase products because Nω-hydroxy-L-arginine reversed the agonist action. Preincubation of TMps with methoctramine partly prevented carbachol-stimulated urea formation. In addition, COX-derived liberation of PGE2 is responsible for the promotion of TMps angiogenic activity by M3 receptor. We also detected a higher expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in TMps than in macrophages from normal mice. Carbachol significantly increased VEGF expression

  18. Characteristics of muscarinic receptors that selectively couple to inhibition of adenylate cyclase or stimulation of phospholipase C on NG108-15 and 1321N1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this dissertation was to establish whether different muscarinic receptor proteins selectively couple to different second messenger response system. Although both second messenger response systems are fully functional in both cell lines, activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors only results in inhibition of adenylate cyclase in NG108-15 neuroblastoma x glioma cells and stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Muscarinic receptors on both cell types were covalently labeled with (3H)Propylbenzilylcholine mustard ((3H)PBCM) and the mobilities of the (3H)PBCM-labelled species of both cells were compared by SDS-PAGE. 1321N1 and NG108-15 cells each primarily expressed a single (3H)PBCM-labelled species with an apparent size of approximately 92,000 and 66,000 Da, respectively. (3H)PBCM labelling was completely inhibited by 1 μM atropine or by down-regulation of muscarinic receptors by an overnight incubation with carbachol. The apparent size of the (3H)PBCM-labelled species of both cell lines was not altered by treatment with a series of protease inhibitors or by treatment with dithiothreitol and iodoacetamide. Another approach for determining differences in the muscarinic receptors of 2 cells lines was to study agonist-induced alteration of muscarinic receptor number. Exposure of both cell types to agonists resulted in rapid loss of muscarinic receptors from cell surface without change of total cellular muscarinic receptors followed by subsequently loss of receptors from cells. Muscarinic receptors on both cell lines were regulated by agonist with similar properties

  19. Differential Rho-kinase dependency of full and partial muscarinic receptor agonists in airway smooth muscle contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, D; Boterman, M; de Jong, AM; Hovens, Iris; Penninks, JM; Nelemans, SA; Meurs, H; Zaagsma, J

    2006-01-01

    1 In airway smooth muscle (ASM), full and partial muscarinic receptor agonists have been described to have large differences in their ability to induce signal transduction, including Ca2+-mobilization. Despite these differences, partial agonists are capable of inducing a submaximal to maximal ASM co

  20. Pharmacological Evaluation of the Long-Term Effects of Xanomeline on the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grant, M.K.O.; Noetzel, M.J.; De Lorme, K.C.; Jakubík, Jan; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 12 (2010), e15722-16. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/09/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Xanomeline * muscarinic acetylcholine receptor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.411, year: 2010

  1. Synthesis and In Vitro Evaluation of Novel Nortropane Derivatives as Potential Radiotracers for Muscarinic M2 Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remco J. J. Knol

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Disturbances of the cerebral cholinergic neurotransmitter system are present in neurodegenerative disorders. SPECT or PET imaging, using radiotracers that selectively target muscarinic receptor subtypes, may be of value for in vivo evaluation of such conditions. 6β-acetoxynortropane, a potent muscarinic M2 receptor agonist, has previously demonstrated nanomolar affinity and high selectivity for this receptor. Based on this compound we synthesized four nortropane derivatives that are potentially suitable for SPECT imaging of the M2 receptor. 6β-acetoxynortropane and the novel derivatives were tested in vitro for affinity to the muscarinic M1−3 receptors. The original 6β-acetoxynortropane displayed high affinity (Ki=70–90 nM to M2 receptors and showed good selectivity ratios to the M1 (65-fold ratio and the M3 (70-fold ratio receptors. All new derivatives showed reduced affinity to the M2 subtype and loss of subtype selectivity. It is therefore concluded that the newly synthesized derivatives are not suitable for human SPECT imaging of M2 receptors.

  2. The regulation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor desensitization by synaptic activity in cultured hippocampal neurons1

    OpenAIRE

    Willets, Jonathon M.; Nelson, Carl P.; Nahorski, Stefan R; Challiss, R.A. John

    2007-01-01

    To better understand metabotropic/ionotropic integration in neurons we have examined the regulation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor signalling in mature (> 14 days in vitro), synaptically-active hippocampal neurons in culture. Using a protocol where neurons are exposed to an EC50 concentration of the muscarinic agonist methacholine (MCh) prior to (R1), and following (R2) a desensitizing pulse of a high concentration of this agonist, we have found that the reduction in M1 mACh r...

  3. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of retinal ganglion cell photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Puneet; Hartwick, Andrew T E

    2016-09-01

    Melanopsin-dependent phototransduction in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) involves a Gq-coupled phospholipase C (PLC) signaling cascade. Acetylcholine, released in the mammalian retina by starburst amacrine cells, can also activate Gq-PLC pathways through certain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Using multielectrode array recordings of rat retinas, we demonstrate that robust spiking responses can be evoked in neonatal and adult ipRGCs after bath application of the muscarinic agonist carbachol. The stimulatory action of carbachol on ipRGCs was a direct effect, as confirmed through calcium imaging experiments on isolated ipRGCs in purified cultures. Using flickering (6 Hz) yellow light stimuli at irradiances below the threshold for melanopsin activation, spiking responses could be elicited in ipRGCs that were suppressed by mAChR antagonism. Therefore, this work identified a novel melanopsin-independent pathway for stimulating sustained spiking in ganglion cell photoreceptors. This mAChR-mediated pathway could enhance ipRGC spiking responses in conditions known to evoke retinal acetylcholine release, such as those involving flickering or moving visual stimuli. Furthermore, this work identifies a pharmacological approach for light-independent ipRGC stimulation that could be targeted by mAChR agonists. PMID:27055770

  4. Dynamic Regulation of Quaternary Organization of the M1 Muscarinic Receptor by Subtype-selective Antagonist Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediani, John D; Ward, Richard J; Godin, Antoine G; Marsango, Sara; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-06-17

    Although rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors can exist as both monomers and non-covalently associated dimers/oligomers, the steady-state proportion of each form and whether this is regulated by receptor ligands are unknown. Herein we address these topics for the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, a key molecular target for novel cognition enhancers, by using spatial intensity distribution analysis. This method can measure fluorescent particle concentration and assess oligomerization states of proteins within defined regions of living cells. Imaging and analysis of the basolateral surface of cells expressing some 50 molecules·μm(-2) human muscarinic M1 receptor identified a ∼75:25 mixture of receptor monomers and dimers/oligomers. Both sustained and shorter term treatment with the selective M1 antagonist pirenzepine resulted in a large shift in the distribution of receptor species to favor the dimeric/oligomeric state. Although sustained treatment with pirenzepine also resulted in marked up-regulation of the receptor, simple mass action effects were not the basis for ligand-induced stabilization of receptor dimers/oligomers. The related antagonist telenzepine also produced stabilization and enrichment of the M1 receptor dimer population, but the receptor subtype non-selective antagonists atropine and N-methylscopolamine did not. In contrast, neither pirenzepine nor telenzepine altered the quaternary organization of the related M3 muscarinic receptor. These data provide unique insights into the selective capacity of receptor ligands to promote and/or stabilize receptor dimers/oligomers and demonstrate that the dynamics of ligand regulation of the quaternary organization of G protein-coupled receptors is markedly more complex than previously appreciated. This may have major implications for receptor function and behavior. PMID:27080256

  5. Human eosinophil major basic protein is an endogenous allosteric antagonist at the inhibitory muscarinic M2 receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacoby, D. B.; Gleich, G J; Fryer, A. D.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of human eosinophil major basic protein (MBP) as well as other eosinophil proteins, on binding of [3H]N-methyl-scopolamine ([3H]NMS: 1 x 10(-10) M) to muscarinic M2 receptors in heart membranes and M3 receptors in submandibular gland membranes was studied. MBP inhibited specific binding of [3H]NMS to M2 receptors but not to M3 receptors. MBP also inhibited atropine-induced dissociation of [3H]NMS-receptor complexes in a dose-dependent fashion, demonstrating that the interaction of ...

  6. Changes in acetylcholine content, release and muscarinic receptors in rat hippocampus under cold stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim was to study the mechanism of the previously established decrease in acetylcholine (ACh) concentration in the rat hippocampus under cold stress. Male rats were exposed for 14 days to cold (5 degree C) or kept (controls) at room temperature (24 degree C). Acetylcholine content, release and muscarinic receptor binding were investigated in the hippocampus. Cold exposure resulted in a decrease of ACh concentration in the dorsal hippocampus. Moreover, the potassium-evoked release of ACh from hippocampal slices was increased and an increase of maximal binding capacity of [3H](-) quinuclidinyl benzilate in the dorsal hippocampus of cold exposed animals was also observed. Thus the decrease of hippocampal ACh concentration under cold exposure is probably due to its increased release. On balance then, our results demonstrate that cold stress in the rat induces significant activation of the hippocampal cholinergic system

  7. Bile acid-induced arrhythmia is mediated by muscarinic M2 receptors in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti H Sheikh Abdul Kadir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP is a common disease affecting up to 5% of pregnancies and which can cause fetal arrhythmia and sudden intrauterine death. We previously demonstrated that bile acid taurocholate (TC, which is raised in the bloodstream of ICP, can acutely alter the rate and rhythm of contraction and induce abnormal calcium destabilization in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCM. Apart from their hepatic functions bile acids are ubiquitous signalling molecules with diverse systemic effects mediated by either the nuclear receptor FXR or by a recently discovered G-protein coupled receptor TGR5. We aim to investigate the mechanism of bile-acid induced arrhythmogenic effects in an in-vitro model of the fetal heart. METHODS AND RESULTS: Levels of bile acid transporters and nuclear receptor FXR were studied by quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunostaining, which showed low levels of expression. We did not observe functional involvement of the canonical receptors FXR and TGR5. Instead, we found that TC binds to the muscarinic M(2 receptor in NRCM and serves as a partial agonist of this receptor in terms of inhibitory effect on intracellular cAMP and negative chronotropic response. Pharmacological inhibition and siRNA-knockdown of the M(2 receptor completely abolished the negative effect of TC on contraction, calcium transient amplitude and synchronisation in NRCM clusters. CONCLUSION: We conclude that in NRCM the TC-induced arrhythmia is mediated by the partial agonism at the M(2 receptor. This mechanism might serve as a promising new therapeutic target for fetal arrhythmia.

  8. Participation of muscarinic receptors in memory consolidation in passive avoidance learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobryakova, Yulia V; Gurskaya, Olga; Markevich, Vladimir A

    2014-01-01

    It is well-known that the cholinergic system and the muscarinic cholinergic receptors are associated with cognitive functions. Here we examined whether a non-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine affects learning performance and/or synaptic plasticity during the memory consolidation period. Adult male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were injected with scopolamine (2 mg/kg) or saline immediately after training in a "passive avoidance" task. Memory retention test was conducted 24 h after training. The changes in the latency of the first entry into a dark compartment of a test chamber was chosen as a criterion of learning. The efficacy of synaptic transmission was estimated by the changes in the basal level of focal potentials (fEPSP amplitude and slope ratio) before training (baseline), 90 min after the training (consolidation period), and 24 hour after the training (retention period). We found that foot-shock presentation by itself had no effect on fEPSP within the first 90 min after training, but in 24 hour fEPSPs were decreased. In untrained rats administration of scopolamine had no effect on the fEPSP amplitude within the first 90 min after the injection, but in 24 h we observed an increase in the fEPSP amplitude. In trained animals, scopolamine decreased the fEPSP amplitude in the hippocampal CA1 area during first 1.5 h after the injection. However, the drug had no effect on the memory retention in the passive avoidance task. Taken together our data suggest that scopolamine modifies the synaptic placticity of the hippocampal network but does not induce significant changes in the retention of the passive avoidance skill. PMID:24993630

  9. Noninvasive quantification of muscarinic receptors in vivo with positron emission tomography in the dog heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delforge, J.; Janier, M.; Syrota, A.; Crouzel, C.; Vallois, J.M.; Cayla, J.; Lancon, J.P.; Mazoyer, B.M. (Commission a l' Energie Atomique, Orsay (France))

    1990-10-01

    The in vivo quantification of myocardial muscarinic receptors has been obtained in six closed-chest dogs by using positron emission tomography. The dogs were injected with a trace amount of 11C-labeled methylquinuclidinyl benzilate (MQNB), a nonmetabolized antagonist of the muscarinic receptor. This was followed 30 minutes later by an injection of an excess of unlabeled MQNB (displacement experiment). Two additional injections of unlabeled MQNB with (11C)MQNB and without (11C)MQNB (second displacement experiment) were administered after 70 and 120 minutes, respectively. This protocol allowed a separate evaluation of the quantity of available receptors (B'max) as well as the association and dissociation rate constants (k+1 and k-1) in each dog. The parameters were calculated by using a nonlinear mathematical model in regions of interest over the left ventricle and the interventricular septum. The average value of B'max was 42 +/- 11 pmol/ml tissue, the rate constants k+1, k-1, and Kd were 0.6 +/- 0.1 ml.pmol-1.min-1, 0.27 +/- 0.03 ml.pmol-1.min-1, and 0.49 +/- 0.14 pmol.ml-1, respectively, taking into account the MQNB reaction volume estimated to 0.15 ml/ml tissue. Although (11C)MQNB binding would appear irreversible, our findings indicate that the association of the antagonist is very rapid and that the dissociation is far from negligible. The dissociated ligand, however, has a high probability of rebinding to a free receptor site instead of escaping into the microcirculation. We deduce that the positron emission tomographic images obtained after injecting a trace amount of (11C)MQNB are more representative of blood flow than of receptor density or affinity. We also suggest a simplified protocol consisting of a tracer injection of (11C)MQNB and a second injection of an excess of cold MQNB, which is sufficient to measure B'max and Kd in humans.

  10. Binding and functional properties of antimuscarinics of the hexocyclium/sila-hexocyclium and hexahydro-diphenidol/hexahydro-sila-diphenidol type to muscarinic receptor subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Waelbroeck, M.; Tastenoy, M.; Camus, J.; Christophe, J; Strohmann, C.; Linoh, H.; Zilch, H.; Tacke, Reinhold; Mutschler, E.; Lambrecht, G.

    2012-01-01

    1. In an attempt to assess the structural requirements for the muscarinic receptor selectivity of hexahydro-diphenidol (hexahydro-difenidol) and hexahydro-sila-diphenidol (hexahydro-sila-difenidol), a series of structurally related C/Si pairs were investigated, along with atropine, pirenzepine and methoctramine, for their binding affinities in NB-OK 1 cells as well as in rat heart and pancreas. 2. The action of these antagonists at muscarinic receptors mediating negative inotropic responses i...

  11. The subpopulation of microglia expressing functional muscarinic acetylcholine receptors expands in stroke and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannell, Maria; Meier, Maria Almut; Szulzewsky, Frank; Matyash, Vitali; Endres, Matthias; Kronenberg, Golo; Prinz, Vincent; Waiczies, Sonia; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-03-01

    Microglia undergo a process of activation in pathology which is controlled by many factors including neurotransmitters. We found that a subpopulation (11 %) of freshly isolated adult microglia respond to the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist carbachol with a Ca(2+) increase and a subpopulation of similar size (16 %) was observed by FACS analysis using an antibody against the M3 receptor subtype. The carbachol-sensitive population increased in microglia/brain macrophages isolated from tissue of mouse models for stroke (60 %) and Alzheimer's disease (25 %), but not for glioma and multiple sclerosis. Microglia cultured from adult and neonatal brain contained a carbachol-sensitive subpopulation (8 and 9 %), which was increased by treatment with interferon-γ to around 60 %. This increase was sensitive to blockers of protein synthesis and correlated with an upregulation of the M3 receptor subtype and with an increased expression of MHC-I and MHC-II. Carbachol was a chemoattractant for microglia and decreased their phagocytic activity. PMID:25523105

  12. Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlet Martinez-Archundia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the results of a combined computational and site mutagenesis study designed to provide new insights into the orthosteric binding site of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. For this purpose a three-dimensional structure of the receptor at atomic resolution was built by homology modeling, using the crystallographic structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. Then, the antagonist N-methylscopolamine was docked in the model and subsequently embedded in a lipid bilayer for its refinement using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different lipid bilayer compositions were studied: one component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC and two-component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine/palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylserine (POPC-POPS. Analysis of the results suggested that residues F222 and T235 may contribute to the ligand-receptor recognition. Accordingly, alanine mutants at positions 222 and 235 were constructed, expressed, and their binding properties determined. The results confirmed the role of these residues in modulating the binding affinity of the ligand.

  13. Alpha-lipoic acid-mediated activation of muscarinic receptors improves hippocampus- and amygdala-dependent memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboob, Aamra; Farhat, Syeda Mehpara; Iqbal, Ghazala; Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Zaidi, Najam-us-Sahar Sadaf; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Ahmed, Touqeer

    2016-04-01

    Aluminum (Al) is a neurotoxic agent which readily crosses the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and accumulates in the brain leading to neurodegenerative disorders, characterised by cognitive impairment. Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is an antioxidant and has a potential to improve cognitive functions. This study aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of ALA in AlCl3-induced neurotoxicity mouse model. Effect of ALA (25mg/kg/day) was evaluated in the AlCl3-induced neurotoxicity (AlCl3 150 mg/kg/day) mouse model on learning and memory using behaviour tests and on the expression of muscarinic receptor genes (using RT-PCR), in hippocampus and amygdala. Following ALA treatment, the expression of muscarinic receptor genes M1, M2 and choline acetyltransferase (ChaT) were significantly improved (penhanced fear memory (pmemory was remarkably restored (penhancement thus presenting it an enviable therapeutic candidate for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26912408

  14. A Subpopulation of Neuronal M4 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors Plays a Critical Role in Modulating Dopamine-Dependent Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Jongrye; Dencker, Ditte; Wortwein, Gitta; Woldbye, David P.D.; Cui, Yinghong; Davis, Albert A.; Levey, Allan I.; Schütz, Günther; Sager, Thomas; Mørk, Arne; Li, Cuiling; Deng, Chu-Xia; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Wess, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates many key functions of the CNS by activating cell surface receptors referred to as muscarinic ACh receptors (M1–M5 mAChRs). Like other mAChR subtypes, the M4 mAChR is widely expressed in different regions of the forebrain. Interestingly, M4 mAChRs are coexpressed with D1 dopamine receptors in a specific subset of striatal projection neurons. To investigate the physiological relevance of this M4 mAChR subpopulation in modulating dopamine-dependent behaviors, we use...

  15. Effects of extracts from Cordyceps sinensis on M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Chiba, Tomohiro

    2010-01-01

    Tomohiro Chiba1, Marina Yamada1, Kosuke Torii2, Masataka Suzuki1, Jumpei Sasabe1, Minoru Ito2, Kenzo Terashita1, Sadakazu Aiso11Department of Anatomy, Keio University, School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Research and Development, Noevir Co. Ltd., Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Cholinergic dysfunction is implicated in the pathogenesis of memory impairment related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Accordingly, regulation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1 mAChR) has been one o...

  16. Unilaterally blocking the muscarinic receptors in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in proestrus rats prevents pre-ovulatory LH secretion and ovulation

    OpenAIRE

    Vieyra, Elizabeth; Ramírez, Deyra A; Lagunas, Noé; Cárdenas, Mario; Chavira, Roberto; Damián-Matsumura, Pablo; Trujillo, Angélica; Domínguez, Roberto; Morales-Ledesma, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Background The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the cholinergic system of various regions of the hypothalamus participate in the regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin secretion, which are necessary for the occurrence of ovulation. In the present study, our goal was to analyse the effects of unilaterally blocking the muscarinic receptors in the SCN on ovulation and steroid secretion. Methods Cyclic rats were randomly allotted to one of the experimental groups. G...

  17. Synthesis of carbon-11 labeled dexetimide and levetimide for studying muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The localization and quantitation of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m-AChR) in the living human brain using a non-invasive method, such as positron emission tomography (PET), may provide valuable information about receptor changes which have been observed post mortem in patients with Huntington's chorea and Alzheimer's dementia, as well as normal brain mechanisms mediated by the m-AChR. Although quinuclidinyl benzilate has been radioiodinated and radiomethylatd, the former is not useful with PET and the latter does not penetrate the blood-brain barrier; therefore, the authors chose to radiolabel dexetimide, a ligand which labels m-AChR in vitro and in vivo, and levetimide, its inactive enantiomer. Carbon-11 labeled carbon dioxide is bubbled through a tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution of phenylmagnesium chloride (1 M, l ml) after which 2 mg of lithium aluminium hydride is added in THF (500 μl). After evaporation of the solvent, 48% hydriodic acid (l ml) is added and the solution is heated for 1 minute. Carbon-11 labeled benzyl iodide is extracted into methylene chloride, added to a solution of nor-benzyl dexetimide or levetimide, and heated for several minutes. Purification is accomplished using semi-preparative reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Analytical HPLC is used to determine the radiochemical purity and specific activity

  18. Muscarinic Receptor Agonists Protect Cultured Bovine Trabecular Meshwork Cells against Apoptosis Induced by Dexamethasone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yajuan Gu; Shujun Zeng; PengXin Qiu; Yuping Wu; Dawei Peng; Guangmei Yan1

    2004-01-01

    Purpose:To study whether muscarinic receptor agonists can protect cultured bovine trabecular meshwork cells against apoptosis induced by dexamethasone.Methods:The third to fifth passags of bovine trabecular meshwork cells were grown to confluence and incubated for 1~14 days in growth media with dexamethasone or pretreatment of pilocarpine or carbachol.The cultures were evaluated for apoptosis by phase-contrast microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, DNA laddering and flow cytometric analysis.Results :Dexamethasone (0.24~0.96 mmol·L-1) induced apoptosis of trabecular meshwork cells in a dose and time-dependent manner. Before 0.48 mmol·L-1 dexamethasone-treatment, 1.84 mmol· L-1 of pilocarpine or 2.74 mmol· L-1 of carbachol added could significantly reduce apoptotic percentage. Conclusion: Muscarinie receptor agonists can protect cultured bovine trabecular meshwork cells against apoptosis induced by dexamethasone. Eye Science 2004;20:42-47.

  19. Distinction between high-affinity [3H]phencyclidine binding sites and muscarinic receptors in guinea-pig ileum muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [3H]Phencyclidine ([3H]PCP) binding was studied in guinea-pig ileum muscle membranes. Specific binding of [3H]PCP was time dependent, reversible and saturable, with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 154 nM and maximum binding of 12.9 pmol/mg of protein at pH 9. Its pH dependency suggests that the un-ionized PCP is the pharmacologically active form. The binding site was on a protein which was sensitive to heat, proteolytic enzymes and the carboxylic group reagent dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, but insensitive to phospholipase A and C, concanavalin A, dithiothreitol and N-ethylmaleimide. Specific [3H]PCP binding was displaced effectively by several PCP analogs and Ca++ channel antagonists including verapamil, to which these sites had a high affinity. These high-affinity PCP-binding sites were found at a much higher concentration in the same membrane preparation than muscarinic receptor sites identified by their specific binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate. PCP bound to both sites, but with a lower affinity to the muscarinic receptor sites. The PCP and muscarinic receptor sites differed in their sensitivities to pH and drug specifities

  20. ZMS regulation of M2 muscarinic receptor mRNA stability requires protein factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim The aim of this work is to study the elevation mechanism of ZMS on muscarinic M2 receptor mRNA expression. Methods Actinomycin D was added to cultured CHOm2 cells to stop the de novo synthesis of M2 receptor mRNA and samples were taken at various times to determine the time course of mRNA of M2 receptor with real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Half-life of M2 receptor mRNA and the effect of ZMS on the half-life was obtained from the slope of the exponential curves. Cycloheximide was added at 4 h prior to and 24 h after the addition of ZMS to examine the effect of de novo protein synthesis on the action of ZMS. Results The half-life of m2 mRNA was prolonged by ZMS treatment without cycloheximide (4.75±0.54 h and 2.13 h±0.23 h for ZMS and vehicle treated groups, respectively, P<0.05). When cycloheximide was added to the culture medium 4h prior to the addition of ZMS, the effect of ZMS in prolonging the half-life of m2 mRNA disappeared (3.06 h±0.23 h and 3.00 h±l.20 h for cells with and without ZMS, respectively). However, when the ZMS was added to the medium 24h prior to the addition of cycloheximide, the action of ZMS was not abolished by cycloheximide (half-life was 5.43 h±1.13 h and 2.46 h±0.09 h for cells with and without ZMS, respectively). Conclusion These data suggest that de novo protein synthesis was required for the increase in M2 mRNA stability induced by ZMS. (authors)

  1. Contrasting Effects of Allosteric and Orthosteric Agonists on M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Internalization and Down-regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Rachel L.; Christopher J Langmead; Wood, Martyn D; Challiss, R.A. John

    2009-01-01

    A new class of subtype-selective muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor agonist that activates the receptor through interaction at a site distinct from the orthosteric acetylcholine binding site has been reported recently. Here, we have compared the effects of orthosteric (oxotremorine-M, arecoline, pilocarpine) and allosteric [4-n-butyl-1-[4-(2-methylphenyl)-4-oxo-1-butyl] piperidine (AC-42); 1-[3-(4-butyl-1-piperidinyl)propyl]-3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone (77-LH-28-1)] agonists on M1 mAC...

  2. Short-term desensitization of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in mouse neuroblastoma cells: selective loss of agonist low-affinity and pirenzepine high-affinity binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of brief incubation with carbamylcholine on subsequent binding of [3H]N-methylscopolamine were investigated in mouse neuroblastoma cells (clone N1E-115). This treatment demonstrated that the muscarinic receptors in this neuronal clone can be divided into two types; one which is readily susceptible to regulation by receptor agonists, whereas the other is resistant in this regard. In control cells, both pirenzepine and carbamylcholine interacted with high- and low-affinity subsets of muscarinic receptors. Computer-assisted analysis of the competition between pirenzepine and carbamylcholine with [3H]N-methylscopolamine showed that the receptor sites remaining upon desensitization are composed mainly of pirenzepine low-affinity and agonist high-affinity binding sites. Furthermore, there was an excellent correlation between the ability of various muscarinic receptor agonists to induce a decrease in consequent [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding and their efficacy in stimulating cyclic GMP synthesis in these cells. Thus, only the agonists that are known to recognize the receptor's low-affinity conformation in order to elicit increases in cyclic GMP levels were capable of diminishing ligand binding. Taken together, our present results suggest that the receptor population that is sensitive to regulation by agonists includes both the pirenzepine high-affinity and the agonist low-affinity receptor binding states. In addition, the sensitivity of these receptor subsets to rapid regulation by agonists further implicates their involvement in desensitization of muscarinic receptor-mediated cyclic GMP formation

  3. Exposure to Gulf War Illness chemicals induces functional muscarinic receptor maladaptations in muscle nociceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, B Y; Johnson, R D; Nutter, T J

    2016-05-01

    Chronic pain is a component of the multisymptom disease known as Gulf War Illness (GWI). There is evidence that pain symptoms could have been a consequence of prolonged and/or excessive exposure to anticholinesterases and other GW chemicals. We previously reported that rats exposed, for 8 weeks, to a mixture of anticholinesterases (pyridostigmine bromide, chlorpyrifos) and a Nav (voltage activated Na(+) channel) deactivation-inhibiting pyrethroid, permethrin, exhibited a behavior pattern that was consistent with a delayed myalgia. This myalgia-like behavior was accompanied by persistent changes to Kv (voltage activated K(+)) channel physiology in muscle nociceptors (Kv7, KDR). In the present study, we examined how exposure to the above agents altered the reactivity of Kv channels to a muscarinic receptor (mAChR) agonist (oxotremorine-M). Comparisons between muscle nociceptors harvested from vehicle and GW chemical-exposed rats revealed that mAChR suppression of Kv7 activity was enhanced in exposed rats. Yet in these same muscle nociceptors, a Stromatoxin-insensitive component of the KDR (voltage activated delayed rectifier K(+) channel) exhibited decreased sensitivity to activation of mAChR. We have previously shown that a unique mAChR-induced depolarization and burst discharge (MDBD) was exaggerated in muscle nociceptors of rats exposed to GW chemicals. We now provide evidence that both muscle and vascular nociceptors of naïve rats exhibit MDBD. Examination of the molecular basis of the MDBD in naïve animals revealed that while the mAChR depolarization was independent of Kv7, the action potential burst was modulated by Kv7 status. mAChR depolarizations were shown to be dependent, in part, on TRPA1. We argue that dysfunction of the MDBD could be a functional convergence point for maladapted ion channels and receptors consequent to exposure to GW chemicals. PMID:27058124

  4. Investigation of the presence and antinociceptive function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristine B.; Krogh-Jensen, Karen; Pickering, Darryl S;

    2016-01-01

    musculus) using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST). The presence and function of M1 and M4 was investigated in vivo, using the formalin test with the muscarinic receptor agonists xanomeline and VU0152100. Spinal cord tissue from the naked mole-rat was used for receptor saturation binding studies...... with [3H]-N-methylscopolamine. The BLAST test revealed 95 % protein sequence homology showing the naked mole-rat to have the genetic potential to express all five muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. A significant reduction in pain behavior was demonstrated after administration of 8.4 mg/kg in...

  5. Muscarinic receptor control of pyramidal neuron membrane potential in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowski, P; Gawlak, M; Szulczyk, P

    2015-09-10

    Damage to the cholinergic input to the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. Cholinergic endings release acetylcholine, which activates nicotinic and/or G-protein-coupled muscarinic receptors. Muscarinic receptors activate transduction systems, which control cellular effectors that regulate the membrane potential in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neurons. The mechanisms responsible for the cholinergic-dependent depolarization of mPFC layer V pyramidal neurons in slices obtained from young rats were elucidated in this study. Glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission as well as tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Na(+) and voltage-dependent Ca(++) currents were eliminated. Cholinergic receptor stimulation by carbamoylcholine chloride (CCh; 100 μM) evoked depolarization (10.0 ± 1.3 mV), which was blocked by M1/M4 (pirenzepine dihydrochloride, 2 μM) and M1 (VU 0255035, 5 μM) muscarinic receptor antagonists and was not affected by a nicotinic receptor antagonist (mecamylamine hydrochloride, 10 μM). CCh-dependent depolarization was attenuated by extra- (20 μM) or intracellular (50 μM) application of an inhibitor of the βγ-subunit-dependent transduction system (gallein). It was also inhibited by intracellular application of a βγ-subunit-binding peptide (GRK2i, 10μM). mPFC pyramidal neurons express Nav1.9 channels. CCh-dependent depolarization was abolished in the presence of antibodies against Nav1.9 channels in the intracellular solution and augmented by the presence of ProTx-I toxin (100 nM) in the extracellular solution. CCh-induced depolarization was not affected by the following reagents: intracellular transduction system blockers, including U-73122 (10 μM), chelerythrine chloride (5 μM), SQ 22536 (100 μM) and H-89 (2 μM); channel blockers, including Ba(++) ions (200 μM), apamin (100 nM), flufenamic acid (200 μM), 2-APB (200 μM), SKF 96365 (50 μM), and ZD 7288 (50 μM); and a Na(+)/Ca(++) exchanger blocker, benzamil (20

  6. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes which selectively couple to phospholipase C: Pharmacological and biochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pharmacological and biochemical properties of rat m1 and m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) stably transfected into Chinese hamster ovary-K1 (CHO) cells were characterized with ligand binding, affinity labeling and biochemical assays. Both mAChR subtypes display saturable, high affinity binding of [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and a rank order of antagonist potency of QNB greater than atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116. Carbachol displacement of [3H]-QNB binding to the m3 mAChR revealed an approximate 17-fold higher affinity than observed with the m1 mAChR. [3H]-propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PrBCM) labeling of mAChR revealed that m1 and m3 mAChR migrated on SDS-polyacrylamide gels with apparent molecular masses of 80,000 and 94,000 daltons, respectively, consistent with the known differences in their molecular sizes. Both m1 and m3 mAChR elicited dose-dependent increases in the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides; however, the maximal increase in total inositol phosphates elicited with the m1 mAChR was approximately 2-fold greater than that observed in cells expressing similar densities of m3 mAChR. Agonist activation of the m1 mAChR also elicited increases in basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP, whereas the m3 mAChR had no effect on intracellular cAMP levels. These data suggest that although m1 and m3 mAChR display a considerable degree of structural homology, they exhibit distinct pharmacological and biochemical properties

  7. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes which selectively couple to phospholipase C: Pharmacological and biochemical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, M.A.; Fraser, C.M. (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (USA))

    1990-12-14

    The pharmacological and biochemical properties of rat m1 and m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) stably transfected into Chinese hamster ovary-K1 (CHO) cells were characterized with ligand binding, affinity labeling and biochemical assays. Both mAChR subtypes display saturable, high affinity binding of (3H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and a rank order of antagonist potency of QNB greater than atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116. Carbachol displacement of (3H)-QNB binding to the m3 mAChR revealed an approximate 17-fold higher affinity than observed with the m1 mAChR. (3H)-propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PrBCM) labeling of mAChR revealed that m1 and m3 mAChR migrated on SDS-polyacrylamide gels with apparent molecular masses of 80,000 and 94,000 daltons, respectively, consistent with the known differences in their molecular sizes. Both m1 and m3 mAChR elicited dose-dependent increases in the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides; however, the maximal increase in total inositol phosphates elicited with the m1 mAChR was approximately 2-fold greater than that observed in cells expressing similar densities of m3 mAChR. Agonist activation of the m1 mAChR also elicited increases in basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP, whereas the m3 mAChR had no effect on intracellular cAMP levels. These data suggest that although m1 and m3 mAChR display a considerable degree of structural homology, they exhibit distinct pharmacological and biochemical properties.

  8. Muscarinic receptor activation of phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis. Relationship to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and diacylglycerol metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, E.A.; Goldstein, D.; Brown, J.H. (Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla (USA))

    1989-09-05

    We examined the relationship between phosphatidylcholine (PC) hydrolysis, phosphoinositide hydrolysis, and diacylglycerol (DAG) formation in response to muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) stimulation in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells. Carbachol increases the release of (3H)choline and (3H)phosphorylcholine ((3H)Pchol) from cells containing (3H)choline-labeled PC. The production of Pchol is rapid and transient, while choline production continues for at least 30 min. mAChR-stimulated release of Pchol is reduced in cells that have been depleted of intracellular Ca2+ stores by ionomycin pretreatment, whereas choline release is unaffected by this pretreatment. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) increases the release of choline, but not Pchol, from 1321N1 cells, and down-regulation of protein kinase C blocks the ability of carbachol to stimulate choline production. Taken together, these results suggest that Ca2+ mobilization is involved in mAChR-mediated hydrolysis of PC by a phospholipase C, whereas protein kinase C activation is required for mAChR-stimulated hydrolysis of PC by a phospholipase D. Both carbachol and PMA rapidly increase the formation of (3H)phosphatidic acid ((3H)PA) in cells containing (3H)myristate-labeled PC. (3H)Diacylglycerol ((3H)DAG) levels increase more slowly, suggesting that the predominant pathway for PC hydrolysis is via phospholipase D. When cells are labeled with (3H)myristate and (14C)arachidonate such that there is a much greater 3H/14C ratio in PC compared with the phosphoinositides, the 3H/14C ratio in DAG and PA increases with PMA treatment but decreases in response to carbachol.

  9. Muscarinic receptor binding increases in anterior thalamus and cingulate cortex during discriminative avoidance learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Training-induced neuronal activity develops in the mammalian limbic system during discriminative avoidance conditioning. This study explores behaviorally relevant changes in muscarinic ACh receptor binding in 52 rabbits that were trained to one of five stages of conditioned response acquisition. Sixteen naive and 10 animals yoked to criterion performance served as control cases. Upon reaching a particular stage of training, the brains were removed and autoradiographically assayed for 3H-oxotremorine-M binding with 50 nM pirenzepine (OxO-M/PZ) or for 3H-pirenzepine binding in nine limbic thalamic nuclei and cingulate cortex. Specific OxO-M/PZ binding increased in the parvocellular division of the anterodorsal nucleus early in training when the animals were first exposed to pairing of the conditional and unconditional stimuli. Elevated binding in this nucleus was maintained throughout subsequent training. In the parvocellular division of the anteroventral nucleus (AVp), OxO-M/PZ binding progressively increased throughout training, reached a peak at the criterion stage of performance, and returned to control values during extinction sessions. Peak OxO-M/PZ binding in AVp was significantly elevated over that for cases yoked to criterion performance. In the magnocellular division of the anteroventral nucleus (AVm), OxO-M/PZ binding was elevated only during criterion performance of the task, and it was unaltered in any other limbic thalamic nuclei. Specific OxO-M/PZ binding was also elevated in most layers in rostral area 29c when subjects first performed a significant behavioral discrimination. Training-induced alterations in OxO-M/PZ binding in AVp and layer Ia of area 29c were similar and highly correlated

  10. Acetylcholine muscarinic receptors and response to anti-cholinesterase therapy in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An acetylcholine deficit remains the most consistent neurotransmitter abnormality found in Alzheimer's disease and various therapeutic agents have been targeted at this. In this study we investigated the action of Donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor that has few side-effects. In particular we set out to investigate whether muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) availability influences the response to this therapy. We used the novel single-photon emission tomography (SPET) tracer (R,R)[123I]I-quinuclidinyl benzilate (R,R[123I]I-QNB), which has high affinity for the M1 subtype of mAChR. Regional cerebral perfusion was also assessed using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime. We investigated 20 patients on Donepezil treatment and ten age-matched controls. The results showed a reduction in (R,R)[123I]I-QNB binding in the caudal anterior cingulate in patients compared with controls and relatively high binding in the putamen and rostral anterior cingulate, suggesting a relative sparing of mAChR in these regions. The main finding of the study was that mAChR availability as assessed by (R,R)[123I]I-QNB binding did not distinguish responders from non-responders. Interestingly, we found that the extent of cognitive improvement showed no positive correlation with (R,R)[123I]I-QNB binding in any brain region but was inversely related to binding in the insular cortex. This suggests that, within the advised cognitive performance band for use of Donepezil, response is greater in those patients with evidence of a more marked cholinergic deficit. A larger study should investigate this. (orig.)

  11. Reversal of cardiac vagal effects of physostigmine by adjunctive muscarinic blockade

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, James; Cook, Alexandra; Patient, Dawn; Emmett, Stevan; Tattersall, John; Shattock, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Pre-treatment with reversible acetylcholinesterase (AChE)inhibitors is an effective strategy for reducing lethality followingorganophosphate nerve agent exposure. AChE inhibition may have unwantedcardiac side effects, which could be negated by adjunctive anticholinergictherapy; however, direct study of this interaction isdifficult in vivo. The aims of the present study were to examine theconcentration-dependent effects of physostigmine on cardiac responses tovagus nerve stimulation (VNS), to ...

  12. Wash-resistantly bound xanomeline inhibits acetylcholine release by persistent activation of presynaptic M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Eva; Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    Praha : 2.Lékařská fakulta UK, 2007. s. 55-55. [Vědecká konference 2007 - věda, sport a rock ´n´roll. 25.04.2007-26.04.2007, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/05/0452; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant ostatní: NIH(US) NS25732 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : spo2 * xanomeline * acetylcholine * presynaptic muscarinic receptors Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  13. Molecular mechanisms of muscarinic receptors in mouse scleral fibroblasts: Prior to and after induction of experimental myopia with atropine treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Barathi, V. A.; Roger W. Beuerman

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of atropine on the development of spectacle lens induced myopia in the mouse and to determine if the level of mRNAs for the muscarinic receptor subtypes (M1 - M5 ) is affected by atropine treatment. Methods Experimental myopia was developed in Balb/CJ (BJ) mice by placing −10 diopter spectacle lens on post-natal day 10 over the right eyes of 150 mice (n=10 in each group, 5 repetitions) for six weeks. After 2 weeks of lens wearing, the atropine group received ...

  14. Role of protein glycosylation on the expression of muscarinic receptors of N4TG1 neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) are glycoproteins. Experiments were conducted to determine whether active glycosylation of proteins in N4TG1 neuroblastoma cells could affect the expression of muscarinic receptors on the cell surface. The binding of radioactive N-methylscopolamine, a membrane impermeable ligand, to intact cells was used as a measure of mAChR. In the presence of the inhibitors of glycosylation, such as tunicamycin, monensin and amphomycin, N-linked glycosylation of proteins in the N4TG1 cells was inhibited, as measured by the incorporation of radioactive glucosamine or mannose in proteins. At the concentrations of tunicamycin and monensin used, the glycosylation of proteins after 3 hours were drastically reduced, but the number of mAChR in the cells was not altered. The apparent lack of effect within a short incubation period could be attributed to the presence of preformed oligosaccharide dolichol readily available for N-glycosylation. However, after 24 hours, tunicamycin (0.05 μg/ml) caused a decrease in the number of mAChR by 17% without having any effect on protein synthesis. Therefore, de novo glycosylation of proteins may be required for the expression of mAChR receptors in the N4TG1 neuroblastoma cell surface

  15. Muscarinic receptor subtypes differentially control synaptic input and excitability of cerebellum-projecting medial vestibular nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun; Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2016-04-01

    Neurons in the vestibular nuclei have a vital function in balance maintenance, gaze stabilization, and posture. Although muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are expressed and involved in regulating vestibular function, it remains unclear how individual mAChR subtypes regulate vestibular neuronal activity. In this study, we determined which specific subtypes of mAChRs control synaptic input and excitability of medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons that project to the cerebellum. Cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons were labeled by a fluorescent retrograde tracer and then identified in rat brainstem slices. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested that M2 and M3 were the possible major mAChR subtypes expressed in the MVN. The mAChR agonist oxotremorine-M significantly reduced the amplitude of glutamatergic excitatory post-synaptic currents evoked by stimulation of vestibular primary afferents, and this effect was abolished by the M2-preferring antagonist AF-DX 116. However, oxotremorine-M had no effect on GABA-mediated spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents of labeled MVN neurons. Furthermore, oxotremorine-M significantly increased the firing activity of labeled MVN neurons, and this effect was blocked by the M3-preferring antagonist J104129 in most neurons tested. In addition, AF-DX 116 reduced the onset latency and prolonged the excitatory effect of oxotremorine-M on the firing activity of labeled MVN neurons. Our findings suggest that M3 is the predominant post-synaptic mAChR involved in muscarinic excitation of cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons. Pre-synaptic M2 mAChR regulates excitatory glutamatergic input from vestibular primary afferents, which in turn influences the excitability of cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons. This new information has important therapeutic implications for treating vestibular disorders with mAChR subtype-selective agents. Medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons projecting to the cerebellum are involved in balance control. We

  16. Functional Characterization of CCHamide and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Signalling in Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guilin Robin

    mutants created with the CRISP/Cas9 technique showed thatCCHamide-2 is probly an orexigenic peptide and also that is an important factor for larvaldevelopmental timing.In mammals, muscarinic acetylcholine signalling is involved in the signal transmission of theparasympathetic nervous system. However...

  17. Reduced posterior cingulate binding of I-123 iodo-dexetimide to muscarinic receptors in mild Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boundy, K L; Barnden, L R; Katsifis, A G; Rowe, C C

    2005-05-01

    Early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) allows timely pharmacological and social interventions. Alteration in muscarinic receptor binding was evaluated with I-123 iodo-dexetimide (IDEX) in early clinical stage AD. We studied 11 mild AD patients (Folstein Minimental State Examination Score 24-27, Clinical Dementia Rating 0.5-1.0) and 10 age- and sex-matched normal subjects with SPECT brain imaging after injection of 185 MBq of IDEX and 750 MBq of 99mTc-HMPAO. Using a voxel based approach (Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM99) software), a deficit in IDEX binding was found in the posterior cingulate cortex in the mild AD group with p (corrected)=0.06 for the most significant voxel and p=0.0003 for the voxel cluster. Region of interest (ROI) analysis confirmed the SPM99 results. SPM99 found no deficit in the HMPAO scans, suggesting that neither atrophy nor hypoperfusion were major factors in the reduced IDEX binding. This study provides further evidence of the involvement of the posterior cingulate region and of muscarinic receptors in early Alzheimer's disease and suggests that this change may precede an alteration in blood flow. PMID:15925773

  18. Dorsal raphe nucleus acetylcholine-mediated neurotransmission modulates post-ictal antinociception: The role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Falconi-Sobrinho, Luiz Luciano; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-01-15

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is a key structure of the endogenous pain inhibitory system. Although the DRN is rich in serotoninergic neurons, cholinergic neurons are also found in that nucleus. Both ictal and inter-ictal states are followed by post-ictal analgesia. The present study investigated the role of cholinergic mechanisms in postictal antinociceptive processes using microinjections of atropine and mecamylamine, muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor antagonists, respectively, in the DRN of rats. Intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) (at 64mg/kg) caused tonic and tonic-clonic seizures. The convulsive motor reactions were followed by an increase in pain thresholds, a phenomenon known as post-ictal analgesia. Pre-treatment of the DRN with atropine or mecamylamine at 1µg, 3µg and 5µg/0.2µL decreased the post-ictal antinociceptive phenomenon. The present results showed that the post-ictal analgesia was mediated by muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the DRN, a structure crucially involved in the neural network that organises post-ictal hypoalgesia. PMID:26620541

  19. Kinetics of in vivo binding of antagonist to muscarinic cholinergic receptor in the human heart studied by Positron Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrota, A.; Paillotin, G.; Davy, J.M.; Aumont, M.C.

    1984-08-27

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was used to analyze in vivo antagonist binding to human myocardial muscarinic cholinergic receptor. The methiodide salt of the muscarinic antagonist, quinuclidinyl benzilate (MQNB), was labeled with the positron emitter, Carbon-11, and injected intravenously to 8 normal subjects. /sup 11/C-MQNB concentration was determined in vivo in the ventricular septum from 40 cross-sectional images acquired at the same transverse level over a period of 70 minutes. In 4 subjects, various amounts of unlabeled atropine were rapidly injected at 20 minutes to study whether atropine competitively inhibited MQNB. The kinetics of binding of /sup 11/C-MQNB were not the same in vivo and in vitro. The apparent dissociation rate of /sup 11/C-MQNB in vivo was much slower (by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude) than that observed in vitro with /sup 3/H-QNB. After atropine injection, /sup 11/C-MQNB dissociated from its binding sites at a rate that apparently depended on the amount of atropine present. /sup 11/C-MQNB kinetics were analyzed with a mathematical model which assumes the existence of a boundary layer containing free ligand in the vicinity of the binding sites. The dissociation rate of the radioligand depends on the probability of its rebinding to a free receptor site. 11 references, 1 table.

  20. Muscarinic receptor plasticity in the brain of senescent rats: down-regulation after repeated administration of diisopropyl fluorophosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potential age-related differences in the response of Fischer 344 rats to subchronic treatment with diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in terms of brain cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition and muscarinic receptor sites. Male 3- and 24-month old rats were sc injected with sublethal doses of DFP for 2 weeks and killed 48 hrs after the last treatment. In the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum of control rats a significant age-related reduction of ChE and of maximum number of 3H-QNB binding sites (Bmax) was observed. The administration of DFP to senescent rats resulted in more pronounced and longer lasting syndrome of cholinergic stimulation, with marked body weight loss and 60% mortality. The percentage inhibition of brain ChE induced by DFP did not differ between young and senescent rats. As expected, in young rats DFP caused a significant decrease of Bmax, which in the cerebral cortex reached about 40%. In the surviving senescent rats, the percentage decrease of Bmax due to DFP with respect to age-matched controls was very similar to that of young animals, especially in the cerebral cortex. Thus there is great variability in the response of aged rats to DFP treatment, from total failure of adaptive mechanisms resulting in death to considerable muscarinic receptor plasticity

  1. Muscarinic receptor plasticity in the brain of senescent rats: down-regulation after repeated administration of diisopropyl fluorophosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pintor, A.; Fortuna, S.; Volpe, M.T.; Michalek, H.

    1988-01-01

    Potential age-related differences in the response of Fischer 344 rats to subchronic treatment with diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in terms of brain cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition and muscarinic receptor sites. Male 3- and 24-month old rats were sc injected with sublethal doses of DFP for 2 weeks and killed 48 hrs after the last treatment. In the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum of control rats a significant age-related reduction of ChE and of maximum number of /sup 3/H-QNB binding sites (Bmax) was observed. The administration of DFP to senescent rats resulted in more pronounced and longer lasting syndrome of cholinergic stimulation, with marked body weight loss and 60% mortality. The percentage inhibition of brain ChE induced by DFP did not differ between young and senescent rats. As expected, in young rats DFP caused a significant decrease of Bmax, which in the cerebral cortex reached about 40%. In the surviving senescent rats, the percentage decrease of Bmax due to DFP with respect to age-matched controls was very similar to that of young animals, especially in the cerebral cortex. Thus there is great variability in the response of aged rats to DFP treatment, from total failure of adaptive mechanisms resulting in death to considerable muscarinic receptor plasticity.

  2. Why does the agonist [18F]FP-TZTP bind preferentially to the M2 muscarinic receptor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preferential binding of FP-TZTP at the M2 receptor in vivo led to investigation of [18F]FP-TZTP as a potential PET tracer for Alzheimer's disease, in which a substantial reduction of M2 receptors has been observed in autopsy studies. We hereby investigated in vitro the FP-TZTP behavior to further elucidate the properties of FP-TZTP that lead to its M2 selectivity. Chinese hamster ovarian cells expressing the five subtypes of human muscarinic receptor as well as the wild type were harvested in culture to assess equilibrium binding. Specific binding was calculated by subtraction of non-specific binding from total binding. Internal specific binding was calculated by subtraction of external specific binding from the total specific binding. Saturation assays were also performed to calculate Bmax, Ki, and IC50. In addition, equilibrium binding and dissociation kinetic studies were performed on rat brain tissue. Selected regions of interest were drawn on the digital autoradiograms and [18F]FP-TZTP off-rates were determined by measurement of the rate of release into a buffer solution of [18F]FP-TZTP from slide-bound cells that had been preincubated with [18F]FP-TZTP. At equilibrium in vitro, M2 subtype selectivity of [18F]FP-TZTP was not evident. We demonstrated that ATP-dependent mechanisms are not responsible for FP-TZTP M2 selectivity. In vitro off-rate studies from rat brain tissue showed that the off-rate of FP-TZTP varied with the percentage of M2 subtype in the tissue region. The slower dissociation kinetics of FP-TZTP from M2 receptors compared with the four other muscarinic receptor subtypes may be a factor in its M2 selectivity. (orig.)

  3. Why does the agonist [{sup 18}F]FP-TZTP bind preferentially to the M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravasi, L. [National Institutes of Health, PET Radiochemistry Group, National Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Bethesda, MD (United States); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Institute of Radiological Sciences, Milan (Italy); Kiesewetter, D.O.; Shimoji, K. [National Institutes of Health, PET Radiochemistry Group, National Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lucignani, G. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Institute of Radiological Sciences, Milan (Italy); European Institute of Oncology, Unit of Molecular Imaging, Division of Radiation Therapy, Milan (Italy); Eckelman, W.C. [National Institutes of Health, PET Department, Clinical Center, Bethesda, MD (United States); Molecular Tracer LLC, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2006-03-15

    Preferential binding of FP-TZTP at the M{sub 2} receptor in vivo led to investigation of [{sup 18}F]FP-TZTP as a potential PET tracer for Alzheimer's disease, in which a substantial reduction of M{sub 2} receptors has been observed in autopsy studies. We hereby investigated in vitro the FP-TZTP behavior to further elucidate the properties of FP-TZTP that lead to its M{sub 2} selectivity. Chinese hamster ovarian cells expressing the five subtypes of human muscarinic receptor as well as the wild type were harvested in culture to assess equilibrium binding. Specific binding was calculated by subtraction of non-specific binding from total binding. Internal specific binding was calculated by subtraction of external specific binding from the total specific binding. Saturation assays were also performed to calculate B{sub max}, K{sub i}, and IC{sub 50}. In addition, equilibrium binding and dissociation kinetic studies were performed on rat brain tissue. Selected regions of interest were drawn on the digital autoradiograms and [{sup 18}F]FP-TZTP off-rates were determined by measurement of the rate of release into a buffer solution of [{sup 18}F]FP-TZTP from slide-bound cells that had been preincubated with [{sup 18}F]FP-TZTP. At equilibrium in vitro, M{sub 2} subtype selectivity of [{sup 18}F]FP-TZTP was not evident. We demonstrated that ATP-dependent mechanisms are not responsible for FP-TZTP M{sub 2} selectivity. In vitro off-rate studies from rat brain tissue showed that the off-rate of FP-TZTP varied with the percentage of M{sub 2} subtype in the tissue region. The slower dissociation kinetics of FP-TZTP from M{sub 2} receptors compared with the four other muscarinic receptor subtypes may be a factor in its M{sub 2} selectivity. (orig.)

  4. The distribution of cerebral muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in vivo in patients with dementia. A controlled study with 123IQNB and single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-affinity muscarinic receptor antagonist, 123IQNB (3-quinuclidinyl-4-iodobenzilate labeled with iodine 123), was used with single photon emission computed tomography to image muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in 14 patients with dementia and in 11 healthy controls. High-resolution single photon emission computed tomographic scanning was performed 21 hours after the intravenous administration of approximately 5 mCi of IQNB. In normal subjects, the images of retained ligand showed a consistent regional pattern that correlated with postmortem studies of the relative distribution of muscarinic receptors in the normal human brain, having high radioactivity counts in the basal ganglia, occipital cortex, and insular cortex, low counts in the thalamus, and virtually no counts in the cerebellum. Eight of 12 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease had obvious focal cortical defects in either frontal or posterior temporal cortex. Both patients with a clinical diagnosis of Pick's disease had obvious frontal and anterior temporal defects. A region of interest statistical analysis of relative regional activity revealed a significant reduction bilaterally in the posterior temporal cortex of the patients with Alzheimer's disease compared with controls. This study demonstrates the practicability of acetylcholine receptor imaging with 123IQNB and single photon emission computed tomography. The data suggest that focal abnormalities in muscarinic binding in vivo may characterize some patients with Alzheimer's disease and Pick's disease, but further studies are needed to address questions about partial volume artifacts and receptor quantification

  5. Evaluation of the Interaction between NMDA Receptors of Nucleus Accumbens and Muscarinic Receptors in Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba Taheri

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Whereas studies have indicated the interaction between NMDA and cholinergic systems, this study was performed with the aim of determining the role of NMDA receptors in the nucleus accumbens (NAc in scopolamine-induced amnesia.Methods: In this study, at first rats were anesthetized with intra-peritoneal injection of ketamine hydrochloride plus xylazine, and then placed in a stereotaxic apparatus. Two stainless-steel cannulas were placed 2mm above nucleus accumbens shell. All animals were allowed to recover for one week, before beginning the behavioral testing. Then, animals were trained in a step-through type inhibitory avoidance task. The drugs were injected after successful training and before testing. The animals were tested 24h after training, and the step-through latency time was measured as the memory criterion in male Wistar rats. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey’s test were used for analysis of the data. p<0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: Intra-nucleus accumbens (intra-NAc injection of scopolamine or NMDA caused impairment in memory in rats. Although, co-administration of an ineffective dose of NMDA with an ineffective dose of scopolamine had no significant effect on memory performance, effective doses of NMDA prevented the amnesic effect of scopolamine on inhibitory avoidance memory. On the other hand, intra-NAc injection of NMDA receptor antagonist, i.e., MK-801 caused no change in memory performance by itself, and its co-administration with an effective dose of scopolamine could not prevent the impairing effect of the latter drug. Conclusion: The finding of this study indicated that NMDA receptors in the nucleus accumbens are involved in the modulation of scopolamine-induced amnesia.

  6. Quantitative autoradiography of muscarine cholinergic receptors and their M1 and M2 subtypes in the rat hippocampus. Influence of a mixed neutron-gamma irradiation. Preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The muscarine cholinergic receptors and their M1 and M2 subtypes are studied by quantitative autoradiography in the hippocampus of 8 shams and 9 rats exposed to a mixed neutron-gamma irradiation at a dose of 8 Gy. 75 minutes post irradiation, no significative difference is noted

  7. Changes of cooperativity between N-methylscopolamine and allosteric modulators alcuronium and gallamine induced by mutations of external loops of muscarinic M(3) receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejčí, Alena; Tuček, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 4 (2001), s. 761-767. ISSN 0026-895X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/99/0214 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * allosteric modulators Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.297, year: 2001

  8. PASSIVE-AVOIDANCE TRAINING INDUCES ENHANCED LEVELS OF IMMUNOREACTIVITY FOR MUSCARINIC ACETYLCHOLINE-RECEPTOR AND COEXPRESSED PKC-GAMMA AND MAP-2 IN RAT CORTICAL-NEURONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERZEE, EA; DOUMA, BRK; BOHUS, B; LUITEN, PGM

    1994-01-01

    Changes in neocortical immunoreactivity (ir) for muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), protein kinase C gamma (PKC gamma), microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PARV) induced by the performance of a one-trial passive shock avoidance (PSA) task

  9. Relation between muscarinic receptor cationic current and internal calcium in guinea-pig jejunal smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacaud, P; Bolton, T B

    1991-09-01

    1. The action of carbachol, which activates muscarinic receptors, was studied in single patch-clamped cells where free internal calcium concentration in the cell (Cai2+) was estimated using the emission from the dye Indo-1. Cells were dialysed with potassium-free caesium solution to block any Ca(2+)-activated K(+)-current. 2. Carbachol applied to the cell evoked an initial peak in Cai2+ followed by a smaller sustained rise (plateau) upon which several oscillations in Cai2+ were often superimposed; the changes in inward, cationic current (icarb) followed changes in Cai2+ closely. Calcium entry blocker did not affect these responses. 3. The initial peak in Cai2+ produced by carbachol was due to calcium store release: it was essentially unchanged at +50 mV, and abolished by prior application of caffeine (10 mM) to the cell or by inclusion of heparin (which blocks D-myoinositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors) in the pipette. In contrast, the rise in Cai2+ produced by ATP in rabbit ear artery smooth muscle cells was unaffected by caffeine or heparin as it was due to calcium entry into the cell. 4. The later sustained rise (plateau) in Cai2+ produced by carbachol was due to the entry of calcium into the cell down its electrochemical gradient as it was affected by changing the cell membrane potential or the calcium concentration of the bathing solution. As the sustained rise in Cai2+ produced by caffeine had similar properties, it was suggested that depletion of calcium stores can evoke an increased calcium entry into the cell through some pathway. 5. The cationic current evoked by carbachol was strongly dependent on Cai2+. It was small if any rise in Cai2+ due to calcium store release was prevented by the inclusion of heparin in the pipette solution and increased greatly if calcium entry was provoked through voltage-dependent channels by applying a depolarizing pulse or if calcium was released from stores by caffeine. 6. In the longitudinal muscle of guinea-pig small

  10. A novel mechanism of hippocampal LTD involving muscarinic receptor-triggered interactions between AMPARs, GRIP and liprin-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickinson Bryony A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term depression (LTD in the hippocampus can be induced by activation of different types of G-protein coupled receptors, in particular metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs and muscarinic acethycholine receptors (mAChRs. Since mGluRs and mAChRs activate the same G-proteins and isoforms of phospholipase C (PLC, it would be expected that these two forms of LTD utilise the same molecular mechanisms. However, we find a distinct mechanism of LTD involving GRIP and liprin-α. Results Whilst both forms of LTD require activation of tyrosine phosphatases and involve internalisation of AMPARs, they use different molecular interactions. Specifically, mAChR-LTD, but not mGluR-LTD, is blocked by peptides that inhibit the binding of GRIP to the AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 and the binding of GRIP to liprin-α. Thus, different receptors that utilise the same G-proteins can regulate AMPAR trafficking and synaptic efficacy via distinct molecular mechanisms. Conclusion Our results suggest that mAChR-LTD selectively involves interactions between GRIP and liprin-α. These data indicate a novel mechanism of synaptic plasticity in which activation of M1 receptors results in AMPAR endocytosis, via a mechanism involving interactions between GluA2, GRIP and liprin-α.

  11. Ca2+ is involved in muscarine-acetylcholine-receptor-mediated acetylcholine signal transduction in guard cells of Vicia faba L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Fanxia; MIAO Long; ZHANG Shuqiu; LOU Chenghou

    2004-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is an important neurochemical transmitter in animals; it also exists in plants and plays a significant role in various kinds of physiological functions in plants. ACh has been known to induce the stomatal opening. By monitoring the changes of cytosolic Ca2+ with fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM under the confocal microscopy,we found that exogenous ACh increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration of guard cells of Vicia faba L. Muscarine, an agonist of muscarine acetylcholine receptor (mAChR), could do so as well. In contrast, atropine, the antagonist of mAChR abolished the ability of ACh to increase Ca2+ in guard cells.This mechanism is similar to mAChR in animals. When EGTA was used to chelate Ca2+ or ruthenium red to block Ca2+ released from vacuole respectively, the results showed that the increased cytosolic Ca2+ mainly come from intracellular Ca2+ store. The evidence supports that Ca2+ is involved in guard-cell response to ACh and that Ca2+ signal is coupled to mAChRs in ACh signal transduction in guard cells.

  12. Rapid antidepressant actions of scopolamine: Role of medial prefrontal cortex and M1-subtype muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarria, Andrea; Wohleb, Eric S; Voleti, Bhavya; Ota, Kristie T; Dutheil, Sophie; Lepack, Ashley E; Dwyer, Jason M; Fuchikami, Manabu; Becker, Astrid; Drago, Filippo; Duman, Ronald S

    2015-10-01

    Clinical studies demonstrate that scopolamine, a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAchR) antagonist, produces rapid therapeutic effects in depressed patients, and preclinical studies report that the actions of scopolamine require glutamate receptor activation and the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The present study extends these findings to determine the role of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and specific muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M-AchR) subtypes in the actions of scopolamine. The administration of scopolamine increases the activity marker Fos in the mPFC, including the infralimbic (IL) and prelimbic (PrL) subregions. Microinfusions of scopolamine into either the IL or the PrL produced significant antidepressant responses in the forced swim test, and neuronal silencing of IL or PrL blocked the antidepressant effects of systemic scopolamine. The results also demonstrate that the systemic administration of a selective M1-AChR antagonist, VU0255035, produced an antidepressant response and stimulated mTORC1 signaling in the PFC, similar to the actions of scopolamine. Finally, we used a chronic unpredictable stress model as a more rigorous test of rapid antidepressant actions and found that a single dose of scopolamine or VU0255035 blocked the anhedonic response caused by CUS, an effect that requires the chronic administration of typical antidepressants. Taken together, these findings indicate that mPFC is a critical mediator of the behavioral actions of scopolamine and identify the M1-AChR as a therapeutic target for the development of novel and selective rapid-acting antidepressants. PMID:26102021

  13. Role of various kinases in muscarinic M3 receptor-mediated contraction of longitudinal muscle of rat colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Charles D.; Kendig, Derek M.; Al-Qudah, Mohammad; Mahavadi, Sunila; Murthy, Karnam S.; Grider, John R.

    2016-01-01

    The longitudinal muscle layer in gut is the functional opponent to the circular muscle layer during peristalsis. Differences in innervation of the layers allow for the contraction of one layer concurrently with the relaxation of the other, enabling the passage of gut contents in a controlled fashion. Differences in development have given the cells of the two layers differences in receptor populations, membrane lipid handling, and calcium handling profiles/behaviors. The contractile activity of the longitudinal muscle is largely mediated by cholinergic neural input from myenteric plexus. Activation of muscarinic receptors leads to rapid activation of several kinases including MLC kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKII and Rho kinase. Phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC20) by MLC kinase (MLCK) is a prerequisite for contraction in both circular and longitudinal muscle cells. In rat colonic longitudinal muscle strips, we measured muscarinic receptor-mediated contraction following incubation with kinase inhibitors. Basal tension was differentially regulated by Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKII and CaMKK. Selective inhibitors of Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKK/AMPK, and CaMKII each reduced carbachol-induced contraction in the innervated muscle strips. These inhibitors had no direct effect on MLCK activity. Thus unlike previously reported for isolated muscle cells where CaMKII and ERK1/2 are not involved in contraction, we conclude that the regulation of carbachol-induced contraction in innervated longitudinal muscle strips involves the interplay of Rho kinase, ERK1/2, CaMKK/AMPK, and CAMKII. PMID:25891767

  14. M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors regulate long-term potentiation at hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cell synapses in an input-specific fashion

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Fang; Wess, Jürgen; Alzheimer, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors have long been known as crucial players in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory, but our understanding of the cellular underpinnings and the receptor subtypes involved lags well behind. This holds in particular for the hippocampal CA3 region, where the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity depend on the type of afferent input. Williams and Johnston (Williams S, Johnston D. Science 242: 84–87, 1988; Williams S, Johnston D. J Neurophysiol 64: 1089–1097, 1990) demonstrated ...

  15. Preparation of an imaging agent for cerebral muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, (R,S)131I-QNB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The method to synthesize a high affinity muscarinic receptor antagonist (R,S)I-QNB[(R)-(-)-1-azabicyclo [2,2,2]oct-3-yl-(S)-(+)-α-hydroxy-α-(4-[127I]iodophenyl)-α-phenyl acetate] from 4-nitrobenzophenone with improvement compared to literatures was reported in this article. IR, MS and 1HNMR characterized the final product. (R,S)131I-QNB was prepared using Cu(I) assisted iodine exchange labeling, and showed by TLC that the radiolabeling yield(RLY) was over 80%, and radiochemical purity(RCP) was over 95%. Stability of the labeled compound was also determined. It was found that (R,S)131I-QNB dried by nitrogen blowing can stay at 4-10℃ for a week without change of RCP.

  16. Effects of trihexyphenidyl and L-dopa on brain muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding measured by positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of pharmacological intervention on brain muscarinic cholinergic receptor (mAChR) binding were assessed in seven patients with Parkinson's disease by positron emission tomography and carbon-11 labelled N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate ([11C]NMPB). [11C]NMPB was injected twice, approximately 2 hours apart, in each patient, to assess the effect of single doses of 4 mg of trihexyphenidyl (n=5) or 400 mg of L-dopa with 57 mg of benserazide (n=2) on the binding parameter of mAChRs (K3). There was a mean 28% inhibition of K3 values in the brain in the presence of trihexyphenidyl, which was assumed to reflect mAChR occupancy. No significant change in K3 was observed in the presence of L-dopa. This study demonstrates the feasibility of measuring mAChR occupancy by an anticholinergic medication with PET

  17. An interspecies comparison of mercury inhibition on muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous pollutant that can disrupt neurochemical signaling pathways in mammals. It is well documented that inorganic Hg (HgCl2) and methyl Hg (MeHg) can inhibit the binding of radioligands to the muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor in rat brains. However, little is known concerning this relationship in specific anatomical regions of the brain or in other species, including humans. The purpose of this study was to explore the inhibitory effects of HgCl2 and MeHg on [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB) binding to the mACh receptor in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex regions from human, rat, mouse, mink, and river otter brain tissues. Saturation binding curves were obtained from each sample to calculate receptor density (B max) and ligand affinity (K d). Subsequently, samples were exposed to HgCl2 or MeHg to derive IC50 values and inhibition constants (K i). Results demonstrate that HgCl2 is a more potent inhibitor of mACh receptor binding than MeHg, and the receptors in the cerebellum are more sensitive to Hg-mediated mACh receptor inhibition than those in the cerebral cortex. Species sensitivities, irrespective of Hg type and brain region, can be ranked from most to least sensitive: river otter > rat > mink > mouse > humans. In summary, our data demonstrate that Hg can inhibit the binding [3H]-QNB to the mACh receptor in a range of mammalian species. This comparative study provides data on interspecies differences and a framework for interpreting results from human, murine, and wildlife studies

  18. An Antibody Biosensor Establishes the Activation of the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor during Learning and Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Adrian J; Bradley, Sophie J; Prihandoko, Rudi; Brooke, Simon M; Mogg, Adrian; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer M; Bottrill, Andrew R; Challiss, R A John; Broad, Lisa M; Felder, Christian C; Tobin, Andrew B

    2016-04-22

    Establishing the in vivo activation status of G protein-coupled receptors would not only indicate physiological roles of G protein-coupled receptors but would also aid drug discovery by establishing drug/receptor engagement. Here, we develop a phospho-specific antibody-based biosensor to detect activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1 mAChR) in vitro and in vivo Mass spectrometry phosphoproteomics identified 14 sites of phosphorylation on the M1 mAChR. Phospho-specific antibodies to four of these sites established that serine at position 228 (Ser(228)) on the M1 mAChR showed extremely low levels of basal phosphorylation that were significantly up-regulated by orthosteric agonist stimulation. In addition, the M1 mAChR-positive allosteric modulator, 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid, enhanced acetylcholine-mediated phosphorylation at Ser(228) These data supported the hypothesis that phosphorylation at Ser(228) was an indicator of M1 mAChR activation. This was further supported in vivo by the identification of phosphorylated Ser(228) on the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus of mice following administration of the muscarinic ligands xanomeline and 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid. Finally, Ser(228) phosphorylation was seen to increase in the CA1 region of the hippocampus following memory acquisition, a response that correlated closely with up-regulation of CA1 neuronal activity. Thus, determining the phosphorylation status of the M1 mAChR at Ser(228) not only provides a means of establishing receptor activation following drug treatment both in vitro and in vivo but also allows for the mapping of the activation status of the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus following memory acquisition thereby establishing a link between M1 mAChR activation and hippocampus-based memory and learning. PMID:26826123

  19. An Antibody Biosensor Establishes the Activation of the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor during Learning and Memory*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Adrian J.; Bradley, Sophie J.; Prihandoko, Rudi; Brooke, Simon M.; Mogg, Adrian; Bourgognon, Julie-Myrtille; Macedo-Hatch, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer M.; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Challiss, R. A. John; Broad, Lisa M.; Felder, Christian C.; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the in vivo activation status of G protein-coupled receptors would not only indicate physiological roles of G protein-coupled receptors but would also aid drug discovery by establishing drug/receptor engagement. Here, we develop a phospho-specific antibody-based biosensor to detect activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1 mAChR) in vitro and in vivo. Mass spectrometry phosphoproteomics identified 14 sites of phosphorylation on the M1 mAChR. Phospho-specific antibodies to four of these sites established that serine at position 228 (Ser228) on the M1 mAChR showed extremely low levels of basal phosphorylation that were significantly up-regulated by orthosteric agonist stimulation. In addition, the M1 mAChR-positive allosteric modulator, 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid, enhanced acetylcholine-mediated phosphorylation at Ser228. These data supported the hypothesis that phosphorylation at Ser228 was an indicator of M1 mAChR activation. This was further supported in vivo by the identification of phosphorylated Ser228 on the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus of mice following administration of the muscarinic ligands xanomeline and 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-4-oxo-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid. Finally, Ser228 phosphorylation was seen to increase in the CA1 region of the hippocampus following memory acquisition, a response that correlated closely with up-regulation of CA1 neuronal activity. Thus, determining the phosphorylation status of the M1 mAChR at Ser228 not only provides a means of establishing receptor activation following drug treatment both in vitro and in vivo but also allows for the mapping of the activation status of the M1 mAChR in the hippocampus following memory acquisition thereby establishing a link between M1 mAChR activation and hippocampus-based memory and learning. PMID:26826123

  20. PET imaging of human cardiac opioid receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of opioid peptides and receptors and their role in the regulation of cardiovascular function has been previously demonstrated in the mammalian heart. The aim of this study was to image μ and δ opioid receptors in the human heart using positron emission tomography (PET). Five subjects (three females, two males, 65±8 years old) underwent PET scanning of the chest with [11C]carfentanil ([11C]CFN) and [11C]-N-methyl-naltrindole ([11C]MeNTI) and the images were analyzed for evidence of opioid receptor binding in the heart. Either [11C]CFN or [11C]MeNTI (20 mCi) was injected i.v. with subsequent dynamic acquisitions over 90 min. For the blocking studies, either 0.2 mg/kg or 1 mg/kg of naloxone was injected i.v. 5 min prior to the injection of [11C]CFN and [11C]MeNTI, respectively. Regions of interest were placed over the left ventricle, left ventricular chamber, lung and skeletal muscle. Graphical analysis demonstrated average baseline myocardial binding potentials (BP) of 4.37±0.91 with [11C]CFN and 3.86±0.60 with [11C]MeNTI. Administration of 0.2 mg/kg naloxone prior to [11C]CFN produced a 25% reduction in BP in one subject in comparison with baseline values, and a 19% decrease in myocardial distribution volume (DV). Administration of 1 mg/kg of naloxone before [11C]MeNTI in another subject produced a 14% decrease in BP and a 21% decrease in the myocardial DV. These results demonstrate the ability to image these receptors in vivo by PET. PET imaging of cardiac opioid receptors may help to better understand their role in cardiovascular pathophysiology and the effect of abuse of opioids and drugs on heart function. (orig.)

  1. Synthesis of radiotracers for studying muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the living human brain using positron emission tomography: [11C]dexetimide and [11C]levetimide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The localization and quantitation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors (m-AChR) in the living human brain using a non-invasive method such as positron emission tomography (PET) may provide valuable information about receptor changes which have been observed post mortem in patients with Huntington's chorea and Alzheimer's dementia, as well as normal brain mechanisms mediated by the m-AChR. We chose to label dexetimide as a radiotracer for studying the m-AChR and levetimide as a radiotracer for assessing non-specific binding associated with the in vivo receptor binding studies. (author)

  2. Long-Term Activation upon Brief Exposure to Xanomleline Is Unique to M1 and M4 Subtypes of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šantrůčková, Eva; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Jakubík, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2014), e88910. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/0259 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * functional selectivity * xanomeline Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  3. Changes in Membrane Cholesterol Differentially Influence Preferential and Non-preferential Signaling of the M1 and M3 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michal, Pavel; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 10 (2015), s. 2068-2070. ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05696S; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10060 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * agonist binding * cholesterol * G- protein s * signal transduction * cAMP synthesis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.593, year: 2014

  4. M1 and M3 muscarinic receptors may play a role in the neurotoxicity of anhydroecgonine methyl ester, a cocaine pyrolysis product

    OpenAIRE

    Raphael Caio Tamborelli Garcia; Livia Mendonça Munhoz Dati; Larissa Helena Torres; Mariana Aguilera Alencar da Silva; Mariana Sayuri Berto Udo; Fernando Maurício Francis Abdalla; José Luiz da Costa; Renata Gorjão; Solange Castro Afeche; Mauricio Yonamine; Niswender, Colleen M.; P. Jeffrey Conn; Rosana Camarini; Maria Regina Lopes Sandoval; Tania Marcourakis

    2015-01-01

    The smoke of crack cocaine contains cocaine and its pyrolysis product, anhydroecgonine methyl ester (AEME). AEME possesses greater neurotoxic potential than cocaine and an additive effect when they are combined. Since atropine prevented AEME-induced neurotoxicity, it has been suggested that its toxic effects may involve the muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChRs). Our aim is to understand the interaction between AEME and mAChRs and how it can lead to neuronal death. Using a rat primary hipp...

  5. Asparagine, valine, and threonine in the third extracellular loop of muscarinic receptor have essential roles in the positive cooperativity of strychnine-like allosteric modulators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Krejčí, Alena; Doležal, Vladimír

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 313, č. 2 (2005), s. 688-696. ISSN 0022-3565 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/02/1331; GA ČR(CZ) GP305/02/D090; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011306; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic receptors * positive cooperativity * mutation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.098, year: 2005

  6. Effect of partial volume correction on muscarinic cholinergic receptor imaging with single-photon emission tomography in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Animal experiments and preliminary results in humans have indicated alterations of hippocampal muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in temporal lobe epilepsy. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy often present with a reduction in hippocampal volume. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of hippocampal atrophy on the quantification of mAChR with single photon emission tomography (SPET) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Cerebral uptake of the muscarinic cholinergic antagonist [123I]4-iododexetimide (IDex) was investigated by SPET in patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy of unilateral (n=6) or predominantly unilateral (n=1) onset. Regions of interest were drawn on co-registered magnetic resonance images. Hippocampal volume was determined in these regions and was used to correct the SPET results for partial volume effects. A ratio of hippocampal IDex binding on the affected side to that on the unaffected side was used to detect changes in muscarinic cholinergic receptor density. Before partial volume correction a decrease in hippocampal IDex binding on the focus side was found in each patient. After partial volume no convincing differences remained. Our results indicate that the reduction in hippocampal IDex binding in patients with epilepsy is due to a decrease in hippocampal volume rather than to a decrease in receptor concentration. (orig.). With 2 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Lead generation using pharmacophore mapping and three-dimensional database searching: application to muscarinic M(3) receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, D P; Dougall, I G; Meghani, P; Liu, Y J; Flower, D R

    1999-08-26

    By using a pharmacophore model, a geometrical representation of the features necessary for molecules to show a particular biological activity, it is possible to search databases containing the 3D structures of molecules and identify novel compounds which may possess this activity. We describe our experiences of establishing a working 3D database system and its use in rational drug design. By using muscarinic M(3) receptor antagonists as an example, we show that it is possible to identify potent novel lead compounds using this approach. Pharmacophore generation based on the structures of known M(3) receptor antagonists, 3D database searching, and medium-throughput screening were used to identify candidate compounds. Three compounds were chosen to define the pharmacophore: a lung-selective M(3) antagonist patented by Pfizer and two Astra compounds which show affinity at the M(3) receptor. From these, a pharmacophore model was generated, using the program DISCO, and this was used subsequently to search a UNITY 3D database of proprietary compounds; 172 compounds were found to fit the pharmacophore. These compounds were then screened, and 1-[2-(2-(diethylamino)ethoxy)phenyl]-2-phenylethanone (pA(2) 6.67) was identified as the best hit, with N-[2-(piperidin-1-ylmethyl)cycohexyl]-2-propoxybenz amide (pA(2) 4. 83) and phenylcarbamic acid 2-(morpholin-4-ylmethyl)cyclohexyl ester (pA(2) 5.54) demonstrating lower activity. As well as its potency, 1-[2-(2-(diethylamino)ethoxy)phenyl]-2-phenylethanone is a simple structure with limited similarity to existing M(3) receptor antagonists. PMID:10464008

  8. Activation of the SPHK/S1P signalling pathway is coupled to muscarinic receptor-dependent regulation of peripheral airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kummer Wolfgang

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In peripheral airways, acetylcholine induces contraction via activation of muscarinic M2-and M3-receptor subtypes (M2R and M3R. Cholinergic hypersensitivity is associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma, and therefore the identification of muscarinic signaling pathways are of great therapeutic interest. A pathway that has been shown to be activated via MR and to increase [Ca2+]i includes the activation of sphingosine kinases (SPHK and the generation of the bioactive sphingolipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P. Whether the SPHK/S1P signaling pathway is integrated in the muscarinic control of peripheral airways is not known. Methods To address this issue, we studied precision cut lung slices derived from FVB and M2R-KO and M3R-KO mice. Results In peripheral airways of FVB, wild-type, and MR-deficient mice, SPHK1 was mainly localized to smooth muscle. Muscarine induced a constriction in all investigated mouse strains which was reduced by inhibition of SPHK using D, L-threo-dihydrosphingosine (DHS and N, N-dimethyl-sphingosine (DMS but not by N-acetylsphingosine (N-AcS, a structurally related agent that does not affect SPHK function. The initial phase of constriction was nearly absent in peripheral airways of M3R-KO mice when SPHK was inhibited by DHS and DMS but was unaffected in M2R-KO mice. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that the disruption of the M2R and M3R genes had no significant effect on the expression levels of the SPHK1-isoform in peripheral airways. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the SPHK/S1P signaling pathway contributes to cholinergic constriction of murine peripheral airways. In addition, our data strongly suggest that SPHK is activated via the M2R. Given the important role of muscarinic mechanisms in pulmonary disease, these findings should be of considerable therapeutic relevance.

  9. PET imaging of human cardiac opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villemagne, Patricia S.R.; Dannals, Robert F. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ravert, Hayden T. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Frost, James J. [Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 605 N Caroline St., Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Neuroscience, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2002-10-01

    The presence of opioid peptides and receptors and their role in the regulation of cardiovascular function has been previously demonstrated in the mammalian heart. The aim of this study was to image {mu} and {delta} opioid receptors in the human heart using positron emission tomography (PET). Five subjects (three females, two males, 65{+-}8 years old) underwent PET scanning of the chest with [{sup 11}C]carfentanil ([{sup 11}C]CFN) and [{sup 11}C]-N-methyl-naltrindole ([{sup 11}C]MeNTI) and the images were analyzed for evidence of opioid receptor binding in the heart. Either [{sup 11}C]CFN or [{sup 11}C]MeNTI (20 mCi) was injected i.v. with subsequent dynamic acquisitions over 90 min. For the blocking studies, either 0.2 mg/kg or 1 mg/kg of naloxone was injected i.v. 5 min prior to the injection of [{sup 11}C]CFN and [{sup 11}C]MeNTI, respectively. Regions of interest were placed over the left ventricle, left ventricular chamber, lung and skeletal muscle. Graphical analysis demonstrated average baseline myocardial binding potentials (BP) of 4.37{+-}0.91 with [{sup 11}C]CFN and 3.86{+-}0.60 with [{sup 11}C]MeNTI. Administration of 0.2 mg/kg naloxone prior to [{sup 11}C]CFN produced a 25% reduction in BP in one subject in comparison with baseline values, and a 19% decrease in myocardial distribution volume (DV). Administration of 1 mg/kg of naloxone before [{sup 11}C]MeNTI in another subject produced a 14% decrease in BP and a 21% decrease in the myocardial DV. These results demonstrate the ability to image these receptors in vivo by PET. PET imaging of cardiac opioid receptors may help to better understand their role in cardiovascular pathophysiology and the effect of abuse of opioids and drugs on heart function. (orig.)

  10. Differences in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the central nervous system of long sleep and short sleep mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differences in voluntary ethanol consumption have been noted in various inbred strains of mice and pharmacogenetic approaches have been used to study the mechanisms of action of many drugs such as ethanol. Long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice, selectively bred for differences in ethanol induced narcosis, provide a method by which a relationship between the differential responsiveness of these geno-types and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) may be evaluated. Sleep times after injection of 3ml ethanol/kg (i.p.) verified the higher sensitivity of LS vs. SS. Mean body weights of LS (26.5g) vs. SS (22g) were also significantly (p3H](-) quinuclidinylbenzilate ([3H](-)QNB), a specific but nonsubtype selective mAChR antagonist, [3H]pirenzepine ([3H]PZ), a specific M1 mAChR antagonist and [3H]11-2-[[2-[(diethylamino) methyl]-1-piperidinyl] acetyl]-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido (2,3-b) (1,4) benzodiazepine-6-one, ([3H]AF-DX 116), an M2 selective antagonist were performed to determine mAChR affinity (Kd) and density (Bmax) in CNS regions such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, corpus striatum and other areas. Significantly lower (30-40%) [3H](-)QNB binding suggests that SS have fewer mAChR's than LS in many areas. These differences may relate to their differential ethanol sensitivity

  11. Sex-related differences in the muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor in the healthy human brain. A positron emission tomography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the sex-related differences in the decline of the cerebral muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor (mACh-R) due to aging by using 11C-N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate (11C-NMPB) and positron emission tomography (PET). The subjects consisted of 37 (20 males and 17 females) healthy volunteers. The 11C-NMPB uptake was evaluated by the ratio method (regional 11C-NMPB uptake/Cerebellar 11C-NMPB uptake; rNMPB ratio). The correlation between sex, aging, and the rNMPB ratio in normal aging was evaluated by a multiple regression analysis. The rNMPB ratio was higher in females than in males throughout the entire cerebral region (p<0.01-p<0.0001) and the rNMPB ratio might thus possibly decline with age more rapidly in females. Our study therefore revealed the existence of sex-related differences in the cerebral mACh-R. (author)

  12. Effect of Daicong solution on hippocampal muscarinic receptors 1 and 3 gene expression in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Wang; Shumei Zhao; Qi'an Yue; Lefa Yan; Ying Gong; Rui Ji; Jingzong Gao

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:It has been previously shown that the muscarinic(M)receptor is involved in brain arousal and selective attention,mood,and motor coordination.OBJECTIVE:To explore the effects of various intragastric Daicong doses on hippocampal M1 and M3 receptor gene expression in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:A randomized cellular and molecular biology experiment,conducted at the Molecular Immunology Laboratory in Shandong bctween October 2006 and April 2007.MATERIALS:Fifty 22-month old Sprague Dawley rats,weighing 250-300 g were used for this experiment.Kainic acid was used to lesion the nucleus basalis to establish a rat model of Alzheimer's disease.The components of Daicong solution were as follows:ginseng,rehmannia dride rhizome,anemarrhena,and radix astragali.The solution was provided by the Affiliated Hospital to Weifang Medical College,according to preparation techniques of extracting liquid for traditional Chinese medicine(1 g crude drug/mL solution).Kainic acid was provided by Professor Xiuyan Li at Weifang Medical College.METHODS:The rats were randomly divided into 5 groups,10 rats in each group.Four groups were used for model establishment.and the fifth group served as a normal control group.Three of the model groups were intragastrically administered 5,10,and 20 g/kg/d Daicong solution,and an additional model group and nonnal control group received normal saline(10 mL/kg/d).Drugs were administered over a time period of one month.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Four days after model establishment,Morris water maze was used to measure learning and memory capabilities.RT-PCR was used to detect the effect of Daicong solution on mRNA expression of M1 and M3 receptor in the hippocampus of all groups.RESULTS:Fifty rats were included in the final analysis,without any loss.M1 and M3 receptor mRNA expression was decreased in the model group,compared to the normal control group(P<0.05).Upon Daicong administration(10 g/kg/d and 20 g/kg/d),M1 and M3

  13. Experiment K-6-18. Study of muscarinic and gaba (benzodiazepine) receptors in the sensory-motor cortex, hippcampus and spinal code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunton, N.; Damelio, F.; Krasnov, I.

    1990-01-01

    Frontal lobe samples of rat brains flown aboard Cosmos 1887 were processed for the study of muscarinic (cholinergic) and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors and for immunocytochemical localization of the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Although radioactive labeling of both muscarinic cholinergic and GABA (benzodiazepine) receptors proved to be successful with the techniques employed, distinct receptor localization of individual laminae of the frontal neocortex was not possible since the sampling of the area was different in the various groups of animals. In spite of efforts made for proper orientation and regional identification of laminae, it was found that a densitometric (quantitation of autoradiograms) analysis of the tissue did not contribute to the final interpretation of the effects of weightlessness on these receptors. As to the immunocytochemical studies the use of both markers, GFAP and GABA antiserum, confirmed the suitability of the techniques for use in frozen material. However, similar problems to those encountered in the receptor studies prevented an adequate interpretation of the effects of micro-G exposure on the localization and distribution of GABA and GFAP. This study did, however, confirm the feasibility of investigating neurotransmitters and their receptors in future space flight experiments.

  14. Effects of muscarinic M1 receptor blockade on cocaine-induced elevations of brain dopamine levels and locomotor behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanda, Gianluigi; Ebbs, Aaron L; Kopajtic, Theresa A; Elias, Lyn M; Campbell, Bettye L; Newman, Amy H; Katz, Jonathan L

    2007-04-01

    Cholinergic muscarinic systems have been shown to influence dopaminergic function in the central nervous system. In addition, previous studies of benztropine analogs that inhibit dopamine uptake and show antagonism at muscarinic receptors show these drugs to be less effective than cocaine in producing its various prototypic effects such as locomotor stimulation. Because previous pharmacological studies on these topics have used nonselective M1 antagonists, we examined the interactions of preferential M1 muscarinic antagonists and cocaine. Dose-dependent increases in extracellular levels of dopamine in selected brain areas, the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell and core, and the prefrontal cortex, were produced by cocaine but not by the preferential M1 antagonists telenzepine and trihexyphenidyl. When administered with cocaine, however, both M1 antagonists dose-dependently increased the effects of cocaine on dopamine in the NAc shell, and these effects were selective in that they were not obtained in the NAc core or in the prefrontal cortex. Telenzepine also increased locomotor activity, although the effect was small compared with that of cocaine. The locomotor stimulant effects of trihexyphenidyl, in contrast, approached those of cocaine. Telenzepine attenuated, whereas trihexyphenidyl enhanced the locomotor stimulant effects of cocaine, with neither drug facilitating cocaine-induced stereotypy. The present results indicate that preferential antagonist effects at muscarinic M1 receptors do not uniformly alter all of the effects of cocaine, nor do they explain the differences in effects of cocaine and benztropine analogs, and that the alterations in dopamine levels in the NAc shell do not predict the behavioral effects of the interactions with cocaine. PMID:17255465

  15. AT2 Receptors Targeting Cardiac Protection Post-Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaschina, Elena; Lauer, Dilyara; Schmerler, Patrick; Unger, Thomas; Steckelings, Ulrike Muscha

    2014-01-01

    The angiotensin AT2-receptor mediates tissue protective actions. Its regenerative potential has been tested in multiple disease models including models of myocardial infarction. These studies used different experimental approaches in order to detect AT2-receptor-related effects such as AT2-receptor...... deficiency or overexpression, treatment with an AT1-receptor blocker leading to indirect stimulation of the unopposed AT2-receptor, or studies using AT2-receptor agonists. It is a common finding in these studies that the AT2-receptor improves cardiac function in the early phase post-MI, and that this effect...... is preserved over periods of up to four months. Depending on the experimental protocol, the AT2R also attenuates post-MI left ventricular remodeling or protects the heart from early left ventricular thinning and rupture. In combination with AT1-receptor blockade or deficiency, post-MI cardiac...

  16. Reduced muscarinic receptors in the cingulate cortex in mild Alzheimer's disease demonstrated with 123I iodo-dexetamide SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Parietal hypoperfusion/hypometabolism is a feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In early AD this may be preceded by changes in the posterior cingulate cortex, part of the cortico-limbic circuit with connections to the medial temporal lobes. Because cholinergic function is affected in early AD, we aimed to investigate the binding of the muscarinic receptor label, I-123 iodo-dexetamide (IDEX). We recruited 11 mild (MiniMental State Examination 27-24) and 11 moderate (MMSE 23-16) Alzheimer's patients and 10 age and sex-matched normal subjects. SPECT was performed six hours after injection of 185 MBq IDEX. Sections were reconstructed with attenuation correction using an iterative algorithm (OSEM). Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM 99) was used to analyse the data. Because there is very little IDEX uptake in the cerebellum and thalamus it was necessary to edit them from the SPM PET template. Facial and scalp activity was also edited. Global scaling relative to the basal ganglia was used. Significant areas of decreased IDEX binding were found in the mild Alzheimer's group in the cingulate cortex with pvoxel = .08 and pcluster < 0.001, (particularly the posterior cingulate), left parietotemporal junction (pcluster = 0.01) and posteromedial left temporal lobe (pcluster = 0.03). In moderate AD extensive areas of decreased binding were found in the posterior cingulate, parietal and temporal lobes. The difference between the group-means at the posterior cingulate was 14% (mild AD) and 22% (moderate AD). Hypoperfusion, hypometabolism and now reduced cholinergic receptors have been demonstrated in the posterior cingulate in mild AD. Greater attention to this area may enhance the diagnostic value of functional imaging in early AD. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  17. Stereoselective interaction of procyclidine, hexahydro-difenidol, hexbutinol and oxyphencyclimine, and of related antagonists, with four muscarinic receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Waelbroeck, M.; Camus, J.; Tastenoy, M.; Mutschler, E; Strohmann, C.; Tacke, Reinhold; Schjelderup, L.; Aasen, A.; Lambrecht, G.; Christophe, J.

    2012-01-01

    Wc invcstigatcd thc binding properlies of thc (R)- and (Sl-cnantiomcrs of thc muscarinic antagonists trihcxyphcnidyl, procyclidinc, hcxahydro-difcnidol. p-fluoro-hcxahydro-difcnidol. hcxbutinol, p-fluoro-hcxbutinnl. and thcir corrcsponding mcthiodidcs at muscarinic M1• M 1• M~ and M4 rcccptor subtypcs. In addition. binding properlies of thc (R)- and (S)-cnantiomcrs of oxyphcncycliminc wcrc studicd. Thc {R)- cnantiomcrs (cutomcrs} of all thc compounds had a grcatcr affinity than thc (S)-isomcr...

  18. Antipsychotic-induced catalepsy is attenuated in mice lacking the M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink-Jensen, Anders; Schmidt, Lene S; Dencker, Ditte;

    2011-01-01

    A delicate balance exists between the central dopaminergic and cholinergic neurotransmitter systems with respect to motor function. An imbalance can result in motor dysfunction as observed in Parkinson's disease patients and in patients treated with antipsychotic compounds. Cholinergic receptor a...

  19. Studies for transitional changes of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and mRNA distribution by focal ischemia using nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessing stress-induced brain receptor responses is important in understanding clinical brain receptor images for nuclear medicine. It is known that cholinergic neurons are decreased by Alzheimer's disease and that there is a close relationship between cholinergic neurons and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAchR). Thus, this study assessed the response of mAchR to focal ischemia using infarction model rats (prepared by middle cerebral artery occlusion) and sham-operated rats. In the same rats, three kinds of images -- ex vivo regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) images with 99mTc-hexametyl-propyleneamine oxime (99mTc-HMPAO), in vitro mAchR binding images with [3H] quinuclidinyl benzilate (3H-QNB), and mAchR-mRNA images by in situ hybridization method using 35S-labeled-oligonucleotide probes specific for mAchR gene subtypes of m1 to m5 -- were obtained in acute and chronic phases. Each image datum was digitalized and assessed semi-quantitatively. There were significant changes in global distribution among rCBF, mAchR and mAchR-mRNAs. In the acute phase, there was no significant change in mAchR in the infarcted area, although rCBF markedly decreased. In the chronic phase, there was a significant decrease in mAchR in the infarct-sided thalamus, although there was no change in rCBF; and there was a significant decrease in mAchR of the infarct-sided substantia nigra in spite of increase in rCBF. In the acute phase, mAchR-mRNAs of the infarct-sided caudate-putamen was decreased, suggesting that the ability of cholinergic neuron to synthesize receptor protein had decreased in the acute phase. Because mAchR was not decreased in the acute phase, some viable neurons with no normal function may be preserved in the acute phase. These results were encouraging in understanding mAchR brain images of patients with memory disturbances such as cerebrovascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. (N.K.)

  20. Role of M2 Muscarinic Receptor in the Airway Response to Methacholine of Mice Selected for Minimal or Maximal Acute Inflammatory Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juciane Maria de Andrade Castro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway smooth muscle constriction induced by cholinergic agonists such as methacholine (MCh, which is typically increased in asthmatic patients, is regulated mainly by muscle muscarinic M3 receptors and negatively by vagal muscarinic M2 receptors. Here we evaluated basal (intrinsic and allergen-induced (extrinsic airway responses to MCh. We used two mouse lines selected to respond maximally (AIRmax or minimally (AIRmin to innate inflammatory stimuli. We found that in basal condition AIRmin mice responded more vigorously to MCh than AIRmax. Treatment with a specific M2 antagonist increased airway response of AIRmax but not of AIRmin mice. The expression of M2 receptors in the lung was significantly lower in AIRmin compared to AIRmax animals. AIRmax mice developed a more intense allergic inflammation than AIRmin, and both allergic mouse lines increased airway responses to MCh. However, gallamine treatment of allergic groups did not affect the responses to MCh. Our results confirm that low or dysfunctional M2 receptor activity is associated with increased airway responsiveness to MCh and that this trait was inherited during the selective breeding of AIRmin mice and was acquired by AIRmax mice during allergic lung inflammation.

  1. Annulated heterocyclic bioisosteres of norarecoline. Synthesis and molecular pharmacology at five recombinant human muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Ebert, B; Brann, M R;

    1995-01-01

    = 0.011 microM), and 4d (IC50 = 0.0008 microM). Pharmacological effects (EC50 or Ki values) and intrinsic activities (per cent of maximal carbachol responses) were determined using five recombinant human mAChRs (m1-m5) and the functional assay, receptor selection and amplification technology (R-SAT...

  2. Taurolithocholic acid promotes intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell growth via muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and EGFR/ERK1/2 signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    AMONYINGCHAROEN, SUMET; SURIYO, TAWIT; THIANTANAWAT, APINYA; WATCHARASIT, PIYAJIT; SATAYAVIVAD, JUTAMAAD

    2015-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a malignant cancer of the biliary tract and its occurrence is associated with chronic cholestasis which causes an elevation of bile acids in the liver and bile duct. The present study aimed to investigate the role and mechanistic effect of bile acids on the CCA cell growth. Intrahepatic CCA cell lines, RMCCA-1 and HuCCA-1, were treated with bile acids and their metabolites to determine the growth promoting effect. Cell viability, cell cycle analysis, EdU incorporation assays were conducted. Intracellular signaling proteins were detected by western immunoblotting. Among eleven forms of bile acids and their metabolites, only taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) concentration dependently (1–40 μM) increased the cell viability of RMCCA-1, but not HuCCA-1 cells. The cell cycle analysis showed induction of cells in the S phase and the EdU incorporation assay revealed induction of DNA synthesis in the TLCA-treated RMCCA-1 cells. Moreover, TLCA increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, ERK 1/2 and also increased the expression of cyclin D1 in RMCCA-1 cells. Furthermore, TLCA-induced RMCCA-1 cell growth could be inhibited by atropine, a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist, AG 1478, a specific EGFR inhibitor, or U 0126, a specific MEK 1/2 inhibitor. These results suggest that TLCA induces CCA cell growth via mAChR and EGFR/EKR1/2 signaling pathway. Moreover, the functional presence of cholinergic system plays a certain role in TLCA-induced CCA cell growth. PMID:25815516

  3. Acetylcholine muscarinic receptors and response to anti-cholinesterase therapy in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Derek [Department of Psychiatry, Stobhill Hospital, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Chisholm, Jennifer A.; Patterson, Jim; Wyper, David [Department of Clinical Physics, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, G51 4TF (United Kingdom); Owens, Jonathan; Pimlott, Sally [Department of Clinical Physics, Western Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2003-02-01

    An acetylcholine deficit remains the most consistent neurotransmitter abnormality found in Alzheimer's disease and various therapeutic agents have been targeted at this. In this study we investigated the action of Donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor that has few side-effects. In particular we set out to investigate whether muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) availability influences the response to this therapy. We used the novel single-photon emission tomography (SPET) tracer (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-quinuclidinyl benzilate (R,R[{sup 123}I]I-QNB), which has high affinity for the M1 subtype of mAChR. Regional cerebral perfusion was also assessed using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime. We investigated 20 patients on Donepezil treatment and ten age-matched controls. The results showed a reduction in (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding in the caudal anterior cingulate in patients compared with controls and relatively high binding in the putamen and rostral anterior cingulate, suggesting a relative sparing of mAChR in these regions. The main finding of the study was that mAChR availability as assessed by (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding did not distinguish responders from non-responders. Interestingly, we found that the extent of cognitive improvement showed no positive correlation with (R,R)[{sup 123}I]I-QNB binding in any brain region but was inversely related to binding in the insular cortex. This suggests that, within the advised cognitive performance band for use of Donepezil, response is greater in those patients with evidence of a more marked cholinergic deficit. A larger study should investigate this. (orig.)

  4. Differences in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the central nervous system of long sleep and short sleep mice. [Ethanol effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, M.; Ming, X.; McArdle, J.J. (Univ of Medical, Newark, NJ (USA))

    1989-02-09

    Differences in voluntary ethanol consumption have been noted in various inbred strains of mice and pharmacogenetic approaches have been used to study the mechanisms of action of many drugs such as ethanol. Long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice, selectively bred for differences in ethanol induced narcosis, provide a method by which a relationship between the differential responsiveness of these geno-types and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) may be evaluated. Sleep times after injection of 3ml ethanol/kg (i.p.) verified the higher sensitivity of LS vs. SS. Mean body weights of LS (26.5g) vs. SS (22g) were also significantly (p<.01) greater. Binding assays for ({sup 3}H)(-) quinuclidinylbenzilate (({sup 3}H)(-)QNB), a specific but nonsubtype selective mAChR antagonist, ({sup 3}H)pirenzepine (({sup 3}H)PZ), a specific M1 mAChR antagonist and ({sup 3}H)11-2-((2-((diethylamino) methyl)-1-piperidinyl) acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido (2,3-b) (1,4) benzodiazepine-6-one, (({sup 3}H)AF-DX 116), an M2 selective antagonist were performed to determine mAChR affinity (K{sub d}) and density (B{sub max}) in CNS regions such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, corpus striatum and other areas. Significantly lower (30-40%) ({sup 3}H)(-)QNB binding suggests that SS have fewer mAChR's than LS in many areas. These differences may relate to their differential ethanol sensitivity.

  5. Repression of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression in fast skeletal muscle fibers by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and Gαq signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Theresa; Li, Jinyuan; Jiang, Hongbin; DiMario, Joseph X.

    2003-01-01

    Gene expression in skeletal muscle fibers is regulated by innervation and intrinsic fiber properties. To determine the mechanism of repression of slow MyHC2 expression in innervated fast pectoralis major (PM) fibers, we investigated the function of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAchR) and Gαq. Both mAchR and Gαq are abundant in medial adductor (MA) and PM fibers, and mAchR and Gαq interact in these fibers. Whereas innervation of PM fibers was insufficient to induce slow MyHC2 express...

  6. Demonstration of a reduction in muscarinic receptor binding in early Alzheimer's disease using iodine-123 dexetimide single-photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreased muscarinic receptor binding has been suggested in single-photon emission tomography (SPET) studies of Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unclear whether these changes are present in mildly demented patients, and the role of cortical atrophy in receptor binding assessment has not been investigated. We studied muscarinic receptor binding normalized to neostriatum with SPET using [123I[4-iododexetimide in five mildly affected patients with probable Alzheimer's disease and in five age-matched control subjects. Region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed in a consensus procedure blind to clinical diagnosis using matched magnetic resonance (MRI) images. Cortical atrophy was assessed by calculating percentages of cerebrospinal fluid in each ROI. An observer study with three observers was conducted to validate this method. Alzheimer patients showed statistically significantly less [123I[4-iododexetimide binding in left temporal and right temporo-parietal cortex compared with controls, independent of age, sex and cortical atrophy. Mean intra-observer variability was 3.6% and inter-observer results showed consistent differences in [123I[4-iododexetimide binding between observers. However, differences between patients and controls were comparable among observers and statistically significant in the same regions as in the consensus procedure. Using an MRI-SPET matching technique, we conclude that [123I[4-iododexetimide binding is reduced in patients with mild probable Alzheimer's disease in areas of temporal and temporo-parietal cortex. (orig.). With 1 fig., 4 tabs

  7. Demonstration of a reduction in muscarinic receptor binding in early Alzheimer`s disease using iodine-123 dexetimide single-photon emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claus, J.J. [Department of Neurology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dubois, E.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Booij, J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Habraken, J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Munck, J.C. van [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Herk, M. van [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verbeeten, B. Jr. [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Royen, E.A. van [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-06-10

    Decreased muscarinic receptor binding has been suggested in single-photon emission tomography (SPET) studies of Alzheimer`s disease. However, it remains unclear whether these changes are present in mildly demented patients, and the role of cortical atrophy in receptor binding assessment has not been investigated. We studied muscarinic receptor binding normalized to neostriatum with SPET using [{sup 123}I]4-iododexetimide in five mildly affected patients with probable Alzheimer`s disease and in five age-matched control subjects. Region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed in a consensus procedure blind to clinical diagnosis using matched magnetic resonance (MRI) images. Cortical atrophy was assessed by calculating percentages of cerebrospinal fluid in each ROI. An observer study with three observers was conducted to validate this method. Alzheimer patients showed statistically significantly less [{sup 123}I]4-iododexetimide binding in left temporal and right temporo-parietal cortex compared with controls, independent of age, sex and cortical atrophy. Mean intra-observer variability was 3.6% and inter-observer results showed consistent differences in [{sup 123}I]4-iododexetimide binding between observers. However, differences between patients and controls were comparable among observers and statistically significant in the same regions as in the consensus procedure. Using an MRI-SPET matching technique, we conclude that [{sup 123}I]4-iododexetimide binding is reduced in patients with mild probable Alzheimer`s disease in areas of temporal and temporo-parietal cortex. (orig.). With 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  8. Activity of muscarinic, galanin and cannabinoid receptors in the prodromal and advanced stages in the triple transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Iván; Lombardero, Laura; LaFerla, Frank M; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Rodríguez-Puertas, Rafael

    2016-08-01

    Neurochemical alterations in Alzheimer's disease (AD) include cholinergic neuronal loss in the nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM) and a decrease in densities of the M2 muscarinic receptor subtype in areas related to learning and memory. Neuromodulators present in the cholinergic pathways, such as neuropeptides and neurolipids, control these cognitive processes and have become targets of research in order to understand and treat the pathophysiological and clinical stages of the disease. This is the case of the endocannabinoid and galaninergic systems, which have been found to be up-regulated in AD, and could therefore have a neuroprotective role. In the present study, the functional coupling of Gi/o protein-coupled receptors to GalR1, and the CB1 receptor subtype for endocannabinoids were analyzed in the 3xTg-AD mice model of AD. In addition, the activity mediated by Gi/o protein-coupled M2/4 muscarinic receptor subtypes was also analyzed in brain areas involved in anxiety and cognition. Thus, male mice were studied at 4 and 15months of age (prodromal and advanced stages, respectively) and compared to age-matched non-transgenic (NTg) mice (adult and old, respectively). In 4-month-old 3xTg-AD mice, the [(35)S]GTPγS binding stimulated by galanin was significantly increased in the hypothalamus, but a decrease of functional M2/4 receptors was observed in the posterior amygdala. The CB1 cannabinoid receptor activity was up-regulated in the anterior thalamus at that age. In 15-month-old 3xTg-AD mice, muscarinic receptor activity was found to be increased in motor cortex, while CB1 activity was decreased in nbM. No changes were found in GalR1-mediated activity at this age. Our results provide further evidence of the relevance of limbic areas in the prodromal stage of AD, the profile of which is characterized by anxiety. The up-regulation of galaninergic and endocannabinoid systems support the hypothesis of their neuroprotective roles, and these are established prior to the

  9. Guanosine 5'-triphosphate binding protein (G/sub i/) and two additional pertussis toxin substrates associated with muscarinic receptors in rat heart myocytes: characterization and age dependency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coupling of muscarinic receptors with G-proteins was investigated in cultured myocytes prepared from the hearts of newborn rats. The coupling was investigated in both young (5 days after plating) and aged (14 days after plating) cultures, in view of the completely different effects of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p] on muscarinic agonist binding to homogenates from young vs aged cultures. Pretreatment of cultures from both ages by Bordetella pertussis toxin (IAP) was found to eliminate any Gpp(NH)p effect on carbamylcholine binding. IAP by itself induced a rightward shift in the carbamylcholine competition curve in homogenates from aged cultures, but no such effect was observed in homogenates from young cultures. IAP-catalyzed [32P]ADP-ribosylation of membrane preparations from young and aged cultures revealed major differences between them. Young cultures exhibited a major IAP substrate at 40 kDa, which was also recognized by anti-α/sub i/ antibodies, and two novel IAP substrates at 28 and 42 kDa, which were weakly ADP-ribosylated by the toxin and were not recognized with either anti-α/sub i/ or anti-α0 antibodies. In aged cultures, only the 40-kDa band (ribosylated to a lower degree) was detected. The parallel age-dependent changes in the three IAP substrates (28, 40, and 42 kDa) and in the interactions of the G-protein(s) with the muscarinic receptors strongly suggest close association between the two phenomena. All of these age-dependent changes in the G-protein related parameters were prevented by phosphatidylcholine-liposome treatment of the aged cultures. The role of the membrane lipid composition in these phenomena is discussed

  10. Cigarette Smoke Disturbs the Survival of CD8+ Tc/Tregs Partially through Muscarinic Receptors-Dependent Mechanisms in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Chen

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cells (Cytotoxic T cells, Tc are known to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of smoking related airway inflammation including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, how cigarette smoke directly impacts systematic CD8+ T cell and regulatory T cell (Treg subsets, especially by modulating muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (MRs, has yet to be well elucidated.Circulating CD8+ Tc/Tregs in healthy nonsmokers (n = 15, healthy smokers (n = 15 and COPD patients (n = 18 were evaluated by flow cytometry after incubating with anti-CD3, anti-CD8, anti-CD25, anti-Foxp3 antibodies. Peripheral blood T cells (PBT cells from healthy nonsmokers were cultured in the presence of cigarette smoke extract (CSE alone or combined with MRs agonist/antagonist for 5 days. Proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometry using Ki-67/Annexin-V antibodies to measure the effects of CSE on the survival of CD8+ Tc/Tregs.While COPD patients have elevated circulating percentage of CD8+ T cells, healthy smokers have higher frequency of CD8+ Tregs. Elevated percentages of CD8+ T cells correlated inversely with declined FEV1 in COPD. CSE promoted the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of CD8+ T cells, while facilitated both the proliferation and apoptosis of CD8+ Tregs. Notably, the effects of CSE on CD8+ Tc/Tregs can be mostly simulated or attenuated by muscarine and atropine, the MR agonist and antagonist, respectively. However, neither muscarine nor atropine influenced the apoptosis of CD8+ Tregs.The results imply that cigarette smoking likely facilitates a proinflammatory state in smokers, which is partially mediated by MR dysfunction. The MR antagonist may be a beneficial drug candidate for cigarette smoke-induced chronic airway inflammation.

  11. Increased efflux of amyloid-β peptides through the blood-brain barrier by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor inhibition reduces pathological phenotypes in mouse models of brain amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganetti, Paolo; Antoniello, Katia; Devraj, Kavi; Toni, Nicolas; Kieran, Dairin; Madani, Rime; Pihlgren, Maria; Adolfsson, Oskar; Froestl, Wolfgang; Schrattenholz, André; Liebner, Stefan; Havas, Daniel; Windisch, Manfred; Cirrito, John R; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The formation and accumulation of toxic amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) in the brain may drive the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease and related disorders could result from treatments regulating Aβ homeostasis. Examples are the inhibition of production, misfolding, and accumulation of Aβ or the enhancement of its clearance. Here we show that oral treatment with ACI-91 (Pirenzepine) dose-dependently reduced brain Aβ burden in AβPPPS1, hAβPPSL, and AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice. A possible mechanism of action of ACI-91 may occur through selective inhibition of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) on endothelial cells of brain microvessels and enhanced Aβ peptide clearance across the blood-brain barrier. One month treatment with ACI-91 increased the clearance of intrathecally-injected Aβ in plaque-bearing mice. ACI-91 also accelerated the clearance of brain-injected Aβ in blood and peripheral tissues by favoring its urinal excretion. A single oral dose of ACI-91 reduced the half-life of interstitial Aβ peptide in pre-plaque mhAβPP/PS1d mice. By extending our studies to an in vitro model, we showed that muscarinic AChR inhibition by ACI-91 and Darifenacin augmented the capacity of differentiated endothelial monolayers for active transport of Aβ peptide. Finally, ACI-91 was found to consistently affect, in vitro and in vivo, the expression of endothelial cell genes involved in Aβ transport across the Blood Brain Brain (BBB). Thus increased Aβ clearance through the BBB may contribute to reduced Aβ burden and associated phenotypes. Inhibition of muscarinic AChR restricted to the periphery may present a therapeutic advantage as it avoids adverse central cholinergic effects. PMID:24072071

  12. Dopamine-Induced Stress Signaling in COS-7 Cells Transfected With Selectively Vulnerable Muscarinic Receptor Subtypes is Partially Mediated Via the i3 Loop and Antagonized By Blueberry Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscarinic receptors (MAChRs) are intimately involved in various aspects of both neuronal and vascular functioning, and there is selective oxidative stress sensitivity (OSS) among MAChR subtypes, with M1, M2, and M4 showing > OSS as evidenced by the inability of the cell to extrude or sequester Ca2+...

  13. Evidence for cholinergic participation in the control of bird song; acetylcholinesterase distribution and muscarinic receptor autoradiography in the zebra finch brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brain regions thought to be involved in the control of song in the zebra finch (Poephila guttata), were examined histochemically using the Karnovsky and Roots direct-coloring method for the detection of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the autoradiographic method for the localization of muscarinic cholinergic receptors following injection of tritiated quinuclidinyl benzilate (3H QNB). All presently identified vocal control nuclei in both males and females contain AChE. These nuclei include Area X, magnocellular nucleus of the anterior neostriatum (MAN), nucleus interface (NIF), caudal nucleus of the hyperstriatum ventrale (HVc), intercollicular nucleus (ICo), nucleus uva, robust nucleus of the archistriatum (RA), and tracheosyringeal portion of the hypoglossal nerve nucleus (nXIIts). All nuclei except Area X contain mostly AChE-synthesizing cell bodies. All of these nuclei contain some AChE in the neuropil, with particularly intense staining in Area X, the surrounding LPO, and the dorsomedial portion of ICo. In agreement with this description are very high concentrations of 3H QNB in both Area X and the dorsomedial ICo. HVc also appears specifically labeled. Evidence from these two histological technique suggests that efferent projections of most vocal control area may utilize acetylcholine, and that several of the vocal control nuclei may themselves receive muscarinic cholinergic projection. In Area X, there are sex differences of AChE neuropil staining. This evidence suggesting that sexually dimorphic projections to or within Area X are cholinergic or cholinoceptive

  14. Triazolam-induced modulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor in living brain slices as revealed by a new positron-based imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of triazolam, a potent benzodiazepine (BZ) agonist, on muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor (mAChR) binding was investigated in living brain slices by use of a novel positron-based imaging technique. Fresh rat brain slices were incubated with [11C]N-methyl-4-piperidylbenzilate ([11C]NMPB), a mAChR antagonist, in oxygenated Krebs-Ringer solution at 37 degree C. During incubation, time-resolved imaging of [11C]NMPB binding in the slices was constructed on the storage phosphor screens. Addition of triazolam (1 μM) plus muscimol (30 μM), a GABAA receptor agonist, to the incubation mixture decreased the specific binding of [11C]NMPB. Ro15-1788, a BZ receptor antagonist, prevented this effect, indicating that the effect was exerted through the GABAA/BZ receptor complex. These results demonstrated that stimulation of the GABAA/BZ receptor lowers the affinity of the mAChR for its ligand, which may underlie the BZ-induced amnesia, a serious clinical side effect of BZ. No such effect in the P2-fraction instead implies that the integrity of the neuronal cells and/or their environment is prerequisite for the modulation of mAChR by GABAA/BZ stimulation. (author)

  15. The role of protein kinase-G in the antidepressant-like response of sildenafil in combination with muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebenberg, Nico; Wegener, Gregers; Brink, Christiaan; Harvey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently we reported on a novel antidepressant-like response following simultaneous administration of sildenafil (PDE5 inhibitor, thereby increasing cGMP levels), and atropine (muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist) in the rat forced swim test (FST). It is unclear whether the...... antidepressant-like activity of sildenafil + atropine is mediated via the activation of PK-G, a downstream effector for cGMP, and whether this may target known pathways in antidepressant action. Purpose We investigated whether the antidepressant-like response of sildenafil ± atropine could be reversed by Rp-8-Br......-PET-cGMP, a PK-G inhibitor, and also whether a combination of 8-Br-cGMP (PK-G activator) ± atropine would likewise be active in the FST, and whether this combination could be attenuated by a PK-G inhibitor. Study methods The FST consisted of a 15 minute pre-conditioning swim session on the first day of the...

  16. Cardiac-Specific Knockout of ETA Receptor Mitigates Paraquat-Induced Cardiac Contractile Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaxing; Lu, Songhe; Zheng, Qijun; Hu, Nan; Yu, Wenjun; Li, Na; Liu, Min; Gao, Beilei; Zhang, Guoyong; Zhang, Yingmei; Wang, Haichang

    2016-07-01

    Paraquat (1,1'-dim ethyl-4-4'-bipyridinium dichloride), a highly toxic quaternary ammonium herbicide widely used in agriculture, exerts potent toxic prooxidant effects resulting in multi-organ failure including the lung and heart although the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Recent evidence suggests possible involvement of endothelin system in paraquat-induced acute lung injury. This study was designed to examine the role of endothelin receptor A (ETA) in paraquat-induced cardiac contractile and mitochondrial injury. Wild-type (WT) and cardiac-specific ETA receptor knockout mice were challenged to paraquat (45 mg/kg, i.p.) for 48 h prior to the assessment of echocardiographic, cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) properties, as well as apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. Levels of the mitochondrial proteins for biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation including UCP2, HSP90 and PGC1α were evaluated. Our results revealed that paraquat elicited cardiac enlargement, mechanical anomalies including compromised echocardiographic parameters (elevated left ventricular end-systolic and end-diastolic diameters as well as reduced factional shortening), suppressed cardiomyocyte contractile function, intracellular Ca(2+) handling, overt apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. ETA receptor knockout itself failed to affect myocardial function, apoptosis, mitochondrial integrity and mitochondrial protein expression. However, ETA receptor knockout ablated or significantly attenuated paraquat-induced cardiac contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) defect, apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. Taken together, these findings revealed that endothelin system in particular the ETA receptor may be involved in paraquat-induced toxic myocardial contractile anomalies possibly related to apoptosis and mitochondrial damage. PMID:26089164

  17. Activation biosensor for G protein-coupled receptors: a FRET-based m1 muscarinic activation sensor that regulates G(q.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungwoo Chang

    Full Text Available We describe the design, construction and validation of a fluorescence sensor to measure activation by agonist of the m1 muscarinic cholinergic receptor, a prototypical class I G(q-coupled receptor. The sensor uses an established general design in which Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET from a circularly permuted CFP mutant to FlAsH, a selectively reactive fluorescein, is decreased 15-20% upon binding of a full agonist. Notably, the sensor displays essentially wild-type capacity to catalyze activation of Gα(q, and the purified and reconstituted sensor displays appropriate regulation of affinity for agonists by G(q. We describe the strategies used to increase the agonist-driven change in FRET while simultaneously maintaining regulatory interactions with Gα(q, in the context of the known structures of Class I G protein-coupled receptors. The approach should be generally applicable to other Class I receptors which include numerous important drug targets.

  18. Reductions of {sup 56}Fe heavy-particle irradiation-induced deficits in striatal muscarinic receptor sensitivity by selective cross-activation/inhibition of second-messenger systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, J.A.; Villalobos-Molina, R.; Rabin, B.M.; Dalton, T.K.; Harris, A.; Kandasamy, S. [Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Recent experiments have revealed radiation-induced losses of sensitivity of rodent neostriatal muscarinic receptors to stimulation by cholinergic agonists that appears as reduction in oxotremorine enhancement of K{sup +}-evoked dopamine release. These losses were postulated to be the result of radiation-induced alterations early in phosphoinositide-mediated signal transduction. Additional findings indicated that if the ligand-receptor-G protein interface was bypassed no radiation deficits were seen. In the present study, radiation-induced deficits in K{sup +}-evoked dopamine release were examined in perifused striatal tissue obtained from rats exposed to 0,0.1 or 1.0 Gy of {sup 56}Fe particles. Results showed that these deficits could be reduced by co-applying combinations of various pharmacological agents that were known to have differential effects on various second messengers such as 1,4,5-inositoltrisphosphate (IP{sub 3}). Combinations included oxotremorine-carbachol, and either oxotremorine or carbachol with arginine vasopressin or arachidonic acid. These results are discussed in terms of putative radiation-induced changes in receptor-containing membranes which alter receptor-G protein coupling/uncoupling. 49 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Hook-up of GluA2, GRIP and liprin-α for cholinergic muscarinic receptor-dependent LTD in the hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Long-Jun

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular mechanism underlying muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-dependent LTD (mAChR-LTD in the hippocampus is less studied. In a recent study, a novel mechanism is described. The induction of mAChR-LTD required the activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP, and the expression was mediated by AMPA receptor endocytosis via interactions between GluA2, GRIP and liprin-α. The hook-up of these proteins may result in the recruitment of leukocyte common antigen-related receptor (LAR, a PTP that is known to be involved in AMPA receptor trafficking. Interestingly, the similar molecular interaction cannot be applied to mGluR-LTD, despite the fact that the same G-protein involved in LTD is activated by both mAChR and mGluR. This discovery provides key molecular insights for cholinergic dependent cognitive function, and mAChR-LTD can serve as a useful cellular model for studying the roles of cholinergic mechanism in learning and memory.

  20. Spatial localization of ryanodine receptors in human cardiac cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallmitjana, A; Nolla, C; Herraiz-Martínez, A; Hove-Madsen, L; Benítez, R

    2015-08-01

    We present a novel image processing method to determine the location of ryanodine receptors in cardiac cells. A semi-automatic manual validation by an expert has been used in order to establish the performance of the segmentation method. The approach provides high accuracy under different experimental conditions and it is robust to common sources of noise including experimental, molecular and biological fluctuations. PMID:26737732

  1. Prostacyclin receptor suppresses cardiac fibrosis: role of CREB phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Elsa C; Dusting, Gregory J; Guo, Nancy; Peshavariya, Hitesh M; Taylor, Caroline J; Dilley, Rodney; Narumiya, Shuh; Jiang, Fan

    2010-08-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is a consequence of many cardiovascular diseases and contributes to impaired ventricular function. Activation of the prostacyclin receptor (IP) protects against cardiac fibrosis, but the molecular mechanisms are not totally understood. Using mouse cardiac fibroblasts, we found that IP activation with cicaprost suppressed expression of collagen I and other target genes of transforming growth factor-beta. This effect of cicaprost was unlikely to be mediated by inhibition of the Smad2/3 or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activities, but was associated with cAMP elevation and phosphorylation of the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Expression of a non-phosphorylated CREB mutant suppressed the inhibitory effect of cicaprost. It appears that phosphorylated CREB binds to and sequestrates the transcription coactivator CBP/p300 from binding to Smad. Inhibition of the intrinsic histone acetyl-transferase activity of CBP/p300 with garcinol significantly suppressed collagen I expression in fibroblasts. Using apolipoprotein E and IP double knockout mouse, we demonstrated that endogenous prostacyclin/IP signaling had an inhibitory effect on angiotensin II-induced cardiac fibrosis under hypercholesterolemic conditions. Taken together, our results suggest that the prostacyclin/IP pathway suppresses cardiac fibrosis, at least partly, by inducing CREB phosphorylation. PMID:20403362

  2. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype 4 is essential for cholinergic stimulation of duodenal bicarbonate secretion in mice - relationship to D cell/somatostatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, K; Kita, K; Takahashi, K; Aihara, E; Hayashi, S

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the roles of muscarinic (M) acetylcholine receptor subtype in the cholinergic stimulation of duodenal HCO3(-) secretion using knockout (KO) mice. Wild-type and M1-M5 KO C57BL/6J mice were used. The duodenal mucosa was mounted on an Ussing chamber, and HCO3(-) secretion was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method in vitro. Carbachol (CCh) or other agents were added to the serosal side. CCh dose-dependently stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in wild-type mice, and this effect was completely inhibited in the presence of atropine. The HCO3(-) response to CCh in wild-type mice was also inhibited by pirenzepine (M1 antagonist), 4DAMP (M3 antagonist), and tropicamide (M4 antagonist), but not by methoctramine (M2 antagonist). CCh stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in M2 and M5 KO animals as effectively as in WT mice; however, this stimulatory effect was significantly attenuated in M1, M3, and M4 KO mice. The decrease observed in the CCh-stimulated HCO3(-) response in M4 KO mice was reversed by the co-application of CYN154806, a somatostatin receptor type 2 (SST2) antagonist. Octreotide (a somatostatin analogue) decreased the basal and CCh-stimulated secretion of HCO3(-) in wild-type mice. The co-localized expression of somatostatin and M4 receptors was confirmed immunohistologically in the duodenum. We concluded that the duodenal HCO3(-) response to CCh was directly mediated by M1/M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. The activation of M4 receptors was assumed to inhibit the release of somatostatin from D cells and potentiate the HCO3(-) response by removing the negative influence of somatostatin via the activation of SST2 receptors. PMID:26084221

  3. 3D Reconstructed Cyto-, Muscarinic M2 Receptor, and Fiber Architecture of the Rat Brain Registered to the Waxholm Space Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Nicole; Axer, Markus; Schober, Martin; Huynh, Anh-Minh; Huysegoms, Marcel; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Bjaalie, Jan G.; Leergaard, Trygve B.; Kirlangic, Mehmet E.; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution multiscale and multimodal 3D models of the brain are essential tools to understand its complex structural and functional organization. Neuroimaging techniques addressing different aspects of brain organization should be integrated in a reference space to enable topographically correct alignment and subsequent analysis of the various datasets and their modalities. The Waxholm Space (http://software.incf.org/software/waxholm-space) is a publicly available 3D coordinate-based standard reference space for the mapping and registration of neuroanatomical data in rodent brains. This paper provides a newly developed pipeline combining imaging and reconstruction steps with a novel registration strategy to integrate new neuroimaging modalities into the Waxholm Space atlas. As a proof of principle, we incorporated large scale high-resolution cyto-, muscarinic M2 receptor, and fiber architectonic images of rat brains into the 3D digital MRI based atlas of the Sprague Dawley rat in Waxholm Space. We describe the whole workflow, from image acquisition to reconstruction and registration of these three modalities into the Waxholm Space rat atlas. The registration of the brain sections into the atlas is performed by using both linear and non-linear transformations. The validity of the procedure is qualitatively demonstrated by visual inspection, and a quantitative evaluation is performed by measurement of the concordance between representative atlas-delineated regions and the same regions based on receptor or fiber architectonic data. This novel approach enables for the first time the generation of 3D reconstructed volumes of nerve fibers and fiber tracts, or of muscarinic M2 receptor density distributions, in an entire rat brain. Additionally, our pipeline facilitates the inclusion of further neuroimaging datasets, e.g., 3D reconstructed volumes of histochemical stainings or of the regional distributions of multiple other receptor types, into the Waxholm Space

  4. Evidence for cross-talk between M2 and M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the regulation of second messenger and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signalling pathways in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hornigold, David C; Mistry, Rajendra; Raymond, Pamela D; Blank, Jonathan L; John Challiss, R A

    2003-01-01

    We have examined possible mechanisms of cross-talk between the Gq/11-linked M3 muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor and the Gi/o-linked M2 mACh receptor by stable receptor coexpression in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. A number of second messenger (cyclic AMP, Ins(1,4,5)P3) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK and JNK) responses stimulated by the mACh receptor agonist methacholine were examined in CHO-m2m3 cells and compared to those stimulated in CHO-m2 and CHO-m3 cell-lines, ex...

  5. Beta amyloid differently modulate nicotinic and muscarinic receptor subtypes which regulate in vitro and in vivo the release of glycine in the rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania eZappettini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Using both in vitro (hippocampal synaptosomes in superfusion and in vivo (microdialysis approaches we investigated whether and to what extent β amyloid peptide 1-40 (Aβ 1-40 interferes with the cholinergic modulation of the release of glycine (GLY in the rat hippocampus. The nicotine-evoked overflow of endogenous GLY in hippocampal synaptosomes in superfusion was significantly inhibited by Aβ 1-40 (10 nM while increasing the concentration to 100 nM the inhibitory effect did not further increase. Both the Choline (Ch (α7 agonist; 1 mM and the 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride (5IA85380, α4β2 agonist; 10 nM-evoked GLY overflow were inhibited by Aβ1-40 at 100 nM but not at 10nM concentrations. The KCl evoked [3H]GLY and [3H]Acetylcholine (ACh overflow were strongly inhibited in presence of oxotremorine; however this inhibitory muscarinic effect was not affected by Aβ1-40. The effects of Aβ1-40 on the administration of nicotine, veratridine, 5IA85380 and PHA 543613 hydrochloride (PHA543613 (a selective agonist of α7 subtypes on hippocampal endogenous GLY release in vivo were also studied. Aβ 1-40 significantly reduced (at 10 μM but not at 1 μM the nicotine evoked in vivo release of GLY. Aβ 1-40 (at 10 μM but not at 1 μM significantly inhibited the PHA543613 (1 mM-elicited GLY overflow while was ineffective on the GLY overflow evoked by 5IA85380 (1 mM. Aβ 40-1 (10 μM did not produce any inhibitory effect on nicotine evoked GLY overflow both in the in vitro and in vivo experiments. Our results indicate that a the cholinergic modulation of the release of GLY occurs by the activation of both α7 and α4β2 nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs as well as by the activation of inhibitory muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs and b Aβ 1-40 can modulate cholinergic evoked GLY release exclusively through the interaction with α7 and the α4β2 nAChR nicotinic receptors but not through mAChR subtypes.

  6. Memory enhancement induced by post-training intrabasolateral amygdala infusions of β-adrenergic or muscarinic agonists requires activation of dopamine receptors: Involvement of right, but not left, basolateral amygdala

    OpenAIRE

    LaLumiere, Ryan T; McGaugh, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Previous findings indicate that the noradrenergic, dopaminergic, and cholinergic innervations of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) modulate memory consolidation. The current study investigated whether memory enhancement induced by post-training intra-BLA infusions of a β-adrenergic or muscarinic cholinergic agonist requires concurrent activation of dopamine (DA) receptors in the BLA. Rats with implanted BLA cannulae were trained on an inhibitory avoidance (IA) task and, 48 h later, tested for re...

  7. A novel cell-based assay for inhibitory anti-muscarinic type 3 receptor antibodies in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Isabell; Gordon, Tom P; Jackson, Michael W

    2015-12-01

    Inhibitory autoantibodies acting at the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor type 3 (M3R) are postulated to mediate autonomic dysfunction, including decreased salivary and lacrimal gland output and extra-glandular manifestations, in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome. However, the contention that anti-M3R antibodies are pathogenic in patients remains untested, due to a lack of assays both sophisticated enough to detect inhibitory anti-M3R antibodies yet suitable for screening large patient cohorts. In the current study, we have established a cell-based bioassay of M3R activity, based on dual transfection of the M3R and a luciferase reporter gene. The bioassay is capable of capturing real-time agonist-mediated signalling of the M3R, which is inhibited specifically by patient IgG that have previously been demonstrated to have anti-M3R activity. The assay can be run in multi-well culture plates, and analysed using simple luminescence readers. As such, the new bioassay incorporating M3R-mediated luciferase transduction is the first assay adaptable to common diagnostic platforms that is capable of determining the presence in patient serum of functionally active anti-M3R autoantibodies. The new bioassay should prove useful for large cohort screening studies aiming to correlate the presence in patients of inhibitory anti-M3R antibodies with symptoms of both glandular and extra-glandular autonomic dysfunction. PMID:26584897

  8. M1 and M3 muscarinic receptors may play a role in the neurotoxicity of anhydroecgonine methyl ester, a cocaine pyrolysis product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Raphael Caio Tamborelli; Dati, Livia Mendonça Munhoz; Torres, Larissa Helena; da Silva, Mariana Aguilera Alencar; Udo, Mariana Sayuri Berto; Abdalla, Fernando Maurício Francis; da Costa, José Luiz; Gorjão, Renata; Afeche, Solange Castro; Yonamine, Mauricio; Niswender, Colleen M; Conn, P Jeffrey; Camarini, Rosana; Sandoval, Maria Regina Lopes; Marcourakis, Tania

    2015-01-01

    The smoke of crack cocaine contains cocaine and its pyrolysis product, anhydroecgonine methyl ester (AEME). AEME possesses greater neurotoxic potential than cocaine and an additive effect when they are combined. Since atropine prevented AEME-induced neurotoxicity, it has been suggested that its toxic effects may involve the muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChRs). Our aim is to understand the interaction between AEME and mAChRs and how it can lead to neuronal death. Using a rat primary hippocampal cell culture, AEME was shown to cause a concentration-dependent increase on both total [(3)H]inositol phosphate and intracellular calcium, and to induce DNA fragmentation after 24 hours of exposure, in line with the activation of caspase-3 previously shown. Additionally, we assessed AEME activity at rat mAChR subtypes 1-5 heterologously expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells. l-[N-methyl-(3)H]scopolamine competition binding showed a preference of AEME for the M2 subtype; calcium mobilization tests revealed partial agonist effects at M1 and M3 and antagonist activity at the remaining subtypes. The selective M1 and M3 antagonists and the phospholipase C inhibitor, were able to prevent AEME-induced neurotoxicity, suggesting that the toxicity is due to the partial agonist effect at M1 and M3 mAChRs, leading to DNA fragmentation and neuronal death by apoptosis. PMID:26626425

  9. Novel Toll-like receptor-4 deficiency attenuates trastuzumab (Herceptin) induced cardiac injury in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yousif Nasser; Al-amran Fadhil G

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Cardiac inflammation and generation of oxidative stress are known to contribute to trastuzumab (herceptin) induced cardiac toxicity. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a part of the innate immune system and are involved in cardiac stress reactions. Since TLR4 might play a relevant role in cardiac inflammatory signaling, we investigated whether or not TLR4 is involved in trastuzumab induced cardiotoxicity. Methods Seven days after a single injection of herceptin (2 mg/kg; i.p.)...

  10. Antagonism by 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetraline and other serotonin agonists of muscarinic M1-type receptors coupled to inositol phospholipid breakdown in human IMR-32 and SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IMR-32 and SK-N-MC cells were found to contain [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate specific binding sites inhibited by pirenzepine in a manner suggesting the presence of both M1-type and M2-type muscarinic receptor recognition sites. Neither cell had detectable [3H]8-OH-DPAT binding sites. Carbachol stimulated the rate of inositol phospholipid breakdown in IMR-32 and SK-N-MC human neuroblastoma cells with an EC50 value of about 50 μM in both cases. Pirenzepine inhibited the carbachol stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown in both cells with Hill slopes of unity and IC50 values of 15 nM (IMR-32) and 12 nM (SK-N-MC). The 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT competitively inhibited carbachol-stimulated inositol phospholipid breakdown with pA2 values of 5.78 (IMR-32) and 5.61 (SK-N-MC). The 5-HT agonists 5-MeODMT and buspirone at micromolar concentrations inhibited carbachol-stimulated breakdown in IMR-32 cells. The inhibition by 8-OH-DPAT and 5-MeODMT was not affected by preincubation with (-)alprenolol. 5-HT was without effect on either basal or carbachol-stimulated breakdown. It is concluded that IMR-32 and SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells express muscarinic M1-type but not serotoninergic receptors coupled to phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C. 8-OH-DPAT acts as a weak antagonist at these muscarinic receptors

  11. Muscarinic modulation of erg potassium current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirdes, Wiebke; Horowitz, Lisa F; Hille, Bertil

    2004-08-15

    We studied modulation of current in human embryonic kidney tsA-201 cells coexpressing rat erg1 channels with M(1) muscarinic receptors. Maximal current was inhibited 30% during muscarinic receptor stimulation, with a small positive shift of the midpoint of activation. Inhibition was attenuated by coexpression of the regulator of G-protein signalling RGS2 or of a dominant-negative protein, G(q), but not by N-ethylmaleimide or C3 toxin. Overexpression of a constitutively active form of G(q) (but not of G(13) or of G(s)) abolished the erg current. Hence it is likely that G(q/11), and not G(i/o) or G(13), mediates muscarinic inhibition. Muscarinic suppression of erg was attenuated by chelating intracellular Ca(2+) to polysulphate, preincubation with thapsigargin, and removal of extracellular Ca(2+)). Hence a minimum amount of Ca(2+) was necessary for the inhibition, but a Ca(2+) elevation was not. The ATP analogue AMP-PCP did not prevent inhibition. The protein kinase C (PKC) blockers staurosporine and bisindolylmaleimide I did not prevent inhibition, and the PKC-activating phorbol ester PMA did not mimic it. Neither the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein nor the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor dephostatin prevented inhibition by oxotremorine-M. Hence protein kinases are not needed. Experiments with a high concentration of wortmannin were consistent with recovery being partially dependent on PIP(2) resynthesis. Wortmannin did not prevent muscarinic inhibition. Our studies of muscarinic inhibition of erg current suggest a role for phospholipase C, but not the classical downstream messengers, such as PKC or a calcium transient. PMID:15235086

  12. Localization of the M2 muscarinic cholinergic receptor in dendrites, cholinergic terminals, and noncholinergic terminals in the rat basolateral amygdala: An ultrastructural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Jay F; Mascagni, Franco; Zaric, Violeta; Mott, David D; McDonald, Alexander J

    2016-08-15

    Activation of M2 muscarinic receptors (M2Rs) in the rat anterior basolateral nucleus (BLa) is critical for the consolidation of memories of emotionally arousing events. The present investigation used immunocytochemistry at the electron microscopic level to determine which structures in the BLa express M2Rs. In addition, dual localization of M2R and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter protein (VAChT), a marker for cholinergic axons, was performed to determine whether M2R is an autoreceptor in cholinergic axons innervating the BLa. M2R immunoreactivity (M2R-ir) was absent from the perikarya of pyramidal neurons, with the exception of the Golgi complex, but was dense in the proximal dendrites and axon initial segments emanating from these neurons. Most perikarya of nonpyramidal neurons were also M2R-negative. About 95% of dendritic shafts and 60% of dendritic spines were M2 immunoreactive (M2R(+) ). Some M2R(+) dendrites had spines, suggesting that they belonged to pyramidal cells, whereas others had morphological features typical of nonpyramidal neurons. M2R-ir was also seen in axon terminals, most of which formed asymmetrical synapses. The main targets of M2R(+) terminals forming asymmetrical (putative excitatory) synapses were dendritic spines, most of which were M2R(+) . The main targets of M2R(+) terminals forming symmetrical (putative inhibitory or neuromodulatory) synapses were unlabeled perikarya and M2R(+) dendritic shafts. M2R-ir was also seen in VAChT(+) cholinergic terminals, indicating a possible autoreceptor role. These findings suggest that M2R-mediated mechanisms in the BLa are very complex, involving postsynaptic effects in dendrites as well as regulating release of glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid, and acetylcholine from presynaptic axon terminals. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2400-2417, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26779591

  13. Electron microscopic localization of M2-muscarinic receptors in cholinergic and noncholinergic neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental and pedunculopontine nuclei of the rat mesopontine tegmentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón, Miguel; Pickel, Virginia M

    2016-10-15

    Muscarinic m2 receptors (M2Rs) are implicated in autoregulatory control of cholinergic output neurons located within the pedunculopontine (PPT) and laterodorsal tegmental (LTD) nuclei of the mesopontine tegmentum (MPT). However, these nuclei contain many noncholinergic neurons in which activation of M2R heteroceptors may contribute significantly to the decisive role of the LTD and PPT in sleep-wakefulness. We examined the electron microscopic dual immunolabeling of M2Rs and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAchT) in the MPT of rat brain to identify the potential sites for M2R activation. M2R immunogold labeling was predominately seen in somatodendritic profiles throughout the PPT/LTD complex. In somata, M2R immunogold particles were often associated with Golgi lamellae and cytoplasmic endomembrannes, but were rarely in contact with the plasma membrane, as was commonly seen in dendrites. Approximately 36% of the M2R-labeled somata and 16% of the more numerous M2R-labeled dendrites coexpressed VAchT. M2R and M2R/VAchT-labeled dendritic profiles received synapses from inhibitory- and excitatory-type axon terminals, over 88% of which were unlabeled and others contained exclusively M2R or VAchT immunoreactivity. In axonal profiles M2R immunogold was localized to plasmalemmal and cytoplasmic regions and showed a similar distribution in many VAchT-negative glial profiles. These results provide ultrastructural evidence suggestive of somatic endomembrane trafficking of M2Rs, whose activation serves to regulate the postsynaptic excitatory and inhibitory responses in dendrites of cholinergic and noncholinergic neurons in the MPT. They also suggest the possibility that M2Rs in this brain region mediate the effects of acetylcholine on the release of other neurotransmitters and on glial signaling. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:3084-3103, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27038330

  14. Impaired recovery of brain muscarinic receptor sites following an adaptive down-regulation induced by repeated administration of diisopropyl fluorophosphate in aged rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pintor, A.; Fortuna, S.; De Angelis, S.; Michalek, H. (Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Rome (Italy))

    1990-01-01

    Potential age-related differences in the recovery rate of brain cholinesterase activity (ChE) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding sites (mAChRs) following reduction induced by repeated treatment with diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats. Male 3- and 24-month old rats were s.c. injected with DFP on alternate days for 2 weeks and killed 48 hr and 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days after the last treatment. In the hippocampus and striatum, but not in the cerebral cortex, of control rats there as a significant age-related decline of ChE activity and maximal density of 3H-QNB binding sites (Bmax). The repeated administration of DFP during the first week caused a syndrome of cholinergic stimulation both in aged and young rats. The syndrome was more pronounced, in terms of intensity and duration in aged than in young animals resulting in 40 and 12% mortality, respectively; during the second week the syndrome attenuated in the two age-groups. The percentage inhibition of brain ChE at the end of DFP treatment did not differ between young and surviving aged rats. The down-regulation of mACRs was present in the three brain regions of both young and age rats (from 20 to 40%). Factorial analysis of variance showed significant differences for age, recovery rate, and significant interaction between age and recovery rate, both for ChE and mAChRs in young rats the three brain areas.

  15. Role for the M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor in Top-Down Cognitive Processing Using a Touchscreen Visual Discrimination Task in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, R W; Dencker, D; Grannan, M; Bubser, M; Zhan, X; Wess, J; Xiang, Z; Locuson, C; Lindsley, C W; Conn, P J; Jones, C K

    2015-10-21

    The M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtype has been implicated in the underlying mechanisms of learning and memory and represents an important potential pharmacotherapeutic target for the cognitive impairments observed in neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Patients with schizophrenia show impairments in top-down processing involving conflict between sensory-driven and goal-oriented processes that can be modeled in preclinical studies using touchscreen-based cognition tasks. The present studies used a touchscreen visual pairwise discrimination task in which mice discriminated between a less salient and a more salient stimulus to assess the influence of the M1 mAChR on top-down processing. M1 mAChR knockout (M1 KO) mice showed a slower rate of learning, evidenced by slower increases in accuracy over 12 consecutive days, and required more days to acquire (achieve 80% accuracy) this discrimination task compared to wild-type mice. In addition, the M1 positive allosteric modulator BQCA enhanced the rate of learning this discrimination in wild-type, but not in M1 KO, mice when BQCA was administered daily prior to testing over 12 consecutive days. Importantly, in discriminations between stimuli of equal salience, M1 KO mice did not show impaired acquisition and BQCA did not affect the rate of learning or acquisition in wild-type mice. These studies are the first to demonstrate performance deficits in M1 KO mice using touchscreen cognitive assessments and enhanced rate of learning and acquisition in wild-type mice through M1 mAChR potentiation when the touchscreen discrimination task involves top-down processing. Taken together, these findings provide further support for M1 potentiation as a potential treatment for the cognitive symptoms associated with schizophrenia. PMID:26176846

  16. Impaired recovery of brain muscarinic receptor sites following an adaptive down-regulation induced by repeated administration of diisopropyl fluorophosphate in aged rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potential age-related differences in the recovery rate of brain cholinesterase activity (ChE) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding sites (mAChRs) following reduction induced by repeated treatment with diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats. Male 3- and 24-month old rats were s.c. injected with DFP on alternate days for 2 weeks and killed 48 hr and 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days after the last treatment. In the hippocampus and striatum, but not in the cerebral cortex, of control rats there as a significant age-related decline of ChE activity and maximal density of 3H-QNB binding sites (Bmax). The repeated administration of DFP during the first week caused a syndrome of cholinergic stimulation both in aged and young rats. The syndrome was more pronounced, in terms of intensity and duration in aged than in young animals resulting in 40 and 12% mortality, respectively; during the second week the syndrome attenuated in the two age-groups. The percentage inhibition of brain ChE at the end of DFP treatment did not differ between young and surviving aged rats. The down-regulation of mACRs was present in the three brain regions of both young and age rats (from 20 to 40%). Factorial analysis of variance showed significant differences for age, recovery rate, and significant interaction between age and recovery rate, both for ChE and mAChRs in young rats the three brain areas

  17. APJ acts as a dual receptor in cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scimia, Maria Cecilia; Hurtado, Cecilia; Ray, Saugata; Metzler, Scott; Wei, Ke; Wang, Jianming; Woods, Chris E; Purcell, Nicole H; Catalucci, Daniele; Akasaka, Takeshi; Bueno, Orlando F; Vlasuk, George P; Kaliman, Perla; Bodmer, Rolf; Smith, Layton H; Ashley, Euan; Mercola, Mark; Brown, Joan Heller; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar

    2012-08-16

    Cardiac hypertrophy is initiated as an adaptive response to sustained overload but progresses pathologically as heart failure ensues. Here we report that genetic loss of APJ, a G-protein-coupled receptor, confers resistance to chronic pressure overload by markedly reducing myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure. In contrast, mice lacking apelin (the endogenous APJ ligand) remain sensitive, suggesting an apelin-independent function of APJ. Freshly isolated APJ-null cardiomyocytes exhibit an attenuated response to stretch, indicating that APJ is a mechanosensor. Activation of APJ by stretch increases cardiomyocyte cell size and induces molecular markers of hypertrophy. Whereas apelin stimulates APJ to activate Gαi and elicits a protective response, stretch signals in an APJ-dependent, G-protein-independent fashion to induce hypertrophy. Stretch-mediated hypertrophy is prevented by knockdown of β-arrestins or by pharmacological doses of apelin acting through Gαi. Taken together, our data indicate that APJ is a bifunctional receptor for both mechanical stretch and the endogenous peptide apelin. By sensing the balance between these stimuli, APJ occupies a pivotal point linking sustained overload to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. PMID:22810587

  18. Selective estrogen receptor modulators promising for cardiac syndrome X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Y

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac syndrome X (CSX is defined as a typical anginal-like chest pain with a transient ischemic electrocardiogram, but without abnormal coronary angiography. It is usually accepted that endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, oxidative stress and estrogen deficiency are the main reasons of CSX. There are some methods to treat CSX including statins, b blocker, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, nitrates, estrogen, and so on. The estrogen replacement therapy (ERT, in particular, has been reported by many researchers to significantly reduce the frequency of chest pain after administration of estrogen, which has been explained as estrogen acting on its receptor to improve the endothelial function. However, it has been suggested that ERT must not be used for coronary heart disease due to its adverse effects. However, some selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs can inhibit inflammatory response as well as oxidative stress, and improve the endothelial function, to reduce the occurrence of chest pain. Here, we hypothesize that SERMs may be the beneficial selection for patients with CSX.

  19. The effect of ZMS on the coupling of muscarinic receptor to G-proteins activation in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbachol-stimulated [35S]GTP γ S binding method was used to observe the effect of ZMS, an active component from Zhimu, on the coupling of M-receptor to G-protein. the effect of ZMS on the ability of learning and memory in aged rats was also observed. It was shown that the carbachol-stimulated elevation of [35S]GTPγS binding was significantly decreased in aged rats as compared with young rats. The carbachol-induced [35S]STPγS binding showed that administration of ZMS at median or high dose have a definite elevation effect on the coupling activity of M-receptors to G-protein in brain, and this elevation was accompanied by an improvement of learning and memory ability

  20. No changes in lymphocyte muscarinic receptors and platelet monoamine oxidase-B examined as surrogate central nervous system biomarkers in a Faroese children cohort prenatally exposed to methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coccini, Teresa; Manzo, Luigi; Debes, Frodi;

    2009-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) and muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChRs) are involved in the pathogenesis of neurotoxicity caused by methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Blood samples from 7-year-old exposed children were analyzed for platelet MAO......-B and lymphocyte mAChRs as potential markers of exposure to these neurotoxicants. The blood neurotoxicity biomarkers were compared with prenatal and current exposures and with neuropsychological test results. Both biomarkers showed homogeneous distributions within this cohort (mAChR, range 0...

  1. Selective activation of M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors reverses MK-801-induced behavioral impairments and enhances associative learning in rodents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubser, Michael; Bridges, Thomas M; Dencker, Ditte;

    2014-01-01

    . VU0467154 produced a robust dose-dependent reversal of MK-801-induced hyperlocomotion and deficits in preclinical models of associative learning and memory functions, including the touchscreen pairwise visual discrimination task in wild-type mice, but failed to reverse these stimulant-induced...... antipsychotic drug-like profile in rodents after amphetamine challenge. Previous studies suggest that enhanced cholinergic activity may also improve cognitive function and reverse deficits observed with reduced signaling through the N-methyl-d-aspartate subtype of the glutamate receptor (NMDAR) in the central...... nervous system. Prior to this study, the M1 mAChR subtype was viewed as the primary candidate for these actions relative to the other mAChR subtypes. Here we describe the discovery of a novel M4 PAM, VU0467154, with enhanced in vitro potency and improved pharmacokinetic properties relative to other M4...

  2. Calcium Sensing Receptor Promotes Cardiac Fibroblast Proliferation and Extracellular Matrix Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinying Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Calcium-sensing receptor (CaR acts as a G protein coupled receptor that mediates the increase of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. The expression of CaR has been confirmed in various cell types, including cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, neurons and vascular endothelial cells. However, whether CaR is expressed and functions in cardiac fibroblasts has remained unknown. The present study investigated whether CaR played a role in cardiac fibroblast proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM secretion, both in cultured rat neonatal cardiac fibroblasts and in a model of cardiac hypertrophy induced by isoproterenol (ISO. Methods and Results: Immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis revealed the presence of CaR in cardiac fibroblasts. Calcium and calindol, a specific activator of CaR, elevated the intracellular calcium concentration in cardiac fibroblasts. Pretreatment of cardiac fibroblasts with calhex231, a specific inhibitor of CaR, U73122 and 2-APB attenuated the calindol- and extracellular calcium-induced increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i. Cardiac fibroblast proliferation and migration were assessed by MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, cell count and the cell scratch assay. ECM production was detected by expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 and -9 (MMP-3 and -9. Activation of CaR promoted cardiac fibroblast proliferation and migration and ECM secretion. More importantly, calhex231, suppressed cardiac fibroblast proliferation and migration and MMP-3 and -9 expression. To further investigate the effect of CaR on cardiac fibrosis, a model of ISO-induced cardiac hypertrophy was established. Pretreatment with calhex231 prevented cardiac fibrosis and decreased the expression of MMP-3 and -9 expression. Conclusions: Our results are the first report that CaR plays an important role in Ca2+ signaling involved in cardiac fibrosis through the phospholipase C- inositol 3

  3. Perspectives for design of selective muscarinic agonists

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jakubík, Jan; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, E. E.; Janíčková, Helena; Randáková, Alena; Šantrůčková, Eva

    Vol. 1. Martin: Jessenius Faculty of Medicine, 2011 - (Babušiková, E.; Dobrota, D.; Lehotský, J.), s. 154-168 ISBN 978-80-88866-99-2 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonists * Alzheimer's disease * schizophrenia Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  4. Administration of an anti-interleukin 2 receptor monoclonal antibody prolongs cardiac allograft survival in mice

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Administration of the monoclonal antibody M7/20, which binds to the murine interleukin-2 (IL) receptor, significantly prolongs cardiac allograft survival in two H-2-incompatible strain combinations of inbred mice. The results support the important role of the IL-2 receptor in the mechanism of graft rejection, and suggest its suitability as a target for immunosuppressive therapy.

  5. Cardiac pressure overload hypertrophy is differentially regulated by β-adrenergic receptor subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Mingming; Fajardo, Giovanni; Urashima, Takashi; Spin, Joshua M; Poorfarahani, Sara; Rajagopalan, Viswanathan; Huynh, Diem; Connolly, Andrew; Quertermous, Thomas; Bernstein, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In isolated myocytes, hypertrophy induced by norepinephrine is mediated via α1-adrenergic receptors (ARs) and not β-ARs. However, mice with deletions of both major cardiac α1-ARs still develop hypertrophy in response to pressure overload. Our purpose was to better define the role of β-AR subtypes in regulating cardiac hypertrophy in vivo, important given the widespread clinical use of β-AR antagonists and the likelihood that patients treated with these agents could develop conditions of furth...

  6. Development and evaluation of muscarinic cholinergic receptor ligands n-[11c]ethyl-4-piperidyl benzilate and n-[11c]propyl-4-piperidyl benzilate: a PET study in comparison with n-[11c]methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate in the conscious monkey brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The muscarinic cholinergic receptor ligands N-[11C]ethyl-4-piperidyl benzilate (4-EPB) and N-[11C]propyl-4-piperidyl benzilate (4-PPB) were developed and evaluated in comparison with N-[11C]methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate (4-MPB) in the conscious monkey brain using positron emission tomography (PET). Time-activity curves of [11C]4-EPB, unlike [11C]4-MPB, showed peaks within 91 min in regions rich in muscarinic receptors. [11C]4-PPB showed no specific binding even in the regions rich in these receptors. These observation demonstrated that increases in [11C]alkyl chain length could alter the kinetic properties of receptor ligands for PET

  7. Increased natriuretic peptide receptor A and C gene expression in rats with pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Tue E.H.; Aplin, Mark; Strom, Claes C.;

    2006-01-01

    Both atrial (ANP) and brain (BNP) natriuretic peptide affect development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis via binding to natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A in the heart. A putative clearance receptor, NPR-C, is believed to regulate cardiac levels of ANP and BNP. The renin-angiotensin system...... also affects cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. In this study we examined the expression of genes for the NPRs in rats with pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy. The ANG II type 1 receptor was blocked with losartan (10 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) to investigate a possible role of the renin-angiotensin system in...

  8. Steroidal and Nonsteroidal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists Cause Differential Cardiac Gene Expression in Pressure Overload-induced Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grune, Jana; Benz, Verena; Brix, Sarah; Salatzki, Janek; Blumrich, Annelie; Höft, Beata; Klopfleisch, Robert; Foryst-Ludwig, Anna; Kolkhof, Peter; Kintscher, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacological blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) is known as an efficacious therapy in chronic heart failure. Therapy with steroidal MR antagonists such as spironolactone or eplerenone (EPL) is often limited because of side effects. Recently, a new highly selective and potent, nonsteroidal MR antagonist, finerenone (FIN), has been developed. To investigate the effects of FIN on pressure-induced cardiac hypertrophy, the transverse aortic constriction (TAC) model was used in C57BL/6 mice treated with FIN (10 mg·kg·d), EPL (200 mg·kg·d) or vehicle (VEH). First, we analyzed cardiac gene expression 4 weeks after TAC using a pathway-focused quantitative polymerase chain reaction array. FIN caused a distinct cardiac gene expression profile compared to VEH and EPL, including differential expression of BNP (brain natriuretic peptide) and Tnnt2 (troponin T type 2). FIN treatment led to a significant reduction of TAC-induced left ventricular (LV) wall thickening assessed by echocardiography. In accordance, FIN-treated mice showed a significant lower increase of calculated left ventricular mass compared with VEH- and EPL-treated mice (FIN: 28.4 ± 3.7 mg; EPL: 38.4 ± 4.3 mg; VEH: 39.3 ± 3.1 mg; P < 0.05). These data show beneficial effects of nonsteroidal MR antagonism by FIN on left ventricular mass development in pressure overload associated with a distinct cardiac gene expression profile. PMID:26859196

  9. Regulation of human cardiac KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel by epidermal growth factor receptor kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, MQ; Sun, HY; Tang, Q.; Tse, HF; Lau, CP; Li, GR

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether/how the recombinant human cardiac I Ks could be regulated by epidermal growth factor receptor kinase in HEK 293 cells stably expressing hKCNQ1/hKCNE1 genes using the approaches of perforated patch clamp technique, immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis. It was found that the broad spectrum isoflavone tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein and the selective epidermal growth factor receptor kinase inhibitor tyrphostin AG556 suppressed ...

  10. Toll-Like Receptor 9 Promotes Cardiac Inflammation and Heart Failure during Polymicrobial Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Lohner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aim was to elucidate the role of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 in cardiac inflammation and septic heart failure in a murine model of polymicrobial sepsis. Methods. Sepsis was induced via colon ascendens stent peritonitis (CASP in C57BL/6 wild-type (WT and TLR9-deficient (TLR9-D mice. Bacterial load in the peritoneal cavity and cardiac expression of inflammatory mediators were determined at 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 h. Eighteen hours after CASP cardiac function was monitored in vivo. Sarcomere length of isolated cardiomyocytes was measured at 0.5 to 10 Hz after incubation with heat-inactivated bacteria. Results. CASP led to continuous release of bacteria into the peritoneal cavity, an increase of cytokines, and differential regulation of receptors of innate immunity in the heart. Eighteen hours after CASP WT mice developed septic heart failure characterised by reduction of end-systolic pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output, and parameters of contractility. This coincided with reduced cardiomyocyte sarcomere shortening. TLR9 deficiency resulted in significant reduction of cardiac inflammation and a sustained heart function. This was consistent with reduced mortality in TLR9-D compared to WT mice. Conclusions. In polymicrobial sepsis TLR9 signalling is pivotal to cardiac inflammation and septic heart failure.

  11. CaMKII Regulation of Cardiac Ryanodine Receptors and Inositol Triphosphate Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel eCamors

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ryanodine receptors (RyRs and inositol triphosphate receptors (InsP3Rs are structurally related intracellular calcium release channels that participate in multiple primary or secondary amplified Ca2+ signals, triggering muscle contraction and oscillatory Ca2+ waves, or activating transcription factors. In the heart, RyRs play an indisputable role in the process of excitation-contraction coupling as the main pathway for Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR, and a less prominent role in the process of excitation-transcription coupling. Conversely, InsP3Rs are believed to contribute in subtle ways, only, to contraction of the heart, and in more important ways to regulation of transcription factors. Because uncontrolled activity of either RyRs or InsP3Rs may elicit life-threatening arrhythmogenic and/or remodeling Ca2+ signals, regulation of their activity is of paramount importance for normal cardiac function. Due to their structural similarity, many regulatory factors, accessory proteins, and posttranslational processes are equivalent for RyRs and InsP3Rs. Here we discuss regulation of RyRs and InsP3Rs by CaMKII phosphorylation, but touch on other kinases whenever appropriate. CaMKII is emerging as a powerful modulator of RyR and InsP3R activity but interestingly, some of the complexities and controversies surrounding phosphorylation of RyRs also apply to InsP3Rs, and a clear-cut effect of CaMKII on either channel eludes investigators for now. Nevertheless, some effects of CaMKII on global cellular activity, such as SR Ca2+ leak or force-frequency potentiation, appear clear now, and this constrains the limits of the controversies and permits a more tractable approach to elucidate the effects of phosphorylation at the single channel level.

  12. Surface charge potentiates conduction through the cardiac ryanodine receptor channel

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Single channel currents through cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channels were measured in very low levels of current carrier (e.g., 1 mM Ba2+). The hypothesis that surface charge contributes to these anomalously large single channel currents was tested by changing ionic strength and surface charge density. Channel identity and sidedness was pharmacologically determined. At low ionic strength (20 mM Cs+), Cs+ conduction in the lumen-->myoplasm (L-->M) direction was significant...

  13. APJ ACTS AS A DUAL RECEPTOR IN CARDIAC HYPERTROPHY

    OpenAIRE

    Scimia, Maria Cecilia; Hurtado, Cecilia; Ray, Saugata; Metzler, Scott; Wei, Ke; Wang, Jianming; Woods, Chris E.; Purcell, Nicole H.; Catalucci, Daniele; Akasaka, Takashi; Bueno, Orlando F.; Vlasuk, George P.; Kaliman, Perla; Bodmer, Rolf; Smith, Layton H.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is initiated as an adaptive response to sustained overload but progresses pathologically as heart failure ensues 1 . Here we report that genetic loss of APJ confers resistance to chronic pressure overload by dramatically reducing myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure. In contrast, mice lacking apelin (the endogenous APJ ligand) remain sensitive, suggesting an apelin independent function of APJ. Freshly isolated APJ-null cardiomyocytes exhibit an attenuated response to s...

  14. Signaling through retinoic acid receptors in cardiac development: Doing the right things at the right times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier-Neto, José; Sousa Costa, Ângela M; Figueira, Ana Carolina M; Caiaffa, Carlo Donato; Amaral, Fabio Neves do; Peres, Lara Maldanis Cerqueira; da Silva, Bárbara Santos Pires; Santos, Luana Nunes; Moise, Alexander R; Castillo, Hozana Andrade

    2015-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a terpenoid that is synthesized from vitamin A/retinol (ROL) and binds to the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) to control multiple developmental processes in vertebrates. The available clinical and experimental data provide uncontested evidence for the pleiotropic roles of RA signaling in development of multiple embryonic structures and organs such eyes, central nervous system, gonads, lungs and heart. The development of any of these above-mentioned embryonic organ systems can be effectively utilized to showcase the many strategies utilized by RA signaling. However, it is very likely that the strategies employed to transfer RA signals during cardiac development comprise the majority of the relevant and sophisticated ways through which retinoid signals can be conveyed in a complex biological system. Here, we provide the reader with arguments indicating that RA signaling is exquisitely regulated according to specific phases of cardiac development and that RA signaling itself is one of the major regulators of the timing of cardiac morphogenesis and differentiation. We will focus on the role of signaling by RA receptors (RARs) in early phases of heart development. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear receptors in animal development. PMID:25134739

  15. Activation of the Cardiac Renin-Angiotensin System in High Oxygen-Exposed Newborn Rats: Angiotensin Receptor Blockade Prevents the Developmental Programming of Cardiac Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnolli, Mariane; Dios, Anne; Béland-Bonenfant, Sarah; Gascon, Gabrielle; Sutherland, Megan; Lukaszewski, Marie-Amélie; Cloutier, Anik; Paradis, Pierre; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Nuyt, Anne Monique

    2016-04-01

    Newborn rats exposed to high oxygen (O2), mimicking preterm birth-related neonatal stress, develop later in life cardiac hypertrophy, dysfunction, fibrosis, and activation of the renin-angiotensin system. Cardiac renin-angiotensin system activation in O2-exposed adult rats is characterized by an imbalance in angiotensin (Ang) receptors type 1/2 (AT1/2), with prevailing AT1 expression. To study the role of renin-angiotensin system in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction, we assessed Ang receptor expression during neonatal high O2 exposure and whether AT1 receptor blockade prevents cardiac alterations in early adulthood. Sprague-Dawley newborn rats were kept with their mother in 80% O2 or room air (control) from days 3 to 10 (P3-P10) of life. Losartan or water was administered by gavage from P8 to P10 (n=9/group). Rats were studied at P3 (before O2 exposure), P5, P10 (end of O2), and P28. Losartan treatment had no impact on growth or kidney development. AT1 and Ang type 2 receptors were upregulated in the left ventricle by high O2 exposure (P5 and P10), which was prevented by Losartan treatment at P10. Losartan prevented the cardiac AT1/2 imbalance at P28. Losartan decreased cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis and improved left ventricle fraction of shortening in P28 O2-exposed rats, which was associated with decreased oxidation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, inhibition of the transforming growth factor-β/SMAD3 pathway, and upregulation of cardiac angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. In conclusion, short-term Ang II blockade during neonatal high O2 prevents the development of cardiac alterations later in life in rats. These findings highlight the key role of neonatal renin-angiotensin system activation in the developmental programming of cardiac dysfunction induced by deleterious neonatal conditions. PMID:26857347

  16. Cardiac mast cells regulate myocyte ANP release via histamine H2 receptor in beating rabbit atria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Wen, Jin Fu; Jin, Jing Yu; Quan, He Xiu; Cho, Kyung Woo

    2009-06-01

    It has been shown that histamine inhibits atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release. Because cardiac mast cells are the principal source of histamine in the heart, we hypothesized that cardiac mast cells are involved in the regulation of atrial ANP release. To test the hypothesis, experiments were performed in perfused beating rabbit atria allowing atrial pacing and measurements of changes in atrial stroke volume, intraatrial pulse pressure and myocyte ANP release. Mast cell degranulation with Compound 48/80 decreased atrial myocyte ANP release, and the response was blocked by a selective histamine H(2) receptor blocker, cimetidine, indicating that histamine was responsible for the decrease in ANP release. Mast cell stabilization with cromolyn blocked the Compound 48/80-induced decrease in ANP release. These data suggest that mast cell-derived histamine is involved in the regulation of cardiac ANP release. Thus, the cardiac mast cell-cardiomyocyte communication via the histamine-ANP pathway may implicate in the cardiac disorder associated with mast cell degranulation such as in acute coronary syndrome or cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:19328828

  17. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy predicts impending cardiac allograft rejection before endomyocardial biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aparici, C.M.; Martin, J.C.; Tembl, A.; Flotats, A.; Estorch, M.; Catafau, A.M.; Berna, L.; Carrio, I. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Narula, J.; Puig, M.; Camprecios, M.; Ballester, M. [Cardiology Department, Sant Pau Hospital, Barcelona (Spain)

    2000-12-01

    The invasive nature of endomyocardial biopsy has led to a search for alternative diagnostic modalities for the detection of cardiac allograft rejection. To date, no non-invasive test meets all the requirements for the detection of acute and chronic rejection. The rejection process usually presents with lymphocyte infiltration with or without myocyte necrosis, which indicates the severity of cardiac allograft rejection and the necessity of treatment. Activated lymphocytes express somatostatin receptors; thus somatostatin receptor imaging could be used to target them. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using somatostatin receptor imaging to target activated lymphocytes in the process of cardiac allograft rejection. Thirteen somatostatin receptor imaging studies were performed on ten cardiac allograft recipients 12-4745 days after transplantation, simultaneously with endomyocardial biopsy, to assess the imaging of activated lymphocytes in comparison with histological findings. Somatostatin receptor imaging was performed 4 h after the injection of 110 MBq of the somatostatin analogue indium-111 pentetreotide. {sup 111}In-pentetreotide uptake was visually scored and semi-quantitatively estimated by the calculation of a heart-to-lung ratio (HLR). The visual score correlated with the HLR. Intense/moderate uptake on visual assessment and an HLR >1.6 was observed in eight studies. In three of these studies there was significant rejection in the simultaneous endomyocardial biopsy [International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) rejection grade 3A/4]. Intense/moderate uptake was associated with mild or no rejection in the remaining five patients, and in four of them the next endomyocardial biopsy performed 1 week later demonstrated significant rejection requiring treatment. Two patients with low uptake and an HLR <1.6 had no evidence of rejection either in the simultaneous endomyocardial biopsy or in the endomyocardial biopsy performed the

  18. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy predicts impending cardiac allograft rejection before endomyocardial biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invasive nature of endomyocardial biopsy has led to a search for alternative diagnostic modalities for the detection of cardiac allograft rejection. To date, no non-invasive test meets all the requirements for the detection of acute and chronic rejection. The rejection process usually presents with lymphocyte infiltration with or without myocyte necrosis, which indicates the severity of cardiac allograft rejection and the necessity of treatment. Activated lymphocytes express somatostatin receptors; thus somatostatin receptor imaging could be used to target them. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using somatostatin receptor imaging to target activated lymphocytes in the process of cardiac allograft rejection. Thirteen somatostatin receptor imaging studies were performed on ten cardiac allograft recipients 12-4745 days after transplantation, simultaneously with endomyocardial biopsy, to assess the imaging of activated lymphocytes in comparison with histological findings. Somatostatin receptor imaging was performed 4 h after the injection of 110 MBq of the somatostatin analogue indium-111 pentetreotide. 111In-pentetreotide uptake was visually scored and semi-quantitatively estimated by the calculation of a heart-to-lung ratio (HLR). The visual score correlated with the HLR. Intense/moderate uptake on visual assessment and an HLR >1.6 was observed in eight studies. In three of these studies there was significant rejection in the simultaneous endomyocardial biopsy [International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) rejection grade 3A/4]. Intense/moderate uptake was associated with mild or no rejection in the remaining five patients, and in four of them the next endomyocardial biopsy performed 1 week later demonstrated significant rejection requiring treatment. Two patients with low uptake and an HLR <1.6 had no evidence of rejection either in the simultaneous endomyocardial biopsy or in the endomyocardial biopsy performed the

  19. SIGNALLING THROUGH RETINOIC ACID RECEPTORS IN CARDIAC DEVELOPMENT: DOING THE RIGHT THINGS AT THE RIGHT TIMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier-Neto, José; Costa, Ângela M. Sousa; Figueira, Ana Carolina M.; Caiaffa, Carlo Donato; do Amaral, Fabio Neves; Peres, Lara Maldanis Cerqueira; da Silva, Bárbara Santos Pires; Santos, Luana Nunes; Moise, Alexander R.; Castillo, Hozana Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a terpenoid that is synthesized from Vitamin A/retinol (ROL) and binds to the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) to control multiple developmental processes in vertebrates. The available clinic and experimental data provide uncontested evidence for the pleiotropic roles of RA signalling in development of multiple embryonic structures and organs such eyes, central nervous system, gonads, lungs and heart. The development of any of these above-mentioned embryonic organ systems can be effectively utilized to showcase the many strategies utilized by RA signalling. However, it is very likely that the strategies employed to transfer RA signals during cardiac development comprise the majority of the relevant and sophisticated ways through which retinoid signals can be conveyed in a complex biological system. Here, we provide the reader with arguments indicating that RA signalling is exquisitely regulated according to specific phases of cardiac development and that RA signalling itself is one of the major regulators of the timing of cardiac morphogenesis and differentiation. We will focus on the role of signalling by RA receptors (RARs) in early phases of heart development. PMID:25134739

  20. Investigation of myocardial receptors by PET in heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in number and/or affinity of cardiac neurotransmitter receptors have been associated with myocardial ischemia and infarction, congestive heart failure, cardiomyopathy, as well as diabetes or thyroid-induced heart muscle disease. These alterations of cardiac receptors have been demonstrated in vitro on membrane homogenates from samples collected mainly during surgery or post mortem. The disadvantage of these in vitro binding techniques is that receptors lose their natural environment and their relationships with the other components of the tissue. With the advent of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) it is now possible to obtain noninvasively quantitative determination of regional biochemical processes in the heart. The feasibility of characterizing muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, beta-adrenergic receptors and α1-adrenergic receptors has been shown in animals and in man. The receptor PET technique begins to be applied to clinical investigation

  1. Anti-rat soluble IL-6 receptor antibody down-regulates cardiac IL-6 and improves cardiac function following trauma-hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaolong; Hu, Shunhua; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Rue, Loring W; Bland, Kirby I; Chaudry, Irshad H

    2007-03-01

    Although anti-IL-6-mAb down-regulates cardiac IL-6 and attenuates IL-6-mediated cardiac dysfunction following trauma-hemorrhage, it is not known whether blockade of IL-6 receptor will down-regulate cardiac IL-6 and improve cardiac function under those conditions. Six groups of male adult rats (275-325 g) were used: sham/trauma-hemorrhage+vehicle, sham/trauma-hemorrhage+IgG, sham/trauma-hemorrhage+anti-rat sIL-6R. Rats underwent trauma-hemorrhage (removal of 60% of the circulating blood volume and fluid resuscitation after 90 min). Vehicle (V), normal goat IgG or anti-rat sIL-6R (16.7 microg/kg BW) was administered intra-peritoneally in the middle of resuscitation. Two hours later, cardiac function was measured by ICG dilution technique; blood samples collected, cardiomyocytes isolated, and cardiomyocyte nuclei were then extracted. Cardiac IL-6, IL-6R, gp130, IkappaB-alpha/P-IkappaB-alpha, NF-kappaB, and ICAM-1 expressions were measured by immunoblotting. Plasma IL-6 and cardiomyocyte NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity were determined by ELISA. In additional animals, heart harvested and cardiac MPO activity and CINC-1 and -3 were also measured. In another group of rats, cardiac function was measure by microspheres at 24 h following trauma-hemorrhage. Cardiac function was depressed and cardiac IL-6, P-IkappaB-alpha, NF-kappaB and its DNA-binding activity, ICAM-1, MPO activity, and CINC-1 and -3 were markedly increased after trauma-hemorrhage. Moreover, cardiac dysfunction was evident even 24 h after trauma-hemorrhage. Administration of sIL-6R following trauma-hemorrhage: (1) improved cardiac output at 2 h and 24 h (p<0.05); (2) down-regulated both cardiac IL-6 and IL-6R (p<0.05); and (3) attenuated cardiac P-IkappaB-alpha, NF-kappaB, NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity, ICAM-1, CINC-1, -3, and MPO activity (p<0.05). IgG did not significantly influence the above parameters. Thus, IL-6-mediated up-regulation of cardiac NF-kappaB, ICAM-1, CINC-1, -3, and MPO activity likely

  2. The effects of Vigna unguiculata on cardiac oxidative stress and aorta estrogen receptor-β expression of ovariectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etik Khusniyati

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: V. unguiculata is an alternative therapy in decreasing cardiac oxidative stress in ovariectomized rats. Besides, high dose of V. unguiculata also able to increase aorta estrogen receptor-β expression in ovariectomized rats.

  3. Amphibian ryanodine receptor isoforms are related to those of mammalian skeletal or cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, F A; Liu, Q Y; Xu, L; el-Hashem, A; Kramarcy, N R; Sealock, R; Meissner, G

    1992-08-01

    The ryanodine receptor (RyR)-Ca2+ release channels of frog skeletal muscle have been purified as 30S protein complexes comprised of two high molecular weight polypeptides. The upper and lower bands of the frog doublet comigrated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacylamide gels with the mammalian skeletal and cardiac RyR polypeptides, respectively. Immunoblot analysis showed that a polyclonal antiserum to the rat skeletal RyR preferentially cross-reacted with the upper band, whereas monoclonal antibodies to the canine cardiac RyR preferentially cross-reacted with the lower band of the frog receptor doublet. Immunoprecipitation studies indicated the presence of two homooligomer 30S RyR complexes comprised of either the lower or upper polypeptide band of the frog doublet, and immunocytochemical staining revealed their colocalization in frog gastrocnemius muscle. After planar lipid bilayer reconstitution of the 30S frog RyR, single-channel currents were observed that exhibited a Na+ and Ca2+ conductance and pharmacological characteristics similar to those of the mammalian skeletal and cardiac Ca2+ release channels. These results suggest that amphibian skeletal muscle expresses two distinct RyR isoforms that share epitopes in common with the mammalian skeletal or cardiac RyR. PMID:1325114

  4. Glucocorticoid-Induced Hypertension and Cardiac Injury: Effects of Mineralocorticoid and Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOHZO NAGATA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are widely administered for the treatment of various disorders, although their long-term use results in adverse effects associated with glucocorticoid excess. We investigated the pathophysiological roles of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs and mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs in the cardiac changes induced by exogenous corticosterone in rats. Corticosterone or vehicle was injected twice daily in rats from 8 to 12 weeks of age. The effects of the GR antagonist RU 486, the MR antagonist spironolactone, or both agents on corticosterone action were also determined. Corticosterone induced hypertension, left ventricular (LV fibrosis, and LV diastolic dysfunction. Neither RU 486 nor spironolactone affected corticosteroneinduced hypertension, whereas spironolactone, but not RU 486, attenuated the effects of corticosterone on LV fibrosis and diastolic function. Corticosterone also increased cardiac oxidative stress and inflammation in a manner sensitive to spironolactone but not to RU 486. The corticosterone-induced LV atrophy was not affected by either RU 486 or spironolactone. Our results implicate MRs in the cardiac fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction, but not MRs or GRs in the cardiac atrophy, induced by corticosterone. Neither MRs nor GRs appear to contribute to corticosterone-induced hypertension.

  5. Thermodynamics of calmodulin binding to cardiac and skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor ion channels

    OpenAIRE

    Meissner, Gerhard; Pasek, Daniel A.; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Ramachandran, Srinivas; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Tripathy, Ashutosh

    2009-01-01

    The skeletal muscle (RyR1) and cardiac muscle (RyR2) ryanodine receptor calcium release channels contain a single, conserved calmodulin (CaM) binding domain, yet are differentially regulated by CaM. Here, we report that high-affinity [35S]CaM binding to RyR1 is driven by favorable enthalpic and entropic contributions at Ca2+ concentrations from

  6. Cardiac gene expression data and in silico analysis provide novel insights into human and mouse taste receptor gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Simon R; Porrello, Enzo R; Stefani, Maurizio; Smith, Nicola J; Molenaar, Peter; dos Remedios, Cristobal G; Thomas, Walter G; Ramialison, Mirana

    2015-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are the principal mediators of the sweet, umami, bitter, and fat taste qualities in mammals. Intriguingly, the taste receptors are also expressed outside of the oral cavity, including in the gut, airways, brain, and heart, where they have additional functions and contribute to disease. However, there is little known about the mechanisms governing the transcriptional regulation of taste receptor genes. Following our recent delineation of taste receptors in the heart, we investigated the genomic loci encoding for taste receptors to gain insight into the regulatory mechanisms that drive their expression in the heart. Gene expression analyses of healthy and diseased human and mouse hearts showed coordinated expression for a subset of chromosomally clustered taste receptors. This chromosomal clustering mirrored the cardiac expression profile, suggesting that a common gene regulatory block may control the taste receptor locus. We identified unique domains with strong regulatory potential in the vicinity of taste receptor genes. We also performed de novo motif enrichment in the proximal promoter regions and found several overrepresented DNA motifs in cardiac taste receptor gene promoters corresponding to ubiquitous and cardiac-specific transcription factor binding sites. Thus, combining cardiac gene expression data with bioinformatic analyses, this study has provided insights into the noncoding regulatory landscape for taste GPCRs. These findings also have broader relevance for the study of taste GPCRs outside of the classical gustatory system, where understanding the mechanisms controlling the expression of these receptors may have implications for future therapeutic development. PMID:25986534

  7. Novel Toll-like receptor-4 deficiency attenuates trastuzumab (Herceptin induced cardiac injury in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousif Nasser

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac inflammation and generation of oxidative stress are known to contribute to trastuzumab (herceptin induced cardiac toxicity. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a part of the innate immune system and are involved in cardiac stress reactions. Since TLR4 might play a relevant role in cardiac inflammatory signaling, we investigated whether or not TLR4 is involved in trastuzumab induced cardiotoxicity. Methods Seven days after a single injection of herceptin (2 mg/kg; i.p., left ventricular pressure volume loops were measured in HeN compotent (TLR4+/+ and HeJ mutant (TLR4-/- treated with trastuzumab and control mice. Immunofluorescent staining for monocyte infiltration and analyses of plasma by (ELISAs for different chemokines including: MCP-1and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, Western immunoblotting assay for ICAM-1, and used troponin I for cardiac injury marker. Results Trastuzumab injection resulted in an impairment of left ventricular function in TLR-4 competent (HeN, in contrast TLR4-/- trastuzumab mice showed improved left ventricular function EF%, CO; p -/-; p -/-, marked reduction of myocardial troponin-I levels in TLR4-deficient mice. Data are presented as means ± SE; n = 8 in each group p Conclusions Treatment with trastuzumab induces an inflammatory response that contributes to myocardial tissue TLR4 mediates chemokine expression (TNF-α, MCP-1and ICAM-1, so in experimental animals TLR4 deficiency improves left ventricular function and attenuates pathophysiological key mechanisms in trastuzumab induced cardiomyopathy.

  8. Inhibition of CaMKII does not attenuate cardiac hypertrophy in mice with dysfunctional ryanodine receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asima Chakraborty

    Full Text Available In cardiac muscle, the release of calcium ions from the sarcoplasmic reticulum through ryanodine receptor ion channels (RyR2s leads to muscle contraction. RyR2 is negatively regulated by calmodulin (CaM and by phosphorylation of Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII. Substitution of three amino acid residues in the CaM binding domain of RyR2 (RyR2-W3587A/L3591D/F3603A, RyR2ADA impairs inhibition of RyR2 by CaM and results in cardiac hypertrophy and early death of mice carrying the RyR2ADA mutation. To test the cellular function of CaMKII in cardiac hypertrophy, mutant mice were crossed with mice expressing the CaMKII inhibitory AC3-I peptide or the control AC3-C peptide in the myocardium. Inhibition of CaMKII by AC3-I modestly reduced CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation of RyR2 at Ser-2815 and markedly reduced CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation of SERCA2a regulatory subunit phospholamban at Thr-17. However the average life span and heart-to-body weight ratio of Ryr2ADA/ADA mice expressing the inhibitory peptide were not altered compared to control mice. In Ryr2ADA/ADA homozygous mice, AC3-I did not alter cardiac morphology, enhance cardiac function, improve sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ handling, or suppress the expression of genes implicated in cardiac remodeling. The results suggest that CaMKII was not required for the rapid development of cardiac hypertrophy in Ryr2ADA/ADA mice.

  9. Cerebral muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor measurement in Alzheimer`s disease patients on {sup 11}C-N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate. Comparison with cerebral blood flow and cerebral glucose metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Ichiya, Yuichi; Sasaki, Masayuki; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Ichimiya, Atsushi; Takita, Masashi; Ogomori, Koji; Masuda, Kouji [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-02-01

    We studied the cerebral muscarinic acetylcholinergic receptor (mACh-R) by means of {sup 11}C-N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate ({sup 11}C-NMPB) and positron emission tomography (PET) in Alzheimer`s disease (AD) cases, and the findings were compared with the cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the glucose metabolism (CMRGlc) to evaluate the relationship between the mACh-R and the CBF or the CMRGlc. The subjects consisted of 18 patients with AD and 18 age and sex matched normal volunteers. The patients were clinically diagnosed according to the criteria of the NINDS-ADRDA as having ``probable AD`` and were thus classified into two groups (mild and moderate AD) according to the severity of dementia determined by DSM-III-R. The CBF was measured by {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT, and the CMRGlc was measured by {sup 18}FDG PET. The {sup 11}C-NMPB uptake was evaluated by the graphical method and the ratio method (ROIs/Cerebellum). A significant mACh-R decrease and more severe CMRGlc decrease in the cortical region was seen in mild and moderate AD. The decrease in the CBF was not as obvious as that in the mACh-R and the CMRGlc. Our study thus suggested that the mACh-R decreased in patients with AD, and that the {sup 18}FDG PET was the most sensitive method for detecting the degenerative regions in patients with AD. (author)

  10. Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein activates GATA4 transcription and mediates cardiac hypertrophic signaling from angiotensin II receptor 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pressure overload and prolonged angiotensin II (Ang II infusion elicit cardiac hypertrophy in Ang II receptor 1 (AT(1 null mouse, whereas Ang II receptor 2 (AT(2 gene deletion abolishes the hypertrophic response. The roles and signals of the cardiac AT(2 receptor still remain unsettled. Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF was shown to bind to the AT(2 receptor and transmit the hypertrophic signal. Using PLZF knockout mice we directed our studies on the function of PLZF concerning the cardiac specific transcription factor GATA4, and GATA4 targets. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PLZF knockout and age-matched wild-type (WT mice were treated with Ang II, infused at a rate of 4.2 ng·kg(-1·min(-1 for 3 weeks. Ang II elevated systolic blood pressure to comparable levels in PLZF knockout and WT mice (140 mmHg. WT mice developed prominent cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis after Ang II infusion. In contrast, there was no obvious cardiac hypertrophy or fibrosis in PLZF knockout mice. An AT(2 receptor blocker given to Ang II-infused wild type mice prevented hypertrophy, verifying the role of AT(2 receptor for cardiac hypertrophy. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that PLZF bound to the GATA4 gene regulatory region. A Luciferase assay verified that PLZF up-regulated GATA4 gene expression and the absence of PLZF expression in vivo produced a corresponding repression of GATA4 protein. CONCLUSIONS: PLZF is an important AT(2 receptor binding protein in mediating Ang II induced cardiac hypertrophy through an AT(2 receptor-dependent signal pathway. The angiotensin II-AT(2-PLZF-GATA4 signal may further augment Ang II induced pathological effects on cardiomyocytes.

  11. Synthesis and muscarinic receptor pharmacology of a series of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisothiazolo[4,5-c]pyridine bioisosteres of arecoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, H; Bräuner-Osborne, H; Ball, R G;

    1999-01-01

    selected series of chiral analogues, with established absolute stereochemistry, were studied using receptor selection and amplification technology (R-SAT). The potency, relative efficacy, and receptor subtype selectivity of these compounds were related to the structure of the O-substituents and the...

  12. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor signalling regulates microRNA differentially in cardiac fibroblasts and myocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Pia Lindgren; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Schneider, Mikael; Nossent, Anne Yaël; Jensen, Hasse Brønnum; Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Eskildsen, Tilde; Gammeltoft, Steen; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Sheikh, Søren Paludan

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: The Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1) R) is a key regulator of blood pressure and cardiac contractility and is profoundly involved in development of cardiac disease. Since several microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in cardiac disease, we asked whether miRNAs might...... be regulated by AT(1) R signals in a Gaq/11 dependent or -independent manner. Experimental approach: We performed a global miRNA array analysis of angiotensin II (Ang II) mediated miRNA regulation in HEK293N cells over-expressing the AT(1) R and focused on separating the role of Gaq/11 -dependent and...... -independent pathways. MiRNA regulation was verified with quantitative PCR in both HEK293N cells and primary cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts. Key results: Our studies revealed five miRNAs (miR-29b, -129-3p, -132, -132* and -212) that were upregulated by Ang II in HEK293N cells. In contrast, the biased Ang II...

  13. Abnormal cardiac autonomic regulation in mice lacking ASIC3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ching-Feng; Kuo, Terry B J; Chen, Wei-Nan; Lin, Chao-Chieh; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Integration of sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow is essential in maintaining normal cardiac autonomic function. Recent studies demonstrate that acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) is a sensitive acid sensor for cardiac ischemia and prolonged mild acidification can open ASIC3 and evoke a sustained inward current that fires action potentials in cardiac sensory neurons. However, the physiological role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic regulation is not known. In this study, we elucidate the role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic function using Asic3(-/-) mice. Asic3(-/-) mice showed normal baseline heart rate and lower blood pressure as compared with their wild-type littermates. Heart rate variability analyses revealed imbalanced autonomic regulation, with decreased sympathetic function. Furthermore, Asic3(-/-) mice demonstrated a blunted response to isoproterenol-induced cardiac tachycardia and prolonged duration to recover to baseline heart rate. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression in sensory ganglia and heart revealed that no gene compensation for muscarinic acetylcholines receptors and beta-adrenalin receptors were found in Asic3(-/-) mice. In summary, we unraveled an important role of ASIC3 in regulating cardiac autonomic function, whereby loss of ASIC3 alters the normal physiological response to ischemic stimuli, which reveals new implications for therapy in autonomic nervous system-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24804235

  14. Abnormal Cardiac Autonomic Regulation in Mice Lacking ASIC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Feng Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Integration of sympathetic and parasympathetic outflow is essential in maintaining normal cardiac autonomic function. Recent studies demonstrate that acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3 is a sensitive acid sensor for cardiac ischemia and prolonged mild acidification can open ASIC3 and evoke a sustained inward current that fires action potentials in cardiac sensory neurons. However, the physiological role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic regulation is not known. In this study, we elucidate the role of ASIC3 in cardiac autonomic function using Asic3−/− mice. Asic3−/− mice showed normal baseline heart rate and lower blood pressure as compared with their wild-type littermates. Heart rate variability analyses revealed imbalanced autonomic regulation, with decreased sympathetic function. Furthermore, Asic3−/− mice demonstrated a blunted response to isoproterenol-induced cardiac tachycardia and prolonged duration to recover to baseline heart rate. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression in sensory ganglia and heart revealed that no gene compensation for muscarinic acetylcholines receptors and beta-adrenalin receptors were found in Asic3−/− mice. In summary, we unraveled an important role of ASIC3 in regulating cardiac autonomic function, whereby loss of ASIC3 alters the normal physiological response to ischemic stimuli, which reveals new implications for therapy in autonomic nervous system-related cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Expressions of cardiac sympathetic norepinephrine transporter and β1-adrenergic receptor decreased in aged rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He LI; Xiao-qing MA; Fan YE; Jing ZHANG; Xin ZHOU; Zhi-hong WANG; Yu-ming LI; Guo-yuan ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the deterioration of communication between the sympathetic nervous system and cardiovas-cular system always accompanies the aging of human and animals. Cardiac sympathetic norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) on presynaptic membrane is a predominant component to eliminate released NE in the synaptic cleff and maintains the sensitivity of the β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR). In the present study, we investigated NET and β1-AR mRNA levels and sympathetic nerve density in cardiac sympathetic ganglion and leff ventricular myocardium in 2- and 16-month-old rats with Northern blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. The expression levels of NET mRNA, NET protein and β1-AR mRNA in the ganglia or myocardia of 16-month-old rats were markedly reduced by 67%, 26%, and 43%, respectively, in comparison with those in 2-month-old rats. Our results also show that aging induces a strong decrease of the catecholaminergic nerve fiber density.

  16. INTRACELLULAR REDISTRIBUTION OF CARDIAC ENDOTHELIN-1 RECEPTOR IN RAT DURING MYOCARDIAL HYPERTROPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective. In a model of rat cardiac hypertrophy, the changes in the distribution of ET-1 receptors in two subcellular fractions, the sarcolemma and the light vesicles during myocardial hypertrophy were studied. Methods. Cardiac hypertrophy was produced by placing a constricting clip around the suprarenal abdominal aorta of rats, and ET-1 receptor was assayed with radioactive analysis method. Results. It was found that plasma and ventricular ET-1 levels increased significantly on week 2 and week 4 of pressure overload. ET-1 binding studies showed that during myocardial hypertrophy, the maximum binding capacity (Bmax) was increased by 41% (P<0.01) and 65% (P< 0.01) in sarcolemma in H-2 week and H-4 week groups, but was decreased by 24% (P< 0.01) and 21% (P< 0.01) in light vesicles. The sum of Bmax of sarcolemmal and light vesicle fractions was increased by 33% (P< 0.01) and 57% (P< 0.01) in group H-2 week and H-4 week, respectively. ? Conclusion. ET-1 receptors in rat heart were externalized from light vesicles to sarcolemma, which may contribute to the development of myocardial hypertrophy.

  17. INTRACELLULAR REDISTRIBUTION OF CARDIAC ENDOTHELIN-1 RECEPTOR IN RAT DURING MYOCARDIAL HYPERTROPHYA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓红; 齐永芬; 杨军; 佟利家; 庞永正; 唐朝枢

    2001-01-01

    Objective. In a model of rat cardiac hypertrophy, the changes in the distribution of ET-1 receptors in two subcellular fractions, the sarcolemma and the light vesicles during myocardial hypertrophy were studied. Methods. Cardiac hypertrophy was produced by placing a constricting clip around the suprarenal abdominalaorta of rats, and ET-1 receptor was assayed with radioactive analysis method. Results. It was found that plasma and ventricular ET-1 levels increased significantly on week 2 and week 4 ofpressure overload. ET-1 binding studies showed that during myocardial hypertrophy, the maximum binding capaci-ty (Bmax) was increased by 41% ( P < 0. 01) and 65% ( P < 0. 01) in sarcolemma in H-2 week and H-4 weekgroups, but was decreased by 24% (P <0.01) and 21% (P <0.01) in light vesicles. The sum of Bmax ofsarcolemmal and light vesicle fractions was increased by 33% ( P < 0. 01 ) and 57% ( P < 0.01 ) in group H-2 week and H-4 week, respectively. Conclusion. ET-1 receptors in rat heart were externalized from light vesicles to sarcolemma, which may contribute to the development of myocardial hypertrophy.

  18. Aspirin suppresses cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen formation through downregulation of angiotensin type 1 receptor transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid, ASA) is a common drug used for its analgesic and antipyretic effects. Recent studies show that ASA not only blocks cyclooxygenase, but also inhibits NADPH oxidase and resultant reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, a pathway that underlies pathogenesis of several ailments, including hypertension and tissue remodeling after injury. In these disease states, angiotensin II (Ang II) activates NADPH oxidase via its type 1 receptor (AT1R) and leads to fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. In this study, we examined if ASA would inhibit NADPH oxidase activation, upregulation of AT1R transcription, and subsequent collagen generation in mouse cardiac fibroblasts challenged with Ang II. Mouse heart fibroblasts were isolated and treated with Ang II with or without ASA. As expected, Ang II induced AT1R expression, and stimulated cardiac fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. The AT1R blocker losartan attenuated these effects of Ang II. Similarly to losartan, ASA, and its SA moiety suppressed Ang II-mediated AT1R transcription and fibroblast proliferation as well as expression of collagens and MMPs. ASA also suppressed the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (p22phox, p47phox, p67phox, NOX2 and NOX4) and ROS generation. ASA did not affect total NF-κB p65, but inhibited its phosphorylation and activation. These observations suggest that ASA inhibits Ang II-induced NADPH oxidase expression, NF-κB activation and AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts, and fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. The critical role of NADPH oxidase activity in stimulation of AT1R transcription became apparent in experiments where ASA also inhibited AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts challenged with H2O2. Since SA had similar effect as ASA on AT1R expression, we suggest that ASA's effect is mediated by its SA moiety. -- Highlights: ► Aspirin in therapeutic concentrations decreases mouse cardiac fibroblast growth and collagen formation

  19. Aspirin suppresses cardiac fibroblast proliferation and collagen formation through downregulation of angiotensin type 1 receptor transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xianwei, E-mail: XWang2@UAMS.edu; Lu, Jingjun; Khaidakov, Magomed; Mitra, Sona; Ding, Zufeng; Raina, Sameer; Goyal, Tanu; Mehta, Jawahar L., E-mail: MehtaJL@UAMS.edu

    2012-03-15

    Aspirin (acetyl salicylic acid, ASA) is a common drug used for its analgesic and antipyretic effects. Recent studies show that ASA not only blocks cyclooxygenase, but also inhibits NADPH oxidase and resultant reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, a pathway that underlies pathogenesis of several ailments, including hypertension and tissue remodeling after injury. In these disease states, angiotensin II (Ang II) activates NADPH oxidase via its type 1 receptor (AT1R) and leads to fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. In this study, we examined if ASA would inhibit NADPH oxidase activation, upregulation of AT1R transcription, and subsequent collagen generation in mouse cardiac fibroblasts challenged with Ang II. Mouse heart fibroblasts were isolated and treated with Ang II with or without ASA. As expected, Ang II induced AT1R expression, and stimulated cardiac fibroblast growth and collagen synthesis. The AT1R blocker losartan attenuated these effects of Ang II. Similarly to losartan, ASA, and its SA moiety suppressed Ang II-mediated AT1R transcription and fibroblast proliferation as well as expression of collagens and MMPs. ASA also suppressed the expression of NADPH oxidase subunits (p22{sup phox}, p47{sup phox}, p67{sup phox}, NOX2 and NOX4) and ROS generation. ASA did not affect total NF-κB p65, but inhibited its phosphorylation and activation. These observations suggest that ASA inhibits Ang II-induced NADPH oxidase expression, NF-κB activation and AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts, and fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. The critical role of NADPH oxidase activity in stimulation of AT1R transcription became apparent in experiments where ASA also inhibited AT1R transcription in cardiac fibroblasts challenged with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Since SA had similar effect as ASA on AT1R expression, we suggest that ASA's effect is mediated by its SA moiety. -- Highlights: ► Aspirin in therapeutic concentrations decreases mouse cardiac

  20. Structural and functional characterization of the purified cardiac ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ release channel complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K; Lai, F A; Liu, Q Y; Rousseau, E; Erickson, H P; Meissner, G

    1989-01-15

    Using density gradient centrifugation and [3H]ryanodine as a specific marker, the ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ release channel complex from Chaps-solubilized canine cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) has been purified in the form of an approximately 30 S complex, comprised of Mr approximately 400,000 polypeptides. Purification resulted in a specific activity of approximately 450 pmol bound ryanodine/mg of protein, a 60-70% recovery of ryanodine binding activity, and retention of the high affinity ryanodine binding site (KD = 3 nM). Negative stain electron microscopy revealed a 4-fold symmetric, four-leaf clover structure, which could fill a box approximately 30 x 30 nm and was thus morphologically similar to the SR-transverse-tubule, junctionally associated foot structure. The structural, sedimentation, and ryanodine binding data strongly suggest there is one high affinity ryanodine binding site/30 S complex, comprised of four Mr approximately 400,000 subunits. Upon reconstitution into planar lipid bilayers, the purified complex exhibited a Ca2+ conductance (70 pS in 50 mM Ca2+) similar to that of the native cardiac Ca2+ release channel (75 pS). The reconstituted complex was also found to conduct Na+ (550 pS in 500 mM Na+) and often to display complex Na+ subconducting states. The purified channel could be activated by micromolar Ca2+ or millimolar ATP, inhibited by millimolar Mg2+ or micromolar ruthenium red, and modified to a long-lived open subconducting state by ryanodine. The sedimentation, subunit composition, morphological, and ryanodine binding characteristics of the purified cardiac ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ release channel complex were similar to those previously described for the purified ryanodine receptor-Ca2+ release channel complex from fast-twitch skeletal muscle. PMID:2463249

  1. Membrane Localization, Caveolin-3 Association and Rapid Actions of Vitamin D Receptor in Cardiac Myocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Guisheng; Simpson, Robert U.

    2009-01-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1alpha, 25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1, 25(OH)2D3), mediates both genomic and rapid non-genomic actions in heart cells. We have previously shown that the vitamin D receptor (VDR) is located in the t-tubular structure of cardiomyocytes. Here we show that VDR specifically interacts with Caveolin-3 in the t-tubules and sarcolemma of adult rat cardiac myocytes. Co-Immunoprecipitation studies using VDR antibodies revealed that Caveolin-3 specifically co-precipitates with t...

  2. Involvement of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in the endogenous cholinergic modulation of the balance between excitation and inhibition in the young rat visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas-Meunier, Estelle; Monier, Cyril; Amar, Muriel; Baux, Gérard; Frégnac, Yves; Fossier, Philippe

    2009-10-01

    This study aims to clarify how endogenous release of cortical acetylcholine (ACh) modulates the balance between excitation and inhibition evoked in visual cortex. We show that electrical stimulation in layer 1 produced a significant release of ACh measured intracortically by chemoluminescence and evoked a composite synaptic response recorded intracellularly in layer 5 pyramidal neurons of rat visual cortex. The pharmacological specificity of the ACh neuromodulation was determined from the continuous whole-cell voltage clamp measurement of stimulation-locked changes of the input conductance during the application of cholinergic agonists and antagonists. Blockade of glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic) receptors suppressed the evoked response, indicating that stimulation-induced release of ACh does not directly activate a cholinergic synaptic conductance in recorded neurons. Comparison of cytisine and mecamylamine effects on nicotinic receptors showed that excitation is enhanced by endogenous evoked release of ACh through the presynaptic activation of alpha(*)beta4 receptors located on glutamatergic fibers. DHbetaE, the selective alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptor antagonist, induced a depression of inhibition. Endogenous ACh could also enhance inhibition by acting directly on GABAergic interneurons, presynaptic to the recorded cell. We conclude that endogenous-released ACh amplifies the dominance of the inhibitory drive and thus decreases the excitability and sensory responsiveness of layer 5 pyramidal neurons. PMID:19176636

  3. Structural Insight into Specificity of Interactions between Nonconventional Three-finger Weak Toxin from Naja kaouthia (WTX) and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lyukmanova, E. N.; Shenkarev, Z. O.; Shulepko, M. A.; Paramonov, A. S.; Chugunov, A. O.; Janíčková, Helena; Dolejší, Eva; Doležal, Vladimír; Utkin, Y.N.; Tsetlin, V.I.; Arseniev, A. S.; Efremov, R. G.; Dolgikh, D. A.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 290, č. 39 (2015), s. 23616-23630. ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05696S Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : computer modeling * G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) * site-directed mutagenesis Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.573, year: 2014

  4. Variation in the gene coding for the M5 Muscarinic receptor (CHRM5 influences cigarette dose but is not associated with dependence to drugs of addiction: evidence from a prospective population based cohort study of young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsson Craig A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mesolimbic structures of the brain are important in the anticipation and perception of reward. Moreover, many drugs of addiction elicit their response in these structures. The M5 muscarinic receptor (M5R is expressed in dopamine-containing neurones of the substantia nigra pars compacta and ventral tegmental area, and regulates the release of mesolimbic dopamine. Mice lacking M5R show a substantial reduction in both reward and withdrawal responses to morphine and cocaine. The CHRM5, the gene that codes for the M5R, is a strong biological candidate for a role in human addiction. We screened the coding and core promoter sequences of CHRM5 using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography to identify common polymorphisms. Additional polymorphisms within the coding and core promoter regions that were identified through dbSNP were validated in the test population. We investigated whether these polymorphisms influence substance dependence and dose in a cohort of 1947 young Australians. Results Analysis was performed on 815 participants of European ancestry who were interviewed at wave 8 of the cohort study and provided DNA. We observed a 26.8% increase in cigarette consumption in carriers of the rs7162140 T-allele, equating to 20.1 cigarettes per week (p=0.01. Carriers of the rs7162140 T-allele were also found to have nearly a 3-fold increased risk of developing cannabis dependence (OR=2.9 (95%CI 1.1-7.4; p=0.03. Conclusion Our data suggest that variation within the CHRM5 locus may play an important role in tobacco and cannabis but not alcohol addiction in European ancestry populations. This is the first study to show an association between CHRM5 and substance use in humans. These data support the further investigation of this gene as a risk factor in substance use and dependence.

  5. Functional role of peripheral opioid receptors in the regulation of cardiac spinal afferent nerve activity during myocardial ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Liang-Wu; Longhurst, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Thinly myelinated Aδ-fiber and unmyelinated C-fiber cardiac sympathetic (spinal) sensory nerve fibers are activated during myocardial ischemia to transmit the sensation of angina pectoris. Although recent observations showed that myocardial ischemia increases the concentrations of opioid peptides and that the stimulation of peripheral opioid receptors inhibits chemically induced visceral and somatic nociception, the role of opioids in cardiac spinal afferent signaling during myocardial ischem...

  6. The Cardiac Ventricular 5-HT4 Receptor Is Functional in Late Foetal Development and Is Reactivated in Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Brattelid, Trond; Qvigstad, Eirik; Moltzau, Lise R; Bekkevold, Silje V. S.; Sandnes, Dagny L; Birkeland, Jon Arne K.; Skomedal, Tor; Osnes, Jan-Bjørn; Sjaastad, Ivar; Levy, Finn Olav

    2012-01-01

    A positive inotropic responsiveness to serotonin, mediated by 5-HT4 and 5-HT2A receptors, appears in the ventricle of rats with post-infarction congestive heart failure (HF) and pressure overload-induced hypertrophy. A hallmark of HF is a transition towards a foetal genotype which correlates with loss of cardiac functions. Thus, we wanted to investigate whether the foetal and neonatal cardiac ventricle displays serotonin responsiveness. Wistar rat hearts were collected day 3 and 1 before expe...

  7. Ah Receptor Signaling Controls the Expression of Cardiac Development and Homeostasis Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, Vinicius S; Fan, Yunxia; Wang, Qing; Zhang, Xiang; Kurita, Hisaka; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-10-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common congenital abnormality and one of the leading causes of newborn death throughout the world. Despite much emerging scientific information, the precise etiology of this disease remains elusive. Here, we show that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) regulates the expression of crucial cardiogenesis genes and that interference with endogenous AHR functions, either by gene ablation or by agonist exposure during early development, causes overlapping structural and functional cardiac abnormalities that lead to altered fetal heart physiology, including higher heart rates, right and left ventricle dilation, higher stroke volume, and reduced ejection fraction. With striking similarity between AHR knockout (Ahr(-/-)) and agonist-exposed wild type (Ahr(+/+)) embryos, in utero disruption of endogenous AHR functions converge into dysregulation of molecular mechanisms needed for attainment and maintenance of cardiac differentiation, including the pivotal signals regulated by the cardiogenic transcription factor NKH2.5, energy balance via oxidative phosphorylation and TCA cycle and global mitochondrial function and homeostasis. Our findings suggest that AHR signaling in the developing mammalian heart is central to the regulation of pathways crucial for cellular metabolism, cardiogenesis, and cardiac function, which are potential targets of environmental factors associated with CHD. PMID:26139165

  8. The insect repellent N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET) induces angiogenesis via allosteric modulation of the M3 muscarinic receptor in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legeay, Samuel; Clere, Nicolas; Hilairet, Grégory; Do, Quoc-Tuan; Bernard, Philippe; Quignard, Jean-François; Apaire-Marchais, Véronique; Lapied, Bruno; Faure, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The insect repellent N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET) has been reported to inhibit AChE (acetylcholinesterase) and to possess potential carcinogenic properties with excessive vascularization. In the present paper, we demonstrate that DEET specifically stimulates endothelial cells that promote angiogenesis which increases tumor growth. DEET activates cellular processes that lead to angiogenesis including proliferation, migration and adhesion. This is associated with an enhancement of NO production and VEGF expression in endothelial cells. M3 silencing or the use of a pharmacological M3 inhibitor abrogates all of these effects which reveals that DEET-induced angiogenesis is M3 sensitive. The experiments involving calcium signals in both endothelial and HEK cells overexpressing M3 receptors, as well as binding and docking studies demonstrate that DEET acts as an allosteric modulator of the M3 receptor. In addition, DEET inhibited AChE which increased acetylcholine bioavailability and binding to M3 receptors and also strengthened proangiogenic effects by an allosteric modulation. PMID:27345502

  9. Cardiac ryanodine receptor in metabolic syndrome: is JTV519 (K201 future therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dincer UD

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available U Deniz DincerDepartment of Pharmacology, Ufuk University School of Medicine. Mevlana Bulvari, Balgat, Ankara, TurkeyAbstract: Metabolic syndrome is characterized by a combination of obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance. This multifaceted syndrome is often accompanied by a hyperdynamic circulatory state characterized by increased blood pressure, total blood volume, cardiac output, and metabolic tissue demand. Experimental, epidemiological, and clinical studies have demonstrated that patients with metabolic syndrome have significantly elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates. One of the main and frequent complications seen in metabolic syndrome is cardiovascular disease. The primary endpoints of cardiometabolic risk are coronary and peripheral arterial disease, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, arrhythmia, and stroke. Alterations in expression and/or functioning of several key proteins involved in regulating and maintaining ionic homeostasis can cause cardiac disturbances. One such group of proteins is known as ryanodine receptors (intracellular calcium release channels, which are the major channels through which Ca2+ ions leave the sarcoplasmic reticulum, leading to cardiac muscle contraction. The economic cost of metabolic syndrome and its associated complications has a significant effect on health care budgets. Improvements in body weight, blood lipid profile, and hyperglycemia can reduce cardiometabolic risk. However, constant hyperadrenergic stimulation still contributes to the burden of disease. Normalization of the hyperdynamic circulatory state with conventional therapies is the most reasonable therapeutic strategy to date. JTV519 (K201 is a newly developed 1,4-benzothiazepine drug with antiarrhythmic and cardioprotective properties. It appears to be very effective in not only preventing but also in reversing the characteristic myocardial changes and preventing

  10. (Prorenin receptor triggers distinct angiotensin II-independent extracellular matrix remodeling and deterioration of cardiac function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Mari Moilanen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activation of the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS plays a key pathophysiological role in heart failure in patients with hypertension and myocardial infarction. However, the function of (prorenin receptor ((PRR is not yet solved. We determined here the direct functional and structural effects of (PRR in the heart. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: (PRR was overexpressed by using adenovirus-mediated gene delivery in normal adult rat hearts up to 2 weeks. (PRR gene delivery into the anterior wall of the left ventricle decreased ejection fraction (P<0.01, fractional shortening (P<0.01, and intraventricular septum diastolic and systolic thickness, associated with approximately 2-fold increase in left ventricular (PRR protein levels at 2 weeks. To test whether the worsening of cardiac function and structure by (PRR gene overexpression was mediated by angiotensin II (Ang II, we infused an AT(1 receptor blocker losartan via osmotic minipumps. Remarkably, cardiac function deteriorated in losartan-treated (PRR overexpressing animals as well. Intramyocardial (PRR gene delivery also resulted in Ang II-independent activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase1/2 phosphorylation and myocardial fibrosis, and the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 and connective tissue growth factor genes. In contrast, activation of heat shock protein 27 phosphorylation and apoptotic cell death by (PRR gene delivery was Ang II-dependent. Finally, (PRR overexpression significantly increased direct protein-protein interaction between (PRR and promyelocytic zinc-finger protein. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate for the first time that (PRR triggers distinct Ang II-independent myocardial fibrosis and deterioration of cardiac function in normal adult heart and identify (PRR as a novel therapeutic target to optimize RAS blockade in failing hearts.

  11. EXTERNALIZATION AND INTERNALIZATION OF CARDIAC ENDOTHELIN RECEPTORS DURING DIFFERENT PHASES OF SEPSIS IN RAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓红; 杨军; 董林旺; 庞永政; 苏静怡; 唐朝枢; 刘乃奎

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To study the redistribution of endothelin-1 (ET-1) receptors in two subcellular organelles , the sarcolemmal membrane and the light vesicle, of rat heart during the progression of sepsis. Methods. Sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). ET1 receptor was assayed by using [125I]-ET1 binding. Marker enzyme activities, protein yield, and dry-to-wet weight ratio of cardiac membranes were measured. Results. Septic rat heart exhibited two distinct phases: an initial hyperdynamic phase( 9h after CLP; early stage of sepsis) followed by a hypodynamic (18h after CLP, late stage of sepsis) phase. [125I]-ET1 binding study showed that during early stage of sepsis, the Bmax of ET1 receptors was increased by 30% in sarcolemma but decreased by 19% in light vesicles, while during late stage of sepsis, the Bmax was decreased by 24% in sarcolemma but increased by 38% in light vesicles.The total binding of sarcolemma and light vesicles was increased by 25% during early stage of sepsis but decreased by 17% during late stage of sepsis. Conclusions. These data indicated that ET1 receptors in the rat heart were externalized from light vesicles to sarcolemmal membranes during early hyperdynamic phase while internalized from surface membranes to intracellular compartment during late hypodynamic phase of sepsis.

  12. Experiment K-7-18: Effects of Spaceflight in the Muscle Adductor Longus of Rats Flown in the Soviet Biosatellite Cosmos 2044. Part 2; Quantitative Autoradiographic Analysis of Gaba (Benzodiazepine) and Muscarinic (Cholinergic) Receptors in the Forebrain of Rats Flown on Cosmos 2044

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L.; Daunton, N. G.; Krasnov, I. B.; DAmelio, F.; Hyde, T. M.; Sigworth, S. K.

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of receptors for GABA and acetylcholine in the forebrain of rats flown on COSMOS 2044 was undertaken as part of a joint US-Soviet study to determine the effects of microgravity on the central nervous system, and in particular on the sensory and motor portions of the forebrain. Changes in binding of these receptors in tissue from animals exposed to microgravity would provide evidence for possible changes in neural processing as a result of exposure to microgravity. Tritium-labelled diazepam and Quinuclidinyl-benzilate (QNB) were used to visualize GABA (benzodiazepine) and muscarinic (cholinergic) receptors, respectively. The density of tritium-labelled radioligands bound to various regions in the forebrain of both flight and control animals were measured from autoradiograms. Data from rats flown in space and from ground-based control animals that were not exposed to microgravity were compared.

  13. Angiotensin II (AT1) Receptor Blockade Reduces Vascular Tissue Factor in Angiotensin II-Induced Cardiac Vasculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Dominik N Müller; Mervaala, Eero M A; Dechend, Ralf; Fiebeler, Anette; Park, Joon-Keun; Schmidt, Folke; Theuer, Jürgen; Breu, Volker; Mackman, Nigel; Luther, Thomas; Schneider, Wolfgang; Gulba, Dietrich; Ganten, Detlev; Haller, Hermann; Luft, Friedrich C.

    2000-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF), a main initiator of clotting, is up-regulated in vasculopathy. We tested the hypothesis that chronic in vivo angiotensin (ANG) II receptor AT1 receptor blockade inhibits TF expression in a model of ANG II-induced cardiac vasculopathy. Furthermore, we explored the mechanisms by examining transcription factor activation and analyzing the TF promoter. Untreated transgenic rats overexpressing the human renin and angiotensinogen genes (dTGR) feature hypertension and severe left...

  14. Inducible Conditional Vascular-Specific Overexpression of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Beta/Delta Leads to Rapid Cardiac Hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Kay-Dietrich; Vukolic, Ana; Baudouy, Delphine; Michiels, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are nuclear receptors which function as ligand-activated transcription factors. Among them, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta (PPARβ/δ) is highly expressed in the heart and thought to have cardioprotective functions due to its beneficial effects in metabolic syndrome. As we already showed that PPARβ/δ activation resulted in an enhanced cardiac angiogenesis and growth without impairment of heart function, we were interested to determine the effects of a specific activation of PPARβ/δ in the vasculature on cardiac performance under normal and in chronic ischemic heart disease conditions. We analyzed the effects of a specific PPARβ/δ overexpression in endothelial cells on the heart using an inducible conditional vascular-specific mouse model. We demonstrate that vessel-specific overexpression of PPARβ/δ induces rapid cardiac angiogenesis and growth with an increase in cardiomyocyte size. Upon myocardial infarction, vascular overexpression of PPARβ/δ, despite the enhanced cardiac vessel formation, does not protect against chronic ischemic injury. Our results suggest that the proper balance of PPARβ/δ activation in the different cardiac cell types is required to obtain beneficial effects on the outcome in chronic ischemic heart disease. PMID:27057154

  15. Memory Enhancement Induced by Post-Training Intrabasolateral Amygdala Infusions of [beta]-Adrenergic or Muscarinic Agonists Requires Activation of Dopamine Receptors: Involvement of Right, but Not Left, Basolateral Amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaLumiere, Ryan T.; McGaugh, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Previous findings indicate that the noradrenergic, dopaminergic, and cholinergic innervations of the basolateral amygdala (BLA) modulate memory consolidation. The current study investigated whether memory enhancement induced by post-training intra-BLA infusions of a [beta]-adrenergic or muscarinic cholinergic agonist requires concurrent activation…

  16. Younger patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome are more likely to have salivary IgG anti-muscarinic acetylcholine receptor type 3 antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakanthan, K; Ramya, J; Mandal, Santosh Kumar; Sandhya, P; Gowri, M; Danda, Debashish

    2016-03-01

    Acetylcholine type 3 receptor (M3R) is recognized as an autoantigen in primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). Assay of anti-M3R antibody levels in serum is fraught with low sensitivity for diagnosis of pSS. Salivary assay is more likely to improve the diagnostic accuracy. Patients with pSS classified either by the American European Consensus Group (AECG) or American college of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, attending rheumatology clinic between October 2014 and July 2015 were included. Hospital staff and lupus patients constituted healthy and disease controls, respectively. Evaluation of pSS included clinical evaluation, laboratory tests, ESSDAI and ESSPRI scoring. Unstimulated saliva was collected by the spitting method. Salivary IgG antibody against M3R (anti-M3R) was quantified by indirect ELISA. In this study, 43 patients with pSS, 34 with lupus and 42 healthy controls were recruited. The frequency of anti-M3R antibody levels was 55.81, 17.64 and 7 % for pSS, lupus and healthy controls, respectively. Area under the Receiver Operator Characteristic was 0.7791 (95 % CI,, 0.67-0.87). Sensitivity and specificity of the assay for diagnosis of pSS were 44.19 and 88.16 %, respectively. Salivary anti-M3R IgG antibody positivity was associated with lower age, shorter disease duration and higher globulin levels in our cohort. Salivary anti-M3R IgG antibody assay has high specificity in pSS; younger patients and those with hyperglobulinemia more frequently tested positive for this antibody. PMID:26809799

  17. Association between Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Polymorphism and Sudden Cardiac Death in Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruzliak, Peter; Kovacova, Gabriela; Pechanova, Olga; Balogh, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The renin-angiotensin system is involved in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction (MI). Angiotensin II (Ang II) has many adverse effects such as vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling, and these actions are mediated by the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). Patients and Methods. A total of 1376 patients were recruited from January 2010 to April 2012. The study group consisted of 749 patients with ACS (317 females and 432 males) and of 627 healthy controls. Results. The ACS patients demonstrated a lower proportion of AA genotypes and AC genotypes but higher proportions of CC genotypes than the control population. The AT1R CC genotype conferred a 2.76-fold higher risk of MI compared with the genotype AC and AA. In addition, the CC genotype was also associated with a 4.08 times higher risk of left anterior descending artery infarction and a 3.07 times higher risk of anterior wall infarction. We also found that the CC genotype was independently associated with sudden cardiac death. In Summary. This study demonstrated that the AT1R CC genotype is an independent risk factor for ACS incidence, and this genotype is associated with a greater ACS severity and greater risk of sudden cardiac death. PMID:24167376

  18. Differences in affinity of cardiac beta-adrenergic receptors for [3H]dihydroalprenolol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed quantitative light microscopic autoradiography of [3H]dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binding to frozen sections of canine myocardium to test the hypothesis that there are differences in the density or affinity of beta-adrenergic receptors on various tissue compartments. In one study, with concentrations of [3H]DHA from 0.34 to 5.1 nM, specific binding to cardiac myocytes was saturable, whereas nonspecific binding was linear with ligand concentration. Arterioles had more specific grain counts than muscle cells (P less than 0.0001), and Scatchard analysis showed that the arterioles had a much higher affinity for [3H]DHA than myocytes. In a second study with lower concentrations of [3H]DHA (0.19-1.98 nM), binding to the arterioles saturated, whereas binding to the cardiac myocytes did not. Specific binding to arterioles was significantly higher (P less than 0.0001) than binding to myocytes at all concentrations of [3H]DHA. The dissociation constants for the subendocardial and subepicardial myocytes were 1.57 and 1.71 nM, respectively, while the dissociation constant for the arterioles was 0.26 nM. The maximum number of binding sites was 911 grains/0.9 X 10(-2) mm2 for subepicardial myocytes, 936 for subendocardial myocytes, and 986 for arterioles. The large nerves accompanying an epicardial artery also demonstrated specific [3H]DHA binding. Thus this study has demonstrated major differences in the distribution and affinity of beta-adrenergic receptors, which may help to explain various physiological responses to beta-adrenergic stimulation

  19. Role of cardiac volume receptors in the control of ADH release during acute simulated weightlessness in man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, V. A.; Benjamin, B. A.; Keil, L. C.; Sandler, H.

    1984-01-01

    Hemodynamic responses and antidiuretic hormone (ADH) were measured during body position changes, designed to induce central blood volume shifts in ten cardiac and one heart-lung transplant recipients, to assess the contribution of cardiac volume receptors in the control of ADH release during the initial acute phase of exposure to weightlessness. Each subject underwent 15 min of a sitting-control period (C) followed by 30 min of 6 deg headdown tilt (T) and 30 min of resumed sitting (S). Venous blood samples and cardiac dimensions were taken at 0 and 15 min of C; 5, 15, and 30 min of T; and 5, 15, and 30 min of S. Blood samples were analyzed for hematocrit, plasma osmolality, plasma renin activity (PRA), and ADH. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded every two min. Plasma osmolality was not altered by posture changes. Mean left ventricular end-diastolic volume increased (P less than 0.05) from 90 ml in C to 106 ml in T and returned to 87 ml in S. Plasma ADH was reduced by 20 percent (P less than 0.05) with T, and returned to control levels with S. These responses were similar in six normal cardiac-innervated control subjects. These data may suggest that cardiac volume receptors are not the primary mechanism for the control of ADH release during acute central volume shifts in man.

  20. RU28318, an Aldosterone Antagonist, in Combination with an ACE Inhibitor and Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Attenuates Cardiac Dysfunction in Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benter, Ibrahim F.; Babiker, Fawzi; Al-Rashdan, Ibrahim; Yousif, Mariam; Akhtar, Saghir

    2013-01-01

    Aims. We evaluated the effects of RU28318 (RU), a selective mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, Captopril (Capt), an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, and Losartan (Los), an angiotensin receptor blocker, alone or in combination with ischemia/reperfusion- (I/R-) induced cardiac dysfunction in hearts obtained from normal and diabetic rats. Methods. Isolated hearts were perfused for 30 min and then subjected to 30 min of global ischemia (I) followed by a period of 30 min of reperfusion (R). Drugs were administered for 30 min either before or after ischemia. Drug regimens tested were RU, Capt, Los, RU + Capt, RU + Los, Capt + Los, and RU + Capt + Los (Triple). Recovery of cardiac hemodynamics was evaluated. Results. Recovery of cardiac function was up to 5-fold worse in hearts obtained from diabetic animals compared to controls. Treatment with RU was generally better in preventing or reversing ischemia-induced cardiac dysfunction in normal hearts compared to treatment with Capt or Los alone. In diabetic hearts, RU was generally similarly effective as Capt or Los treatment. Conclusions. RU treatment locally might be considered as an effective therapy or preventative measure in cardiac I/R injury. Importantly, RU was the most effective at improving −dP/dt (a measure of diastolic function) when administered to diabetic hearts after ischemia. PMID:24066305

  1. RU28318, an Aldosterone Antagonist, in Combination with an ACE Inhibitor and Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Attenuates Cardiac Dysfunction in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim F. Benter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. We evaluated the effects of RU28318 (RU, a selective mineralocorticoid receptor (MR antagonist, Captopril (Capt, an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, and Losartan (Los, an angiotensin receptor blocker, alone or in combination with ischemia/reperfusion- (I/R- induced cardiac dysfunction in hearts obtained from normal and diabetic rats. Methods. Isolated hearts were perfused for 30 min and then subjected to 30 min of global ischemia (I followed by a period of 30 min of reperfusion (R. Drugs were administered for 30 min either before or after ischemia. Drug regimens tested were RU, Capt, Los, RU + Capt, RU + Los, Capt + Los, and RU + Capt + Los (Triple. Recovery of cardiac hemodynamics was evaluated. Results. Recovery of cardiac function was up to 5-fold worse in hearts obtained from diabetic animals compared to controls. Treatment with RU was generally better in preventing or reversing ischemia-induced cardiac dysfunction in normal hearts compared to treatment with Capt or Los alone. In diabetic hearts, RU was generally similarly effective as Capt or Los treatment. Conclusions. RU treatment locally might be considered as an effective therapy or preventative measure in cardiac I/R injury. Importantly, RU was the most effective at improving -dP/dt (a measure of diastolic function when administered to diabetic hearts after ischemia.

  2. 七氟烷和东莨菪碱对老年大鼠海马毒蕈碱受体表达的影响%Efforts of sevoflurane and scopolamine on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in hippocampus in gerontal rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国君; 张焰; 方强; 孙大鹏; 张邓新

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of sevoflurane and scopolamine on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in hippocampus in gerontal rata.Methods Forty-eight male SD rats aged 18 months weighing 560-600 g were randomly divided into 3 groups(n=16 each):group Ⅰcontrol(C);group Ⅱ inhaled 3%sevoflurane for 2 h(Sevo);group Ⅲ received intraperitoneal scopolamine 0.8 mg/kg.Y-maze was used to test the abihty of learning and memow at 1 and 3 d after drug administration in 8 animals from each group.The animals were decapitated immediately after Y-maze test at 1 and 3 day after drug administration.The hippocampus was removed for determination of the relative levels of expression of M1 and M2 acetylcholine receptor(mAChR M1,M2)mRNA(by RT-PCR)and the expression of mAChR MI and M2(by immuno-histochemistry).Results The ability to learn and remenlber and the expression of M1 and M2 AChR and AChR mRNA were significantly decreased at 1 d after sevoflurane inhalation(in group Ⅱ)and scopolamine IP administration(in group m)aS compared with control group and returned to control level at 3 d.Conclusion The ability to learn and remember cfln be reduced for a short period of time after sevoflurane inhalation and IP scopolamine throgh down-regulation of Ml and M2 mAChR in the brain.%目的 探讨七氟烷和东莨菪碱对老年大鼠海马毒蕈碱受体表达的影响.方法 健康雄性老年SD大鼠48只,月龄18月,体重560~600 g,随机分为对照组(Con组)、七氟烷组(Sev组)和东莨菪碱组(Sco组),每组16只.Sco组腹腔注射东茛菪碱0.8 mg/kg,Con组和Sev组腹腔注射等容量生理盐水,30 min后Sev组吸入3.0%七氟烷、Con组和Sco组吸入空气2 h.于给药后1、3 d时分别取8只大鼠,采用Y型迷宫实验测试学习记忆能力,然后断头处死,取脑分离海马,采用RT-PCR法检测M1受体和M,受体mRNA的表达,采用免疫组化法检测海马神经元M1受体和M2受体的表达.结果 与Con组相比,给药后1d时Sev组和Sco组

  3. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Progenitor Cells in Phenotypic Screening: A Transforming Growth Factor-β Type 1 Receptor Kinase Inhibitor Induces Efficient Cardiac Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drowley, Lauren; Koonce, Chad; Peel, Samantha; Jonebring, Anna; Plowright, Alleyn T; Kattman, Steven J; Andersson, Henrik; Anson, Blake; Swanson, Bradley J; Wang, Qing-Dong; Brolen, Gabriella

    2016-02-01

    Several progenitor cell populations have been reported to exist in hearts that play a role in cardiac turnover and/or repair. Despite the presence of cardiac stem and progenitor cells within the myocardium, functional repair of the heart after injury is inadequate. Identification of the signaling pathways involved in the expansion and differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) will broaden insight into the fundamental mechanisms playing a role in cardiac homeostasis and disease and might provide strategies for in vivo regenerative therapies. To understand and exploit cardiac ontogeny for drug discovery efforts, we developed an in vitro human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived CPC model system using a highly enriched population of KDR(pos)/CKIT(neg)/NKX2.5(pos) CPCs. Using this model system, these CPCs were capable of generating highly enriched cultures of cardiomyocytes under directed differentiation conditions. In order to facilitate the identification of pathways and targets involved in proliferation and differentiation of resident CPCs, we developed phenotypic screening assays. Screening paradigms for therapeutic applications require a robust, scalable, and consistent methodology. In the present study, we have demonstrated the suitability of these cells for medium to high-throughput screens to assess both proliferation and multilineage differentiation. Using this CPC model system and a small directed compound set, we identified activin-like kinase 5 (transforming growth factor-β type 1 receptor kinase) inhibitors as novel and potent inducers of human CPC differentiation to cardiomyocytes. Significance: Cardiac disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, with no treatment available that can result in functional repair. This study demonstrates how differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells can be used to identify and isolate cell populations of interest that can translate to the adult human heart. Two separate examples of phenotypic

  4. Synthesis of N-Substituted Piperidine Salts as Potential Muscarinic Ligands for Alzheimer's Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boulos, J.; Jakubík, Jan; Randáková, Alena; Avila, C.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 6 (2013), s. 1363-1367. ISSN 0022-152X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0681 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : N-piperidine substituted salts * muscarinic receptor antagonists * selectivity Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.873, year: 2013

  5. The human cardiac muscle ryanodine receptor-calcium release channel: identification, primary structure and topological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunwell, R E; Wickenden, C; Bertrand, B M; Shevchenko, V I; Walsh, M B; Allen, P D; Lai, F A

    1996-09-01

    Rapid Ca2+ efflux from intracellular stores during cardiac muscle excitation-contraction coupling is mediated by the ryanodine-sensitive calcium-release channel, a large homotetrameric complex present in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. We report here the identification, primary structure and topological analysis of the ryanodine receptor-calcium release channel from human cardiac muscle (hRyR-2). Consistent with sedimentation and immunoblotting studies on the hRyR-2 protein, sequence analysis of ten overlapping cDNA clones reveals an open reading frame of 14901 nucleotides encoding a protein of 4967 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 564 569 Da for hRyR-2. In-frame insertions corresponding to eight and ten amino acid residues were found in two of the ten cDNAs isolated, suggesting that novel, alternatively spliced transcripts of the hRyR-2 gene might exist. Six hydrophobic stretches, which are present within the hRyR-2 C-terminal 500 amino acids and are conserved in all RyR sequences, may be involved in forming the transmembrane domain that constitutes the Ca(2+)-conducting pathway, in agreement with competitive ELISA studies with a RyR-2-specific antibody. Sequence alignment of hRyR-2 with other RyR isoforms indicates a high level of overall identity within the RyR family, with the exception of two important regions that exhibit substantial variability. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the RyR-2 isoform diverged from a single ancestral gene before the RyR-1 and RyR-3 isoforms to form a distinct branch of the RyR family tree. PMID:8809036

  6. Effects of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-δ Agonist on Cardiac Healing after Myocardial Infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Rang Park

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-delta (PPAR-δ-dependent signaling is associated with rapid wound healing in the skin. Here, we investigated the therapeutic effects of PPAR-δ-agonist treatment on cardiac healing in post-myocardial infarction (MI rats. Animals were assigned to the following groups: sham-operated control group, left anterior descending coronary artery ligation (MI group, or MI with administration of the PPAR-δ agonist GW610742 group. GW610742 (1 mg/kg was administrated intraperitoneally after the operation and repeated every 3 days. Echocardiographic data showed no differences between the two groups in terms of cardiac function and remodeling until 4 weeks. However, the degrees of angiogenesis and fibrosis after MI were significantly higher in the GW610742-treated rats than in the untreated MI rats at 1 week following MI, which changes were not different at 2 weeks after MI. Naturally, PPAR-δ expression in infarcted myocardium was highest increased in 3 day after MI and then disappeared in 14 day after MI. GW610742 increased myofibroblast differentiation and transforming growth factor-beta 2 expression in the infarct zone at 7 days after MI. GW610742 also increased bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC recruitment in whole myocardium, and increased serum platelet-derived growth factor B, stromal-derived factor-1 alpha, and matrix metallopeptidase 9 levels at day 3 after MI. PPAR-δ agonists treatment have the temporal effect on early fibrosis of infarcted myocardium, which might not sustain the functional and structural beneficial effect.

  7. Suppression of calcium‑sensing receptor ameliorates cardiac hypertrophy through inhibition of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Wang, Chao; Lin, Yan; Xi, Yuhui; Li, Hong; Shi, Sa; Li, Hongzhu; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Yajun; Tian, Ye; Xu, Changqing; Wang, Lina

    2016-07-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) releases intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) by accumulating inositol phosphate. Changes in [Ca2+]i initiate myocardial hypertrophy. Furthermore, autophagy associated with [Ca2+]i. Autophagy has previously been demonstrated to participate in the hypertrophic process. The current study investigated whether suppression of CaSR affects the hypertrophic response via modulating autophagy. Isoproterenol (ISO) was used to induce cardiac hypertrophy in Wistar rats. Hypertrophic status was determined by echocardiographic assessment, hematoxylin and eosin, and Masson's staining. The protein expression levels of CaSR and autophagy level were observed. Changes of hypertrophy and autophagy indicators were observed following intravenous injection of a CaSR inhibitor. An ISO‑induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy model was established and used determine the involvement of GdCl3. [Ca2+]i was determined using Fluo‑4/AM dye followed by confocal microscopy. The expression levels of various active proteins were analyzed by western blotting. The size of the heart, expression levels of CaSR and autophagy level were markedly increased in hypertrophic myocardium. In addition, the present study demonstrated that the indicators of hypertrophy and autophagy were effectively suppressed by CaSR inhibitor. Furthermore, similar effects were demonstrated in neonatal rat hypertrophic cardiomyocytes treated with ISO. It was also observed that CaSR regulates the Ca2+/calmodulin‑dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ)‑AMP‑activated protein kinase (AMPK)‑mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway induced by ISO in cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, the AMPK inhibition significantly reduced the autophagy level following CaSR stimulation (P<0.05). The results of the present demonstrated that inhibition of CaSR may ameliorate cardiac hypertrophy induced by ISO and the effect may be associated with the inhibition of autophagy and suppression of the Ca

  8. 抗M2受体的抗肽段抗体对cAMP产生量和钙电流的影响%Effects of anti-peptide antibodies against the second extrace llular loop of human M2 muscarinic receptors on the cAMP production and calci um currents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文泽; 赵荣瑞; 吴博威; 郭光伟; 唐进; 李家成; Hjalmarson; Ake; Michael; Fu; LX

    2001-01-01

    Effects of anti-peptide antibodies aga inst the second extracellular loop of human M2 muscarinic receptors on the cAMP production and calcium currents(ICa) in guinea pig ventricular m yocytes we re studied by using radioimmunoassay and whole-cell patch clamp technique an d a comparison was also made with those of the muscarinic receptor agonist. Both muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol (Carb 10 μmol/L) and anti-pepti de antibodies (Abs 100 nmol/L) could decrease the isoprenaline (Iso 0.8 μm ol/L) -induced increases of cAMP〔from (108.2±7.0) to (88.4±7.2) pmol/(mg* min)for Carb and (88.6±5.1) pmol/(mg*min) for Abs respectively〕 production and i ncreases of ICa〔from (53.5± 7.0)% to (13.0±2.0)% for Carb and (66.9± 10.5)% to (34.5±8.0)% for Abs res pectively〕. The muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (Atr) was able to prevent these effects of Carb and Abs.These results indicated that the anti-p eptide antibodies against an epitope located in the second extracellular loop o f human M2 muscarinic receptors, similar to muscarinic receptor agonist , could decrease the β-receptor agonist stimulated incre ase of ICa by decreasing the β -receptor agonist stimulated increa se of cAMP productions and therefore could have an effect on their target receptor. These results further suggest that autoimmunity may participate in the pathogenesis of human idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy(DCM) and the seco nd extracellular loop of human M2 musarinic receptor could be the ma in immunodominant region.%应用放射免疫分析方法及全细胞膜片钳技术研究了抗M2受体细胞外第二环上的抗肽段 抗体(Abs )对豚鼠心室肌细胞cAMP产生量和内向钙电流(ICa)的影响并同M受体激 动剂的 效应进行了比较。结果如下:M受体激动剂carbachol(Carb 10 μmol/L)和抗肽段抗体( Abs 100 nmol/L)两者均可抑制异丙肾上腺素(Iso 0.8 μmol/L)所引起的cAMP量的增 加〔Carb可使组织中cAMP从(108

  9. Effects of muscarinic blockade in perirhinal cortex during visual recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi; Mishkin, Mortimer; Aigner, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    Stimulus recognition in monkeys is severely impaired by destruction or dysfunction of the perirhinal cortex and also by systemic administration of the cholinergic-muscarinic receptor blocker, scopolamine. These two effects are shown here to be linked: Stimulus recognition was found to be significantly impaired after bilateral microinjection of scopolamine directly into the perirhinal cortex, but not after equivalent injections into the laterally adjacent visual area TE or into the dentate gyrus of the overlying hippocampal formation. The results suggest that the formation of stimulus memories depends critically on cholinergic-muscarinic activation of the perirhinal area, providing a new clue to how stimulus representations are stored. PMID:9356507

  10. Prevention by NMDA receptor antagonists of the centrally-evoked increases of cardiac inotropic responses in rabbits.

    OpenAIRE

    Monassier, L.; Tibiriça, E.; Roegel, J. C.; Mettauer, B.; Feldman, J.; Bousquet, P.

    1994-01-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to investigate further the role of the excitatory amino acid (EAA) system of neurotransmission, particularly of the NMDA receptor, in the central regulation of cardiac function. 2. Electrical stimulation of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) in pentobarbitone anaesthetized rabbits induced a cardiovascular response mainly characterized by a positive inotropic effect, hypertension and a marked increase in the myocardial oxygen demand index. 3....

  11. Ryanodine receptors/calcium release channels in heart failure and sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, A R

    2001-04-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) ions are second messengers in signaling pathways in all types of cells. They regulate muscle contraction, electrical signals which determine the cardiac rhythm and cell growth pathways in the heart. In the past decade cDNA cloning has provided clues as to the molecular structure of the intracellular Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors, RyR, and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, IP3R) on the sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) and an understanding of how these molecules regulate Ca2+ homeostasis in the heart is beginning to emerge. The intracellular Ca2+ release channels form a distinct class of ion channels distinguished by their structure, size, and function. Both RyRs and IP3Rs have gigantic cytoplasmic domains that serve as scaffolds for modulatory proteins that regulate the channel pore located in the carboxy terminal 10% of the channel sequence. The channels are tetramers comprised of four RyR or IP3R subunits. RyR2 is required for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling in the heart. Using co-sedimentation and co-immunoprecipitation we have defined a macromolecular complex comprised of RyR2, FKBP12.6, PKA, the protein phosphatases PP1 and PP2A, and an anchoring protein mAKAP. We have shown that protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation of RyR2 dissociates FKBP12.6 and regulates the channel open probability (P(o)). In failing human hearts RyR2 is PKA hyperphosphorylated resulting in defective channel function due to increased sensitivity to Ca2+-induced activation. PMID:11273716

  12. Tenascin C upregulates interleukin-6 expression in human cardiac myofibroblasts via toll-like receptor 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Azhar; Spary, Emma J; Manfield, Iain W; Ruhmann, Michaela; Zuliani-Alvarez, Lorena; Gamboa-Esteves, Filomena O; Porter, Karen E; Drinkhill, Mark J; Midwood, Kim S; Turner, Neil A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Tenascin C (TNC) on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases in human cardiac myofibroblasts (CMF). METHODS: CMF were isolated and cultured from patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Cultured cells were treated with either TNC (0.1 μmol/L, 24 h) or a recombinant protein corresponding to different domains of the TNC protein; fibrinogen-like globe (FBG) and fibronectin type III-like repeats (TNIII 5-7) (both 1 μmol/L, 24 h). The expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines; interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, TNFα and the matrix metalloproteinases; MMPs (MMP1, 2, 3, 9, 10, MT1-MMP) was assessed using real time RT-PCR and western blot analysis. RESULTS: TNC increased both IL-6 and MMP3 (P < 0.01) mRNA levels in cultured human CMF but had no significant effect on the other markers studied. The increase in IL-6 mRNA expression was mirrored by an increase in protein secretion as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (P < 0.01). Treating CMF with the recombinant protein FBG increased IL-6 mRNA and protein (P < 0.01) whereas the recombinant protein TNIII 5-7 had no effect. Neither FBG nor TNIII 5-7 had any significant effect on MMP3 expression. The expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in human CMF was confirmed by real time RT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Pre-incubation of cells with TLR4 neutralising antisera attenuated the effect of both TNC and FBG on IL-6 mRNA and protein expression. CONCLUSION: TNC up-regulates IL-6 expression in human CMF, an effect mediated through the FBG domain of TNC and via the TLR4 receptor. PMID:27231521

  13. Effects of certain muscarinic antagonists on the actions of anticholinesterases on cat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimblecombe, R W; French, M C; Webb, S N

    1979-04-01

    1. The effects of some muscarinic antagonists, namely, N-ethyl-2-pyrrolidylmethyl-cyclopentylphenyl glycollate (PMCG), N-methyl-4-piperidyl-phenylcyclohexyl glycollate (PPCG, racemate and R and S enantiomers) and 4'-N-methyl-piperidyl-1-phenyl-cyclopentane carboxylate (G3063) on organophosphate (sarin, soman)- and carbamate (neostigmine)-induced twitch augmentation have been studied in cat soleus muscle. 2. The results of a preliminary study comparing the potency of sarin and soman in inhibiting the acetylcholinesterase activity of muscle in relation to the effect on the maximal twitch response indicated that there is not a simple relationship between degree of enzyme inhibition by these drugs and alteration of muscle function. 3. The muscarinic antagonists studied were capable of preventing or reversing sarin-, soman- or neostigmine-induced twitch augmentation. Doses sufficient to give complete protection from the effects of the anticholinesterase agents had little or no effect on the twitch response of normal muscle. 4. The protective action of these muscarinic antagonists is dose-dependent but independent of known antagonist actions at muscarinic receptors. 5. The effects of some local anaesthetics (lignocaine, prilocaine, cinchocaine, procaine) and other membrane stabilizers (quinine, ketamine, chlorpromazine, triflupromazine) were compared with those of the muscarinic antagonists in an attempt to elucidate the mode of action of these acetylcholine antagonists. The evidence is insufficient to exclude the involvement of a membrane stabilizing action. PMID:435681

  14. Posttranslational modifications of cardiac ryanodine receptors: Ca2+ signaling and EC-coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niggli, Ernst; Ullrich, Nina D.; Gutierrez, D.; Kyrychenko, Sergii; Poláková, Eva; Shirokova, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    In cardiac muscle, a number of posttranslational protein modifications can alter the function of the Ca2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), also known as the ryanodine receptor (RyR). During every heartbeat RyRs are activated by the Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism and contribute a large fraction of the Ca2+ required for contraction. Some of the posttranslational modifications of the RyR are known to affect its gating and Ca2+ sensitivity. Presently, research in a number of laboratories is focussed on RyR phosphorylation, both by PKA and CaMKII, or on RyR modifications caused by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS / RNS). Both classes of posttranslational modifications are thought to play important roles in the physiological regulation of channel activity, but are also known to provoke abnormal alterations during various diseases. Only recently it was realized that several types of posttranslational modifications are tightly connected and form synergistic (or antagonistic) feed-back loops resulting in additive and potentially detrimental downstream effects. This review summarizes recent findings on such posttranslational modifications, attempts to bridge molecular with cellular findings, and opens a perspective for future work trying to understand the ramifications of crosstalk in these multiple signaling pathways. Clarifying these complex interactions will be important in the development of novel therapeutic approaches, since this may form the foundation for the implementation of multi-pronged treatment regimes in the future. PMID:22960642

  15. Cardiac arrest during gamete release in chum salmon regulated by the parasympathetic nerve system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Makiguchi

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest caused by startling stimuli, such as visual and vibration stimuli, has been reported in some animals and could be considered as an extraordinary case of bradycardia and defined as reversible missed heart beats. Variability of the heart rate is established as a balance between an autonomic system, namely cholinergic vagus inhibition, and excitatory adrenergic stimulation of neural and hormonal action in teleost. However, the cardiac arrest and its regulating nervous mechanism remain poorly understood. We show, by using electrocardiogram (ECG data loggers, that cardiac arrest occurs in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta at the moment of gamete release for 7.39+/-1.61 s in females and for 5.20+/-0.97 s in males. The increase in heart rate during spawning behavior relative to the background rate during the resting period suggests that cardiac arrest is a characteristic physiological phenomenon of the extraordinarily high heart rate during spawning behavior. The ECG morphological analysis showed a peaked and tall T-wave adjacent to the cardiac arrest, indicating an increase in potassium permeability in cardiac muscle cells, which would function to retard the cardiac action potential. Pharmacological studies showed that the cardiac arrest was abolished by injection of atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, revealing that the cardiac arrest is a reflex response of the parasympathetic nerve system, although injection of sotalol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, did not affect the cardiac arrest. We conclude that cardiac arrest during gamete release in spawning release in spawning chum salmon is a physiological reflex response controlled by the parasympathetic nervous system. This cardiac arrest represents a response to the gaping behavior that occurs at the moment of gamete release.

  16. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius S Carreira

    Full Text Available The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR, either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease.

  17. Type III Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor Drives Cardiac Hypertrophy Through β-Arrestin2-Dependent Activation of Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jie; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Ling-Ling; Song, Shu-Ying; Li, Yan-Chao; Sun, Fei; Ding, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Chang-Jiang; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Mei-Tong; Dong, Chang-Jiang; Ji, Yong; Li, Hongliang; Chu, Wenfeng; Zhang, Zhi-Ren

    2016-09-01

    The role of type III transforming growth factor-β receptor (TβRIII) in the pathogenesis of heart diseases remains largely unclear. Here, we investigated the functional role and molecular mechanisms of TβRIII in the development of myocardial hypertrophy. Western blot and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that the expression of TβRIII was significantly elevated in human cardiac hypertrophic samples. Consistently, TβRIII expression was substantially increased in transverse aortic constriction (TAC)- and isoproterenol-induced mouse cardiac hypertrophy in vivo and in isoproterenol-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro. Overexpression of TβRIII resulted in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, whereas isoproterenol-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was greatly attenuated by knockdown of TβRIII in vitro. Cardiac-specific transgenic expression of TβRIII independently led to cardiac hypertrophy in mice, which was further aggravated by isoproterenol and TAC treatment. Cardiac contractile function of the mice was not altered in TβRIII transgenic mice; however, TAC led to significantly decreased cardiac contractile function in TβRIII transgenic mice compared with control mice. Conversely, isoproterenol- and TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and TAC-induced cardiac contractile function impairment were partially reversed by suppression of TβRIII in vivo. Our data suggest that TβRIII mediates stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy through activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, which requires a physical interaction of β-arrestin2 with both TβRIII and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Our findings indicate that stress-induced increase in TβRIII expression results in cardiac hypertrophy through β-arrestin2-dependent activation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and that transforming growth factor-β and β-adrenergic receptor signaling are not involved in spontaneous cardiac hypertrophy in cardiac

  18. Knockout of Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 4 Prevents Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentin-Sonoda, Mayra; da Silva, Rogério Cirino; Kmit, Fernanda Vieira; Abrahão, Mariana Vieira; Monnerat Cahli, Gustavo; Brasil, Guilherme Visconde; Muzi-Filho, Humberto; Silva, Paulo André; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda Freire; Vieyra, Adalberto; Medei, Emiliano; Carneiro-Ramos, Marcela Sorelli

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether the pathways linked to Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLRs) are involved in renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Wild type (WT) C57BL/6J, TLR2-/- and TLR4-/- mice were subjected to left kidney ischemia for 60 min followed by reperfusion for 5, 8, 12 and 15 days. Proton density magnetic resonance showed alterations in the injured kidney from WT mice, together with signs of parenchymal edema and higher levels of vimentin mRNA, accompanied by: (i) small, but significant, increase in serum urea after 24 h, (ii) 100% increase in serum creatinine at 24 h. A serum peak of inflammatory cytokines occurred after 5 days of reperfusion. Heart weight/body weight and heart weight/tibia length ratios increased after 12 and 15 days of reperfusion, respectively. Cardiac hypertrophy markers, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and α-actin, left ventricle mass, cardiac wall thickness and myocyte width increased after 15 days of reperfusion, together with longer QTc and action potential duration. Cardiac TLRs, MyD88, HSP60 and HSP70 mRNA levels also increased. After 15 days of reperfusion, absence of TLRs prevented cardiac hypertrophy, as reflected by similar values of left ventricular cardiac mass and heart weight/body weight ratio compared to the transgenic Sham. Renal tissular injury also ameliorated in both knockout mice, as revealed by the comparison of their vimentin mRNA levels with those found in the WT on the same day after I/R. The I/R TLR2-/- group had TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-1β levels similar to the non-I/R group, whereas the TLR4-/- group conserved the p-NF-κB/NF- κB ratio contrasting with that found in TLR2-/-. We conclude: (i) TLRs are involved in renal I/R-induced cardiac hypertrophy; (ii) absence of TLRs prevents I/R-induced cardiac hypertrophy, despite renal lesions seeming to evolve towards those of chronic disease; (iii) TLR2 and TLR4 selectively regulate the systemic inflammatory profile and NF- κB activation. PMID

  19. Safety of long acting muscarinic antagonists: are all these drugs always and equally safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melani, Andrea S; Sestini, Piersante

    2016-05-01

    Inhaled bronchodilators - such as long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists (LAMAs) - are central to the pharmacological management of symptomatic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. LAMAs are considered to be safe drugs at recommended dosages. In the present issue of the Journal safety of umeclidinium, a recently marketed LAMA, at twice the recommended dosage, has been evaluated with good results in a Japanese, COPD population. However, because muscarinic receptors are expressed not only in the lungs but also at the level of heart, digestive and urinary apparatus, the potential exists for LAMAs to cause adverse events related to stimulation of receptors in these organs. Head-to-head and post-marketing vigilance studies are required to determine the profile risk of these drugs, ultimately, and whether differences exist between currently available LAMAs. PMID:26789695

  20. Characterizing the role of endothelin-1 in the progression of cardiac hypertrophy in aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) null mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor characterized to play a role in detection and adaptation to environmental stimuli. Genetic deletion of AhR results in hypertension, and cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, associated with elevated plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) and endothelin-1 (ET-1), thus AhR appears to contribute to cardiovascular homeostasis. In these studies, we tested the hypothesis that ET-1 mediates cardiovascular pathology in AhR null mice via ETA receptor activation. First, we determine the time courses of cardiac hypertrophy, and of plasma and tissue ET-1 expression in AhR wildtype and null mice. AhR null mice exhibited increases in heart-to-body weight ratio and age-related expression of cardiac hypertrophy markers, β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC), and atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), which were significant at 2 months. Similarly, plasma and tissue ET-1 expression was significantly elevated at 2 months and increased further with age. Second, AhR null mice were treated with ETA receptor antagonist, BQ-123 (100 nmol/kg/day), for 7, 28, or 58 days and blood pressure, cardiac fibrosis, and cardiac hypertrophy assessed, respectively. BQ-123 for 7 days significantly reduced mean arterial pressure in conscious, catheterized mice. BQ-123 for 28 days significantly reduced the histological appearance of cardiac fibrosis. Treatment for 58 days significantly reduced cardiac mass, assessed by heart weight, echocardiography, and β-MHC and ANF expression; and reduced cardiac fibrosis as determined by osteopontin and collagen I mRNA expression. These findings establish ET-1 and the ETA receptor as primary determinants of hypertension and cardiac pathology in AhR null mice

  1. Prostaglandin E Receptor Subtype 4 Signaling in the Heart: Role in Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury and Cardiac Hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yin; Tang, Eva Hoi Ching; Ma, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is an endogenous lipid mediator, produced from the metabolism of arachidonic acids, upon the sequential actions of phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenases, and prostaglandin E synthases. The various biological functions governed by PGE2 are mediated through its four distinct prostaglandin E receptors (EPs), designated as EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4, among which the EP4 receptor is the one most widely distributed in the heart. The availability of global or cardiac-specific EP4 knockout mice and the development of selective EP4 agonists/antagonists have provided substantial evidence to support the role of EP4 receptor in the heart. However, like any good drama, activation of PGE2-EP4 signaling exerts both protective and detrimental effects in the ischemic heart disease. Thus, the primary object of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current progress of the PGE2-EP4 signaling in ischemic heart diseases, including cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. A better understanding of PGE2-EP4 signaling should promote the development of more effective therapeutic approaches to treat the ischemic heart diseases without triggering unwanted side effects. PMID:27190998

  2. TWEAK-Fn14 cytokine-receptor axis: a new player of myocardial remodeling and cardiac failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana eNovoyatleva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF has been firmly established as a pathogenic factor in heart failure, a significant socio-economic burden. In this review we will explore the role of other members of the TNF/TNF receptor superfamily (TNFSF/TNFRSF in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs focusing on TWEAK and its receptor Fn14, new players in myocardial remodeling and heart failure. The TWEAK/Fn14 pathway controls a variety of cellular activities such as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis and has diverse biological functions in pathological mechanisms like inflammation and fibrosis that are associated with CVDs. Furthermore, it has recently been shown that the TWEAK/Fn14 axis is a positive regulator of cardiac hypertrophy and that deletion of Fn14 receptor protects from right heart fibrosis and dysfunction. We discuss the potential use of the TWEAK/Fn14 axis as biomarker for CVDs as well as therapeutic target for future treatment of human heart failure based on supporting data from animal models and in vitro studies. Collectively, existing data strongly suggest the TWEAK/Fn14 axis as a potential new therapeutic target for achieving cardiac protection in patients with CVDs.

  3. Embryonic caffeine exposure acts via A1 adenosine receptors to alter adult cardiac function and DNA methylation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela L Buscariollo

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that disruption of normal prenatal development influences an individual's risk of developing obesity and cardiovascular disease as an adult. Thus, understanding how in utero exposure to chemical agents leads to increased susceptibility to adult diseases is a critical health related issue. Our aim was to determine whether adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs mediate the long-term effects of in utero caffeine exposure on cardiac function and whether these long-term effects are the result of changes in DNA methylation patterns in adult hearts. Pregnant A1AR knockout mice were treated with caffeine (20 mg/kg or vehicle (0.09% NaCl i.p. at embryonic day 8.5. This caffeine treatment results in serum levels equivalent to the consumption of 2-4 cups of coffee in humans. After dams gave birth, offspring were examined at 8-10 weeks of age. A1AR+/+ offspring treated in utero with caffeine were 10% heavier than vehicle controls. Using echocardiography, we observed altered cardiac function and morphology in adult mice exposed to caffeine in utero. Caffeine treatment decreased cardiac output by 11% and increased left ventricular wall thickness by 29% during diastole. Using DNA methylation arrays, we identified altered DNA methylation patterns in A1AR+/+ caffeine treated hearts, including 7719 differentially methylated regions (DMRs within the genome and an overall decrease in DNA methylation of 26%. Analysis of genes associated with DMRs revealed that many are associated with cardiac hypertrophy. These data demonstrate that A1ARs mediate in utero caffeine effects on cardiac function and growth and that caffeine exposure leads to changes in DNA methylation.

  4. Obesity alters molecular and functional cardiac responses to ischemia/reperfusion and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassoon, Daniel J; Goodwill, Adam G; Noblet, Jillian N; Conteh, Abass M; Herring, B Paul; McClintick, Jeanette N; Tune, Johnathan D; Mather, Kieren J

    2016-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that obesity alters the cardiac response to ischemia/reperfusion and/or glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation, and that these differences are associated with alterations in the obese cardiac proteome and microRNA (miRNA) transcriptome. Ossabaw swine were fed normal chow or obesogenic diet for 6 months. Cardiac function was assessed at baseline, during a 30-minutes coronary occlusion, and during 2 hours of reperfusion in anesthetized swine treated with saline or exendin-4 for 24 hours. Cardiac biopsies were obtained from normal and ischemia/reperfusion territories. Fat-fed animals were heavier, and exhibited hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Plasma troponin-I concentration (index of myocardial injury) was increased following ischemia/reperfusion and decreased by exendin-4 treatment in both groups. Ischemia/reperfusion produced reductions in systolic pressure and stroke volume in lean swine. These indices were higher in obese hearts at baseline and relatively maintained throughout ischemia/reperfusion. Exendin-4 administration increased systolic pressure in lean swine but did not affect the blood pressure in obese swine. End-diastolic volume was reduced by exendin-4 following ischemia/reperfusion in obese swine. These divergent physiologic responses were associated with obesity-related differences in proteins related to myocardial structure/function (e.g. titin) and calcium handling (e.g. SERCA2a, histidine-rich Ca(2+) binding protein). Alterations in expression of cardiac miRs in obese hearts included miR-15, miR-27, miR-130, miR-181, and let-7. Taken together, these observations validate this discovery approach and reveal novel associations that suggest previously undiscovered mechanisms contributing to the effects of obesity on the heart and contributing to the actions of GLP-1 following ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:27234258

  5. 5-HT1A/7 receptor agonist excites cardiac vagal neurons via inhibition of both GABAergic and glycinergic inputs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-hua CHEN; Li-li HOU; Ji-jiang WANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To study the synaptic mechanisms involved in the 5-hydroxytryptaminel AF/7 (5-HT1A/7) receptor-mediated reflex control of cardiac vagal preganglionic neurons (CVPN). Methods: CVPN were retrogradely labeled and identified in brain stem slices of newborn rats, and their synaptic activity was examined using whole-cell patch-clamp. Results: 8-Hydroxy-2-(di-N-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), an agonist of 5-HT1A/7 receptors, had no effect on the glutamatergic inputs of CVPN. In contrast, it significantly decreased the frequency and the amplitude of both the GABAergic and the glycinergic spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (slPSC). 8-OH-DPAT also caused significant amplitude decrease of the GABAergic currents evoked by stimulation of the nucleus tractus solitarius. Both the fre-quency inhibition and the amplitude inhibition of the GABAergic and the glycinergic sIPSC by 8-OH-DPAT had dose-dependent tendencies and could be reversed by WAY-100635, an antagonist of 5-HT1A/7 receptors. In the pre-exist-ence of tetrodotoxin, 8-OH-DPAT had no effect on the GABAergic or the glycinergic miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents, and had no effect on the GABAergic or the glycinergic currents evoked by exogenous GABA or glycine. Conclusion:The 5-HT1A/7 receptor agonist excites CVPN indirectly via the inhibition of both the GABAergic and glycinergic inputs. These findings have at least in part re-vealed the synaptic mechanisms involved in the 5-HT1A/7 receptor-mediated reflex control of cardiac vagal nerves in intact animals.

  6. Knockout of Toll-Like Receptors 2 and 4 Prevents Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Trentin-Sonoda, Mayra; da Silva, Rogério Cirino; Kmit, Fernanda Vieira; Abrahão, Mariana Vieira; Monnerat Cahli, Gustavo; Brasil, Guilherme Visconde; Muzi-Filho, Humberto; Silva, Paulo André; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda Freire; Vieyra, Adalberto; Medei, Emiliano; Carneiro-Ramos, Marcela Sorelli

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether the pathways linked to Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLRs) are involved in renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Wild type (WT) C57BL/6J, TLR2-/- and TLR4-/- mice were subjected to left kidney ischemia for 60 min followed by reperfusion for 5, 8, 12 and 15 days. Proton density magnetic resonance showed alterations in the injured kidney from WT mice, together with signs of parenchymal edema and higher levels of vimentin mRNA, accompanied by: (i) s...

  7. Histamine induces postprandian tachycardia through a direct effect on cardiac H2-receptors in pythons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Nini Skovgaard; Møller, Kate; Gesser, Hans; Wang, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    snakes histamine caused a systemic vasodilatation and a marked increase in heart rate and cardiac output mediated through a direct effect on H2-receptors. Our study strongly indicates that histamine regulates heart rate during the initial phase of digestion in pythons. This study describes a novel...... doubling of intrinsic heart rate. The H2-antagonist did not affect heart rate of fasting snakes, but decreased heart rate by 15-20 min-1 at 24h into digestion, while it had no effects at 48h. Thus, the histaminergic tone on the heart rose from none to 30% at 24h, but vanished after 48h. In anesthetised...

  8. Genetically Modified Mouse Models Used for Studying the Role of the AT2 Receptor in Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D. Avila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The actions of Angiotensin II have been implicated in many cardiovascular conditions. It is widely accepted that the cardiovascular effects of Angiotensin II are mediated by different subtypes of receptors: AT1 and AT2. These membrane-bound receptors share a part of their nucleic acid but seem to have different distribution and pathophysiological actions. AT1 mediates most of the Angiotensin II actions since it is ubiquitously expressed in the cardiovascular system of the normal adult. Moreover AT2 is highly expressed in the developing fetus but its expression in the cardiovascular system is low and declines after birth. However the expression of AT2 appears to be modulated by pathological states such as hypertension, myocardial infarction or any pathology associated to tissue remodeling or inflammation. The specific role of this receptor is still unclear and different studies involving in vivo and in vitro experiments have shown conflicting data. It is essential to clarify the role of the AT2 receptor in the different pathological states as it is a potential site for an effective therapeutic regimen that targets the Angiotensin II system. We will review the different genetically modified mouse models used to study the AT2 receptor and its association with cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

  9. Tenascin C upregulates IL-6 expression in Human Cardiac Myofibroblasts via Toll-Like Receptor 4

    OpenAIRE

    Midwood, KS; Maqbool, A; Spary, EJ; Manfield, IW; Ruhmann, M; Zuliani-Alvarez, L; Gamboa-Esteves, FO; Porter, KE; Drinkhill, MJ; Turner, NA

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Tenascin-C (TNC) on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases in human cardiac myofibroblasts. METHODS: Cardiac myofibroblasts (CMF) were isolated and cultured from patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Cultured cells were treated with either TNC (0.1 µM, 24 h) or a recombinant protein corresponding to different domains of the TNC protein; fibrinogen-like globe (FBG) and fibronectin type III-like repeats (TN...

  10. Cardiac adaptation to high altitude in the plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichon, Aurélien; Zhenzhong, Bai; Marchant, Dominique; Jin, Guoen; Voituron, Nicolas; Haixia, Yun; Favret, Fabrice; Richalet, Jean-Paul; Ge, Ri-Li

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess maximal heart rate (HR) and heart morphological changes in high altitude living "plateau pikas" and rats bred at 2260 m. Rats and pikas were catheterized to measure HR (2260 m). After baseline measurements, 1 mg/kg of atropine (AT) and increasing doses of isoproterenol (IsoP) (0.1, 1, 10, and 100 μg kg) were injected into animals. Right (RV) and left ventricles (LV) were removed to calculate Fulton's ratio (LV + septum (S) to RV weights) and to assess mRNA expression level of β1- and β2-adrenoceptors, muscarinic m1 and m2 receptors, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Resting HR was significantly lower in rats than in pikas and increased after AT injection only in rats. IsoP injection induced a significant increase in HR in rat for all doses, which was systematically greater than in pikas. In pikas HR was slightly increased only after the two highest concentrations of IsoP. Fulton's ratio was greater in rats compared with pikas but the LV + S adjusted for body weight was greater in pikas. Pikas showed lower β1-adrenoceptors and muscarinic m2 receptors mRNA expression but larger VEGF mRNA expression than rats both in RV and LV. These results suggest that pikas have a lower maximal HR compared with rats certainly due to a decrease in β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors mRNA expression. However, the LV hypertrophy probably led to an increase in stroke volume to maintain cardiac output in response to the cold and hypoxic environment. PMID:24303117

  11. Characterization of an atypical muscarinic cholinoceptor mediating contraction of the guinea-pig isolated uterus

    OpenAIRE

    Boxall, Donna K; Ford, Anthony P D W; Choppin, Agnes; Nahorski, Stefan R; Challiss, R.A. John; Eglen, Richard M

    1998-01-01

    In many smooth muscle tissues a minor M3-muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor population mediates contraction, despite the presence of a larger M2-mACh receptor population. However, this is not the case for guinea-pig uterus where radioligand binding and functional studies exclude a dominant role for M3-mACh receptors.Using tissue from animals pre-treated with diethylstilboestrol, estimates of antagonist affinity were made before and after selective alkylation procedures, together with es...

  12. Impairment of muscarinic transmission in transgenic APPswe/PS1dE9 mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Eva; Jakubík, Jan; Michal, Pavel; Oksman, M.; Iivonen, H.; Tanila, H.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 3 (2008), s. 368-378. ISSN 0197-4580 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011206 Grant ostatní: EC(XE) QLK1-CT-2002-00172 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Alzheimer ´s disease * muscarinic receptors * cholinergic neurotransmission Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 5.959, year: 2008

  13. Purinergic and muscarinic modulation of ATP release from the urothelium and its paracrine actions

    OpenAIRE

    Sui, Guiping; Fry, Chris H.; Montgomery, Bruce; Roberts, Max; Wu, Rui; Wu, Changhao

    2013-01-01

    The urothelium is a newly recognized sensory structure that detects bladder fullness. Pivotal to this sensory role is the release of ATP from the urothelium. However, the routes for urothelial ATP release, its modulation by receptor-mediated pathways, and the autocrine/paracrine role of ATP are poorly understood, especially in native tissue. We examined the action of key neurotransmitters: purinergic and muscarinic agonists on ATP release and its paracrine effect. Guinea pig and human urothel...

  14. Protective effect of prostacyclin against pre-cardiac edema caused by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and a thromboxane receptor agonist in developing zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijoukubo, Daisuke; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Okuno, Yuki; Yin, Guojun; Kitazawa, Takio; Peterson, Richard E; Kubota, Akira; Teraoka, Hiroki

    2016-08-01

    The role of prostaglandin pathways has been suggested in some toxicological responses to dioxins. Cyclooxygenase type 2b (COX2b), thromboxane synthase, and the thromboxane receptor (TP) pathway have been implicated in mediating 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced pre-cardiac edema in developing zebrafish at 55 h post fertilization (hpf). Pre-cardiac edema refers to edema located in a small cavity between the heart and body wall of zebrafish eleutheroembryos. In the present study, we assessed the role of prostacyclin, which counteracts some biological effects of thromboxane, in TCDD-induced pre-cardiac edema. Pre-cardiac edema induced by TCDD exposure (0.5 and 1 ppb) beginning at 24 hpf was markedly inhibited by exposure to beraprost (5 and 10 μM), a prostacyclin receptor (IP) agonist, beginning at 33 hpf. The preventive effect of beraprost was reduced by exposure to CAY10441 (10 μM), an IP antagonist starting at 33 hpf. Knockdowns of the IP receptor (IP-KD) with two different morpholinos caused edema by themselves and enhanced pre-cardiac edema caused by the low concentration of TCDD (0.5 ppb). On the other hand, short exposure beginning at 48 hpf to U46619 (7.5-30 μM), a thromboxane receptor agonist caused pre-cardiac edema, which was inhibited by exposure beginning at 48 hpf to both ICI-192,605 (24 μM), a TP antagonist, and beraprost. Expression of prostacyclin synthase was increased from fertilization, plateaued by 48 hpf, and was maintained until at least 96 hpf. Overall, the results demonstrate a preventive effect of prostacyclin on TCDD-induced pre-cardiac edema in developing zebrafish. PMID:27174823

  15. SIGNALLING THROUGH RETINOIC ACID RECEPTORS IN CARDIAC DEVELOPMENT: DOING THE RIGHT THINGS AT THE RIGHT TIMES

    OpenAIRE

    Xavier-Neto, José; Costa, Ângela M. Sousa; Figueira, Ana Carolina M.; Caiaffa, Carlo Donato; do Amaral, Fabio Neves; Peres, Lara Maldanis Cerqueira; da Silva, Bárbara Santos Pires; Santos, Luana Nunes; Moise, Alexander R.; Castillo, Hozana Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a terpenoid that is synthesized from Vitamin A/retinol (ROL) and binds to the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) to control multiple developmental processes in vertebrates. The available clinic and experimental data provide uncontested evidence for the pleiotropic roles of RA signalling in development of multiple embryonic structures and organs such eyes, central nervous system, gonads, lungs and heart. The development of any of thes...

  16. Apolipoprotein A-I Mimetic Peptide D-4F Reduces Cardiac Hypertrophy and Improves Apolipoprotein A-I-Mediated Reverse Cholesterol Transport From Cardiac Tissue in LDL Receptor-null Mice Fed a Western Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Zhang, Song; Ye, Ping; Liu, Yong-Xue; Qin, Yan-Wen; Miao, Dong-Mei

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that hypercholesterolemia is an independent determinant of increased left ventricular (LV) mass. Because high-density lipoprotein and its major protein apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) mediate reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and have cardiac protective effects, we hypothesized that the apoA-I mimetic peptide D-4F could promote RCT in cardiac tissue and decrease cardiac hypertrophy induced by hypercholesterolemia. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice were fed by a Western diet for 18 weeks and then randomized to receive water, or D-4F 0.3 mg/mL, or D-4F 0.5 mg/mL added to drinking water for 6 weeks. After D-4F administration, an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and a decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglyceride in a trend toward dose-responsivity were found in cardiac tissue. Ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed a reduction in LV posterior wall end-diastolic dimension, and an increase in mitral valve E/A ratio and LV ejection fraction. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed reduced LV wall thickness and myocardial cell diameter. The protein levels of ABCA1 and LXRα were elevated in cardiac tissue of D-4F treated mice compared with the controls (P < 0.05). These results demonstrated that D-4F treatment reduced cardiac hypertrophy, and improved cardiac performance in low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice fed a Western diet, presumably through the LXRα-ABCA1 pathway associated with enhanced myocardial RCT. PMID:26828321

  17. Insulin/glucose induces natriuretic peptide clearance receptor in human adipocytes: a metabolic link with the cardiac natriuretic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordicchia, M; Ceresiani, M; Pavani, M; Minardi, D; Polito, M; Wabitsch, M; Cannone, V; Burnett, J C; Dessì-Fulgheri, P; Sarzani, R

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac natriuretic peptides (NP) are involved in cardiorenal regulation and in lipolysis. The NP activity is largely dependent on the ratio between the signaling receptor NPRA and the clearance receptor NPRC. Lipolysis increases when NPRC is reduced by starving or very-low-calorie diet. On the contrary, insulin is an antilipolytic hormone that increases sodium retention, suggesting a possible functional link with NP. We examined the insulin-mediated regulation of NP receptors in differentiated human adipocytes and tested the association of NP receptor expression in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) with metabolic profiles of patients undergoing renal surgery. Differentiated human adipocytes from VAT and Simpson-Golabi-Behmel Syndrome (SGBS) adipocyte cell line were treated with insulin in the presence of high-glucose or low-glucose media to study NP receptors and insulin/glucose-regulated pathways. Fasting blood samples and VAT samples were taken from patients on the day of renal surgery. We observed a potent insulin-mediated and glucose-dependent upregulation of NPRC, through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, associated with lower lipolysis in differentiated adipocytes. No effect was observed on NPRA. Low-glucose medium, used to simulate in vivo starving conditions, hampered the insulin effect on NPRC through modulation of insulin/glucose-regulated pathways, allowing atrial natriuretic peptide to induce lipolysis and thermogenic genes. An expression ratio in favor of NPRC in adipose tissue was associated with higher fasting insulinemia, HOMA-IR, and atherogenic lipid levels. Insulin/glucose-dependent NPRC induction in adipocytes might be a key factor linking hyperinsulinemia, metabolic syndrome, and higher blood pressure by reducing NP effects on adipocytes. PMID:27101299

  18. G16R single nucleotide polymorphism but not haplotypes of the ß2-adrenergic receptor gene alters cardiac output in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokamp, Kim Z; Staalsø, Jonatan M; Gartmann, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    Variation in genes encoding the ß2-adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) may influence Q¿ (cardiac output). The 46G>A (G16R) SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) has been associated with ß2-mediated vasodilation, but the effect of ADRB2 haplotypes on Q¿ has not been ...

  19. Pressure mediated hypertrophy and mechanical stretch up-regulate expression of the long form of leptin receptor (ob-Rb in rat cardiac myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsui Hiroki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperleptinemia is known to participate in cardiac hypertrophy and hypertension, but the relationship between pressure overload and leptin is poorly understood. We therefore examined the expression of leptin (ob and the leptin receptor (ob-R in the pressure-overloaded rat heart. We also examined gene expressions in culture cardiac myocytes to clarify which hypertension-related stimulus induces these genes. Results Pressure overload was produced by ligation of the rat abdominal aorta, and ob and ob-R isoform mRNAs were measured using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. We also measured these gene expressions in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes treated with angiotensin II (ANGII, endothelin-1 (ET-1, or cyclic mechanical stretch. Leptin and the long form of the leptin receptor (ob-Rb gene were significantly increased 4 weeks after banding, but expression of the short form of the leptin receptor (ob-Ra was unchanged. ob-Rb protein expression was also detected by immunohistochemistry in hypertrophied cardiac myocytes after banding. Meanwhile, plasma leptin concentrations were not different between the control and banding groups. In cultured myocytes, ANGII and ET-1 increased only ob mRNA expression. However, mechanical stretch activated both ob and ob-Rb mRNA expression in a time-dependent manner, but ob-Ra mRNA was unchanged by any stress. Conclusions We first demonstrated that both pressure mediated hypertrophy and mechanical stretch up-regulate ob-Rb gene expression in heart and cardiac myocytes, which are thought to be important for leptin action in cardiac myocytes. These results suggest a new local mechanism by which leptin affects cardiac remodeling in pressure-overloaded hearts.

  20. Effects of anti-peptide antibody against human M2 muscarinic receptors on the cAMP content in rat ventricles%心肌M2胆碱受体抗体对大鼠心房及心室肌cAMP含量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱琳; 李香珍; 冯羡菊; 王文泽; 张琳; 陈爱莲

    2001-01-01

    目的:了解心肌M2胆碱受体抗体(M2-Ab)对大鼠心房和心室肌cAMP含量的影响,并与M2胆碱受体激动剂卡巴可(Carb)的作用进行了对比观察。方法:采用离体生化放射免疫分析法测定M2-Ab及M2胆碱受体激动剂Carb对心肌cAMP含量的影响。结果:①M2-Ab及Carb两者均可剂量依赖性抑制异丙肾上腺素(Isoproterenol,Iso)所刺激的大鼠心房及心室肌cAMP的增加。卡巴可浓度为2 μmol/L,10 μmol/L,50 μmol/L时可分别抑制Iso所刺激的cAMP含量(8.5±1.2)%,(16.2±1.4)%,(29.5±2.1)%,而M2-Ab浓度为50 nmol/L,100 nmol/L,400 nmol/L时,可分别抑制(6.1±0.6)%,(17.3±1.8)%,(31.7±3.1)%(P<0.01)。②Carb(10 μmol/L)及M2-Ab(100 nmol/L)两者可分别抑制基础cAMP(49.2±4.3)%和(64.3±5.1)%。③M受体阻断剂阿托品(Atr)(1.5 μmol/L)不但可阻断Carb对Iso的抑制反应,亦能阻断M2-Ab的这种反应。而相应的抗原性肽段也能阻断M2-Ab的这种反应。结论:M2-Ab抑制Iso引起的心室肌细胞cAMP生成量的增加反应,类似于M受体激动剂Carb,两者效应均通过作用于M2受体途径实现。%Aim:To study the effects of anti-peptide antibodies(M2-Ab) against the second extracellular loop of human muscarinic receptor 2 on the cAMP content in rat atria and ventricles.These effects were compared with those of the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol (Carb).Methods:Radioimmunoassay technique,was used for determining the effects of anti-pepitide antibodies and carb on cAMP content in rat ventricles.Result:①both Carb and M2-Ab were able to inhibit the isoproterenol (Iso) stimulated cAMP production in rat atria and ventricles.Carb at 2μmol/L,10μmol/L and 50μmol/L decreased Iso-stimulated cAMP production by (8.5±1.2)%,(16.2±1.4)% and (29.5±2.1)%,respectively;whereas M2-Ab at 50nmol/L,100nmol/L and 400nmol/L decreased it by (6.1±0.6)%,(17.3±1.8)% and (31.7±3.1)% (P<0.01),respectively.②Both Carb and M2-Ab

  1. Inhibition by the tetramine disulphide, benextramine, of cardiac chronotropic histamine H2-receptor-mediated effects.

    OpenAIRE

    Belleau, B.; Benfey, B. G.; Benfey, T. J.; Melchiorre, C.

    1982-01-01

    1 Benextramine (N,N1-bis[o-methoxybenzylamino)-n-hexyl]cystamine), which irreversibly blocks alpha-adrenoceptors and does not inhibit the H1-receptor-mediated contractile effect of histamine on guinea-pig isolated ileum, also did not inhibit the H1-receptor-mediated inotropic effect of histamine on guinea-pig isolated atrium. 2 Benextramine irreversibly inhibited the H2-receptor-mediated chronotropic effect of histamine on guinea-pig isolated atrium. 3 Since its combination with the competiti...

  2. Muscarinic supersensibility of anterior pituitary ACTH and beta-endorphin release in major depressive illness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since numerious physiological systems display muscarinic receptor supersensitivity in major depressive illnesses, the authors have hypothesize that anterior pituitary release of ACTH and beta-Endorphin immunoreactivity may also be muscarinically supersensitive in depression. The studies were conducted under FDA-approved IND and with local human subjects committee approval. Plasma ACTH concentrations were determined as follows: samples were assayed in duplicate using equilibrium radioimmunoassay utilizing a rabbit anti-porcine ACTH antibody. Significance ofchanges in plasma cortisol, ACTH and beta-endorphin immunoreactivity after physostigmine and saline were determined by repeated measures analysis of variance. In all subject groups, physostigmine (relative to placebo) caused significant increases in plasma concentrations of cortisol, ACTH, and beta-endorphin immonoreactivity

  3. Endothelin A receptor antagonist, atrasentan, attenuates renal and cardiac dysfunction in Dahl salt-hypertensive rats in a blood pressure independent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A Samad

    Full Text Available Proteinuria is a hallmark of chronic kidney disease (CKD and cardiovascular disease (CVD, and a good predictor of clinical outcome. Selective endothelin A (ETA receptor antagonist used with renin-angiotensin system (RAS inhibitors prevents development of proteinuria in CKD. However, whether the improvement in proteinuria would have beneficial effects on CVD, independent of RAS inhibition, is not well understood. In this study, we investigated whether atrasentan, an ETA receptor antagonist, has renal and cardiovascular effects independent of RAS inhibition. Male Dahl salt sensitive (DSS rats, at six weeks of age, received water with or without different doses of atrasentan and/or enalapril under high salt (HS diet or normal diet (ND for 6 weeks. At the end of 12th week, atrasentan at a moderate dose significantly attenuated proteinuria and serum creatinine without reducing mean arterial pressure (MAP, thereby preventing cardiac hypertrophy and improving cardiac function. ACE inhibitor enalapril at a dose that did not significantly lowered BP, attenuated cardiac hypertrophy while moderately improving cardiac function without reducing proteinuria and serum creatinine level. Nonetheless, combined therapy of atrasentan and enalapril that does not altering BP exerted additional cardioprotective effect. Based on these findings, we conclude that BP independent monotherapy of ETA receptor antagonist attenuates the progression of CKD and significantly mitigates CVD independent of RAS inhibition.

  4. Endothelin A receptor antagonist, atrasentan, attenuates renal and cardiac dysfunction in Dahl salt-hypertensive rats in a blood pressure independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, Mohammed A; Kim, Ui Kyoung; Kang, Joshua J; Ke, Qingen; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Proteinuria is a hallmark of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and a good predictor of clinical outcome. Selective endothelin A (ETA) receptor antagonist used with renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors prevents development of proteinuria in CKD. However, whether the improvement in proteinuria would have beneficial effects on CVD, independent of RAS inhibition, is not well understood. In this study, we investigated whether atrasentan, an ETA receptor antagonist, has renal and cardiovascular effects independent of RAS inhibition. Male Dahl salt sensitive (DSS) rats, at six weeks of age, received water with or without different doses of atrasentan and/or enalapril under high salt (HS) diet or normal diet (ND) for 6 weeks. At the end of 12th week, atrasentan at a moderate dose significantly attenuated proteinuria and serum creatinine without reducing mean arterial pressure (MAP), thereby preventing cardiac hypertrophy and improving cardiac function. ACE inhibitor enalapril at a dose that did not significantly lowered BP, attenuated cardiac hypertrophy while moderately improving cardiac function without reducing proteinuria and serum creatinine level. Nonetheless, combined therapy of atrasentan and enalapril that does not altering BP exerted additional cardioprotective effect. Based on these findings, we conclude that BP independent monotherapy of ETA receptor antagonist attenuates the progression of CKD and significantly mitigates CVD independent of RAS inhibition. PMID:25775254

  5. Role of adenosine A2A receptor signaling in the nicotine-evoked attenuation of reflex cardiac sympathetic control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baroreflex dysfunction contributes to increased cardiovascular risk in cigarette smokers. Given the importance of adenosinergic pathways in baroreflex control, the hypothesis was tested that defective central adenosinergic modulation of cardiac autonomic activity mediates the nicotine-baroreflex interaction. Baroreflex curves relating changes in heart rate (HR) to increases or decreases in blood pressure (BP) evoked by i.v. doses (1-16 μg/kg) of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), respectively, were constructed in conscious rats; slopes of the curves were taken as measures of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Nicotine (25 and 100 μg/kg i.v.) dose-dependently reduced BRSSNP in contrast to no effect on BRSPE. BRSSNP was also attenuated after intracisternal (i.c.) administration of nicotine. Similar reductions in BRSSNP were observed in rats pretreated with atropine or propranolol. The combined treatment with nicotine and atropine produced additive inhibitory effects on BRS, an effect that was not demonstrated upon concurrent exposure to nicotine and propranolol. BRSSNP was reduced in preparations treated with i.c. 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT, nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist), 8-(3-Chlorostyryl) caffeine (CSC, A2A antagonist), or VUF5574 (A3 antagonist). In contrast, BRSSNP was preserved after blockade of A1 (DPCPX) or A2B (alloxazine) receptors or inhibition of adenosine uptake by dipyridamole. CSC or 8-PT abrogated the BRSSNP depressant effect of nicotine whereas other adenosinergic antagonists were without effect. Together, nicotine preferentially impairs reflex tachycardia via disruption of adenosine A2A receptor-mediated facilitation of reflex cardiac sympathoexcitation. Clinically, the attenuation by nicotine of compensatory sympathoexcitation may be detrimental in conditions such as hypothalamic defense response, posture changes, and ventricular rhythms. - Research highlights: → The role of central adenosinergic sites in the nicotine

  6. Recent progress of adrenergic receptors on cardiac hypertrophy%肾上腺素能受体与心肌肥大的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄丹(综述); 毛建文; 李春梅(审校)

    2015-01-01

    心肌肥大是一种较缓慢而有力的代偿形式,然而它不是无限度的,心肌肥大最终将引起心室功能异常而导致心力衰竭,这往往是心血管疾病患者的主要死因之一。肾上腺素能受体(adrenergic receptor,AR)是介导儿茶酚胺作用的一类组织受体,研究表明AR与心肌肥大和心力衰竭的发生密切相关。因此,本文就几种AR与心肌肥大近年的研究进展进行综述,以便更好的了解心肌肥大的发生机理。%Cardiac hypertrophy is a relatively slow but powerful compensatory pattern. However, it is not unlimited, excessive cardiac hypertrophy will eventually cause ventricular dysfunction leading to heart failure, which is one of the main causes of death in patients with cardiovascular disease. Adrenergic receptor is a kind of receptors which mediate the effect of catecholamine. Studies have shown that there is a close relationship between adrenergic receptors and cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we reviewed the advance of study on relationship between adrenergic receptors and cardiac hypertrophy, in recent years. It will help us to better understand the mechanism of cardiac hypertrophy.

  7. Electron-conformational transformations govern the temperature dependence of the cardiac ryanodine receptor gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskvin, A. S.; Iaparov, B. I.; Ryvkin, A. M.; Solovyova, O. E.; Markhasin, V. S.

    2015-07-01

    Temperature influences many aspects of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, in particular, hypothermia increases the open probability ( P open) of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-release channels (ryanodine-sensitive RyR channels) rising the SR Ca2+ load in mammalian myocytes. However, to the best of our knowledge, no theoretical models are available for that effect. Traditional Markov chain models do not provide a reasonable molecular mechanistic insight on the origin of the temperature effects. Here in the paper we address a simple physically clear electron-conformational model to describe the RyR gating and argue that a synergetic effect of external thermal fluctuation forces (Gaussian-Markovian noise) and internal friction via the temperature stimulation/suppression of the open-close RyR tunneling probability can be considered as a main contributor to temperature effects on the RyR gating. Results of the computer modeling allowed us to successfully reproduce all the temperature effects observed for an isolated RyR gating in vitro under reducing the temperature: increase in P open and mean open time without any significant effect on mean closed

  8. Greater adenosine A2A receptor densities in cardiac and skeletal muscle in endurance-trained men: a [11C]TMSX PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the densities of adenosine A2A receptors in cardiac and skeletal muscles between untrained and endurance-trained subjects using positron emission tomography (PET) and [7-methyl-11C]-(E)-8-(3,4,5-trimethoxystyryl)-1,3,7-trimethylxanthine ([11C]TMSX), a newly developed radioligand for mapping adenosine A2A receptors. Five untrained and five endurance-trained subjects participated in this study. The density of adenosine A2A receptors was evaluated as the distribution volume of [11C]TMSX in cardiac and triceps brachii muscles in the resting state using PET. The distribution volume of [11C]TMSX in the myocardium was significantly greater than in the triceps brachii muscle in both groups. Further, distribution volumes [11C]TMSX in the trained subjects were significantly grater than those in untrained subjects (myocardium, 3.6±0.3 vs. 3.1±0.4 ml g-1; triceps brachii muscle, 1.7±0.3 vs. 1.2±0.2 ml g-1, respectively). These results indicate that the densities of adenosine A2A receptors in the cardiac and skeletal muscles are greater in the endurance-trained men than in the untrained men

  9. Angiotensin and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism attenuates cardiac oxidative stress in angiotensin II-infused rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minas, Jacqueline N; Thorwald, Max A; Conte, Debra; Vázquez-Medina, Jose-Pablo; Nishiyama, Akira; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) and aldosterone contribute to hypertension, oxidative stress and cardiovascular damage, but the contributions of aldosterone during Ang II-dependent hypertension are not well defined because of the difficulty to assess each independently. To test the hypothesis that during Ang II infusion, oxidative and nitrosative damage is mediated through both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1), five groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: (i) control; (ii) Ang II infused (80 ng/min × 28 days); (iii) Ang II + AT1 receptor blocker (ARB; 10 mg losartan/kg per day × 21 days); (iv) Ang II + mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist (Epl; 100 mg eplerenone/day × 21 days); and (v) Ang II + ARB + Epl (Combo; × 21 days). Both ARB and combination treatments completely alleviated the Ang II-induced hypertension, whereas eplerenone treatment only prolonged the onset of the hypertension. Eplerenone treatment exacerbated the Ang II-mediated increase in plasma and heart aldosterone 2.3- and 1.8-fold, respectively, while ARB treatment reduced both. Chronic MR blockade was sufficient to ameliorate the AT1-mediated increase in oxidative damage. All treatments normalized protein oxidation (nitrotyrosine) levels; however, only ARB and Combo treatments completely reduced lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal) to control levels. Collectively, these data suggest that receptor signalling, and not the elevated arterial blood pressure, is the principal culprit in the oxidative stress-associated cardiovascular damage in Ang II-dependent hypertension. PMID:26234762

  10. α1A-Adrenergic receptor prevents cardiac ischemic damage through PKCδ/GLUT1/4-mediated glucose uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ting; Papay, Robert S; Perez, Dianne M

    2016-06-01

    While α1-adrenergic receptors (ARs) have been previously shown to limit ischemic cardiac damage, the mechanisms remain unclear. Most previous studies utilized low oxygen conditions in addition to ischemic buffers with glucose deficiencies, but we discovered profound differences if the two conditions are separated. We assessed both mouse neonatal and adult myocytes and HL-1 cells in a series of assays assessing ischemic damage under hypoxic or low glucose conditions. We found that α1-AR stimulation protected against increased lactate dehydrogenase release or Annexin V(+) apoptosis under conditions that were due to low glucose concentration not to hypoxia. The α1-AR antagonist prazosin or nonselective protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors blocked the protective effect. α1-AR stimulation increased (3)H-deoxyglucose uptake that was blocked with either an inhibitor to glucose transporter 1 or 4 (GLUT1 or GLUT4) or small interfering RNA (siRNA) against PKCδ. GLUT1/4 inhibition also blocked α1-AR-mediated protection from apoptosis. The PKC inhibitor rottlerin or siRNA against PKCδ blocked α1-AR stimulated GLUT1 or GLUT4 plasma membrane translocation. α1-AR stimulation increased plasma membrane concentration of either GLUT1 or GLUT4 in a time-dependent fashion. Transgenic mice overexpressing the α1A-AR but not α1B-AR mice displayed increased glucose uptake and increased GLUT1 and GLUT4 plasma membrane translocation in the adult heart while α1A-AR but not α1B-AR knockout mice displayed lowered glucose uptake and GLUT translocation. Our results suggest that α1-AR activation is anti-apoptotic and protective during cardiac ischemia due to glucose deprivation and not hypoxia by enhancing glucose uptake into the heart via PKCδ-mediated GLUT translocation that may be specific to the α1A-AR subtype. PMID:26832303

  11. Antioxidant/oxidant status and cardiac function in bradykinin B(1)- and B(2)-receptor null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delemasure, S; Blaes, N; Richard, C; Couture, R; Bader, M; Dutartre, P; Girolami, J-P; Connat, J-L; Rochette, L

    2013-01-01

    Kinin-vasoactive peptides activate two G-protein-coupled receptors (R), B(1)R (inducible) and B(2)R (constitutive). Their complex role in cardiovascular diseases could be related to differential actions on oxidative stress. This study investigated impacts of B(1)R or B(2)R gene deletion in mice on the cardiac function and plasma antioxidant and oxidant status. Echocardiography-Doppler was performed in B(1)R (B(1)R(-/-)) and B(2)R (B(2)R(-/-)) deficient and wild type (WT) adult male mice. No functional alteration was observed in B(2)R(-/-) hearts. B(1)R(-/-) mice had significantly lowered fractional shortening and increased isovolumetric contraction time. The diastolic E and A waves velocity ratio was similar in all mice groups. Thus B(1)R(-/-) mice provide a model of moderate systolic dysfunction, whereas B(2)R(-/-) mice displayed a normal cardiac phenotype. Plasma antioxidant capacity (ORAC) was significantly decreased in both B(1)R(-/-) and B(2)R(-/-) mice whereas the vitamin C levels were decreased in B(2)R(-/-) mice only. Plasma ascorbyl free radical was significantly higher in B(1)R(-/-) compared to WT and B(2)R(-/-) mice. Therefore, the oxidative stress index, ascorbyl free radical to vitamin C ratio, was increased in both B(1)R(-/-) and B(2)R(-/-) mice. Hence, B(1)R and B(2)R deficiency are associated with increased oxidative stress, but there is a differential imbalance between free radical production and antioxidant defense. The interrelationship between the differential B(1)R and B(2)R roles in oxidative stress and cardiovascular diseases remain to be investigated. PMID:24020815

  12. Cardiac hypertrophy, arrhythmogenicity and the new myocardial phenotype. II. The cellular adaptational process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swynghedauw, B; Chevalier, B; Charlemagne, D; Mansier, P; Carré, F

    1997-07-01

    Ventricular fibrosis is not the only structural determinant of arrhythmias in left ventricular hypertrophy. In an experimental model of compensatory cardiac hypertrophy (CCH) the degree of cardiac hypertrophy is also independently linked to ventricular arrhythmias. Cardiac hypertrophy reflects the level of adaptation, and matches the adaptational modifications of the myocardial phenotype. We suggest that these modifications have detrimental aspects. The increased action potential (AP) and QT duration and the prolonged calcium transient both favour spontaneous calcium oscillations, and both are potentially arrhythmogenic and linked to phenotypic changes in membrane proteins. To date, only two ionic currents have been studied in detail: Ito is depressed (likely the main determinant in AP durations), and If, the pacemaker current, is induced in the overloaded ventricular myocytes. In rat CCH, the two components of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, namely Ca(2+)-ATPase and ryanodine receptors, are down-regulated in parallel. Nevertheless, while the inward calcium current is unchanged, the functionally linked duo composed of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanged and (Na+, K+)-ATPase, is less active. Such an imbalance may explain the prolonged calcium transient. The changes in heart rate variability provide information about the state of the autonomic nervous system and has prognostic value even in CCH. Transgenic studies have demonstrated that the myocardial adrenergic and muscarinic receptor content is also a determining factor. During CCH, several phenotypic membrane changes participate in the slowing of contraction velocity and are thus adaptational. They also have a detrimental counterpart and, together with fibrosis, favour arrhythmias. PMID:9302342

  13. Liganded Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs) Preserve Nuclear Histone Deacetylase 5 Levels in Endothelin-Treated Sprague-Dawley Rat Cardiac Myocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Haining; Shao, Zongjun; Alibin, Caroline P.; Acosta, Crystal; Anderson, Hope D

    2014-01-01

    Ligand activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) prevents cardiac myocyte hypertrophy, and we previously reported that diacylglycerol kinase zeta (DGKζ) is critically involved. DGKζ is an intracellular lipid kinase that catalyzes phosphorylation of diacylglycerol; by attenuating DAG signaling, DGKζ suppresses protein kinase C (PKC) and G-protein signaling. Here, we investigated how PPAR-DGKζ signaling blocks activation of the hypertrophic gene program. We focused on ex...

  14. Differential extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 activation by the angiotensin type 1 receptor supports distinct phenotypes of cardiac myocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aplin, Mark; Christensen, Gitte Lund; Schneider, Mikael;

    2007-01-01

    The angiotensin II (AngII) type 1 receptor (AT(1)R) is a seven-transmembrane receptor well established to activate extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) by discrete G protein-dependent and beta-arrestin2-dependent pathways. The biological importance of this, however, remains obs...... obscure. Application of the modified analogue [Sar(1), Ile(4), Ile(8)]-AngII ([SII] AngII) allowed us to dissect the two pathways of ERK1/2 activation in native cardiac myocytes. Although cytosol-retained, the beta-arrestin2-bound pool of ERK1/2 represents an active signalling component...

  15. Renal denervation mitigates cardiac remodeling and renal damage in Dahl rats: a comparison with β-receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Heitaro; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Miyaji, Yuki; Yamamoto, Hiromi; Miyazaki, Shunichi

    2016-04-01

    Chronic activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) contributes to cardiac remodeling and the transition to heart failure (HF). Renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) may ameliorate this damage by improving renal function and sympathetic cardioregulation in hypertensive HF patients with renal injury. The efficacy may be comparable to that of chronic β-blocker treatment. Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats were subjected to RDN in the hypertrophic stage. Another group of Dahl rats were subjected to sham operations and treated chronically with vehicle (CONT) or β-blocker bisoprolol (BISO). Neither RDN nor BISO altered the blood pressure; however, BISO significantly reduced the heart rate (HR). Both RDN and BISO significantly prolonged survival (22.2 and 22.4 weeks, respectively) compared with CONT (18.3 weeks). Echocardiography revealed reduced left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and improved LV function, and histological analysis demonstrated the amelioration of LV myocyte hypertrophy and fibrosis in the RDN and BISO rats at the HF stage. Tyrosine hydroxylase and β1-adrenergic receptor (ADR) expression levels in the LV myocardium significantly increased only in the RDN rats, whereas the α1b-, α1d- and α2c-ADR expression levels increased only in the BISO rats. In both groups, renal damage and dysfunction were also reduced, and this reduction was accompanied by the suppression of endothelin-1, renin and angiotensin-converting enzyme mRNAs. RDN ameliorated the progression of both myocardial and renal damage in the hypertensive rats independent of blood pressure changes. The overall effects were similar to those of β-receptor blockade with favorable effects on HR and α-ADR expression. These findings may be associated with the restoration of the myocardial SNS and renal protection. PMID:26631854

  16. Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a modifier of cardiac conduction and arrhythmia vulnerability in the setting of myocardial ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsman, Roos F.J.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Freiberg, Fabian; Verkerk, Arie O.; Adriaens, Michiel E.; Podliesna, Svitlana; Chen, Chen; Purfürst, Bettina; Spallek, Bastian; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Baczko, Istvan; dos Remedios, Cristobal G.; George, Alfred L.; Bishopric, Nanette H.; Lodder, Elisabeth M.; de Bakker, Jacques M.T.; Fischer, Robert; Coronel, Ruben; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Gotthardt, Michael; Remme, Carol Ann

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the modulatory effect of the Coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) on ventricular conduction and arrhythmia vulnerability in the setting of myocardial ischemia. Background A heritable component in risk for ventricular fibrillation (VF) during myocardial infarction (MI) has been well established. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) for VF during acute MI has led to the identification of a locus on chromosome 21q21 (rs2824292) in the vicinity of the CXADR gene. CXADR encodes the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR), a cell adhesion molecule predominantly located at intercalated discs of the cardiomyocyte. Methods The correlation between CAR transcript levels and rs2824292 genotype was investigated in human left ventricular samples. Electrophysiological studies and molecular analyses were performed CAR haploinsufficient mice (CAR+/−). Results In human left ventricular samples, the risk allele at the chr21q21 GWAS locus was associated with lower CXADR mRNA levels, suggesting that decreased cardiac levels of CAR predispose to ischemia-induced VF. Hearts from CAR+/− mice displayed ventricular conduction slowing in addition to an earlier onset of ventricular arrhythmias during the early phase of acute myocardial ischemia following LAD ligation. Connexin43 expression and distribution was unaffected, but CAR+/− hearts displayed increased arrhythmia susceptibility upon pharmacological electrical uncoupling. Patch-clamp analysis of isolated CAR+/− myocytes showed reduced sodium current magnitude specifically at the intercalated disc. Moreover, CAR co-precipitated with NaV1.5 in vitro, suggesting that CAR affects sodium channel function through a physical interaction with NaV1.5. Conclusion We identify CAR as a novel modifier of ventricular conduction and arrhythmia vulnerability in the setting of myocardial ischemia. Genetic determinants of arrhythmia susceptibility (such as CAR) may constitute future targets for risk

  17. Effect of chronic metoprolol and coronary occlusion (CO) on cardiac beta receptor density in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of metoprolol (M) on beta receptor density (BRD) was examined. M (5 mg/kg, p.o., b.i.d.) was given for 2 and 8 wks prior to CO of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) at its origin. BRD, determined by binding of 3H-dihydroalprenol, was examined in the myocardium (LA = left atrium, RA = right atrium, LV1 = proximal LAD distribution, LV = 2 distal LAD distribution, LV3 = posterior left ventricle, RV = right ventricle, and S = septum. A 2 factor ANOVA followed by simple effect and Newman-Keuls post hoc tests revealed that M produced no effect in BRD in LA, RA, LV2, or S. M increased BRD in LV1, LV3, and RV after 2 wk when compared to no M. In addition, BRD in LV3 and RV were also greater at 2 wk than after 8 wk M. The data indicate that there are regional differences in the beta adrenergic receptor densities among the areas of the heart and within the left ventricle. Chronic dosing with M produced increased BRD in only some of the areas of the heart. These differences may be related to functional differences in the various areas of the heart after CO

  18. Effect of chronic metoprolol and coronary occlusion (CO) on cardiac beta receptor density in cats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lathers, C.M.; Spivey, W.H.; Levin, R.M.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of metoprolol (M) on beta receptor density (BRD) was examined. M (5 mg/kg, p.o., b.i.d.) was given for 2 and 8 wks prior to CO of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) at its origin. BRD, determined by binding of /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenol, was examined in the myocardium (LA = left atrium, RA = right atrium, LV1 = proximal LAD distribution, LV = 2 distal LAD distribution, LV3 = posterior left ventricle, RV = right ventricle, and S = septum. A 2 factor ANOVA followed by simple effect and Newman-Keuls post hoc tests revealed that M produced no effect in BRD in LA, RA, LV2, or S. M increased BRD in LV1, LV3, and RV after 2 wk when compared to no M. In addition, BRD in LV3 and RV were also greater at 2 wk than after 8 wk M. The data indicate that there are regional differences in the beta adrenergic receptor densities among the areas of the heart and within the left ventricle. Chronic dosing with M produced increased BRD in only some of the areas of the heart. These differences may be related to functional differences in the various areas of the heart after CO.

  19. The effects of compensated cardiac hypertrophy on dihydropyridine and ryanodine receptors in rat, ferret and guinea-pig hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannou, F; Sainte-Beuve, C; Oliviero, P; Do, E; Trouvé, P; Charlemagne, D

    1995-05-01

    The number of dihydropyridine and ryanodine receptors (DHP-R and RyR) has been measured in control and hypertrophied ventricles from rats, guinea pigs and ferrets to determine whether these two channels contribute to the alterations in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), and in Ca2+ transient during compensated cardiac hypertrophy. We found that ventricular hypertrophy did not change the density of DHP-R. Mild hypertrophy did not alter the density of RyR in the rat but decreased it in the guinea-pig and in the ferret (30% and 36%, respectively). Severe hypertrophy decreased the density of RyR by 20% in the rat and by 34% in the guinea-pig. Therefore, the decrease is greater in ferret and guinea-pig hearts than in rat heart. We conclude that the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channels but not the L-type Ca2+ channels could contribute to the slowing of intracellular Ca2+ movements and to the reduced velocity of shortening of the hypertrophied hearts. We suggest that, in the guinea pig and ferret hearts which express only the beta myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform, the reduced velocity of shortening during hypertrophy is related to the decrease in RyR density, whereas in the rat, it is regulated primarily via a shift in the MHC isoform, except in severe hypertrophy in which the moderate decrease in RyR would also be involved. PMID:7473781

  20. EFFECT OF ELECTROACUPUNCTURE ON MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA INDUCED CHANGES OF CARDIAC SYMPATHETIC ACTIVITY AND INVOLVEMENT OF SPINIAL δ-OPIOID,NMDA-AND NON-NMDA RECEPTORS IN THE RABBIT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊岭; 高永辉; 陈淑萍

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on acute myocardial ischemia (AMI) induced changes of cardiac sympathetic discharges and the effects of some related receptors in the spinal cord. Methods: A total of 53 rabbits anesthetized with mixture solution of 25% urethane (420 mg/kg) and 1.5% chloralose (50 mg/kg)were used in this study. AMI was induced by occlusion of the ventricular branch of the left coronary artery. Discharges of the left cardiac sympathetic nerve were recorded by using a bipolar platinum electrode. Bilateral "Ximen"(PC 40)and "Kongzhui"(LU 6) were stimulated electrically by using an EA therapeutic apparatus or an electrical stimulator.DPDPE δ-opiate receptor agonist, 20 nmol, 10 μL, n= 8), Naltrindole Hydrochloride (δ-opiate receptor antagonist, 20nmol, 10 μL, n=8), DAP5 (NMDA receptor antagonist, 5 nmol, 10 μL, n=9) and CNQX (non-NMDA receptor antagonist, 5 nmol, 10 μL, n=8) were respectively injected into the thoracic subarachnoid space of the spinal cord in different groups, followed by observing their effects on changes of sympathetic activity evoked by EA of the abovementioned acupoints. Results: ① After AMI, sympathetic discharges increased (200.56± 79.89%) in 10 cases and decreased (- 59.34 ±7.06% ) in other 9 cases in comparison with their individual basal values. After EA of "Ximen" (PC 4)and "Kongzhui" (Lu 6), AMI-induced increase and decrease changes of the sympathetic activity were suppressed significantly, but the effect of EA of LU-6 was weaker than that of EA of PC-4.②Following EA of PC-4 and LU-6, sympathetic discharges increased significantly in 2 and 4 cases, decreased apparently in 7 and 3 cases, and had no striking changes in 1 and 3 cases respectively. The mean reaction threshold of sympathetic activity after EA of PC-4 and LU-6were 2.1 ± 0.65 mA and 3.28± 1.13 mA separately.③ After pre-treatment with DPDPE, the reaction threshold of the cardiac sympathetic activity to EA of PC-4 elevated

  1. Muscarinic enhancement of persistent sodium current synchronizes striatal medium spiny neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Vautrelle, Nicolas; Hernández, Adán; Vergara, Ramiro; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, José

    2009-08-01

    Network dynamics denoted by synchronous firing of neuronal pools rely on synaptic interactions and intrinsic properties. In striatal medium spiny neurons, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation endows neurons with nonlinear capabilities by inducing a negative-slope conductance region (NSCR) in the current-voltage relationship. Nonlinearities underlie associative learning, procedural memory, and the sequential organization of behavior in basal ganglia nuclei. The cholinergic system modulates the function of medium spiny projection neurons through the activation of muscarinic receptors, increasing the NMDA-induced NSCR. This enhancement is reflected as a change in the NMDA-induced network dynamics, making it more synchronous. Nevertheless, little is known about the contribution of intrinsic properties that promote this activity. To investigate the mechanisms underlying the cholinergic modulation of bistable behavior in the striatum, we used whole cell and calcium-imaging techniques. A persistent sodium current modulated by muscarinic receptor activation participated in the enhancement of the NSCR and the increased network synchrony. These experiments provide evidence that persistent sodium current generates bistable behavior in striatal neurons and contributes to the regulation of synchronous network activity. The neuromodulation of bistable properties could represent a cellular and network mechanism for cholinergic actions in the striatum. PMID:19474176

  2. Cardiac adverse effects of naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal on right ventricle: Role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 1 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opioid addiction is associated with cardiovascular disease. However, mechanisms linking opioid addiction and cardiovascular disease remain unclear. This study investigated the role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 1 receptor in mediating somatic signs and the behavioural states produced during withdrawal from morphine dependence. Furthermore, it studied the efficacy of CRF1 receptor antagonist, CP-154,526 to prevent the cardiac sympathetic activity induced by morphine withdrawal. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylation pathways were evaluated. Like stress, morphine withdrawal induced an increase in the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis activity and an enhancement of noradrenaline (NA) turnover. Pre-treatment with CRF1 receptor antagonist significantly reduced morphine withdrawal-induced increases in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, NA turnover and TH phosphorylation at Ser31 in the right ventricle. In addition, CP-154,526 reduced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) after naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. In addition, CP-154,526 attenuated the increases in body weight loss during morphine treatment and suppressed some of morphine withdrawal signs. Altogether, these results support the idea that cardiac sympathetic pathways are activated in response to naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal suggesting that treatment with a CRF1 receptor antagonist before morphine withdrawal would prevent the development of stress-induced behavioural and autonomic dysfunction in opioid addicts. - Highlights: • Morphine withdrawal caused an increase in myocardial sympathetic activity. • ERK regulates TH phosphorylation after naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal. • CRF1R is involved in cardiac adaptive changes during morphine dependence

  3. Cardiac adverse effects of naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal on right ventricle: Role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro-Zaragoza, J.; Martínez-Laorden, E.; Mora, L.; Hidalgo, J.; Milanés, M.V.; Laorden, M.L., E-mail: laorden@um.es

    2014-02-15

    Opioid addiction is associated with cardiovascular disease. However, mechanisms linking opioid addiction and cardiovascular disease remain unclear. This study investigated the role of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 1 receptor in mediating somatic signs and the behavioural states produced during withdrawal from morphine dependence. Furthermore, it studied the efficacy of CRF1 receptor antagonist, CP-154,526 to prevent the cardiac sympathetic activity induced by morphine withdrawal. In addition, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) phosphorylation pathways were evaluated. Like stress, morphine withdrawal induced an increase in the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis activity and an enhancement of noradrenaline (NA) turnover. Pre-treatment with CRF1 receptor antagonist significantly reduced morphine withdrawal-induced increases in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, NA turnover and TH phosphorylation at Ser31 in the right ventricle. In addition, CP-154,526 reduced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) after naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. In addition, CP-154,526 attenuated the increases in body weight loss during morphine treatment and suppressed some of morphine withdrawal signs. Altogether, these results support the idea that cardiac sympathetic pathways are activated in response to naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal suggesting that treatment with a CRF1 receptor antagonist before morphine withdrawal would prevent the development of stress-induced behavioural and autonomic dysfunction in opioid addicts. - Highlights: • Morphine withdrawal caused an increase in myocardial sympathetic activity. • ERK regulates TH phosphorylation after naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal. • CRF1R is involved in cardiac adaptive changes during morphine dependence.

  4. 长效β2受体激动剂对气道平滑肌细胞 M3受体的影响%Effect of long-acting beta 2-adrenergic agonist on muscarine cholinergic subtype-3 receptors in airway smooth mus-cle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘媛华; 刘光辉; 梅静静; 王静

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential effect of formoterol, a long-acting beta2-adrenergic agonist, and combined glucocorticoids on the expression of muscarinic M3 receptors ( M3 R) in rat airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Methods Primary rat ASMCs were cultured. Protein expressions of M3 R were determined by Western blot a-nalysis after treatments of formoterol and combined glucocorticoids. Results Formoterol increased the protein expression of M3 R in rat ASMCs in a time-and dose-dependent manner. Glucocorticoid budesonide significantly suppressed formoterol-in-duced up-regulation of M3 R. Conclusions Formoterol can up-regulate M3 R protein in rat ASMCs which lead to the in-creased risks of severe asthma excerbation. Glucocorticoids can suppress M3 R protein expression.%目的:探讨长期单独使用肾上腺素β2受体(β2 AR)激动剂及其与糖皮质激素联用时对气道平滑肌细胞胆碱能毒蕈碱受体3型(M3 R)的影响。方法使用免疫印迹法检测福莫特罗及糖皮质激素对原代培养的气道平滑肌细胞 M3 R 蛋白的影响。结果福莫特罗呈时间和剂量依赖性上调 M3 R 蛋白的表达,布地奈德能够抑制福莫特罗上调 M3 R 的作用。结论长期规律使用肾上腺素β2受体(β2 AR)激动剂导致严重哮喘恶化的风险增加可能与其上调 M3 R 蛋白有关,而糖皮质激素与其联用能够抑制这一作用。

  5. Temperature and species-specific effects on ß3-adrenergic receptor cardiac regulation in two freshwater teleosts: Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, L H; Burleson, M L; Huggett, D B

    2015-07-01

    β₃-adrenergic receptors (AR) are important in teleost cardiovascular regulation. To date, it is unknown whether temperature acclimation changes ß₃-AR functionality and consequently the involvement of this AR subtype in teleost cardiac regulation. Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) were acclimated at 12 °C or 23 °C (minimum 3 weeks) after which cardiovascular variables (cardiac output (Q), stroke volume (Sv) and heart rate (fH)) were measured upon injection of the ß₃-AR agonist, BRL(37344), and antagonist, SR(59230A). In both 12 °C and 23 °C acclimated carp, BRL(37344) induced significant increases in fH and Q whereas Sv was significantly decreased. While temperature did not affect the change (increase vs. decrease) in cardiac variables, the magnitude and on-set of responses differed. For instance, fH, Sv and Q responded significantly faster to ß₃-AR stimulation in 23 °C carp. In contrast, maximum responses of fH and Q were significantly higher in 23 °C carp whereas the maximum response of Sv was significantly greater in 12 °C carp. These findings suggest that temperature acclimation induced changes in β₃-AR receptor functionality (e.g. density and/or affinity). Stimulation of β₃-ARs in 23 °C acclimated channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) caused significant increases in fH, Sv and Q. The increase in Sv was opposite to the decrease observed in 23 °C acclimated common carp. SR(59230A) induced significant decreases in Sv and Q but had no effect in carp (23 °C). Results suggest species diversity in the density and affinity or structure of ß₃-ARs which may explain the different cardiac responses to ß₃-AR ligands. PMID:25882086

  6. Evidence for a direct action of Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom on the cardiac muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, A L; Fontoura, B F; Freire-Maia, L; Machado, C R; Camargos, E R; Teixeira, M M

    2001-05-01

    The ability of toxins to activate the cardiovascular system plays an important role in the morbidity and lethality of the Tityus serrulatus scorpion envenoming. Most of the actions of the scorpion toxins are indirect and due to the release of adrenergic and cholinergic neurotransmitters. Accordingly, treatment following envenoming is targeted towards inhibition of adrenergic and cholinergic receptors. Here, we have sought evidence for a direct action of T. serrulatus venom on the isolated rat heart (Langendorff's method). We show that the bradycardia induced by T. serrulatus venom was completely blocked by atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist. Similarly, the increase in heart rate that follows the venom-induced bradycardia was totally inhibited by a beta(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist or by chemical sympathetic denervation with 6-hydroxydopamine. In contrast to these findings, the venom-induced increase in contractile force was not modified by beta(1)-adrenoceptor blockade or by chemical sympathetic denervation. The results clearly demonstrate that the chronotropic effects of T. serrulatus are dependent on neurotransmitter release, but the inotropic effects are not. The neurotransmitter-independent increase in contractility seems to be a direct action of the venom on cardiomyocytes. We suggest that this direct effect on cardiac fibers may play a role in the development of cardiac arrhythmias and contractility defects following envenoming with T. serrulatus scorpion. PMID:11072050

  7. Endosulfan and cholinergic (muscarinic) transmission: effect on electroencephalograms and [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate in pigeon brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single exposure of endosulfan (5 mg/kg) to pigeons (Columbia livia) caused neuronal hyperexcitability as evidence by spike discharges of 200-500 μV in the electroencephalograms (EEG) from the telencephalon and hyperstriatum, but there was not effect on the ectostriatal area. Cholinergic (muscarinic) receptor binding study using [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]QNB) as a specific ligand indicated that a single exposure to 5 mg/kg of endosulfan caused a significant increase in [3H]QNB binding to the striatal membrane. Behavior study further indicated that a single dose of 200 μg/kg of oxotremorine produced a significant induction in the tremor in endosulfan-pretreated pigeons. The results of this behavioral and biochemical study indicate the involvement of a cholinergic (muscarinic) transmitter system in endosulfan-induced neurotoxicity

  8. Angiotensin II reduces cardiac AdipoR1 expression through AT1 receptor/ROS/ERK1/2/c-Myc pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    Full Text Available Adiponectin, an abundant adipose tissue-derived protein, exerts protective effect against cardiovascular disease. Adiponectin receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 mediate the beneficial effects of adiponectin on the cardiovascular system. However, the alteration of AdipoRs in cardiac remodeling is not fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the effect of angiotensin II (AngII on cardiac AdipoRs expression and explored the possible molecular mechanism. AngII infusion into rats induced cardiac hypertrophy, reduced AdipoR1 but not AdipoR2 expression, and attenuated the phosphorylations of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, and those effects were all reversed by losartan, an AngII type 1 (AT1 receptor blocker. AngII reduced expression of AdipoR1 mRNA and protein in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, which was abolished by losartan, but not by PD123319, an AT2 receptor antagonist. The antioxidants including reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenger NAC, NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin, Nox2 inhibitor peptide gp91 ds-tat, and mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I inhibitor rotenone attenuated AngII-induced production of ROS and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2. AngII-reduced AdipoR1 expression was reversed by pretreatment with NAC, apocynin, gp91 ds-tat, rotenone, and an ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that AngII provoked the recruitment of c-Myc onto the promoter region of AdipoR1, which was attenuated by PD98059. Moreover, AngII-induced DNA binding activity of c-Myc was inhibited by losartan, NAC, apocynin, gp91 ds-tat, rotenone, and PD98059. c-Myc small interfering RNA abolished the inhibitory effect of AngII on AdipoR1 expression. Our results suggest that AngII inhibits cardiac AdipoR1 expression in vivo and in vitro and AT1 receptor/ROS/ERK1/2/c-Myc pathway is required for the downregulation of AdipoR1 induced by AngII.

  9. Involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in cardiac and vascular remodeling in a novel minipig model of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis induced by consumption of a high-fat/cholesterol diet

    OpenAIRE

    Yongming, Pan; Zhaowei, Cai; Yichao, Ma; Keyan, Zhu; Liang, Chen; Fangming, Chen; Xiaoping, Xu; Quanxin, Ma; Minli, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background A long-term high-fat/cholesterol (HFC) diet leads to insulin resistance (IR), which is associated with inflammation, atherosclerosis (AS), cardiac sympathovagal imbalance, and cardiac dysfunction. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and nuclear factor ĸB (NF-κB) are involved in the development of IR-AS. Thus, we elucidated the pathological molecular mechanism of IR-AS by feeding an HFC diet to Tibetan minipigs to induce IR and AS. Methods Male Tibetan minipigs were ...

  10. Stem cell factor receptor induces progenitor and natural killer cell-mediated cardiac survival and repair after myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Ayach, Bilal B.; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Dawood, Fayez; Sun, Mei; Arab, Sara; Chen, Manyin; HIGUCHI, KOJI; Siatskas, Christopher; Lee, Paul; Lim, Hilda; Zhang, Jane; Cukerman, Eva; Stanford, William L.; Medin, Jeffrey A; Liu, Peter P.

    2006-01-01

    Inappropriate cardiac remodeling and repair after myocardial infarction (MI) predisposes to heart failure. Studies have reported on the potential for lineage negative, steel factor positive (c-kit+) bone marrow-derived hematopoetic stem∕progenitor cells (HSPCs) to repair damaged myocardium through neovascularization and myogenesis. However, the precise contribution of the c-kit signaling pathway to the cardiac repair process has yet to be determined. In this study, we sought to directly eluci...

  11. A preliminary experimental study on the cardiac toxicity of glutamate and the role of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan; ZHOU Lan; XU Hai-fei; YAN Li; DING Fan; HAO Wei; CAO Ji-min

    2013-01-01

    Background Monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) is a food flavour enhancer and its potential harmfulness to the heart remains controversial.We investigated whether MSG could induce cardiac arrhythmias and apoptosis via the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor.Methods Myocardial infarction (MI) was created by ligating the coronary artery and ventricular arrhythmias were monitored by electrocardiogram in the rat in vivo.Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were isolated and cultured.Cell viability was estimated by 3-(4,5)-dimethylthiahiazo(-z-yl)-3,5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) assay.Calcium mobilization was monitored by confocal microscopy.Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was evaluated by acridine orange staining,flow cytometry,DNA laddering,reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting.Results MSG (i.v.) decreased the heart rate at 0.5 g/kg and serious bradycardia at 1.5 g/kg,but could not induce ventricular tachyarrhythmias in normal rats in vivo.In rats with acute MI in vivo,however,MSG (1.5 g/kg,i.v.) induced ventricular tachyarrhythmias and these arrhythmias could be prevented by blocking the AMPA and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors.Selectively activating the AMPA or NMDA receptor induced ventricular tachyarrhythmias in MI rats.At the cellular level,AMPA induced calcium mobilization,oxidative stress,mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in cultured cardiomyocytes,especially when the AMPA receptor desensitization were blocked by cyclothiazide.The above toxic cellular effects of AMPA were abolished by AMPA receptor blockade or by H2O2 scavengers.Conclusions MSG induces bradycardia in normal rats,but triggers lethal tachyarrhythmias in myocardial infarcted rats probably by hindering AMPA receptors.AMPA receptor overstimulation also induces cardiomyocyte apoptosis,which may facilitate arrhythmia.

  12. Muscarinic signaling influences the patterning and phenotype of cholinergic amacrine cells in the developing chick retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Andy J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies in the vertebrate retina have characterized the differentiation of amacrine cells as a homogenous class of neurons, but little is known about the genes and factors that regulate the development of distinct types of amacrine cells. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to characterize the development of the cholinergic amacrine cells and identify factors that influence their development. Cholinergic amacrine cells in the embryonic chick retina were identified by using antibodies to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT. Results We found that as ChAT-immunoreactive cells differentiate they expressed the homeodomain transcription factors Pax6 and Islet1, and the cell-cycle inhibitor p27kip1. As differentiation proceeds, type-II cholinergic cells, displaced to the ganglion cell layer, transiently expressed high levels of cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP and neurofilament, while type-I cells in the inner nuclear layer did not. Although there is a 1:1 ratio of type-I to type-II cells in vivo, in dissociated cell cultures the type-I cells (ChAT-positive and CRABP-negative out-numbered the type-II cells (ChAT and CRABP-positive cells by 2:1. The relative abundance of type-I to type-II cells was not influenced by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh, but was affected by compounds that act at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. In addition, the abundance and mosaic patterning of type-II cholinergic amacrine cells is disrupted by interfering with muscarinic signaling. Conclusion We conclude that: (1 during development type-I and type-II cholinergic amacrine cells are not homotypic, (2 the phenotypic differences between these subtypes of cells is controlled by the local microenvironment, and (3 appropriate levels of muscarinic signaling between the cholinergic amacrine cells are required for proper mosaic patterning.

  13. Endothelin receptor B, a candidate gene from human studies at high altitude, improves cardiac tolerance to hypoxia in genetically engineered heterozygote mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stobdan, Tsering; Zhou, Dan; Ao-Ieong, Eilleen; Ortiz, Daniel; Ronen, Roy; Hartley, Iain; Gan, Zhuohui; McCulloch, Andrew D; Bafna, Vineet; Cabrales, Pedro; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2015-08-18

    To better understand human adaptation to stress, and in particular to hypoxia, we took advantage of one of nature's experiments at high altitude (HA) and studied Ethiopians, a population that is well-adapted to HA hypoxic stress. Using whole-genome sequencing, we discovered that EDNRB (Endothelin receptor type B) is a candidate gene involved in HA adaptation. To test whether EDNRB plays a critical role in hypoxia tolerance and adaptation, we generated EdnrB knockout mice and found that when EdnrB (-/+) heterozygote mice are treated with lower levels of oxygen (O2), they tolerate various levels of hypoxia (even extreme hypoxia, e.g., 5% O2) very well. For example, they maintain ejection fraction, cardiac contractility, and cardiac output in severe hypoxia. Furthermore, O2 delivery to vital organs was significantly higher and blood lactate was lower in EdnrB (-/+) compared with wild type in hypoxia. Tissue hypoxia in brain, heart, and kidney was lower in EdnrB (-/+) mice as well. These data demonstrate that a lower level of EDNRB significantly improves cardiac performance and tissue perfusion under various levels of hypoxia. Transcriptomic profiling of left ventricles revealed three specific genes [natriuretic peptide type A (Nppa), sarcolipin (Sln), and myosin light polypeptide 4 (Myl4)] that were oppositely expressed (q < 0.05) between EdnrB (-/+) and wild type. Functions related to these gene networks were consistent with a better cardiac contractility and performance. We conclude that EDNRB plays a key role in hypoxia tolerance and that a lower level of EDNRB contributes, at least in part, to HA adaptation in humans. PMID:26240367

  14. Left ventricular dysfunction with reduced functional cardiac reserve in diabetic and non-diabetic LDL-receptor deficient apolipoprotein B100-only mice

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    Bosch Fatima

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lack of suitable mouse models has hindered the studying of diabetic macrovascular complications. We examined the effects of type 2 diabetes on coronary artery disease and cardiac function in hypercholesterolemic low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient apolipoprotein B100-only mice (LDLR-/-ApoB100/100. Methods and results 18-month-old LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 (n = 12, diabetic LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 mice overexpressing insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II in pancreatic beta cells (IGF-II/LDLR-/-ApoB100/100, n = 14 and age-matched C57Bl/6 mice (n = 15 were studied after three months of high-fat Western diet. Compared to LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 mice, diabetic IGF-II/LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 mice demonstrated more calcified atherosclerotic lesions in aorta. However, compensatory vascular enlargement was similar in both diabetic and non-diabetic mice with equal atherosclerosis (cross-sectional lesion area ~60% and consequently the lumen area was preserved. In coronary arteries, both hypercholesterolemic models showed significant stenosis (~80% despite positive remodeling. Echocardiography revealed severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction and anteroapical akinesia in both LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 and IGF-II/LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 mice. Myocardial scarring was not detected, cardiac reserve after dobutamine challenge was preserved and ultrasructural changes revealed ischemic yet viable myocardium, which together with coronary artery stenosis and slightly impaired myocardial perfusion suggest myocardial hibernation resulting from chronic hypoperfusion. Conclusions LDLR-/-ApoB100/100 mice develop significant coronary atherosclerosis, severe left ventricular dysfunction with preserved but diminished cardiac reserve and signs of chronic myocardial hibernation. However, the cardiac outcome is not worsened by type 2 diabetes, despite more advanced aortic atherosclerosis in diabetic animals.

  15. Role of ionotropic GABA, glutamate and glycine receptors in the tonic and reflex control of cardiac vagal outflow in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodchild Ann K

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiac vagal preganglionic neurons (CVPN are responsible for the tonic, reflex and respiratory modulation of heart rate (HR. Although CVPN receive GABAergic and glutamatergic inputs, likely involved in respiratory and reflex modulation of HR respectively, little else is known regarding the functions controlled by ionotropic inputs. Activation of g-protein coupled receptors (GPCR alters these inputs, but the functional consequence is largely unknown. The present study aimed to delineate how ionotropic GABAergic, glycinergic and glutamatergic inputs contribute to the tonic and reflex control of HR and in particular determine which receptor subtypes were involved. Furthermore, we wished to establish how activation of the 5-HT1A GPCR affects tonic and reflex control of HR and what ionotropic interactions this might involve. Results Microinjection of the GABAA antagonist picrotoxin into CVPN decreased HR but did not affect baroreflex bradycardia. The glycine antagonist strychnine did not alter HR or baroreflex bradycardia. Combined microinjection of the NMDA antagonist, MK801, and AMPA antagonist, CNQX, into CVPN evoked a small bradycardia and abolished baroreflex bradycardia. MK801 attenuated whereas CNQX abolished baroreceptor bradycardia. Control intravenous injections of the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT evoked a small bradycardia and potentiated baroreflex bradycardia. These effects were still observed following microinjection of picrotoxin but not strychnine into CVPN. Conclusions We conclude that activation of GABAA receptors set the level of HR whereas AMPA to a greater extent than NMDA receptors elicit baroreflex changes in HR. Furthermore, activation of 5-HT1A receptors evokes bradycardia and enhances baroreflex changes in HR due to interactions with glycinergic neurons involving strychnine receptors. This study provides reference for future studies investigating how diseases alter neurochemical inputs to CVPN.

  16. Differential effects of acidosis, high potassium concentrations, and metabolic inhibition on noradrenaline release and its presynaptic muscarinic regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haunstetter, Armin; Schulze Icking, Babette; Backs, Johannes; Krüger, Carsten; Haass, Markus

    2002-03-01

    It was the aim of the present study to characterize the effect of single components of ischaemia, such as inhibition of aerobic and anaerobic energy production by combined anoxic and glucose-free perfusion (metabolic inhibition), high extracellular potassium concentrations (hyperkalaemia), and acidosis, on (1). the stimulated release of noradrenaline from the in situ perfused guinea-pig heart and (2). its presynaptic modulation by the muscarinic agonist carbachol. The release of endogenous noradrenaline from efferent cardiac sympathetic nerve endings was induced by electrical stimulation of the left stellate ganglion (1 min, 5 V, 12 Hz) and quantified in the coronary venous effluent by high-performance liquid chromatography. Under control conditions, two consecutive electrical stimulations (S1, S2) elicited a similar noradrenaline overflow (S2/S1: 0.98 plus minus 0.05). After 10 min of global myocardial ischaemia overflow of endogenous noradrenaline was significantly reduced (S2/S1: 0.18 plus minus 0.03; P< 0.05). When studied separately, metabolic inhibition, hyperkalaemia (16 mM), and acidosis (pH 6.0) each markedly attenuated stimulated noradrenaline overflow (S2/S1: 0.65 plus minus 0.05, 0.43 plus minus 0.14, and 0.37 plus minus 0.09, respectively; P< 0.05). The muscarinic agonist carbachol (10 microM) inhibited stimulated noradrenaline release under normoxic conditions (S2/S1: 0.41 plus minus 0.07; P< 0.05). However, after 10 min of global myocardial ischaemia the inhibitory effect of carbachol on noradrenaline overflow was completely lost. Single components of ischaemia had a differential effect on presynaptic muscarinic modulation. Whereas hyperkalaemia (8-16 mM) did not affect muscarinic inhibition of noradrenaline release, carbachol lost its inhibitory effect during acidosis and metabolic inhibition. In conclusion, hyperkalaemia, metabolic inhibition, and severe acidosis each contribute to reduced overflow of noradrenaline after 10 min of myocardial

  17. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Phase III Study of the Short-Acting β1-Adrenergic Receptor Blocker Landiolol Hydrochloride for Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography in Japanese Patients with Suspected Ischemic Cardiac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hirano, Masaharu; Yamashina, Akira; Hara, Kazuhiro; Ikari, Yuji; Jinzaki, Masahiro; Iino, Misako; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Tanimoto, Mitsunobu; Kuribayashi, Sachio; ,

    2013-01-01

    Objectives and Background The objective of this study was to investigate the image quality-improving and heart rate-lowering effects of landiolol hydrochloride (a short-acting β1-adrenergic receptor blocker) on coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). During CCTA, β-adrenergic receptor blockers have been commonly used to lower heart rate and improve image quality. Methods A total of 258 subjects suspected of having ischemic cardiac disease and requiring CCTA were randomized to either ...

  18. In vivo transfer of soluble TNF-alpha receptor 1 gene improves cardiac function and reduces infarct size after myocardial infarction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Masahiro; Tsuchida, Keiko; Hata, Tomoji; Makino, Naoki

    2004-05-01

    Increased circulating and cardiac TNF-alpha levels during myocardial ischemia have been found in both experimental animals and patients with ischemic heart disease and advanced heart failure. Soluble TNF-alpha receptor 1 (sTNFR1) is an antagonist to TNF-alpha. In the present study, we examined whether sTNFR1 improves cardiac function in rats after myocardial infarction. Male Wistar rats were subjected to left coronary artery (LCA) ligation. Immediately after the ligation, a total of 200 microg of either the sTNFR1 or LacZ plasmid was injected into three different sites in the left ventricular wall. From 1 to 21 days after LCA ligation, TNF-alpha bioactivity in the heart was higher in rats receiving LacZ plasmid than in sham-operated rats, whereas sTNFR1 plasmid significantly suppressed the increase. The LV diastolic dimension was significantly lower, and the fractional shortening was significantly higher in rats treated with the sTNFR1 plasmid than in those treated with the LacZ plasmid. At 21 days after LCA ligation, the LV end-diastolic pressure was also significantly lower in the rats treated with the sTNFR1 plasmid. In addition, the sTNFR1 expression plasmid had significantly reduced the infarct size. In conclusion, TNF-alpha bioactivity in the heart increased during the early stage of infarction and remained elevated. This elevation seemed partially responsible for the impairment of LV function and the increased infarct size. Suppression of TNF-alpha bioactivity from the early stage of infarction with the sTNFR1 plasmid improved cardiac function and reduced infarct size. PMID:15117889

  19. Electrocardiographic Characterization of Cardiac Hypertrophy in Mice that Overexpress the ErbB2 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sysa-Shah, Polina; Sørensen, Lars L; Abraham, M Roselle;

    2015-01-01

    Electrocardiography is an important method for evaluation and risk stratification of patients with cardiac hypertrophy. We hypothesized that the recently developed transgenic mouse model of cardiac hypertrophy (ErbB2(tg)) will display distinct ECG features, enabling WT (wild type) mice to be......, the ECG recordings of ErbB2(tg) mice were characterized by higher P- and R-wave amplitudes, broader QRS complexes, inverted T waves, and ST interval depression. Pearson's correlation matrix analysis of combined WT and ErbB2(tg) data revealed significant correlation between heart weight and the ECG...... distinguished from transgenic mice without using conventional PCR genotyping. We evaluated more than 2000 mice and developed specific criteria for genotype determination by using cageside ECG, during which unanesthetized mice were manually restrained for less than 1 min. Compared with those from WT counterparts...

  20. Calpain Activity and Toll-Like Receptor 4 Expression in Platelet Regulate Haemostatic Situation in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery and Coagulation in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Chi Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human platelets express Toll-like receptors (TLR 4. However, the mechanism by which TLR4 directly affects platelet aggregation and blood coagulation remains to be explored. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the platelet TLR4 expression in patients who underwent CABG surgery; we explored the correlation between platelet TLR4 expression and the early outcomes in hospital of patients. Additionally, C57BL/6 and C57BL/6-TlrLPS−/− mice were used to explore the roles of platelet TLR4 in coagulation by platelet aggregometry and rotation thromboelastometry. In conclusion, our results highlight the important roles of TLR4 in blood coagulation and platelet function. Of clinical relevance, we also explored novel roles for platelet TLR4 that are associated with early outcomes in cardiac surgery.

  1. Prolonged TSH receptor A subunit immunization of female mice leads to a long-term model of Graves' disease, tachycardia, and cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthoff, Hans-Peter; Goebel, Sylvia; Li, Zhongmin; Faßbender, Julia; Reimann, Andreas; Zeibig, Stefan; Lohse, Martin J; Münch, Götz; Ungerer, Martin

    2015-04-01

    A transient model for human Graves' disease was successfully established in mice using up to 3 immunizations with recombinant adenovirus expressing the extracellular A-subunit of the human TSH receptor (TSHR) (Ad-TSHR). We studied extension of adenovirally induced TSHR A-subunit immunization in mice by using a novel protocol of long-term 3- and 4-weekly injections. Generation of TSHR binding stimulatory antibodies (capacity to stimulate cAMP activity in TSHR-expressing test cells), goiter, and histological thyroid alterations were maintained for at least 9 months in all Ad-TSHR-immunized mice. In response to injection of 10(10) plaque-forming units of Ad-TSHR, also elevated mean serum T4 levels were observed throughout the study. Moreover, cardiac organ involvement (tachycardia and hypertrophy) were consistently observed in these mice. Higher doses of Ad-TSHR (10(11) plaque-forming units) did not produce consistent elevation of T4 and were not associated with a clear increase in heart rate vs controls, probably because these high doses provoked an immune response-induced tachycardia on their own. In summary, a long-term model of Graves' disease induced by a relatively simple protocol of continuing monthly immunizations should allow to investigate long-term disease mechanisms and may possibly obviate the need for more complicated disease models. Moreover, the clinical outcome predictor of tachycardia and cardiac involvement was reliably detected in the model. PMID:25562617

  2. Muscarinic Transmission is Impaired in Zouny Adult Transgenic APPswe/PS1dE9 Female Mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Eva; Jakubík, Jan; Michal, Pavel; Oksman, M.; Iivonen, H.; Tanila, H.; Doležal, Vladimír

    Bologna: Mediamond, 2007 - (Hanin, I.; Windisch, M.; Poewe, W.), s. 91-94 ISBN 978-88-7587-405-6. [International conference Alzheimer ´s diseases/Parkinson´s diseases /8./. Salzburg (AT), 14.03.2007-18.03.2007] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110703 Grant ostatní: EC(XE) QLK1-CT-2002-00172 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Alzheimer ´s disease * muscarinic receptors * cholinergic neurotransmission Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  3. Arachidonic acid mediates muscarinic inhibition and enhancement of N-type Ca2+ current in sympathetic neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Liwang; Rittenhouse, Ann R.

    2002-01-01

    N-type Ca2+ channels participate in acute activity-dependent processes such as regulation of Ca2+-activated K+ channels and in more prolonged events such as gene transcription and long-term depression. A slow postsynaptic M1 muscarinic receptor-mediated modulation of N-type current in superior cervical ganglion neurons may be important in regulating these processes. This slow pathway inhibits N-type current by using a diffusible second messenger that has remained unidentified for more than a ...

  4. Cardiac peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ expression is modulated by oxidative stress in acutely infrasound-exposed cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zhaohui; Meng, Rongsen; Zhuang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yiqiao; Liu, Fangpeng; Zhu, Miao-Zhang; Li, Ruiman

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of acute infrasound exposure on oxidative damage and investigate the underlying mechanisms in rat cardiomyocytes. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were cultured and exposed to infrasound for several days. In the study, the expression of CAT, GPx, SOD1, and SOD2 and their activities in rat cardiomyocytes in infrasound exposure groups were significantly decreased compared to those in the various time controls, along with significantly higher levels of O2 (-) and H2O2. Decreased cardiac cell viability was not observed in various time controls. A significant reduction in cardiac cell viability was observed in the infrasound group compared to the control, while significantly increased cardiac cell viability was observed in the infrasound exposure and rosiglitazone pretreatment group. Compared to the control, rosiglitazone significantly upregulated CAT, GPx, SOD1, and SOD2 expression and their activities in rat cardiomyocytes exposed to infrasound, while the levels of O2 (-) or H2O2 were significantly decreased. A potential link between a significant downregulation of PPAR-γ expression in rat cardiomyocytes in the infrasound group was compared to the control and infrasound-induced oxidative stress. These findings indicate that infrasound can induce oxidative damage in rat cardiomyocytes by inactivating PPAR-γ. PMID:23632742

  5. High-affinity prorenin binding to cardiac man-6-P/IGF-II receptors precedes proteolytic activation to renin

    OpenAIRE

    Saris, Jasper; Derkx, Frans; Bruin, René; Dekkers, Dick; Lamers, Jos; Saxena, Pramod Ranjan; Schalekamp, Maarten; Danser, Jan

    2001-01-01

    textabstractMannose-6-phosphate (man-6-P)/insulin-like growth factor-II (man-6-P/IgF-II) receptors are involved in the activation of recombinant human prorenin by cardiomyocytes. To investigate the kinetics of this process, the nature of activation, the existence of other prorenin receptors, and binding of native prorenin, neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were incubated with recombinant, renal, or amniotic fluid prorenin with or without man-6-P. Intact and activated prorenin were measured in cell ...

  6. Preserved cardiac mitochondrial function and reduced ischaemia/reperfusion injury afforded by chronic continuous hypoxia: Role of opioid receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maslov, L. N.; Naryzhnaya, N. V.; Prokudina, E. S.; Kolář, František; Gorbunov, A. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, H.; Tsibulnikov, S.Yu.; Portnichenko, A. G.; Lasukova, T. V.; Lishmanov, Yu. B.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 5 (2015), s. 496-501. ISSN 1440-1681 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1162 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cardioprotection * chronic hypoxia * ischaemia/reperfusion * mitochondrial function * opioid receptors Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.372, year: 2014

  7. Cardiac hypertrophy induced by exercise training:the function of AT1 receptor, autophagy and miRNAs%运动性心脏肥大:AT1受体、细胞自噬和 miRNAs 的调节

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱帅伟; 张瑞萍; 张安民

    2014-01-01

    As a mechanical and exogenous stimulus , exercise training induces cardiac physiological hypertro-phy, and the cardiac structure is changed slowly , steadily and coordinately.Simultaneously, energy metabolism and func-tion of the cardiac muscle are also improved .These are positive adaptations in the heart when experiencing endurance exer -cise training.Recently, angiotensinⅡtype 1 (AT1) receptor, autophagy and miRNAs are all considered as important reg-ulators to cardiac hypertrophy induced by exercise training at different molecular levels .Fully understanding the relations and the important role of AT1 receptor, autophagy and miRNAs in cardiac physiological hypertrophy will further enrich the signaling pathway of cardiac hypertrophy induced by exercise training .

  8. Bright artificial light subsensitizes a central muscarinic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilsaver, S C; Majchrzak, M J

    1987-12-14

    Supersensitivity of a muscarinic mechanism is implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. Bright artificial light is efficacious in the treatment of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). We studied the effect of constant bright light (11,500 lux) on the sensitivity of adult, male rats to oxotremorine, 1.5 mg/kg ip, using a repeated measures design. Oxotremorine challenges were proceeded by the injection of methylscopolamine, 1 mg/kg ip, by 30 minutes. Temperature was telemetrically measured every 10 minutes for 120 minutes starting 10 minutes after the injection of oxotremorine. Prior to and after 7 continuous days of exposure to bright light, the sample exhibited a hypothermic response of 2.50 +/- 0.48 degrees C (mean +/- SEM) and 0.29 +/- 0.31 degrees C (mean +/- SEM), respectively (p less than 0.0014). All 7 animals exhibited blunting to the thermic response to oxotremorine. Bright light also blocked the capacity of amitriptyline to supersensitize a central muscarinic mechanism. Exposure to light at an intensity of 300 lux for 7 days had no effect on the thermic response to oxotremorine. These data are consistent with the hypotheses that the biology of depression involves supersensitivity of central muscarinic mechanisms and that the effects of bright artificial light are not the consequence of shifting circadian rhythms. PMID:3695799

  9. Hypoxia and glucose independently regulate the beta-adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase system in cardiac myocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha-Singh, K J; Honbo, N Y; Karliner, J S

    1991-01-01

    We explored the effects of two components of ischemia, hypoxia and glucose deprivation, on the beta-adrenergic receptor (beta AR)-adenylate cyclase system in a model of hypoxic injury in cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. After 2 h of hypoxia in the presence of 5 mM glucose, cell surface beta AR density (3H-CGP-12177) decreased from 54.8 +/- 8.4 to 39 +/- 6.3 (SE) fmol/mg protein (n = 10, P less than 0.025), while cytosolic beta AR density (125I-iodocyanopindolol [ICYP]) increased by...

  10. Protective Effect of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α Activation against Cardiac Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Is Related to Upregulation of Uncoupling Protein-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Wook Song

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα confers cardioprotection, while its mechanism remains elusive. We investigated the protective effect of PPARα activation against cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury in terms of the expression of uncoupling protein (UCP. Myocardial infarct size and UCP expression were measured in rats treated with WY-14643 20 mg/kg, a PPARα ligand, or vehicle. WY-14643 increased UCP3 expression in vivo. Myocardial infarct size was decreased in the WY-14643 group (76 ± 8% versus 42 ± 12%, P<0.05. During reperfusion, the incidence of arrhythmia was higher in the control group compared with the WY-14643 group (9/10 versus 3/10, P<0.05. H9c2 cells were incubated for 24 h with WY-14643 or vehicle. WY-14643 increased UCP3 expression in H9c2 cells. WY-14643 decreased hypoxia-stimulated ROS production. Cells treated with WY-14643 were more resistant to hypoxia-reoxygenation than the untreated cells. Knocking-down UCP3 by siRNA prevented WY-14643 from attenuating the production of ROS. UCP3 siRNA abolished the effect of WY-14643 on cell viability against hypoxia-reoxygenation. In summary, administration of PPARα agonist WY-14643 mitigated the extent of myocardial infarction and incidence of reperfusion-induced arrhythmia. PPARα activation conferred cytoprotective effect against hypoxia-reoxygenation. Associated mechanisms involved increased UCP3 expression and resultant attenuation of ROS production.

  11. Muscarinic cholinergic regulation of L-type calcium channel in heart of embryonic mice at different developmental stages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-minLIANG; MingTANG; Chang-jinLIU; Hong-yanLUO; Yuan-longSONG; Xin-wuHU; Jiao-yaXI; Lin-linGAO; BinNIE; Su-yunLI; Ling-lingLAI; JuergenHESCHELER

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the muscarinic regulation of L-type calcium current (ICa-L) during development. METHODS:The whole cell patch-clamp technique was used to record ICa-L in mice embryonic cardiomyocytes at different stages (the early developmental stage, EDS; the intermediate developmental stage, IDS; and the late developmental stage, LDS). Carbachol (CCh) was used to stimulate M-receptor in the embryonic cardiomyocytes of mice.RESULTS: The expression of lCa.L density did not change in different developmental stages (P>0.05). There was no difference in the sensitivity of ICa-L to CCh during development (P>0.05). This inhibitory action of CCh was mediated by inhibition of cyclic AMP since 8-bromo-cAMP completely reversed the muscarinic inhibitory action. IBMX, a non-selective inhibitor of phosphodiesterase (PDE), reversed the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L current by 71.2 %±9.2% (n=8) and 11.3%±2.5% (n=9) in EDS and LDS respectively. However forskolin, an agonist of adenylyl cyclase (AC), reversed the action of CCh by 14.5%±3.5% (n=5) and 82.7%± 10.4% (n=7) in EDS and LDS respectively. CONCLUSION: The inhibitory action of CCh on lca.L current was mediated in different pathways: in EDS, the inhibitory action of M-receptor on ICa-L channel mainly depended on the stimulation of PDE. However, in LDS, the regulation by M-receptor on lCa.L channel mainly depended on the inactivation of AC.

  12. An improved radiosynthesis of the muscarinic M2 radiopharmaceutical, [18F]FP-TZTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioligand 3-(4-(3-[18F]fluoropropylthio)-1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-yl)-1-methyl-1,2,5, 6-tetrahydropyridine ([18F]FP-TZTP) is an agonist with specificity towards subtype 2 of muscarinic acetylcholine (M2) receptors. It is currently the only radiotracer available for imaging M2 receptors in human subjects with positron emission tomography. The present study reports on an improved method for the synthesis of [18F]FP-TZTP, automated using a GE TRACERlabTM FXFN radiosynthesis module. A key facet was the use of a new precursor, 3-(4-(1-methyl-1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridin-3-yl)-1,2,5-thiadiazol-3-ylthio) propyl 4-methylbenzenesulfonate. The precursor was fluorinated via nucleophilic displacement of the tosyloxy group by potassium cryptand [18F]fluoride (K[18F]/K222) in CH3CN at 80 deg. C for 5 min, and purified by HPLC. Formulated [18F]FP-TZTP was prepared in an uncorrected radiochemical yield of 29±4%, with a specific activity of 138±41 GBq/μmol (3732±1109 mCi/μmol) at the end of synthesis (35 min; n=3). This methodology offers higher yields, faster synthesis times, an optimized precursor, and simpler automation than previously reported

  13. Cardiac toxicity of 5-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is differentially dependent on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2 isoform during zebrafish development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Incardona, John P., E-mail: john.incardona@noaa.gov; Linbo, Tiffany L.; Scholz, Nathaniel L.

    2011-12-15

    Petroleum-derived compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), commonly occur as complex mixtures in the environment. Recent studies using the zebrafish experimental model have shown that PAHs are toxic to the embryonic cardiovascular system, and that the severity and nature of this developmental cardiotoxicity varies by individual PAH. In the present study we characterize the toxicity of the relatively higher molecular weight 5-ring PAHs benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), benzo[e]pyrene (BeP), and benzo[k]fluoranthene (BkF). While all three compounds target the cardiovascular system, the underlying role of the ligand-activated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR2) and the tissue-specific induction of the cytochrome p450 metabolic pathway (CYP1A) were distinct for each. BaP exposure (40 {mu}M) produced AHR2-dependent bradycardia, pericardial edema, and myocardial CYP1A immunofluorescence. By contrast, BkF exposure (4-40 {mu}M) caused more severe pericardial edema, looping defects, and erythrocyte regurgitation through the atrioventricular valve that were AHR2-independent (i.e., absent myocardial or endocardial CYP1A induction). Lastly, exposure to BeP (40 {mu}M) yielded a low level of CYP1A+ signal in the vascular endothelium of the head and trunk, without evident toxic effects on cardiac function or morphogenesis. Combined with earlier work on 3- and 4-ring PAHs, our findings provide a more complete picture of how individual PAHs may drive the cardiotoxicity of mixtures in which they predominate. This will improve toxic injury assessments and risk assessments for wild fish populations that spawn in habitats altered by overlapping petroleum-related human impacts such as oil spills, urban stormwater runoff, or sediments contaminated by legacy industrial activities. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PAH compounds with 5 rings in different arrangements caused differential tissue-specific patterns of CYP1A induction in zebrafish embryos. Black

  14. The M1 Muscarinic Positive Allosteric Modulator PQCA Improves Performance on Translatable Tests of Memory and Attention in Rhesus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Henry S; Cannon, Christopher E; Drott, Jason T; Kuduk, Scott D; Uslaner, Jason M

    2015-12-01

    Improved treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD) is a significant unmet medical need that is becoming even more critical given the rise in the number of patients and the substantial economic burden. The current standards of care, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs), are hindered by gastrointestinal side effects owing to their nonselective activation of muscarinic and nicotinic receptors. Recently, the highly selective M1 positive allosteric modulator PQCA (1-((4-cyano-4-(pyridine-2-yl)piperidin-1-yl)methyl-4-oxo-4 H-quinolizine-3-carboxylic acid) has been demonstrated to improve cognition in a variety of rodent and nonhuman primate cognition models without producing significant gastrointestinal side effects. Here we describe the effect of PQCA and the AChEI donepezil on two clinically relevant and highly translatable touchscreen cognition tasks in nonhuman primates: paired-associates learning (PAL) and the continuous-performance task (CPT). Blockade of muscarinic signaling by scopolamine produced significant impairments in both PAL and CPT. PQCA and donepezil attenuated the scopolamine deficits in both tasks, and the action of these two compounds was similar in magnitude. In addition, the combination of subeffective doses of PQCA and donepezil enhanced PAL performance. These results further suggest that M1-positive allosteric modulators, either as monotherapy or as an add-on to current standards of care, have potential to reduce the cognitive deficits associated with AD. PMID:26446308

  15. Apigenin Attenuates β-Receptor-Stimulated Myocardial Injury Via Safeguarding Cardiac Functions and Escalation of Antioxidant Defence System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buwa, Chhabildas C; Mahajan, Umesh B; Patil, Chandragouda R; Goyal, Sameer N

    2016-07-01

    Apigenin (AP) is a flavone in dietary flavonoids reported as strong antioxidant and elite modulator of PPARγ. The current study evaluated the consequence of AP in isoproterenol (ISO)-induced oxidative stress and myocardial infarction during β-adrenergic receptor stimulus in rats by persistent hemodynamic, biochemical and histopathological changes. Rats received AP (25, 50 and 75 mg/kg/day) or vehicle i.p. for 14 days and ISO (100 mg/kg, s.c.) on 13th and 14th days for initiation of cardiotoxicity. ISO-treated rats showed evidence of significant dwindle in systolic and diastolic arterial pressures, maximal positive rate of developed left ventricular pressure. In totting up, a noteworthy diminution in activities of creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme, reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase and level along with rise in malondialdehyde content were observed. The shielding function of AP on isoproterenol-induced myocardial damage was observed by attenuating all the endogenous parameters and the membrane-bound enzymes. It was confirmed by histopathological examinations. The effect of AP at the doses of 50 and 75 mg/kg showed added apparent than at the dose of 25 mg/kg. Current study thus provides confirmation for protective effects of AP on myocardium in experimentally induced myocardial infarction. PMID:26186996

  16. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) modulates syntaxin-1A binding to sulfonylurea receptor 2A to regulate cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Li; Liang, Tao; Kang, Youhou; Lin, Xianguang; Sobbi, Roozbeh; Xie, Huanli; Chao, Christin; Backx, Peter; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Shyng, Show-Ling; Gaisano, Herbert Y

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac sarcolemmal syntaxin (Syn)-1A interacts with sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) 2A to inhibit ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), a ubiquitous endogenous inositol phospholipid, known to bind Kir6.2 subunit to open KATP channels, has recently been shown to directly bind Syn-1A in plasma membrane to form Syn-1A clusters. Here, we sought to determine whether the interaction between Syn-1A and PIP2 interferes with the ability of Syn-1A to bind SUR2A and inhibit KATP channel activity. We found that PIP2 dose-dependently reduced SUR2A binding to GST-Syn-1A by in vitro pulldown assays. FRET studies in intact cells using TIRFM revealed that increasing endogenous PIP2 levels led to increased Syn-1A (-EGFP) cluster formation and a severe reduction in availability of Syn-1A molecules to interact with SUR2A (-mCherry) molecules outside the Syn-1A clusters. Correspondingly, electrophysiological studies employing SUR2A/Kir6.2-expressing HEK cells showed that increasing endogenous or exogenous PIP2 diminished the inhibitory effect of Syn-1A on KATP currents. The physiological relevance of these findings was confirmed by ability of exogenous PIP2 to block exogenous Syn-1A inhibition of cardiac KATP currents in inside-out patches of mouse ventricular myocytes. The effect of PIP2 on physical and functional interactions between Syn-1A and KATP channels is specific and not observed with physiologic concentrations of other phospholipids. To unequivocally demonstrate the specificity of PIP2 interaction with Syn-1A and its impact on KATP channel modulation by Syn-1A, we employed a PIP2-insensitive Syn-1A-5RK/A mutant. The Syn-1A-5RK/A mutant retains the ability to interact with SUR2A in both in vitro binding and in vivo FRET assays, although as expected the interaction is no longer disrupted by PIP2. Interestingly, at physiological PIP2 concentrations, Syn-1A-5RK/A inhibited KATP currents to a greater extent than Syn-1A-WT, indicating

  17. Telocytes in exercise-induced cardiac growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Junjie; Chen, Ping; Qu, Yi; Yu, Pujiao; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Hongbao; Fu, Siyi; Bei, Yihua; Chen, Yan; Che, Lin; Xu, Jiahong

    2016-05-01

    Exercise can induce physiological cardiac growth, which is featured by enlarged cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes. Telocytes (TCs) are a recently identified distinct interstitial cell type, existing in many tissues and organs including heart. TCs have been shown to form a tandem with cardiac stem/progenitor cells in cardiac stem cell niches, participating in cardiac regeneration and repair. Although exercise-induced cardiac growth has been confirmed as an important way to promote cardiac regeneration and repair, the response of cardiac TCs to exercise is still unclear. In this study, 4 weeks of swimming training was used to induce robust healthy cardiac growth. Exercise can induce an increase in cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes as determined by Wheat Germ Lectin and EdU staining respectively. TCs were identified by three immunofluorescence stainings including double labelling for CD34/vimentin, CD34/platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor-α and CD34/PDGF receptor-β. We found that cardiac TCs were significantly increased in exercised heart, suggesting that TCs might help control the activity of cardiac stem/progenitor cells, cardiomyocytes or endothelial cells. Adding cardiac TCs might help promote cardiac regeneration and renewal. PMID:26987685

  18. Autoradiographic evidence that (R)-3-quinuclidinyl (S)-4-fluoromethylbenzilate ((R,S)-FMeQNB) displays in vivo selectivity for the muscarinic m2 subtype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves selective loss of muscarinic m2, but not m1, subtype neuroreceptors in cortical and hippocampal regions of the human brain. Until recently, emission tomographic study of the loss of m2 receptors in AD has been limited by the absence of available m2-selective radioligands that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier. We now demonstrate the in vivo m2 selectivity of a fluorinated derivative of QNB, (R)-3-quinuclidinyl (S)-4-fluoromethylbenzilate ((R,S)-FMeQNB), by studying autoradiographically the in vivo inhibition of radioiodinated (R)-3-quinuclidinyl (S)-4-iodobenzilate ((R,S)-[125I]IQNB) binding by unlabelled (R,S)-FMeQNB. In the absence of (R,S)-FMeQNB, (R,S)-[125I]IQNB labels brain regions in proportion to the total muscarinic receptor concentration; in the presence of 75 nmol of (R,S)-FMeQNB, (R,S)-[125I]IQNB labelling in those brain regions containing predominantly m2 subtype is reduced to background levels. We conclude that (R,S)-FMeQNB is m2-selective in vivo, and that (R,S)-[18F]FMeQNB may be of potential use in positron emission tomographic (PET) study of the loss of m2 receptors in AD

  19. Laminar pattern of cholinergic and adrenergic receptors in rat visual cortex using quantitative receptor autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laminar distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, including the M1-receptor subtype, of beta-adrenergic receptors, and noradrenaline uptake sites, was studied in the adult rat visual, frontal, somatosensory and motor cortex, using quantitative receptor autoradiography. In the visual cortex, the highest density of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors was found in layer I. From layer II/III to layer V binding decreases continueously reaching a constant binding level in layers V and VI. This laminar pattern of muscarinic receptor density differs somewhat from that observed in the non-visual cortical regions examined: layer II/III contained the highest receptor density followed by layer I and IV: lowest density was found in layer V and VI. The binding profile of the muscarinic cholinergic M1-subtype through the visual cortex shows a peak in cortical layer II and in the upper part of layer VI, whereas in the non-visual cortical regions cited the binding level was high in layer II/III, moderate in layer I and IV, and low in layer VI. Layers I to IV of the visual cortex contained the highest beta-adrenergic receptor densities, whereas only low binding levels were observed in the deeper layers. A similar laminar distribution was found also in the frontal, somatosensory and motor cortex. The density of noradrenaline uptake sites was high in all layers of the cortical regions studied, but with noradrenaline uptake sites somewhat more concentrated in the superficial layers than in deeper ones. The distinct laminar pattern of cholinergic and noradrenergic receptor sites indicates a different role for acetylcholine and noradrenaline in the functional anatomy of the cerebral cortex, and in particular, the visual cortex. (author)

  20. Treatment with Benznidazole during the Chronic Phase of Experimental Chagas' Disease Decreases Cardiac Alterations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Simone; Ramos, Carolina O.; Senra, Juliana F. V.; Vilas-Boas, Fabio; Rodrigues, Maurício M.; Campos-de-Carvalho, Antonio C.; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ricardo; Soares, Milena B. P.

    2005-01-01

    Chagas' disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is one of the main causes of death due to heart failure in Latin American countries. Benznidazole, the chemotherapeutic agent most often used for the treatment of chagasic patients, is highly toxic and has limited efficacy, especially in the chronic phase of the disease. In the present study we used a mouse model of chronic Chagas' disease to investigate the effects of benznidazole treatment during the chronic phase on disease progression. The hearts of benznidazole-treated mice had decreased parasitism and myocarditis compared to the hearts of untreated chagasic mice. Both groups of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected mice had significant alterations in their electrocardiograms compared to those of the healthy mice. However, untreated mice had significantly higher cardiac conduction disturbances than benznidazole-treated mice, including intraventricular conduction disturbances, atrioventricular blocks, and extrasystoles. The levels of antibodies against T. cruzi antigens (epimastigote extract, P2β, and trans-sialidase) as well as antibodies against peptides of the second extracellular loops of β1-adrenergic and M2-muscarinic cardiac receptors were also lower in the sera from benznidazole-treated mice than in the sera from untreated mice. These results demonstrate that treatment with benznidazole in the chronic phase of infection prevents the development of severe chronic cardiomyopathy, despite the lack of complete parasite eradication. In addition, our data highlight the role of parasite persistence in the development of chronic Chagas' disease and reinforce the importance of T. cruzi elimination in order to decrease or prevent the development of severe chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:15793134

  1. Regulation of TRP-like muscarinic cation current in gastrointestinal smooth muscle with special reference to PLC/InsP3/Ca2+ system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander V ZHOLOS

    2006-01-01

    Acetylcholine,the main enteric excitatory neuromuscular transmitter,evokes membrane depolarization and contraction of gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells by activating G protein-coupled muscarinic receptors.Although the cholinergic excitation is generally underlined by the multiplicity of ion channel effects,the primary event appears to be the opening of cation-selective channels;among them the 60 pS channel has been recently identified as the main target for the acetylcholine action in gastrointestinal myocytes.The evoked cation current,termed mICAT,causes either an oscillatory or a more sustained membrane depolarization response,which in turn leads to increases of the open probability of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels.thus providing Ca2+ entry in parallel with Ca2+ release for intracellular Ca2+ concentration rise and contraction.In recent years there have been several significant developments in our understanding of the signaling processes underlying mIcAT generation.They have revealed important synergistic interactions between M2 and M3 receptor subtypes,single channel mechanisms,and the involvement of TRPC-encoded proteins as essential components of native muscarinic cation channels.This review summarizes these recent findings and in particular discusses the roles of the phospholipase C/InsP3/intracellular Ca2+ release system in the mICAT physiological regulation.

  2. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  3. Cardiac effects of vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jean-Sébastien; Dicken, Bryan; Bigam, David; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2014-07-01

    Vasopressin is an essential hormone involved in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. It has been in use therapeutically for many decades, with an emphasis on its vasoconstrictive and antidiuretic properties. However, this hormone has a ubiquitous influence and has specific effects on the heart. Although difficult to separate from its powerful vascular effects in the clinical setting, a better understanding of vasopressin's direct cardiac effects could lead to its more effective clinical use for a variety of shock states by maximizing its therapeutic benefit. The cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin are complex and require further elucidation. Complicating our understanding include the various receptors and secondary messengers involved in vasopressin's effects, which may lead to various results based on differing doses and varying environmental conditions. Thus, there have been contradictory reports on vasopressin's action on the coronary vasculature and on its effect on inotropy. However, beneficial results have been found and warrant further study to expand the potential therapeutic role of vasopressin. This review outlines the effect of vasopressin on the coronary vasculature, cardiac contractility, and on hypertrophy and cardioprotection. These cardiac-specific effects of vasopressin represent an interesting area for further study for potentially important therapeutic benefits. PMID:24621650

  4. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attack or other heart problem. You might consider cardiac rehab if you have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery Heart transplant Procedures such as angioplasty and stenting In some ...

  5. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program to help people who have A heart attack Angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting for coronary heart disease A heart valve repair or replacement A ...

  6. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Costello BT; Nadel J.; Taylor AJ

    2016-01-01

    Benedict T Costello,1,2 James Nadel,3 Andrew J Taylor,1,21Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Alfred Hospital, 2Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, 3School of Medicine, University of Notre Dame, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Cardiac sarcoidosis is a rare but life-threatening condition, requiring a high degree of clinical suspicion and low threshold for investigation to make the diagnosis. The cardiac manifestations include heart failure, conducting syst...

  7. Lipid-Based Diets Improve Muscarinic Neurotransmission in the Hippocampus of Transgenic APPswe/PS1dE9 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janickova, Helena; Rudajev, Vladimir; Dolejsi, Eva; Koivisto, Hennariikka; Jakubik, Jan; Tanila, Heikki; El-Fakahany, Esam E; Dolezal, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Transgenic APPswe/PS1dE9 mice modeling Alzheimer's disease demonstrate ongoing accumulation of β-amyloid fragments resulting in formation of amyloid plaques that starts at the age of 4-5 months. Buildup of β-amyloid fragments is accompanied by impairment of muscarinic transmission that becomes detectable at this age, well before the appearance of cognitive deficits that manifest around the age of 12 months. We have recently demonstrated that long-term feeding of trangenic mice with specific isocaloric fish oil-based diets improves specific behavioral parameters. Now we report on the influence of short-term feeding (3 weeks) of three isocaloric diets supplemented with Fortasyn (containing fish oil and ingredients supporting membrane renewal), the plant sterol stigmasterol together with fish oil, and stigmasterol alone on markers of cholinergic neurotransmission in the hippocampus of 5-month-old transgenic mice and their wild-type littermates. Transgenic mice fed normal diet demostrated increase in ChAT activity and attenuation of carbachol-stimulated GTP-γ(35)S binding compared to wild-type mice. None of the tested diets compared to control diet influenced the activities of ChAT, AChE, BuChE, muscarinic receptor density or carbachol-stimulated GTP-γ(35)S binding in wild-type mice. In contrast, all experimental diets increased the potency of carbachol in stimulating GTP-γ(35)S binding in trangenic mice to the level found in wild-type animals. Only the Fortasyn diet increased markers of cholinergic synapses in transgenic mice. Our data demonstrate that even short-term feeding of transgenic mice with chow containing specific lipid-based dietary supplements can influence markers of cholinergic synapses and rectify impaired muscarinic signal transduction that develops in transgenic mice. PMID:26502816

  8. Modulation of muscarinic system with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor antidepressant attenuates depression in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramdeep Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Several studies suggest that muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine is a rapidly acting antidepressant for the treatment-resistant depression. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the possibility of synergistic potential of scopolamine with antidepressants for the treatment of depression without memory impairment in mice. Materials and Methods: Antidepressants such as citalopram, duloxetine, fluvoxamine, and venlafaxine at their median effective dose that is 12.5, 42.8, 17.5, 15.7 mg/kg p.o., respectively, were evaluated in combination with scopolamine 0.2 mg/kg intraperitoneally for the synergistic potential for ameliorating depression in Swiss albino mice. A battery of tests including forced swim test (FST and tail suspension test (TST were performed in all the groups comprising vehicle control, scopolamine, antidepressants per se, and the combinations of antidepressants with scopolamine. This was followed by the locomotor activity and memory tests. Results: Behavioral studies indicated that only antidepressant venlafaxine with scopolamine resulted in 95.5% and 93.6% reduction in immobility time compared to the vehicle control in FST and TST, respectively. This is significant (P < 0.0001 synergistic hyper-additive antidepressive-like effect compared to scopolamine per se and venlafaxine per se treatment effects in antidepressant paradigms. All the data were evaluated using the one-way analysis of variance followed by individual comparisons using Tukey′s post-hoc test. Control open field studies demonstrated no significant increase in general locomotion after co-administration of the compounds. Step down avoidance paradigm confirmed that scopolamine at the selected dose has no cognition deficit in any mice. Conclusions: The dose of scopolamine selected for synergistic potential has no detrimental effect on memory. The present results suggest the concoction of scopolamine with venlafaxine for enhanced synergistic

  9. Acute and long-lasting cardiac changes following a single whole-body exposure to sarin vapor in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allon, N; Rabinovitz, I; Manistersky, E; Weissman, B A; Grauer, E

    2005-10-01

    Epinephrine-induced arrhythmias (EPIA) are known to be associated with local cardiac cholinergic activation. The present study examined the development of QT prolongation and the effect on EPIA of whole-body exposure of animals to a potent acetylcholine esterase inhibitor. Freely moving rats were exposed to sarin vapor (34.2 +/- 0.8 microg/liter) for 10 min. The electrocardiograms (ECG) of exposed and control animals were monitored every 2 weeks for 6 months. One and six months post exposure, rats were challenged with epinephrine under anesthesia, and the threshold for arrhythmias was determined. Approximately 35% of the intoxicated rats died within 24 h of sarin exposure. Additional occasional deaths were recorded for up to 6 months (final mortality rate of 48%). Surviving rats showed, agitation, aggression, and weight loss compared to non-exposed rats, and about 20% of them experienced sporadic convulsions. Sarin-challenged rats with severe symptoms demonstrated QT segment prolongation during the first 2-3 weeks after exposure. The EPIA that appeared at a significantly lower blood pressure in the treated group in the first month after intoxication lasted for up to 6 months. This decrease in EPIA threshold was blocked by atropine and methyl-atropine. Three months post exposure no significant changes were detected in either k(D) or B(max) values of (3)H-N-methyl scopolamine binding to heart homogenates, or in the affinity of carbamylcholine to cardiac muscarinic receptors. The increase in the vulnerability to develop arrhythmias long after accidental or terror-related organophosphate (OP) intoxication, especially under challenging conditions such as stress or intensive physical exercise, may explain the delayed mortality observed following OP exposure. PMID:16033992

  10. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  11. A peptide tetramer Tk-tPN induces tolerance of cardiac allografting by conversion of type 1 to type 2 immune responses via the Toll-like receptor 2 signal-promoted activation of the MCP1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuoqing; Yang, Neng; Zhou, Ling; Gu, Peng; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Yun; Zhou, Peijun; Lu, Liming; Chou, Kuang-Yen

    2016-03-01

    The plant protein trichosanthin (Tk) and its derived peptide tetramer Tk-tPN have been shown to stimulate the type 2 immune responses for treating autoimmune disease. This work explores the possibility of using Tk-tPN as a non-toxic immunosuppressant to induce transplantation tolerance using the mechanisms by which T-cell-mediated immune responses are transferred from type 1 to type 2 through innate immunity-related pathways. Immunocytes and cytokine secretions involved in the mouse cardiac allografting model with Tk-tPN treatment were characterized. Identification of critical genes and analysis of their functions through Toll-like receptor (TLR) -initiated signalling and the possible epigenetic changes were performed. Mean survival times of the cardiac allografts were delayed from 7·7 ± 0·3 days (control) to 22·7 ± 3·9 days (P Gata3(+) ), together with a selective expansion of the IL-4/IL-10-producing CD8(+)  CD28(-) regulatory T-cell subset. A TLR2-initiated high expression of chemokine gene MCP1 was detectable simultaneously. Epigenetically Tk/Tk-tPN could also acetylate the histone H3K9 of MCP1 promoter to skew the immunity towards T helper type 2 responses. Tk/Tk-tPN is therefore capable of down-regulating the type 1 response-dominant rejection of cardiac allografts by evoking type 2 immunity through the activation of a TLR2-initiated signalling pathway and MCP1 gene to expand the IL-4/IL-10-secreting CD8(+)  CD28(-) regulatory T cells. Tk-tPN could be a promising novel immunosuppressant to induce tolerance in allotransplantation. PMID:26694804

  12. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  13. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  14. Changes in cardiac glycoside receptor sites 86 rubidium uptake and intracellular sodium concentrations in the erythrocytes of patients receiving digoxin during the early phases of treatment of cardiac failure in regular rhythm and of atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the binding of 12-α-[3H]-digoxin to the membranes of intact erythrocytes, erythrocytic 86Rb uptake and intraerythrocytic sodium concentrations have been made in the red cells of patients receiving digoxin in the short-term for atrial fibrillation or cardiac failure in regular rhythm. During the first few days of treatment [3H]-digoxin binding and 86Rb uptake fall and intraerythrocytic sodium concentrations rise. Subsequently parallel fluctuations occur in [3H]-digoxin binding and 86Rb uptake but not in intraerythrocytic sodium concentrations and the significance of the fluctuations is discussed. The values of all three measurements correlate significantly with the response of the heart in sinus rhythm as measured by QS2I. Plasma digoxin concentrations do not correlate with QS2I. (author)

  15. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedema, J.P.; Zondervan, P.E.; van Hagen, P.; ten Cate, F.J.; Bresser, P.; Doubell, A.F.; Pattynama, P.; Hoogsteden, H.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Symptomatic cardiac involvement occurs in approximately 5% of patients. The prevalence of sarcoidosis in the Netherlands is unknown, but estimated to be approximately 20 per 100,000 population (3200 patients). We report on five patients who presented with different manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis, and give a brief review on the current management of this condition. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be of great help in diagnosing this condition as well as in the follow-up of the response to therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:25696121

  16. FGF21 and cardiac physiopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna ePlanavila

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The heart is not traditionally considered either a target or a site of fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21 production. However, recent findings indicate that FGF21 can act as a cardiomyokine; that is, it is produced by cardiac cells at significant levels and acts in an autocrine manner on the heart itself. The heart is sensitive to the effects of FGF21, both systemic and locally generated, owing to the expression in cardiomyocytes of β-Klotho, the key co-receptor known to confer specific responsiveness to FGF21 action. FGF21 has been demonstrated to protect against cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac inflammation, and oxidative stress. FGF21 expression in the heart is induced in response to cardiac insults, such as experimental cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial infarction in rodents, as well as in failing human hearts. Intracellular mechanisms involving PPARα and Sirt1 mediate transcriptional regulation of the FGF21 gene in response to exogenous stimuli. In humans, circulating FGF21 levels are elevated in coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis, and are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes. These findings provide new insights into the role of FGF21 in the heart and may offer potential therapeutic strategies for cardiac disease.

  17. Endothelin A Receptor Antagonist, Atrasentan, Attenuates Renal and Cardiac Dysfunction in Dahl Salt-Hypertensive Rats in a Blood Pressure Independent Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Samad, Mohammed A.; Kim, Ui Kyoung; Kang, Joshua J.; Ke, Qingen; Kang, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinuria is a hallmark of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD), and a good predictor of clinical outcome. Selective endothelin A (ETA) receptor antagonist used with renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors prevents development of proteinuria in CKD. However, whether the improvement in proteinuria would have beneficial effects on CVD, independent of RAS inhibition, is not well understood. In this study, we investigated whether atrasentan, an ETA receptor antagonist...

  18. Cardiac Pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete survey of physiological biophysical,clinical and engineering aspects of cardiac facing,including the history and an assessment of possible future developments.Among the topics studied are: pacemakers, energy search, heart stimulating with pacemakers ,mathematical aspects of the electric cardio stimulation chronic, pacemaker implants,proceeding,treatment and control

  19. Imaging of neuropsychiatric disorders. The usefulness of new brain receptor radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until now, imaging of brain receptors have been only possible with positron emission tomography (PET), because there have been no high specific activity, high receptor affinity tracers available for clinical use with single photon emission tomography (SPECT). During the recent years fair number of new receptor ligands have been developed. For dopaminergic system there, are ligands for studying both presynaptic and postsynaptic sites, benzodiazepine receptors can be imaged with high quality ligands and also serotonergic receptors can be imaged. Very intensive work is underway for developing muscarinic receptor ligands, as well as for many other brain receptors

  20. Cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chlumský, Jaromír; Holá, Dana; Hlaváček, Karel; Michal, Michal; Švec, Alexander; Špatenka, Jaroslav; Dušek, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sarcoma is a very rare neoplasm and is difficult to diagnose. The case of a 51-year-old man with a left atrial tumour, locally recurrent three months after its surgical removal, is presented. Computed tomography showed metastatic spread to the lung parenchyma. On revised histology, the mass extirpated was a sarcoma. Because of the metastatic spread, further therapy was symptomatic only; the patient died 15 months after the first manifestation of his problems. Immunohistochemical stain...

  1. Cardiac Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Joorabian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a spectrum of different types of cardiac"ncalcifications with the importance and significance"nof each type of cardiac calcification, especially"ncoronary artery calcification. Radiologic detection of"ncalcifications within the heart is quite common. The"namount of coronary artery calcification correlates"nwith the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD."nCalcification of the aortic or mitral valve may indicate"nhemodynamically significant valvular stenosis."nMyocardial calcification is a sign of prior infarction,"nwhile pericardial calcification is strongly associated"nwith constrictive pericarditis. A spectrum of different"ntypes of cardiac calcifications (linear, annular,"ncurvilinear,... could be seen in chest radiography and"nother imaging modalities. So a carful inspection for"ndetection and reorganization of these calcifications"nshould be necessary. Numerous modalities exist for"nidentifying coronary calcification, including plain"nradiography, fluoroscopy, intravascular ultrasound,"nMRI, echocardiography, and conventional, helical and"nelectron-beam CT (EBCT. Coronary calcifications"ndetected on EBCT or helical CT can be quantifie,"nand a total calcification score (Cardiac Calcification"nScoring may be calculated. In an asymptomatic"npopulation and/or patients with concomitant risk"nfactors like diabetes mellitus, determination of the"npresence of coronary calcifications identifies the"npatients at risk for future myocardial infarction and"ncoronary artery disease. In patients without coronary"ncalcifications, future cardiovascular events could"nbe excluded. Therefore, detecting and recognizing"ncalcification related to the heart on chest radiography"nand other imaging modalities such as fluoroscopy, CT"nand echocardiography may have important clinical"nimplications.

  2. Angiotensin II type 1 receptors stimulate protein synthesis in human cardiac fibroblasts via a Ca2+-sensitive PKC-dependent tyrosine kinase pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, M; Pantev, E; Möller, S;

    2000-01-01

    ) was obtained at a concentration of 10 nM. There were no significant alterations of cell number or total protein content, suggesting that Ang II stimulated protein synthesis but did not induce hypertrophy. The accumulation of 3H-leucine was blocked by the AT1 receptor antagonist candesartan but not by...

  3. Vitamin D and Cardiac Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Irene M; Norris, Keith C; Artaza, Jorge N

    2016-01-01

    Calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol or 1,25-D3) is the hormonally active metabolite of vitamin D. Experimental studies of vitamin D receptors and 1,25-D3 establish calcitriol to be a critical regulator of the structure and function of the heart. Clinical studies link vitamin D deficiency with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Emerging evidence demonstrates that calcitriol is highly involved in CVD-related signaling pathways, particularly the Wnt signaling pathway. Addition of 1,25-D3 to cardiomyocyte cells and examination of its effects on cardiomyocytes and mainly Wnt11 signaling allowed the specific characterization of the role of calcitriol in cardiac differentiation. 1,25-D3 is demonstrated to: (i) inhibit cell proliferation without promoting apoptosis; (ii) decrease expression of genes related to the regulation of the cell cycle; (iii) promote formation of cardiomyotubes; (iv) induce expression of casein kinase-1-α1, a negative regulator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway; and (v) increase expression of noncanonical Wnt11, which has been recognized to induce cardiac differentiation during embryonic development and in adult cells. Thus, it appears that vitamin D promotes cardiac differentiation through negative modulation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and upregulation of noncanonical Wnt11 expression. Future work to elucidate the role(s) of vitamin D in cardiovascular disorders will hopefully lead to improvement and potentially prevention of CVD, including abnormal cardiac differentiation in settings such as postinfarction cardiac remodeling. PMID:26827957

  4. Structure Activity Relationship of (N)-Methanocarba Phosphonate Analogues of 5’-AMP as Cardioprotective Agents Acting Through a Cardiac P2X Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, T. Santhosh; Zhou, Si-yuan; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Balasubramanian, Ramachandran; Yang, Tiehong; Liang, Bruce T.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    P2X receptor activation protects in heart failure models. MRS2339 3, a 2-chloro-AMP derivative containing a (N)-methanocarba (bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) system, activates this cardioprotective channel. Michaelis–Arbuzov and Wittig reactions provided phosphonate analogues of 3, expected to be stable in vivo due to the C-P bond. After chronic administration via a mini-osmotic pump (Alzet), some analogues significantly increased intact heart contractile function in calsequestrin-overexpressing mice (...

  5. Cardiac conduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cardiac conduction system is a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals ... to contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system are the SA node, AV node, bundle ...

  6. A role for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 (PGC-1) in the regulation of cardiac mitochondrial phospholipid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ling; Wang, Miao; Martin, Ola J; Leone, Teresa C; Vega, Rick B; Han, Xianlin; Kelly, Daniel P

    2014-01-24

    The energy demands of the adult mammalian heart are met largely by ATP generated via oxidation of fatty acids in a high capacity mitochondrial system. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 (PGC-1)-α and -β serve as inducible transcriptional coregulators of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism. Whether PGC-1 plays a role in the regulation of mitochondrial structure is unknown. In this study, mice with combined deficiency of PGC-1α and PGC-1β (PGC-1αβ(-/-)) in adult heart were analyzed. PGC-1αβ(-/-) hearts exhibited a distinctive mitochondrial cristae-stacking abnormality suggestive of a phospholipid abnormality as has been described in humans with genetic defects in cardiolipin (CL) synthesis (Barth syndrome). A subset of molecular species, containing n-3 polyunsaturated species in the CL, phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidylethanolamine profiles, was reduced in PGC-1αβ-deficient hearts. Gene expression profiling of PGC-1αβ(-/-) hearts revealed reduced expression of the gene encoding CDP-diacylglycerol synthase 1 (Cds1), an enzyme that catalyzes the proximal step in CL biosynthesis. Cds1 gene promoter-reporter cotransfection experiments and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that PGC-1α coregulates estrogen-related receptors to activate the transcription of the Cds1 gene. We conclude that the PGC-1/estrogen-related receptor axis coordinately regulates metabolic and membrane structural programs relevant to the maintenance of high capacity mitochondrial function in heart. PMID:24337569

  7. Receptor binding studies of soft anticholinergic agents

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Fenglei; Buchwald, Peter; Browne, Clinton E.; Farag, Hassan H.; Wu, Wnei-Mei; Ji, Fubao; Hochhaus, Guenther; Bodor, Nicholas

    2001-01-01

    Receptor binding studies were performed on 24 soft anticholinergic agents and 5 conventional anticholinergic agents using 4 cloned human muscarinic receptor subtypes. The measured pKi values of the soft anticholinergic agents ranged from 6.5 to 9.5, with the majority being in the range of 7.5 to 8.5. Strong correlation was observed between the pKis determined here and the pA2 values measured earlier in guinea pig ileum contraction assays. The corresponding correlation coefficients (r2) were 0...

  8. Ascorbic acid enhances the cardiac differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells through promoting the proliferation of cardiac progenitor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Cao; Bin Wei; Liu Wang; Ying Jin; Huang-Tian Yang; Zumei Liu; Zhongyan Chen; Jia Wang; Taotao Chen; Xiaoyang Zhao; Yu Ma; Lianju Qin; Jiuhong Kang

    2012-01-01

    Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has opened new avenues for the investigation of heart diseases,drug screening and potential autologous cardiac regeneration.However,their application is hampered by inefficient cardiac differentiation,high interline variability,and poor maturation of iPSC-derived cardiomyoeytes (iPS-CMs).To identify efficient inducers for cardiac differentiation and maturation of iPSCs and elucidate the mechanisms,we systematically screened sixteen cardiomyocyte inducers on various murine (m) iPSCs and found that only ascorbic acid (AA) consistently and robustly enhanced the cardiac differentiation of eleven lines including eight without spontaneous cardiogenic potential.We then optimized the treatment conditions and demonstrated that differentiation day 2-6,a period for the specification of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs),was a critical time for AA to take effect.This was further confirmed by the fact that AA increased the expression of cardiovascular but not mesodermal markers.Noteworthily,AA treatment led to approximately 7.3-fold (miPSCs) and 30.2-fold (human iPSCs) augment in the yield of iPS-CMs.Such effect was attributed to a specific increase in the proliferation of CPCs via the MEK-ERK1/2 pathway by promoting collagen synthesis.In addition,AA-induced cardiomyocytes showed better sareomerie organization and enhanced responses of action potentials and calcium transients to β-adrenergic and muscarinic stimulations.These findings demonstrate that AA is a suitable cardiomyocyte inducer for iPSCs to improve cardiac differentiation and maturation simply,universally,and efficiently.These findings also highlight the importance of stimulating CPC proliferation by manipulating extracellular microenvironment in guiding cardiac differentiation of the pluripotent stem cells.

  9. Changes in brain striatum dopamine and acetylcholine receptors induced by chronic CDP-choline treatment of aging mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Giménez, R.; Raïch, J.; Aguilar, J.

    1991-01-01

    1. Spiroperidol binding (dopamine D2 receptors) and quinuclidinyl benzilate binding (muscarinic receptors) in striata of 19-month old mice was analyzed for animals that had received chronic administration of cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) incorporated into the chow consumed (100 or 500 mg kg-1 added per day) for the 7 months before they were killed. 2. Treated animals displayed an increase in the dopamine receptor densities of 11% for those receiving 100 mg kg-1 and 18% for those ...

  10. Central muscarinic cholinergic activation alters interaction between splenic dendritic cell and CD4+CD25- T cells in experimental colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peris Munyaka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway (CAP is based on vagus nerve (VN activity that regulates macrophage and dendritic cell responses in the spleen through alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR signaling. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients present dysautonomia with decreased vagus nerve activity, dendritic cell and T cell over-activation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether central activation of the CAP alters the function of dendritic cells (DCs and sequential CD4+/CD25-T cell activation in the context of experimental colitis. METHODS: The dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of experimental colitis in C57BL/6 mice was used. Central, intracerebroventricular infusion of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist McN-A-343 was used to activate CAP and vagus nerve and/or splenic nerve transection were performed. In addition, the role of α7nAChR signaling and the NF-kB pathway was studied. Serum amyloid protein (SAP-A, colonic tissue cytokines, IL-12p70 and IL-23 in isolated splenic DCs, and cytokines levels in DC-CD4+CD25-T cell co-culture were determined. RESULTS: McN-A-343 treatment reduced colonic inflammation associated with decreased pro-inflammatory Th1/Th17 colonic and splenic cytokine secretion. Splenic DCs cytokine release was modulated through α7nAChR and the NF-kB signaling pathways. Cholinergic activation resulted in decreased CD4+CD25-T cell priming. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of central cholinergic activation was abolished in mice with vagotomy or splenic neurectomy. CONCLUSIONS: Suppression of splenic immune cell activation and altered interaction between DCs and T cells are important aspects of the beneficial effect of brain activation of the CAP in experimental colitis. These findings may lead to improved therapeutic strategies in the treatment of IBD.

  11. Cardiac MRI in Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, T.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is often used in athletes to image cardiac anatomy and function and is increasingly requested in the context of screening for pathology that can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD). In this thesis, patterns of cardiac adaptation to sports are investigated with C

  12. Exercício de força ativa a via AKT/mTor pelo receptor de angiotensina II tipo I no músculo cardíaco de ratos Activation of AKT-mTor signaling pathways by angiotensin II receptor type 1 after a session of strength exercise in cardiac muscle of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphano Freitas Soares Melo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available O receptor de angiotensina II tipo I (AT1 tem uma importante participação no desenvolvimento da hipertrofia cardíaca. Em um trabalho publicado anteriormente, por nosso grupo, demonstramos que o bloqueio do receptor AT1 durante o treinamento de força inibiu a hipertrofia cardíaca em ratos. Por isso, o objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a participação do receptor AT1 na ativação de vias de sinalização intracelular relacionadas com o aumento da síntese de proteína em ratos submetidos a uma sessão de exercício de força. Para isso, realizamos um experimento com seis grupos de animais (n = 6; cada: controle (Con, exercitado e sacrificado cinco minutos após o exercício (Exe 5, exercitado e sacrificado 30 minutos após o exercício (Exe 30, controle tratado com losartan (Con Los, tratado com losartan, exercitado e sacrificado cinco minutos após o exercício (Exe 5 Los, tratado com losartan, exercitado e sacrificado 30 minutos após o exercício (Exe 30 Los. Os resultados mostram que no grupo Exe 5 e Exe 30 ocorreu um aumento de 63% (P The angiotensin II type I (AT1 receptor has an important participation in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Previously, we have shown that AT1 receptor participates in the cardiac hypertrophy induced by resistance training in rats. Here, we studied the involvement of AT1 receptor in the activation of intracellular signaling pathways related to the concentric HC in rats submitted to a session of strength exercise. Male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups (n= 6 each: control (Con; exercised and killed 5 minutes after exercise (Exe 5; exercised and killed 30 minutes after exercise (Exe 30; control treated with Losartan (Con Los; treated with Losartan, exercised and killed 5 minutes after the exercise (Exe Los 5; treated with Losartan, exercised and killed 30 minutes after training (Exe Los 30. The results show that phosphorylation activity of AKT in group Exe 5 and Exe 30 increased 63% (P < 0

  13. Cardiac calcium release channel (ryanodine receptor) in control and cardiomyopathic human hearts: mRNA and protein contents are differentially regulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainte Beuve, C; Allen, P D; Dambrin, G; Rannou, F; Marty, I; Trouvé, P; Bors, V; Pavie, A; Gandgjbakch, I; Charlemagne, D

    1997-04-01

    Abnormal intracellular calcium handling in cardiomyopathic human hearts has been associated with an impaired function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, but previous reports on the gene expression of the ryanodine receptors (Ry2) are contradictory. We measured the mRNA levels, the protein levels and the number of high affinity [3H]ryanodine binding sites in the left ventricle of non-failing (n = 9) and failing human hearts [idiopathic dilated (IDCM n = 16), ischemic (ICM n = 7) or mixed (MCM n = 8) cardiomyopathies]. Ry2 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in IDCM (-30%) and unchanged in MCM and ICM and Ry2 protein levels were similar. In contrast, we observed a two-fold increase in the number of high affinity Ry2 (B(max) = 0.43 +/- 0.11 v 0.22 +/- 0.13 pmol/mg protein, respectively; P<0.01) and an unchanged K(d). Furthermore, levels of myosin heavy chain mRNA and protein per g of tissue were similar in failing and non-failing hearts, suggesting that the observed differences in Ry2 are not caused by the increase in fibrosis in failing heart. Therefore, the dissociation between the two-fold increase in the number of high affinity ryanodine receptors observed in all failing hearts and the slightly decreased mRNA level or unchanged protein level suggests that the ryanodine binding properties are affected in failing myocardium and that such modifications rather than a change in gene expression alter the channel activity and could contribute to abnormalities in intracellular Ca2+ handling. PMID:9160875

  14. Muscarinic and nicotinic mechanisms in the responses of the adrenal medulla of the dog and cat to reflex stimuli and to cholinomimetic drugs.

    OpenAIRE

    Critchley, J A; Ellis, P; Henderson, C. G.; Ungar, A.; West, C P

    1986-01-01

    In isolated perfused adrenal glands of the cat, muscarinic and nicotinic agonists selectively released adrenaline and noradrenaline respectively. In isolated perfused adrenal glands of the dog, the output of adrenaline and noradrenaline remained in a fixed ratio at rest and when stimulated by muscarinic or by nicotinic agonists. In the anaesthetized dog, a combination of muscarinic and nicotinic antagonists was needed to block reflex responses of the adrenal medulla. A nicotinic antagonist wa...

  15. Bile Acid-Induced Arrhythmia Is Mediated by Muscarinic M2 Receptors in Neonatal Rat Cardiomyocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikh Abdul Kadir, Siti H; Michele Miragoli; Shadi Abu-Hayyeh; Moshkov, Alexey V.; Qilian Xie; Verena Keitel; Viacheslav O. Nikolaev; Catherine Williamson; Julia Gorelik

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is a common disease affecting up to 5% of pregnancies and which can cause fetal arrhythmia and sudden intrauterine death. We previously demonstrated that bile acid taurocholate (TC), which is raised in the bloodstream of ICP, can acutely alter the rate and rhythm of contraction and induce abnormal calcium destabilization in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCM). Apart from their hepatic functions bile acids are ubiquitous signallin...

  16. Ultrastructural localization of cholinergic muscarinic receptors in rat brain cortical capillaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiten, PGM; deJong, GI; VanderZee, EA; vanDijken, H; Dijken, H. van

    1996-01-01

    Cholinergic innervation of the cerebrovasculature is known to regulate vascular tone, perfusion rate and permeability of the microvascular wall. Notably the cholinergic innervation of cerebral capillaries is of interest since these capillaries form the blood-brain barrier. Although there is a genera

  17. Original nootropic drug noopept prevents memory deficit in rats with muscarinic and nicotinic receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radionova, K S; Belnik, A P; Ostrovskaya, R U

    2008-07-01

    Antiamnesic activity of Noopept was studied on the original three-way model of conditioned passive avoidance response, which allows studying spatial component of memory. Cholinoceptor antagonists of both types (scopolamine and mecamylamine) decreased entry latency and reduced the probability for selection of the safe compartment. Noopept abolished the antiamnesic effect of cholinoceptor antagonists and improved spatial preference. PMID:19145351

  18. Developmental neurotoxicity of ethanol (EtOH): Interaction with muscarinic receptor (MR) stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously reported that administration of EtOH (4g/kg/day) to rats from postnatal day 4 to day 10 causes microencephaly and decreases MR-stimulated inositol metabolism on days 7 and 10. An identical exposure to EtOH of adult rats, which resulted in similar blood EtOH concentrations, did not have any effect on the same system. To test whether a differential sensitivity of the phosphoinostitide (PI) system coupled to MR during development could account for these findings, we have investigated the in vitro effects of EtOH on carbachol (CB)-stimulated PI metabolism in rat brain slices. EtOH (500 mM) caused a 30% decrease of maximal accumulation of [3H] inositol phosphates (InsPs) induced by CB and a two fold increase in its EC50 in 7 day-old rats, but had no effect on adults. The effect of EtOH on MR-stimulated PI metabolism in 7 day-old rats was dependent on the time of preincubation of the slices with EtOH. After 90 min preincubation, the effect of EtOH was significant at a concentration as low as 50 mM, which is obtained after in vivo administration of EtOH. The inhibitory effect of EtOH was brain region- and age- dependent, with its maximal effect occurring on days 7-10. These results confirm that the PI system coupled to MR could represent a relevant target for the developmental neurotoxicity of EtOH

  19. NMDA and Muscarinic Receptors of the Nucleus Accumbens Have Differential Effects on Taste Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico; Ramirez-Lugo, Leticia; Zavala-Vega, Sergio

    2006-01-01

    Animals recognize a taste cue as aversive when it has been associated with post-ingestive malaise; this associative learning is known as conditioned taste aversion (CTA). When an animal consumes a new taste and no negative consequences follow, it becomes recognized as a safe signal, leading to an increase in its consumption in subsequent…

  20. Huperzine A Alleviates Mechanical Allodynia but Not Spontaneous Pain via Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Xing Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a major health issue and most patients suffer from spontaneous pain. Previous studies suggest that Huperzine A (Hup A, an alkaloid isolated from the Chinese herb Huperzia serrata, is a potent analgesic with few side effects. However, whether it alleviates spontaneous pain is unclear. We evaluated the effects of Hup A on spontaneous pain in mice using the conditioned place preference (CPP behavioral assay and found that application of Hup A attenuated the mechanical allodynia induced by peripheral nerve injury or inflammation. This effect was blocked by atropine. However, clonidine but not Hup A induced preference for the drug-paired chamber in CPP. The same effects occurred when Hup A was infused into the anterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, ambenonium chloride, a competitive inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, also increased the paw-withdrawal threshold but failed to induce place preference in CPP. Therefore, our data suggest that acetylcholinesterase in both the peripheral and central nervous systems is involved in the regulation of mechanical allodynia but not the spontaneous pain.

  1. Heterotrimeric G proteins precouple with G protein-coupled receptors in living cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nobles, M.; Benians, A.; Tinker, A

    2005-01-01

    Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy, we investigate how heterotrimeric G proteins interact with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In the absence of receptor activation, the alpha 2A adrenergic and muscarinic M4 receptors are present on the cell membrane as dimers. Furthermore, there is an interaction between the G protein subunits alpha o, beta 1, and gamma 2 and a number of GPCRs including M4, a2A, the adenosine All receptor, and the dopamine D2 receptor under r...

  2. Are there valid reasons for using anti-muscarinic drugs in the management of renal colic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiak, R H; Barlow, R B; Smith, P J

    1985-10-01

    Experiments have been carried out with isolated ring preparations of human ureter. The tissue displayed spontaneous activity and contracted when exposed to barium chloride (0.5-4 mM) but no responses were obtained with carbachol (0.1 micromolar-0.1 mM). This raises questions about the value of treating ureteric colic with anti-muscarinic drugs. PMID:4063728

  3. Pharmacological Evidence that Histamine H3 Receptors Mediate Histamine-Induced Inhibition of the Vagal Bradycardic Out-flow in Pithed Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Mónica; García-Pedraza, José Ángel; Villalón, Carlos M; Morán, Asunción

    2016-02-01

    In vivo stimulation of cardiac vagal neurons induces bradycardia by acetylcholine (ACh) release. As vagal release of ACh may be modulated by autoreceptors (muscarinic M2 ) and heteroreceptors (including serotonin 5-HT1 ), this study has analysed the pharmacological profile of the receptors involved in histamine-induced inhibition of the vagal bradycardic out-flow in pithed rats. For this purpose, 180 male Wistar rats were pithed, artificially ventilated and pre-treated (i.v.) with 1 mg/kg atenolol, followed by i.v. administration of physiological saline (1 ml/kg), histamine (10, 50, 100 and 200 μg/kg) or the selective histamine H1 (2-pyridylethylamine), H2 (dimaprit), H3 (methimepip) and H4 (VUF 8430) receptor agonists (1, 10, 50 and 100 μg/kg each). Under these conditions, electrical stimulation (3, 6 and 9 Hz; 15 ± 3 V and 1 ms) of the vagus nerve resulted in frequency-dependent bradycardic responses, which were (i) unchanged during the infusions of saline, 2-pyridylethylamine, dimaprit or VUF 8430; and (ii) dose-dependently inhibited by histamine or methimepip. Moreover, the inhibition of the bradycardia caused by 50 μg/kg of either histamine or methimepip (which failed to inhibit the bradycardic responses to i.v. bolus injections of acetylcholine; 1-10 μg/kg) was abolished by the H3 receptor antagonist JNJ 10181457 (1 mg/kg, i.v.). In conclusion, our results suggest that histamine-induced inhibition of the vagal bradycardic out-flow in pithed rats is mainly mediated by pre-junctional activation of histamine H3 receptors, as previously demonstrated for the vasopressor sympathetic out-flow and the vasodepressor sensory CGRPergic (calcitonin gene-related peptide) out-flow. PMID:26301462

  4. Cardiac perception and cardiac control. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, D

    1977-12-01

    The evidence regarding specific cardiac perception and discrimination, and its relationship to voluntary cardiac control, is critically reviewed. Studies are considered in three sections, depending on the method used to assess cardiac perception: questionnaire assessment, discrimination procedures, and heartbeat tracking. The heartbeat tracking procedure would appear to suffer least from interpretative difficulties. Recommendations are made regarding the style of analysis used to assess heartbeat perception in such tracking tasks. PMID:348240

  5. Imaging of the muscarinic acetylcholine neuroreceptor in rats with the M2 selective agonist [18F]FP-TZTP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: [18F]FP-TZTP is an M2 muscarinic subtype selective receptor-binding radiotracer used in vivo to image human and nonhuman primate brain following both bolus injection and infusion. In order to carry out repeated studies in rodents, the techniques developed for primates must be transferred to rodents with the same precision. This includes obtaining a metabolite-corrected input function. Methods: We compared bolus injection with constant infusion in rats that were awake or under isoflurane anesthesia. Brain–plasma and brain–blood distribution ratios were calculated by dividing brain 18F concentrations, determined in vivo by positron emission tomography imaging with the Advanced Technology Laboratory Animal Scanner, ex vivo by direct counting in excised brain tissue or by quantitative autoradiography by the plasma or whole blood concentrations that had been corrected for metabolite contents. Results: Blood volume constraints prevented adequate blood sampling to define a precise input function after bolus injection, thus preventing full kinetic analysis. Constant infusion, however, required fewer blood samples to define the input function, allowing calculation of distribution ratios, but complete equilibrium between plasma and tissue had not yet been reached after 120 min. Conclusion: Our results showed that the blood clearance and metabolism were too rapid to obtain a reproducible input function after bolus injection. The equilibrium distribution ratios did not lead to precise biochemical parameters, but the constant infusion was more suitable in that distribution ratios between tissue and plasma were statistically more precise. Constant infusion is the better approach for studying [18F]FP-TZTP by small animal imaging.

  6. Reductions in the Cardiac Transient Outward K+ Current Ito Caused by Chronic β-Adrenergic Receptor Stimulation Are Partly Rescued by Inhibition of Nuclear Factor κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panama, Brian K; Korogyi, Adam S; Aschar-Sobbi, Roozbeh; Oh, Yena; Gray, Charles B B; Gang, Hongying; Brown, Joan Heller; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A; Backx, Peter H

    2016-02-19

    The fast transient outward potassium current (Ito,f) plays a critical role in the electrical and contractile properties of the myocardium. Ito,f channels are formed by the co-assembly of the pore-forming α-subunits, Kv4.2 and Kv4.3, together with the accessory β-subunit KChIP2. Reductions of Ito,f are common in the diseased heart, which is also associated with enhanced stimulation of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs). We used cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes to examine how chronic β-AR stimulation decreases Ito,f. To determine which downstream pathways mediate these Ito,f changes, adenoviral infections were used to inhibit CaMKIIδc, CaMKIIδb, calcineurin, or nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). We observed that chronic β-AR stimulation with isoproterenol (ISO) for 48 h reduced Ito,f along with mRNA expression of all three of its subunits (Kv4.2, Kv4.3, and KChIP2). Inhibiting either CaMKIIδc nor CaMKIIδb did not prevent the ISO-mediated Ito,f reductions, even though CaMKIIδc and CaMKIIδb clearly regulated Ito,f and the mRNA expression of its subunits. Likewise, calcineurin inhibition did not prevent the Ito,f reductions induced by β-AR stimulation despite strongly modulating Ito,f and subunit mRNA expression. In contrast, NF-κB inhibition partly rescued the ISO-mediated Ito,f reductions in association with restoration of KChIP2 mRNA expression. Consistent with these observations, KChIP2 promoter activity was reduced by p65 as well as β-AR stimulation. In conclusion, NF-κB, and not CaMKIIδ or calcineurin, partly mediates the Ito,f reductions induced by chronic β-AR stimulation. Both mRNA and KChIP2 promoter data suggest that the ISO-induced Ito,f reductions are, in part, mediated through reduced KChIP2 transcription caused by NF-κB activation. PMID:26742842

  7. Platelets and cardiac arrhythmia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JonasSDe Jong

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death remains one of the most prevalent modes of death in industrialized countries, and myocardial ischemia due to thrombotic coronary occlusion is its primary cause. The role of platelets in the occurrence of SCD extends beyond coronary flow impairment by clot formation. Here we review the substances released by platelets during clot formation and their arrhythmic properties. Platelet products are released from three types of platelet granules: dense core granules, alpha-granules, and platelet lysosomes. The physiologic properties of dense granule products are of special interest as a potential source of arrhythmic substances. They are released readily upon activation and contain high concentrations of serotonin, histamine, purines, pyrimidines, and ions such as calcium and magnesium. Potential arrhythmic mechanisms of these substances, e.g. serotonin and high energy phosphates, include induction of coronary constriction, calcium overloading, and induction of delayed after-depolarizations. Alpha-granules produce thromboxanes and other arachidonic acid products with many potential arrhythmic effects mediated by interference with cardiac sodium, calcium and potassium channels. Alpha-granules also contain hundreds of proteins that could potentially serve as ligands to receptors on cardiomyocytes. Lysosomal products probably do not have an important arrhythmic effect. Platelet products and ischemia can induce coronary permeability, thereby enhancing interaction with surrounding cardiomyocytes. Antiplatelet therapy is known to improve survival after myocardial infarction. Although an important part of this effect results from prevention of coronary clot formation, there is evidence to suggest that antiplatelet therapy also induces anti-arrhythmic effects during ischemia by preventing the release of platelet activation products.

  8. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  9. Gα15 and Gα16 Couple a Wide Variety of Receptors to Phospholipase C

    OpenAIRE

    Offermanns, Stefan; Simon, Melvin I.

    1995-01-01

    The murine G-protein α-subunit Gα15 and its human counterpart Gα16 are expressed in a subset of hematopoietic cells, and they have been shown to regulate β-isoforms of inositide-specific phospholipase C. We studied the ability of a variety of receptors to interact with Gα15 and Gα16 by cotransfecting receptors and G-protein α-subunits in COS-7 cells. Activation of β2 adrenergic and muscarinic M2 receptors in cells expressing the receptors alone or together with Gαq, Gα11, or Gα14 led to a ver...

  10. Diffuse infiltrative cardiac tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the cardiac magnetic resonance images of an unusual form of cardiac tuberculosis. Nodular masses in a sheet-like distribution were seen to infiltrate the outer myocardium and pericardium along most of the cardiac chambers. The lesions showed significant resolution on antitubercular therapy

  11. A novel muscarinic antagonist R2HBJJ inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cell growth and arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Hua

    Full Text Available Lung cancers express the cholinergic autocrine loop, which facilitates the progression of cancer cells. The antagonists of mAChRs have been demonstrated to depress the growth of small cell lung cancers (SCLCs. In this study we intended to investigate the growth inhibitory effect of R2HBJJ, a novel muscarinic antagonist, on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells and the possible mechanisms. The competitive binding assay revealed that R2HBJJ had a high affinity to M3 and M1 AChRs. R2HBJJ presented a strong anticholinergic activity on carbachol-induced contraction of guinea-pig trachea. R2HBJJ markedly suppressed the growth of NSCLC cells, such as H1299, H460 and H157. In H1299 cells, both R2HBJJ and its leading compound R2-PHC displayed significant anti-proliferative activity as M3 receptor antagonist darifenacin. Exogenous replenish of ACh could attenuate R2HBJJ-induced growth inhibition. Silencing M3 receptor or ChAT by specific-siRNAs resulted in a growth inhibition of 55.5% and 37.9% on H1299 cells 96 h post transfection, respectively. Further studies revealed that treatment with R2HBJJ arrested the cell cycle in G0/G1 by down-regulation of cyclin D1-CDK4/6-Rb. Therefore, the current study reveals that NSCLC cells express an autocrine and paracrine cholinergic system which stimulates the growth of NSCLC cells. R2HBJJ, as a novel mAChRs antagonist, can block the local cholinergic loop by antagonizing predominantly M3 receptors and inhibit NSCLC cell growth, which suggest that M3 receptor antagonist might be a potential chemotherapeutic regimen for NSCLC.

  12. A novel muscarinic antagonist R2HBJJ inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cell growth and arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Nan; Wei, Xiaoli; Liu, Xiaoyan; Ma, Xiaoyun; He, Xinhua; Zhuo, Rengong; Zhao, Zhe; Wang, Liyun; Yan, Haitao; Zhong, Bohua; Zheng, Jianquan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancers express the cholinergic autocrine loop, which facilitates the progression of cancer cells. The antagonists of mAChRs have been demonstrated to depress the growth of small cell lung cancers (SCLCs). In this study we intended to investigate the growth inhibitory effect of R2HBJJ, a novel muscarinic antagonist, on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and the possible mechanisms. The competitive binding assay revealed that R2HBJJ had a high affinity to M3 and M1 AChRs. R2HBJJ presented a strong anticholinergic activity on carbachol-induced contraction of guinea-pig trachea. R2HBJJ markedly suppressed the growth of NSCLC cells, such as H1299, H460 and H157. In H1299 cells, both R2HBJJ and its leading compound R2-PHC displayed significant anti-proliferative activity as M3 receptor antagonist darifenacin. Exogenous replenish of ACh could attenuate R2HBJJ-induced growth inhibition. Silencing M3 receptor or ChAT by specific-siRNAs resulted in a growth inhibition of 55.5% and 37.9% on H1299 cells 96 h post transfection, respectively. Further studies revealed that treatment with R2HBJJ arrested the cell cycle in G0/G1 by down-regulation of cyclin D1-CDK4/6-Rb. Therefore, the current study reveals that NSCLC cells express an autocrine and paracrine cholinergic system which stimulates the growth of NSCLC cells. R2HBJJ, as a novel mAChRs antagonist, can block the local cholinergic loop by antagonizing predominantly M3 receptors and inhibit NSCLC cell growth, which suggest that M3 receptor antagonist might be a potential chemotherapeutic regimen for NSCLC. PMID:23285263

  13. Functional activation of the T-cell antigen receptor induces tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, A; Koretzky, G; Schatzman, R C; Kadlecek, T

    1991-01-01

    Stimulation of the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR), which itself is not a protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK), activates a PTK and phospholipase C (PLC). Using the human T-cell leukemic line Jurkat and normal peripheral blood lymphocytes, we demonstrate that stimulation of the TCR specifically induces the recovery of PLC activity in eluates from anti-phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitates. Stimulation of the human muscarinic receptor, subtype 1, when expressed in Jurkat activates PLC through a guanine nu...

  14. Cholinergic-mediated IP3-receptor activation induces long-lasting synaptic enhancement in CA1 pyramidal neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández de Sevilla, D.; Núñez Molina, Ángel; Borde, M.; Malinow, R.; Buño, Washinton

    2008-01-01

    Cholinergic-glutamatergic interactions influence forms of synaptic plasticity that are thought to mediate memory and learning. We tested in vitro the induction of long-lasting synaptic enhancement at Schaffer collaterals by acetylcholine (ACh) at the apical dendrite of CA1 pyramidal neurons and in vivo by stimulation of cholinergic afferents. In vitro ACh induced a Ca2+ wave and synaptic enhancement mediated by insertion of AMPA receptors in spines. Activation of muscarinic ACh receptors (mAC...

  15. Fatty old hearts: role of cardiac lipotoxicity in age-related cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Drosatos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cardiomyopathy accounts for a significant part of heart failure cases. Imbalance of the energetic equilibrium of the heart along with mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired β-adrenergic receptor signaling contributes in the aggravation of cardiac function in the elderly. In this review article, studies that correlate cardiac aging with lipotoxicity are summarized. The involvement of inhibition of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, β-adrenergic receptor desensitization, ...

  16. Changes in mRNA levels of cardiac α1-adrenergic receptor and angiotensin Ⅱ receptor subtypes with aging in rats%大鼠心脏α1-肾上腺素受体和血管紧张素Ⅱ受体亚型mRNA水平的增龄改变

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹晓菁; 李艳芳

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine the expression levels of α1-adrenergie receptor(α1-AR)and angiotensinⅡ reeeptor(ATR)subtypes in left ventricle of rats from adolescent age, middle age,presenium to senium. Methods Semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to quantitate the messenger RNA (mRNA) of α1-AR and ATR subtypes in left ventricle in Wistar rats aged 3-months (adolescent age), 12-months (middle age), 18-months (presenium) and 24-months (senium). Results The expression of α1A-AR mRNA was decreased gradually with aging, and the gene expression of α1 D-AR was repressed in middle age and presenium,while the expression of a,B-AR mRNA remained unchanged during senescence. Cardiac AT1R expression was not affected by aging from adolescent age to presenium, but exhibited a remarkable up-regulation in senium There was no significant discrepancies of cardiac AT2R expression among the four different age groups. Conclusions The results suggest that there are considerable changes in mRNA levels of cardiac α1-AR and ATR subtypes with aging. The change of cardiac α1-AR and ATR expression during aging is a protective response for senescence and has an important significance in maintaining normal physiological functions of heart.%目的 从受体信使RNA(messenger RNA,mRNA)水平研究了心脏α1-肾上腺素受体(α1-AR)亚型和血管紧张素Ⅱ受体(ATR)亚型在大鼠增龄过程中表达水平的变化. 方法 采用半定量逆转录聚合酶链反应(semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction,RTPCR)分别对3月龄(青年)、12月龄(中年)、18月龄(老年前期)和24月龄(老年)Wistar大鼠左心室的mRNA水平进行测定. 结果 α1A-AR随增龄逐渐F调,各年龄组的表达水平分别为0.71±0.06、0.29±0.06、0.23±0.03、0.12±0.04.α1D-AR在中年和老年前期下凋,各年龄组的表达水平分别为0.52±0.05、0.41±0.03、0.24±0.11、0.27±0.08.α1B-AR的表达未

  17. Venoms of South Asian hump-nosed pit vipers (Genus: Hypnale cause muscarinic effects in BALB/c mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Although clinical, in-vivo and in-vitro studies suggest the necrotic, haemorrhagic, pro-coagulant and nephrotoxic effects of South Asian Hump nosed pit vipers, reports on neurotoxic properties are limited to a single in-vitro study. Using BALB/c mice, for the first time, here we demonstrate the signs of envenoming suggestive of possible muscarinic effects of the venoms of all three Hypnale species. Further, we demonstrate that the muscarinic effects are occurred at lower venom doses by H. hypnale venom, compared to H. nepa and H. zara.

  18. Cardiac tumours in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons Jonathan M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac tumours are benign or malignant neoplasms arising primarily in the inner lining, muscle layer, or the surrounding pericardium of the heart. They can be primary or metastatic. Primary cardiac tumours are rare in paediatric practice with a prevalence of 0.0017 to 0.28 in autopsy series. In contrast, the incidence of cardiac tumours during foetal life has been reported to be approximately 0.14%. The vast majority of primary cardiac tumours in children are benign, whilst approximately 10% are malignant. Secondary malignant tumours are 10–20 times more prevalent than primary malignant tumours. Rhabdomyoma is the most common cardiac tumour during foetal life and childhood. It accounts for more than 60% of all primary cardiac tumours. The frequency and type of cardiac tumours in adults differ from those in children with 75% being benign and 25% being malignant. Myxomas are the most common primary tumours in adults constituting 40% of benign tumours. Sarcomas make up 75% of malignant cardiac masses. Echocardiography, Computing Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of the heart are the main non-invasive diagnostic tools. Cardiac catheterisation is seldom necessary. Tumour biopsy with histological assessment remains the gold standard for confirmation of the diagnosis. Surgical resection of primary cardiac tumours should be considered to relieve symptoms and mechanical obstruction to blood flow. The outcome of surgical resection in symptomatic, non-myxomatous benign cardiac tumours is favourable. Patients with primary cardiac malignancies may benefit from palliative surgery but this approach should not be recommended for patients with metastatic cardiac tumours. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy may prolong survival. The prognosis for malignant primary cardiac tumours is generally extremely poor.

  19. Expression Profiles of Neuropeptides, Neurotransmitters, and Their Receptors in Human Keratocytes In Vitro and In Situ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Słoniecka

    Full Text Available Keratocytes, the quiescent cells of the corneal stroma, play a crucial role in corneal wound healing. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are usually associated with neuronal signaling, but have recently been shown to be produced also by non-neuronal cells and to be involved in many cellular processes. The aim of this study was to assess the endogenous intracellular and secreted levels of the neuropeptides substance P (SP and neurokinin A (NKA, and of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh, catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine, and glutamate, as well as the expression profiles of their receptors, in human primary keratocytes in vitro and in keratocytes of human corneal tissue sections in situ. Cultured keratocytes expressed genes encoding for SP and NKA, and for catecholamine and glutamate synthesizing enzymes, as well as genes for neuropeptide, adrenergic and ACh (muscarinic receptors. Keratocytes in culture produced SP, NKA, catecholamines, ACh, and glutamate, and expressed neurokinin-1 and -2 receptors (NK-1R and NK-2R, dopamine receptor D2, muscarinic ACh receptors, and NDMAR1 glutamate receptor. Human corneal sections expressed SP, NKA, NK-1R, NK-2R, receptor D2, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT, M3, M4 and M5 muscarinic ACh receptors, glutamate, and NMDAR1, but not catecholamine synthesizing enzyme or the α1 and β2 adrenoreceptors, nor M1 receptor. In addition, expression profiles assumed significant differences between keratocytes from the peripheral cornea as compared to those from the central cornea, as well as differences between keratocytes cultured under various serum concentrations. In conclusion, human keratocytes express an array of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters. The cells furthermore express receptors for neuropeptides/neurotransmitters, which suggests that they are susceptible to stimulation by these substances in the cornea, whether of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. As it has been shown that

  20. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  1. σ1 Receptor Modulation of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling: Potentiation of Opioid Transduction Independent from Receptor Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Felix J.; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Burgman, Maxim; Neilan, Claire; Chien, Chih-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    σ Ligands modulate opioid actions in vivo, with agonists diminishing morphine analgesia and antagonists enhancing the response. Using human BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells that natively express opioid receptors and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with a cloned μ opioid receptor, we now demonstrate a similar modulation of opioid function, as assessed by guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS) binding, by σ1 receptors. σ Ligands do not compete opioid receptor binding. Administered alone, neither σ agonists nor antagonists significantly stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding. Yet σ receptor selective antagonists, but not agonists, shifted the EC50 of opioid-induced stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding by 3- to 10-fold to the left. This enhanced potency was seen without a change in the efficacy of the opioid, as assessed by the maximal stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding. σ1 Receptors physically associate with μ opioid receptors, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation studies in transfected HEK cells, implying a direct interaction between the proteins. Thus, σ receptors modulate opioid transduction without influencing opioid receptor binding. RNA interference knockdown of σ1 in BE(2)-C cells also potentiated μ opioid-induced stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding. These modulatory actions are not limited to μ and δ opioid receptors. In mouse brain membrane preparations, σ1-selective antagonists also potentiated both opioid receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding, suggesting a broader role for σ receptors in modulating G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20089882

  2. Sigma 1 receptor modulation of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling: potentiation of opioid transduction independent from receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Felix J; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Burgman, Maxim; Neilan, Claire; Chien, Chih-Cheng; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2010-04-01

    sigma Ligands modulate opioid actions in vivo, with agonists diminishing morphine analgesia and antagonists enhancing the response. Using human BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells that natively express opioid receptors and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with a cloned mu opioid receptor, we now demonstrate a similar modulation of opioid function, as assessed by guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP gamma S) binding, by sigma(1) receptors. sigma Ligands do not compete opioid receptor binding. Administered alone, neither sigma agonists nor antagonists significantly stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. Yet sigma receptor selective antagonists, but not agonists, shifted the EC(50) of opioid-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding by 3- to 10-fold to the left. This enhanced potency was seen without a change in the efficacy of the opioid, as assessed by the maximal stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. sigma(1) Receptors physically associate with mu opioid receptors, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation studies in transfected HEK cells, implying a direct interaction between the proteins. Thus, sigma receptors modulate opioid transduction without influencing opioid receptor binding. RNA interference knockdown of sigma(1) in BE(2)-C cells also potentiated mu opioid-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. These modulatory actions are not limited to mu and delta opioid receptors. In mouse brain membrane preparations, sigma(1)-selective antagonists also potentiated both opioid receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding, suggesting a broader role for sigma receptors in modulating G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20089882

  3. Cardiac cAMP: production, hydrolysis, modulation and detection

    OpenAIRE

    Boularan, Cédric; Gales, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) modulates a broad range of biological processes including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractile function where it constitutes the main second messenger for β-adrenergic receptors' signaling to fulfill positive chronotropic, inotropic and lusitropic effects. A growing number of studies pinpoint the role of spatial organization of the cAMP signaling as an essential mechanism to regulate cAMP outcomes in cardiac physiology. Here, we will briefl...

  4. Preoperative cardiac risk management

    OpenAIRE

    Vidaković Radosav; Poldermans Don; Nešković Aleksandar N.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 100 million people undergo noncardiac surgery annually worldwide. It is estimated that around 3% of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery experience a major adverse cardiac event. Although cardiac events, like myocardial infarction, are major cause of perioperative morbidity or mortality, its true incidence is difficult to assess. The risk of perioperative cardiac complications depends mainly on two conditions: 1) identified risk factors, and 2) the type of the surgical p...

  5. Evidence for angiotensin II type 2 receptor–mediated cardiac myocyte enlargement during in vivo pressure overload

    OpenAIRE

    Senbonmatsu, Takaaki; Ichihara, Sahoko; Price, Edward; Gaffney, F.Andrew; Inagami, Tadashi

    2000-01-01

    The pathophysiological roles of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2) in cardiac hypertrophy remain unclear. By the targeted deletion of mouse AT2 we were able to prevent the left ventricular hypertrophy resulting from pressure overload, while cardiac contractile functions remained normal. This implies that AT2 is a mediator of cardiac hypertrophy in response to increased blood pressure. The effects of AT2 deletion were independent of activation of embryonic genes for cardiac hypertrophy. ...

  6. Thyroid Hormone Control of Cardiac Substrate Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Hyyti Villet, Outi

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) plays an important role in maintaining a homeostasis in all the cells of our body. It also has significant cardiovascular effects, and abnormalities of its concentration can cause cardiovascular disease and even morbidity. Especially development of heart failure has been connected to low levels of thyroid hormone. A decrease in TH levels or TH-receptor binding adversely effects cardiac function. Although, this occurs in part through alterations in excitation-contraction a...

  7. Differential effects of m1 and m2 receptor antagonists in perirhinal cortex on visual recognition memory in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Saunders, Richard C; Mishkin, Mortimer; Turchi, Janita

    2012-07-01

    Microinfusions of the nonselective muscarinic antagonist scopolamine into perirhinal cortex impairs performance on visual recognition tasks, indicating that muscarinic receptors in this region play a pivotal role in recognition memory. To assess the mnemonic effects of selective blockade in perirhinal cortex of muscarinic receptor subtypes, we locally infused either the m1-selective antagonist pirenzepine or the m2-selective antagonist methoctramine in animals performing one-trial visual recognition, and compared these scores with those following infusions of equivalent volumes of saline. Compared to these control infusions, injections of pirenzepine, but not of methoctramine, significantly impaired recognition accuracy. Further, similar doses of scopolamine and pirenzepine yielded similar deficits, suggesting that the deficits obtained earlier with scopolamine were due mainly, if not exclusively, to blockade of m1 receptors. The present findings indicate that m1 and m2 receptors have functionally dissociable roles, and that the formation of new visual memories is critically dependent on the cholinergic activation of m1 receptors located on perirhinal cells. PMID:22561485

  8. Cardiac cAMP: production, hydrolysis, modulation and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boularan, Cédric; Gales, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) modulates a broad range of biological processes including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractile function where it constitutes the main second messenger for β-adrenergic receptors' signaling to fulfill positive chronotropic, inotropic and lusitropic effects. A growing number of studies pinpoint the role of spatial organization of the cAMP signaling as an essential mechanism to regulate cAMP outcomes in cardiac physiology. Here, we will briefly discuss the complexity of cAMP synthesis and degradation in the cardiac context, describe the way to detect it and review the main pharmacological arsenal to modulate its availability. PMID:26483685

  9. AT1 receptors as mechanosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mederos y Schnitzler, Michael; Storch, Ursula; Gudermann, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are appreciated as central components of neurohormonal signaling. Recently, it turned out that they may also play a role in mechanotransduction. The angiotensin II AT(1) receptor was the first G-protein-coupled receptor claimed to be a mechanosensor. In the meantime, several other G(q/11)-coupled receptors were found to be sensitive to mechanical stimuli. Furthermore, there is first evidence to support the concept that G(i/o)-coupled receptors are susceptible to mechanical stimulation as well. Mechanical receptor activation appears to be agonist-independent and is initiated by a conformational change of the receptor protein discernible from agonist-bound conformations. Mechanically induced receptor activation plays a physiological role for myogenic vasoconstriction and is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:21147033

  10. IL-1 Receptors Mediate Persistent, but Not Acute, Airway Hyperreactivity to Ozone in Guinea Pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Verhein, Kirsten C.; Jacoby, David B.; Allison D Fryer

    2008-01-01

    Ozone exposure in the lab and environment causes airway hyperreactivity lasting at least 3 days in humans and animals. In guinea pigs 1 day after ozone exposure, airway hyperreactivity is mediated by eosinophils that block neuronal M2 muscarinic receptor function, thus increasing acetylcholine release from airway parasympathetic nerves. However, mechanisms of ozone-induced airway hyperreactivity change over time, so that depleting eosinophils 3 days after ozone makes airway hyperreactivity wo...

  11. Role of α7 nicotinic receptor in the immune system and intracellular signaling pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Zdanowski, Robert; Krzyżowska, Małgorzata; Ujazdowska, Dominika; Lewicka, Aneta; Lewicki, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine has been well known as one of the most exemplary neurotransmitters. In humans, this versatile molecule and its synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase, have been found in various non-neural tissues such as the epithelium, endothelium, mesothelium muscle, blood cells and immune cells. The non-neuronal acetylcholine is accompanied by the expression of acetylcholinesterase and nicotinic/muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Increasing evidence of the non-neuronal acetylcholine...

  12. Regulation of cyclic AMP response-element binding-protein (CREB) by Gq/11-protein-coupled receptors in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rosethorne, Elizabeth M; Nahorski, Stefan R; Challiss, R.A. John

    2008-01-01

    Human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells have been used to investigate mechanisms involved in CREB phosphorylation after activation of two endogenously expressed Gq/11-protein-coupled receptors, the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) and B2 bradykinin receptors. Stimulation with either methacholine or bradykinin resulted in maximal increases in CREB phosphorylation within 1 min, with either a rapid subsequent decrease (bradykinin) to basal levels, or a sustained response (methacholine). Inhibitor st...

  13. Synergistic activation of vascular TRPC6 channel by receptor and mechanical stimulation via phospholipase C/diacylglycerol and phospholipase A2/¿-hydroxylase/20-HETE pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inoue, Ryuji; Jensen, Lars Jørn; Jian, Zhong;

    2009-01-01

    currents (I(TRPC6)) induced by a muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol. This effect was insensitive to a tarantula toxin GsMTx-4 (5 mumol/L). A similar extent of mechanical potentiation was observed after activation of I(TRPC6) by GTPgammaS or a diacylglycerol analog 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (OAG...

  14. Blunt cardiac rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T D; Flynn, T C; Rowlands, B J; Ward, R E; Fischer, R P

    1984-04-01

    Blunt injury to the heart ranges from contusion to disruption. This report comprises 14 patients seen during a 6-year period with cardiac rupture secondary to blunt trauma. Eight patients were injured in automobile accidents, two patients were injured in auto-pedestrian accidents, two were kicked in the chest by ungulates, and two sustained falls. Cardiac tamponade was suspected in ten patients. Five patients presented with prehospital cardiac arrest or arrested shortly after arrival. All underwent emergency department thoracotomy without survival. Two patients expired in the operating room during attempted cardiac repair; both had significant extracardiac injury. Seven patients survived, three had right atrial injuries, three had right ventricular injuries, and one had a left atrial injury. Cardiopulmonary bypass was not required for repair of the surviving patients. There were no significant complications from the cardiac repair. The history of significant force dispersed over a relatively small area of the precordium as in a kicking injury from an animal or steering wheel impact should alert the physician to possible cardiac rupture. Cardiac rupture should be considered in patients who present with signs of cardiac tamponade or persistent thoracic bleeding after blunt trauma. PMID:6708151

  15. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  16. Mathematical cardiac electrophysiology

    CERN Document Server

    Colli Franzone, Piero; Scacchi, Simone

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the main mathematical and numerical models in computational electrocardiology, ranging from microscopic membrane models of cardiac ionic channels to macroscopic bidomain, monodomain, eikonal models and cardiac source representations. These advanced multiscale and nonlinear models describe the cardiac bioelectrical activity from the cell level to the body surface and are employed in both the direct and inverse problems of electrocardiology. The book also covers advanced numerical techniques needed to efficiently carry out large-scale cardiac simulations, including time and space discretizations, decoupling and operator splitting techniques, parallel finite element solvers. These techniques are employed in 3D cardiac simulations illustrating the excitation mechanisms, the anisotropic effects on excitation and repolarization wavefronts, the morphology of electrograms in normal and pathological tissue and some reentry phenomena. The overall aim of the book is to present rigorously the mathematica...

  17. Vascular endothelium receptors and transduction mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Gillis, C; Ryan, Una; Proceedings of the Advanced Studies Institute on "Vascular Endothelium: Receptors and Transduction Mechanisms"

    1989-01-01

    Beyond their obvious role of a barrier between blood and tissue, vascular endothelial cells are now firmly established as active and essential participants in a host of crucial physiological and pathophysiological functions. Probably the two most important factors responsible for promoting the current knowledge of endothelial functions are 1) observations in the late sixties-early seventies that many non-ventilatory properties of the lung could be attributed to the pulmonary endothelium and 2) the establishment, in the early and mid-seventies of procedures for routine culture of vascular endothelial cells. Many of these endothelial functions require the presence of receptors on the surface of the plasma membrane. There is now evidence for the existence among others of muscarinic, a-and /3-adrenergic, purine, insulin, histamine, bradykinin, lipoprotein, thrombin, paf, fibronectin, vitronectin, interleukin and albumin receptors. For some of these ligands, there is evidence only for the existence of endothelial ...

  18. [Cardiac evaluation before non-cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzenbach, Jan; Boehm, Olaf

    2016-07-01

    Before non-cardiac surgery, evaluation of cardiac function is no frequent part of surgical treatment. European societies of anesthesiology and cardiology published consensus-guidelines in 2014 to present a reasonable approach for preoperative evaluation. This paper intends to differentiate the composite of perioperative risk and to display the guidelines methodical approach to handle it. Features to identify patients at risk from an ageing population with comorbidities, are the classification of surgical risk, functional capacity and risk indices. Application of diagnostic means, should be used adjusted to this risk estimation. Cardiac biomarkers are useful to discover risk of complications or mortality, that cannot be assessed by clinical signs. After preoperative optimization and perioperative cardiac protection, the observation of the postoperative period remains, to prohibit complications or even death. In consideration of limited resources of intensive care department, postoperative ward rounds beyond intensive care units are considered to be an appropriate instrument to avoid or recognize complications early to reduce postoperative mortality. PMID:27479258

  19. Structural basis for modulation of a G-protein-coupled receptor by allosteric drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Ron O.; Green, Hillary F.; Valant, Celine; Borhani, David W.; Valcourt, James R.; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Canals, Meritxell; Lane, J. Robert; Rahmani, Raphaël; Baell, Jonathan B.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Shaw, David E.

    2013-11-01

    The design of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) allosteric modulators, an active area of modern pharmaceutical research, has proved challenging because neither the binding modes nor the molecular mechanisms of such drugs are known. Here we determine binding sites, bound conformations and specific drug-receptor interactions for several allosteric modulators of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor), a prototypical family A GPCR, using atomic-level simulations in which the modulators spontaneously associate with the receptor. Despite substantial structural diversity, all modulators form cation-π interactions with clusters of aromatic residues in the receptor extracellular vestibule, approximately 15Å from the classical, `orthosteric' ligand-binding site. We validate the observed modulator binding modes through radioligand binding experiments on receptor mutants designed, on the basis of our simulations, either to increase or to decrease modulator affinity. Simulations also revealed mechanisms that contribute to positive and negative allosteric modulation of classical ligand binding, including coupled conformational changes of the two binding sites and electrostatic interactions between ligands in these sites. These observations enabled the design of chemical modifications that substantially alter a modulator's allosteric effects. Our findings thus provide a structural basis for the rational design of allosteric modulators targeting muscarinic and possibly other GPCRs.

  20. Cardiac metabolism and arrhythmias

    OpenAIRE

    Barth, Andreas S.; Tomaselli, Gordon F.

    2009-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death remains a leading cause of mortality in the Western world, accounting for up to 20% of all deaths in the U.S.1, 2 The major causes of sudden cardiac death in adults age 35 and older are coronary artery disease (70–80%) and dilated cardiomyopathy (10–15%).3 At the molecular level, a wide variety of mechanisms contribute to arrhythmias that cause sudden cardiac death, ranging from genetic predisposition (rare mutations and common polymorphisms in ion channels and structural...

  1. [Cardiac Rehabilitation 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Andreas

    2015-11-25

    The goals of cardiac rehabilitation are (re-)conditioning and secondary prevention in patients with heart disease or an elevated cardiovascular risk profile. Rehabilitation is based on motivation through education, on adapted physical activity, instruction of relaxation techniques, psychological support and optimized medication. It is performed preferably in groups either in outpatient or inpatient settings. The Swiss working group on cardiac rehabilitation provides a network of institutions with regular quality auditing. Positive effects of rehabilitation programs on mortality and morbidity have been established by numerous studies. Although a majority of patients after cardiac surgery are being referred to rehabilitation, these services are notoriously underused after catheter procedures. PMID:26602848

  2. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Hochstrasser, Stefan; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The costs of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation are established and compared to the corresponding costs of usual care. The effect on health-related quality of life is analyzed. METHODS: An unprecedented and very detailed cost assessment was carried out, as no guidelines existed for...... uncertain and may be as high as euro 1.877. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is more costly than usual care, and the higher costs are not outweighed by a quality of life gain. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is, therefore, not cost-effective....

  3. A Common Polymorphism of the Human Cardiac Sodium Channel Alpha Subunit (SCN5A) Gene Is Associated with Sudden Cardiac Death in Chronic Ischemic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcsa, Boglárka; Dénes, Réka; Vörös, Krisztina; Rácz, Gergely; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Rónai, Zsolt; Törő, Klára; Keszler, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac death remains one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Recent research has shed light on pathophysiological mechanisms underlying cardiac death, and several genetic variants in novel candidate genes have been identified as risk factors. However, the vast majority of studies performed so far investigated genetic associations with specific forms of cardiac death only (sudden, arrhythmogenic, ischemic etc.). The aim of the present investigation was to find a genetic marker that can be used as a general, powerful predictor of cardiac death risk. To this end, a case-control association study was performed on a heterogeneous cohort of cardiac death victims (n=360) and age-matched controls (n=300). Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from five candidate genes (beta2 adrenergic receptor, nitric oxide synthase 1 adaptor protein, ryanodine receptor 2, sodium channel type V alpha subunit and transforming growth factor-beta receptor 2) that had previously been shown to associate with certain forms of cardiac death were genotyped using sequence-specific real-time PCR probes. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the CC genotype of the rs11720524 polymorphism in the SCN5A gene encoding a subunit of the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel occurred more frequently in the highly heterogeneous cardiac death cohort compared to the control population (p=0.019, odds ratio: 1.351). A detailed subgroup analysis uncovered that this effect was due to an association of this variant with cardiac death in chronic ischemic heart disease (p=0.012, odds ratio = 1.455). None of the other investigated polymorphisms showed association with cardiac death in this context. In conclusion, our results shed light on the role of this non-coding polymorphism in cardiac death in ischemic cardiomyopathy. Functional studies are needed to explore the pathophysiological background of this association. PMID:26146998

  4. Molecular Basis of Cardiac Myxomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Singhal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tumors are rare, and of these, primary cardiac tumors are even rarer. Metastatic cardiac tumors are about 100 times more common than the primary tumors. About 90% of primary cardiac tumors are benign, and of these the most common are cardiac myxomas. Approximately 12% of primary cardiac tumors are completely asymptomatic while others present with one or more signs and symptoms of the classical triad of hemodynamic changes due to intracardiac obstruction, embolism and nonspecific constitutional symptoms. Echocardiography is highly sensitive and specific in detecting cardiac tumors. Other helpful investigations are chest X-rays, magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography scan. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for primary cardiac tumors and is usually associated with a good prognosis. This review article will focus on the general features of benign cardiac tumors with an emphasis on cardiac myxomas and their molecular basis.

  5. Relationships between choline acetyl-transferase and muscarinic binding in aging rodent brain and in Alzheimers disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines how the relation between ChAT and muscarinic binding might be affected by aging in mouse and rat brains. Preliminary data are presented regarding this relation in postmortem cerebral cortex samples from human subjects who died with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and from age-matched controls. The effect of acetyl coenzme A (1- C 14-acetyl coenzyme A concentration on enzyme activity was determined by varying the concentration of the coenzyme in the assay medium. Assays of muscarinic binding were performed on tissue sonicates diluted with Tris-HC1 buffer using tritium-quinuclidinyl benzilate tritium-QNB as the ligand. For brain regions obtained from rats, significance of age differences were assessed by one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni t statistics. Differences in ChAT activity and binding site density from human postmortem samples between diagnostic groups were assessed separately by region using an analysis of covariance

  6. Comparative efficacy of long-acting muscarinic antagonist monotherapies in COPD: a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ismaila, Afisi Segun; Huisman, Eline L; Punekar, Yogesh Suresh; Karabis, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background Randomized, controlled trials comparing long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) efficacy in COPD are limited. This network meta-analysis (NMA) assessed the relative efficacy of tiotropium 18 µg once-daily (OD) and newer agents (aclidinium 400 µg twice-daily, glycopyrronium 50 µg OD, and umeclidinium 62.5 µg OD). Methods A systematic literature review identified randomized, controlled trials of adult COPD patients receiving LAMAs. A NMA within a Bayesian framework examined change f...

  7. Comparative efficacy of long-acting muscarinic antagonist monotherapies in COPD: a systematic review and network meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ismaila AS; Huisman EL; Punekar YS; Karabis A

    2015-01-01

    Afisi Segun Ismaila,1,2 Eline L Huisman,3 Yogesh Suresh Punekar,4 Andreas Karabis31Value Evidence and Outcomes, GlaxoSmithKline, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA; 2Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada; 3Real World Strategy and Analytics, Mapi Group, Houten, the Netherlands; 4Value Evidence and Outcomes, GlaxoSmithKline, Uxbridge, UKBackground: Randomized, controlled trials comparing long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) efficacy in COPD are limi...

  8. Brain cortex muscarinic transmission is impaired in young adult transgenic Appswe/Ps1de9 female mice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová, Eva; Jakubík, Jan; Michal, Pavel; Oksman, M.; Iivonen, H.; Tanila, H.; Doležal, Vladimír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 4, Suppl.1 (2007), s. 281-281. ISSN 1660-2854. [International conference Alzheimer´s diseases/Parkinson´s diseases /8./. 14.03.2007-18.03.2007, Salzburg] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011206; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpr1 * brain cortex * muscarinic transmission * Alzheimer´s disease Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  9. Are Agonistic Autoantibodies against G-Protein Coupled Receptors Involved in the Development of Long-Term Side Effects of Tumor Chemotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberland, Annekathrin; Santos, Robson A S; Schimke, Ingolf; Wallukat, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome and cardiomyopathies are long-term consequences of chemo- and radiotherapy and develop long after completing the initial tumor treatment. The slow progression of such late effects might be an indication of the involvement of autoimmune processes in the development of such follow-up consequences. Functionally active autoantibodies, which permanently stimulate relevant cell receptors, might be a crucial component. Here, we report the detection of functionally active agonistic autoantibodies such as the autoantibody against the adrenergic alpha1-receptor, the muscarinic M2-receptor, and the newly discovered autoantibody against the Mas-receptor in the plasma of a cancer survivor following chemotherapy treatment. PMID:23569443

  10. Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Automatic Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator February 19, 2009 Halifax Health Medical Center, Daytona Beach, FL Welcome to Halifax Health Daytona Beach, Florida. Over the next hour you' ...

  11. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scan, or MUGA, which shows how well your heart is pumping blood. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which gives doctors detailed pictures of your heart. How is SCA treated? Sudden cardiac arrest should ...

  12. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Risk Factors & Prevention Heart Diseases & Disorders Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) SCA: Who's At Risk? Prevention of SCA What Causes SCA? SCA Awareness Atrial Flutter Heart Block Heart Failure Sick Sinus Syndrome Substances & Heart Rhythm Disorders Symptoms & ...

  13. Sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aranđelović Aleksandra Č.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death in an athlete is rare and tragic event. An athlete's death draws high public attention given that athletes are considered the healthiest category of society. The vast majority of sudden cardiac death in young athletes is due to congenital cardiac malformations such as hypertrophie cardiomyopathy and various coronary artery anomalies. In athletes over age 35, the usual cause of sudden cardiac death is coronary artery disease. With each tragic death of a young athlete, there is a question why this tragedy has not been prevented. The American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association recommend that a pre-participation exam should include a complete cardiovascular history and physical examination.

  14. Cardiac Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to assess cardiac risk include: High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) : Studies have shown that measuring ... LDL-C but does not respond to typical strategies to lower LDL-C such as diet, exercise, ...

  15. Cardiac arrest - cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Basri Lenjani; Besnik Elshani; Nehat Baftiu; Kelmend Pallaska; Kadir Hyseni; Njazi Gashi; Nexhbedin Karemani; Ilaz Bunjaku; Taxhidin Zaimi; Arianit Jakupi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR) measures within the golden minutes inEurope.Methods:The material was taken from theUniversityClinical Center ofKosovo -EmergencyCentre inPristina, during the two(2) year period(2010-2011).The collected date belong to the patients with cardiac arrest have been recorded in the patients' log book protocol at the emergency clinic.Results:During the2010 to2011 in the emergency center of theCUCK inPristina have been treated a total of269 patients with cardiac arrest, of whom159 or59.1% have been treated in2010, and110 patients or40.9% in2011.Of the269 patients treated in the emergency centre,93 or34.6% have exited lethally in the emergency centre, and176 or 65.4% have been transferred to other clinics.In the total number of patients with cardiac arrest, males have dominated with186 cases, or69.1%.The average age of patients included in the survey was56.7 year oldSD±16.0 years.Of the269 patients with cardiac arrest, defibrillation has been applied for93 or34.6% of patients.In the outpatient settings defibrillation has been applied for3 or3.2% of patients.Patients were defibrillated with application of one to four shocks. Of27 cases with who have survived cardiac arrest, none of them have suffered cardiac arrest at home,3 or11.1% of them have suffered cardiac arrest on the street, and24 or88.9% of them have suffered cardiac arrest in the hospital.5 out of27 patients survived have ended with neurological impairment.Cardiac arrest cases were present during all days of the week, but frequently most reported cases have been onMonday with32.0% of cases, and onFriday with24.5% of cases. Conclusions:All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care(with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care) the rate of survival is higher.

  16. Awareness in cardiac anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Serfontein, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac surgery represents a sub-group of patients at significantly increased risk of intraoperative awareness. Relatively few recent publications have targeted the topic of awareness in this group. The aim of this review is to identify areas of awareness research that may equally be extrapolated to cardiac anesthesia in the attempt to increase understanding of the nature and significance of this scenario and how to reduce it.

  17. Safety in cardiac surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Siregar, S.

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of safety in cardiac surgery is a complex process, which involves many clinical, practical, methodological and statistical issues. The objective of this thesis was to measure and to compare safety in cardiac surgery in The Netherlands using the Netherlands Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (NVT) database. The safety of care is usually measured using patient outcomes. If outcomes are not available, the process and structure of care may be used. Outcomes should be adjusted ...

  18. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoff, Marthin; Held, Klaus; Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the rehabilitation measures provided for cardiac patients in Germany and to outline its legal basis and outcomes. In Germany the cardiac rehabilitation system is different from rehabilitation measures in other European countries. Cardiac rehabilitation in Germany since 1885 is based on specific laws and the regulations of insurance providers. Cardiac rehabilitation has predominantly been offered as an inpatient service, but has recently been complemented by outpatient services. A general agreement on the different indications for offering these two services has yet to be reached. Cardiac rehabilitation is mainly offered after an acute cardiac event and bypass surgery. It is also indicated in severe heart failure and special cases of percutaneous coronary intervention. Most patients are men (>65%) and the age at which events occur is increasing. The benefits obtained during the 3-4 weeks after an acute event, and confirmed in numerous studies, are often later lost under 'usual care' conditions. Many attempts have been made by rehabilitation institutions to improve this deficit by providing intensive aftercare. One instrument set up to achieve this is the nationwide institution currently comprising more than 6000 heart groups with approximately 120000 outpatients. After coronary artery bypass grafting or acute coronary syndrome cardiac rehabilitation can usually be started within 10 days. The multidisciplinary rehabilitation team consists of cardiologists, psychologists, exercise therapists, social workers, nutritionists and nurses. The positive effects of cardiac rehabilitation are also important economically, for example, for the improvement of secondary prevention and vocational integration. PMID:17301623

  19. Ranolazine in Cardiac Arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Marwan; Mahmoud, Ahmed; Elgendy, Islam Y; Richard Conti, C

    2016-03-01

    Ranolazine utilization in the management of refractory angina has been established by multiple randomized clinical studies. However, there is growing evidence showing an evolving role in the field of cardiac arrhythmias. Multiple experimental and clinical studies have evaluated the role of ranolazine in prevention and management of atrial fibrillation, with ongoing studies on its role in ventricular arrhythmias. In this review, we will discuss the pharmacological, experimental, and clinical evidence behind ranolazine use in the management of various cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:26459200

  20. Cardiac tumours in infancy

    OpenAIRE

    Yadava, O.P.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac tumours in infancy are rare and are mostly benign with rhabdomyomas, fibromas and teratomas accounting for the majority. The presentation depends on size and location of the mass as they tend to cause cavity obstruction or arrhythmias. Most rhabdomyomas tend to regress spontaneously but fibromas and teratomas generally require surgical intervention for severe haemodynamic or arrhythmic complications. Other relatively rare cardiac tumours too are discussed along with an Indian perspect...