WorldWideScience

Sample records for cardiac mri advances

  1. Advanced Analysis Techniques for Intra-cardiac Flow Evaluation from 4D Flow MRI

    OpenAIRE

    van der Geest, Rob J; Garg, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of the Review Time-resolved 3D velocity-encoded MR imaging with velocity encoding in three directions (4D Flow) has emerged as a novel MR acquisition technique providing detailed information on flow in the cardiovascular system. In contrast to other clinically available imaging techniques such as echo-Doppler, 4D Flow MRI provides the 3D Flow velocity field within a volumetric region of interest over the cardiac cycle. This work reviews the most recent advances in the development and ...

  2. Cardiac MRI tagging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac MRI tagging is an original technique based upon the perturbation of the magnetization of determined regions of the myocardium (tags). The motion of the tags accurately reflects the deformation of the underlying tissue. Data analysis requires special techniques to reconstruct the 3D motion of the heart, and to evaluate the myocardial strain, locally and throughout the whole heart. (authors)

  3. Cardiac MRI in Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, T.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is often used in athletes to image cardiac anatomy and function and is increasingly requested in the context of screening for pathology that can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD). In this thesis, patterns of cardiac adaptation to sports are investigated with C

  4. Atrial tumors in cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool for the diagnosis of cardiac masses. Various cardiac tumors are predisposed to occurring in atrial structures. The aim of this review article is the description of atrial tumors and their morphological features in MRI. In general, cardiac tumors are rare: approximately 0.001-0.03% in autopsy studies. About 75% of them are benign. The most common cardiac tumor is the myxoma. They are predisposed to occur in the atria and show a characteristically strong hyperintense signal on T2-wieghted images in MRI. In other sequences a heterogeneous pattern reflects its variable histological appearance. Lipomas exhibit a signal behavior identical to fatty tissue with a typical passive movement in cine imaging. Fibroelastomas are the most common tumors of the cardiac valves. Consisting of avascular fibrous tissue, they often present with hypointense signal intensities. Thrombi attached to their surface can cause severe emboli even in small tumors. Amongst primary cardiac malignancies, sarcomas are most common and favor the atria. Secondary malignancies of the heart are far more common than primary ones (20-40 times). In case of known malignancies, approximately 10% of patients develop cardiac metastasis at the end of their disease. Lymphogenic metastases favor the pericardium, while hematogenic spread prefers the myocardium. Since they are not real atrial tumors, thrombi and anatomical structures of the atria have to be differentiated from other pathologies. (orig.)

  5. Cardiac MRI in suspected myocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential of ECG-gated breath-hold MRI in diagnosing acute myocardidits. Material and methods: Cardiac MRI was performed on 21 consecutive patients with suspected myocarditis. ECG-gated breath-hold T2-weighted images with fat suppression were acquired in 3 standard views. T1-weighted imaging (FLASH) was performed 10 min after IV administration of Gd-DTPA. Laboratory data included creatine kinase, troponin T and serological tests, ECG findings and echocardiography. Imaging findings were retrospectively compared to the discharge diagnoses. Signal alterations were semiquantitatively classified. Results: Acute myocarditis was diagnosed in 9 patients and cardiac sarcoidosis in 2 patients. Late enhancement was observed in 4 patients with acute myocarditis and in both patients with cardiac sarcoidosis. Semiquantitative evaluation revealed 9 true positive, 9 true negative, 1 false positive and 2 false negative results. Conclusion: Cardiac MRI has the potential to detect acute myocarditis and to diagnose cardiac sarcoidosis. Late enhancement of Gd-DTPA can be found in both viral myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis. (orig.)

  6. Comprehensive MRI for the detection of subtle alterations in diastolic cardiac function in apoE/LDLR(-/-) mice with advanced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrankiewicz, Urszula; Skorka, Tomasz; Orzylowska, Anna; Jablonska, Magdalena; Jasinski, Krzysztof; Jasztal, Agnieszka; Bar, Anna; Kostogrys, Renata; Chlopicki, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    ApoE/LDLR(-/-) mice represent a reliable model of atherosclerosis. However, it is not clear whether cardiac performance is impaired in this murine model of atherosclerosis. Here, we used MRI to characterize cardiac performance in vivo in apoE/LDLR(-/-) mice with advanced atherosclerosis. Six-month-old apoE/LDLR(-/-) mice and age-matched C57BL/6J mice (control) were examined using highly time-resolved cine-MRI [whole-chamber left ventricle (LV) imaging] and MR tagging (three slices: basal, mid-cavity and apical). Global and regional measures of cardiac function included LV volumes, kinetics, time-dependent parameters, strains and rotations. Histological analysis was performed using OMSB (orceine with Martius, Scarlet and Blue) and ORO (oil red-O) staining to demonstrate the presence of advanced coronary atherosclerosis. MR-tagging-based strain analysis in apoE/LDLR(-/-) mice revealed an increased frequency of radial and circumferential systolic stretch (25% and 50% of segments, respectively, p ≤ 0.012), increased radial post-systolic strain index (45% of segments, p = 0.009) and decreased LV untwisting rate (-30.3° (11.6°)/cycle, p = 0.004) when compared with control mice. Maximal strains and LV twist were unchanged. Most of the cine-MRI-based LV functional and anatomical parameters also remained unchanged in apoE/LDLR(-/-) mice, with only a lower filling rate, longer filling time, shorter isovolumetric contraction time and slower heart rate observed in comparison with control mice. The coronary arteries displayed severe atherosclerosis, as evidenced by histological analysis. Using comprehensive MRI methods, we have demonstrated that, despite severe coronary atherosclerosis in six-month-old apoE/LDLR(-/-) mice, cardiac performance including global parameters, twist and strains, was well preserved. Only subtle diastolic alterations, possibly of ischemic background, were uncovered. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27146203

  7. MRI of cardiac rhabdomyoma in the fetus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivelitz, Dietmar E.; Muehler, Matthias [Institut fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Charite, Schumannstrasse 20/21, 10098, Berlin (Germany); Rake, Annett; Chaoui, Rabih [Klinik fuer Gynaekologie und Geburtshilfe, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Charite, Schumannstrasse 20/21, 10098, Berlin (Germany); Scheer, Ianina [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Abteilung Paediatrische Radiologie, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Charite, Schumannstrasse 20/21, 10098, Berlin (Germany)

    2004-08-01

    Primary cardiac tumors are rarely diagnosed in utero and are usually seen on prenatal echocardiography. Cardiac rhabdomyomata can be associated with tuberous sclerosis. Prenatal MRI can be performed to assess associated malformations. This case report illustrates the ability of fetal MRI to image cardiac rhabdomyata and compares it with prenatal and postnatal echocardiography. (orig.)

  8. Cardiac functional analysis with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are among the leading causes of death worldwide. Even in the 21st century CVD will still be the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality. Precise evaluation of cardiac function is therefore mandatory for therapy planning and monitoring. In this article the contribution of MRI-based analysis of cardiac function will be addressed. Nowadays cine-MRI is considered as the standard of reference (SOR) in cardiac functional analysis. ECG-triggered steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequences are mainly used as they stand out due to short acquisition times and excellent contrast between the myocardium and the ventricular cavity. An indispensible requirement for cardiac functional analysis is an exact planning of the examination and based on that the coverage of the whole ventricle in short axial slices. By means of dedicated post-processing software, manual or semi-automatic segmentation of the endocardial and epicardial contours is necessary for functional analysis. In this way end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and the ejection fraction (EF) are defined and regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMA) can be detected. (orig.)

  9. Cardiac MRI of the athlete's heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakken, N.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    The increase in pre-participation cardiovascular screening using the Lausanne protocol will ultimately lead to an increased use of cardiac MRI and MDCT in the cardiovascular work-up of athletes. The role of cardiac MRI is well established in the evaluation of cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, aortic st

  10. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  11. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Singh Gulati, G., E-mail: gulatigurpreet@rediffmail.com [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Seth, S. [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Sharma, S. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India)

    2012-02-15

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  12. Cardiac MRI in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable progress has been made in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cine MRI is recognized as the most accurate method for evaluating ventricular function. Late gadolinium-enhanced MRI can clearly delineate subendocardial infarction, and the assessment of transmural extent of infarction on MRI is widely useful for predicting myocardial viability. Stress myocardial perfusion MRI allows for detection of subendocardial myocardial ischemia, and the diagnostic accuracy of stress perfusion MRI is superior to stress perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD). In recent years, image quality, volume coverage, acquisition speed and arterial contrast of 3-dimensional coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) have been substantially improved with use of steady-state free precession sequences and parallel imaging techniques, permitting the acquisition of high-quality, whole-heart coronary MRA within a reasonably short imaging time. It is now widely recognized that cardiac MRI has tremendous potential for the evaluation of ischemic heart disease. However, cardiac MRI is technically complicated and its use in clinical practice is relatively limited. With further improvements in education and training, as well as standardization of appropriate study protocols, cardiac MRI will play a central role in managing patients with CAD. (author)

  13. Benign cardiac tumours: cardiac CT and MRI imaging appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Primary benign cardiac tumours are rarely found in clinical practice and are generally evaluated with echocardiography. However, with the increasing usage of helical multislice CT, the initial detection and evaluation of these masses may be made by the radiologist during routine daily practice for other indications. The echocardiographic, CT and cardiac MRI appearances of various benign cardiac tumours and masses are described and illustrated in this review

  14. MRI in cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarcoidosis and amyloidosis are both multisystem disorders, which may involve the heart; however, isolated cardiac disease is rare. Diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis is crucial because the patient prognosis is dependent on cardiac involvement and early treatment. Echocardiography is the first line imaging modality in the diagnostic work-up of both diseases, possibly giving hints towards the correct diagnosis. Besides myocardial biopsy and radionuclide studies cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely performed in patients suspect of having infiltrative cardiomyopathy. The T1 mapping procedure is currently being evaluated as a new technique for detection and quantification of global myocardial enhancement, as seen in cardiac amyloidosis. Sensitivities and specificities for detection of cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis can be significantly improved by MRI, especially with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging. In cardiac sarcoidosis the use of LGE is outcome-related while in amyloidosis analysis of T1-mapping may be of prognostic value. If cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis or amyloidosis is suspected cardiac MRI including LGE should be performed for establishing the diagnosis. (orig.)

  15. MRI and pathologic correlation of cardiac myxomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the MRI features of cardiac myxoma by correlated with its pathological findings. Methods: MRI features of 22 cases of pathologically confirmed cardiac myxomas were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Of 22 cases, 21 are solitary, 12 located in left atrium, 6 located in right atrium, 2 located in left ventricle and 1 located in fight ventricle. The other one occupied multiple chambers. MRI: 19 are heterogeneous and 3 are homogeneous. Cine-MRI: 18 attach to the endocardium with a pedunculated stalk and 4 are sessile and with a broad attachment. Thirteen cases had secondary valve insufficience or stenosis. Nine have compromised cardiac function. Nineteen cases demonstrated mild to moderate heterogeneous enhancement after Gd-DTPA administration and 3 case showed no enhancement. Four cases had gadolinium first-pass perfusion study and showed a slow and continuous increasing time-intensity, lower than normal myocardium. The pedicles and wall showed delay enhancement. Pathologic findings: 21 are oval and lobular configuration, 1 is grape-like. Ten cases had fresh hemorrhage and 5 had chronic hemorrhage. Fourteen had necrosis, 2 had cystic change and 4 had calcification. Blood vessels or inflammatory cells could be detected in 19 cases. Conclusions: MRI can evaluate the size, location, morphology, especially the vascularity, histologic features and cardiac function of cardiac myxomas. (authors)

  16. Practical textbook of cardiac CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guide to the interpretation of cardiac CT and MRI for the purposes of diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. Emphasis on applications in a wide range of real clinical situations. Numerous informative illustrations. Summarizing sections permitting rapid retrieval of information. QR codes allowing access to references, additional figures, and motion pictures from the internet. This up-to-date textbook comprehensively reviews all aspects of cardiac CT and MRI and demonstrates the value of these techniques in clinical practice. A wide range of applications are considered, including imaging of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, coronary revascularization, ischemic heart disease, non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease, cardiac tumors, and pericardial disease. The numerous high-quality images illustrate how to interpret cardiac CT and MRI correctly for the purposes of diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. Helpful summarizing sections in every chapter will facilitate rapid retrieval of information. This book will be of great value to radiologists and cardiologists seeking a reliable guide to the optimal use of cardiac CT and MRI in real clinical situations.

  17. Practical textbook of cardiac CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Tae-Hwan (ed.) [ASAN Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2015-04-01

    Guide to the interpretation of cardiac CT and MRI for the purposes of diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. Emphasis on applications in a wide range of real clinical situations. Numerous informative illustrations. Summarizing sections permitting rapid retrieval of information. QR codes allowing access to references, additional figures, and motion pictures from the internet. This up-to-date textbook comprehensively reviews all aspects of cardiac CT and MRI and demonstrates the value of these techniques in clinical practice. A wide range of applications are considered, including imaging of atherosclerotic and non-atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, coronary revascularization, ischemic heart disease, non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease, cardiac tumors, and pericardial disease. The numerous high-quality images illustrate how to interpret cardiac CT and MRI correctly for the purposes of diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up. Helpful summarizing sections in every chapter will facilitate rapid retrieval of information. This book will be of great value to radiologists and cardiologists seeking a reliable guide to the optimal use of cardiac CT and MRI in real clinical situations.

  18. Fast Registration of Cardiac Perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsson, Henrik B. W.

    2003-01-01

    This abstract presents a novel method for registration of cardiac perfusion MRI sequences. By performing complex analyses of variance and clustering in an annotated training set off-line, our method provides real-time segmentation in an on-line setting. This renders the method feasible for live...

  19. Establishing a clinical cardiac MRI service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After several years of research development cardiovascular MRI has evolved into a widely accepted clinical tool. It offers important diagnostic and prognostic information for a variety of clinical indications, which include ischaemic heart disease, cardiomyopathies, valvular dysfunction and congenital heart disorders. It is a safe non-invasive technique that employs a variety of imaging sequences optimized for temporal or spatial resolution, tissue-specific contrast, flow quantification or angiography. Cardiac MRI offers specific advantages over conventional imaging techniques for a significant number of patients. The demand for cardiac MRI studies from cardiothoracic surgeons, cardiologists and other referrers is likely to continue to rise with pressure for more widespread local service provision. Setting up a cardiac MRI service requires careful consideration regarding funding issues and how it will be integrated with existing service provision. The purchase of cardiac phased array coils, monitoring equipment and software upgrades must also be considered, as well as the training needs of those involved. The choice of appropriate imaging protocols will be guided by operator experience, clinical indication and equipment capability, and is likely to evolve as the service develops. Post-processing and offline analysis form a significant part of the time taken to report studies and an efficient method of providing quantitative reports is an important requirement. Collaboration between radiologists and cardiologists is needed to develop a successful service and multi-disciplinary meetings are key component of this. This review will explore these issues from our perspective of a new clinical cardiac MRI service operating over its first year in a teaching hospital imaging department

  20. CT and MRI findings of cardiac echinococcosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifteen patients (8 males and 7 females, 15-56 years old) with primary or secondary hydatid disease involving the heart were examined by radiography, CT and/or MRI. MRI was done with a 1.5 T machine (Picker) in 11 cases and a 0.5 T machine (Philips) in 4 cases using ECG-gated T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo pulse sequences. Transaxial sections were combined with at least one more plane (coronal and/or sagittal) and intermediate views if the need for further information was anticipated. In 4 patients primary cardiac echinococcal cysts were found, localised to the left ventricle/pericardium/interventricular septum in 2 cases and to the left atrium/pericardium and right atrium/pericardium in 1 case each. In 11 of 15 cases there was secondary involvement of the heart by echinococcal cysts primarily arising in the lung parenchyma (n = 6), mediastinum (n = 3) and by transdiaphragmatic extension from the liver and abdomen (n = 2). CT was superior to MRI in visualising calcifications. However, ECG-gated MRI of cardiac hydatid disease appears to be the method of choice for specific diagnosis and exact assessment of hydatid cysts and their correlation with cardiac structures. (orig.)

  1. Cardiac Metastasis from Invasive Thymoma Via the Superior Vena Cava: Cardiac MRI Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and metastatic deposits are more common than primary cardiac tumors. We present cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 50-year-old woman with invasive thymoma. Cardiac MRI revealed a heterogeneous, lobulated anterior mediastinal mass invading the superior vena cava and extending to the right atrium. In cine images there was no invasion to the right atrial wall.

  2. MRI findings of cardiac tumors in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten cases of cardiac tumor, detected by echocardiograms in childhood, were evaluated by using a 1.5T super-conductive magnetic resonance imager. Eight cases were with tuberous sclerosis, three of which were diagnosed as lipoma because of high intensity on T1 and T2 weighted images. The others were diagnosed as rhabdomyoma. It was difficult for echocardiograms to distinguish between the lipoma and the rhabdomyoma. MRI was very useful for the differential diagnosis of them. Two of ten cases were diagnosed as fibroma because of low intensity on T1 and T2 weighted images and inhomogeneous enhancement on Gd-DTPA enhanced T1 weighted image. MRI is a valuable tool for qualitative diagnosing cardiac tumors in childhood. (author)

  3. Cardiac MRI of acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerem Khan, Shamruz; Khan, Shamruz Akarem; Williamson, Eric E; Foley, Thomas A; Cullen, Ethany L; Young, Phillip M; Araoz, Philip A

    2013-05-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. New serological biomarkers, such as troponins, have improved the diagnosis of ACS; however, the diagnosis of ACS can still be difficult as there is marked heterogeneity in its presentation and significant overlap with other disorders presenting with chest pain. Evidence is accumulating that cardiac MRI provides information that can aid the detection and differential diagnosis of ACS, guide clinical decision-making and improve risk-stratification after an event. In this review, we present the relevant cardiac MRI techniques that can be used to detect ACS accurately, provide differential diagnosis, identify the sequelae of ACS, and determine prognostication after ACS. PMID:23668741

  4. Advanced cardiac chemical exchange saturation transfer (cardioCEST) MRI for in vivo cell tracking and metabolic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumphrey, Ashley; Yang, Zhengshi; Ye, Shaojing; Powell, David K.; Thalman, Scott; Watt, David S.; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Unrine, Jason; Thompson, Katherine; Fornwalt, Brandon; Ferrauto, Giuseppe; Vandsburger, Moriel

    2016-01-01

    An improved pre-clinical cardiac chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) pulse sequence (cardioCEST) was used to selectively visualize paramagnetic CEST (paraCEST)-labeled cells following intramyocardial implantation. In addition, cardioCEST was used to examine the effect of diet-induced obesity upon myocardial creatine CEST contrast. CEST pulse sequences were designed from standard turbo-spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences, and a cardiorespiratory-gated steady-state cine gradient-echo sequence. In vitro validation studies performed in phantoms composed of 20mM Eu-HPDO3A, 20mM Yb-HPDO3A, or saline demonstrated similar CEST contrast by spin-echo and gradient-echo pulse sequences. Skeletal myoblast cells (C2C12) were labeled with either Eu-HPDO3A or saline using a hypotonic swelling procedure and implanted into the myocardium of C57B6/J mice. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry confirmed cellular levels of Eu of 2.1 × 10−3 ng/cell in Eu-HPDO3A-labeled cells and 2.3 × 10−5 ng/cell in saline-labeled cells. In vivo cardioCEST imaging of labeled cells at ±15ppm was performed 24 h after implantation and revealed significantly elevated asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio values in regions of Eu-HPDO3A-labeled cells when compared with surrounding myocardium or saline-labeled cells. We further utilized the cardioCEST pulse sequence to examine changes in myocardial creatine in response to diet-induced obesity by acquiring pairs of cardioCEST images at ±1.8 ppm. While ventricular geometry and function were unchanged between mice fed either a high-fat diet or a corresponding control low-fat diet for 14 weeks, myocardial creatine CEST contrast was significantly reduced in mice fed the high-fat diet. The selective visualization of paraCEST-labeled cells using cardioCEST imaging can enable investigation of cell fate processes in cardioregenerative medicine, or multiplex imaging of cell survival with imaging of cardiac structure and function and

  5. Cardiac MRI for myocardial ischemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Daly, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Proper assessment of the physiologic impact of coronary artery stenosis on the LV myocardium can affect patient prognosis and treatment decisions. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) assesses myocardial perfusion by imaging the myocardium during a first-pass transit of an intravenous gadolinium bolus, with spatial and temporal resolution substantially higher than nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging. Coupled with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging for infarction during the same imaging session, CMR with vasodilating stress perfusion imaging can qualitatively and quantitatively assess the myocardial extent of hypoperfusion from coronary stenosis independent of infarcted myocardium. This approach has been validated experimentally, and multiple clinical trials have established its diagnostic robustness when compared to stress single-photon emission computed tomography. In specialized centers, dobutamine stress CMR has been shown to have incremental diagnostic value above stress echocardiography due to its high imaging quality and ability to image the heart with no restriction of imaging window. This paper reviews the technical aspects, diagnostic utility, prognostic values, challenges to clinical adaptation, and future developments of stress CMR imaging.

  6. Advanced flow MRI: emerging techniques and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markl, M; Schnell, S; Wu, C; Bollache, E; Jarvis, K; Barker, A J; Robinson, J D; Rigsby, C K

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide non-invasive and non-ionising methods for the highly accurate anatomical depiction of the heart and vessels throughout the cardiac cycle. In addition, the intrinsic sensitivity of MRI to motion offers the unique ability to acquire spatially registered blood flow simultaneously with the morphological data, within a single measurement. In clinical routine, flow MRI is typically accomplished using methods that resolve two spatial dimensions in individual planes and encode the time-resolved velocity in one principal direction, typically oriented perpendicular to the two-dimensional (2D) section. This review describes recently developed advanced MRI flow techniques, which allow for more comprehensive evaluation of blood flow characteristics, such as real-time flow imaging, 2D multiple-venc phase contrast MRI, four-dimensional (4D) flow MRI, quantification of complex haemodynamic properties, and highly accelerated flow imaging. Emerging techniques and novel applications are explored. In addition, applications of these new techniques for the improved evaluation of cardiovascular (aorta, pulmonary arteries, congenital heart disease, atrial fibrillation, coronary arteries) as well as cerebrovascular disease (intra-cranial arteries and veins) are presented. PMID:26944696

  7. Noninvasive Diagnosis of Cardiac Amyloidosis by MRI and Echochardiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪晶; 孔祥泉; 徐海波; 周国锋; 常丹丹; 刘定西; 张丽; 谢明星

    2010-01-01

    This study described the radiological features on echocardiography and MRI specific to cardiac amyloidosis confirmed on biopsy. Eleven cases of biopsy-proven cardiac amyloidosis were retrospectively reviewed in this study. All patients underwent biopsy, cardiac MRI and echocardiography. The main echocardiography and MRI findings were as follows: diffuse ventricular and septum wall thickening, atrial enlargement, pericardial effusion, restricted left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function, characte...

  8. MRI determination of cardiac dimensions. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR images in cardiac function studies allow for precise alignment in reproducible axial planes, with excellent resolution and without areas of signal loss, so that highly accurate measurements can be made. This is important particularly in patients with regional functional deficits, in whom precise depiction of function in each myocardial region without overlap or signal 'drop-out' is critical. Also, MR tomograms make possible the elimination of geometric assumptions, which lead to errors when regional dysfunction is present, in assessment of ventricular volume and ejection fraction. The development of improved temporal resolution and motion display by cine MRI and, in particular, echo-planar techniques has made the measurement of function MRI a valuable clinical method. (author). 36 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  9. VSD following blunt cardiac trauma: MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Andrew E; Maertins, Benjamin A; Richardson, Randy

    2013-10-01

    In this report, we describe the clinical and radiographic findings of ventricular septal defects (VSDs) following blunt cardiac trauma in two patients. VSDs following either penetrating or blunt cardiac trauma are a rare occurrence. The variable presentation and timing of symptom onset along with the common association of other injuries can make the diagnosis of a posttraumatic VSD difficult. Therefore, investigation should be initiated when elements from the history and physical examination (e.g., new onset murmur), laboratory tests (e.g., cardiac enzymes), EKG, and CT or echocardiography warrant it. The first patient was a 19-year-old male who was hemodynamically stable on initial presentation to this trauma center after a motor vehicle collision. A posttraumatic VSD was found by echocardiography on the day of admission and further defined on cardiac MRI (CMRI). The second patient was a 31-year-oid male who presented after a high-speed motorcycle accident and was found to have a VSD 40 days later on CMRI after a fluctuating clinical course and multiple normal echocardiograms. Both patients had good outcomes with subsequent surgical closure. PMID:23604922

  10. Recent advances in cardiac SPECT instrumentation and system design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark F

    2013-08-01

    Recent advances in clinical cardiac SPECT instrumentation are reviewed from a systems perspective. New hardware technologies include pixelated scintillator and semiconductor detector elements; photodetectors such as position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT), avalanche photodiodes (APD) and silicon photomultipliers (SiPM); and novel cardiac collimation methods. There are new approaches for positioning detectors and controlling their motion during cardiac imaging. Software technology advances include iterative image reconstruction with modeling of Poisson statistics and depth-dependent collimator response. These new technologies enable faster acquisitions, the lowering of administered activity and radiation dose, and improved image resolution. Higher sensitivity collimators are a significant factor enabling faster acquisitions. Several clinical systems incorporating new technologies are discussed and different system designs can achieve similar performance. With detector elements such as APDs, SiPMs and semiconductors that are insensitive to magnetic fields, the potential for cardiac SPECT imagers that are MRI compatible opens up new frontiers in clinical cardiac research and patient care. PMID:23832650

  11. CT and MRI of pericardial and cardiac neoplastic disease

    OpenAIRE

    van Beek, Edwin JR; Stolpen, Alan H.; Khanna, Geetika; Thompson, Brad H

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the pathological classification of cardiac and pericardial neoplasms, the incidence of the various tumor types, and the role of CT and MRI, including their major differences and clinical impact on patient management.

  12. MRI and echocardiography in the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the values of MRI and echocardiography for the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis (CA). Methods: Eleven cases with CA proved pathologically performed MRI and echocardiography, the findings were analyzed retrospectively. Results: The characteristic features of cardiac amyloidosis on MRI and echocardiography were: diffuse slight myocardial thickening of the left ventricular wall and interventricular septum (11 cases), slight myocardial thickening of the interatrial septum (5 cases), increased left ventricular mass (7 cases), enlarged left atrium (7 cases), impaired ventricular systolic and diastolic function (10 cases), pleural and pericardial effusions (11 and 9 cases). Echocardiography showed that myocardium was hyperechoic and presented as ground glass with some spotty hyperechoes in 6 cases. MRI revealed a distinct diffuse delayed enhancement of subendocardial and entire myocardium in 8 cases. Conclusion: Doppler echocardiography is the first-choice imaging technique and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging can provide more information for the diagnosis of CA. (authors)

  13. MRI and CT appearances of cardiac tumours in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary cardiac tumours are rare, and metastases to the heart are much more frequent. Myxoma is the commonest benign primary tumour and sarcomas account for the majority of malignant lesions. Clinical manifestations are diverse, non-specific, and governed by the location, size, and aggressiveness. Imaging plays a central role in their evaluation, and familiarity with characteristic features is essential to generate a meaningful differential diagnosis. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the reference technique for evaluation of a suspected cardiac mass. Computed tomography (CT) provides complementary information and, with the advent of electrocardiographic gating, has become a powerful tool in its own right for cardiac morphological assessment. This paper reviews the MRI and CT features of primary and secondary cardiac malignancy. Important differential considerations and potential diagnostic pitfalls are also highlighted.

  14. Atrial tumors in cardiac MRI; Vorhoftumoren in der kardialen MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, Nils; Schoth, F.; Guenther, R.W.; Krombach, G. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum RWTH Aachen (Germany); Balzer, J.C.; Neizel, M.; Kuehl, H. [Klinik fuer Kardiologie, Pneumologie und Angiologie, Universitaetsklinikum RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool for the diagnosis of cardiac masses. Various cardiac tumors are predisposed to occurring in atrial structures. The aim of this review article is the description of atrial tumors and their morphological features in MRI. In general, cardiac tumors are rare: approximately 0.001-0.03% in autopsy studies. About 75% of them are benign. The most common cardiac tumor is the myxoma. They are predisposed to occur in the atria and show a characteristically strong hyperintense signal on T2-wieghted images in MRI. In other sequences a heterogeneous pattern reflects its variable histological appearance. Lipomas exhibit a signal behavior identical to fatty tissue with a typical passive movement in cine imaging. Fibroelastomas are the most common tumors of the cardiac valves. Consisting of avascular fibrous tissue, they often present with hypointense signal intensities. Thrombi attached to their surface can cause severe emboli even in small tumors. Amongst primary cardiac malignancies, sarcomas are most common and favor the atria. Secondary malignancies of the heart are far more common than primary ones (20-40 times). In case of known malignancies, approximately 10% of patients develop cardiac metastasis at the end of their disease. Lymphogenic metastases favor the pericardium, while hematogenic spread prefers the myocardium. Since they are not real atrial tumors, thrombi and anatomical structures of the atria have to be differentiated from other pathologies. (orig.)

  15. Predictive Modelling of Cardiac 2D Multi-Slice MRI with Simultaneous Resolution of Cardiac and Respiratory Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik; Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Darkner, Sune;

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach to modelling of volumetric cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with simultaneous resolution of cardiac and respiratory motion. The major challenge is that the inherent slow nature of MRI prevents obtaining real-time volumetric images of the heart with...... respiratory bellow and a vectorcardiogram, and utilizes a combination of deformation modelling and pixel intensity modelling. We demonstrate that this approach reliably models volumetric cardiac MRI for any combination of cardiac and respiratory phase....

  16. MRI with cardiac pacing devices – Safety in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaasalainen, Touko, E-mail: touko.kaasalainen@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Department of Physics, University of Helsinki (Finland); Pakarinen, Sami, E-mail: sami.pakarinen@hus.fi [HUS Department of Cardiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Kivistö, Sari, E-mail: sari.kivisto@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Holmström, Miia, E-mail: miia.holmstrom@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Hänninen, Helena, E-mail: helena.hanninen@hus.fi [HUS Department of Cardiology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Peltonen, Juha, E-mail: juha.peltonen@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, School of Science, Aalto University, Helsinki (Finland); Lauerma, Kirsi, E-mail: kirsi.lauerma@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland); Sipilä, Outi, E-mail: outi.sipila@hus.fi [HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, POB 340 (Haartmaninkatu 4), 00290 Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-08-15

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to introduce a single centre “real life” experience of performing MRI examinations in clinical practice on patients with cardiac pacemaker systems. Additionally, we aimed to evaluate the safety of using a dedicated safety protocol for these patients. Materials and methods: We used a 1.5 T MRI scanner to conduct 68 MRI scans of different body regions in patients with pacing systems. Of the cardiac devices, 32% were MR-conditional, whereas the remaining 68% were MR-unsafe. We recorded the functional parameters of the devices prior, immediately after, and approximately one month after the MRI scanning, and compared the device parameters to the baseline values. Results: All MRI examinations were completed safely, and each device could be interrogated normally following the MRI. We observed no changes in the programmed parameters of the devices. For most of the participants, the distributions of the immediate and one-month changes in the device parameters were within 20% of the baseline values, although some changes approached clinically important thresholds. Furthermore, we observed no differences in the variable changes between MR-conditional and MR-unsafe pacing systems, or between scans of the thorax area and other scanned areas. Conclusion: MRI in patients with MR-conditional pacing systems and selected MR-unsafe systems could be performed safely under strict conditions in this study.

  17. MRI with cardiac pacing devices – Safety in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to introduce a single centre “real life” experience of performing MRI examinations in clinical practice on patients with cardiac pacemaker systems. Additionally, we aimed to evaluate the safety of using a dedicated safety protocol for these patients. Materials and methods: We used a 1.5 T MRI scanner to conduct 68 MRI scans of different body regions in patients with pacing systems. Of the cardiac devices, 32% were MR-conditional, whereas the remaining 68% were MR-unsafe. We recorded the functional parameters of the devices prior, immediately after, and approximately one month after the MRI scanning, and compared the device parameters to the baseline values. Results: All MRI examinations were completed safely, and each device could be interrogated normally following the MRI. We observed no changes in the programmed parameters of the devices. For most of the participants, the distributions of the immediate and one-month changes in the device parameters were within 20% of the baseline values, although some changes approached clinically important thresholds. Furthermore, we observed no differences in the variable changes between MR-conditional and MR-unsafe pacing systems, or between scans of the thorax area and other scanned areas. Conclusion: MRI in patients with MR-conditional pacing systems and selected MR-unsafe systems could be performed safely under strict conditions in this study

  18. A multimodal (MRI/ultrasound) cardiac phantom for imaging experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Vahid; Kendrick, Michael; Shakeri, Mostafa; Alshaher, Motaz; Stoddard, Marcus F.; Amini, Amir

    2013-03-01

    A dynamic cardiac phantom can play a significant role in the evaluation and development of ultrasound and cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) motion tracking and registration methods. A four chamber multimodal cardiac phantom has been designed and built to simulate normal and pathologic hearts with different degrees of "infarction" and "scar tissues". In this set up, cardiac valves have been designed and modeled as well. The four-chamber structure can simulate the asymmetric ventricular, atrial and valve motions. Poly Vinyl Alcohol (PVA) is used as the principal material since it can simulate the shape, elasticity, and MR and ultrasound properties of the heart. The cardiac shape is simulated using a four-chamber mold made of polymer clay. An additional pathologic heart phantom containing stiff inclusions has been manufactured in order to simulate an infracted heart. The stiff inclusions are of different shapes and different degrees of elasticity and are able to simulate abnormal cardiac segments. The cardiac elasticity is adjusted based on freeze-thaw cycles of the PVA cryogel for normal and scarred regions. Ultrasound and MRI markers were inserted in the cardiac phantom as landmarks for validations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first multimodal phantom that models a dynamic four-chamber human heart including the cardiac valve.

  19. Role of cardiac MRI in acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Mulia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI has decreased significantly and appears to be the result of current reperfusion therapeutic strategies. Reperfusion itself may develop into reperfusion injury. Therefore, management of these patients poses several challenges, such as diagnosing and managing heart failure, identifying persistent or inducible ischaemia, estimating the need for anticoagulation, and assessing overall cardiovascular risk. This case presentation will demonstrate the impact of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in the assessment of the pathophysiology of AMI in the current reperfusion era. Cardiac MRI can provide a wide range of clinically useful information which will help clinicians to manage and choose specific therapeutic strategies for AMI patients. (Med J Indones. 2013;22:46-53Keywords: Acute myocardial infarction, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, reperfusion injury

  20. The usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in cardiac myxoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of cardiac myxoma on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were evaluated in 20 patients operated on from 1985 to 1991. MRI studies were performed with an 0.5-T system in 5 patients and an 0.15-T system in 15 patients using ECG gating. T1-weighted images (T1WI) were obtained in all 20 patients, T2-weighted images (T2WI) were obtained in 16, and Gd-DTPA-enhanced images were obtained in 9. MRI was able to correctly locate the myxoma and determine the site of attachment. MRI also correctly determined the shape of 19/20 tumors. The exception was an oval myxoma with a smooth but fibrotic and calcified margin, in which MRI visualized the signal void due to calcification as a villous surface. Myxomas showed an inhomogeneous intermediate intensity on T1WI and an inhomogeneous high intensity on T2WI. These findings were thought to be related to variations in the amount of cellular components, capillaries, and calcification within the myxoid matrix. A relatively high intensity on T1WI and enhancement was observed at the base of the myxomas, where less myxoid matrix and abundant vessels were seen histologically. A low intensity band was noted on T1WI just next to the base of 3 myxomas, and bundles of collagen fibers were observed at the same site histologically. MRI provided information about the internal architecture of these tumors, but the cause of the relatively high intensity area at the tumor based on T1WI remains unproven. In conclusion, MRI was reliable for the diagnosis of cardiac myxoma, and should be performed after cardiac ultrasonography. (author)

  1. Value of fetal cerebral MRI in sonographically proven cardiac rhabdomyoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muehler, Matthias R.; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Rake, Annett [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Section for Prenatal Medicine, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Berlin (Germany); Schwabe, Michael [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Pathology, Berlin (Germany); Schmidt, Susanne [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Paediatric Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Kivelitz, Dietmar [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Leipzig Heart Center, Department of Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Chaoui, Rabih [Prenatal Diagnosis and Human Genetics, Berlin (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant phakomatosis associated with intracardiac rhabdomyomas. The aim of our study was to examine the value of cerebral MRI in diagnosing TSC in fetuses with intracardiac rhabdomyomas, applying the TSC Consensus Conference (TSCCC) criteria. In a prospective manner six consecutive fetuses with cardiac rhabdomyomas (21-34 weeks' gestation) underwent cerebral MRI. The MRI results were correlated with clinical follow-up at 10-34 months after birth, histology, and genetic data. In five of the six fetuses the diagnosis of TSC was established. In two of five fetuses MRI demonstrated cerebral manifestations of TSC that correlated well with severe epilepsy manifesting during the follow-up period. In another two of five fetuses MRI as well as clinical follow-up were normal. One of five pregnancies was terminated and histology demonstrated microscopically small subependymal nodules not demonstrated by MRI. The results of our study agree with the available literature that fetal MRI is sufficient for the detection of cerebral lesions in TSC and should be better promoted. The TSCCC criteria can also be applied to fetal MRI. (orig.)

  2. Automatic assessment of cardiac perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsson, Henrik B.W.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a method based on Active Appearance Models (AAM) is applied for automatic registration of myocardial perfusion MRI. A semi-quantitative perfusion assessment of the registered image sequences is presented. This includes the formation of perfusion maps for three parameters; maximum up...

  3. Automatic assessment of cardiac perfusion MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsson, Henrik B. W.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a method based on Active Appearance Models (AAM) is applied for automatic registration of myocardial perfusion MRI. A semi-quantitative perfusion assessment of the registered image sequences is presented. This includes the formation of perfusion maps for three parameters; maximum up-slope, peak and time-to-peak.

  4. Applications of cardiac MRI in pediatric heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the value of magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric heart diseases. Methods: Ninety-seven cases received cardiac MR scanning in this present study. The age range was 2 day to 13 years including 62 boys and 35 girls, the median age was 6 years. They were performed on h 5 T scanner with cardiac phased-array coil and VCG. Results: Eighty-five of the 97 cases were positive. Those positive findings included cardiomyopathy in 41 cases, congenital heart disease in 20 cases, constrictive pericarditis in 4 cases, pericardiac effusions with or without other cardiovascular diseases in 17 cases, cardiac tumor in 2 cases,thrombus in 3 cases and in 5 other cases. Conclusion: Cardiac MRI is an excellent imaging modality for the anatomical and functional abnormalities of pediatric heart diseases. (authors)

  5. Functional cardiac MRI for assessment of aortic valve disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aortic valve disease shows a rising incidence with the increasing mean age of Western populations. The detection of hemodynamic parameters, which transcends the mere assessment of valve morphology, has an important future potential concerning classification of the severity of disease. MRI allows a non-invasive and a spatially flexible view of the aortic valve and the adjacent anatomic region, left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) and ascending aorta. Moreover, the technique allows the determination of functional hemodynamic parameters, such as flow velocities and effective orifice areas. The new approach of a serial systolic planimetry velocity-encoded MRI sequence (VENC-MRI) facilitates the sizing of blood-filled cardiac structures with the registration of changes in magnitude during systole. Additionally, the subvalvular VENC-MRI measurements improve the clinically important exact determination of the LVOT area with respect to its specific eccentric configuration and its systolic deformity. (orig.)

  6. Cardiac MRI and CT features of inheritable and congenital conditions associated with sudden cardiac death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparrow, Patrick; Merchant, Naeem; Provost, Yves; Doyle, Deirdre; Nguyen, Elsie; Paul, Narinder [University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, Division of Cardiothoracic Imaging, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    Cardiac MRI (CMR) and electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) are increasingly important tools in the identification and assessment of cardiac-related disease processes, including those associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD). While the commonest cause of SCD is coronary artery disease (CAD), in patients under 35 years inheritable cardiomyopathies such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy are important aetiologies. CMR in particular offers both accurate delineation of the morphological abnormalities associated with these and other conditions and the possibility for risk stratification for development of ventricular arrhythmias with demonstration of macroscopic scar by delayed enhancement imaging with intravenous gadolinium. (orig.)

  7. Using MRI to calculate cardiac velocity fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the use of magnetic resonance imaging to produce quantitative information about heart motion. Motion estimation techniques utilizing convex set projections and simple block shift matching are applied to determine directional and magnitude of heart motion. These methods are tested and compared using simulated motion on a single MMR frame and actual MRI cine data. These simulated motion is in the form of transnational only and linear velocity fields. Motion estimation is performed using image pairs with and without additive noise. Results are given which quantify the effectiveness of the algorithms

  8. [Stress cardiac MRI in management of ischemic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russel, S; Darmon, S; Vermillet, A; Haziza, F

    2014-11-01

    Stress magnetic cardiac resonance imaging (MRI) development is in progress. Many cardiac imaging technics already known are completed by this safe radiation free exam with a short time acquisition (30minutes) and a good diagnostic performance in particular for patients with three vessels coronary artery diseases. Best indication concerns symptomatic patients unable to exercise with intermediate or high pretest probability. Pharmacological heart stress can be induced with vasodilatators or dobutamine to identify the presence and extent of myocardial ischemia, with high precision to guide coronary vessels revascularization. MRI gives many other interesting informations like heart anatomy, left ventricular function. Myocardial viability can be assessed with study of late gadolinium enhancement or analysis of contractile reserve with low dose of dobutamine. PMID:25281219

  9. Respiratory and cardiac self-gated radial MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Motion in cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a major challenge, as it results in artifacts like image blurring if not compensated for. Respiratory motion of the heart can be addressed by acquisitions during breath-hold for scan times shorter than 10–15 seconds. When longer scans are required, only data from end-expiration is used. Determination of the respiratory position is typically achieved via interleaved Respiratory Navigator (RNAV) measurements. Self-Gating (SG) is an alter...

  10. Metric optimized gating for fetal cardiac MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansz, Michael S; Seed, Mike; van Amerom, Joshua F P; Wong, Derek; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Macgowan, Christopher K

    2010-11-01

    Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging can be used to complement echocardiography for the evaluation of the fetal heart. Cardiac imaging typically requires gating with peripheral hardware; however, a gating signal is not readily available in utero. No successful application of existing technologies to human fetal phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging has been reported to date in the literature. The purpose of this work is to develop a technique for phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal heart that does not require measurement of a gating signal. Metric optimized gating involves acquiring data without gating and retrospectively determining the proper reconstruction by optimizing an image metric. The effects of incorrect gating on phase contrast images were investigated, and the time-entropy of the series of images was found to provide a good measure of the level of corruption. The technique was validated with a pulsatile flow phantom, experiments with adult volunteers, and in vivo application in the fetal population. Images and flow curves from these measurements are presented. Additionally, numerical simulations were used to investigate the degree to which heart rate variability affects the reconstruction process. Metric optimized gating enables imaging with conventional phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging sequences in the absence of a gating signal, permitting flow measurements in the great vessels in utero. PMID:20632406

  11. Cardiac CT. Advanced architectures and algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently started a new collaborative project to develop improved Cardiac CT architectures and reconstruction algorithms. This paper presents a status update of the initial work in this project and we expect to be able to show several new results by the time of the conference. Firstly, we summarize the cardiac CT application needs and performance requirements. Secondly, we report on a study of cardiac CT architectures, which is still in progress. The architecture analysis requires in-depth understanding of the reconstruction process in terms of noise propagation, spatial resolution, Radon space completeness, and image artifacts. Thirdly, we present an evaluation framework based on simulations and measurements. We started implementing and verifying some advanced system models in our simulation framework. Finally, we present a high-level overview of the different challenges in cardiac CT and how different reconstruction techniques can overcome some of these challenges. (orig.)

  12. Advanced MRI techniques of the fetal brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the normal and pathological fetal brain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Advanced MRI of the fetal brain. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is used in clinical practice, all other methods are used at a research level. Serving as standard methods in the future. Combined structural and functional data for all gestational ages will allow more specific insight into the developmental processes of the fetal brain. This gain of information will help provide a common understanding of complex spatial and temporal procedures of early morphological features and their impact on cognitive and sensory abilities. (orig.)

  13. Interpolation of vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F.; Zhu, Y. M.; Rapacchi, S.; Luo, J. H.; Robini, M.; Croisille, P.

    2011-03-01

    There has recently been increased interest in developing tensor data processing methods for the new medical imaging modality referred to as diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI). This paper proposes a method for interpolating the primary vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI, with the particularity of achieving interpolation and denoising simultaneously. The method consists of localizing the noise-corrupted vectors using the local statistical properties of vector fields, removing the noise-corrupted vectors and reconstructing them by using the thin plate spline (TPS) model, and finally applying global TPS interpolation to increase the resolution in the spatial domain. Experiments on 17 human hearts show that the proposed method allows us to obtain higher resolution while reducing noise, preserving details and improving direction coherence (DC) of vector fields as well as fiber tracking. Moreover, the proposed method perfectly reconstructs azimuth and elevation angle maps.

  14. Interpolation of vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has recently been increased interest in developing tensor data processing methods for the new medical imaging modality referred to as diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI). This paper proposes a method for interpolating the primary vector fields from human cardiac DT-MRI, with the particularity of achieving interpolation and denoising simultaneously. The method consists of localizing the noise-corrupted vectors using the local statistical properties of vector fields, removing the noise-corrupted vectors and reconstructing them by using the thin plate spline (TPS) model, and finally applying global TPS interpolation to increase the resolution in the spatial domain. Experiments on 17 human hearts show that the proposed method allows us to obtain higher resolution while reducing noise, preserving details and improving direction coherence (DC) of vector fields as well as fiber tracking. Moreover, the proposed method perfectly reconstructs azimuth and elevation angle maps.

  15. Distilling complexity to advance cardiac tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Brenda M; Bursac, Nenad; Domian, Ibrahim; Huang, Ngan F; Menasché, Philippe; Murry, Charles E; Pruitt, Beth; Radisic, Milica; Wu, Joseph C; Wu, Sean M; Zhang, Jianyi; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-06-01

    The promise of cardiac tissue engineering is in the ability to recapitulate in vitro the functional aspects of a healthy heart and disease pathology as well as to design replacement muscle for clinical therapy. Parts of this promise have been realized; others have not. In a meeting of scientists in this field, five central challenges or "big questions" were articulated that, if addressed, could substantially advance the current state of the art in modeling heart disease and realizing heart repair. PMID:27280684

  16. Predictive Modelling of Cardiac 2D Multi-Slice MRI with Simultaneous Resolution of Cardiac and Respiratory Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Henrik; Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Darkner, Sune; Lyksborg, Mark; Larsen, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach to modelling of volumetric cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with simultaneous resolution of cardiac and respiratory motion. The major challenge is that the inherent slow nature of MRI prevents obtaining real-time volumetric images of the heart with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution. To overcome this problem our method predicts pixel intensities in multiple 2D slices, acquired with high spatial and temporal resolution, and subsequently as...

  17. Late gadolinium enhancement and subclinical cardiac dysfunction on cardiac MRI in asymptomatic HIV-positive men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Loy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: HIV is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD and related clinical events. While traditional risk factors play an important role in the pathology of cardiovascular disease, HIV infection and its sequelae of immune activation and inflammation may have significant effects on the myocardium before becoming clinically evident. Cardiac MRI (CMR can be used to detect the pattern of these subclinical changes. This will lead to a better understanding of risk factors contributing to cardiovascular disease prior to it becoming clinically significant in HIV-positive patients. Methods: Prospective cohort study of 127 asymptomatic HIV-positive men on ART compared to 35 matched controls. Baseline demographics, HIV parameters, 12-lead ECG, routine biochemistry, and traditional cardiovascular risk factors were recorded. Images were acquired on a 3T Achieva Philips MRI scanner with 5 channel phase array cardiac coil and weight-based IV gadolinium was given at 0.15 mmol/kg dose with post-contrast inversion recovery imaging after 10 minutes. Results: 6/127 (4.7% of asymptomatic HIV-positive men had late gadolinium enhancement (LGE on MRI verses 1/35 (2.9% in the control group. In 3/6 (50% of cases this was in a classical infarction pattern with subendocardial involvement. 3/6 (50% were consistent with prior myocarditis. There was no significant difference in mean LVEF (66.93% vs 65.18%, LVMI (60.05g/m2 vs 55.94g/m2 or posterolateral wall thickness (8.28 mm and 8.16 mm between cases and controls respectively. There was significantly more diastolic dysfunction, E:A ratio < 1, found in the HIV-positive group, 18% vs 7% of controls (p = 0.037. Framingham risk did not predict either of these outcomes. Conclusions: There is an increased incidence of LGE detected on CMR in this asymptomatic HIV-positive cohort. Two distinct pathological processes were identifed as causing these changes, myocardial infarction and myocarditis

  18. Evaluation of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT versus cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is stated that cardiac MRI imaging can provide accurate estimation of left ventricular (LV) volumes and ejection fraction (EF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for assessment of LV end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and EF, using cardiac MRI as the reference methods/(methodology). Gated myocardial perfusion SPECT images were analyzed with two different quantification software, quantitative gated SPECT (QGS) and 4D-MSPECT. Thirty-four consecutive patients were studied. Myocardial perfusion SPECT and cardiac MRI had excellent intra/interobserver reproducibility. Correlation between the results of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT and cardiac MRI were high for EDV and EF. However, ESV and EDV were significantly underestimated by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT compared to cardiac MRI. Moreover, gated myocardial perfusion SPECT overestimated EF for small heart. One reason for the difference in volumes and EF is the delineation of the endocardial border. Cardiac MRI has higher spatial resolution. We should understand the differences of volumes and EF as determined by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT and cardiac MRI. (author)

  19. Distilling complexity to advance cardiac tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Brenda M.; Bursac, Nenad; Domian, Ibrahim; Huang, Ngan F; Menasché, Philippe; Murry, Charles; Pruitt, Beth; Radisic, Milica; Wu, Joseph C; Wu, Sean M; Zhang, Jianyi; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    The promise of cardiac tissue engineering is in the ability to recapitulate in vitro the functional aspects of healthy heart and disease pathology as well as to design replacement muscle for clinical therapy. Parts of this promise have been realized; others have not. In a meeting of scientists in this field, five central challenges or “big questions” were articulated that, if addressed, could substantially advance the current state-of-the-art in modeling heart disease and realizing heart repair. PMID:27280684

  20. Recent advances in paediatric cardiac anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Vakamudi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric cardiac anaesthesia involves anaesthetizing very small children with complex congenital heart disease for major surgical procedures. The unique nature of this patient population requires considerable expertise and in-depth knowledge of the altered physiology. There have been several developments in the last decade in this subspecialty that has contributed to better care and improved outcome in this vulnerable group of patients. The purpose of this review is to present some of the recent advances in the anesthetic management of these children from preoperative evaluation to postoperative care. This article reviews the role of magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in preoperative evaluation, the use of ultrasound to secure vascular access, the use of cuffed endotracheal tubes, the optimal haematocrit and the role of blood products, including the use of recombinant factor VIIa. It also deals with the advances in technology that have led to improved monitoring, the newer developments in cardiopulmonary bypass, the use of centrifugal pumps and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and the role of DHCA. The role of new drugs, especially the α-2 agonists in paediatric cardiac anesthetic practice, fast tracking and effective postoperative pain management have also been reviewed.

  1. Nuclear cardiology in the era of cardiac CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Current indications for classical nuclear cardiology are summarized (diagnosis, prognosis, myocardial viability, ventricular function). First, the use of nuclear cardiology is discussed within the clinical context (typical vs. atypical history of ischemia, findings on resting ECG etc.). An overview of different perfusion tracers is given both for SPECT (thallium, MIBI, microspheres) and PET (NH4, H2O, Rb). The advantages of gated imaging are mentioned, thus combining information regarding perfusion, ventricular function, regional wall motion and thickening. Then specificity and sensitivity data for detection of significant coronary artery disease are reviewed in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients: sensitivity values of 86% are reached for coronary artery stenosis of >50% in both populations. Sensitivity increases to around 90% for coronary artery stenosis of >70%. The issue of risk stratification and prognosis in both populations is raised: Negative predictive values as high as 0.97 for death and 0.94 for death or myocardial infarction are reached when patients have normal myocardial perfusion scans (follow-up 23+/-17 months). The current strengths and weaknesses of CT and MR imaging for detection of coronary artery disease are mentioned, including dobutamine stress MRI and perfusion imaging. With dobutamine stress MRI, sensitivity values between 83% and 91% are observed. When comparing dobutamine stress MRI with dobutamine echocardiography, image quality has a huge impact on sensitivity and specificity values with echo, but only minimal impact on MRI sensitivity/specificity values. In a second part of the talk, the advantages of positron emission tomography (PET) and its use in clinical cardiology (mainly detection of viability) are discussed. First, advantages of positron tomography are listed: short half life of the tracer, physiological labelling, absolute quantification, tomographic imaging. Different cardiac tracers are mentioned, such as

  2. Rank-One and Transformed Sparse Decomposition for Dynamic Cardiac MRI

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    It is challenging and inspiring for us to achieve high spatiotemporal resolutions in dynamic cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this paper, we introduce two novel models and algorithms to reconstruct dynamic cardiac MRI data from under-sampled k − t space data. In contrast to classical low-rank and sparse model, we use rank-one and transformed sparse model to exploit the correlations in the dataset. In addition, we propose projected alternative direction method (PADM) and alternativ...

  3. Unsupervised motion-compensation of multi-slice cardiac perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, M.B.; Ólafsdóttir, H; Larsson, H.B.W.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for registration of single and multi-slice cardiac perfusion MRI. Utilising off-line computer intensive analyses of variance and clustering in an annotated training set, the presented method is capable of providing registration without any manual interaction in...... holds great promise for the automation of cardiac perfusion investigations, due to its accuracy, robustness and generalisation ability...

  4. Unsupervised motion-compensation of multi-slice cardiac perfusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Larsson, Henrik B. W.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for registration of single and multi-slice cardiac perfusion MRI. Utilising computer intensive analyses of variance and clustering in an annotated training set off-line, the presented method is capable of providing registration without any manual interaction in...... holds great promise for the automation of cardiac perfusion investigations, due to its accuracy, robustness and generalisation ability....

  5. MRI as an adjunct to echocardiography for the diagnostic imaging of cardiac masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as part of the diagnostic evaluation for cardiac masses; eight of them had been preliminary studied by 2D-echocardiography (US). MRI did not add to the US diagnostic information in patients affected by intracavitary masses. It represented the definitive diagnostic modality in two patients with intramural pathology: one with ventricular rhabdomyoma, the second with an echinococcyal cyst located within the left atrial wall. The complementary role of MRI to US in cardiac masses is discussed. (orig.)

  6. Using motion correction to improve real-time cardiac MRI reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgazyev, E.; Uyanik, I.; Unan, M.; Shah, Dipan; Tsekos, Nikolaos V.; Leiss, E. L.

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac gating or breath-hold MRI acquisition is challenging. In particular, data collected in a short amount of time might be insufficient for the diagnosis of patients with impaired breath-holding capabilities and/or arrhythmia. A major challenge in cardiac MRI is the motion of the heart itself, the pulsate blood flow, and the respiratory motion. Furthermore, the motion of the diaphragm in the chest moving up and down gets translated to the heart when a patient breathes. Therefore, artifacts arise due to the changes in signal intensity or phase as a function of time, resulting in blurry images. This paper describes a novel reconstruction strategy for real time cardiac MRI without requiring the use of an electro-cardiogram or of breath holding. In this research we focused on automation and evaluation of the performance of our proposed method in real time MRI data to ensure a good basis for the signal extraction. Hence, it assists in the reconstruction. The proposed method enables one to extract cardiac beating waveforms directly from real-time cardiac MRI series collected from freely breathing patients and without cardiac gating. Our method only requires minimal user involvement as initialization step. Thereafter, the method follows the registered area in every frame and updates itself.

  7. CT and MRI evaluation of cardiac complications in patients with hematologic diseases: a pictorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Yun; Jung, Jung Im; Kim, Yoo Jin; Kim, Hwan Wook; Lee, Hae Giu

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac complications with hematologic diseases are not uncommon but it is difficult to diagnose, due to non-specific clinical symptoms. Prompt recognition of these potentially fatal complications by cardiac computed tomography (CT) or cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may help to direct clinicians to specific treatments according to causes. Thrombosis is often related to central venous catheter use and is usually located at the catheter tip near the atrial wall. Differentiation of thrombosis from normal structure is possible with CT and, distinction of a thrombus from a tumor is possible on a delayed enhancement MRI with a long inversion time (500-600 ms). Granulocytic sarcoma of the heart is indicated by an infiltrative nature with involvement of whole layers of myocardium on CT and MRI. MRI with T2* mapping is useful in evaluating myocardial iron content in patients with hemochromatosis. Diffuse subendocardial enhancement is typically observed on delayed MRIs in patients with cardiac amyloidosis. T1 mapping is an emerging tool to diagnose amyloidosis. Myocardial abscess can occur due to an immunocompromised status. CT and MRI show loculated lesions with fluid density and concomitant rim-like contrast enhancement. Awareness of CT and MRI findings of cardiac complications of hematologic diseases can be helpful to physicians for clinical decision making and treatment. PMID:25651878

  8. Design and testing of an MRI-compatible cycle ergometer for non-invasive cardiac assessments during exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Gusso Silmara; Salvador Carlo; Hofman Paul; Cutfield Wayne; Baldi James C; Taberner Andrew; Nielsen Poul

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool for cardiac research, and it is frequently used for resting cardiac assessments. However, research into non-pharmacological stress cardiac evaluation is limited. Methods We aimed to design a portable and relatively inexpensive MRI cycle ergometer capable of continuously measuring pedalling workload while patients exercise to maintain target heart rates. Results We constructed and tested an MRI-compatible cycle ergometer...

  9. Optimization of myocardial nulling in pediatric cardiac MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tham, Edythe B. [Stollery Children' s Hospital, University of Alberta, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Hung, Ryan W.; Crawley, Cinzia; Noga, Michelle L. [University of Alberta, Pediatric Radiology, Stollery Children' s Hospital, Edmonton (Canada); Myers, Kimberley A. [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Calgary (Canada)

    2012-04-15

    Current protocols to determine optimal nulling time in late enhancement imaging using adult techniques may not apply to children. To determine the optimal nulling time in anesthetised children, with the hypothesis that this occurs earlier than in adults. Sedated cardiac MRI was performed in 12 children (median age: 12 months, range: 1-60 months). After gadolinium administration, scout images at 2, 3, 4 and 10 min and phase sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR) images from 5 to 10 min were obtained. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and inversion time (TI) were determined. Quality of nulling was assessed according to a grading score by three observers. Data was analysed using linear regression, Kruskal-Wallis and quadratic-weighted kappa statistics. One child with a cardiomyopathy had late enhancement. Good agreement in nulling occurred for scout images at 2 ({kappa} = 0.69) and 3 ({kappa} = 0.66) min and moderate agreement at 4 min ({kappa} = 0.57). Agreement of PSIR images was moderate at 7 min ({kappa} = 0.44) and poor-fair at other times. There were significant correlations between TI and scout time (r = 0.61, P < 0.0001), and SNR and kappa (r = 0.22, P = 0.017). Scout images at 2-4 min can be used to determine the TI with little variability. Image quality for PSIR images was highest at 7 min and SNR optimal at 7-9 min. TI increases with time and should be adjusted frequently during imaging. Thus, nulling times in children differ from nulling times in adults when using standard adult techniques. (orig.)

  10. Cardiac tumors: optimal cardiac MR sequences and spectrum of imaging appearances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the optimal cardiac MRI sequences for and the spectrum of imaging appearances of cardiac tumors. CONCLUSION: Recent technologic advances in cardiac MRI have resulted in the rapid acquisition of images of the heart with high spatial and temporal resolution and excellent myocardial tissue characterization. Cardiac MRI provides optimal assessment of the location, functional characteristics, and soft-tissue features of cardiac tumors, allowing accurate differentiation of benign and malignant lesions.

  11. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M. P. J.; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj.; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advan

  12. Efficacy of weekly docetaxel in locally advanced cardiac angiosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Minichillo, Santino; Pantaleo, Maria Abbondanza; Nannini, Margherita; Coccolo, Fabio; GATTO, LIDIA; Biasco, Guido; Brandi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary cardiac angiosarcoma is extremely aggressive; however, it is often misdiagnosed because of its rarity. For locally advanced tumors, doxorubicin-based chemotherapy regimens are the standard of treatment, even if the gain in term of progression-free survival is limited and is no longer than 5 months. Case presentation We report the case of a Caucasian 23-year-old man with locally advanced cardiac angiosarcoma who underwent radical surgical resection after a prolonged response...

  13. Cardiac fiber tracking using adaptive particle filtering based on tensor rotation invariant in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanhui; Liu, Wanyu; Magnin, Isabelle E.; Zhu, Yuemin

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is a non-invasive method currently available for cardiac fiber tracking. However, accurate and efficient cardiac fiber tracking is still a challenge. This paper presents a probabilistic cardiac fiber tracking method based on particle filtering. In this framework, an adaptive sampling technique is presented to describe the posterior distribution of fiber orientations by adjusting the number and status of particles according to the fractional anisotropy of diffusion. An observation model is then proposed to update the weight of particles by rotating diffusion tensor from the primary eigenvector to a given fiber orientation while keeping the shape of the tensor invariant. The results on human cardiac dMRI show that the proposed method is robust to noise and outperforms conventional streamline and particle filtering techniques.

  14. PET/MRI: Technical challenges and recent advances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong; Im, Ki Chun [Molecular Imaging Research and Education Laboratory, Dept. of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Integrated positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which can provide complementary functional and anatomical information about a specific organ or body system at the molecular level, has become a powerful imaging modality to understand the molecular biology details, disease mechanisms, and pharmacokinetics in animals and humans. Although the first experiment on the PET/MRI was performed in the early 1990s, its clinical application was accomplished in recent years because there were various technical challenges in integrating PET and MRI in a single system with minimum mutual interference between PET and MRI. This paper presents the technical challenges and recent advances in combining PET and MRI along with several approaches for improving PET image quality of the PET/MRI hybrid imaging system.

  15. Imaging technique and current status of valvular heart disease using cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main indications for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of valvular heart disease are pathologies of the aortic and pulmonary valve. For mitral and tricuspid valve pathologies MRI is not the first line modality as these are usually well visualized by echocardiography. The advantages of MRI in valvular heart disease are a high reliability in the evaluation of ventricular volumes and function as well as the assessment of the perivalvular arterial or atrial structures. This reliability and the limitless access to any imaging plane partially compensates for the lower temporal and spatial resolution in comparison to echocardiography. In patients with congenital heart disease, cardiac MRI is established as a valuable diagnostic tool in daily clinical management, especially for the evaluation of pulmonary valve defects. Nevertheless, echocardiography remains the first-line diagnostic imaging tool for the foreseeable future. (orig.)

  16. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: Target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipsen, S. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia and Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Blanck, O.; Rades, D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Oborn, B. [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre (ICCC), Wollongong, New South Wales 2500, Australia and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP), University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Bode, F. [Medical Department II, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Liney, G. [Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Hunold, P. [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Luebeck and University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Schweikard, A. [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Luebeck, Luebeck 23562 (Germany); Keall, P. J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. Methods: For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Results: Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior–inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior–posterior), and 2 mm (left–right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the

  17. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: Target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. Methods: For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Results: Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior–inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior–posterior), and 2 mm (left–right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the

  18. Robust segmentation of 4D cardiac MRI-tagged images via spatio-temporal propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhen; Huang, Xiaolei; Metaxas, Dimitris N.; Axel, Leon

    2005-04-01

    In this paper we present a robust method for segmenting and tracking cardiac contours and tags in 4D cardiac MRI tagged images via spatio-temporal propagation. Our method is based on two main techniques: the Metamorphs Segmentation for robust boundary estimation, and the tunable Gabor filter bank for tagging lines enhancement, removal and myocardium tracking. We have developed a prototype system based on the integration of these two techniques, and achieved efficient, robust segmentation and tracking with minimal human interaction.

  19. Advances in MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in the world, and the incidence of prostate cancer in China shows an upward trend. MRI has high soft tissue resolution and multi-dimensional imaging advantages, and it can better show the anatomy of the prostate and adjacent tissue structures. With the development of MR technique, it plays a more and more important role in prostate cancer diagnosis. This review starts from the imaging performance of routine MRI sequence of prostate cancer, and a variety of functional MRI applications in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of prostate cancer are described in detail, such as MR perfusion-weighted imaging, MR spectroscopy, MR diffusion-weighted imaging, MR diffusion tensor imaging, intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted imaging, MR susceptibility-weighted imaging. Meanwhile this review introduces that functional MRI has more advantages and can provide more image information than routine MRI sequence. According to a series of semi-quantitative and quantitative data, functional MRI can further provide the blood perfusion of prostate cancer, water molecule diffusion and microcirculation state, metabolism and biochemical composition change information. (authors)

  20. MRI in cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis; MRT bei kardialer Sarkoidose und Amyloidose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauner, K.U. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Wintersperger, B. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Campus Grosshadern, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    Sarcoidosis and amyloidosis are both multisystem disorders, which may involve the heart; however, isolated cardiac disease is rare. Diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis is crucial because the patient prognosis is dependent on cardiac involvement and early treatment. Echocardiography is the first line imaging modality in the diagnostic work-up of both diseases, possibly giving hints towards the correct diagnosis. Besides myocardial biopsy and radionuclide studies cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely performed in patients suspect of having infiltrative cardiomyopathy. The T1 mapping procedure is currently being evaluated as a new technique for detection and quantification of global myocardial enhancement, as seen in cardiac amyloidosis. Sensitivities and specificities for detection of cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis can be significantly improved by MRI, especially with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging. In cardiac sarcoidosis the use of LGE is outcome-related while in amyloidosis analysis of T1-mapping may be of prognostic value. If cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis or amyloidosis is suspected cardiac MRI including LGE should be performed for establishing the diagnosis. (orig.) [German] Die Sarkoidose und Amyloidose sind Multisystemerkrankungen, in deren Verlauf es zu einer kardialen Beteiligung kommen kann. Bildgebend wird als primaeres Verfahren die Echokardiographie eingesetzt. Zur weiteren Diagnostik wird neben der Biopsie und nuklearmedizinischen Verfahren v. a. die MRT herangezogen. Als neuere Technik zur Darstellung globaler diffuser Kontrastmittelanreicherungen, wie sie im Rahmen der Amyloidose vorkommen, wird z. Z. das T1-Mapping evaluiert. Durch den Einsatz der MRT, insbesondere des Late-Gadolinium-Enhancements (LGE), koennen die Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet in der Diagnostik der kardialen Sarkoidose und Amyloidose entscheidend verbessert werden. Bei der Sarkoidose stellt das Vorhandensein eines LGE einen

  1. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  2. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M P J; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. PMID:25552386

  3. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  4. Churg-Strauss Syndrome with Cardiac Involvement: A Case Report with CT and MRI Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Seong Joo; Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Keum; Hwang, Cheol Mok; Kim, Dae Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eu Gene [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    This is a case report of Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS) associated with cardiac involvement which is demonstrated in chest CT and cardiac MRI (CMR) without specific cardiac symptoms. A 32-year-old woman had a 3-year history of bronchial asthma, chronic sinusitis, and otitis media. The patient had various typical findings of CSS. The patient had no specific cardiac symptoms or signs such as chest pain, palpitations, syncope, or murmur, but she had diffuse low attenuation lesions in the inner wall of the left ventricle (LV) in contrast-enhanced CT. This corresponded to the area of subendocardial hyperenhancement in delayed contrast-enhanced CMR images. She was treated with steroids for 2 months. Follow-up delayed contrast-enhanced CMR of the LV showed a decrease in the size of the subendocardial enhancement area, and she had no symptoms. Therefore, the radiologist and clinician both should pay careful attention to observe possible cardiac involvement in case of CSS.

  5. Churg-Strauss Syndrome with Cardiac Involvement: A Case Report with CT and MRI Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a case report of Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS) associated with cardiac involvement which is demonstrated in chest CT and cardiac MRI (CMR) without specific cardiac symptoms. A 32-year-old woman had a 3-year history of bronchial asthma, chronic sinusitis, and otitis media. The patient had various typical findings of CSS. The patient had no specific cardiac symptoms or signs such as chest pain, palpitations, syncope, or murmur, but she had diffuse low attenuation lesions in the inner wall of the left ventricle (LV) in contrast-enhanced CT. This corresponded to the area of subendocardial hyperenhancement in delayed contrast-enhanced CMR images. She was treated with steroids for 2 months. Follow-up delayed contrast-enhanced CMR of the LV showed a decrease in the size of the subendocardial enhancement area, and she had no symptoms. Therefore, the radiologist and clinician both should pay careful attention to observe possible cardiac involvement in case of CSS.

  6. Recent advances in the diagnosis and management of cardiac amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Taimur; Gertz, Morie A

    2014-01-01

    The heart is commonly involved in various forms of amyloidosis and cardiomyopathy is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis is often delayed due to nonspecific presenting symptoms and failure to recognize early signs of amyloid heart disease on routine cardiac imaging. Treatment of cardiac amyloidosis depends upon the type of amyloid protein. Systemic chemotherapy with or without stem cell transplantation is used to treat immunoglobulin-related amyloidosis and liver transplantation is used for familial transthyretin amyloidosis in select patients. Clinical trials with siRNA for the treatment of transthyretin amyloid cardiomyopathies and amyloid protein stabilizers are ongoing. Prognosis depends on the type of amyloid protein with poorer outcomes noted in immunoglobulin light-chain amyloidosis. Supportive care forms the cornerstone of management and advancements in cardiac imaging and proteomics are expected to positively impact our ability to diagnose, prognosticate and treat cardiac amyloidosis. PMID:24344669

  7. Motion-compensation of cardiac perfusion MRI using a statistical texture ensemble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, M.B.; Larsson, H.B.W.

    This paper presents a novel method for segmentation of cardiac perfusion MRI. By performing complex analyses of variance and clustering in an annotated training set off-line, the presented method provides real-time segmentation in an on-line setting. This renders the method feasible for e...

  8. Motion-compensation of Cardiac Perfusion MRI using a Statistical Texture Ensemble

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Larsson, Henrik B. W.

    This paper presents a novel method for segmentation of cardiac perfusion MRI. By performing complex analyses of variance and clustering in an annotated training set off-line, the presented method provide real-time segmentation in an on-line setting. This renders the method feasible for e...

  9. Compressed sensing reconstruction of cardiac cine MRI using golden angle spiral trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolouee, Azar; Alirezaie, Javad; Babyn, Paul

    2015-11-01

    In dynamic cardiac cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), the spatiotemporal resolution is limited by the low imaging speed. Compressed sensing (CS) theory has been applied to improve the imaging speed and thus the spatiotemporal resolution. The purpose of this paper is to improve CS reconstruction of under sampled data by exploiting spatiotemporal sparsity and efficient spiral trajectories. We extend k-t sparse algorithm to spiral trajectories to achieve high spatio temporal resolutions in cardiac cine imaging. We have exploited spatiotemporal sparsity of cardiac cine MRI by applying a 2D + time wavelet-Fourier transform. For efficient coverage of k-space, we have used a modified version of multi shot (interleaved) spirals trajectories. In order to reduce incoherent aliasing artifact, we use different random undersampling pattern for each temporal frame. Finally, we have used nonuniform fast Fourier transform (NUFFT) algorithm to reconstruct the image from the non-uniformly acquired samples. The proposed approach was tested in simulated and cardiac cine MRI data. Results show that higher acceleration factors with improved image quality can be obtained with the proposed approach in comparison to the existing state-of-the-art method. The flexibility of the introduced method should allow it to be used not only for the challenging case of cardiac imaging, but also for other patient motion where the patient moves or breathes during acquisition.

  10. Automatic localization of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI images using deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emad, Omar; Yassine, Inas A; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2015-08-01

    Automatic localization of the left ventricle (LV) in cardiac MRI images is an essential step for automatic segmentation, functional analysis, and content based retrieval of cardiac images. In this paper, we introduce a new approach based on deep Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) to localize the LV in cardiac MRI in short axis views. A six-layer CNN with different kernel sizes was employed for feature extraction, followed by Softmax fully connected layer for classification. The pyramids of scales analysis was introduced in order to take account of the different sizes of the heart. A publically-available database of 33 patients was used for learning and testing. The proposed method was able it localize the LV with 98.66%, 83.91% and 99.07% for accuracy, sensitivity and specificity respectively. PMID:26736354

  11. Clinical features and MRI characteristics in patients with cardiac amyloidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To observe the clinical features and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging characteristics in patients with cardiac amyloidosis. Methods: A total of 5 patients (4 males and 1 female) with the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis (3 were proven by heart transplantation, 2 by endomyocardial biopsy) were evaluated by electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, chest X-ray and CMR with delayed Gadolinium enhancement. Results: Echocardiograms were abnormal in all five patients; chest X- ray showed pulmonary hemorrhage (3), cardiomegaly (5), pleural effusion (3); echocardiogram showed atrial enlargement, left ventricular wall thickening, limited ventricular wall motion, etc. CMR exhibited increased thickness of the left ventricular wall, mild to moderate depression of systolic function (mean ejection fraction: 32.5%±15.0%) and bilateral atrial enlargement with restriction of diastolic ventricular filling. In all patients, there were widespread enhancement of the thickened myocardium on delayed post- contrast studies. In 4 patients, global subendocardial delayed gadolinium enhancement was found, in papillary muscles, and interventricular septa with 'zebra-like' sign in 3 patients. Left ventricular transmural delayed gadolinium enhancement was found in 1 patient. Conclusions: CMR shows a characteristic pattern of global subendocardial delayed gadolinium enhancement in cardiac amyloidosis. The findings may be valuable in the diagnosis of cardiac amyloidosis. (authors)

  12. Efficacy and safety of deep sedation by non-anesthesiologists for cardiac MRI in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac MRI has become widespread to characterize cardiac lesions in children. No study has examined the role of deep sedation performed by non-anesthesiologists for this investigation. We hypothesized that deep sedation provided by non-anesthesiologists can be provided with a similar safety and efficacy profile to general anesthesia provided by anesthesiologists. This is a retrospective chart review of children who underwent cardiac MRI over a 5-year period. The following data were collected from the medical records: demographic data, cardiac lesion, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status, sedation type, provider, medications, sedation duration and adverse events or interventions. Image and sedation adequacy were recorded. Of 1,465 studies identified, 1,197 met inclusion criteria; 43 studies (3.6%) used general anesthesia, 506 (42.3%) had deep sedation and eight (0.7%) required anxiolysis only. The remaining 640 studies (53.5%) were performed without sedation. There were two complications in the general anesthesia group (4.7%) versus 17 in the deep sedation group (3.4%). Sedation was considered inadequate in 22 of the 506 deep sedation patients (4.3%). Adequate images were obtained in 95.3% of general anesthesia patients versus 86.6% of deep sedation patients. There was no difference in the incidence of adverse events or cardiac MRI image adequacy for children receiving general anesthesia by anesthesiologists versus deep sedation by non-anesthesiologists. In summary, this study demonstrates that an appropriately trained sedation provider can provide deep sedation for cardiac MRI without the need for general anesthesia in selected cases. (orig.)

  13. Efficacy and safety of deep sedation by non-anesthesiologists for cardiac MRI in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Rini [University of Ottawa, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa (Canada); Petrillo-Albarano, Toni; Stockwell, Jana A. [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Critical Care Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Children' s Sedation Services, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston, Atlanta, GA (United States); Parks, W.J. [Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Sibley Heart Center, Atlanta, GA (United States); Linzer, Jeffrey F. [Children' s Sedation Services, Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston, Atlanta, GA (United States); Emory University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Cardiac MRI has become widespread to characterize cardiac lesions in children. No study has examined the role of deep sedation performed by non-anesthesiologists for this investigation. We hypothesized that deep sedation provided by non-anesthesiologists can be provided with a similar safety and efficacy profile to general anesthesia provided by anesthesiologists. This is a retrospective chart review of children who underwent cardiac MRI over a 5-year period. The following data were collected from the medical records: demographic data, cardiac lesion, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status, sedation type, provider, medications, sedation duration and adverse events or interventions. Image and sedation adequacy were recorded. Of 1,465 studies identified, 1,197 met inclusion criteria; 43 studies (3.6%) used general anesthesia, 506 (42.3%) had deep sedation and eight (0.7%) required anxiolysis only. The remaining 640 studies (53.5%) were performed without sedation. There were two complications in the general anesthesia group (4.7%) versus 17 in the deep sedation group (3.4%). Sedation was considered inadequate in 22 of the 506 deep sedation patients (4.3%). Adequate images were obtained in 95.3% of general anesthesia patients versus 86.6% of deep sedation patients. There was no difference in the incidence of adverse events or cardiac MRI image adequacy for children receiving general anesthesia by anesthesiologists versus deep sedation by non-anesthesiologists. In summary, this study demonstrates that an appropriately trained sedation provider can provide deep sedation for cardiac MRI without the need for general anesthesia in selected cases. (orig.)

  14. Cardiac metabolism measured noninvasively by hyperpolarized 13C MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golman, K.; Petersson, J.S.; Magnusson, P.;

    2008-01-01

    was almost absent (0.2-11%) and the alanine signal was reduced (27-51%). Due to image-folding artifacts the data obtained for lactate were inconclusive. These studies demonstrate that cardiac metabolic imaging with hyperpolarized 1-(13)C-pyruvate is feasible. The changes in concentrations of the...

  15. SELDI-TOF-MS Serum Profiling Reveals Predictors of Cardiac MRI Changes in Marathon Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George D. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To utilize proteomics to discover proteins associated with significant cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI changes in marathon runners. Methods. Serum from 25 runners was analyzed by surface enhanced laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS. Proteomic profiles were compared in serum samples obtained prior to the race, at the finish line and within 7 hours after race to identify dynamic proteins correlated with cardiac MRI changes. Results. 693 protein/peptide clusters were identified using two ProteinChip surface chemistries and, of these, 116 were significantly different between the three time points. We identified 7 different patterns of protein expression change within the runners and 5 prerace protein peaks, 16 finish-line protein levels, and 15 postrace proteins which were correlated with significant postrace cardiac MRI changes. Conclusions. This study has identified baseline levels of proteins which may be predictive of risk of significant cardiac damage following a marathon race. Preliminary identification of the significant proteins suggested the involvement of cytokines and other proteins involved in stress and inflammatory response.

  16. Left atrial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus: insights from cardiac MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graca, Bruno; Donato, Paulo; Caseiro-Alves, Filipe [University of Coimbra, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Coimbra' s Hospital Centre and University, Medical Imaging Department, Coimbra (Portugal); Joao Ferreira, Maria [University of Coimbra, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Coimbra' s Hospital Centre and University, Cardiology Department, Coimbra (Portugal); Gomes, Leonor [University of Coimbra, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal); Coimbra' s Hospital Centre and University, Endocrinology Department, Coimbra (Portugal); Castelo-Branco, Miguel [University of Coimbra, Faculty of Medicine, Coimbra (Portugal)

    2014-11-15

    The left atrium (LA) modulates left ventricular filling through reservoir, conduit and booster pump functions. Only limited data exist on LA involvement in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). This study sought to assess LA function in asymptomatic DM2 with cardiac MRI. We hypothesized that cardiac MRI can detect LA dysfunction in asymptomatic DM2. Forty-five patients with asymptomatic DM2 and 24 normoglycaemic controls were studied. MRI cine imaging was performed to measure LA maximal and minimal volumes. A flow-sensitive phase-contrast gradient-echo sequence was used for flow measurements perpendicular to the orifice of the mitral valve, to quantify active LA stroke volume. LA total, passive and active emptying volumes and fractions were calculated. LA reservoir function, namely LA total ejection fraction, was significantly greater in controls compared to patients with DM2 (62.2 ± 5.2 vs 57.0 ± 7.6 %, P = 0.004). LA passive ejection fraction was also greater in the controls (26.2 ± 9.5 vs 16.1 ± 11.0 %, P < 0.001). Regarding parameters of LA booster pump function, LA active ejection fraction was not significantly different between groups. DM2 was demonstrated to be an independent determinant of LA function. Cardiac MRI enables the detection of LA dysfunction in asymptomatic DM2, characterized by a reduction in LA reservoir and conduit functions. (orig.)

  17. Left atrial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus: insights from cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The left atrium (LA) modulates left ventricular filling through reservoir, conduit and booster pump functions. Only limited data exist on LA involvement in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). This study sought to assess LA function in asymptomatic DM2 with cardiac MRI. We hypothesized that cardiac MRI can detect LA dysfunction in asymptomatic DM2. Forty-five patients with asymptomatic DM2 and 24 normoglycaemic controls were studied. MRI cine imaging was performed to measure LA maximal and minimal volumes. A flow-sensitive phase-contrast gradient-echo sequence was used for flow measurements perpendicular to the orifice of the mitral valve, to quantify active LA stroke volume. LA total, passive and active emptying volumes and fractions were calculated. LA reservoir function, namely LA total ejection fraction, was significantly greater in controls compared to patients with DM2 (62.2 ± 5.2 vs 57.0 ± 7.6 %, P = 0.004). LA passive ejection fraction was also greater in the controls (26.2 ± 9.5 vs 16.1 ± 11.0 %, P < 0.001). Regarding parameters of LA booster pump function, LA active ejection fraction was not significantly different between groups. DM2 was demonstrated to be an independent determinant of LA function. Cardiac MRI enables the detection of LA dysfunction in asymptomatic DM2, characterized by a reduction in LA reservoir and conduit functions. (orig.)

  18. Simulation of concomitant magnetic fields on fast switched gradient coils used in advanced application of MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Muciño, G.; Torres-García, E.; Hidalgo-Tobon, S.

    2012-10-01

    The process to produce an MR image includes nuclear alignment, RF excitation, spatial encoding, and image formation. To form an image, it is necessary to perform spatial localization of the MR signals, which is achieved using gradient coils. MRI requires the use of gradient coils that generate magnetic fields, which vary linearly with position over the imaging volume. Safety issues have been a motivation to study deeply the relation between the interaction of gradient magnetic field and the peripheral nerve stimulation. In this work is presented a numerical modeling between the concomitant magnetic fields produced by the gradient coils and the electric field induced in a cube with σ conductivity by the gradient field switching in pulse sequences as Eco planar Imaging (EPI), due to this kind of sequence is the most used in advance applications of magnetic resonance imaging as functional MRI, cardiac imaging or diffusion.

  19. Short-Term Effects of Transjugular Intrahepatic Shunt on Cardiac Function Assessed by Cardiac MRI: Preliminary Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess short-term effects of transjugular intrahepatic shunt (TIPS) on cardiac function with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with liver cirrhosis. Eleven patients (six males and five females) with intractable esophageal varices or refractory ascites were imaged with MRI at 1.5 T prior to, within 24 h after, and 4-6 months after TIPS creation (n = 5). Invasive pressures were registered during TIPS creation. MRI consisted of a stack of contiguous slices as well as phase contrast images at all four valve planes and perpendicular to the portal vein. Imaging data were analyzed through time-volume curves and first derivatives. The portoatrial pressure gradient decreased from 19.8 ± 2.3 to 6.6 ± 2.3, accompanied by a nearly two fold increase in central pressures and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure immediately after TIPS creation. Left and right end diastolic volumes and stroke volumes increased by 11, 13, and 24%, respectively (p < 0.001), but dropped back to baseline at follow-up. End systolic volumes remained unchanged. E/A ratios remained within normal range. During follow-up the left ventricular mass was larger than baseline values in all patients, with an average increase of 7.9 g (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the increased volume load shunted to the heart after TIPS creation transiently exceeded the preload reserve of the right and left ventricle, leading to significantly increased pulmonary wedge pressures and persistent enlargement of the left and right atria. Normalization of cardiac dimensions was observed after months together with mild left ventricular hypertrophy.

  20. Groupwise registration of cardiac perfusion MRI sequences using normalized mutual information in high dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrouni, Sameh; Rougon, Nicolas; Pr"teux, Françoise

    2011-03-01

    In perfusion MRI (p-MRI) exams, short-axis (SA) image sequences are captured at multiple slice levels along the long-axis of the heart during the transit of a vascular contrast agent (Gd-DTPA) through the cardiac chambers and muscle. Compensating cardio-thoracic motions is a requirement for enabling computer-aided quantitative assessment of myocardial ischaemia from contrast-enhanced p-MRI sequences. The classical paradigm consists of registering each sequence frame on a reference image using some intensity-based matching criterion. In this paper, we introduce a novel unsupervised method for the spatio-temporal groupwise registration of cardiac p-MRI exams based on normalized mutual information (NMI) between high-dimensional feature distributions. Here, local contrast enhancement curves are used as a dense set of spatio-temporal features, and statistically matched through variational optimization to a target feature distribution derived from a registered reference template. The hard issue of probability density estimation in high-dimensional state spaces is bypassed by using consistent geometric entropy estimators, allowing NMI to be computed directly from feature samples. Specifically, a computationally efficient kth-nearest neighbor (kNN) estimation framework is retained, leading to closed-form expressions for the gradient flow of NMI over finite- and infinite-dimensional motion spaces. This approach is applied to the groupwise alignment of cardiac p-MRI exams using a free-form Deformation (FFD) model for cardio-thoracic motions. Experiments on simulated and natural datasets suggest its accuracy and robustness for registering p-MRI exams comprising more than 30 frames.

  1. Preliminary MRI study on hemodynamics after prosthetic cardiac valve implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the function of prosthetic valve by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to measure the blood velocity downstream of prosthetic valve and three-dimensional surface profiles so as to provide the original materials for appearance and development of thrombi-embolic complications in the long time follow-up. Methods: Twenty-seven cases with prosthetic aortic valve were examined and the blood velocity was measured by using MRI. The diseased heart valves were replaced with two prosthetic valves in 20 cases, and replaced with single prosthetic valve in 7 cases. The axial velocity components were measured at three positions near the valve including half, one, and two diameter downstream in the ascending aorta. Two and three-dimensional surface profile reconstruction were analyzed by using flow analysis software and Matlab 6.5 software. Results: In 16 cases with prosthetic aortic valve replacement with two leaflets prosthetic valves, the velocity profiles downstream of the valve prosthetic reflecting the valve design was nearly three velocity, jets of the two major orifices and the central slit between the two leaflets. In 4 cases with prosthetic aortic valve replace with Sorin two leaflets prosthetic valve, the velocity profiles downstream was nearly two velocity jets of the two major orifices. In 20 cases replaced with two leaflets prosthetic valves, blood velocity profiles were skewed with highest velocities. Seven cases with single leaflet showed single velocity jets of the major orifices at peak systole. Retrograde velocities occurred in part of the lateral orifice regions in 26 cases. Three-dimensional surface profiles downstream of the prosthetic aortic valve reflected the valve design. The blood velocity profiles with prosthetic aortic valve in the one diameter downstream in the ascending aorta clearly showed the valve design. Conclusion: MRI is a non-invasive, direct, and in-vivo method of choice to assess the valvular function and is the

  2. Pattern-based approach to fetal congenital cardiovascular anomalies using the transverse aortic arch view on prenatal cardiac MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Su-Zhen; Zhu, Ming [Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Children' s Medical Center, Shanghai (China)

    2015-05-01

    Fetal echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for prenatal diagnosis of congenital cardiovascular anomalies. However, echocardiography has limitations. Fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to complement US in detecting congenital cardiovascular anomalies. This article draws on our experience; it describes the transverse aortic arch view on fetal cardiac MRI and important clues on an abnormal transverse view at the level of the aortic arch to the diagnosis of fetal congenital cardiovascular anomalies. (orig.)

  3. Pattern-based approach to fetal congenital cardiovascular anomalies using the transverse aortic arch view on prenatal cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetal echocardiography is the imaging modality of choice for prenatal diagnosis of congenital cardiovascular anomalies. However, echocardiography has limitations. Fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to complement US in detecting congenital cardiovascular anomalies. This article draws on our experience; it describes the transverse aortic arch view on fetal cardiac MRI and important clues on an abnormal transverse view at the level of the aortic arch to the diagnosis of fetal congenital cardiovascular anomalies. (orig.)

  4. Real-time cardiac MRI using prior spatial-spectral information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinegar, Cornelius; Zhang, Haosen; Wu, Yi-Jen L; Foley, Lesley M; Hitchens, T; Ye, Qing; Pocci, Darren; Lam, Fan; Ho, Chien; Liang, Zhi-Pei

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac MRI performed while the patient is breathing is typically achieved using non-real-time techniques such as ECG triggering with respiratory gating; however, modern dynamic imaging techniques are beginning to enable this type of imaging in real-time. One of these dynamic imaging techniques is based on forming a Partially Separable Function (PSF) model of the data, but the model fitting process is known to be sensitive even when truncated SVD regularization is used. As a result, physiologically meaningless artifacts can appear in the dynamic images when the total number of measurements is limited. To address this issue, the dynamic imaging problem is formulated as a generalized Tikhonov regularization problem with the PSF model as a component of the forward data model, and a penalty function is used to introduce spatial-spectral prior information. This new method both reduces data acquisition requirements and improves stability relative to the original PSF based method when applied to cardiac MRI. PMID:19964109

  5. 核磁共振在缺血性心脏病及心脏功能分析中的新进展%Advances of MRI in Ischemic Heart Disease and Analysis of Cardiac Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄莺; 马依彤

    2003-01-01

    @@ 随着科学技术的发展,心血管疾病的诊断日益完善,仅心血管影像技术就有超声心动图,心肌灌注断层显像(Single photon emission computed tomography,SPECT),X-线计算机断层成像(Computed tomography,CT),核磁共振(Magnetic resonance imaging,MRI)及数字减影血管造影(Digital subtraction angiography,DSA)等.MRI是近十年来用于临床心血管疾病的诊断技术,由于其无创,无辐射,可行多层面,多角度成像,因而较之其他的技术更便利.

  6. Cardiac MRI in pulmonary artery hypertension: correlations between morphological and functional parameters and invasive measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare cardiac MRI with right heart catheterisation in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and to evaluate its ability to assess PH severity. Forty patients were included. MRI included cine and phase-contrast sequences, study of ventricular function, cardiac cavity areas and ratios, position of the interventricular septum (IVS) in systole and diastole, and flow measurements. We defined four groups according to the severity of PH and three groups according to IVS position: A, normal position; B, abnormal in diastole; C, abnormal in diastole and systole. IVS position was correlated with pulmonary artery pressures and PVR (pulmonary vascular resistance). Median pulmonary artery pressures and resistance were significantly higher in patients with an abnormal septal position compared with those with a normal position. Correlations were good between the right ventricular ejection fraction and PVR, right ventricular end-systolic volume and PAP, percentage of right ventricular area change and PVR, and diastolic and systolic ventricular area ratio and PVR. These parameters were significantly associated with PH severity. Cardiac MRI can help to assess the severity of PH. (orig.)

  7. Optimizing conventional cardiac MRI in the rabbit at 0.3 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to define the most efficient way of performing cardiac MRI for anatomic information in small experimental animals, using a vertical magnetic field with a strength of 0.3 T (FONAR beta-3000M). This information may be used to improve cardiac MRI in infants and small children, since the size of a rabbit is considered comparable to that of a neonate. Experimental axial cardiac MRI studies were performed in a rabbit under general anesthesia in order to study the effects on image quality of changing various imaging parameters. These are ECG-gating, number of excitations (averages), number of warp levels, echo time (TE) and repetition time (TR). The effects of changing the size of the field of view (FOV), the slice thickness and the phase-encoding direction were also studied. We found that ECG-gating was crucial and that three excitations, TE 16 ms, and 257 vertical phase-encoding warp levels were adequate. Five-millimeter slice thickness and FOV 20 cm were preferred. (orig.)

  8. Pulmonary arterial dimensions and right ventricular function by cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Methods: One hundred and thirty patients with PAH confirmed by right cardiac catheterization were examined by CMRI and the results were compared with that of 31 healthy control participants. The main pulmonary artery diameter (MPAD), aortic diameter (AOD), main pulmonary artery diameter/aortic diameter (MPAD/AOD), right ventricular end-diastolic volume (RVEDV), right ventricular end-systolic volume (RVESV), right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) and right ventricular mass (RVM) were measured. The independent samples t-test was used to compare the PAH group with the control group. The Pearson correlation analysis and linear regression analysis were used to evaluate the relationship between cardiac and arterial measurements and pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). Results: The MPAD, MPAD/AOD, RVEDV, RVESV, RVM in PAH group [(3.88 ±0.57) cm,1.36 ±0.17,(161.63 ±56.37) ml,(112.61 ±41.46) ml,(82.70 ± 20.73) g, respectively] were increased compared with those in normal control group [(2.74 ±0.31 ) cm, 0.90 ±0.07, (131.31 ± 15.14) ml, (61.33±9.00) ml, (44.39±5.87) g, respectively]. The RVSV and RVEF in PAH group[(49.02 ±19.20) ml, (30.76 ± 5.85 )%, respectively] were decreased compared with those in normal control group [(69.95 ± 9.63 )ml, (53.28 ± 4.14)%, respectively]. The MPAD, MPAD/AOD, RVEDV, RVESV, RVSV, RVEF, RVM were significantly different between PAH patients and control participants (tMPAD=10.82, tMPAD/AOD=14.93, tRVEDV=2.96, tRVESV=6.83, tRVSV=-5.89, tRVEF=-20.22, tRVM=10.12, respectively, P<0.01). There were no significant correlations between MPAD, RVEDV, RVESV, RVSV and PAP (r=0.299 for MPAD, r=0.127 for RVEDV, r=0.278 for RVESV, r=-0.229 for RVSV). Moderate positive correlations were found between MPAD/AOD, RVM and PAP (r=0.702 for MPAD/AOD, r=0.683 for RVM ). A moderate negative correlation was found between

  9. Differentiation of cardiac thrombus from cardiac tumor combining cardiac MRI and 18F-FDG-PET/CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinuncini, Massimo; Zuin, Marco; Scaranello, Fiorenzo; Fejzo, Majlinda; Rampin, Lucia; Rubello, Domenico; Faggian, Giuseppe; Roncon, Loris

    2016-06-01

    Radiological differentiation of an unknown cardiac masse is often a challenging issue. 18F-FDG-PET/CT imaging was performed to evaluate a left ventricle mass visualized on transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in a patient with an history of ischemic heart disease. The metabolically inert area on the PET/CT, corresponding to the relatively homogenous hypodensity in the LV, was thought to represent an old organized LV thrombus. Histopathological examination confirmed the imaging diagnosis. PMID:27038712

  10. Assessment of cardiac morphology and ventricular function in healthy Chinese individuals using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate reproducibility of cardiac MRI for assessment of cardiac morphology and ventricular function in selected normal Chinese Han population. Methods: Two hundred and sixty-nine normal volunteers underwent cardiac MRI using a 1.5 T MR system. HASTE and steady state free precession imaging were performed with long and short axis images and cine mode through the ventricle with wireless vector cardiac gating. The images were reviewed by two independent observers. The dimensions of cardiac chambers and ventricular function including ejection fraction (EF), end diastolic volume (EDV) , end systolic volume (ESV) and myocardial mass were evaluated. The data between male and female were compared by using two-tailed unpaired t test. Results: Total imaging time was (15±3) min. The anteroposterior diameter of the left atrium was (2.87±0.77) cm, the right atrial diameter perpendicular to the atrial septum was (3.61±0.57) cm, the end diastolic diameter of the left ventricle was (4.97± 0.52) cm, the end diastolic diameter of the right ventricle was (2.65±0.48) cm. On the left ventricle, EF was (60.62±7.08)%, EDV was (115.37±26.71) ml, ESV was (46.02±15.72) ml and LV mass was (82.97±24.03) g. On the right ventricle, EF was (47.73±6.50)%, EDV was (128.27±32.16) ml, ESV was (67.7±21.07) ml and RV mass was (48.24±13.42) g. There were no statistically significant differences in LVESV (P=0.144), LVEDV index (P=0.714), LVESV index (P=0.113), LVCI (P=0.199), RVEF (P=0.296) and RV mass (P=0.093), and statistically significant differences in other cardiac parameters between male and female. Conclusion: Cardiac MRI can provide useful information about cardiac function and morphology with a high level of reproducibility in normal Chinese Han population. (authors)

  11. Automated segmentation and reconstruction of patient-specific cardiac anatomy and pathology from in vivo MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an automated method to segment left ventricle (LV) tissues from functional and delayed-enhancement (DE) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans using a sequential multi-step approach. First, a region of interest (ROI) is computed to create a subvolume around the LV using morphological operations and image arithmetic. From the subvolume, the myocardial contours are automatically delineated using difference of Gaussians (DoG) filters and GSV snakes. These contours are used as a mask to identify pathological tissues, such as fibrosis or scar, within the DE-MRI. The presented automated technique is able to accurately delineate the myocardium and identify the pathological tissue in patient sets. The results were validated by two expert cardiologists, and in one set the automated results are quantitatively and qualitatively compared with expert manual delineation. Furthermore, the method is patient-specific, performed on an entire patient MRI series. Thus, in addition to providing a quick analysis of individual MRI scans, the fully automated segmentation method is used for effectively tagging regions in order to reconstruct computerized patient-specific 3D cardiac models. These models can then be used in electrophysiological studies and surgical strategy planning. (paper)

  12. Automated segmentation and reconstruction of patient-specific cardiac anatomy and pathology from in vivo MRI*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringenberg, Jordan; Deo, Makarand; Devabhaktuni, Vijay; Filgueiras-Rama, David; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Ibañez, Borja; Berenfeld, Omer; Boyers, Pamela; Gold, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an automated method to segment left ventricle (LV) tissues from functional and delayed-enhancement (DE) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans using a sequential multi-step approach. First, a region of interest (ROI) is computed to create a subvolume around the LV using morphological operations and image arithmetic. From the subvolume, the myocardial contours are automatically delineated using difference of Gaussians (DoG) filters and GSV snakes. These contours are used as a mask to identify pathological tissues, such as fibrosis or scar, within the DE-MRI. The presented automated technique is able to accurately delineate the myocardium and identify the pathological tissue in patient sets. The results were validated by two expert cardiologists, and in one set the automated results are quantitatively and qualitatively compared with expert manual delineation. Furthermore, the method is patient-specific, performed on an entire patient MRI series. Thus, in addition to providing a quick analysis of individual MRI scans, the fully automated segmentation method is used for effectively tagging regions in order to reconstruct computerized patient-specific 3D cardiac models. These models can then be used in electrophysiological studies and surgical strategy planning.

  13. Cardiac MRI, How Much can be Performed on a 1.5T Magnet with Basic Cardiac Sequences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Sefidbakht*

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: To present our first 8-month experience with cardiac MRI (1.5T, Siemens Avanto magnet, Argus viewer spectrum of local referrals and outcomes.Materials and Methods: The population included 24 patients, (five female, 19 male reffered for evaluation of possible arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD (11, myocarditis (5, ischemic scar (2 and miscellaneous cases (6 including myocardial cyst, papillary muscle lipoma, straight back syndrome (ruling out absent pericardium, possible pericarditis, Brugada syndrome and one case of later biopsy proven cardiac amyloidosis. Retrorecon, truFisp cine images were obtained in SA, 2 and 4 chamber views. T1 flash images were taken with/ without fat-saturation. T2HASTE and SA STIR images were obtained. Postcontrast delayed enhancement images were taken (PSIR tFla or Trufisp. Dynamic perfusion images were obtained in two cases. For DE images, TI 160-360 was manually selected one image at a time and optimal myocardial nulling was selected visually and subjectively. Results: Out of 11 patients reffered for possible ARVD, four patients showed regional dys/akinesia; with an EF<40% this was considered a major criterion. Three of the mentioned patients as well as two patients without obvious dyskinesia showed delayed RV freewall enhancement. Out of five patients referred with possible myocarditis, three showed patchy subepicardial enhanecement which confirmed the diagnosis, and two showed nonspecific transmural edema and/or enhancement. Ischemic scar was observed in two.Conclusion: Although far less than perfect, the basic MRI sequences provided by many vendors on 1.5T magnets can be helpful in selected cases of cardiac disease when referral to centers with a higher level of expertise and equipment is not feasible.

  14. Evaluation of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction by gated SPECT and cardiac MRI in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of gated single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the assessment of left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic/end-systolic volumes (EDV, ESV) and ejection fraction (LVEF) in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the reference method. Furthermore, software-specific characteristics of Quantitative Gated SPECT (QGS), Emory Cardiac Toolbox (ECTB) and 4D-MSPECT were analysed. Thirty-six patients with dilated cardiomyopathy who underwent gated 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile SPECT and cardiac MRI were included. LV EDV, ESV and LVEF values of gated SPECT were calculated using QGS, ECTB and 4D-MSPECT. The correlation between the results of gated SPECT and cardiac MRI was excellent for EDV [R = 0.872 (QGS), R = 0.879 (ECTB), R = 0.869 (4D-MSPECT)], ESV [R = 0.908 (QGS), R = 0.897 (ECTB), R = 0.880 (4D-MSPECT)] and LVEF [R = 0.794 (QGS), R = 0.763 (ECTB), R = 0.710 (4D-MSPECT)]. EDV and ESV assessed by QGS did not differ significantly from those assessed by cardiac MRI (all p = NS), whereas EDV and ESV were overestimated by ECTB and 4D-MSPECT compared with cardiac MRI (all p < 0.05). LVEF was overestimated by QGS, ECTB and 4D-MSPECT compared with cardiac MRI (all p < 0.05). The correlation between gated SPECT and cardiac MRI is excellent for LV volume and LVEF values calculated by QGS, ECTB and 4D-MSPECT in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. However, algorithm-varying over- or underestimation of LV volumes and LVEF should be accounted for in the clinical context. (orig.)

  15. MRI assessment of cardiac tumours: part 2, spectrum of appearances of histologically malignant lesions and tumour mimics

    OpenAIRE

    Hoey, Edward T.D.; Shahid, Muhammad; Ganeshan, Arul; Baijal, Shobhit; Simpson, Helen; Watkin, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the reference standard technique for assessment and characterization of a suspected cardiac tumour. It provides an unrestricted field of view, high temporal resolution and non-invasive tissue characterization based on multi-parametric assessment of the chemical micro-environment. Sarcomas account for around 95% of all primary malignant cardiac tumours with lymphoma, and primary pericardial mesothelioma making up most of the remainder of cases. By co...

  16. Current Pharmacological Advances in the Treatment of Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andry Papastylianou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest is defined as the sudden cessation of spontaneous ventilation and circulation. Within 15 seconds of cardiac arrest, the patient loses consciousness, electroencephalogram becomes flat after 30 seconds, pupils dilate fully after 60 seconds, and cerebral damage takes place within 90–300 seconds. It is essential to act immediately as irreversible damage can occur in a short time. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is an attempt to restore spontaneous circulation through a broad range of interventions which are early defibrillation, high-quality and uninterrupted chest compressions, advanced airway interventions, and pharmacological interventions. Drugs should be considered only after initial shocks have been delivered (when indicated and chest compressions and ventilation have been started. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, no specific drug therapy has been shown to improve survival to hospital discharge after cardiac arrest, and only few drugs have a proven benefit for short-term survival. This paper reviews current pharmacological treatment of cardiac arrest. There are three groups of drugs relevant to the management of cardiac arrest: vasopressors, antiarrhythmics, and other drugs such as sodium bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, atropine, fibrinolytic drugs, and corticosteroids.

  17. Super-resolution in cardiac MRI using a Bayesian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco Toledo, Nelson; Rueda, Andrea; Santa Marta, Cristina; Romero, Eduardo

    2013-03-01

    Acquisition of proper cardiac MR images is highly limited by continued heart motion and apnea periods. A typical acquisition results in volumes with inter-slice separations of up to 8 mm. This paper presents a super-resolution strategy that estimates a high-resolution image from a set of low-resolution image series acquired in different non-orthogonal orientations. The proposal is based on a Bayesian approach that implements a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) estimator combined with a Wiener filter. A pre-processing stage was also included, to correct or eliminate differences in the image intensities and to transform the low-resolution images to a common spatial reference system. The MAP estimation includes an observation image model that represents the different contributions to the voxel intensities based on a 3D Gaussian function. A quantitative and qualitative assessment was performed using synthetic and real images, showing that the proposed approach produces a high-resolution image with significant improvements (about 3dB in PSNR) with respect to a simple trilinear interpolation. The Wiener filter shows little contribution to the final result, demonstrating that the MAP uniformity prior is able to filter out a large amount of the acquisition noise.

  18. From the Weinberg Angle to Cardiac MRI a career change

    CERN Document Server

    ten Have, I

    1997-01-01

    In summer 1994 I left particle physics to pursue a career in industry. Now three years later I am working for Philips Medical Systems in the Netherlands. I am responsible, both technically and commercially, for adapting the exist-ingMagnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique for cardiology applications. In this seminar I will talk about the interesting challenges my current position holds for me. I will present the substantial added value of my working experience at CERN: the physics research, working at technological frontiers, the international collaboration, expatriate life. Finally I will also describe what I have done to actively support this career change. Speaker: 1985-1989 Ð University of Nijmegen and CERN - Ph.D. on B0-B0bar mixing, Eurojet, top quark cross-sections, test of the O(as3) QCD matrix element, calculations for future hadron colliders, UA1. 1989-1994 Ð University of Glasgow and CERN - ALEPH - Jet charge studies, measurement of the Weinberg Angle. 1994-1996 Ð Master of Business Administr...

  19. Hepatoma with cardiac metastasis: An advanced cancer requiring advanced treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Sheng Lin; Shih-Ming Jung; Feng-Chun Tsai; Chun-Nan Yeh; Tzu-Fang Shiu; Hsueh-Hua Wu; Pyng-Jing Lin; Pao-Hsien Chu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical and pathologic findings,and to discuss the pathophysiology of hepatocellular carcinoma with cardiac metastasis.METHODS: Eight hepatoma patients with cardiac metastasis, who were treated by surgical excision from 1993 to 2006, were retrospectively studied. Detailed clinical parameters were analyzed.RESULTS: Of those eight patients, two (25%) were women and six (75%) were men, with the mean age of 50 years (range, 40-70 years). The presentations included: asymptomatic (75%), heart failure (25%), and pulmonary embolism (12.5%). All lesions involved the right atrium, and extended to the lung (12.5%), inferior vena cava (25%), and left atrium (12.5%). The level of tumor marker, alpha-fetal protein, was not correlated with the severity of metastasis or disease prognosis.Moreover, the availably estimated doubling time was less than 3 mo. The pathological findings included variable hemorrhage and necrosis. The survival time following surgery also varied from one month to more than 30 mo.CONCLUSION: Hepatoma metastasis to the heart was detected in all eight patients. This study demonstrates that surgery might help the outcome in such cases.

  20. The Adverse Events and Hemodynamic Effects of Adenosine-Based Cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We wanted to prospectively assess the adverse events and hemodynamic effects associated with an intravenous adenosine infusion in patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease and who were undergoing cardiac MRI. One hundred and sixty-eight patients (64 ± 9 years) received adenosine (140 μg/kg/min) during cardiac MRI. Before and during the administration, the heart rate, systemic blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were monitored using a MRI-compatible system. We documented any signs and symptoms of potential adverse events. In total, 47 out of 168 patients (28%) experienced adverse effects, which were mostly mild or moderate. In 13 patients (8%), the adenosine infusion was discontinued due to intolerable dyspnea or chest pain. No high grade atrioventricular block, bronchospasm or other life-threatening adverse events occurred. The hemodynamic measurements showed a significant increase in the heart rate during adenosine infusion (69.3 ± 11.7 versus 82.4 ± 13.0 beats/min, respectively; p < 0.001). A significant but clinically irrelevant increase in oxygen saturation occurred during adenosine infusion (96 ± 1.9% versus 97 ± 1.3%, respectively; p < 0.001). The blood pressure did not significantly change during adenosine infusion (systolic: 142.8 ± 24.0 versus 140.9 ± 25.7 mmHg; diastolic: 80.2 ± 12.5 mmHg versus 78.9 ± 15.6, respectively). This study confirms the safety of adenosine infusion during cardiac MRI. A considerable proportion of all patients will experience minor adverse effects and some patients will not tolerate adenosine infusion. However, all adverse events can be successfully managed by a radiologist. The increased heart rate during adenosine infusion highlights the need to individually adjust the settings according to the patient, e.g., the number of slices of myocardial perfusion imaging.

  1. Modelling Cardiac Signal as a Confound in EEG-fMRI and its Application in Focal Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liston, Adam David; Salek-Haddadi, Afraim; Hamandi, Khalid;

    2005-01-01

    Cardiac noise has been shown to reduce the sensitivity of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to an experimental effect due to its confounding presence in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal. Its effect is most severe in particular regions of the brain and a method is yet...... to take it into account in routine fMRI analysis. This paper reports the development of a general and robust technique to improve the reliability of EEG-fMRI studies to BOLD signal correlated with interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs). In these studies, ECG is routinely recorded, enabling cardiac...... effects to be modelled, as effects of no interest. Our model is based on an over-complete basis set covering a linear relationship between cardiac-related MR signal and the phase of the cardiac cycle or time after pulse (TAP). This method showed that, on average, 24.6 +/- 10.9% of grey matter voxels...

  2. Effect of cardiac motion on body surface electrocardiographic potentials: an MRI-based simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an electrical model of cardiac ventricles incorporating real geometry and motion. The heart anatomy and its motion through the cardiac cycle are obtained from segmentations of multiple-slice MRI time sequences; the special conduction system is constructed using an automated mapping procedure from an existing static heart model. The heart model is mounted in an anatomically realistic voxel model of the human body. The cardiac electrical source and surface potentials are determined numerically using both a finite-difference scheme and a boundary-element method with the incorporation of the motion of the heart. The electrocardiograms (ECG) and body surface potential maps are calculated and compared to the static simulation in the resting heart. The simulations demonstrate that introducing motion into the cardiac model modifies the ECG signals, with the most obvious change occurring during the T-wave at peak contraction of the ventricles. Body surface potential maps differ in some local positions during the T-wave, which may be of importance to a number of cardiac models, including those incorporating inverse methods

  3. Effect of cardiac motion on body surface electrocardiographic potentials: an MRI-based simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Qing [School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, QLD (Australia); Liu Feng [School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, QLD (Australia); Appleton, Ben [School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, QLD (Australia); Xia Ling [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Liu Nianjun [School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, QLD (Australia); Wilson, Stephen [School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, QLD (Australia); Riley, Robyn [Cardiac MRI Centre, Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Strugnel, Wendy [Cardiac MRI Centre, Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Slaughter, Richard [Cardiac MRI Centre, Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Denman, Russel [Cardiac MRI Centre, Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, QLD (Australia); Crozier, Stuart [School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, University of Queensland, QLD (Australia)

    2006-07-21

    This paper describes an electrical model of cardiac ventricles incorporating real geometry and motion. The heart anatomy and its motion through the cardiac cycle are obtained from segmentations of multiple-slice MRI time sequences; the special conduction system is constructed using an automated mapping procedure from an existing static heart model. The heart model is mounted in an anatomically realistic voxel model of the human body. The cardiac electrical source and surface potentials are determined numerically using both a finite-difference scheme and a boundary-element method with the incorporation of the motion of the heart. The electrocardiograms (ECG) and body surface potential maps are calculated and compared to the static simulation in the resting heart. The simulations demonstrate that introducing motion into the cardiac model modifies the ECG signals, with the most obvious change occurring during the T-wave at peak contraction of the ventricles. Body surface potential maps differ in some local positions during the T-wave, which may be of importance to a number of cardiac models, including those incorporating inverse methods.

  4. Effect of cardiac motion on body surface electrocardiographic potentials: an MRI-based simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qing; Liu, Feng; Appleton, Ben; Xia, Ling; Liu, Nianjun; Wilson, Stephen; Riley, Robyn; Strugnel, Wendy; Slaughter, Richard; Denman, Russel; Crozier, Stuart

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes an electrical model of cardiac ventricles incorporating real geometry and motion. The heart anatomy and its motion through the cardiac cycle are obtained from segmentations of multiple-slice MRI time sequences; the special conduction system is constructed using an automated mapping procedure from an existing static heart model. The heart model is mounted in an anatomically realistic voxel model of the human body. The cardiac electrical source and surface potentials are determined numerically using both a finite-difference scheme and a boundary-element method with the incorporation of the motion of the heart. The electrocardiograms (ECG) and body surface potential maps are calculated and compared to the static simulation in the resting heart. The simulations demonstrate that introducing motion into the cardiac model modifies the ECG signals, with the most obvious change occurring during the T-wave at peak contraction of the ventricles. Body surface potential maps differ in some local positions during the T-wave, which may be of importance to a number of cardiac models, including those incorporating inverse methods.

  5. New cardiac MRI gating method using event-synchronous adaptive digital filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hodong; Park, Youngcheol; Cho, Sungpil; Jang, Bongryoel; Lee, Kyoungjoung

    2009-11-01

    When imaging the heart using MRI, an artefact-free electrocardiograph (ECG) signal is not only important for monitoring the patient's heart activity but also essential for cardiac gating to reduce noise in MR images induced by moving organs. The fundamental problem in conventional ECG is the distortion induced by electromagnetic interference. Here, we propose an adaptive algorithm for the suppression of MR gradient artefacts (MRGAs) in ECG leads of a cardiac MRI gating system. We have modeled MRGAs by assuming a source of strong pulses used for dephasing the MR signal. The modeled MRGAs are rectangular pulse-like signals. We used an event-synchronous adaptive digital filter whose reference signal is synchronous to the gradient peaks of MRI. The event detection processor for the event-synchronous adaptive digital filter was implemented using the phase space method-a sort of topology mapping method-and least-squares acceleration filter. For evaluating the efficiency of the proposed method, the filter was tested using simulation and actual data. The proposed method requires a simple experimental setup that does not require extra hardware connections to obtain the reference signals of adaptive digital filter. The proposed algorithm was more effective than the multichannel approach. PMID:19644754

  6. Advanced Structural and Functional Brain MRI in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgio, Antonio; De Stefano, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the central nervous system is crucial for an early and reliable diagnosis and monitoring of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Focal white matter (WM) lesions, as detected by MRI, are the pathological hallmark of the disease and show some relation to clinical disability, especially in the long run. Gray matter (GM) involvement is evident from disease onset and includes focal (i.e., cortical lesions) and diffuse pathology (i.e., atrophy). Both accumulate over time and show close relation to physical disability and cognitive impairment. Using advanced quantitative MRI techniques such as magnetization transfer imaging (MTI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS), and iron imaging, subtle MS pathology has been demonstrated from early stages outside focal WM lesions in the form of widespread abnormalities of the normal appearing WM and GM. In addition, studies using functional MRI have demonstrated that brain plasticity is driven by MS pathology, playing adaptive or maladaptive roles to neurologic and cognitive status and explaining, at least in part, the clinicoradiological paradox of MS. PMID:27116723

  7. A 128-Channel Receive-Only Cardiac Coil for Highly Accelerated Cardiac MRI at 3 Tesla

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Melanie; Potthast, Andreas; Sosnovik, David E; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Wiggins, Graham C.; Triantafyllou, Christina; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2008-01-01

    A 128-channel receive-only array coil is described and tested for cardiac imaging at 3T. The coil is closely contoured to the body with a “clam-shell” geometry with 68 posterior and 60 anterior elements, each 75 mm in diameter, and arranged in a continuous overlapped array of hexagonal symmetry to minimize nearest neighbor coupling. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and noise amplification for parallel imaging (G-factor) were evaluated in phantom and volunteer experiments. These results were compar...

  8. The role of 1.5 tesla MRI and anesthetic regimen concerning cardiac analysis in mice with cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Grabmaier

    Full Text Available Accurate assessment of left ventricular function in rodent models is essential for the evaluation of new therapeutic approaches for cardiac diseases. In our study, we provide new insights regarding the role of a 1.5 Tesla (T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI device and different anesthetic regimens on data validity. As dedicated small animal MRI and echocardiographic devices are not broadly available, we evaluated whether monitoring cardiac function in small rodents with a clinical 1.5 T MRI device is feasible. On a clinical electrocardiogram (ECG synchronized 1.5 T MRI scanner we therefore studied cardiac function parameters of mice with chronic virus-induced cardiomyopathy. Thus, reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF could be verified compared to healthy controls. However, our results showed a high variability. First, anesthesia with medetomidine, midazolam and fentanyl (MMF led to depressed cardiac function parameters and more variability than isoflurane gas inhalation anesthesia, especially at high concentrations. Furthermore, calculation of an average ejection fraction value from sequenced scans significantly reduced the variance of the results. To sum up, we introduce the clinical 1.5 T MRI device as a new tool for effective analysis of left ventricular function in mice with cardiomyopathy. Besides, we suggest isoflurane gas inhalation anesthesia at high concentrations for variance reduction and recommend calculation of an average ejection fraction value from multiple sequenced MRI scans to provide valid data and a solid basis for further clinical testing.

  9. Cardiac involvement in Erdheim- Chester disease: MRI findings and literature revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare form of non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, characterized by the involvement of several organs. The lesions may be skeletal or extra-skeletal: in particular, long bones, skin, lungs, and the cardiovascular and the central nervous systems can be affected. In this report, we describe a case of a 34-year-old man, who came to our observation with symptomatic ECD, for a correct assessment of the degree of cardiac involvement through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

  10. Cardiac function and myocardial perfusion immediately following maximal treadmill exercise inside the MRI room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballinger Michelle R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Treadmill exercise stress testing is an essential tool in the prevention, detection, and treatment of a broad spectrum of cardiovascular disease. After maximal exercise, cardiac images at peak stress are typically acquired using nuclear scintigraphy or echocardiography, both of which have inherent limitations. Although CMR offers superior image quality, the lack of MRI-compatible exercise and monitoring equipment has prevented the realization of treadmill exercise CMR. It is critical to commence imaging as quickly as possible after exercise to capture exercise-induced cardiac wall motion abnormalities. We modified a commercial treadmill such that it could be safely positioned inside the MRI room to minimize the distance between the treadmill and the scan table. We optimized the treadmill exercise CMR protocol in 20 healthy volunteers and successfully imaged cardiac function and myocardial perfusion at peak stress, followed by viability imaging at rest. Imaging commenced an average of 30 seconds after maximal exercise. Real-time cine of seven slices with no breath-hold and no ECG-gating was completed within 45 seconds of exercise, immediately followed by stress perfusion imaging of three short-axis slices which showed an average time to peak enhancement within 57 seconds of exercise. We observed a 3.1-fold increase in cardiac output and a myocardial perfusion reserve index of 1.9, which agree with reported values for healthy subjects at peak stress. This study successfully demonstrates in-room treadmill exercise CMR in healthy volunteers, but confirmation of feasibility in patients with heart disease is still needed.

  11. Advances in MRI for the evaluation of carotid atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, G C; Teng, Z; Patterson, A J; Lin, J-M; Young, V; Graves, M J; Gillard, J H

    2015-08-01

    Carotid artery atherosclerosis is an important source of mortality and morbidity in the Western world with significant socioeconomic implications. The quest for the early identification of the vulnerable carotid plaque is already in its third decade and traditional measures, such as the sonographic degree of stenosis, are not selective enough to distinguish those who would really benefit from a carotid endarterectomy. MRI of the carotid plaque enables the visualization of plaque composition and specific plaque components that have been linked to a higher risk of subsequent embolic events. Blood suppressed T1 and T2 weighted and proton density-weighted fast spin echo, gradient echo and time-of-flight sequences are typically used to quantify plaque components such as lipid-rich necrotic core, intraplaque haemorrhage, calcification and surface defects including erosion, disruption and ulceration. The purpose of this article is to review the most important recent advances in MRI technology to enable better diagnostic carotid imaging. PMID:25826233

  12. Evaluation of dual-channel and 4-port multi transmit technique in 3T MRI. Implications for cardiac SSFP cine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the usefulness of the dual-channel and 4-port multi transmit technique for cardiac examinations in 3T MRI. The B1 shimming conditions and the quadrature detection (QD) conditions were used, and B1 map scans and cardiac cine scans were performed using these two conditions. A half-Fourier FSE sequence was used for the B1 map scans, and the differences between the B1 shimming and QD conditions were analyzed. In addition, the cardiac cine images were acquired with a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence, and the image quality was compared in terms of the contrast-to-noise ratio. The maps acquired with the B1 shimming had lower RF field inhomogeneity than the maps acquired with the QD conditions. In the quantitative evaluation of the cine images, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and luminal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were significantly higher in scans with the B1 shimming than in scans with the QD conditions, while no significant differences were observed in the signal ratio or myocardial SNR. The use of this technique in 3T MRI provides significantly better B1 homogeneity and image quality in cardiac cine imaging as compared with conventional RF transmission. This technique has the potential to overcome the problems such as B1 inhomogeneity with commonly employed sequences for routine clinical cardiac MRI examinations performed at 3T. (author)

  13. A dynamic thorax phantom for the assessment of cardiac and respiratory motion correction in PET/MRI: A preliminary evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fieseler, Michael, E-mail: michael.fieseler@uni-muenster.de [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Mendelstrasse 11, 48149 Münster (Germany); Department of Computer Science, University of Münster, Einsteinstrasse 62, 48149 Münster (Germany); Kugel, Harald [Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital of Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, 48149 Münster (Germany); Gigengack, Fabian [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Mendelstrasse 11, 48149 Münster (Germany); Department of Computer Science, University of Münster, Einsteinstrasse 62, 48149 Münster (Germany); Kösters, Thomas; Büther, Florian [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Mendelstrasse 11, 48149 Münster (Germany); Quick, Harald H. [Institute of Medical Physics, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Henkestrasse 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Faber, Cornelius [Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospital of Münster, Albert-Schweitzer-Campus 1, 48149 Münster (Germany); Jiang, Xiaoyi [Department of Computer Science, University of Münster, Einsteinstrasse 62, 48149 Münster (Germany); Schäfers, Klaus P. [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Mendelstrasse 11, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2013-02-21

    Respiratory and cardiac motion are a known source of image degradation and quantification impairment in positron emission tomography (PET). In this study we use near-realistic PET/MRI data acquired using a custom-built human torso phantom capable of simulating respiratory and cardiac motion. We demonstrate that a significant reduction in motion-induced artifacts in PET data is possible using MR-derived motion estimates.

  14. A dynamic thorax phantom for the assessment of cardiac and respiratory motion correction in PET/MRI: A preliminary evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieseler, Michael; Kugel, Harald; Gigengack, Fabian; Kösters, Thomas; Büther, Florian; Quick, Harald H.; Faber, Cornelius; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Schäfers, Klaus P.

    2013-02-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion are a known source of image degradation and quantification impairment in positron emission tomography (PET). In this study we use near-realistic PET/MRI data acquired using a custom-built human torso phantom capable of simulating respiratory and cardiac motion. We demonstrate that a significant reduction in motion-induced artifacts in PET data is possible using MR-derived motion estimates.

  15. Cardiac MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gadolinium can be used in patients with iodine contrast allergy, but may require pre-medication. It is far ... it is known that the patient has an allergy to the gadolinium contrast, it may still be possible to use it ...

  16. Technical assessment of whole body angiography and cardiac function within a single MRI examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate a combined protocol for simultaneous cardiac MRI (CMR) and contrast-enhanced (CE) whole-body MR angiography (WB-MRA) techniques within a single examination. Materials and methods: Asymptomatic volunteers (n = 48) with low-moderate risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) were recruited. The protocol was divided into four sections: (1) CMR of left ventricle (LV) structure and function; (2) CE-MRA of the head, neck, and thorax followed by the distal lower limbs; (3) CMR LV “late gadolinium enhancement” assessment; and (4) CE-MRA of the abdomen and pelvis followed by the proximal lower limbs. Multiple observers undertook the image analysis. Results: For CMR, the mean ejection fraction (EF) was 67.3 ± 4.8% and mean left ventricular mass (LVM) was 100.3 ± 22.8 g. The intra-observer repeatability for EF ranged from 2.1–4.7% and from 9–12 g for LVM. Interobserver repeatability was 8.1% for EF and 19.1 g for LVM. No LV delayed myocardial enhancement was observed. For WB-MRA, some degree of luminal narrowing or stenosis was seen at 3.6% of the vessel segments (involving n = 29 of 48 volunteers) and interobserver radiological opinion was consistent in 96.7% of 1488 vessel segments assessed. Conclusion: Combined assessment of WB-MRA and CMR can be undertaken within a single examination on a clinical MRI system. The associated analysis techniques are repeatable and may be suitable for larger-scale cardiovascular MRI studies. - Highlights: • We report the use of whole body MR angiography and cardiac MR as a single examination. • Healthy volunteers with elevated cardiovascular disease risk were scanned. • Vessel segments and cardiac function were assessed by Radiologists and Physicists respectively. • The protocol took an average of 51 minutes to complete, and analyses were repeatable. • This combined cardiovascular MRI protocol will be used for better targeting of future interventions

  17. Establishment of Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Advanced Practice Provider Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Jill; Donnellan, Amy; Justice, Lindsey; Moake, Lindy; Mauney, Jennifer; Steadman, Page; Drajpuch, David; Tucker, Dawn; Storey, Jean; Roth, Stephen J; Koch, Josh; Checchia, Paul; Cooper, David S; Staveski, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The addition of advanced practice providers (APPs; nurse practitioners and physician assistants) to a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) team is a health care innovation that addresses medical provider shortages while allowing PCICUs to deliver high-quality, cost-effective patient care. APPs, through their consistent clinical presence, effective communication, and facilitation of interdisciplinary collaboration, provide a sustainable solution for the highly specialized needs of PCICU patients. In addition, APPs provide leadership, patient and staff education, facilitate implementation of evidence-based practice and quality improvement initiatives, and the performance of clinical research in the PCICU. This article reviews mechanisms for developing, implementing, and sustaining advance practice services in PCICUs. PMID:26714997

  18. Motion corrected LV quantification based on 3D modelling for improved functional assessment in cardiac MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Y. M.; McLaughlin, R. A.; Chan, B. T.; Aziz, Y. F. Abdul; Chee, K. H.; Ung, N. M.; Tan, L. K.; Lai, K. W.; Ng, S.; Lim, E.

    2015-04-01

    Cine MRI is a clinical reference standard for the quantitative assessment of cardiac function, but reproducibility is confounded by motion artefacts. We explore the feasibility of a motion corrected 3D left ventricle (LV) quantification method, incorporating multislice image registration into the 3D model reconstruction, to improve reproducibility of 3D LV functional quantification. Multi-breath-hold short-axis and radial long-axis images were acquired from 10 patients and 10 healthy subjects. The proposed framework reduced misalignment between slices to subpixel accuracy (2.88 to 1.21 mm), and improved interstudy reproducibility for 5 important clinical functional measures, i.e. end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, ejection fraction, myocardial mass and 3D-sphericity index, as reflected in a reduction in the sample size required to detect statistically significant cardiac changes: a reduction of 21-66%. Our investigation on the optimum registration parameters, including both cardiac time frames and number of long-axis (LA) slices, suggested that a single time frame is adequate for motion correction whereas integrating more LA slices can improve registration and model reconstruction accuracy for improved functional quantification especially on datasets with severe motion artefacts.

  19. Quantitative assessment of small animal cardiac 18F-FDG PET and MRI image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac disease research relies increasingly on small animal models and non-invasive imaging methods such as positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) using gadolinium-based contrast agents appear to be a visualizing infracted myocardium with high spatial resolution. Polar map (or bull's-eye image) was used to determination of the myocardial infarction area. Polar map is a comprehensive interpretation of the left ventricle. The infarct size was computed as the fraction of the total polar map areas. The threshold was computed as the percentage of mean intensity of the normal region. In other study, 50% predefined threshold value in varying range (30∼70%) was most commonly use. However, predefined threshold value isn't acceptance in all case. The purpose of this study was to investigate methodological approach for automatic measurement of rat myocardial infarct size using PET and MRI polar map with adaptive threshold value driven from Multi gaussian mixture model (MGMM)

  20. 3D cardiac motion reconstruction from CT data and tagged MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Mihalef, Viorel; Qian, Zhen; Voros, Szilard; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for left ventricle (LV) endocardium motion reconstruction using high resolution CT data and tagged MRI. High resolution CT data provide anatomic details on the LV endocardial surface, such as the papillary muscle and trabeculae carneae. Tagged MRI provides better time resolution. The combination of these two imaging techniques can give us better understanding on left ventricle motion. The high resolution CT images are segmented with mean shift method and generate the LV endocardium mesh. The meshless deformable model built with high resolution endocardium surface from CT data fit to the tagged MRI of the same phase. 3D deformation of the myocardium is computed with the Lagrangian dynamics and local Laplacian deformation. The segmented inner surface of left ventricle is compared with the heart inner surface picture and show high agreement. The papillary muscles are attached to the inner surface with roots. The free wall of the left ventricle inner surface is covered with trabeculae carneae. The deformation of the heart wall and the papillary muscle in the first half of the cardiac cycle is presented. The motion reconstruction results are very close to the live heart video. PMID:23366825

  1. Cardiac MRI. Diagnostic gain of an additional axial SSFP chest sequence for the detection of potentially significant extracardiac findings in the cardiac MRI examination setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Cardiac MRI (CMRI) is an effective method for imaging of the heart. The aim of our study was to assess whether an axial chest sequence in addition to the standard CMR examination setting has advantages in the detection of potentially significant extracardiac findings (PSEF). Materials and Methods: 400 consecutive patients were imaged at 1.5 T for clinical reasons. In addition to the standard long and short-axis views, an axial SSFP sequence was obtained covering the thorax from the lung apex to the diaphragm. All sequences were separately evaluated for PSEF. Results: A total of 25 PSEF were diagnosed in 400 patients, including 16 pleural effusions, a pulmonary fibrosis, a spondylodiscitis, ascites, lymphadenopathies, relapse of a mamma carcinoma, growth of adrenal glands metastases and diaphragmatic elevation. All 25 PSEF were detected by reading survey sequences. 24 of the 25 PSEF were detected by the additional SSFP chest sequence as well as the CINE sequences. Conclusion: In our study the additional axial SSFP chest sequence didn't show a benefit in the detection of PSEF. With the survey sequences we were able to detect all PSEF. We conclude that survey images should be assessed for additional findings. (orig.)

  2. Cardiac MRI. Diagnostic gain of an additional axial SSFP chest sequence for the detection of potentially significant extracardiac findings in the cardiac MRI examination setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roller, F.C.; Schneider, C.; Krombach, G.A. [University Hospital Giessen (Germany). Dept. Radiology; Schuhbaeck, A. [University Hospital Giessen (Germany). Dept. Cardiology; Rolf, A. [Kerckhoff Hospital Bad Nauheim (Germany). Dept. Cardiology

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Cardiac MRI (CMRI) is an effective method for imaging of the heart. The aim of our study was to assess whether an axial chest sequence in addition to the standard CMR examination setting has advantages in the detection of potentially significant extracardiac findings (PSEF). Materials and Methods: 400 consecutive patients were imaged at 1.5 T for clinical reasons. In addition to the standard long and short-axis views, an axial SSFP sequence was obtained covering the thorax from the lung apex to the diaphragm. All sequences were separately evaluated for PSEF. Results: A total of 25 PSEF were diagnosed in 400 patients, including 16 pleural effusions, a pulmonary fibrosis, a spondylodiscitis, ascites, lymphadenopathies, relapse of a mamma carcinoma, growth of adrenal glands metastases and diaphragmatic elevation. All 25 PSEF were detected by reading survey sequences. 24 of the 25 PSEF were detected by the additional SSFP chest sequence as well as the CINE sequences. Conclusion: In our study the additional axial SSFP chest sequence didn't show a benefit in the detection of PSEF. With the survey sequences we were able to detect all PSEF. We conclude that survey images should be assessed for additional findings. (orig.)

  3. Using learned under-sampling pattern for increasing speed of cardiac cine MRI based on compressive sensing principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Pooria; Kayvanrad, Mohammad; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2012-12-01

    This article presents a compressive sensing approach for reducing data acquisition time in cardiac cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In cardiac cine MRI, several images are acquired throughout the cardiac cycle, each of which is reconstructed from the raw data acquired in the Fourier transform domain, traditionally called k-space. In the proposed approach, a majority, e.g., 62.5%, of the k-space lines (trajectories) are acquired at the odd time points and a minority, e.g., 37.5%, of the k-space lines are acquired at the even time points of the cardiac cycle. Optimal data acquisition at the even time points is learned from the data acquired at the odd time points. To this end, statistical features of the k-space data at the odd time points are clustered by fuzzy c-means and the results are considered as the states of Markov chains. The resulting data is used to train hidden Markov models and find their transition matrices. Then, the trajectories corresponding to transition matrices far from an identity matrix are selected for data acquisition. At the end, an iterative thresholding algorithm is used to reconstruct the images from the under-sampled k-space datasets. The proposed approaches for selecting the k-space trajectories and reconstructing the images generate more accurate images compared to alternative methods. The proposed under-sampling approach achieves an acceleration factor of 2 for cardiac cine MRI.

  4. Cardiac Imaging Using Clinical 1.5 T MRI Scanners in a Murine Ischemia/Reperfusion Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob G. J. Voelkl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To perform cardiac imaging in mice without having to invest in expensive dedicated equipment, we adapted a clinical 1.5 Tesla (T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanner for use in a murine ischemia/reperfusion model. Phase-sensitive inversion recovery (PSIR sequence facilitated the determination of infarct sizes in vivo by late gadolinium enhancement. Results were compared to histological infarct areas in mice after ischemia/reperfusion procedure with a good correlation (=0.807, <.001. In addition, fractional area change (FAC was assessed with single slice cine MRI and was matched to infarct size (=−0.837 and fractional shortening (FS measured with echocardiography (=0.860; both <.001. Here, we demonstrate the use of clinical 1.5 MRI scanners as a feasible method for basic phenotyping in mice. These widely available scanners are capable of investigating in vivo infarct dimensions as well as assessment of cardiac functional parameters in mice with reasonable throughput.

  5. Assessment of myocardial infarction with delayed-enhancement MRI in coronary artery disease: a correlative study with cardiac events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the correlation between recent cardiac events and the score of myocardial infarction by delayed-enhancement MRI (DE-MRI). Methods: DE-MRI was performed in 40 subjects with coronary artery disease. The score of myocardial infarction by DE-MRI, the ejection fraction (EF) by echocardiography, recent cardiac events (the number of weekly nitroglycerin, the number of weekly angina episodes and the onset number of heart failure in the last year), 6-minute walking distance, as well as the Seattle angina questionnaire (SAQ) score were assessed. The Spearman correlation test and Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney test were used for the statistics. Results: There were negative correlation between the myocardial infarction score by DE-MRI (median 12, inter-quartile range: 6.0-19.8) and the 6-minute walking distance (378.93±100.53), SAQ score (74.55±11.40) (r was 0.66 and 0.54, P< 0.05). The myocardial infarction score by DE-MRI was strongly correlated with the number of weekly nitroglycerin (median 1; inter-quartile range: 0-2.8), the number of weekly angina episodes (median 3, inter-quartile range: 1-6.5) and the onset number of heart failure in the last year (median 0, inter-quartile range: 0-2) (r was 0.87, 0.85 and 0.89, P<0.05). EF [(49.2±13.72)%] was negative correlation with the number of weekly nitroglycerin, the number of weekly angina episodes and the onset number of heart failure in the last year (r were 0.67, 0.73 and 0.73, P<0.05). Conclusion: DE-MRI can be used for evaluation and prediction of future cardiac events. (authors)

  6. Cardiac motion tracking with multilevel B-splines and SinMod from tagged MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Amini, Amir A.

    2011-03-01

    Cardiac motion analysis can play an important role in cardiac disease diagnosis. Tagged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the ability to directly and non-invasively alter tissue magnetization and produce tags on the deforming tissue. This paper proposes an approach to analysis of tagged MR images using a multilevel B-splines fitting model incorporating phase information. The novelty of the proposed technique is that phase information is extracted from SinMod.1 By using real tag intersections extracted directly from tagged MR image data and virtual tag intersections extracted from phase information, both considered to be scattered data, multilevel B-spline fitting can result in accurate displacement motion fields. The B-spline approximation which also serves to remove noise in the displacement measurements is performed without specifying control point locations explicitly and is very fast. Dense virtual tag intersections based on SinMod were created and incorporated into the multilevel B-spline fitting process. Experimental results on simulated data from the 13- parameter kinematic model of Arts et al.2 and in vivo canine data demonstrate further improvement in accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. Joint image reconstruction and motion parameter estimation for free-breathing navigator-gated cardiac MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçakaya, Mehmet; Basha, Tamer A.; Weingärtner, Sebastian; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-09-01

    We propose an acquisition and reconstruction technique for accelerated free-breathing cardiac MRI acquisitions. For the acquisition, a random undersampling pattern, including a fully-sampled center of k-space, is generated prospectively. The k-space lines specified by this undersampling pattern is acquired with respiratory navigating (NAV), where only the central k-space lines are acquired within the prespecified gating window. For the outer k-space lines, if the NAV signal corresponding to a k-space segment is outside the gating window, the segment is rejected, but not re-acquired. The reconstruction approach jointly estimates the underlying image using a compressed-sensing based approach, and the translational motion parameters for each segment for the outer k-space segments acquired outside the gating window. The feasibility of the approach is demonstrated in healthy adult subjects using whole-heart coronary MRI with a 3-fold accelerated random undersampling pattern. The proposed acquisition and reconstruction technique is compared to parallel imaging with uniform undersampling with 3-fold undersampling. The two techniques exhibit similar image quality with a shorter acquisition time for the proposed approach (4:25+/-0:31 minutes versus 6:52+/-0:19).

  8. Regional assessment of LV wall in infarcted heart using tagged MRI and cardiac modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanzad, Zeinab; Miin Liew, Yih; Bilgen, Mehmet; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Onn Leong, Chen; Chee, Kok Han; Aziz, Yang Faridah Abdul; Ung, Ngie Min; Lai, Khin Wee; Ng, Siew-Cheok; Lim, Einly

    2015-05-01

    A segmental two-parameter empirical deformable model is proposed for evaluating regional motion abnormality of the left ventricle. Short-axis tagged MRI scans were acquired from 10 healthy subjects and 10 postinfarct patients. Two motion parameters, contraction and rotation, were quantified for each cardiac segment by fitting the proposed model using a non-rigid registration algorithm. The accuracy in motion estimation was compared to a global model approach. Motion parameters extracted from patients were correlated to infarct transmurality assessed with delayed-contrast-enhanced MRI. The proposed segmental model allows markedly improved accuracy in regional motion analysis as compared to the global model for both subject groups (1.22-1.40 mm versus 2.31-2.55 mm error). By end-systole, all healthy segments experienced radial displacement by ~25-35% of the epicardial radius, whereas the 3 short-axis planes rotated differently (basal: 3.3° mid:  -1° and apical:  -4.6°) to create a twisting motion. While systolic contraction showed clear correspondence to infarct transmurality, rotation was nonspecific to either infarct location or transmurality but could indicate the presence of functional abnormality. Regional contraction and rotation derived using this model could potentially aid in the assessment of severity of regional dysfunction of infarcted myocardium.

  9. Regional assessment of LV wall in infarcted heart using tagged MRI and cardiac modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A segmental two-parameter empirical deformable model is proposed for evaluating regional motion abnormality of the left ventricle. Short-axis tagged MRI scans were acquired from 10 healthy subjects and 10 postinfarct patients. Two motion parameters, contraction and rotation, were quantified for each cardiac segment by fitting the proposed model using a non-rigid registration algorithm. The accuracy in motion estimation was compared to a global model approach. Motion parameters extracted from patients were correlated to infarct transmurality assessed with delayed-contrast-enhanced MRI. The proposed segmental model allows markedly improved accuracy in regional motion analysis as compared to the global model for both subject groups (1.22–1.40 mm versus 2.31–2.55 mm error). By end-systole, all healthy segments experienced radial displacement by ∼25–35% of the epicardial radius, whereas the 3 short-axis planes rotated differently (basal: 3.3°; mid:  −1° and apical:  −4.6°) to create a twisting motion. While systolic contraction showed clear correspondence to infarct transmurality, rotation was nonspecific to either infarct location or transmurality but could indicate the presence of functional abnormality. Regional contraction and rotation derived using this model could potentially aid in the assessment of severity of regional dysfunction of infarcted myocardium. (paper)

  10. Importance of Delayed Enhanced Cardiac MRI Imaging in Idiopathic RVOT-VT: Differentiating Mimics Including Early Stage ARVC and Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Macias, MD; Keijiro Nakamura, MD; Roderick Tung, MD; Noel G. Boyle, MD PhD; Kalyanam Shivkumar, MD, PhD and Jason S. Bradfield, MD.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A detailed understanding of cardiac anatomy and pathophysiology is necessary to optimize catheter ablation procedural success for patients with symptomatic ventricular tachycardia (VT/premature ventricular contractions (PVCs of outflow tract origin. Comprehensive imaging with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI is now at the forefront of procedural planning for complex ventricular arrhythmia ablation for patients with structural heart disease, but is increasingly used in patients with presumed “idiopathic” outflow VT/PVCs as well. cMRI with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE can localize small regions of myocardial scar from previous myocardial infarction, fibrosis from non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, or edema/fibrosis from inflammatory disorders and help define targets for ablation. LGE, in combination with structural assessment, can help differentiate true idiopathic outflow VT/PVCs from those caused by early stage disease secondary to more significant pathology, such as arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or cardiac sarcoidosis. We review the benefits of cMRI with LGE for patients with VT/PVCs of outflow origin.

  11. SVM-based classification of LV wall motion in cardiac MRI with the assessment of STE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Juan; Garreau, Mireille; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Paredes, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an automated method to classify normal/abnormal wall motion in Left Ventricle (LV) function in cardiac cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), taking as reference, strain information obtained from 2D Speckle Tracking Echocardiography (STE). Without the need of pre-processing and by exploiting all the images acquired during a cardiac cycle, spatio-temporal profiles are extracted from a subset of radial lines from the ventricle centroid to points outside the epicardial border. Classical Support Vector Machines (SVM) are used to classify features extracted from gray levels of the spatio-temporal profile as well as their representations in the Wavelet domain under the assumption that the data may be sparse in that domain. Based on information obtained from radial strain curves in 2D-STE studies, we label all the spatio-temporal profiles that belong to a particular segment as normal if the peak systolic radial strain curve of this segment presents normal kinesis, or abnormal if the peak systolic radial strain curve presents hypokinesis or akinesis. For this study, short-axis cine- MR images are collected from 9 patients with cardiac dyssynchrony for which we have the radial strain tracings at the mid-papilary muscle obtained by 2D STE; and from one control group formed by 9 healthy subjects. The best classification performance is obtained with the gray level information of the spatio-temporal profiles using a RBF kernel with 91.88% of accuracy, 92.75% of sensitivity and 91.52% of specificity.

  12. Myocardial delayed contrast enhancement in patients with arterial hypertension: Initial results of cardiac MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Kjel [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: kjel_andersen@web.de; Hennersdorf, Marcus [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: hennersdorf@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Cohnen, Mathias [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: cohnen@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Blondin, Dirk [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: blondin@med.uni-duesseldorf.de; Moedder, Ulrich [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: moedder@uni-duesseldorf.de; Poll, Ludger W. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Duesseldorf, Moorenstr. 5, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany)], E-mail: poll@gmx.de

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: In arterial hypertension left ventricular hypertrophy comprises myocyte hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis and structural alterations of the coronary microcirculation. MRI enables the detection of myocardial fibrosis, infarction and scar tissue by delayed enhancement (DE) after contrast media application. Aim of this study was to investigate patients with arterial hypertension but without known coronary disease or previous myocardial infarction to detect areas of DE. Methods and material: Twenty patients with arterial hypertension with clinical symptoms of myocardial ischemia, but without history of myocardial infarction and normal coronary arteries during coronary angiography were investigated on a 1.0 T superconducting magnet (Gyroscan T10-NT, Intera Release 8.0, Philips). Fast gradient-echo cine sequences and T2-weighted STIR-sequences were acquired. Fifteen minutes after injection of Gadobenate dimeglumine inversion recovery gradient-echo sequences were performed for detection of myocardial DE. Presence or absence of DE on MRI was correlated with clinical data and the results of echocardiography and electrocardiography, respectively. Results: Nine of 20 patients showed DE in the interventricular septum and the anteroseptal left ventricular wall. In 6 patients, DE was localized intramurally and in 3 patients subendocardially. There was a significant correlation between myocardial DE and ST-segment depressions during exercise and between DE and left-ventricular enddiastolic pressure. Patients with intermittent atrial fibrillation showed a myocardial DE more often than patients without atrial fibrillation. Conclusion: In our series, 45% of patients with arterial hypertension showed DE on cardiac MRI. In this clinical setting, delayed enhancement may be due to coronary microangiopathy. The more intramurally localization of DE, however, rather indicates myocardial interstitial fibrosis.

  13. Myocardial delayed contrast enhancement in patients with arterial hypertension: Initial results of cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In arterial hypertension left ventricular hypertrophy comprises myocyte hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis and structural alterations of the coronary microcirculation. MRI enables the detection of myocardial fibrosis, infarction and scar tissue by delayed enhancement (DE) after contrast media application. Aim of this study was to investigate patients with arterial hypertension but without known coronary disease or previous myocardial infarction to detect areas of DE. Methods and material: Twenty patients with arterial hypertension with clinical symptoms of myocardial ischemia, but without history of myocardial infarction and normal coronary arteries during coronary angiography were investigated on a 1.0 T superconducting magnet (Gyroscan T10-NT, Intera Release 8.0, Philips). Fast gradient-echo cine sequences and T2-weighted STIR-sequences were acquired. Fifteen minutes after injection of Gadobenate dimeglumine inversion recovery gradient-echo sequences were performed for detection of myocardial DE. Presence or absence of DE on MRI was correlated with clinical data and the results of echocardiography and electrocardiography, respectively. Results: Nine of 20 patients showed DE in the interventricular septum and the anteroseptal left ventricular wall. In 6 patients, DE was localized intramurally and in 3 patients subendocardially. There was a significant correlation between myocardial DE and ST-segment depressions during exercise and between DE and left-ventricular enddiastolic pressure. Patients with intermittent atrial fibrillation showed a myocardial DE more often than patients without atrial fibrillation. Conclusion: In our series, 45% of patients with arterial hypertension showed DE on cardiac MRI. In this clinical setting, delayed enhancement may be due to coronary microangiopathy. The more intramurally localization of DE, however, rather indicates myocardial interstitial fibrosis.

  14. Pediatric cardiac MRI: automated left-ventricular volumes and function analysis and effects of manual adjustments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammon, Matthias; Janka, Rolf; Dankerl, Peter; Kammerer, Ferdinand J.; Uder, Michael; Rompel, Oliver [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Gloeckler, Martin; Dittrich, Sven [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac MRI is an accurate and reproducible technique for the assessment of left ventricular volumes and function. The accuracy of automated segmentation and the effects of manual adjustments have not been determined in children. To evaluate automated segmentation and the effects of manual adjustments for left ventricular parameter quantification in pediatric cardiac MR images. Left ventricular parameters were evaluated in 45 children with suspected myocarditis (age 13.4 ± 3.5 years, range 4-17 years) who underwent cardiac MRI. Dedicated software was used to automatically segment and adjust the parameters. Results of end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, stroke volume, myocardial mass, and ejection fraction were documented before and after apex/base adjustment and after apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment. The software successfully detected the left ventricle in 42 of 45 (93.3%) children; failures occurred in the smallest and youngest children. Of those 42 children, automatically segmented end-diastolic volume (EDV) was 151 ± 47 ml, and after apex/base adjustment it was 146 ± 45 ml, after apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment 146 ± 45 ml. The corresponding results for end-systolic volume (ESV) were 66 ± 32 ml, 63 ± 29 ml and 64 ± 28 ml; for stroke volume (SV) they were 85 ± 25 ml, 83 ± 23 ml and 83 ± 23 ml; for ejection fracture (EF) they were 57 ± 10%, 58 ± 9% and 58 ± 9%, and for myocardial mass (MM) they were 104 ± 31 g, 95 ± 31 g and 94 ± 30 g. Statistically significant differences were found when comparing the EDV/ESV/MM results, the EF results after apex/base adjustment and after apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment and the SV results (except for comparing the SVs after apex/base adjustment and after apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment). Automated segmentation for the evaluation of left ventricular parameters in pediatric MR images proved to be feasible. Automated segmentation + apex/base adjustment provided clinically

  15. Pediatric cardiac MRI: automated left-ventricular volumes and function analysis and effects of manual adjustments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac MRI is an accurate and reproducible technique for the assessment of left ventricular volumes and function. The accuracy of automated segmentation and the effects of manual adjustments have not been determined in children. To evaluate automated segmentation and the effects of manual adjustments for left ventricular parameter quantification in pediatric cardiac MR images. Left ventricular parameters were evaluated in 45 children with suspected myocarditis (age 13.4 ± 3.5 years, range 4-17 years) who underwent cardiac MRI. Dedicated software was used to automatically segment and adjust the parameters. Results of end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, stroke volume, myocardial mass, and ejection fraction were documented before and after apex/base adjustment and after apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment. The software successfully detected the left ventricle in 42 of 45 (93.3%) children; failures occurred in the smallest and youngest children. Of those 42 children, automatically segmented end-diastolic volume (EDV) was 151 ± 47 ml, and after apex/base adjustment it was 146 ± 45 ml, after apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment 146 ± 45 ml. The corresponding results for end-systolic volume (ESV) were 66 ± 32 ml, 63 ± 29 ml and 64 ± 28 ml; for stroke volume (SV) they were 85 ± 25 ml, 83 ± 23 ml and 83 ± 23 ml; for ejection fracture (EF) they were 57 ± 10%, 58 ± 9% and 58 ± 9%, and for myocardial mass (MM) they were 104 ± 31 g, 95 ± 31 g and 94 ± 30 g. Statistically significant differences were found when comparing the EDV/ESV/MM results, the EF results after apex/base adjustment and after apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment and the SV results (except for comparing the SVs after apex/base adjustment and after apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment). Automated segmentation for the evaluation of left ventricular parameters in pediatric MR images proved to be feasible. Automated segmentation + apex/base adjustment provided clinically

  16. Contrast-enhanced cardiac MRI before coronary artery bypass surgery: impact of myocardial scar extent on bypass flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to relate the extent of myocardial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in cardiac MRI to intraoperative graft flow in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. Thirty-three CAD patients underwent LGE MRI before surgery using an inversion-recovery GRE sequence (turboFLASH). Intraoperative graft flow in Doppler ultrasonography was compared with the scar extent in each coronary vessel territory. One hundred and fourteen grafts were established supplying 86 of the 99 vessel territories. A significant negative correlation was found between scar extent and graft flow (r = -0.4, p -1; p < 0.0001). In summary, the extent of myocardial scar as defined by contrast-enhanced MRI predicts coronary bypass graft flow. Beyond the probability of functional recovery, preoperative MRI might add value to surgery planning by predicting midterm bypass graft patency. (orig.)

  17. Joint multi-object registration and segmentation of left and right cardiac ventricles in 4D cine MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Jan; Kepp, Timo; Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Handels, Heinz

    2014-03-01

    The diagnosis of cardiac function based on cine MRI requires the segmentation of cardiac structures in the images, but the problem of automatic cardiac segmentation is still open, due to the imaging characteristics of cardiac MR images and the anatomical variability of the heart. In this paper, we present a variational framework for joint segmentation and registration of multiple structures of the heart. To enable the simultaneous segmentation and registration of multiple objects, a shape prior term is introduced into a region competition approach for multi-object level set segmentation. The proposed algorithm is applied for simultaneous segmentation of the myocardium as well as the left and right ventricular blood pool in short axis cine MRI images. Two experiments are performed: first, intra-patient 4D segmentation with a given initial segmentation for one time-point in a 4D sequence, and second, a multi-atlas segmentation strategy is applied to unseen patient data. Evaluation of segmentation accuracy is done by overlap coefficients and surface distances. An evaluation based on clinical 4D cine MRI images of 25 patients shows the benefit of the combined approach compared to sole registration and sole segmentation.

  18. Highly accelerated cardiac MRI using iterative SENSE reconstruction: initial clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Bradley D; Carr, Maria; Botelho, Marcos P F; Rahsepar, Amir Ali; Markl, Michael; Zenge, Michael O; Schmidt, Michaela; Nadar, Mariappan S; Spottiswoode, Bruce; Collins, Jeremy D; Carr, James C

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the qualitative and quantitative performance of an accelerated cardiovascular MRI (CMR) protocol that features iterative SENSE reconstruction and spatio-temporal L1-regularization (IS SENSE). Twenty consecutively recruited patients and 9 healthy volunteers were included. 2D steady state free precession cine images including 3-chamber, 4-chamber, and short axis slices were acquired using standard parallel imaging (GRAPPA, acceleration factor = 2), spatio-temporal undersampled TSENSE (acceleration factor = 4), and IS SENSE techniques (acceleration factor = 4). Acquisition times, quantitative cardiac functional parameters, wall motion abnormalities (WMA), and qualitative performance (scale: 1-poor to 5-excellent for overall image quality, noise, and artifact) were compared. Breath-hold times for IS SENSE (3.0 ± 0.6 s) and TSENSE (3.3 ± 0.6) were both reduced relative to GRAPPA (8.4 ± 1.7 s, p cardiac function was present between the three techniques (p = 0.89 for ejection fraction). GRAPPA and IS SENSE had similar image quality (4.7 ± 0.4 vs. 4.5 ± 0.6, p = 0.09) while, both techniques were superior to TSENSE (quality: 4.1 ± 0.7, p  0.60, p < 0.001), while agreement with TSENSE was poor (κ < 0.40, p < 0.001). IS SENSE is a viable clinical CMR acceleration approach to reduce acquisition times while maintaining satisfactory qualitative and quantitative performance. PMID:26894256

  19. Novel MRI-derived quantitative biomarker for cardiac function applied to classifying ischemic cardiomyopathy within a Bayesian rule learning framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Prahlad G.; Morris, Lailonny; Staines, Mara; Lima, Joao; Lee, Daniel C.; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi

    2014-03-01

    Characterization of regional left ventricular (LV) function may have application in prognosticating timely response and informing choice therapy in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. The purpose of this study is to characterize LV function through a systematic analysis of 4D (3D + time) endocardial motion over the cardiac cycle in an effort to define objective, clinically useful metrics of pathological remodeling and declining cardiac performance, using standard cardiac MRI data for two distinct patient cohorts accessed from CardiacAtlas.org: a) MESA - a cohort of asymptomatic patients; and b) DETERMINE - a cohort of symptomatic patients with a history of ischemic heart disease (IHD) or myocardial infarction. The LV endocardium was segmented and a signed phase-to-phase Hausdorff distance (HD) was computed at 3D uniformly spaced points tracked on segmented endocardial surface contours, over the cardiac cycle. An LV-averaged index of phase-to-phase endocardial displacement (P2PD) time-histories was computed at each tracked point, using the HD computed between consecutive cardiac phases. Average and standard deviation in P2PD over the cardiac cycle was used to prepare characteristic curves for the asymptomatic and IHD cohort. A novel biomarker of RMS error between mean patient-specific characteristic P2PD over the cardiac cycle for each individual patient and the cumulative P2PD characteristic of a cohort of asymptomatic patients was established as the RMS-P2PD marker. The novel RMS-P2PD marker was tested as a cardiac function based feature for automatic patient classification using a Bayesian Rule Learning (BRL) framework. The RMS-P2PD biomarker indices were significantly different for the symptomatic patient and asymptomatic control cohorts (pcardiac performance.

  20. Clinical Application of Cine-MRI in the Visual Assessment of Mitral Regurgitation Compared to Echocardiography and Cardiac Catheterization

    OpenAIRE

    Heitner, John; Bhumireddy, Geetha P; Crowley, Anna Lisa; Weinsaft, Jonathan; Haq, Salman A.; Klem, Igor; Kim, Raymond J; Jollis, James G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Detecting and quantifying the severity of mitral regurgitation is essential for risk stratification and clinical decision-making regarding timing of surgery. Our objective was to assess specific visual parameters by cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the determination of the severity of mitral regurgitation and to compare it to previously validated imaging modalities: echocardiography and cardiac ventriculography. Methods The study population consisted of 68 patients who unde...

  1. A model-based time-reversal of left ventricular motion improves cardiac motion analysis using tagged MRI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook Larry T

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial motion is an important observable for the assessment of heart condition. Accurate estimates of ventricular (LV wall motion are required for quantifying myocardial deformation and assessing local tissue function and viability. Harmonic Phase (HARP analysis was developed for measuring regional LV motion using tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI data. With current computer-aided postprocessing tools including HARP analysis, large motions experienced by myocardial tissue are, however, often intractable to measure. This paper addresses this issue and provides a solution to make such measurements possible. Methods To improve the estimation performance of large cardiac motions while analyzing tMRI data sets, we propose a two-step solution. The first step involves constructing a model to describe average systolic motion of the LV wall within a subject group. The second step involves time-reversal of the model applied as a spatial coordinate transformation to digitally relax the contracted LV wall in the experimental data of a single subject to the beginning of systole. Cardiac tMRI scans were performed on four healthy rats and used for developing the forward LV model. Algorithms were implemented for preprocessing the tMRI data, optimizing the model parameters and performing the HARP analysis. Slices from the midventricular level were then analyzed for all systolic phases. Results The time-reversal operation derived from the LV model accounted for the bulk portion of the myocardial motion, which was the average motion experienced within the overall subject population. In analyzing the individual tMRI data sets, removing this average with the time-reversal operation left small magnitude residual motion unique to the case. This remaining residual portion of the motion was estimated robustly using the HARP analysis. Conclusion Utilizing a combination of the forward LV model and its time reversal improves the performance of

  2. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Cardiac structural and microvascular abnormalities as evaluated with multi-parametric MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • LGE-present HCM had lower Ktrans, higher Ve and MTT against LGE-absent HCM and normal group. • LGE-absent had significantly higher Ve and MTT against normal group. • Ktrans was not changed between LGE-absent and normal group Microcirculatory dysfunction in HCM closely correlated to structural abnormality. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine the relationship between myocardial structural and microvascular abnormality in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) by multi-parametric cardiac MRI. Materials and methods: Twenty-four HCM and eighteen controls were retrospectively included. Left ventricle mass (LVM), LV end-systolic and end-diastolic volume (LVESV, LVEDV), LV ejection fraction (LVEF), and 16-segment wall thickness at ES and ED (SESWT, SEDWT) were assessed with a 2D cine-MRI. Myocardial perfusion (reflected by Ktrans), interstitial volume (Ve) and mean transmit time (MTT) were evaluated with a model-dependent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Myocardial fibrosis was assessed with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging. Results: Ktrans was significantly decreased in LGE-present (0.74 ± 0.15 mL/g/min) against LGE-absent (0.55 ± 0.14 mL/g/min, p = 0.030) and normal group (0.81 ± 0.32 mL/g/min, p < 0.001), but was unchanged in LGE-absent against normal group (p > 0.05). Ve and MTT were significantly increased in LGE-present (Ve: 26.7 ± 15.7%; MTT: 28.6 ± 21.3 s) against LGE-absent (37.6 ± 18.3%; 49.8 ± 30.5 s) and normal group (19.7 ± 6.9%; 15.1 ± 3.9 s; all p < 0.001), and were significantly increased in LGE-absent against normal group (p < 0.001). LGE significantly correlated to Ktrans, Ve, MTT, and SESWT (ρ = 0.232, −0.247, −0.443, and −0.207, respectively). Ktrans negatively correlated to SEDWT and SESWT (ρ = −0.224 and −0.231). Ve and MTT positively correlated to SEDWT (Ve: ρ = 0.223; MTT: ρ = 0.239) and SESWT (Ve: ρ = 0.248; MTT: ρ = 0.254). Conclusions: Consistent relationship was determined between myocardial

  3. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: Cardiac structural and microvascular abnormalities as evaluated with multi-parametric MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu-Dong, E-mail: njmu_zyd@163.com [Department of Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital with Nanjing Medical University (China); Li, Meijiao, E-mail: newgljyk@163.com [Department of Radiology, Peking University First Hospital (China); Qi, Liang, E-mail: qiliang1120@126.com [Department of Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital with Nanjing Medical University (China); Wu, Chen-Jiang, E-mail: njmu_wcj@163.com [Department of Radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital with Nanjing Medical University (China); Wang, Xiaoying, E-mail: cjr.wangxiaoying@vip.163.com [Department of Radiology, Peking University First Hospital (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • LGE-present HCM had lower K{sup trans}, higher V{sub e} and MTT against LGE-absent HCM and normal group. • LGE-absent had significantly higher V{sub e} and MTT against normal group. • K{sup trans} was not changed between LGE-absent and normal group Microcirculatory dysfunction in HCM closely correlated to structural abnormality. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine the relationship between myocardial structural and microvascular abnormality in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) by multi-parametric cardiac MRI. Materials and methods: Twenty-four HCM and eighteen controls were retrospectively included. Left ventricle mass (LVM), LV end-systolic and end-diastolic volume (LVESV, LVEDV), LV ejection fraction (LVEF), and 16-segment wall thickness at ES and ED (SESWT, SEDWT) were assessed with a 2D cine-MRI. Myocardial perfusion (reflected by K{sup trans}), interstitial volume (V{sub e}) and mean transmit time (MTT) were evaluated with a model-dependent dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Myocardial fibrosis was assessed with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging. Results: K{sup trans} was significantly decreased in LGE-present (0.74 ± 0.15 mL/g/min) against LGE-absent (0.55 ± 0.14 mL/g/min, p = 0.030) and normal group (0.81 ± 0.32 mL/g/min, p < 0.001), but was unchanged in LGE-absent against normal group (p > 0.05). V{sub e} and MTT were significantly increased in LGE-present (V{sub e}: 26.7 ± 15.7%; MTT: 28.6 ± 21.3 s) against LGE-absent (37.6 ± 18.3%; 49.8 ± 30.5 s) and normal group (19.7 ± 6.9%; 15.1 ± 3.9 s; all p < 0.001), and were significantly increased in LGE-absent against normal group (p < 0.001). LGE significantly correlated to K{sup trans}, V{sub e}, MTT, and SESWT (ρ = 0.232, −0.247, −0.443, and −0.207, respectively). K{sup trans} negatively correlated to SEDWT and SESWT (ρ = −0.224 and −0.231). V{sub e} and MTT positively correlated to SEDWT (V{sub e}: ρ = 0.223; MTT: ρ = 0.239) and SESWT (V{sub e}: ρ = 0.248; MTT:

  4. Repeatability of cardiac-MRI-measured right ventricular size and function in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Rowan; Salem, Yishay [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Shah, Amee; Lai, Wyman W. [Morgan Stanley Children' s Hospital of New York Presbyterian, New York, NY (United States); Nielsen, James C. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai Children' s Heart Center, Box 1201, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The measurement error for right ventricular (RV) size and function assessed by cardiac MRI (CMRI) in congenital heart disease has not been fully characterized. As CMRI parameters are being increasingly utilized to make clinical decisions, defining error in the clinical setting is critical. This investigation examines the repeatability of CMRI for RV size and function. Forty consecutive people with congenital heart disease involving the RV were retrospectively identified. Contouring of RV volumes was performed by two expert CMRI clinicians. The coefficient of variability and repeatability coefficients were calculated. Repeatability coefficients were multiplied by the mean value for each group studied to define a threshold beyond which measurement error was unlikely to be responsible. The variability for indexed RV end-diastolic volume = 3.2% and 3.3% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, respectively. The repeatability coefficients were 13.2% and 14.9% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, which yielded threshold values of 15.1 ml/m{sup 2} and 20.2 ml/m{sup 2}, respectively. For RV ejection fraction (EF), the repeatability coefficients for intra- and interobserver comparisons were 5.0% and 6.0%, which resulted in threshold values of 2.6 EF% and 3.0 EF%. The threshold values generated can be used during serial assessment of RV size and function. (orig.)

  5. Repeatability of cardiac-MRI-measured right ventricular size and function in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement error for right ventricular (RV) size and function assessed by cardiac MRI (CMRI) in congenital heart disease has not been fully characterized. As CMRI parameters are being increasingly utilized to make clinical decisions, defining error in the clinical setting is critical. This investigation examines the repeatability of CMRI for RV size and function. Forty consecutive people with congenital heart disease involving the RV were retrospectively identified. Contouring of RV volumes was performed by two expert CMRI clinicians. The coefficient of variability and repeatability coefficients were calculated. Repeatability coefficients were multiplied by the mean value for each group studied to define a threshold beyond which measurement error was unlikely to be responsible. The variability for indexed RV end-diastolic volume = 3.2% and 3.3% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, respectively. The repeatability coefficients were 13.2% and 14.9% for intra- and interobserver comparisons, which yielded threshold values of 15.1 ml/m2 and 20.2 ml/m2, respectively. For RV ejection fraction (EF), the repeatability coefficients for intra- and interobserver comparisons were 5.0% and 6.0%, which resulted in threshold values of 2.6 EF% and 3.0 EF%. The threshold values generated can be used during serial assessment of RV size and function. (orig.)

  6. 3-D cardiac MRI in free-breathing newborns and infants: when is respiratory gating necessary?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, Achim [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Krumm, Patrick; Schaefer, Juergen F.; Kramer, Ulrich [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Hornung, Andreas; Sieverding, Ludger [University Hospital of Tuebingen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Newborns and small infants have shallow breathing. To suggest criteria for when respiratory gating is necessary during cardiac MRI in newborns and infants. One-hundred ten data sets of newborns and infants with (n = 92, mean age: 1.9 ± 1.7 [SD] years) and without (n = 18, mean age: 1.6 ± 1.8 [SD] years) navigator gating were analysed retrospectively. The respiratory motion of the right hemidiaphragm was recorded and correlated to age, weight, body surface area and qualitative image quality on a 4-point score. Quantitative image quality assessment was performed (sharpness of the delineation of the ventricular septal wall) as well as a matched-pair comparison between navigator-gated and non-gated data sets. No significant differences were found in overall image quality or in the sharpness of the ventricular septal wall between gated and non-gated scans. A navigator acceptance of >80% was frequently found in patients ages <12 months, body surface area <0.40 m{sup 2}, body weight <10 kg and a size of <80 cm. Sequences without respiratory gating may be used in newborns and small infants, in particular if age <12 months, body surface area <0.40 m{sup 2}, body weight <10 kg and height <80 cm. (orig.)

  7. 3-D cardiac MRI in free-breathing newborns and infants: when is respiratory gating necessary?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newborns and small infants have shallow breathing. To suggest criteria for when respiratory gating is necessary during cardiac MRI in newborns and infants. One-hundred ten data sets of newborns and infants with (n = 92, mean age: 1.9 ± 1.7 [SD] years) and without (n = 18, mean age: 1.6 ± 1.8 [SD] years) navigator gating were analysed retrospectively. The respiratory motion of the right hemidiaphragm was recorded and correlated to age, weight, body surface area and qualitative image quality on a 4-point score. Quantitative image quality assessment was performed (sharpness of the delineation of the ventricular septal wall) as well as a matched-pair comparison between navigator-gated and non-gated data sets. No significant differences were found in overall image quality or in the sharpness of the ventricular septal wall between gated and non-gated scans. A navigator acceptance of >80% was frequently found in patients ages <12 months, body surface area <0.40 m2, body weight <10 kg and a size of <80 cm. Sequences without respiratory gating may be used in newborns and small infants, in particular if age <12 months, body surface area <0.40 m2, body weight <10 kg and height <80 cm. (orig.)

  8. Visualization of transcoronary ablation of septal hypertrophy in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy: a comparison between cardiac MRI, invasive measurements and echocardiography

    OpenAIRE

    Sohns, Christian; Sossalla, Samuel; Schmitto, Jan D; Jacobshagen, Claudius; Raab, Björn; Obenauer, Silvia; Maier, Lars S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is treated by surgical myectomy or transcoronary ablation of septal hypertrophy (TASH). The aim of this study was to visualize the feasibility, success and short-term results of TASH on the basis of cardiac MRI (CMR) in comparison with cardiac catheterization and echocardiography. Methods In this in vivo study, nine patients with HOCM were treated with TASH. Patients were evaluated by transthoracic echocardiography, invasive cardiac ang...

  9. DNA methylation in cardiac fibrosis: New advances and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac fibrosis is characterized by net accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the cardiac interstitium, and contributes to both systolic and diastolic dysfunction in many cardiac pathophysiologic conditions. More specifically, cardiac fibroblasts are activated by a variety of pathological stimuli, thereby undergoing proliferation, differentiation to myofibroblasts, and production of various cytokines and ECM proteins. Thus, understanding the biological processes of cardiac fibroblasts will provide novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of cardiac fibrosis. DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mechanism, which often occurs in response to environmental stimuli and is crucial in regulating gene expression. The aberrant methylation of CpG island promoters of selected genes is the prominent epigenetic mechanism by which gene transcription can be effectively silenced. Aberrant hypermethylation of a few selected genes such as RASSF1A plays an important role in facilitating fibrotic fibroblast activation and in driving fibrosis. In this review we will discuss the mechanisms of DNA methylation and their implications for cardiac fibroblasts activation and fibrosis. Control of DNA methylation may serve as a new strategy for anti-fibrotic therapy

  10. Early assessment of sub-clinical cardiac involvement in systemic sclerosis (SSc) using delayed enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (CE-MRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Cesare, Ernesto, E-mail: ernesto.dicesare@cc.univaq.it [Department of Radiology, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio 1, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Battisti, Sara; Di Sibio, Alessandra [Department of Radiology, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio 1, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy); Cipriani, Paola; Giacomelli, Roberto; Liakouli, Vasiliky; Ruscitti, Piero [Rheumatology Clinic, Department of Internal Medicine and Public Health, University of L’Aquila, L’Aquila (Italy); Masciocchi, Carlo [Department of Radiology, University of L’Aquila, Via Vetoio 1, 67100 L’Aquila (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    Objectives: Systemic sclerosis heart involvement (SHI) is one of systemic sclerosis (SSc) most frequent complications, both in diffuse (dcSSc) and limited (lcSSc) cutaneous forms of disease. Nowadays, SHI is a major factor decreasing SSc survival rate because, when clinically evident, is associated with 70% of mortality at 5 years. SHI shows different forms, primary and/or secondary. Primary myocardial SHI is characterized by fibrosis. Aim of our study is to assess the presence and pattern of fibrosis as detected by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in systemic sclerosis. Methods: In this study, we used CE-MRI (contrast enhanced-MRI) in 58 female SSc patients. Images were evaluated to obtain functional parameters and to see presence, location and pattern (nodular, linear or diffuse) of myocardial LE, sign of fibrosis. CE-MRI findings were correlated with patients clinical setting. Results: Myocardial fibrosis was detected in 25 of 58 patients (43%). The main finding observed in 16 of these 25 patients was a late enhancement showing a linear pattern, without coronary distribution and sparing the sub-endocardial myocardial layers. A patchy nodular enhancement pattern was observed in 9 patients (36%). Patients with linear pattern presented dcSSc, on the contrary patients with nodular LE displayed the lcSSc form. Conclusions: This study shows that CE-MRI is a reliable technique to detect SHI earlier than other methods. SHI increase passive myocardial stiffness, proportional to collagen deposition degree, leading to cardiac remodelling with possible development of heart failure, even with normal ejection fraction. An early treatment of SHI might improve SSc patients outcome.

  11. Early assessment of sub-clinical cardiac involvement in systemic sclerosis (SSc) using delayed enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (CE-MRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: Systemic sclerosis heart involvement (SHI) is one of systemic sclerosis (SSc) most frequent complications, both in diffuse (dcSSc) and limited (lcSSc) cutaneous forms of disease. Nowadays, SHI is a major factor decreasing SSc survival rate because, when clinically evident, is associated with 70% of mortality at 5 years. SHI shows different forms, primary and/or secondary. Primary myocardial SHI is characterized by fibrosis. Aim of our study is to assess the presence and pattern of fibrosis as detected by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in systemic sclerosis. Methods: In this study, we used CE-MRI (contrast enhanced-MRI) in 58 female SSc patients. Images were evaluated to obtain functional parameters and to see presence, location and pattern (nodular, linear or diffuse) of myocardial LE, sign of fibrosis. CE-MRI findings were correlated with patients clinical setting. Results: Myocardial fibrosis was detected in 25 of 58 patients (43%). The main finding observed in 16 of these 25 patients was a late enhancement showing a linear pattern, without coronary distribution and sparing the sub-endocardial myocardial layers. A patchy nodular enhancement pattern was observed in 9 patients (36%). Patients with linear pattern presented dcSSc, on the contrary patients with nodular LE displayed the lcSSc form. Conclusions: This study shows that CE-MRI is a reliable technique to detect SHI earlier than other methods. SHI increase passive myocardial stiffness, proportional to collagen deposition degree, leading to cardiac remodelling with possible development of heart failure, even with normal ejection fraction. An early treatment of SHI might improve SSc patients outcome

  12. The search for neuroimaging biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease with advanced MRI techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tie-Qiang (Karolinska Huddinge - Medical Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)), email: tieqiang.li@karolinska.se; Wahlund, Lars-Olof (Dept. of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this review is to examine the recent literature on using advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for finding neuroimaging biomarkers that are sensitive to the detection of risks for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since structural MRI techniques, such as brain structural volumetry and voxel based morphometry (VBM), have been widely used for AD studies and extensively reviewed, we will only briefly touch on the topics of volumetry and morphometry. The focus of the current review is about the more recent developments in the search for AD neuroimaging biomarkers with functional MRI (fMRI), resting-state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), arterial spin-labeling (ASL), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)

  13. Best-of 2001: nuclear cardiology and cardiac MRI; Le best-of 2001: cardiologie nucleaire et IRM cardiaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manrique, A. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 76 - Rouen (France); Marie, P.Y. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 54 - Nancy (France)

    2001-12-01

    This year 2001 has been very rich in innovations and in works-in-progress in the field of cardiac imaging. In nuclear cardiology, this year has been mainly impressed by a large number of studies concerning 'gated SPECT' which allows the simultaneous analysis of the perfusion and of the contraction of the left ventricle. The clinical contribution of this technique is quite significant in any of the fields of use of the conventional tomo-scintigraphy such as the screening of the coronary disease, the evaluation of its prognosis or the evaluation of the viability. Innovation has also concerned the field of the radio-tracers, with studies concerning some very promising tracers of the apoptosis or of the cellular hypoxia. At last, various works have been carried out on the gamma-cameras, particularly to make them suitable for imaging of tracers used in positron emission tomography (PET). This should allow to spread to any of the nuclear medicine centers the use of FDG imaging which is the golden standard for myocardial viability assessment. About MRI, a lot of studies have been performed about sequences using gadolinium as a vascular contrast agent, to identify and to localize the infarction sequelae, even when limited to sub-endocardium. Probably the most dramatic technical innovations concerned the development of methods enhancing the recorded signal (SENSE) and the design of real-time imaging sequences, without apnea and without ECG gating. But, as every year, important advances have also been registered in angio-MR of the coronary vessels, as in the myocardial perfusion analysis using sequences without the requirement of contrast agent injection. (author)

  14. The developing role of fetal magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of congenital cardiac anomalies: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit S Loomba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in the fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI over the last few years have resulted in the exploring the use of fetal MRI to detect congenital cardiac anomalies. Early detection of congenital cardiac anomalies can help more appropriately manage the infant′s delivery and neonatal management. MRI offers anatomical and functional studies and is a safe adjunct that can help more fully understand a fetus′ cardiac anatomy. It is important for the obstetricians and pediatric cardiologists to be aware of the recent advancements in fetal MRI and it`s potential utility in diagnosing congenital cardiac anomalies.

  15. The developing role of fetal magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of congenital cardiac anomalies: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in the fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) over the last few years have resulted in the exploring the use of fetal MRI to detect congenital cardiac anomalies. Early detection of congenital cardiac anomalies can help more appropriately manage the infant's delivery and neonatal management. MRI offers anatomical and functional studies and is a safe adjunct that can help more fully understand a fetus' cardiac anatomy. It is important for the obstetricians and pediatric cardiologists to be aware of the recent advancements in fetal MRI and it's potential utility in diagnosing congenital cardiac anomalies

  16. Clinical application of respiratory navigator echo triggered black blood contrast cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the application of respiratory navigator echo triggered black blood contrast FSE in cardiac MRI. Methods: The respiratory navigator echo trigger technique combining with black blood FSE (NAV-FSE) was tested on 11 volunteers and 5 patients in free breathing, using breath-hold FSE (BH-FSE) with the same imaging protocals as control. The imaging efficiency and the image sharpness were compared between NAV-FSE and BH-FSE and t-test was used for the statistics. Results: All NAV-FSE acquisitions were completed in sixteen subjects while 4 BH-FSE acquisitions failed because of poor breath holding. The efficiencies of NAV-FSE were (42.95 ± 11.50)%, (56.14 ± 11.40)% and (55.25 ± 14.70)% when echo train length (ETL) were 24, 16 and 8, respectively. When ETL were 16 and 24, the sharpness of NAV-FSE (0.43 ± 0.02 vs 0.36 ± 0.02) and BH-FSE (0.36 ± 0.03 vs 0.35 ± 0.02) were statistically different (t =4.26, 5.53, respectively; P <0.05). NAV-FSE could have a shorter ETL setting without consideration of breath holding. Conclusion: The navigator echo trigger technique could be compatible with black blood contrast FSE to image the heart without the restriction of breath holding and it allows to optimize the parameters to improve the image quality. (authors)

  17. Meshless deformable models for 3D cardiac motion and strain analysis from tagged MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxu; Chen, Ting; Zhang, Shaoting; Schaerer, Joël; Qian, Zhen; Huh, Suejung; Metaxas, Dimitris; Axel, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Tagged magnetic resonance imaging (TMRI) provides a direct and noninvasive way to visualize the in-wall deformation of the myocardium. Due to the through-plane motion, the tracking of 3D trajectories of the material points and the computation of 3D strain field call for the necessity of building 3D cardiac deformable models. The intersections of three stacks of orthogonal tagging planes are material points in the myocardium. With these intersections as control points, 3D motion can be reconstructed with a novel meshless deformable model (MDM). Volumetric MDMs describe an object as point cloud inside the object boundary and the coordinate of each point can be written in parametric functions. A generic heart mesh is registered on the TMRI with polar decomposition. A 3D MDM is generated and deformed with MR image tagging lines. Volumetric MDMs are deformed by calculating the dynamics function and minimizing the local Laplacian coordinates. The similarity transformation of each point is computed by assuming its neighboring points are making the same transformation. The deformation is computed iteratively until the control points match the target positions in the consecutive image frame. The 3D strain field is computed from the 3D displacement field with moving least squares. We demonstrate that MDMs outperformed the finite element method and the spline method with a numerical phantom. Meshless deformable models can track the trajectory of any material point in the myocardium and compute the 3D strain field of any particular area. The experimental results on in vivo healthy and patient heart MRI show that the MDM can fully recover the myocardium motion in three dimensions. PMID:25157446

  18. Advanced MRI may complement histological diagnosis of lower grade gliomas and help in predicting survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccarini, Valeria; Erbetta, A; Farinotti, M; Cuppini, L; Ghielmetti, F; Pollo, B; Di Meco, F; Grisoli, M; Filippini, G; Finocchiaro, G; Bruzzone, M G; Eoli, M

    2016-01-01

    MRI grading of grade II and III gliomas may have an important impact on treatment decisions. Occasionally,both conventional MRI (cMRI) and histology fail to clearly establish the tumour grade. Three cMRI features(no necrosis; no relevant oedema; absent or faint contrast enhancement) previously validated in 196 patients with supratentorial gliomas directed our selection of 68 suspected low-grade gliomas (LGG) that were also investigated by advanced MRI (aMRI), including perfusion weighted imaging (PWI), diffusion weighted imaging(DWI) and spectroscopy. All the gliomas had histopathological diagnoses. Sensitivity and specificity of cMRI preoperative diagnosis were 78.5 and 38.5 %, respectively, and 85.7 and 53.8 % when a MRI was included, respectively. ROC analysis showed that cut-off values of 1.29 for maximum rCBV, 1.69 for minimum rADC, 2.1 for rCho/Cr ratio could differentiate between LGG and HGG with a sensitivity of 61.5, 53.8, and 53.8 % and a specificity of 54.7, 43 and 64.3 %, respectively. A significantly longer OS was observed in patients with a maximum rCBV1.69 (80 vs 55 months, p = 0.01; 80 vs 51 months, p = 0.002, respectively). This result was also confirmed when cases were stratified according to pathology (LGG vs HGG). The ability of a MRI to differentiate between LGG and HGG and to predict survival improved as the number of a MRI techniques considered increased. In a selected population of suspected LGG,classification by cMRI underestimated the actual fraction of HGG. aMRI slightly increased the diagnostic accuracy compared to histopathology. However, DWI and PWI were prognostic markers independent of histological grade. PMID:26468137

  19. Impact of advanced MRI techniques for the diagnosis of dementia: comparison with PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Elena; Prakash, Vineet; Vestergård, Karsten;

    investigated with an advanced 3T MRI protocol including 3D pseudocontinuous arterial spin labeling (PC ASL) sequence for CBF measurement and DTI sequence used for tractography. Fifteen of the patients have also undergone 18-FDG PET examination. A reference data set from 30 healthy volunteers was used for......Introduction: The use of high magnetic fields in combination with fast algorithms for computer-based postprocessing has moved advanced MRI techniques into clinical practice. MRI provides in analogy with PET physiological information in addition to more traditional morphological images. Evaluation...... of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and also of white matter damage may be used to support the diagnosis and characterization of dementia and is of special important interest for the detection of changes in the early stages of the disease. Purpose: To investigate whether perfusion MRI with CBF maps combined...

  20. Cardiac MRI and Transthoracic Echocardiography of Left Ventricular Myocardial Noncompaction in A Patient with Congestive Heart Failure: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eui Min; Byun, Joo Nam [Chosun University Hospital College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Hun [Soonchunhyang University Hospital Bucheon College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    We report a case of a 38-year-old male presenting with new-onset dyspnea, that was diagnosed as left ventricular noncompaction by transthoracic echocardiographic and cardiac MR. The tests revealed left ventricular systolic dysfunction with prominent trabeculations associated with deep intertrabecular recesses and an enddiastolic noncompacted to compacted ratio of 2.5 in the whole apical wall and mid-ventricular anterolateral and inferolateral walls. Delayed gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI revealed subepicardial mid-wall hyperenhancement of the midventricular anteroseptal and inferoseptal walls, which suggested myocardial fibrosis. We review the pathophysiology, clinical characteristics, and diagnostic approach of the left ventricular noncompaction associated with congestive heart failure

  1. Cardiac MRI and Transthoracic Echocardiography of Left Ventricular Myocardial Noncompaction in A Patient with Congestive Heart Failure: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a case of a 38-year-old male presenting with new-onset dyspnea, that was diagnosed as left ventricular noncompaction by transthoracic echocardiographic and cardiac MR. The tests revealed left ventricular systolic dysfunction with prominent trabeculations associated with deep intertrabecular recesses and an enddiastolic noncompacted to compacted ratio of 2.5 in the whole apical wall and mid-ventricular anterolateral and inferolateral walls. Delayed gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI revealed subepicardial mid-wall hyperenhancement of the midventricular anteroseptal and inferoseptal walls, which suggested myocardial fibrosis. We review the pathophysiology, clinical characteristics, and diagnostic approach of the left ventricular noncompaction associated with congestive heart failure

  2. Advances in High-Field BOLD fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Barth

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This review article examines the current state of BOLD fMRI at a high magnetic field strength of 7 Tesla. The following aspects are covered: a short description of the BOLD contrast, spatial and temporal resolution, BOLD sensitivity, localization and spatial specificity, technical challenges as well as an outlook on future developments are given. It is shown that the main technical challenges of performing BOLD fMRI at high magnetic field strengths—namely development of array coils, imaging sequences and parallel imaging reconstruction—have been solved successfully. The combination of these developments has lead to the availability of high-resolution BOLD fMRI protocols that are able to cover the whole brain with a repetition time (TR shorter than 3 s. The structural information available from these high-resolution fMRI images itself is already very detailed, which helps to co-localize structure and function. Potential future applications include whole-brain connectivity analysis on a laminar resolution and single subject examinations.

  3. Role of Advanced MRI Brain Sequences in Diagnosing Neurological Complications of Scrub Typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikha Sood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a rare disease affecting many organs and causing vasculitis by affecting the endothelium of blood vessels. Review of literature shows that there are only a few case reports describing the neuroradiological manifestations of scrub typhus. This case report describes how newer and advanced MRI sequences are able to diagnose neurological complications of scrub typhus, such as hemorrhages, meningoencephalitis, infarctions, cranial nerve involvement, thrombosis, and hypoperfusion, that are not picked up on routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI sequences.

  4. Accuracy of MRI for estimating residual tumor size after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer: Relation to response patterns on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. This study evaluated the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for estimating residual tumor size after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer and assessed whether the tumor pattern on MRI after chemotherapy influenced the accuracy of the MRI measurement of the residual tumor size. Patients and methods. Fifty patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy with doxorubicin and docetaxel for locally advanced breast cancer were evaluated with MRI before and after chemotherapy. We compared the residual tumor size measured by MRI with the pathologically determined size and investigated the influence of the residual tumor pattern on MRI (shrinkage, nest or rim, and mixed) and pathologic characteristics on the accuracy of the MRI measurement. Results. The correlation coefficient between the residual tumor sizes determined by MRI and by pathology was 0.645. The MRI measurement agreed with the pathologically determined size in 36 patients (72%) and disagreed in 14 patients (28%), overestimating the size in 13 (26%) and underestimating the size in one (2%). Disagreement appeared to be more frequent in the cases showing a nest or rim pattern than in those exhibiting a shrinkage pattern, although this was not statistically significant (p=0.119). Conclusions. MRI is an accurate method for predicting the extent of residual tumor after neoadjuvant chemotherapy; however, it may overestimate the residual disease, especially in cases showing a nest or rim tumor pattern and in those having combined lesions with ductal carcinoma in situ or multiple scattered nodules after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

  5. Accuracy of MRI for estimating residual tumor size after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer: Relation to response patterns on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Im, Young-Hyuck [Div. of Hematology/Oncology, Dept. of Medic ine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea); Han, Boo-Kyung [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medi cal Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Suwon (KR)] (and others)

    2007-10-15

    Background. This study evaluated the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for estimating residual tumor size after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer and assessed whether the tumor pattern on MRI after chemotherapy influenced the accuracy of the MRI measurement of the residual tumor size. Patients and methods. Fifty patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy with doxorubicin and docetaxel for locally advanced breast cancer were evaluated with MRI before and after chemotherapy. We compared the residual tumor size measured by MRI with the pathologically determined size and investigated the influence of the residual tumor pattern on MRI (shrinkage, nest or rim, and mixed) and pathologic characteristics on the accuracy of the MRI measurement. Results. The correlation coefficient between the residual tumor sizes determined by MRI and by pathology was 0.645. The MRI measurement agreed with the pathologically determined size in 36 patients (72%) and disagreed in 14 patients (28%), overestimating the size in 13 (26%) and underestimating the size in one (2%). Disagreement appeared to be more frequent in the cases showing a nest or rim pattern than in those exhibiting a shrinkage pattern, although this was not statistically significant (p=0.119). Conclusions. MRI is an accurate method for predicting the extent of residual tumor after neoadjuvant chemotherapy; however, it may overestimate the residual disease, especially in cases showing a nest or rim tumor pattern and in those having combined lesions with ductal carcinoma in situ or multiple scattered nodules after neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

  6. Technological advances in MRI measurement of brain perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duyn, Jeff H; van Gelderen, Peter; Talagala, Lalith; Koretsky, Alan; de Zwart, Jacco A

    2005-12-01

    Measurement of brain perfusion using arterial spin labeling (ASL) or dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) based MRI has many potential important clinical applications. However, the clinical application of perfusion MRI has been limited by a number of factors, including a relatively poor spatial resolution, limited volume coverage, and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). It is difficult to improve any of these aspects because both ASL and DSC methods require rapid image acquisition. In this report, recent methodological developments are discussed that alleviate some of these limitations and make perfusion MRI more suitable for clinical application. In particular, the availability of high magnetic field strength systems, increased gradient performance, the use of RF coil arrays and parallel imaging, and increasing pulse sequence efficiency allow for increased image acquisition speed and improved SNR. The use of parallel imaging facilitates the trade-off of SNR for increases in spatial resolution. As a demonstration, we obtained DSC and ASL perfusion images at 3.0 T and 7.0 T with multichannel RF coils and parallel imaging, which allowed us to obtain high-quality images with in-plane voxel sizes of 1.5 x 1.5 mm(2). PMID:16267852

  7. Echocardiography and cardiac MRI in mutation-negative hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in an older patient: a case defining the need for ICD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Fatima; Degnan, Kathleen O; Seidman, Christine E; Mangion, Judy R

    2014-08-01

    We report the case of a 67-year-old man with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who presented for a second opinion about implantable cardio-defibrillator (ICD) placement after a witnessed syncopal episode. Despite his older age, being mutation-negative, and having a maximal septal thickness of 2.2 cm on echocardiography, he demonstrated rapid progression of myocardial fibrosis on cardiac MRI, correlating to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and syncope. We review the role of echocardiography and cardiac MRI in optimizing medical care for such patients who may not otherwise meet criteria for an ICD placement or further interventions. PMID:24816179

  8. Objective evaluation of methods to track motion from clinical cardiac-gated tagged MRI without the use of a gold standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parages, Felipe M.; Denney, Thomas S.; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac-gated MRI is widely used for the task of measuring parameters related to heart motion. More specifically, gated tagged MRI is the preferred modality to estimate local deformation (strain) and rotational motion (twist) of myocardial tissue. Many methods have been proposed to estimate cardiac motion from gated MRI sequences. However, when dealing with clinical data, evaluation of these methods is problematic due to the absence of gold-standards for cardiac motion. To overcome that, a linear regression scheme known as regression-without-truth (RWT) was proposed in the past. RWT uses priors to model the distribution of true values, thus enabling us to assess image-analysis algorithms without knowledge of the ground-truth. Furthermore, it allows one to rank methods by means of an objective figure-of-merit γ (i.e. precision). In this work we apply RWT to compare the performance of several gated MRI motion-tracking methods (e.g. non-rigid registration, feature based, harmonic phase) at the task of estimating myocardial strain and left-ventricle (LV) twist, from a population of 18 clinical human cardiac-gated tagged MRI studies.

  9. Application of the Karhunen-Loeve transform temporal image filter to reduce noise in real-time cardiac cine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Yu; Raman, Subha V; Simonetti, Orlando P [Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, Ohio Sate University, Columbus, OH, 43210 (United States); Chung, Y-C [Siemens Medical Solutions, Inc., Columbus, OH, 43210 (United States)], E-mail: yu.ding@osumc.edu

    2009-06-21

    Real-time dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically sacrifices the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to achieve higher spatial and temporal resolution. Spatial and/or temporal filtering (e.g., low-pass filtering or averaging) of dynamic images improves the SNR at the expense of edge sharpness. We describe the application of a temporal filter for dynamic MR image series based on the Karhunen-Loeve transform (KLT) to remove random noise without blurring stationary or moving edges and requiring no training data. In this paper, we present several properties of this filter and their effects on filter performance, and propose an automatic way to find the filter cutoff based on the autocorrelation of the eigenimages. Numerical simulation and in vivo real-time cardiac cine MR image series spanning multiple cardiac cycles acquired using multi-channel sensitivity-encoded MRI, i.e., parallel imaging, are used to validate and demonstrate these properties. We found that in this application, the noise standard deviation was reduced to 42% of the original with no apparent image blurring by using the proposed filter cutoff. Greater noise reduction can be achieved by increasing the length of the image series. This advantage of KLT filtering provides flexibility in the form of another scan parameter to trade for SNR.

  10. Application of the Karhunen-Loeve transform temporal image filter to reduce noise in real-time cardiac cine MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yu; Chung, Yiu-Cho; Raman, Subha V; Simonetti, Orlando P

    2009-06-21

    Real-time dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically sacrifices the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to achieve higher spatial and temporal resolution. Spatial and/or temporal filtering (e.g., low-pass filtering or averaging) of dynamic images improves the SNR at the expense of edge sharpness. We describe the application of a temporal filter for dynamic MR image series based on the Karhunen-Loeve transform (KLT) to remove random noise without blurring stationary or moving edges and requiring no training data. In this paper, we present several properties of this filter and their effects on filter performance, and propose an automatic way to find the filter cutoff based on the autocorrelation of the eigenimages. Numerical simulation and in vivo real-time cardiac cine MR image series spanning multiple cardiac cycles acquired using multi-channel sensitivity-encoded MRI, i.e., parallel imaging, are used to validate and demonstrate these properties. We found that in this application, the noise standard deviation was reduced to 42% of the original with no apparent image blurring by using the proposed filter cutoff. Greater noise reduction can be achieved by increasing the length of the image series. This advantage of KLT filtering provides flexibility in the form of another scan parameter to trade for SNR. PMID:19491455

  11. Simultaneous detection of landmarks and key-frame in cardiac perfusion MRI using a joint spatial-temporal context model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoguang; Xue, Hui; Jolly, Marie-Pierre; Guetter, Christoph; Kellman, Peter; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Arai, Andrew; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Littmann, Arne; Georgescu, Bogdan; Guehring, Jens

    2011-03-01

    Cardiac perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proven clinical significance in diagnosis of heart diseases. However, analysis of perfusion data is time-consuming, where automatic detection of anatomic landmarks and key-frames from perfusion MR sequences is helpful for anchoring structures and functional analysis of the heart, leading toward fully automated perfusion analysis. Learning-based object detection methods have demonstrated their capabilities to handle large variations of the object by exploring a local region, i.e., context. Conventional 2D approaches take into account spatial context only. Temporal signals in perfusion data present a strong cue for anchoring. We propose a joint context model to encode both spatial and temporal evidence. In addition, our spatial context is constructed not only based on the landmark of interest, but also the landmarks that are correlated in the neighboring anatomies. A discriminative model is learned through a probabilistic boosting tree. A marginal space learning strategy is applied to efficiently learn and search in a high dimensional parameter space. A fully automatic system is developed to simultaneously detect anatomic landmarks and key frames in both RV and LV from perfusion sequences. The proposed approach was evaluated on a database of 373 cardiac perfusion MRI sequences from 77 patients. Experimental results of a 4-fold cross validation show superior landmark detection accuracies of the proposed joint spatial-temporal approach to the 2D approach that is based on spatial context only. The key-frame identification results are promising.

  12. Multidetector CT and MRI of ostial atresia of the coronary sinus, associated collateral venous pathways and cardiac anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To analyse the multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in patients with atresia of the coronary sinus orifice (CSA). Materials and methods: MDCT findings of 15 consecutive adult patients with CSAs were retrospectively analysed. The patients underwent contrast-enhanced electrocardiography-gated MDCT (n = 13) or both CT and MRI (n = 2). Results: The mean size of the coronary sinus (CS) was 14.2 mm (range 5.5–24 mm) and 11 patients (73.3%) showed CS dilatation (diameter ≥12 mm). The mean length of the atretic CS segment was 2.9 mm (range 0–8 mm). Different forms of venous collateral pathways were observed in the CSA patients. Nine (60%) of the 15 CSA patients had communication between the right atrium (RA; n = 6) or LA (n = 5) and CS via intraseptal veins; six patients (40%) had persistent left superior caval veins; communications were also observed between the CS and RA (n = 4) or LA (n = 4); two patients had collateral venous pathways between dilated cardiac veins with RA; two patients had unroofing of the CS as outlet channels. Nine patients (60%) had cardiac anomalies: coronary artery fistula to the pulmonary artery (n = 6) or left ventricular base and CS (n = 1), atrial septal defects (n = 2), and a ventricular septal defect (n = 1). Conclusion: CSA patients have venous collateral pathways and a high incidence of associated cardiovascular anomalies such as coronary artery fistulae and atrial septal defects.

  13. Application of the Karhunen-Loeve transform temporal image filter to reduce noise in real-time cardiac cine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real-time dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) typically sacrifices the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to achieve higher spatial and temporal resolution. Spatial and/or temporal filtering (e.g., low-pass filtering or averaging) of dynamic images improves the SNR at the expense of edge sharpness. We describe the application of a temporal filter for dynamic MR image series based on the Karhunen-Loeve transform (KLT) to remove random noise without blurring stationary or moving edges and requiring no training data. In this paper, we present several properties of this filter and their effects on filter performance, and propose an automatic way to find the filter cutoff based on the autocorrelation of the eigenimages. Numerical simulation and in vivo real-time cardiac cine MR image series spanning multiple cardiac cycles acquired using multi-channel sensitivity-encoded MRI, i.e., parallel imaging, are used to validate and demonstrate these properties. We found that in this application, the noise standard deviation was reduced to 42% of the original with no apparent image blurring by using the proposed filter cutoff. Greater noise reduction can be achieved by increasing the length of the image series. This advantage of KLT filtering provides flexibility in the form of another scan parameter to trade for SNR.

  14. Cardiac structure and function during ageing in energetically compromised Guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT-knockout mice – a one year longitudinal MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Kieran

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI is well suited for determining global cardiac function longitudinally in genetically or surgically manipulated mice, but in practice it is seldom used to its full potential. In this study, male and female guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT knockout, and wild type littermate mice were subjected to a longitudinal cine-MRI study at four time points over the course of one year. GAMT is an essential enzyme in creatine biosynthesis, such that GAMT deficient mice are entirely creatine-free. Since creatine plays an important role in the buffering and transfer of high-energy phosphate bonds in the heart, it was hypothesized that lack of creatine would be detrimental for resting cardiac performance during ageing. Methods Measurements of cardiac structure (left ventricular mass and volumes and function (ejection fraction, stroke volume, cardiac output were obtained using high-resolution cine-MRI at 9.4 T under isoflurane anaesthesia. Results There were no physiologically significant differences in cardiac function between wild type and GAMT knockout mice at any time point for male or female groups, or for both combined (for example ejection fraction: 6 weeks (KO vs. WT: 70 ± 6% vs. 65 ± 7%; 4 months: 70 ± 6% vs. 62 ± 8%; 8 months: 62 ± 11% vs. 62 ± 6%; 12 months: 61 ± 7% vs. 59 ± 11%, respectively. Conclusion These findings suggest the presence of comprehensive adaptations in the knockout mice that can compensate for a lack of creatine. Furthermore, this study clearly demonstrates the power of cine-MRI for accurate non-invasive, serial cardiac measurements. Cardiac growth curves could easily be defined for each group, in the same set of animals for all time points, providing improved statistical power, and substantially reducing the number of mice required to conduct such a study. This technique should be eminently useful for following changes of cardiac structure and

  15. Diffusion Weighted MRI as a predictive tool for effect of radiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack, Søren; Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars;

    Diffusion weighted MRI has shown great potential in diagnostic cancer imaging and may also have value for monitoring tumor response during radiotherapy. Patients with advanced cervical cancer are treated with external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy. This study evaluates the value of DW......-MRI for predicting outcome of patients with advanced cervical cancer at time of brachytherapy. Volume of hyper-intensity on highly diffusion sensitive images and resulting ADC value for treatment responders and non-responders is compared. The change of ADC and volume of hyper-intensity over time of BT is also...

  16. PET/MRI and PET/CT in advanced gynaecological tumours: initial experience and comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, Marcelo A.; Schulthess, Gustav von; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [University Hospital Zurich, Department Medical Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department Medical Radiology, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Freiwald-Chilla, Bianka [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); Hauser, Nik [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Gynaecology, Baden (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Guerbet AG, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-08-15

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy of PET/MRI and PET/CT for staging and re-staging advanced gynaecological cancer patients as well as identify the potential benefits of each method in such a population. Twenty-six patients with suspicious or proven advanced gynaecological cancer (12 ovarian, seven cervical, one vulvar and four endometrial tumours, one uterine metastasis, and one primary peritoneal cancer) underwent whole-body imaging with a sequential trimodality PET/CT/MR system. Images were analysed regarding primary tumour detection and delineation, loco-regional lymph node staging, and abdominal/extra-abdominal distant metastasis detection (last only by PET/CT). Eighteen (69.2 %) patients underwent PET/MRI for primary staging and eight patients (30.8 %) for re-staging their gynaecological malignancies. For primary tumour delineation, PET/MRI accuracy was statistically superior to PET/CT (p < 0.001). Among the different types of cancer, PET/MRI presented better tumour delineation mainly for cervical (6/7) and endometrial (2/3) cancers. PET/MRI for local evaluation as well as PET/CT for extra-abdominal metastases had therapeutic consequences in three and one patients, respectively. PET/CT detected 12 extra-abdominal distant metastases in 26 patients. PET/MRI is superior to PET/CT for primary tumour delineation. No differences were found in detection of regional lymph node involvement and abdominal metastases detection. (orig.)

  17. MRI and endosonography in preoperative staging of advanced rectal carcinomas after hypothermoradiochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of staging of endorectal sonography (ES) and body coil MRI after preoperative hyperthermoradiochemotherapy in patients with advanced rectal cancer. Methods: Prospective analysis of MRI and ES in 30 patients after hyperthermoradiochemotherapy and correlation with histopathological patterns. Results: T-staging by MRI was correct in 47% and by ES in 53% of the cases. Despite similar accuracy of staging in T0- and T1-tumours, we found different accuracies concerning T2-tumour staging about 63% versus 73% (MRI/ES), concerning perirectal infiltration 70% for both techniques, concerning invasion of adjacent organs 90% versus 87%, and concerning lymph node metastases without respect to the N-stage 63% versus 63%. Conclusion: Both imaging modalities provide useful information for operation planning despite limited accuracy after hyperthermoradiochemotherapy. The body coil MRI does not seem to be severely inferior to ES in posttherapeutic staging, despite better contour line imaging by ES. With respect to the determination of invasion of other organs, MRI seems to be more useful. (orig.)

  18. Recent Advances in the Imaging Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Value of Gadoxetic Acid-Enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Ijin; Lee, Jeong Min

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DPTA), or gadoxetic acid for short, is a hepatocyte-specific contrast agent which is now increasingly used for the detection and characterization of focal hepatic lesions, particularly in patients at high-risk of developing hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC). In fact, several recent guidelines now recognize gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI (Gd-EOB-MRI) as the primary diagnostic imaging modality for the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC, although it must be noted that several major guidelines still include only extracellular contrast media-enhanced computed tomography and MRI. The primary merits of Gd-EOB-MRI lie in the fact that it can provide not only dynamic imaging, but also hepatobiliary phase (HBP) imaging which can lead to high lesion-to-liver contrast and give additional information regarding hepatocyte uptake via organic anion transporting polypeptides. This, in turn, allows higher sensitivity in detecting small HCCs and helps provide additional information regarding the multistep process of hepatocarcinogenesis. Indeed, many recent studies have investigated the diagnostic value of Gd-EOB-MRI for early HCCs as well as its role as a potential imaging biomarker in predicting outcome. We herein review the recent advances in the imaging diagnosis of HCCs focusing on the applications of Gd-EOB-MRI and the challenging issues that remain. PMID:26989660

  19. Prognostic implication of late gadolinium enhancement on cardiac MRI in light chain (AL) amyloidosis on long term follow up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a rare plasma cell dyscrasia associated with poor survival especially in the setting of heart failure. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on cardiac MRI was recently found to correlate with myocardial amyloid deposition but the prognostic role is not established. The aim is to determine the prognostic significance of LGE in AL by comparing long term survival of AL patients with and without LGE. Twenty nine consecutive patients (14 females; 62 ± 11 years) with biopsy-proven AL undergoing cardiac MRI with gadolinium as part of AL workup were included. Survival was prospectively followed 29 months (median) following MRI and compared between those with and without LGE by Kaplan-Meier and log-rank analyses. LGE was positive in 23 subjects (79%) and negative in 6 (21%). Left ventricular ejection fraction was 66 ± 17% in LGE-positive and 69 ± 12% in LGE-negative patients (p = 0.8). Overall 1-year mortality was 36%. On follow-up, 14/23 LGE-positive and none of LGE-negative patients died (log rank p = 0.0061). Presenting New York Heart Association heart failure class was also associated with poor survival (p = 0.0059). Survival between two LGE groups stratified by heart failure class still showed a significant difference by a stratified log-rank test (p = 0.04). Late gadolinium enhancement is common and is associated with poor long-term survival in light chain amyloidosis, even after adjustment for heart failure class presentation. The prognostic significance of late gadolinium enhancement in this disease may be useful in patient risk-stratification

  20. Characterization of respiratory and cardiac motion from electro-anatomical mapping data for improved fusion of MRI to left ventricular electrograms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Roujol

    Full Text Available Accurate fusion of late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and electro-anatomical voltage mapping (EAM is required to evaluate the potential of MRI to identify the substrate of ventricular tachycardia. However, both datasets are not acquired at the same cardiac phase and EAM data is corrupted with respiratory motion limiting the accuracy of current rigid fusion techniques. Knowledge of cardiac and respiratory motion during EAM is thus required to enhance the fusion process. In this study, we propose a novel approach to characterize both cardiac and respiratory motion from EAM data using the temporal evolution of the 3D catheter location recorded from clinical EAM systems. Cardiac and respiratory motion components are extracted from the recorded catheter location using multi-band filters. Filters are calibrated for each EAM point using estimates of heart rate and respiratory rate. The method was first evaluated in numerical simulations using 3D models of cardiac and respiratory motions of the heart generated from real time MRI data acquired in 5 healthy subjects. An accuracy of 0.6-0.7 mm was found for both cardiac and respiratory motion estimates in numerical simulations. Cardiac and respiratory motions were then characterized in 27 patients who underwent LV mapping for treatment of ventricular tachycardia. Mean maximum amplitude of cardiac and respiratory motion was 10.2±2.7 mm (min = 5.5, max = 16.9 and 8.8±2.3 mm (min = 4.3, max = 14.8, respectively. 3D Cardiac and respiratory motions could be estimated from the recorded catheter location and the method does not rely on additional imaging modality such as X-ray fluoroscopy and can be used in conventional electrophysiology laboratory setting.

  1. Cardiac MRI in addition to MR angiography: a longitudinal study in vascular risk patients; Kardiale MRT als Ergaenzung zur MR-Angiografie: Eine longitudinale Studie bei vaskulaeren Risikopatienten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, A.; Grimm, F.; Fenchel, M.; Kramer, U.; Doering, J.S.; Klumpp, B.; Claussen, C.D.; Miller, S. [Abt. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. Tuebingen (Germany); Scheule, A. [Abt. fuer Herz-, Thorax- und Gefaesschirurgie, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. Tuebingen (Germany); May, A.E. [Abt. fuer Kardiologie, Eberhard-Karls-Univ. Tuebingen (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    Purpose: the aim of the study was to assess the feasibility and additional diagnostic information of cardiac MRI as a supplement to state-of-the-art MR angiography (MRA) in the case of vascular risk patients. Therefore, the prevalence of delayed myocardial enhancement (DE) was determined in patients suffering from peripheral artery disease (PAD) and a clinical follow-up was evaluated after 2 years. Materials and method: 87 consecutive patients (ages 66 {+-} 10 years, 67 males) with symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease (n = 68) or abdominal aortic aneurysm (n = 19) were examined using delayed cardiac enhancement (DE) within the clinical indication of MRA at a 1.5T system. A follow-up examination was carried out two years later (24 months {+-} 4 months) with regards to cardiac events (cardiac death, myocardial infarction or acute coronary syndrome, heart insufficiency, coronary revascularization). Results: in total, 40/87 patients had myocardial infarctions shown in MRI (46%). In 25 patients (29%), the myocardial infarction was already known, while in 15 patients (17%) an occult progressing infarction was diagnosed (38% of the myocardial infarcts). Follow-up data was able to be obtained after 2 years for 82 patients. 15 patients had a major cardiac event during the follow-up period, and 10 (67%) of them already showed DE in the MRI. In the group with occult progressing infarctions, cardiac events occurred in 40% (6/15 patients, cardiac death n = 1, ischemia n = 4, heart insufficiency n = 1, bypass n = 1), in patients with known infarction in 17% (4/23 patients, cardiac death n = 1, ischemia n = 3, bypass n = 2) and in 11% of patients without myocardial scars (5/44 patients, cardiac death n = 1, ischemia n = 2, heart insufficiency n = 2). (orig.)

  2. Should prehospital resuscitative thoracotomy be incorporated in advanced life support after traumatic cardiac arrest?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkias, A; Xanthos, T

    2014-06-01

    The survival of traumatic cardiac arrest patients poses a challenge for Emergency Medical Services initiating advanced life support on-scene, especially with regard to having to decide immediately whether to initiate prehospital emergency thoracotomy. Although the necessity for carrying out the procedure remains a cause for debate, it can be life-saving when performed with the correct indications and approaches. PMID:26816077

  3. [18F]-fluoro-l-thymidine PET and advanced MRI for preoperative grading of gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Collet

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Whereas advanced MRI parameters give indications for the grading of gliomas, the addition of [18F]-FLT-PET could be of interest for the accurate preoperative classification of diffuse gliomas, particularly for identification of doubtful grade III and IV gliomas.

  4. Functional cardiac MRI for assessment of aortic valve disease; Aortenklappenstenose im MRT mit Dynamik und 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagmeister, F.; Ritter, C.; Machann, W.; Koestler, H.; Hahn, D.; Beer, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Herrmann, S.; Voelker, W.; Weidemann, F. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Medizinische Klinik I, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    Aortic valve disease shows a rising incidence with the increasing mean age of Western populations. The detection of hemodynamic parameters, which transcends the mere assessment of valve morphology, has an important future potential concerning classification of the severity of disease. MRI allows a non-invasive and a spatially flexible view of the aortic valve and the adjacent anatomic region, left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) and ascending aorta. Moreover, the technique allows the determination of functional hemodynamic parameters, such as flow velocities and effective orifice areas. The new approach of a serial systolic planimetry velocity-encoded MRI sequence (VENC-MRI) facilitates the sizing of blood-filled cardiac structures with the registration of changes in magnitude during systole. Additionally, the subvalvular VENC-MRI measurements improve the clinically important exact determination of the LVOT area with respect to its specific eccentric configuration and its systolic deformity. (orig.) [German] Erworbene Erkrankungen der Aortenklappe wie die Aortenklappenstenose zeigen mit zunehmender Alterungstendenz unserer Gesellschaft eine ansteigende Inzidenz. Die Erfassung ueber die reine Klappenmorphologie hinausgehender haemodynamischer Parameter hat ein wichtiges zukuenftiges Potenzial zur Schweregradeinschaetzung. Die MRT erlaubt eine nichtinvasive und raeumlich flexible Darstellung der Aortenklappe sowie ihrer benachbarten anatomischen Strukturen (linksventrikulaerer Ausflusstrakt/LVOT, Aorta ascendens). Darueber hinaus ist eine Bestimmung funktioneller haemodynamischer Parameter wie Flussgeschwindigkeiten und effektiven Oeffnungsflaechen (EOeF) moeglich. Der neue Ansatz einer seriellen Planimetrie geschwindigkeitskodierter MRT-Sequenzen (Velocity-encoding- [VENC-]MRT) erlaubt die Groessenbestimmung flussdurchstroemter kardialer Strukturen und die Aufzeichnung ihrer dynamischen Groessenveraenderung waehrend der Systole. Zusaetzlich ermoeglicht die

  5. Diagnostic accuracy and variability of three semi-quantitative methods for assessing right ventricular systolic function from cardiac MRI in patients with acquired heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and variability of 3 semi-quantitative (SQt) methods for assessing right ventricular (RV) systolic function from cardiac MRI in patients with acquired heart disease: tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), RV fractional-shortening (RVFS) and RV fractional area change (RVFAC). Sixty consecutive patients were enrolled. Reference RV ejection fraction (RVEF) was determined from short axis cine sequences. TAPSE, RVFS and RVFAC were measured on a 4-chamber cine sequence. All SQt analyses were performed twice by 3 observers with various degrees of training in cardiac MRI. Correlation with RVEF, intra- and inter-observer variability, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were performed for each SQt method. Correlation between RVFAC and RVEF was good for all observers and did not depend on previous cardiac MRI experience (R range = 0.716-0.741). Conversely, RVFS (R range = 0.534-0.720) and TAPSE (R range = 0.482-0.646) correlated less with RVEF and depended on previous experience. Intra- and inter-observer variability was much lower for RVFAC than for RVFS and TAPSE. ROC analysis demonstrated that RVFAC <41% could predict a RVEF <45% with 90% sensitivity and 94% specificity. RVFAC appears to be more accurate and reproducible than RVFS and TAPSE for SQt assessment of RV function by cardiac MRI. (orig.)

  6. Combined respiratory and cardiac triggering improves blood pool contrast-enhanced pediatric cardiovascular MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrast-enhanced cardiac MRA suffers from cardiac motion artifacts and often requires a breath-hold. This work develops and evaluates a blood pool contrast-enhanced combined respiratory- and ECG-triggered MRA method. An SPGR sequence was modified to enable combined cardiac and respiratory triggering on a 1.5-T scanner. Twenty-three consecutive children referred for pediatric heart disease receiving gadofosveset were recruited in HIPAA-compliant fashion with IRB approval and informed consent. Children underwent standard non-triggered contrast-enhanced MRA with or without suspended respiration. Additionally, a free-breathing-triggered MRA was acquired. Triggered and non-triggered studies were presented in blinded random order independently to two radiologists twice. Anatomical structure delineation was graded for each triggered and non-triggered acquisition and the visual quality on triggered MRA was compared directly to that on non-triggered MRA. Triggered images received higher scores from each radiologist for all anatomical structures on each of the two reading sessions (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P < 0.05). In direct comparison, triggered images were preferred over non-triggered images for delineating cardiac structures, with most comparisons reaching statistical significance (binomial test, P < 0.05). Combined cardiac and respiratory triggering, enabled by a blood pool contrast agent, improves delineation of most anatomical structures in pediatric cardiovascular MRA. (orig.)

  7. Combined respiratory and cardiac triggering improves blood pool contrast-enhanced pediatric cardiovascular MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasanawala, Shreyas S.; Newman, Beverley [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Chan, Frandics P. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Alley, Marcus T. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Lucas MRS Center, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Contrast-enhanced cardiac MRA suffers from cardiac motion artifacts and often requires a breath-hold. This work develops and evaluates a blood pool contrast-enhanced combined respiratory- and ECG-triggered MRA method. An SPGR sequence was modified to enable combined cardiac and respiratory triggering on a 1.5-T scanner. Twenty-three consecutive children referred for pediatric heart disease receiving gadofosveset were recruited in HIPAA-compliant fashion with IRB approval and informed consent. Children underwent standard non-triggered contrast-enhanced MRA with or without suspended respiration. Additionally, a free-breathing-triggered MRA was acquired. Triggered and non-triggered studies were presented in blinded random order independently to two radiologists twice. Anatomical structure delineation was graded for each triggered and non-triggered acquisition and the visual quality on triggered MRA was compared directly to that on non-triggered MRA. Triggered images received higher scores from each radiologist for all anatomical structures on each of the two reading sessions (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P < 0.05). In direct comparison, triggered images were preferred over non-triggered images for delineating cardiac structures, with most comparisons reaching statistical significance (binomial test, P < 0.05). Combined cardiac and respiratory triggering, enabled by a blood pool contrast agent, improves delineation of most anatomical structures in pediatric cardiovascular MRA. (orig.)

  8. Right-sided cardiac function in healthy volunteers measured by first-pass radionuclide ventriculography and gated blood-pool SPECT: comparison with cine MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Andreas; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Hesse, Birger;

    2005-01-01

    evaluation of right-sided cardiac function. The aim of our study was to compare the agreement between these methods when measuring right-sided cardiac function. METHODS: Twenty-four healthy volunteers were included. Mean age was 44 years (range: 25-60) and 29% were females. All participants had FP, GBPS and...... 6 ml m(-2) (95% CI: 0-11). CONCLUSIONS: (i) Normal values of RVEF differ between MRI, FP and GBPS with wide limits of agreement, accordingly it is difficult to evaluate changes over time if measured by different methods, (ii) RV volumes are in the same range when measured by MRI or GBPS but with...... wide limits of agreement, and (iii) if MRI is considered gold standard then FP is more accurate than GBPS for RVEF measurements....

  9. Validating a new methodology for strain estimation from cardiac cine MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnakib, Ahmed; Beache, Garth M.; Gimel'farb, Georgy; Inanc, Tamer; El-Baz, Ayman

    2013-10-01

    This paper focuses on validating a novel framework for estimating the functional strain from cine cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI). The framework consists of three processing steps. First, the left ventricle (LV) wall borders are segmented using a level-set based deformable model. Second, the points on the wall borders are tracked during the cardiac cycle based on solving the Laplace equation between the LV edges. Finally, the circumferential and radial strains are estimated at the inner, mid-wall, and outer borders of the LV wall. The proposed framework is validated using synthetic phantoms of the material strains that account for the physiological features and the LV response during the cardiac cycle. Experimental results on simulated phantom images confirm the accuracy and robustness of our method.

  10. Detection of pathological areas and estimation of viability parameters in late-enhancement cardiac MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Breeuwer Marcel; Hautvast Gilion; Mory Benoît; Ciofolo-Veit Cybele; Elagouni Khaoula

    2010-01-01

    International audience We propose a novel fully automatic method to detect and quantify pathological areas in late-enhancement cardiac MR images. The electronic version of this abstract is the complete one and can be found online at: http://jcmr-online.com/content/12/S1/P167

  11. Wild-Type Transthyretin Cardiac Amyloidosis: Novel Insights From Advanced Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narotsky, David L; Castano, Adam; Weinsaft, Jonathan W; Bokhari, Sabahat; Maurer, Mathew S

    2016-09-01

    Amyloidosis is caused by extracellular deposition of abnormal protein fibrils, resulting in destruction of tissue architecture and impairment of organ function. The most common forms of systemic amyloidosis are light-chain and transthyretin-related (ATTR). ATTR can result from an autosomal dominant hereditary transmission of mutated genes in the transthyretin or from a wild-type form of disease (ATTRwt), previously known as senile cardiac amyloidosis. With the aging of the worldwide population, ATTRwt will emerge as the most common type of cardiac amyloidosis that clinicians encounter. Diagnosis of systemic amyloidosis is often delayed, either because of the false assumption that it is a rare disease, or because of misdiagnosis as a result of mistaking it with other conditions. Clinicians must integrate clinical clues from history, physical examination, and common diagnostic tests to raise suspicion for ATTRwt. The historical gold standard for diagnosis of cardiac amyloid is endomyocardial biopsy analysis with pathological distinction of precursor protein type, but this method often results in delayed diagnosis because of the limited availability of expertise to perform and interpret the endomyocardial biopsy specimen. Emerging noninvasive imaging modalities provide easier, accurate screening for ATTRwt. These modalities include advanced echocardiography, using strain imaging and the myocardial contraction fraction; nuclear scintigraphy, which can differentiate between ATTR and light-chain cardiac amyloid; and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, using extracellular volume measurement, late gadolinium enhancement, and distinct T1 mapping. These novel approaches reveal insights into the prevalence, clinical course, morphological effects, and prognosis of ATTRwt. PMID:27568874

  12. Phenotyping of left and right ventricular function in mouse models of compensated hypertrophy and heart failure with cardiac MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastiaan J van Nierop

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Left ventricular (LV and right ventricular (RV function have an important impact on symptom occurrence, disease progression and exercise tolerance in pressure overload-induced heart failure, but particularly RV functional changes are not well described in the relevant aortic banding mouse model. Therefore, we quantified time-dependent alterations in the ventricular morphology and function in two models of hypertrophy and heart failure and we studied the relationship between RV and LV function during the transition from hypertrophy to heart failure. METHODS: MRI was used to quantify RV and LV function and morphology in healthy (n = 4 and sham operated (n = 3 C57BL/6 mice, and animals with a mild (n = 5 and a severe aortic constriction (n = 10. RESULTS: Mice subjected to a mild constriction showed increased LV mass (P0.05. Animals with a severe constriction progressively developed LV hypertrophy (P<0.001, depressed LVEF (P<0.001, followed by a declining RVEF (P<0.001 and the development of pulmonary remodeling, as compared to controls during a 10-week follow-up. Myocardial strain, as a measure for local cardiac function, decreased in mice with a severe constriction compared to controls (P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Relevant changes in mouse RV and LV function following an aortic constriction could be quantified using MRI. The well-controlled models described here open opportunities to assess the added value of new MRI techniques for the diagnosis of heart failure and to study the impact of new therapeutic strategies on disease progression and symptom occurrence.

  13. Quantification of cardiac function with multislice spiral CT using retrospective EKG-gating: comparison with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify left ventricular function derived from retrospectively ECG-gated multislice spiral CT (MSCT) data sets in comparison to MRI. Materials and Methods: In 16 patients (14 males, 2 females, mean age 56.8 ± 11.5 years), retrospectively ECG-gated MSCT angiography of the coronary arteries and breath-hold steady state free precession cine MRI were performed. From MSCT data-sets, 20 axial image series were reconstructed every 5% of the RR interval. Multiplanar images were reformatted in the short axis orientation from axial images. End-systolic and end-diastolic images were selected. From these images end-systolic volume (ESV), end-diastolic volume (EDV) and stroke volume (SV) as well as the ejection fraction (EF) and myocardial mass (MM) were determined using the Simpson's method and compared with MRI. Furthermore, image quality was assessed for both imaging modalities using a four point grading scale. Results: All parameters were found to have an excellent correlation between MSCT and MRI data (Pearson's correlation coefficient 0.95 - 0.99), without clinically relevant differences between both modalities. On average, the difference between both methods was 0.5 ml for ESV, 0.8 ml for EDV, 1.3 ml for SV, 0.9% for EF and 2.3 g for MM. Image quality was slightly better for MRI (1.5 ± 0.65) than for MSCT (1.64 ± 0.74). Conclusion: Retrospectively ECG-gated MSCT angiography can not only visualize the coronary arteries but also enables precise quantification of the left ventricular function from the same MSCT data set. (orig.)

  14. Cardiac MRI in a Patient with Coincident Left Ventricular Non-Compaction and Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alizadeh-Sani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Left ventricular non-compaction cardiomyopathy is a rare congenital cardiomyopathy that affects both children and adults. Since the clinical manifestations are not sufficient to establish diagnosis, echocardiography is the diagnostic tool that makes it possible to document ventricular non-compaction and establish prognostic factors. We report a 47-year-old woman with a history of dilated cardiomyopathy with unknown etiology. Echocardiography showed mild left ventricular enlargement with severe systolic dysfunction (EF = 20-25%. According to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging findings non-compaction left ventricle with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy was considered, and right ventricular septal biopsy was recommended. Right ventricular endomyocardial biopsy showed moderate hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes with foci of myocytolysis and moderate interstitial fibrosis. No evidence of infiltrative deposition was seen.

  15. Extranodal Rosai-Dorfman Disease Involving the Left Atrium: Cardiac MRI, CT, and PET Scan Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Vistasp J. Daruwalla; Keyur Parekh; Hassan Tahir; Collins, Jeremy D; James Carr

    2015-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) is a rare entity that usually involves the lymph nodes but extranodal involvements have been seen in numerous cases, although RDD with cardiovascular involvement is extremely rare. We describe a case of a young male who presented with intermittent palpitations and was found to have a left atrium mass. Our case not only emphasizes the rarity of the above lesion but also highlights the importance of modern-day imaging like computed tomography, Cardiac Magnetic Resona...

  16. The role of cardiac MRI in the diagnosis and management of sinus venosus atrial septal defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudan Ganigara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sinus venosus atrial septal defects (SV-ASDs are inter-atrial communications caused by a deficiency of the common wall between the superior or inferior vena cava and the right-sided pulmonary veins. The diagnosis can be challenging, especially in adults with delayed presentation. We present images that illustrate an example of the role of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI in the diagnosis and follow-up of a patient with SV-ASD.

  17. Recurrent Fully Convolutional Neural Networks for Multi-slice MRI Cardiac Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Poudel, Rudra P K; Lamata, Pablo; Montana, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    In cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, fully-automatic segmentation of the heart enables precise structural and functional measurements to be taken, e.g. from short-axis MR images of the left-ventricle. In this work we propose a recurrent fully-convolutional network (RFCN) that learns image representations from the full stack of 2D slices and has the ability to leverage inter-slice spatial dependences through internal memory units. RFCN combines anatomical detection and segmentation into a si...

  18. The role of cardiac MRI in the diagnosis and management of sinus venosus atrial septal defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinus venosus atrial septal defects (SV-ASDs) are inter-atrial communications caused by a deficiency of the common wall between the superior or inferior vena cava and the right-sided pulmonary veins. The diagnosis can be challenging, especially in adults with delayed presentation. We present images that illustrate an example of the role of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) in the diagnosis and follow-up of a patient with SV-ASD

  19. Quantification of left and right ventricular function and myocardial mass: Comparison of low-radiation dose 2nd generation dual-source CT and cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To prospectively evaluate the accuracy of left and right ventricular function and myocardial mass measurements based on a dual-step, low radiation dose protocol with prospectively ECG-triggered 2nd generation dual-source CT (DSCT), using cardiac MRI (cMRI) as the reference standard. Materials and methods: Twenty patients underwent 1.5 T cMRI and prospectively ECG-triggered dual-step pulsing cardiac DSCT. This image acquisition mode performs low-radiation (20% tube current) imaging over the majority of the cardiac cycle and applies full radiation only during a single adjustable phase. Full-radiation-phase images were used to assess cardiac morphology, while low-radiation-phase images were used to measure left and right ventricular function and mass. Quantitative CT measurements based on contiguous multiphase short-axis reconstructions from the axial CT data were compared with short-axis SSFP cardiac cine MRI. Contours were manually traced around the ventricular borders for calculation of left and right ventricular end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, stroke volume, ejection fraction and myocardial mass for both modalities. Statistical methods included independent t-tests, the Mann–Whitney U test, Pearson correlation statistics, and Bland–Altman analysis. Results: All CT measurements of left and right ventricular function and mass correlated well with those from cMRI: for left/right end-diastolic volume r = 0.885/0.801, left/right end-systolic volume r = 0.947/0.879, left/right stroke volume r = 0.620/0.697, left/right ejection fraction r = 0.869/0.751, and left/right myocardial mass r = 0.959/0.702. Mean radiation dose was 6.2 ± 1.8 mSv. Conclusions: Prospectively ECG-triggered, dual-step pulsing cardiac DSCT accurately quantifies left and right ventricular function and myocardial mass in comparison with cMRI with substantially lower radiation exposure than reported for traditional retrospective ECG-gating.

  20. Advances in Functional and Structural Imaging of the Human Lung Using Proton MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, G. Wilson; Mugler, John P.; Sá, Rui C.; Altes, Talissa A.; Prisk, G. Kim; Hopkins, Susan R.

    2014-01-01

    The field of proton lung MRI is advancing on a variety of fronts. In the realm of functional imaging, it is now possible to use arterial spin labeling (ASL) and oxygen-enhanced imaging techniques to quantify regional perfusion and ventilation, respectively, in standard units of measure. By combining these techniques into a single scan, it is also possible to quantify the local ventilation-perfusion ratio, which is the most important determinant of gas-exchange efficiency in the lung. To demon...

  1. MO-A-BRD-08: Radiosurgery Beyond Cancer: Real-Time Target Localization and Treatment Planning for Cardiac Radiosurgery Under MRI Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, affecting >2.5M Americans and >4.5M Europeans. AF is usually treated with minimally-invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. Radiosurgery of the pulmonary veins (PV) has been proposed for AF treatment, however is challenging due to the complex respiratory and cardiac motion patterns. We hypothesize that an MRI-linac could solve the difficult real-time targeting and adaptation problem. In this study we quantified target motion ranges on cardiac MRI and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time MRI tracking was applied. Methods: For the motion study, four human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion on coronal and axial cine planes was analyzed using a template matching algorithm. For the planning study, an ablation line at each PV antrum was defined as target on an AF patient scheduled for catheter ablation. Various safety margins ranging from 0mm (perfect tracking) to 8mm (untracked motion) were added to the target defining the PTV. 30Gy single fraction IMRT plans were then generated. Finally, the influence of a 1T magnetic field on treatment beam delivery was calculated using the Geant4 Monte Carlo algorithm to simulate the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance. Results: The motion study showed the mean respiratory motion of the target area on MRI was 8.4mm (SI), 1.7mm (AP) and 0.3mm (LR). Cardiac motion was small (<2mm). The planning study showed that with increasing safety margins to encompass untracked motion, dose tolerances for OARs such as the esophagus and airways were exceeded by >100%. The magnetic field had little impact on the dose distribution. Conclusion: Our results indicate that real-time MRI tracking of the PVs seems feasible. Accurate image guidance for high-dose AF radiosurgery is essential since safety margins covering untracked target motion will result in unacceptable treatment plans

  2. MO-A-BRD-08: Radiosurgery Beyond Cancer: Real-Time Target Localization and Treatment Planning for Cardiac Radiosurgery Under MRI Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ipsen, S [University of Luebeck, Luebeck, SH (Germany); University of Sydney, Camperdown (Australia); Blanck, O [CyberKnife Zentrum Norddeutschland, Guestrow, MV (Germany); Oborn, B [Illawarra Cancer Care Centre, Wollongong, NSW (Australia); Bode, F [Medical Clinic II, Section for Electrophysiology, UKSH, Luebeck, SH (Germany); Liney, G [Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Keall, P [University of Sydney, Camperdown (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, affecting >2.5M Americans and >4.5M Europeans. AF is usually treated with minimally-invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. Radiosurgery of the pulmonary veins (PV) has been proposed for AF treatment, however is challenging due to the complex respiratory and cardiac motion patterns. We hypothesize that an MRI-linac could solve the difficult real-time targeting and adaptation problem. In this study we quantified target motion ranges on cardiac MRI and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time MRI tracking was applied. Methods: For the motion study, four human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion on coronal and axial cine planes was analyzed using a template matching algorithm. For the planning study, an ablation line at each PV antrum was defined as target on an AF patient scheduled for catheter ablation. Various safety margins ranging from 0mm (perfect tracking) to 8mm (untracked motion) were added to the target defining the PTV. 30Gy single fraction IMRT plans were then generated. Finally, the influence of a 1T magnetic field on treatment beam delivery was calculated using the Geant4 Monte Carlo algorithm to simulate the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance. Results: The motion study showed the mean respiratory motion of the target area on MRI was 8.4mm (SI), 1.7mm (AP) and 0.3mm (LR). Cardiac motion was small (<2mm). The planning study showed that with increasing safety margins to encompass untracked motion, dose tolerances for OARs such as the esophagus and airways were exceeded by >100%. The magnetic field had little impact on the dose distribution. Conclusion: Our results indicate that real-time MRI tracking of the PVs seems feasible. Accurate image guidance for high-dose AF radiosurgery is essential since safety margins covering untracked target motion will result in unacceptable treatment plans.

  3. The correlation study of cardiovascular MRI with cardiac biomarkers and electrocardiography in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the correlation of cardiovascular MRI with cardiac biomarkers and electrocardiography(ECG) in acute myocardial infarction (MI). Methods: Nineteen patients with first acute MI were selected to undergo MRI on a 1.5 T system within 3-7 days after the onset of symptoms. A first-pass perfusion scan was performed with the administration of Gd-DTPA at a speed after cine MRI for global left ventricle (LV) functions. Delay-enhanced MRI was performed by using an ECG-gated inversion- recovery fast-gradient echo-pulse sequence 5 to 10 minutes later with second bolus injection at a speed. Infarct mass (IM), percentage size of infarction (PSI) and LV functions were compared with peak troponin T (peak TnT) and peak creatine kinase-MB fraction (peak CK-MB). The 12-lead ECG was analysed for ST-elevation on admission. Pearson and Spearman correlation test and independent-Sample t test were used for statistics. Results: The IM (median 6.3 g) was correlated with peak TnT( median 0.8 μg/L, r=0.487, P=0.0340) and left ventricle end-systolic volume index (LVESVI) (median 23.4 ml/m2, r= 0.480, P= 0.038), IM showed a negative correlation with left ventricle ejection fraction(LVEF) (54.1±15.4)% (r= -0.563, P=0.012). The PSI (median 6.0%) was correlated with peak TnT(r=0.583, P=0.009), peak CK-MB(median 43.0 U/L,r=0.470, P =0.042)and LVSV [(57.6±15.0) ml, r=-0.482, P= 0.036], peak TnT was also correlated with LVSV (r=-0.524, P=0.021). There were more involved segments (IS) (t=2.972, P=0.009), higher peak TnT (t=2.245, P=0.041) and peak CK-MB (t=2.508,P=0.024)in ST-elevation MI (STEMI) than in non ST-elevation MI (NSTEMI). Conclusions: IM directly influences LV functions in acute MI. Peak TnT was a better biomarker reflecting PSI and LV functions. There were more involved segments in STEMI than in NSTEMI. (authors)

  4. Recent Advancements in Diffusion MRI for Investigating Cortical Development after Preterm Birth – Potential and Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen eDudink

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preterm infants are born during a critical period of brain maturation, in which even subtle events can result in substantial behavioral, motor and cognitive deficits, as well as psychiatric diseases. Recent evidence shows that the main source for these devastating disabilities is not necessarily white matter damage but could also be disruptions of cortical microstructure. Animal studies showed how moderate hypoxic-ischemic conditions did not result in significant neuronal loss in the developing brain, but did cause significantly impaired dendritic growth and synapse formation alongside a disturbed development of neuronal connectivity as measured using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI. When using more advanced acquisition settings such as high-angular resolution diffusion imaging, more advanced reconstruction methods can be applied to investigate the cortical microstructure with higher levels of detail. Recent advances in dMRI acquisition and anlysis have great potential to contribute to a better understanding of neuronal connectivity impairment in preterm birth. We will review the current understanding of abnormal preterm cortical development, novel approaches in dMRI, and the pitfalls in scanning vulnerable preterm infants.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of congestive cardiac failure

    OpenAIRE

    Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2012-01-01

    Congestive cardiac failure is the end-result of various cardiac disorders, and is a major contributor to morbidity, mortality, and financial burden throughout the world. Due to advances in the knowledge of the disease and scanner technology, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is playing an increasingly important role in the evaluation of cardiac failure, including in establishing diagnosis, problem solving, risk stratification, and monitoring of therapy. This review discusses and illustrates th...

  6. Study progress of cardiac MRI technology in assessment of myocardial viability after myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is one of the most common diseases that cause disability and death around the world. Correctly and effectively assessing the myocardial viability after myocardial infarction can reduce the disabled rate and mortality rate. At present, many methods could be used to assess myocardial viability. The cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) technology has a lot of advantages compared to other methods. In this paper, we reviewed the research progress of CMR in assessment of myocardial viability after myocardial infarction, and compared CMR with other technologies. (authors)

  7. Non cardiopatic and cardiopatic beta thalassaemic patients: quantitative and qualitative cardiac iron deposition evaluation with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Cardiomyopathy is one of the major complications of β thalassaemia major as a result of transfusion iron overload. The aim of our study is to evaluate with MR if there is any difference of iron deposition signal intensity (SI) or distribution between non-cardiopatic and cardiopatic thalassaemic patients in order to establish if there is a relationship between cardiopathy and iron deposition. Materials and methods: We studied 20 patients affected by β thalassaemia major, of whom 10 cardiopatic and 10 non-cardiopatic, and 10 healthy volunteers as control group. Serum ferritin and left ventricular ejection fraction were calculated in thalassaemic patients. All patients were examinated using a 1.5 MR unit with ECG-gated GE cine-MR T2*-weighted, SE T1-weighted and GE T2*-weighted sequences. In all cases, using an adequate ROI, the myocardial and skeletal muscle signal intensity (SI), the myocardial/skeletal muscle signal intensity radio (SIR) and the SI average of the myocardium and skeletal muscle were calculated for every study group. The qualitative evaluation of iron deposition distribution was independently performed by three radiologists who analysed the extension, the site and the morphology of iron deposition on the MR images and reported their observations on the basis of a four-level rating scale: 0 (absent), 1 (limited), 2 (partial), 3 (widespread deposition). The results of quantitative and qualitative evaluation were analysed with statistical tests. Results: Cardiac iron deposition was found in 8/10 non-cardiopatic thalassaemic patients and in all cardiopatic thalassaemic patients. We noticed a significant SI difference (p>0.05) between the healthy volunteer control group and the thalassaemic patients with iron deposition, but no significant SI difference in iron deposition between non-cardiopatic thalassaemic patients in the areas evaluated. The qualitative evaluation revealed a different distribution of iron deposition between the two

  8. Assessment of Liver Fibrosis Using Fast Strain-Encoded (FSENC) MRI Driven by Inherent Cardiac Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harouni, Ahmed A.; Gharib, Ahmed M.; Osman, Nael F.; Morse, Caryn; Heller, Theo; Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An external driver-free MRI method for assessment of liver fibrosis offers a promising non-invasive tool for diagnosis and monitoring of liver disease. Lately, the heart’s intrinsic motion and MR tagging have been utilized for the quantification of liver strain. However, MR tagging requires multiple breath-hold acquisitions and substantial post-processing. This work proposes a fast strain-encoded (FSENC) MRI methodology to measure the peak strain (Sp) in the liver’s left lobe, which is in close proximity and caudal to the heart. Additionally, a new method is introduced to measure heart-induced shear wave velocity (SWV) inside the liver. Methods Phantom and in-vivo experiments (11 healthy subjects, and 11 patients with liver fibrosis) were conducted. Reproducibility experiments were performed in seven healthy subjects. Results Peak liver strain Sp significantly decreased in fibrotic liver compared healthy liver (6.46%±2.27% vs. 12.49%±1.76%, P<0.05). Heart-induced SWV significantly increased in patients compared to healthy subjects (0.15±0.04 m/s vs. 0.63±0.32 m/s, P<0.05). Reproducibility analysis yielded no significant difference in Sp (P=0.47) or SWV (P=0.56). Conclusion Accelerated external driver-free noninvasive assessment of left liver lobe strain and shear wave velocity is feasible using strain-encoded MRI. The two measures significantly separate healthy subjects from patients with fibrotic liver. PMID:25081734

  9. A combined deep-learning and deformable-model approach to fully automatic segmentation of the left ventricle in cardiac MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendi, M R; Kheradvar, Arash; Jafarkhani, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets is an essential step for calculation of clinical indices such as ventricular volume and ejection fraction. In this work, we employ deep learning algorithms combined with deformable models to develop and evaluate a fully automatic LV segmentation tool from short-axis cardiac MRI datasets. The method employs deep learning algorithms to learn the segmentation task from the ground true data. Convolutional networks are employed to automatically detect the LV chamber in MRI dataset. Stacked autoencoders are used to infer the LV shape. The inferred shape is incorporated into deformable models to improve the accuracy and robustness of the segmentation. We validated our method using 45 cardiac MR datasets from the MICCAI 2009 LV segmentation challenge and showed that it outperforms the state-of-the art methods. Excellent agreement with the ground truth was achieved. Validation metrics, percentage of good contours, Dice metric, average perpendicular distance and conformity, were computed as 96.69%, 0.94, 1.81 mm and 0.86, versus those of 79.2-95.62%, 0.87-0.9, 1.76-2.97 mm and 0.67-0.78, obtained by other methods, respectively. PMID:26917105

  10. Safe use of MRI in people with cardiac implantable electronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Martin D; Plummer, Christopher J; Manisty, Charlotte H; Linker, Nicholas J

    2015-12-01

    MR scanning in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) was formerly felt to be contraindicated, but an increasing number of patients have an implanted MR conditional device, allowing them to safely undergo MR scanning, provided the manufacturer's guidance is adhered to. In addition, some patients with non-MR conditional devices may undergo MR scanning if no other imaging modality is deemed suitable and there is a clear clinical indication for scanning which outweighs the potential risk. The following guidance has been formulated by the British Heart Rhythm Society and endorsed by the British Cardiovascular Society and others. It describes protocols that should be followed for patients with CIEDs undergoing MR scanning. The recommendations, principles and conclusions are supported by the Royal College of Radiologists. PMID:26420818

  11. Highly accelerated cardiac cine parallel MRI using low-rank matrix completion and partial separability model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Jingyuan; Nakarmi, Ukash; Zhang, Chaoyi; Ying, Leslie

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a new approach to highly accelerated dynamic parallel MRI using low rank matrix completion, partial separability (PS) model. In data acquisition, k-space data is moderately randomly undersampled at the center kspace navigator locations, but highly undersampled at the outer k-space for each temporal frame. In reconstruction, the navigator data is reconstructed from undersampled data using structured low-rank matrix completion. After all the unacquired navigator data is estimated, the partial separable model is used to obtain partial k-t data. Then the parallel imaging method is used to acquire the entire dynamic image series from highly undersampled data. The proposed method has shown to achieve high quality reconstructions with reduction factors up to 31, and temporal resolution of 29ms, when the conventional PS method fails.

  12. Surface-length index: a novel index for rapid detection of right ventricles with abnormal ejection fraction using cardiac MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnemains, Laurent; Mandry, Damien; Felblinger, Jacques; Marie, Pierre-Yves [CHU Nancy, Departments of Cardiology and Medical Imaging and INSERM (IADI U947, CICIT 801 and U684), Vandoeuvre les nancy (France); Universite de Lorraine, Vandoeuvre les nancy (France); Menini, Anne; Vuissoz, Pierre-Andre [CHU Nancy, Departments of Cardiology and Medical Imaging and INSERM (IADI U947, CICIT 801 and U684), Vandoeuvre les nancy (France); Stos, Bertrand [Marie Lannelongue Chirurgical Centre, Le Plessis-Robinson (France)

    2013-09-15

    To validate a new index, the surface-length index (SLI) based on area change in a short-axis view and length reduction in the horizontal long-axis view, which is used to quickly (<1 min) detect right ventricles with an abnormal ejection fraction (EF) during a cardiac MRI examination. SLI can be used to avoid a complete delineation of the endocardial contours of normal right ventricles. Sixty patients (group A) were retrospectively included to calibrate the SLI formula by optimisation of the area under the ROC curves and SLI thresholds were chosen to obtain 100 % sensitivity. Another 340 patients (group B) were prospectively recruited to test SLI's capacity to detect right ventricles (RVs) with an abnormal EF (<0.5). The appropriate threshold to obtain 100 % sensitivity in group A was 0.58. In group B, with the 0.58 threshold, SLI yielded a sensitivity of 100 % and specificity of 51 %. SLI would have saved 35 % of the RV studies in our population, without inducing any diagnostic error. SLI and EF correlation was good (r {sup 2} = 0.64). SLI combines two simple RV measures, and brings significant improvement in post-processing efficiency by preselecting RVs that require a complete study. (orig.)

  13. Image fusion of coronary CT angiography and cardiac perfusion MRI: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To develop a tool for the image fusion of computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR). Surface representations and volume-rendered images from fused CTCA/CMR data of five patients with significant coronary artery disease (CAD) on CTCA and perfusion deficits on CMR were generated using a newly developed software prototype. The spatial relationship of significant coronary artery stenosis at CTCA and myocardial defects at CMR was evaluated. Registration of CTCA and CMR images was possible in all patients. The comprehensive three-dimensional visualisation of fused CTCA and CMR data accurately demonstrated the relationship between coronary artery stenoses and myocardial defects in all patients. The introduced tool enables image fusion of CTCA and CMR data sets and allows for correct superposition of the coronary arteries derived from CTCA onto the corresponding myocardial segments derived from CMR. The method facilitates the comprehensive assessment of the functionally relevant CAD by the exact allocation of culprit coronary stenoses to corresponding myocardial defects at a low radiation dose. (orig.)

  14. Usefulness of breath-hold cardiac cine MR imaging with a middle field MRI system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Kentaro; Sato, Kiyoto; Aono, Masaki; Inoshita, Kenji; Utsumi, Naoko [Kagawa Inoshita Hospital, Ohnohara (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    To assess the accuracy of contrast-enhanced, single breath-hold cine MR imaging in calculating left ventricular volume and ejection fraction, we compared MR measurements with those obtained by using cine ventriculography in 60 patients. Fast cine MR images were acquired with a middle field MR system (0.5 T). A breath-hold single slice multi-phase fast gradient-echo (Fast Card) sequence was used to obtain fast cine MR images with the following parameters; TR of 16 ms, TE of 3 ms, flip angle of 30 degree, matrix elements of 256 x 128, view per segment of 6, field of view of 350 x 260 mm and one excitation. Left ventricular end-diastolic volume and ejection fraction obtained with contrast-enhanced Fast Card correlated well with those obtained with cine ventriculography (end-diastolic volume, y=1.00x+14.0, r=0.904, p<0.001; ejection fraction, y=0.961x+2.8, r=0.936, p<0.001). Our results show that contrast enhanced breath-hold cardiac cine MR imaging on horizontal long-axis view using a middle field MR system is an accurate method for evaluating left ventricular volume and ejection fraction. (author)

  15. Short-term pretreatment DCE-MRI in prediction of outcome in locally advanced cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Several investigators have indicated that dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has the potential to provide biomarkers for personalized treatment of cervical carcinoma. However, some clinical studies have suggested that treatment failure is associated with low tumor signal enhancement, whereas others have reported associations between high signal enhancement and poor outcome. The purpose of this investigation was to clear up these conflicting reports and to provide a method for identifying biomarkers that easily can be implemented in routine DCE-MRI diagnostics. Methods: The study involved 85 patients (FIGO stage IB through IVA) treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Low-enhancing tumor volume (LETV) and low-enhancing tumor fraction (LETF), defined as the volume and fractional volume of low-enhancing voxels, respectively, were calculated from signal intensities recorded within 1 min after contrast administration by using two methods reported to give conflicting conclusions. Results: Multivariate analysis involving tumor volume, lymph node status, FIGO stage, and LETV or LETF revealed that LETV and LETF provided independent prognostic information on treatment outcome, independent of the method of calculation. Conclusion: Low signal enhancement is associated with poor prognosis in cervical carcinoma, and biomarkers predicting poor outcome can be provided by short-term DCE-MRI without advanced image analysis

  16. Automatic training and reliability estimation for 3D ASM applied to cardiac MRI segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobon-Gomez, Catalina; Sukno, Federico M.; Butakoff, Constantine; Huguet, Marina; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2012-07-01

    Training active shape models requires collecting manual ground-truth meshes in a large image database. While shape information can be reused across multiple imaging modalities, intensity information needs to be imaging modality and protocol specific. In this context, this study has two main purposes: (1) to test the potential of using intensity models learned from MRI simulated datasets and (2) to test the potential of including a measure of reliability during the matching process to increase robustness. We used a population of 400 virtual subjects (XCAT phantom), and two clinical populations of 40 and 45 subjects. Virtual subjects were used to generate simulated datasets (MRISIM simulator). Intensity models were trained both on simulated and real datasets. The trained models were used to segment the left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) from real datasets. Segmentations were also obtained with and without reliability information. Performance was evaluated with point-to-surface and volume errors. Simulated intensity models obtained average accuracy comparable to inter-observer variability for LV segmentation. The inclusion of reliability information reduced volume errors in hypertrophic patients (EF errors from 17 ± 57% to 10 ± 18% LV MASS errors from -27 ± 22 g to -14 ± 25 g), and in heart failure patients (EF errors from -8 ± 42% to -5 ± 14%). The RV model of the simulated images needs further improvement to better resemble image intensities around the myocardial edges. Both for real and simulated models, reliability information increased segmentation robustness without penalizing accuracy.

  17. Quantifying the effect of tissue deformation on diffusion-weighted MRI: a mathematical model and an efficient simulation framework applied to cardiac diffusion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekkaoui, Imen; Moulin, Kevin; Croisille, Pierre; Pousin, Jerome; Viallon, Magalie

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac motion presents a major challenge in diffusion weighted MRI, often leading to large signal losses that necessitate repeated measurements. The diffusion process in the myocardium is difficult to investigate because of the unqualified sensitivity of diffusion measurements to cardiac motion. A rigorous mathematical formalism is introduced to quantify the effect of tissue motion in diffusion imaging. The presented mathematical model, based on the Bloch–Torrey equations, takes into account deformations according to the laws of continuum mechanics. Approximating this mathematical model by using finite elements method, numerical simulations can predict the sensitivity of the diffusion signal to cardiac motion. Different diffusion encoding schemes are considered and the diffusion weighted MR signals, computed numerically, are compared to available results in literature. Our numerical model can identify the existence of two time points in the cardiac cycle, at which the diffusion is unaffected by myocardial strain and cardiac motion. Of course, these time points depend on the type of diffusion encoding scheme. Our numerical results also show that the motion sensitivity of the diffusion sequence can be reduced by using either spin echo technique with acceleration motion compensation diffusion gradients or stimulated echo acquisition mode with unipolar and bipolar diffusion gradients.

  18. MR-based attenuation correction for cardiac FDG PET on a hybrid PET/MRI scanner: comparison with standard CT attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of attenuation correction (AC) for cardiac 18F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) using MR-based attenuation maps. We included 23 patients with no known cardiac history undergoing whole-body FDG PET/CT imaging for oncological indications on a PET/CT scanner using time-of-flight (TOF) and subsequent whole-body PET/MR imaging on an investigational hybrid PET/MRI scanner. Data sets from PET/MRI (with and without TOF) were reconstructed using MR AC and semi-quantitative segmental (20-segment model) myocardial tracer uptake (per cent of maximum) and compared to PET/CT which was reconstructed using CT AC and served as standard of reference. Excellent correlations were found for regional uptake values between PET/CT and PET/MRI with TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.913; p < 0.0001) with narrow Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-8.5 to +12.6 %). Correlation coefficients were slightly lower between PET/CT and PET/MRI without TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.851; p < 0.0001) with broader Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-12.5 to +15.0 %). PET/MRI with and without TOF showed minimal underestimation of tracer uptake (-2.08 and -1.29 %, respectively), compared to PET/CT. Relative myocardial FDG uptake obtained from MR-based attenuation corrected FDG PET is highly comparable to standard CT-based attenuation corrected FDG PET, suggesting interchangeability of both AC techniques. (orig.)

  19. MR-based attenuation correction for cardiac FDG PET on a hybrid PET/MRI scanner: comparison with standard CT attenuation correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vontobel, Jan; Liga, Riccardo; Possner, Mathias; Clerc, Olivier F.; Mikulicic, Fran; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Voert, Edwin E.G.W. ter; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Stehli, Julia; Pazhenkottil, Aju P.; Benz, Dominik C.; Graeni, Christoph; Gaemperli, Oliver; Herzog, Bernhard; Buechel, Ronny R.; Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of attenuation correction (AC) for cardiac {sup 18}F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) using MR-based attenuation maps. We included 23 patients with no known cardiac history undergoing whole-body FDG PET/CT imaging for oncological indications on a PET/CT scanner using time-of-flight (TOF) and subsequent whole-body PET/MR imaging on an investigational hybrid PET/MRI scanner. Data sets from PET/MRI (with and without TOF) were reconstructed using MR AC and semi-quantitative segmental (20-segment model) myocardial tracer uptake (per cent of maximum) and compared to PET/CT which was reconstructed using CT AC and served as standard of reference. Excellent correlations were found for regional uptake values between PET/CT and PET/MRI with TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.913; p < 0.0001) with narrow Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-8.5 to +12.6 %). Correlation coefficients were slightly lower between PET/CT and PET/MRI without TOF (n = 460 segments in 23 patients; r = 0.851; p < 0.0001) with broader Bland-Altman limits of agreement (-12.5 to +15.0 %). PET/MRI with and without TOF showed minimal underestimation of tracer uptake (-2.08 and -1.29 %, respectively), compared to PET/CT. Relative myocardial FDG uptake obtained from MR-based attenuation corrected FDG PET is highly comparable to standard CT-based attenuation corrected FDG PET, suggesting interchangeability of both AC techniques. (orig.)

  20. Is cardiac MRI an effective test for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy diagnosis?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santhi; Chellamuthu; Alyson; M; Smith; Steven; M; Thomas; Catherine; Hill; Peter; W; G; Brown; Abdallah; Al-Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the referrals with suspected arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy(ARVC)and compare cardiac MR(cMR)findings against clinical diagnosis.METHODS:A retrospective analysis of 114(age range16 to 83,males 55%and females 45%)patients referred for cMR with a suspected diagnosis of ARVC between May 2006 and February 2010 was performed after obtaining institutional approval for service evaluation.Reasons for referral including clinical symptoms and family history of sudden death,electrocardiogram and echo abnormalities,cMR findings,final clinical diagnosis and information about clinical management were obtained.The results of cMR were classified as major,minor,non-specific or negative depending on both functional and tissue characterisation and the cMR results were compared against the final clinical diagnosis.RESULTS:The most common reasons for referral included arrhythmias(30%)and a family history of sudden death(20%).Of the total cohort of 114 patients:4 patients(4%)had major cMR findings for ARVC,13patients(11%)had minor cMR findings,2 patients had non-specific cMR findings relating to the right ventricle and 95 patients had a negative cMR.Of the 4 patients who had major cMR findings,3(75%)had a positive clinical diagnosis.In contrast,of the 13 patients who had minor cMR findings,only 2(15%)had a positive clinical diagnosis.Out of the 95 negative patients,clinical details were available for 81 patients and none of them had ARVC.Excluding the 14 patients with no clinical data and final diagnosis,the sensitivity of the test was 100%,specificity 87%,positive predictive value29%and the negative predictive value 100%.CONCLUSION:CMR is a useful tool for ARVC evaluation because of the high negative predictive value as the outcome has a significant impact on the clinical decision-making.

  1. Accelerated dynamic cardiac MRI exploiting sparse-Kalman-smoother self-calibration and reconstruction (k  -  t SPARKS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Suhyung; Park, Jaeseok

    2015-05-01

    Accelerated dynamic MRI, which exploits spatiotemporal redundancies in k  -  t space and coil dimension, has been widely used to reduce the number of signal encoding and thus increase imaging efficiency with minimal loss of image quality. Nonetheless, particularly in cardiac MRI it still suffers from artifacts and amplified noise in the presence of time-drifting coil sensitivity due to relative motion between coil and subject (e.g. free breathing). Furthermore, a substantial number of additional calibrating signals is to be acquired to warrant accurate calibration of coil sensitivity. In this work, we propose a novel, accelerated dynamic cardiac MRI with sparse-Kalman-smoother self-calibration and reconstruction (k  -  t SPARKS), which is robust to time-varying coil sensitivity even with a small number of calibrating signals. The proposed k  -  t SPARKS incorporates Kalman-smoother self-calibration in k  -  t space and sparse signal recovery in x  -   f space into a single optimization problem, leading to iterative, joint estimation of time-varying convolution kernels and missing signals in k  -  t space. In the Kalman-smoother calibration, motion-induced uncertainties over the entire time frames were included in modeling state transition while a coil-dependent noise statistic in describing measurement process. The sparse signal recovery iteratively alternates with the self-calibration to tackle the ill-conditioning problem potentially resulting from insufficient calibrating signals. Simulations and experiments were performed using both the proposed and conventional methods for comparison, revealing that the proposed k  -  t SPARKS yields higher signal-to-error ratio and superior temporal fidelity in both breath-hold and free-breathing cardiac applications over all reduction factors.

  2. Diagnosis of Acute Global Myocarditis Using Cardiac MRI with Quantitative T1 and T2 Mapping: Case Report and Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chul Hwan [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul 135-720 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eui-Young [Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 135-720 (Korea, Republic of); Greiser, Andreas [Healthcare Sector, Siemens AG, Erlangen D-91052 (Germany); Paek, Mun Young [Siemens Ltd., Seoul 120-837 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sung Ho; Kim, Tae Hoon [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul 135-720 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The diagnosis of myocarditis can be challenging given that symptoms, clinical exam findings, electrocardiogram results, biomarkers, and echocardiogram results are often non-specific. Endocardial biopsy is an established method for diagnosing myocarditis, but carries the risk of complications and false negative results. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the primary non-invasive imaging tool in patients with suspected myocarditis. Myocarditis can be diagnosed by using three tissue markers including edema, hyperemia/capillary leak, and necrosis/fibrosis. The interpretation of cardiac MR findings can be confusing, especially when the myocardium is diffusely involved. Using T1 and T2 maps, the diagnosis of myocarditis can be made even in cases of global myocarditis with the help of quantitative analysis. We herein describe a case of acute global myocarditis which was diagnosed by using quantitative T1 and T2 mapping.

  3. Diagnosis of Acute Global Myocarditis Using Cardiac MRI with Quantitative T1 and T2 Mapping: Case Report and Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of myocarditis can be challenging given that symptoms, clinical exam findings, electrocardiogram results, biomarkers, and echocardiogram results are often non-specific. Endocardial biopsy is an established method for diagnosing myocarditis, but carries the risk of complications and false negative results. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become the primary non-invasive imaging tool in patients with suspected myocarditis. Myocarditis can be diagnosed by using three tissue markers including edema, hyperemia/capillary leak, and necrosis/fibrosis. The interpretation of cardiac MR findings can be confusing, especially when the myocardium is diffusely involved. Using T1 and T2 maps, the diagnosis of myocarditis can be made even in cases of global myocarditis with the help of quantitative analysis. We herein describe a case of acute global myocarditis which was diagnosed by using quantitative T1 and T2 mapping

  4. The OMERACT MRI inflammatory arthritis group: advances and future research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; Bird, Paul; McQueen, Fiona;

    2009-01-01

    The OMERACT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in inflammatory arthritis group previously developed the rheumatoid arthritis MRI score (RAMRIS) for use in clinical studies, evaluated the use of extremity MRI, and initiated development of a psoriatic arthritis MRI score (PsAMRIS). At OMERACT 9...

  5. Free-Breathing 3D Imaging of Right Ventricular Structure and Function Using Respiratory and Cardiac Self-Gated Cine MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Yanchun Zhu; Jing Liu; Jonathan Weinsaft; Pascal Spincemaille; Nguyen, Thanh D.; Prince, Martin R.; Shanglian Bao; Yaoqin Xie; Yi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Providing a movie of the beating heart in a single prescribed plane, cine MRI has been widely used in clinical cardiac diagnosis, especially in the left ventricle (LV). Right ventricular (RV) morphology and function are also important for the diagnosis of cardiopulmonary diseases and serve as predictors for the long term outcome. The purpose of this study is to develop a self-gated free-breathing 3D imaging method for RV quantification and to evaluate its performance by comparing it with brea...

  6. Imaging technique and current status of valvular heart disease using cardiac MRI; Untersuchungstechniken und Stellenwert der MRT bei der Diagnostik von Herzklappenerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotz, J.; Sohns, J.M. [Universitaetsmedizin Goettingen, Georg-August-Universitaet, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Goettingen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The main indications for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of valvular heart disease are pathologies of the aortic and pulmonary valve. For mitral and tricuspid valve pathologies MRI is not the first line modality as these are usually well visualized by echocardiography. The advantages of MRI in valvular heart disease are a high reliability in the evaluation of ventricular volumes and function as well as the assessment of the perivalvular arterial or atrial structures. This reliability and the limitless access to any imaging plane partially compensates for the lower temporal and spatial resolution in comparison to echocardiography. In patients with congenital heart disease, cardiac MRI is established as a valuable diagnostic tool in daily clinical management, especially for the evaluation of pulmonary valve defects. Nevertheless, echocardiography remains the first-line diagnostic imaging tool for the foreseeable future. (orig.) [German] Die Untersuchung der Herzklappen in der MRT umfasst derzeit v. a. die Aorten- und Pulmonalisklappe. Pathologien der atrioventrikulaeren Klappen bilden demgegenueber nur selten die zentrale Fragestellung einer kardialen MRT-Untersuchung, da diese normalerweise einer echokardiographischen Untersuchung gut zugaenglich sind. Die Staerke der MRT ist die hohe Zuverlaessigkeit, mit der neben der Klappenmorphologie und -funktion die Funktionsparameter des jeweiligen Ventrikels und die Morphologie der nachgeschalteten Arterien bestimmt werden koennen. Dadurch kann die MRT die prinzipielle Schwaeche in der Orts- und Zeitaufloesung gegenueber der Echokardiographie teilweise kompensieren. Bei Patienten mit kongenitalen Herzvitien ist die MRT-basierte Klappendiagnostik fester Bestandteil des klinischen Managements. Das gilt besonders fuer die Evaluation der Pulmonalisklappe. Die Echokardiographie bleibt absehbar die Modalitaet der ersten Wahl fuer die Klappendiagnostik am Herzen. (orig.)

  7. Advanced MRI techniques of the fetal brain; Zukunftsweisende MRT-Techniken des fetalen Gehirns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoepf, V.; Dittrich, E.; Berger-Kulemann, V.; Kasprian, G.; Kollndorfer, K.; Prayer, D. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie und Muskuloskelettale Radiologie, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Wien (Austria)

    2013-02-15

    Evaluation of the normal and pathological fetal brain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Advanced MRI of the fetal brain. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is used in clinical practice, all other methods are used at a research level. Serving as standard methods in the future. Combined structural and functional data for all gestational ages will allow more specific insight into the developmental processes of the fetal brain. This gain of information will help provide a common understanding of complex spatial and temporal procedures of early morphological features and their impact on cognitive and sensory abilities. (orig.) [German] Evaluierung des gesunden bzw. pathologischen fetalen Gehirns. Die Magnetresonanztomographie. Zukunftsweisende Techniken in der MRT-Bildgebung des fetalen Gehirns. Die Diffusionstensorbildgebung (DTI) befindet sich bereits in der klinischen Anwendung, alle anderen Methoden sind bisher noch als experimentell zu werten. Auf dem Weg zur Etablierung als Standardverfahren. Eine kombinierte Verarbeitung funktioneller und struktureller Daten, modelliert fuer jede Schwangerschaftswoche, wird es zukuenftig ermoeglichen, anhand dieser fusionierten Informationen einen praezisen Einblick in den Entwicklungsprozess des Gehirns zu erlangen. Diese Erkenntnisse und Ergebnisse werden entscheidend zur Klaerung des zeitlichen Verlaufs und des komplexen Aufbaus frueher morphologischer Auffaelligkeiten beitragen sowie deren Einfluss auf kognitive und sensorische Faehigkeiten aufzeigen. (orig.)

  8. Recent Advances on Pathophysiology, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Insights in Cardiac Dysfunction Induced by Antineoplastic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilisa Molinaro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the improvement of survival after cancer, cardiotoxicity due to antineoplastic treatments has emerged as a clinically relevant problem. Potential cardiovascular toxicities due to anticancer agents include QT prolongation and arrhythmias, myocardial ischemia and infarction, hypertension and/or thromboembolism, left ventricular (LV dysfunction, and heart failure (HF. The latter is variable in severity, may be reversible or irreversible, and can occur soon after or as a delayed consequence of anticancer treatments. In the last decade recent advances have emerged in clinical and pathophysiological aspects of LV dysfunction induced by the most widely used anticancer drugs. In particular, early, sensitive markers of cardiac dysfunction that can predict this form of cardiomyopathy before ejection fraction (EF is reduced are becoming increasingly important, along with novel therapeutic and cardioprotective strategies, in the attempt of protecting cardiooncologic patients from the development of congestive heart failure.

  9. How Is Sudden Cardiac Arrest Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart (a sign of CHD). MUGA Test or Cardiac MRI A MUGA (multiple gated acquisition) test shows how ... create pictures of many parts of your heart. Cardiac MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe procedure that ...

  10. Modelling cardiac signal as a confound in EEG-fMRI and its application in focal epilepsy studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liston, A. D.; Ellegaard Lund, Torben; Salek-Haddadi, A;

    2006-01-01

    effects to be modelled, as effects of no interest. Our model is based on an over-complete basis set covering a linear relationship between cardiac-related MR signal and the phase of the cardiac cycle or time after pulse (TAP). This method showed that, on average, 24.6 +/- 10.9% of grey matter voxels...

  11. Impact of thoracic surgery on cardiac morphology and function in small animal models of heart disease: a cardiac MRI study in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Nordbeck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surgical procedures in small animal models of heart disease might evoke alterations in cardiac morphology and function. The aim of this study was to reveal and quantify such potential artificial early or long term effects in vivo, which might account for a significant bias in basic cardiovascular research, and, therefore, could potentially question the meaning of respective studies. METHODS: Female Wistar rats (n = 6 per group were matched for weight and assorted for sham left coronary artery ligation or control. Cardiac morphology and function was then investigated in vivo by cine magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla 1 and 8 weeks after the surgical procedure. The time course of metabolic and inflammatory blood parameters was determined in addition. RESULTS: Compared to healthy controls, rats after sham surgery showed a lower body weight both 1 week (267.5±10.6 vs. 317.0±11.3 g, n<0.05 and 8 weeks (317.0±21.1 vs. 358.7±22.4 g, n<0.05 after the intervention. Left and right ventricular morphology and function were not different in absolute measures in both groups 1 week after surgery. However, there was a confined difference in several cardiac parameters normalized to the body weight (bw, such as myocardial mass (2.19±0.30/0.83±0.13 vs. 1.85±0.22/0.70±0.07 mg left/right per g bw, p<0.05, or enddiastolic ventricular volume (1.31±0.36/1.21±0.31 vs. 1.14±0.20/1.07±0.17 µl left/right per g bw, p<0.05. Vice versa, after 8 weeks, cardiac masses, volumes, and output showed a trend for lower values in sham operated rats compared to controls in absolute measures (782.2±57.2/260.2±33.2 vs. 805.9±84.8/310.4±48.5 mg, p<0.05 for left/right ventricular mass, but not normalized to body weight. Matching these findings, blood testing revealed only minor inflammatory but prolonged metabolic changes after surgery not related to cardiac disease. CONCLUSION: Cardio-thoracic surgical procedures in experimental myocardial infarction

  12. Recent Stem Cell Advances: Cord Blood and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell for Cardiac Regeneration- a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhekar, Sheetal Kashinath; Shende, Vikas Suresh; Chincholkar, Anjali Baburao

    2016-05-30

    Stem cells are primitive self renewing undifferentiated cell that can be differentiated into various types of specialized cells like nerve cell, skin cells, muscle cells, intestinal tissue, and blood cells. Stem cells live in bone marrow where they divide to make new blood cells and produces peripheral stem cells in circulation. Under proper environment and in presence of signaling molecules stem cells begin to develop into specialized tissues and organs. These unique characteristics make them very promising entities for regeneration of damaged tissue. Day by day increase in incidence of heart diseases including left ventricular dysfunction, ischemic heart disease (IHD), congestive heart failure (CHF) are the major cause of morbidity and mortality. However infracted tissue cannot regenerate into healthy tissue. Heart transplantation is only the treatment for such patient. Due to limitation of availability of donor for organ transplantation, a focus is made for alternative and effective therapy to treat such condition. In this review we have discussed the new advances in stem cells such as use of cord stem cells and iPSC technology in cardiac repair. Future approach of CB cells was found to be used in tissue repair which is specifically observed for improvement of left ventricular function and myocardial infarction. Here we have also focused on how iPSC technology is used for regeneration of cardiomyocytes and intiating neovascularization in myocardial infarction and also for study of pathophysiology of various degenerative diseases and genetic disease in research field. PMID:27426082

  13. Fairly direct hit. Advances in imaging of shotgun projectiles in MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggert, Sebastian [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; Peters, Alexander [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); Klarhoefer, Markus [Siemens Healthcare, Zurich (Switzerland); Bolliger, Stephan A.; Thali, Michael J. [University of Zurich, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Anderson, Suzanne [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Department of Radiology, Baden (Switzerland); University of Notre Dame Australia, Radiology, Sydney School of Medicine, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Federal Institute of Technology, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-15

    To investigate the magnetic properties of different types of projectiles and qualify the metal artefact reduction technique for diagnostic and/or forensic MRI. Ten different projectiles embedded in ordnance gelatine blocks underwent an in vitro 1.5-T MR study with seven sequences including a recently developed metal artefact reduction sequence (Advanced WARP) combining VAT (view-angle-tilting) and SEMAC (slice-encoding metal-artefact-correction). Resulting image quality (five-point scale: 1=best; 5=worst) was scored. Quantifiable magnetic characteristics were correlated with qualitative rating of the MR sequences and torque dislodgment. Metal artefact reduction sequence (median: 2.5) significantly (p < 0.001) improves depiction of projectiles in comparison to all other MR pulse sequences (median: 4.75). Images from diamagnetic composed bullets (median: 2) are much less disturbed compared to magnetic attracted ones (median: 5). Correlation (0.623) between deflection angle measurement (ferromagnetic mean 84.2 ; paramagnetic 62 ; diamagnetic mean 0 ) and median qualitative image quality was highly significant (p = 0.027). Torque dislodgement was distinct for elongated magnetic attracted projectiles. Significant improvement of MR imaging of projectiles using metal artefact reduction techniques has important implications for diagnostic/forensic work-up. The correlations between magnetic attraction force, deflection-angle results and image properties demonstrate that the MR safety of projectiles can be estimated with one of these methods. (orig.)

  14. Fairly direct hit. Advances in imaging of shotgun projectiles in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the magnetic properties of different types of projectiles and qualify the metal artefact reduction technique for diagnostic and/or forensic MRI. Ten different projectiles embedded in ordnance gelatine blocks underwent an in vitro 1.5-T MR study with seven sequences including a recently developed metal artefact reduction sequence (Advanced WARP) combining VAT (view-angle-tilting) and SEMAC (slice-encoding metal-artefact-correction). Resulting image quality (five-point scale: 1=best; 5=worst) was scored. Quantifiable magnetic characteristics were correlated with qualitative rating of the MR sequences and torque dislodgment. Metal artefact reduction sequence (median: 2.5) significantly (p < 0.001) improves depiction of projectiles in comparison to all other MR pulse sequences (median: 4.75). Images from diamagnetic composed bullets (median: 2) are much less disturbed compared to magnetic attracted ones (median: 5). Correlation (0.623) between deflection angle measurement (ferromagnetic mean 84.2 ; paramagnetic 62 ; diamagnetic mean 0 ) and median qualitative image quality was highly significant (p = 0.027). Torque dislodgement was distinct for elongated magnetic attracted projectiles. Significant improvement of MR imaging of projectiles using metal artefact reduction techniques has important implications for diagnostic/forensic work-up. The correlations between magnetic attraction force, deflection-angle results and image properties demonstrate that the MR safety of projectiles can be estimated with one of these methods. (orig.)

  15. A case of cerebral embolism due to cardiac myxoma presenting with multiple cerebral microaneurysms detected on first MRI scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takahiro; Saji, Naoki; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Shibazaki, Kensaku; Kimura, Kazumi

    2016-03-01

    A 64-year-old man developed right arm weakness and dysarthria, and was admitted to our hospital. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a high intensity area in the frontal lobe. T2*-weighted images showed multiple spotty low intensity lesions in bilateral cerebral hemispheres, mimicking cerebral microbleeds. Cerebral angiography showed multiple aneurysms in the anterior, middle, posterior cerebral arteries and cerebellar arteries. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a floating structure in the left atrial chamber, indicating cardiac myxoma. We diagnosed cardioembolic ischemic stroke due to left atrial myxoma. Cardiac surgery for excision of a left atrial myxoma was performed on the 3rd hospital day. Multiple aneurysms should be taken into account for differential diagnosis in patients with cardiac myxoma and with atypical spotty low intensity on T2*-weighted images. PMID:26797485

  16. MRI volumetry for prediction of tumour response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if MRI-assessed tumour volumetry correlates with histological tumour response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and subsequent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods: Data from 69 prospectively enrolled patients with LARC receiving NACT followed by CRT and radical surgery were analysed. Whole-tumour volumes were contoured in T2 weighted MR images obtained pre-treatment (VPRE), after NACT (VNACT) and after the full course of NACT...

  17. Multi-slice CT (MSCT) in cardiac function imaging: threshold-value-supported 3D volume reconstructions to determine the left ventricular ejection fraction in comparison to MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess MSCT of the heart to determining left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) based on threshold-value-supported 3D volume reconstructions compared to MRI. Methods: Cardiac MSCT was performed in 7 patients. Images were reconstructed during end-systolic and end-diastolic phases of the cardiac cycle and transformed to 3D volumes to determine end-systolic (ESV) and end-diastolic volume (EDV) by using different lower threshold values: besides fixed lower threshold values, identical for each image sequence, individual lower threshold values dependent on contrast enhancement of the left ventricle were applied. The latter represent the mean value calculated by combining the average CT-density of the myocardium and the contrast-enhanced blood in the left ventricle. The EF derived from ESV and EDV. Results: The best correlation with MR imaging was obtained for ESV and EDV by using the individual lower threshold values for the respective sequence. The correlation coefficient for ESV was 0.95 and for EDV it was 0.93. On average, the ESV was overestimated by 3.72 ml, while the ESD was underestimated by 2.85 ml. The respective standard deviation for the ESV was 14,87 ml, for the EDV it was 26.83 ml. On average, the EF was underestimated by 3.57% with a standard deviation of 9.43% and a correlation coefficient of 0.83 in comparison to MRI. Conclusion: The threshold-value-supported 3D volume reconstruction of the left ventricle represents a good method to determine the left ventricular function parameters. Due to the differences in the contrast enhancement, the use of an individual lower threshold value for every image sequence is of particular importance. (orig.)

  18. Cardiac imaging. A multimodality approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An excellent atlas on modern diagnostic imaging of the heart Written by an interdisciplinary team of experts, Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach features an in-depth introduction to all current imaging modalities for the diagnostic assessment of the heart as well as a clinical overview of cardiac diseases and main indications for cardiac imaging. With a particular emphasis on CT and MRI, the first part of the atlas also covers conventional radiography, echocardiography, angiography and nuclear medicine imaging. Leading specialists demonstrate the latest advances in the field, and compare the strengths and weaknesses of each modality. The book's second part features clinical chapters on heart defects, endocarditis, coronary heart disease, cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, cardiac tumors, pericardial diseases, pulmonary vascular diseases, and diseases of the thoracic aorta. The authors address anatomy, pathophysiology, and clinical features, and evaluate the various diagnostic options. Key features: - Highly regarded experts in cardiology and radiology off er image-based teaching of the latest techniques - Readers learn how to decide which modality to use for which indication - Visually highlighted tables and essential points allow for easy navigation through the text - More than 600 outstanding images show up-to-date technology and current imaging protocols Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach is a must-have desk reference for cardiologists and radiologists in practice, as well as a study guide for residents in both fields. It will also appeal to cardiac surgeons, general practitioners, and medical physicists with a special interest in imaging of the heart. (orig.)

  19. Fetal Electrocardiogram (fECG) Gated MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Paley, Martyn N.J.; Morris, Janet E.; Debbie Jarvis; Griffiths, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-compatible system to enable gating of a scanner to the heartbeat of a foetus for cardiac, umbilical cord flow and other possible imaging applications. We performed radiofrequency safety testing prior to a fetal electrocardiogram (fECG) gated imaging study in pregnant volunteers (n = 3). A compact monitoring device with advanced software capable of reliably detecting both the maternal electrocardiogram (mECG) and fECG simultaneously was modi...

  20. Application Progress of MRI in Diagnosis of Cardiac Mitral Valve Diseases%磁共振在心脏二尖瓣病变诊断中的应用进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿德海; 吴丽娜

    2015-01-01

    本文从心脏二尖瓣磁共振研究方法、正常解剖的磁共振表现、二尖瓣血流动力特征及心肌改变、二尖瓣膜病磁共振表现4个方面介绍心脏二尖瓣病变磁共振诊断的临床价值。%The clinical effectiveness of application of MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) in diagnosis of cardiac mitral valve diseases was introduced in this paper from aspects of the MRI research method, the MRI manifestations of the normal anatomy, the blood lfow dynamics features and myocardial changes of mitral valves, as well as the MRI manifestations of mitral valve diseases.

  1. Advances in exploring the role of microRNAs in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy of cardiac diseases in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Z W; Lu, Y J; Yang, B F

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease has become the most serious health threat and represents the major cause of morbidity and mortality in China, as in other industrialized nations. During the past few decades, China's economic boom has tremendously improved people's standard of living but has also changed their lifestyle, increasing the prevalence of cardiovascular disease, the so-called 'disease of modern civilization'. This new trend has attracted a significant amount of research. Many of the studies conducted by Chinese investigators are orientated towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of cardiovascular disease. At the molecular level, the long-standing consensus is that cardiovascular disease is associated with a sequence mutation (genetic anomaly) and expression deregulation (epigenetic disorder) of protein-coding genes. However, new research data have established the non-protein-coding genes microRNAs (miRNAs) as a central regulator of the pathogenesis of cardiac disease and a potential new therapeutic target for cardiovascular disease. These small non-coding RNAs have also been subjected to extensive, rigorous investigations by Chinese researchers. Over the years, a large body of studies on miRNAs in cardiovascular disease has been conducted by Chinese investigators, yielding fruitful research results and a better understanding of miRNAs as a new level of molecular mechanisms for the pathogenesis of cardiac disease. In this review, we briefly summarize the current status of research in the field of miRNAs and cardiovascular disease in China, highlighting the advances made in elucidating the role of miRNAs in various cardiac conditions, including cardiac arrhythmia, myocardial ischaemia, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. We have also examined the potential of miRNAs as novel diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:25393505

  2. Pulmonary hyperpolarized noble gas MRI: Recent advances and perspectives in clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zaiyi [Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Department of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences (China); Araki, Tetsuro, E-mail: taraki@partners.org [Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Okajima, Yuka [Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Albert, Mitchell [Hyperpolarized Gas MRI Laboratory, Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Lakehead University (Canada); Hatabu, Hiroto [Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The invention of hyperpolarized (HP) noble gas MRI using helium-3 ({sup 3}He) or xenon-129 ({sup 129}Xe) has provided a new method to evaluate lung function. Using HP {sup 3}He or {sup 129}Xe for inhalation into the lung air spaces as an MRI contrast agent significantly increases MR signal and makes pulmonary ventilation imaging feasible. This review focuses on important aspects of pulmonary HP noble gas MRI, including the following: (1) functional imaging types, (2) applications for major pulmonary diseases, (3) safety considerations, and (4) future directions. Although it is still challenging to use pulmonary HP noble gas MRI clinically, the technology offers promise for the investigation of the microstructure and function of the lungs.

  3. Pulmonary hyperpolarized noble gas MRI: Recent advances and perspectives in clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention of hyperpolarized (HP) noble gas MRI using helium-3 (3He) or xenon-129 (129Xe) has provided a new method to evaluate lung function. Using HP 3He or 129Xe for inhalation into the lung air spaces as an MRI contrast agent significantly increases MR signal and makes pulmonary ventilation imaging feasible. This review focuses on important aspects of pulmonary HP noble gas MRI, including the following: (1) functional imaging types, (2) applications for major pulmonary diseases, (3) safety considerations, and (4) future directions. Although it is still challenging to use pulmonary HP noble gas MRI clinically, the technology offers promise for the investigation of the microstructure and function of the lungs

  4. Myocardial perfusion imaging for predicting cardiac events in Japanese patients with advanced chronic kidney disease: 1-year interim report of the J-ACCESS 3 investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whether myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) can predict cardiac events in patients with advanced conservative chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains unclear. The present multicenter prospective cohort study aimed to clarify the ability of MPI to predict cardiac events in 529 patients with CKD and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) 2 without a definitive diagnosis of coronary artery disease. All patients were assessed by stress-rest MPI with 99mTc-tetrofosmin and analyzed using summed defect scores and QGS software. Cardiac events were analyzed 1 year after registration. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities defined as summed stress score (SSS) ≥4 and ≥8 were identified in 19 and 7 % of patients, respectively. At the end of the 1-year follow-up, 33 (6.2 %) cardiac events had occurred that included cardiac death, sudden death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and hospitalization due to heart failure. The event-free rates at that time were 0.95, 0.90, and 0.81 for groups with SSS 0-3, 4-7, and ≥8, respectively (p = 0.0009). Thus, patients with abnormal SSS had a higher incidence of cardiac events. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that SSS significantly impacts the prediction of cardiac events independently of eGFR and left ventricular ejection fraction. MPI would be useful to stratify patients with advanced conservative CKD who are at high risk of cardiac events without adversely affecting damaged kidneys. (orig.)

  5. Myocardial perfusion imaging for predicting cardiac events in Japanese patients with advanced chronic kidney disease: 1-year interim report of the J-ACCESS 3 investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joki, Nobuhiko; Hase, Hiroki [Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, Department of Nephrology, Tokyo (Japan); Kawano, Yuhei; Nakamura, Satoko [National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Division of Hypertension and Nephrology, Osaka (Japan); Nakajima, Kenichi [Kanazawa University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kanazawa (Japan); Hatta, Tsuguru [Hatta Medical Office of Internal Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Nishimura, Shigeyuki [Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Moroi, Masao [Toho University Ohashi Medical Center, Department of Cardiology, Tokyo (Japan); Nakagawa, Susumu [Saiseikai Central Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Tokyo (Japan); Kasai, Tokuo [Tokyo Medical University Hachioji Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Kusuoka, Hideo [Osaka National Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Takeishi, Yasuchika [Fukushima Medical University, Department of Cardiology and Hematology, Fukushima (Japan); Momose, Mitsuru [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Takehana, Kazuya [Kansai Medical University, Department of Cardiology, Osaka (Japan); Nanasato, Mamoru [Cardiovascular Center, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Yoda, Shunichi [Nihon University Itabashi Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Tokyo (Japan); Nishina, Hidetaka [Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Tsukuba (Japan); Matsumoto, Naoya [Suruga-dai Nihon University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan)

    2014-09-15

    Whether myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) can predict cardiac events in patients with advanced conservative chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains unclear. The present multicenter prospective cohort study aimed to clarify the ability of MPI to predict cardiac events in 529 patients with CKD and estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) < 50 ml/min per 1.73{sup 2} without a definitive diagnosis of coronary artery disease. All patients were assessed by stress-rest MPI with {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin and analyzed using summed defect scores and QGS software. Cardiac events were analyzed 1 year after registration. Myocardial perfusion abnormalities defined as summed stress score (SSS) ≥4 and ≥8 were identified in 19 and 7 % of patients, respectively. At the end of the 1-year follow-up, 33 (6.2 %) cardiac events had occurred that included cardiac death, sudden death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and hospitalization due to heart failure. The event-free rates at that time were 0.95, 0.90, and 0.81 for groups with SSS 0-3, 4-7, and ≥8, respectively (p = 0.0009). Thus, patients with abnormal SSS had a higher incidence of cardiac events. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that SSS significantly impacts the prediction of cardiac events independently of eGFR and left ventricular ejection fraction. MPI would be useful to stratify patients with advanced conservative CKD who are at high risk of cardiac events without adversely affecting damaged kidneys. (orig.)

  6. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedema, J.P.; Zondervan, P.E.; van Hagen, P.; ten Cate, F.J.; Bresser, P.; Doubell, A.F.; Pattynama, P.; Hoogsteden, H.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Symptomatic cardiac involvement occurs in approximately 5% of patients. The prevalence of sarcoidosis in the Netherlands is unknown, but estimated to be approximately 20 per 100,000 population (3200 patients). We report on five patients who presented with different manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis, and give a brief review on the current management of this condition. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be of great help in diagnosing this condition as well as in the follow-up of the response to therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:25696121

  7. How Can Nanotechnology Help to Repair the Body? Advances in Cardiac, Skin, Bone, Cartilage and Nerve Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Marchal

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnologists have become involved in regenerative medicine via creation of biomaterials and nanostructures with potential clinical implications. Their aim is to develop systems that can mimic, reinforce or even create in vivo tissue repair strategies. In fact, in the last decade, important advances in the field of tissue engineering, cell therapy and cell delivery have already been achieved. In this review, we will delve into the latest research advances and discuss whether cell and/or tissue repair devices are a possibility. Focusing on the application of nanotechnology in tissue engineering research, this review highlights recent advances in the application of nano-engineered scaffolds designed to replace or restore the followed tissues: (i skin; (ii cartilage; (iii bone; (iv nerve; and (v cardiac.

  8. Early MRI response monitoring of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma under treatment with the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New therapeutic principles in clinical oncology require the adjustment of response criteria to govern therapy decisions. For advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) a new era has recently begun by the approval of the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib. As a unique feature, HCC usually develops in a diseased liver and current imaging technologies employing classical response criteria have not been prospectively evaluated for this new treatment. MRI signal patterns were assessed in 21 advanced HCC patients receiving sorafenib. MRI was performed at baseline and in short-term intervals thereafter. Signal changes under therapy on T1WI, T2WI and post-gadolinium images including necrosis volume and its ratio to the entire tumor volume were compared to baseline imaging. To assess the association between the categorical variables, Fisher's exact tests were applied for a statistical analysis. Survey time ranged from 2–65 weeks, and a total of 39 target lesions were evaluated. Signal abnormalities during sorafenib therapy were disclosed by T1WI and T2WI in 15/21 patients. The predominant tumor signal change was hyperintensity on both T1WI and T2WI. Interestingly, most patients developed MRI signal changes within 4 weeks of therapy; in contrast, two non-responders did not show any signal alteration at follow-up. Under therapy, 16/21 patients presented with new or progressive necrosis, whereas 7 patients achieved temporarily >75% tumor necrosis under sorafenib. Significantly associated MRI variables were increase in T1WI signal and tumor necrosis (p = 0.017) as well as increase of tumor necrosis with an elevated ratio of necrotic to vital tumor areas (p = 0.002). Remarkably, some (3/13) of the patients developing necrotic tumor areas showed a relevant (>20%) increase in tumor volume, which should be considered in the assessment of imaging studies. As sorafenib induces early intralesional necrosis with profound changes in T1WI/T2WI MRI signal intensities and measurable

  9. Early MRI response monitoring of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma under treatment with the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Michael

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New therapeutic principles in clinical oncology require the adjustment of response criteria to govern therapy decisions. For advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC a new era has recently begun by the approval of the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib. As a unique feature, HCC usually develops in a diseased liver and current imaging technologies employing classical response criteria have not been prospectively evaluated for this new treatment. Methods MRI signal patterns were assessed in 21 advanced HCC patients receiving sorafenib. MRI was performed at baseline and in short-term intervals thereafter. Signal changes under therapy on T1WI, T2WI and post-gadolinium images including necrosis volume and its ratio to the entire tumor volume were compared to baseline imaging. To assess the association between the categorical variables, Fisher's exact tests were applied for a statistical analysis. Survey time ranged from 2–65 weeks, and a total of 39 target lesions were evaluated. Results Signal abnormalities during sorafenib therapy were disclosed by T1WI and T2WI in 15/21 patients. The predominant tumor signal change was hyperintensity on both T1WI and T2WI. Interestingly, most patients developed MRI signal changes within 4 weeks of therapy; in contrast, two non-responders did not show any signal alteration at follow-up. Under therapy, 16/21 patients presented with new or progressive necrosis, whereas 7 patients achieved temporarily >75% tumor necrosis under sorafenib. Significantly associated MRI variables were increase in T1WI signal and tumor necrosis (p = 0.017 as well as increase of tumor necrosis with an elevated ratio of necrotic to vital tumor areas (p = 0.002. Remarkably, some (3/13 of the patients developing necrotic tumor areas showed a relevant (>20% increase in tumor volume, which should be considered in the assessment of imaging studies. Conclusion As sorafenib induces early intralesional necrosis with profound changes

  10. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... scan, or MUGA, which shows how well your heart is pumping blood. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which gives doctors detailed pictures of your heart. How is SCA treated? Sudden cardiac arrest should ...

  11. Accelerated acquisition of tagged MRI for cardiac motion correction in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom and patient studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chuan, E-mail: chuan.huang@stonybrookmedicine.edu [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Departments of Radiology, Psychiatry, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Petibon, Yoann [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Ouyang, Jinsong; El Fakhri, Georges [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Reese, Timothy G. [Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 (United States); Ahlman, Mark A.; Bluemke, David A. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Degradation of image quality caused by cardiac and respiratory motions hampers the diagnostic quality of cardiac PET. It has been shown that improved diagnostic accuracy of myocardial defect can be achieved by tagged MR (tMR) based PET motion correction using simultaneous PET-MR. However, one major hurdle for the adoption of tMR-based PET motion correction in the PET-MR routine is the long acquisition time needed for the collection of fully sampled tMR data. In this work, the authors propose an accelerated tMR acquisition strategy using parallel imaging and/or compressed sensing and assess the impact on the tMR-based motion corrected PET using phantom and patient data. Methods: Fully sampled tMR data were acquired simultaneously with PET list-mode data on two simultaneous PET-MR scanners for a cardiac phantom and a patient. Parallel imaging and compressed sensing were retrospectively performed by GRAPPA and kt-FOCUSS algorithms with various acceleration factors. Motion fields were estimated using nonrigid B-spline image registration from both the accelerated and fully sampled tMR images. The motion fields were incorporated into a motion corrected ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm with motion-dependent attenuation correction. Results: Although tMR acceleration introduced image artifacts into the tMR images for both phantom and patient data, motion corrected PET images yielded similar image quality as those obtained using the fully sampled tMR images for low to moderate acceleration factors (<4). Quantitative analysis of myocardial defect contrast over ten independent noise realizations showed similar results. It was further observed that although the image quality of the motion corrected PET images deteriorates for high acceleration factors, the images were still superior to the images reconstructed without motion correction. Conclusions: Accelerated tMR images obtained with more than 4 times acceleration can still provide

  12. Accelerated acquisition of tagged MRI for cardiac motion correction in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom and patient studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Degradation of image quality caused by cardiac and respiratory motions hampers the diagnostic quality of cardiac PET. It has been shown that improved diagnostic accuracy of myocardial defect can be achieved by tagged MR (tMR) based PET motion correction using simultaneous PET-MR. However, one major hurdle for the adoption of tMR-based PET motion correction in the PET-MR routine is the long acquisition time needed for the collection of fully sampled tMR data. In this work, the authors propose an accelerated tMR acquisition strategy using parallel imaging and/or compressed sensing and assess the impact on the tMR-based motion corrected PET using phantom and patient data. Methods: Fully sampled tMR data were acquired simultaneously with PET list-mode data on two simultaneous PET-MR scanners for a cardiac phantom and a patient. Parallel imaging and compressed sensing were retrospectively performed by GRAPPA and kt-FOCUSS algorithms with various acceleration factors. Motion fields were estimated using nonrigid B-spline image registration from both the accelerated and fully sampled tMR images. The motion fields were incorporated into a motion corrected ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm with motion-dependent attenuation correction. Results: Although tMR acceleration introduced image artifacts into the tMR images for both phantom and patient data, motion corrected PET images yielded similar image quality as those obtained using the fully sampled tMR images for low to moderate acceleration factors (<4). Quantitative analysis of myocardial defect contrast over ten independent noise realizations showed similar results. It was further observed that although the image quality of the motion corrected PET images deteriorates for high acceleration factors, the images were still superior to the images reconstructed without motion correction. Conclusions: Accelerated tMR images obtained with more than 4 times acceleration can still provide

  13. Impact of fMRI-guided advanced DTI fiber tracking techniques on their clinical applications in patients with brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White matter tractography based on diffusion tensor imaging has become a well-accepted non-invasive tool for exploring the white matter architecture of the human brain in vivo. There exist two main key obstacles for reconstructing white matter fibers: firstly, the implementation and application of a suitable tracking algorithm, which is capable of reconstructing anatomically complex fascicular pathways correctly, as, e.g., areas of fiber crossing or branching; secondly, the definition of an appropriate tracking seed area for starting the reconstruction process. Large intersubject, anatomical variations make it difficult to define tracking seed areas based on reliable anatomical landmarks. An accurate definition of seed regions for the reconstruction of a specific neuronal pathway becomes even more challenging in patients suffering from space occupying pathological processes as, e.g., tumors due to the displacement of the tissue and the distortion of anatomical landmarks around the lesion. To resolve the first problem, an advanced tracking algorithm, called advanced fast marching, was applied in this study. The second challenge was overcome by combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in order to perform fMRI-guided accurate definition of appropriate seed areas for the DTI fiber tracking. In addition, the performance of the tasks was controlled by a MR-compatible power device. Application of this combined approach to eight healthy volunteers and exemplary to three tumor patients showed that it is feasible to accurately reconstruct relevant fiber tracts belonging to a specific functional system. fMRI-guided advanced DTI fiber tracking has the potential to provide accurate anatomical and functional information for a more informed therapeutic decision making. (orig.)

  14. The Association between Serum Ferritin Level, Tissue Doppler Echocardiography, Cardiac T2* MRI, and Heart Rate Recovery in Patients with Beta Thalassemia Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Isa Oner; Koklu, Erkan; Kurtoglu, Erdal; Arslan, Sakir; Cagirci, Goksel; Karakus, Volkan; Kus, Gorkem; Cay, Serkan; Kucukseymen, Selcuk

    2016-01-01

    Background It is generally well-understood that iron-mediated cardiomyopathy is the major complication that can arise from beta thalassemia major (TM). Therefore, early diagnosis, risk stratification, and the effective treatment of beta TM patients are clinically important to optimize long-term positive outcomes. Methods This study included 57 beta TM patients with a mean age of 25 ± 7 years. We determined the serum ferritin level, echocardiography, heart rate recovery (HRR), and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) T2* in all patients. CMR T2* findings were categorized as normal myocardium (T2* > 20 ms), and myocardial involvement (T2* ≤ 20 ms). HRR values at 1-5 min (HRR1-5) were recorded; Subsequently. HRR was calculated by subtracting the heart rate at each time point from the heart rate at peak exercise. Results There was a significant negative correlation between the serum ferritin level and the cardiac T2* MRI findings (r = -0.34, p = 0.009). A similar result was found in the negative correlation between serum ferritin and all heart rate recovery values. There was a significant positive correlation between HRR1, HRR2, and HRR3 values, and CMR T2* (T2* heart rate recovery (HRR)1: r = 0.51, p < 0.001; T2* HRR2: r = 0.48, p < 0.001; T2* HRR3: r = 0.47, p < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions The serum ferritin level and echocardiography can be used to predict the presence of myocardial iron load in beta TM patients. Therefore, HRR can be used to screen beta TM patients, and the clinical use of HRR can be a predictive marker for autonomic dysfunction in beta TM patients. PMID:27122954

  15. Multidetector CT and MR Imaging of Cardiac Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun Young; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Sung, Kiick; Park, Seung Woo; Kim, Ji Hye; Ko, Young-Hyeh

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a current review of the spectrum of multidetector CT (MDCT) and MRI findings for a variety of cardiac neoplasms. In the diagnosis of cardiac tumors, the use of MDCT and MRI can help differentiate benign from malignant masses. Especially, the use of MDCT is advantageous in providing anatomical information and MRI is useful for tissue characterization of cardiac masses. Knowledge of the characteristic MRI findings of benign cardiac tumors or thrombi can...

  16. MRI in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of ischemic heart disease has increased over the last years. Cardiac MRI is the only imaging modality that provides 'one stop shop' assessment. Information about ventricular function, myocardial ischemia and myocardial viability can be obtained in a single cardiac MRI session. Additionally, Cardiac MRI has become a gold standard method in evaluation of myocardial viability and in assessment of ventricular mass and function. As a result, cardiac MRI enable radiologist to comprehensively assess ischemic heart disease. The aim of this presentation is to provide the reader a state-of-the art on how the newest cardiac MRI techniques can be used to study ischemic heart disease patients.

  17. Cardiac metabolism and function in patients with Multiple Sclerosis: a combined {sup 31}P-MR-spectroscopy and MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, M.; Sandstede, J.; Buchner, S.; Krug, A.; Koestler, H.; Pabst, T.; Kenn, W.; Hahn, D. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Weillbach, F.; Toyka, K.V.; Gold, R. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Neurologische Klinik; Spindler, M.; Ertl, G. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Medizinische Klinik; Landschuetz, W.; Kienlin, M. von [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). V. Physikalisches Inst.

    2001-05-01

    14/15 patients with MS could be included in the study, as the MRS examination of one patient had to be excluded from analysis due to movement during the examination. Using chemical shift imaging (CSI) and AMARES, phosphocreatine (PCr) to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratios, characterizing myocardial high-energy phosphate metabolism, were determined. Additionally, absolute concentrations of PCr and ATP were calculated by SLOOP (spatial localization with optimal pointspread function). Analysis of functional changes was performed by Cine-MRI. 14 healthy volunteers matched for age and gender served as control. Results: A significant decrease of absolute PCr concentration was observed in patients with MS compared to matched volunteers (p<0.05), whereas ATP concentrations showed no significant changes (p = 0.27). Metabolite ratios calculated by SLOOP or AMARES showed a tendency to be reduced in patients, however, did not reach significance (p = 0.08, SLOOP; p = 0.47, AMARES). Using volunteers' mean values {+-} 2 x SD as cut off value revealed PCr changes in 5 of 14 patients, whereas only 2 also had pathologic PCr/ATP ratios. Functional analysis by MRI depicted depressed left ventricular ejection fraction in 4 patients. (orig.) [German] 14/15 Patienten konnten in die Studie eingeschlossen werden, da die MRS Untersuchung eines Patienten infolge von Bewegungsartefakten von der Datenanalyse ausgeschlossen werden musste. Als Index des myokardialen Energiestoffwechsels wurde zum einen das Phosphokreatin (PCr) zu Adenosintriphosphat (ATP) Verhaeltnis mittels 3D-chemical shift imaging (CSI) und konventioneller Fouriertransformation (AMARES) bestimmt. Zusaetzlich wurden die Absolutkonzentrationen von PCr und ATP mit Hilfe des SLOOP-Verfahrens (spatial localization with optimal pointspread function) berechnet. Morphologische wie funktionelle Veraenderungen wurden mittels MRI erfasst. 14 gesunde Probanden gematcht fuer Alter und Geschlecht bildeten eine Kontrollgruppe

  18. MRS: a noninvasive window into cardiac metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ewijk, Petronella A; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B; Bekkers, Sebastiaan C A M; Glatz, Jan F C; Wildberger, Joachim E; Kooi, M Eline

    2015-07-01

    A well-functioning heart requires a constant supply of a balanced mixture of nutrients to be used for the production of adequate amounts of adenosine triphosphate, which is the main energy source for most cellular functions. Defects in cardiac energy metabolism are linked to several myocardial disorders. MRS can be used to study in vivo changes in cardiac metabolism noninvasively. MR techniques allow repeated measurements, so that disease progression and the response to treatment or to a lifestyle intervention can be monitored. It has also been shown that MRS can predict clinical heart failure and death. This article focuses on in vivo MRS to assess cardiac metabolism in humans and experimental animals, as experimental animals are often used to investigate the mechanisms underlying the development of metabolic diseases. Various MR techniques, such as cardiac (31) P-MRS, (1) H-MRS, hyperpolarized (13) C-MRS and Dixon MRI, are described. A short overview of current and emerging applications is given. Cardiac MRS is a promising technique for the investigation of the relationship between cardiac metabolism and cardiac disease. However, further optimization of scan time and signal-to-noise ratio is required before broad clinical application. In this respect, the ongoing development of advanced shimming algorithms, radiofrequency pulses, pulse sequences, (multichannel) detection coils, the use of hyperpolarized nuclei and scanning at higher magnetic field strengths offer future perspective for clinical applications of MRS. PMID:26010681

  19. Optimization of Free-Breathing Whole-Heart 3D Cardiac MRI at 3Tesla to Identify Coronary Vein Anatomy and to Compare with Multi-Detector Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Wael G.; El Khouli, Riham H.; Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z.; Matta, Jatin Raj; McAreavey, Dorothea; Gharib, Ahmed M

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study optimizes use of 3T MRI to delineate coronary venous anatomy, and compares 3T MRI with MDCT measurements. Methods The study population included 37 consecutive subjects (22 men, 19-71 years). Whole-heart contrast-enhanced MRI images at 3T were acquired using segmented k-space gradient echo with inversion recovery prepared technique. MDCT images were obtained using nonionic iodinated contrast. Results The coronary sinus, and great cardiac, posterior interventricular, and anterior interventricular veins were visualized in 100% of cases by both MRI and MDCT. Detection of the posterior vein of left ventricle and left marginal vein by MRI was 97% and 81% respectively. Bland Altman plots showed agreement in ostial diameter measured by both modalities with correlation coefficients ranging 0.5-0.76. Vein length and distances also agreed closely. Conclusion Free-breathing whole-heart 3D MRI at 3T provides high spatial resolution images and could offer an alternative imaging technique instead of MDCT scans. PMID:24983436

  20. Advances of blood oxygen-level dependent MRI in muscular system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOLD-fMRI has been applied to muscular system to observe muscular pathophysiological change after performing a task and show the characteristics of muscle perfusion. This paper mainly introduces the scanning sequence, common tasking methods, such as cuff compression, excise, oxygen and drug, etc. It also introduces clinical study of perfusion reserve of muscular tissue with abnormal blood vessels. (authors)

  1. Right and left ventricular volume measurements in an animal heart model in vitro: first experiences with cardiac MRI at 1.0 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy in quantifying right and left ventricular volumes using a 1.0-T system and commercially available, standard equipment. For exact comparison of MRI measurements and real volumes we used an animal heart model ex vivo. Eight pig hearts were explanted and prepared by removal of the atria. Aorta and pulmonary truncus were cannulated. Definable volumes were injected into the ventricles. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at 1.0 T (Gyroscan T10 NT, Philips, Eindhoven, The Netherlands); sequence: fast field echo-echo planar (multishot EPI); body coil; MR software: Cardiac Application Package (Philips). Statistical analysis correlated the real volumes and MR measurements separately for both ventricles and two investigators (SAS, ANOVA). For both ventricles and both investigators the correlation between real volumes and MR measurements was greater than 0.99. There was no significant systematic false estimation for both ventricles. Magnetic resonance imaging at 1.0 T using standard hardware and software equipment enables the quantification of right and left ventricular volumes with high approximation to the real volumes in vitro. There is a clear restriction in translating these data into a clinical application because under experimental conditions no motion-induced artifacts existed. (orig.)

  2. Recent advances in understanding cardiac contractility in health and disease [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken T. MacLeod

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to provide the reader with a synopsis of some of the emerging ideas and experimental findings in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology that were published in 2015. To provide context for the non-specialist, a brief summary of cardiac contraction and calcium (Ca regulation in the heart in health and disease is provided. Thereafter, some recently published articles are introduced that indicate the current thinking on (1 the Ca regulatory pathways modulated by Ca/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, (2 the potential influences of nitrosylation by nitric oxide or S-nitrosated proteins, (3 newly observed effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS on contraction and Ca regulation following myocardial infarction and a possible link with changes in mitochondrial Ca, and (4 the effects of some of these signaling pathways on late Na current and pro-arrhythmic afterdepolarizations as well as the effects of transverse tubule disturbances.

  3. Cardiac MRI assessed left ventricular hypertrophy in differentiating hypertensive heart disease from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy attributable to a sarcomeric gene mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the value of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI)-assessed left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in differentiating between hypertensive heart disease and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). 95 unselected subjects with mild-to-moderate hypertension, 24 patients with HCM attributable to the D175N mutation of the α-tropomyosin gene and 17 control subjects were studied by cine CMRI. Left ventricular (LV) quantitative and qualitative characteristics were evaluated. LV maximal end-diastolic wall thickness, wall thickness-to-LV volume ratio, end-diastolic septum thickness and septum-to-lateral wall thickness ratio were useful measures for differentiating between LVH due to hypertension and HCM. The most accurate measure for identifying patients with HCM was the LV maximal wall thickness ≥17 mm, with a sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and accuracy of 90%, 93%, 86%, 95% and 91%, respectively. LV maximal wall thickness in the anterior wall, or regional bulging in left ventricular wall was found only in patients with HCM. LV mass index was not discriminant between patients with HCM and those with LVH due to hypertension. LV maximal thickness measured by CMRI is the best anatomical parameter in differentiating between LVH due to mild-to-moderate hypertension and HCM attributable to a sarcomeric mutation. CMRI assessment of location and quality of LVH is also of value in differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  4. Cardiac MRI assessed left ventricular hypertrophy in differentiating hypertensive heart disease from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy attributable to a sarcomeric gene mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipola, Petri [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kuopio (Finland); Magga, Jarkko; Peuhkurinen, Keijo [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Medicine, Kuopio (Finland); Husso, Minna [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Jaeaeskelaeinen, Pertti; Kuusisto, Johanna [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Medicine, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, Heart Center, P.O. Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland)

    2011-07-15

    To evaluate the value of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI)-assessed left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in differentiating between hypertensive heart disease and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). 95 unselected subjects with mild-to-moderate hypertension, 24 patients with HCM attributable to the D175N mutation of the {alpha}-tropomyosin gene and 17 control subjects were studied by cine CMRI. Left ventricular (LV) quantitative and qualitative characteristics were evaluated. LV maximal end-diastolic wall thickness, wall thickness-to-LV volume ratio, end-diastolic septum thickness and septum-to-lateral wall thickness ratio were useful measures for differentiating between LVH due to hypertension and HCM. The most accurate measure for identifying patients with HCM was the LV maximal wall thickness {>=}17 mm, with a sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and accuracy of 90%, 93%, 86%, 95% and 91%, respectively. LV maximal wall thickness in the anterior wall, or regional bulging in left ventricular wall was found only in patients with HCM. LV mass index was not discriminant between patients with HCM and those with LVH due to hypertension. LV maximal thickness measured by CMRI is the best anatomical parameter in differentiating between LVH due to mild-to-moderate hypertension and HCM attributable to a sarcomeric mutation. CMRI assessment of location and quality of LVH is also of value in differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  5. Impact of advanced cardiac life support training program on the outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanwalpreet Sodhi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Guidelines on performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR have been published from time to time, and formal training programs are conducted based on these guidelines. Very few data are available in world literature highlighting the impact of these trainings on CPR outcome. Aim: The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of the American Heart Association (AHA-certified basic life support (BLS and advanced cardiac life support (ACLS provider course on the outcomes of CPR in our hospital. Materials and Methods : An AHA-certified BLS and ACLS provider training programme was conducted in our hospital in the first week of October 2009, in which all doctors in the code blue team and intensive care units were given training. The retrospective study was performed over an 18-month period. All in-hospital adult cardiac arrest victims in the pre-BLS/ACLS training period (January 2009 to September 2009 and the post-BLS/ACLS training period (October 2009 to June 2010 were included in the study. We compared the outcomes of CPR between these two study periods. Results: There were a total of 627 in-hospital cardiac arrests, 284 during the pre-BLS/ACLS training period and 343 during the post-BLS/ACLS training period. In the pre-BLS/ACLS training period, 52 patients (18.3% had return of spontaneous circulation, compared with 97 patients (28.3% in the post-BLS/ACLS training period (P < 0.005. Survival to hospital discharge was also significantly higher in the post-BLS/ACLS training period (67 patients, 69.1% than in the pre-BLS/ACLS training period (12 patients, 23.1% (P < 0.0001. Conclusion : Formal certified BLS and ACLS training of healthcare professionals leads to definitive improvement in the outcome of CPR.

  6. 'Dead or alive?': how and why myocardial viability imaging by cardiac MRI works; 'Tot oder lebendig?': Wie und warum myokardiale Vitalitaetsdiagnostik mit MRT funktioniert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunold, P.; Barkhausen, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Kreitner, K.F. [Universitaetsklinikum Mainz (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie

    2007-10-15

    Myocardial viability imaging by contrast-enhanced MRI has supported the broad acceptance of cardiac MRI as a valuable clinical tool in cardiology over the last few years. The late enhancement (delayed enhancement, late gadolinium enhancement) technique has emerged as an easy-to-perform and robust method for identifying and quantifying myocardial scars. In the condition of acute myocardial infarction, MRI offers important prognostic information regarding anticipated left ventricular changes (''remodeling'') and future cardiac events. In coronary artery disease patients with chronic infarction, the extent of late enhancement reliably predicts the outcome of global and regional left ventricular function after revascularization. In particular, CAD patients with severely impaired left ventricular function benefit from preoperative viability imaging before bypass surgery. The present paper describes the definitions and physiology of viable and non-viable myocardium as well as the pathophysiologic basis of late enhancement. The process from the correct setting of imaging protocols via the interpretation of late enhancement images to the stating of the correct diagnosis and estimation of viability is followed. The background of the successful development of the late enhancement method towards the new reference standard in myocardial viability imaging is described. (orig.)

  7. BASIC PRINCIPLES AND CONCEPTS UNDERLYING RECENT ADVANCES IN MRI OF THE DEVELOPING BRAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Panigrahy, Ashok; Borzage, Matthew; Blüml, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Over the last decade, magnetic resonance imaging has become an essential tool in the evaluation of both in vivo human brain development and perinatal brain injury. Recent technology including MR compatible neonatal incubators, neonatal head coils, advanced MR pulse sequences and 3T field strength magnets allow high quality MR imaging studies to be performed on sick neonates. This article will review basic principles and concepts underlying recent advances in MR spectroscopy, diffusion, perfus...

  8. Clinical impact of MRI assisted dose volume adaptation and dose escalation in brachytherapy of locally advanced cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: To investigate the clinical impact of MRI based cervix cancer brachytherapy combined with external beam radiochemotherapy applying dose volume adaptation and dose escalation in a consecutive group of patients with locally advanced cervix cancer. Methods: In the period 1998-2003, 145 patients with cervix cancer stages IB-IVA were treated with definitive radiotherapy +/- cisplatin chemotherapy. Median age was 60 years. In 67 patients, the tumour size was 2-5 cm, in 78 patients it was >5 cm. In 29 cases the standard intracavitary technique was combined with interstitial brachytherapy. Total prescribed dose was 80-85 Gy (total biologically equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions). Since 2001, MRI based treatment planning integrated systematic concepts for High Risk Clinical Target Volume (HR CTV) and organs at risk (OAR), biological modelling, Dose-Volume-Histogram analysis, dose-volume-adaptation (D90, D 2 cm3), and dose escalation, if appropriate and feasible. Findings: Dose volume adaptation was performed in 130/145 patients. The mean D90 during the whole period was 86 Gy, with a mean D90 of 81 Gy and 90 Gy during the first and second period, respectively (p 5 cm it was 71% in 1998-2000 and 90% in 2001-2003 (p = 0.05). Progression free survival (PFS) for true pelvis (local control) was 85%, PFS for distant metastases was 80%, both at 3 years. Local control for tumours >5 cm was 64% in 1998-2000 and 82% in 2001-2003 (p = 0.09) and 100% and 96%, respectively, for tumours 2-5 cm. PFS for distant metastases remained the same during the two treatment periods with 79% and 80%. Overall survival (OS) was 58%, and cancer-specific survival (CSS) was 68% at 3 years. In the two different periods improvement in OS was from 53% to 64% (p = 0.03) and in CSS from 62% to 74% (p = 0.13). Improvement occurred only in tumours >5 cm: OS 28% versus 58% (p = 0.003); CSS 40% versus 62% (p = 0.07). Actuarial late morbidity rate (LENT SOMA, grades 3 and 4) at 3 years was

  9. Research on the cardiac MRI in the diagnosis and treatment of unstable angina%核磁共振在不稳定型心绞痛诊治中的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鹏; 亓燕

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the cardiac magnetic resonance technique in the diagnosis and treatment of unstable angina application value. Methods:The hospital diagnosed patients with unstable angina as research subjects, were given coronary angiography in patients (CAG) examination, ECG, echocardiography and cardiac MRI examination, recording the results and statistical analysis. Results:Cardiac MRI for>90%stenos is detected heart rate, and coronary angiography (CAG) showed no significant difference (x2=3.257, P>0.05), for0.05);cardiac MRI for cardiac function and cardiac structure determination is better than conventional echocardiography. Conclusion: Cardiac MRI technology to more accurately reflect changes in cardiac structure and function of the stenos is and effort ischemia detection rate with conventional inspection methods have better consistency.%目的:探讨核磁共振技术在不稳定心绞痛诊治中的应用价值。方法:选取经莱芜市人民医院确诊的不稳定心绞痛患者40例,分别给予冠状动脉造影(CAG)、心电图、超声心电图及心脏核磁共振检查,并对结果进行统计学分析。结果:核磁共振在心脏狭窄>90%的检出率高,与CAG间差异无统计学意义(x2=3.257,P>0.05),对<90%的狭窄检出率低,与CAG检查结果间差异有统计学意义(x2=17.267,x2=25.714;P<0.05);核磁共振对心脏狭窄程度高的患者的心肌缺血检出率高,与心电图检出率差异明显,有统计学意义(x2=4.65,P<0.05),但总检出率间差异不明显,无统计学意义(x2=0.251,P>0.05);核磁共振对于心功能及心脏结构的测定效果优于传统的超声心动图。结论:核磁共振技术能更准确的反应心脏结构和功能改变,对狭窄和心机缺血的检出率与传统检查方法有较好一致性。

  10. Locally advanced rectal cancer: is diffusion weighted MRI helpful for the identification of complete responders (ypT0N0) after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassen, S.; Booij, M. de; Vliegen, R. [Atrium Medical Center Parkstad, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 4446, Heerlen (Netherlands); Sosef, M. [Atrium Medical Center Parkstad, Department of General Surgery, P.O. Box 4446, Heerlen (Netherlands); Berendsen, R. [Atrium Medical Center Parkstad, Department of Clinical Physics, P.O. Box 4446, Heerlen (Netherlands); Lammering, G. [MAASTRO Clinic, Department of Radiation Oncology, P.O. Box 3035, Maastricht (Netherlands); Clarijs, R. [Atrium Medical Center Parkstad, Department of Pathology, P.O. Box 4446, Heerlen (Netherlands); Bakker, M. [Atrium Medical Center Parkstad, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, P.O. Box 4446, Heerlen (Netherlands); Beets-Tan, R. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Warmerdam, F. [Atrium Medical Center Parkstad, Department of Internal Medicine/Oncology, P.O. Box 4446, Heerlen (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    To determine retrospectively the additional value of DWI-MRI toT2-MRI for predicting complete response (ypT0N0 = CR) after chemoradiation-therapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer. Seventy locally advanced rectal cancer patients underwent CRT followed by restaging MRI and resection. Two readers with different experience levels independently scored T2 images for CR and, in a second reading, combined T2 and DWI. A 5-point confidence-level score was used to generate ROC curves. Areas under the ROC curves (AUC) and interobserver agreement were compared for both readings. Histology served as reference standard. The interobserver agreement increased after addition of DWI from 0.35 to 0.58 but the AUC improved only for the experienced reader (0.77 to 0.89, p = 0.005 vs. 0.74 to 0.70, p > 0.05). Sensitivity and NPV improved from 20-30 % to 40-70 %, respectively 88 % to 91-95 %. Specificity and PPV improved only for the experienced reader (87 to 93 % respectively 27 to 63 %). Adding DWI to T2-MRI improves consistency between readers and has potential to improve readers' accuracy dependent on his/her experience. DWI could be of additional value, particularly in ruling out CR (high NPV), but considering the sub-optimal PPV one should be cautious about relying solely on MRI for the clinical decision to offer a wait-and-see strategy. (orig.)

  11. Locally advanced rectal cancer: is diffusion weighted MRI helpful for the identification of complete responders (ypT0N0) after neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine retrospectively the additional value of DWI-MRI toT2-MRI for predicting complete response (ypT0N0 = CR) after chemoradiation-therapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer. Seventy locally advanced rectal cancer patients underwent CRT followed by restaging MRI and resection. Two readers with different experience levels independently scored T2 images for CR and, in a second reading, combined T2 and DWI. A 5-point confidence-level score was used to generate ROC curves. Areas under the ROC curves (AUC) and interobserver agreement were compared for both readings. Histology served as reference standard. The interobserver agreement increased after addition of DWI from 0.35 to 0.58 but the AUC improved only for the experienced reader (0.77 to 0.89, p = 0.005 vs. 0.74 to 0.70, p > 0.05). Sensitivity and NPV improved from 20-30 % to 40-70 %, respectively 88 % to 91-95 %. Specificity and PPV improved only for the experienced reader (87 to 93 % respectively 27 to 63 %). Adding DWI to T2-MRI improves consistency between readers and has potential to improve readers' accuracy dependent on his/her experience. DWI could be of additional value, particularly in ruling out CR (high NPV), but considering the sub-optimal PPV one should be cautious about relying solely on MRI for the clinical decision to offer a wait-and-see strategy. (orig.)

  12. Assessment of the right ventricular function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cor pulmonale using cardiac 64-slice spiral CT comparing with 1.7 T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the right ventricular function in patients with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and eor pulmonale using cardiac 64 MSCT comparing with MRI. Methods: Forty-six patients with COPD determined by pulmonary function test (PFT) were prospectively studied. According to the Global Initiative for COPD classification, the COPD patients were divided into three groups depending on the severity of the disease: mild COPD (16 cases), moderate COPD (16 cases) and severe COPD (14 cases). Twenty age-matched subjects were included as the controls. The RV function was assessed by 64-MSCT and 1.5 T cardiac MRI in all four groups. Pearson correlation analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF), myocardial mass (MM) and the PFT results in COPD patients. AP value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. End-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), RVEF and MM on MSCT were compared with that on MRI using Pearson correlation analysis. Bland-Airman plot was used to evaluate the correlation between MSCT and MRI. Results: The RVEF was (51.6 ± 5.6)% in mild COPD, (49.8 ± 6.0)% in moderate COPD, (39.4 ± 7.2)% in severe COPD, and (53 ± 5.9)% in controls, respectively. The MM was (44.5 ± 5.4) g in mild COPD, (49.6 ± 5.0) g in moderate COPD, (57.1 ± 3.4) g in severe COPD, and (40.8 ± 3.9) g in controls, respectively. The EDV was (139.9 ± 25.0), (130.2 ± 21.2), (107.6 ± 18.4) and (149.2 ± 27.9) ml, the SV was (72.1 ± 16.1), (64.3 ± 11.0), (42.5 ± 16.5) and (77.0 ± 11.7) ml in four groups, respectively. The values of RVEF and RVEDV were significantly lower in severe COPD than that in mild COPD, moderate COPD and controls (FRVEF=143, FRVEDV=38.07, PRVEF= 1.03, FEDV=3.22, FEFV=0.44, FSV=2.77, P>0.05). The MM of the RV was significantly different between controls and the other three groups (F=66.34, P<0.01). All parameters of the RV function on

  13. Advanced Imaging of Chiari 1 Malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Akbar; Shah, Manish N; Goyal, Manu S

    2015-10-01

    Type I Chiari malformations are congenital deformities involving cerebellar tonsillar herniation downward through the foramen magnum. Structurally, greater than 5 mm of tonsillar descent in adults and more than 6 mm in children is consistent with type I Chiari malformations. However, the radiographic severity of the tonsillar descent does not always correlate well with the clinical symptomatology. Advanced imaging can help clinically correlate imaging to symptoms. Specifically, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow abnormalities are seen in patients with type I Chiari malformation. Advanced MRI involving cardiac-gated and phase-contrast MRI affords a view of such CSF flow abnormalities. PMID:26408061

  14. Brain MRI in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.J.A.; Goraj, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this review article, conventional brain MRI and advanced MRI techniques in Parkinson`s disease (PD) are discussed, with emphasis on clinical relevance. Conventional brain MRI sequences generally demonstrate limited abnormalities specific for PD and in clinical practice brain MRI is mainly used to

  15. MRI for Assessing Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Using DCE-MR and DW-MR Data Sets: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Petrillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate MRI for neoadjuvant therapy response assessment in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC using dynamic contrast enhanced-MRI (DCE-MRI and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, we have compared magnetic resonance volumetry based on DCE-MRI (V(DCE and on DWI (V(DWI scans with conventional T2-weighted volumetry (V(C in LARC patients after neoadjuvant therapy. Twenty-nine patients with LARC underwent MR examination before and after neoadjuvant therapy. A manual segmentation was performed on DCE-MR postcontrast images, on DWI (b-value 800 s/mm2, and on conventional T2-weighted images by two radiologists. DCE-MRI, DWI, and T2-weigthed volumetric changes before and after treatment were evaluated. Nonparametric sample tests, interobserver agreement, and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC were performed. Diagnostic performance linked to DCE-MRI volumetric change was superior to T2-w and DW-MRI volumetric changes performance (specificity 86%, sensitivity 93%, and accuracy 93%. Area Under ROC (AUC of V(DCE was greater than AUCs of V(C and V(DWI resulting in an increase of 15.6% and 11.1%, respectively. Interobserver agreement between two radiologists was 0.977, 0.864, and 0.756 for V(C, V(DCE, and V(DWI, respectively. V(DCE seems to be a promising tool for therapy response assessment in LARC. Further studies on large series of patients are needed to refine technique and evaluate its potential value.

  16. What advances in microscopy are required for combined MRI and optical functional brain imaging? (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinfeld, David

    2016-03-01

    This overview talk will focus on forward-looking scientific needs and physical limits to images of neuronal processes. The challenge in nervous systems is that the basic unit for "switching" events in the nervous system occurs on the one micrometer scale of synaptic spines, while computations involve communication between individual neurons across the full expanse of cortex, which is ten millimeters for mouse cortex. I will address hoped-for advances in optical microscopy, within the context of existing and proposed contrast mechanisms of neuronal function, that span the four orders of magnitude of length scales for neuronal processing

  17. Impact of increasing levels of advanced iterative reconstruction on image quality in low-dose cardiac CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of an advanced iterative reconstruction (IR) technique on subjective and objective image quality (IQ) in low-dose cardiac CT angiography (CCTA). Materials and Methods: 30 datasets of prospectively triggered 'step-and-shoot' CCTA scans acquired on a 256-slice CT scanner with optimized exposure settings were processed on a prototype IR system using filtered back-projection (FBP) and 4 levels of advanced IR (iDose4, Philips) providing incremental rates of IR (level 2, 4, 6, 7). In addition, the effects of different reconstruction kernels (semi-smooth [CB], standard with edge-enhancement [XCB]) and a 'multi-resolution' feature [MR] to preserve the noise power spectrum were evaluated resulting in a total of n = 480 image sets. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were computed from regions of interest at 9 coronary locations. The subjective IQ was rated on a 4-point-scale with 'classic' image appearance and noise-related artifacts as main criteria. Results: At an effective dose of 1.7 ± 0.7 mSv, the CNR significantly improved with every increasing level of IR (range: 14.2-27.8; p < 0.001) with the best objective IQ at the highest level of IR (level 7). The subjective IQ, however, was rated best at the medium level of IR (level 4) with minimal artifacts and a more 'classic' image appearance when compared to higher IR levels. The XCB kernel provided better subjective ratings than CB (p < 0.05) and the MR feature further increased the IQ at a high level of IR. Conclusion: The objective IQ of low-dose CCTA progressively improves with an increasing level of IR. The best subjective IQ, however, is reached at medium levels of IR combined with an edge-enhancing kernel allowing for preservation of a 'classic' image appearance suggesting application in the clinical routine. (orig.)

  18. Cardiac tumours in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons Jonathan M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac tumours are benign or malignant neoplasms arising primarily in the inner lining, muscle layer, or the surrounding pericardium of the heart. They can be primary or metastatic. Primary cardiac tumours are rare in paediatric practice with a prevalence of 0.0017 to 0.28 in autopsy series. In contrast, the incidence of cardiac tumours during foetal life has been reported to be approximately 0.14%. The vast majority of primary cardiac tumours in children are benign, whilst approximately 10% are malignant. Secondary malignant tumours are 10–20 times more prevalent than primary malignant tumours. Rhabdomyoma is the most common cardiac tumour during foetal life and childhood. It accounts for more than 60% of all primary cardiac tumours. The frequency and type of cardiac tumours in adults differ from those in children with 75% being benign and 25% being malignant. Myxomas are the most common primary tumours in adults constituting 40% of benign tumours. Sarcomas make up 75% of malignant cardiac masses. Echocardiography, Computing Tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of the heart are the main non-invasive diagnostic tools. Cardiac catheterisation is seldom necessary. Tumour biopsy with histological assessment remains the gold standard for confirmation of the diagnosis. Surgical resection of primary cardiac tumours should be considered to relieve symptoms and mechanical obstruction to blood flow. The outcome of surgical resection in symptomatic, non-myxomatous benign cardiac tumours is favourable. Patients with primary cardiac malignancies may benefit from palliative surgery but this approach should not be recommended for patients with metastatic cardiac tumours. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy may prolong survival. The prognosis for malignant primary cardiac tumours is generally extremely poor.

  19. Cancer treatment-related cardiac toxicity: prevention, assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanous, Ibrahim; Dillon, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Cancer therapies, especially anthracyclines and monoclonal antibodies, have been linked with increased rates of cardiotoxicity. The development of some cardiac side effects happens over several months, and changes in ejection fraction can be detected long before permanent damage or disability occurs. Advanced heart failure could be averted with better and earlier detection. Methodologies for early detection of cardiac changes include stress echocardiograms, cardiac velocity measurements, radionuclide imaging, cardiac MRI and several potential biomarkers. Many agents have been described for prophylaxis of cardiac events precipitated by cancer therapy. Prophylactic use of beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors may be considered for use with trastuzumab in breast cancer as tolerated. Recovery of cardiac function is possible early after the injury from a cancer therapy. Late complications for coronary artery disease, hypertension and arrhythmia are underappreciated. Treatments for severe cancer therapy-related cardiac complications follow the existing paradigms for congestive heart failure and coronary artery disease, although outcomes for cancer patients differ from outcomes for non-cancer patients. PMID:27372782

  20. Adverse events associated with poor neurological outcome during targeted temperature management and advanced critical care after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Young-Min; Youn, Chun Song; Kim, Soo Hyun; Lee, Byung Kook; Cho, In Soo; Cho, Gyu Chong; Jeung, Kyung Woon; Oh, Sang Hoon; Choi, Seung Pill; Shin, Jong Hwan; Cha, Kyoung-Chul; Oh, Joo Suk; Yim, Hyeon Woo; Park, Kyu Nam; ,

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the association of adverse events (AEs) during targeted temperature management (TTM) and other AEs and concomitant treatments during the advanced critical care period with poor neurological outcome at hospital discharge in adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients. Methods This was a retrospective study using Korean Hypothermia Network registry data of adult OHCA patients treated with TTM in 24 teaching hospitals throughout Sout...

  1. Translocation and cleavage of myocardial dystrophin as a common pathway to advanced heart failure: A scheme for the progression of cardiac dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Toyo-Oka, Teruhiko; Kawada, Tomie; Nakata, Jumi; Xie, Han; Urabe, Masashi; Masui, Fujiko; Ebisawa, Takashi; Tezuka, Asaki; Iwasawa, Kuniaki; Nakajima, Toshiaki; Uehara, Yoshio; Kumagai, Hiroyuki; Kostin, Sawa; Schaper, Jutta; Nakazawa, Mikio

    2004-01-01

    Advanced heart failure (HF) is the leading cause of death in developed countries. The mechanism underlying the progression of cardiac dysfunction needs to be clarified to establish approaches to prevention or treatment. Here, using TO-2 hamsters with hereditary dilated cardiomyopathy, we show age-dependent cleavage and translocation of myocardial dystrophin (Dys) from the sarcolemma (SL) to the myoplasm, increased SL permeability in situ, and a close relationship between the loss of Dys and h...

  2. Cardiac imaging: Current and emerging applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jankharia B; Raut A

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scan have made big inroads as modalities used for evaluation of various pathologies of the heart. Cardiac MRI is typically used for perfusion and viability studies as well as to study various cardiomyopathies, valvular diseases and the pericardium. It has been used in the evaluation of congenital heart diseases over the last two decades. Cardiac CT is used mainly for the evaluation of the coronary arteries, typically in the...

  3. Advanced Cardiac Resuscitation Evaluation (ACRE: A randomised single-blind controlled trial of peer-led vs. expert-led advanced resuscitation training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    statistics showed that the difference of 15% meant that it was possible that the expert-led teaching was 20% better at generating students with High Passes. Conclusions The key elements of advanced cardiac resuscitation can be safely and effectively taught to medical students in small groups by peer-instructors who have undergone basic medical education training.

  4. Functional and morphological findings in early and advanced stages of HIV infection: A comparison of 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT with CT and MRI studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In fourty patients at early and advanced stages of HIV infection (Water-Reed stages I-VI) regional cerebral blood flow was determined by 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT, comparing the results with CT and MRI findings. All patients with HIV encephalopathy (AIDS dementia complex) had pathologic SPECT results (multilocular, patchy uptake defects), but also in earlier and even earliest stages of HIV infection positive SPECT findings were observed. Compared to functional SPECT imaging, morphologically orientated method (CT, MRI) were insensitive in detecting HIV-induced foci: More than 50% of the patients with pathologic SPECT findings had negative CT or MRI scans. Most patients in advanced Walter Reed stages had neurological abnormalities accompanied by positive SPECT. Subtle alterations of HMPAO uptake were observed even in a few cases of early HIV infection without neurological CNS symptoms. The data presented suggest that HMPAO SPECT is highly sensitive in the detection of altered brain perfusion not only in advanced but also early stages of HIV infection. Changes in regional cerebral blood flow are presented before noticeable structural defects may be observed. (orig./MG)

  5. Cardiac Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Joorabian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a spectrum of different types of cardiac"ncalcifications with the importance and significance"nof each type of cardiac calcification, especially"ncoronary artery calcification. Radiologic detection of"ncalcifications within the heart is quite common. The"namount of coronary artery calcification correlates"nwith the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD."nCalcification of the aortic or mitral valve may indicate"nhemodynamically significant valvular stenosis."nMyocardial calcification is a sign of prior infarction,"nwhile pericardial calcification is strongly associated"nwith constrictive pericarditis. A spectrum of different"ntypes of cardiac calcifications (linear, annular,"ncurvilinear,... could be seen in chest radiography and"nother imaging modalities. So a carful inspection for"ndetection and reorganization of these calcifications"nshould be necessary. Numerous modalities exist for"nidentifying coronary calcification, including plain"nradiography, fluoroscopy, intravascular ultrasound,"nMRI, echocardiography, and conventional, helical and"nelectron-beam CT (EBCT. Coronary calcifications"ndetected on EBCT or helical CT can be quantifie,"nand a total calcification score (Cardiac Calcification"nScoring may be calculated. In an asymptomatic"npopulation and/or patients with concomitant risk"nfactors like diabetes mellitus, determination of the"npresence of coronary calcifications identifies the"npatients at risk for future myocardial infarction and"ncoronary artery disease. In patients without coronary"ncalcifications, future cardiovascular events could"nbe excluded. Therefore, detecting and recognizing"ncalcification related to the heart on chest radiography"nand other imaging modalities such as fluoroscopy, CT"nand echocardiography may have important clinical"nimplications.

  6. Adaptation of the modified Bouc–Wen model to compensate for hysteresis in respiratory motion for the list-mode binning of cardiac SPECT and PET acquisitions: Testing using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasari, Paul K. R.; Shazeeb, Mohammed Salman [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609 (United States); Könik, Arda; Lindsay, Clifford; Mukherjee, Joyeeta M.; Johnson, Karen L.; King, Michael A., E-mail: Michael.King@umassmed.edu [Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Binning list-mode acquisitions as a function of a surrogate signal related to respiration has been employed to reduce the impact of respiratory motion on image quality in cardiac emission tomography (SPECT and PET). Inherent in amplitude binning is the assumption that there is a monotonic relationship between the amplitude of the surrogate signal and respiratory motion of the heart. This assumption is not valid in the presence of hysteresis when heart motion exhibits a different relationship with the surrogate during inspiration and expiration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the novel approach of using the Bouc–Wen (BW) model to provide a signal accounting for hysteresis when binning list-mode data with the goal of thereby improving motion correction. The study is based on the authors’ previous observations that hysteresis between chest and abdomen markers was indicative of hysteresis between abdomen markers and the internal motion of the heart. Methods: In 19 healthy volunteers, they determined the internal motion of the heart and diaphragm in the superior–inferior direction during free breathing using MRI navigators. A visual tracking system (VTS) synchronized with MRI acquisition tracked the anterior–posterior motions of external markers placed on the chest and abdomen. These data were employed to develop and test the Bouc–Wen model by inputting the VTS derived chest and abdomen motions into it and using the resulting output signals as surrogates for cardiac motion. The data of the volunteers were divided into training and testing sets. The training set was used to obtain initial values for the model parameters for all of the volunteers in the set, and for set members based on whether they were or were not classified as exhibiting hysteresis using a metric derived from the markers. These initial parameters were then employed with the testing set to estimate output signals. Pearson’s linear correlation coefficient between the

  7. Adaptation of the modified Bouc–Wen model to compensate for hysteresis in respiratory motion for the list-mode binning of cardiac SPECT and PET acquisitions: Testing using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Binning list-mode acquisitions as a function of a surrogate signal related to respiration has been employed to reduce the impact of respiratory motion on image quality in cardiac emission tomography (SPECT and PET). Inherent in amplitude binning is the assumption that there is a monotonic relationship between the amplitude of the surrogate signal and respiratory motion of the heart. This assumption is not valid in the presence of hysteresis when heart motion exhibits a different relationship with the surrogate during inspiration and expiration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the novel approach of using the Bouc–Wen (BW) model to provide a signal accounting for hysteresis when binning list-mode data with the goal of thereby improving motion correction. The study is based on the authors’ previous observations that hysteresis between chest and abdomen markers was indicative of hysteresis between abdomen markers and the internal motion of the heart. Methods: In 19 healthy volunteers, they determined the internal motion of the heart and diaphragm in the superior–inferior direction during free breathing using MRI navigators. A visual tracking system (VTS) synchronized with MRI acquisition tracked the anterior–posterior motions of external markers placed on the chest and abdomen. These data were employed to develop and test the Bouc–Wen model by inputting the VTS derived chest and abdomen motions into it and using the resulting output signals as surrogates for cardiac motion. The data of the volunteers were divided into training and testing sets. The training set was used to obtain initial values for the model parameters for all of the volunteers in the set, and for set members based on whether they were or were not classified as exhibiting hysteresis using a metric derived from the markers. These initial parameters were then employed with the testing set to estimate output signals. Pearson’s linear correlation coefficient between the

  8. Impact of increasing levels of advanced iterative reconstruction on image quality in low-dose cardiac CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroepil, P.; Antoch, G. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Bigdeli, A.H.; Cohnen, M. [Staedtische Kliniken Neuss Lukaskrankenhaus GmbH, Neuss (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Radiology; Nagel, H.D. [Dr. HD Nagel, Buchholz (Germany). Science and Technology for Radiology

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of an advanced iterative reconstruction (IR) technique on subjective and objective image quality (IQ) in low-dose cardiac CT angiography (CCTA). Materials and Methods: 30 datasets of prospectively triggered 'step-and-shoot' CCTA scans acquired on a 256-slice CT scanner with optimized exposure settings were processed on a prototype IR system using filtered back-projection (FBP) and 4 levels of advanced IR (iDose4, Philips) providing incremental rates of IR (level 2, 4, 6, 7). In addition, the effects of different reconstruction kernels (semi-smooth [CB], standard with edge-enhancement [XCB]) and a 'multi-resolution' feature [MR] to preserve the noise power spectrum were evaluated resulting in a total of n = 480 image sets. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were computed from regions of interest at 9 coronary locations. The subjective IQ was rated on a 4-point-scale with 'classic' image appearance and noise-related artifacts as main criteria. Results: At an effective dose of 1.7 ± 0.7 mSv, the CNR significantly improved with every increasing level of IR (range: 14.2-27.8; p < 0.001) with the best objective IQ at the highest level of IR (level 7). The subjective IQ, however, was rated best at the medium level of IR (level 4) with minimal artifacts and a more 'classic' image appearance when compared to higher IR levels. The XCB kernel provided better subjective ratings than CB (p < 0.05) and the MR feature further increased the IQ at a high level of IR. Conclusion: The objective IQ of low-dose CCTA progressively improves with an increasing level of IR. The best subjective IQ, however, is reached at medium levels of IR combined with an edge-enhancing kernel allowing for preservation of a 'classic' image appearance suggesting application in the clinical routine. (orig.)

  9. Cardiac carcinoid: tricuspid delayed hyperenhancement on cardiac 64-slice multidetector CT and magnetic resonance imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martos, R

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Carcinoid heart disease is a rare condition in adults. Its diagnosis can be easily missed in a patient presenting to a primary care setting. We revised the advantages of using coronary multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing this condition. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We studied a 65-year-old patient with carcinoid heart disease and right heart failure using transthoracic Doppler-echocardiogram, cardiac MDCT and MRI. Cardiac echocardiogram revealed marked thickening and retraction of the tricuspid leaflets with dilated right atrium and ventricle. Cardiac MDCT and MRI demonstrated fixation and retraction of the tricuspid leaflets with delayed contrast hyperenhancement of the tricuspid annulus. CONCLUSION: This case demonstrates fascinating imaging findings of cardiac carcinoid disease and highlights the increasing utility of contrast-enhanced MRI and cardiac MDCT in the diagnosis of this interesting condition.

  10. First experience of simultaneous PET/MRI for the early detection of cardiac involvement in patients with Anderson-Fabry disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nappi, Carmela; Altiero, Michele; Imbriaco, Massimo; Giudice, Caterina Anna; Spinelli, Letizia; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Naples (Italy); Nicolai, Emanuele; Aiello, Marco; Diomiaiuti, Claudio Tommaso [IRCCS SDN, Naples (Italy); Pisani, Antonio [University Federico II, Department of Public Health, Naples (Italy)

    2015-03-26

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder associated with severe multiorgan dysfunction and premature death. Early diagnosis and treatment strategies play a key role in patient outcome. We investigated the potential role of hybrid PET/MR imaging in the assessment of early cardiac involvement in AFD patients. Thirteen AFD patients without cardiac symptoms and with normal left ventricular function underwent simultaneous cardiac PET/MR imaging after administration of {sup 18}F-FDG. Cardiac FDG uptake was quantified by measuring the standardized uptake value in 17 myocardial segments in each subject. The coefficient of variation (COV, i.e. the standard deviation divided by the average) of the uptake of the 17 segments was calculated as an index of heterogeneity in the heart. Six patients exhibited focal late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) indicating intramyocardial fibrosis, and four of these also had positive short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) sequences. All patients with LGE and positive STIR MR images showed focal FDG uptake in the corresponding myocardial segments indicating inflammation. Of the seven patients with negative LGE and STIR images, five showed homogeneous FDG cardiac uptake and two showed heterogeneous FDG uptake. The COV was significantly greater in patients with focal FDG uptake (0.25 ± 0.02) than in those without (0.14 ± 0.07, p < 0.01). PET/MR imaging is clinically feasible for the early detection of cardiac involvement in patients with AFD. Further studies evaluating the role of hybrid PET/MR imaging in management of the disease in larger patient populations are warranted. (orig.)

  11. First experience of simultaneous PET/MRI for the early detection of cardiac involvement in patients with Anderson-Fabry disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson-Fabry disease (AFD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder associated with severe multiorgan dysfunction and premature death. Early diagnosis and treatment strategies play a key role in patient outcome. We investigated the potential role of hybrid PET/MR imaging in the assessment of early cardiac involvement in AFD patients. Thirteen AFD patients without cardiac symptoms and with normal left ventricular function underwent simultaneous cardiac PET/MR imaging after administration of 18F-FDG. Cardiac FDG uptake was quantified by measuring the standardized uptake value in 17 myocardial segments in each subject. The coefficient of variation (COV, i.e. the standard deviation divided by the average) of the uptake of the 17 segments was calculated as an index of heterogeneity in the heart. Six patients exhibited focal late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) indicating intramyocardial fibrosis, and four of these also had positive short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) sequences. All patients with LGE and positive STIR MR images showed focal FDG uptake in the corresponding myocardial segments indicating inflammation. Of the seven patients with negative LGE and STIR images, five showed homogeneous FDG cardiac uptake and two showed heterogeneous FDG uptake. The COV was significantly greater in patients with focal FDG uptake (0.25 ± 0.02) than in those without (0.14 ± 0.07, p < 0.01). PET/MR imaging is clinically feasible for the early detection of cardiac involvement in patients with AFD. Further studies evaluating the role of hybrid PET/MR imaging in management of the disease in larger patient populations are warranted. (orig.)

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Kengo F; Satomi, Kazuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology. The frequency of cardiac involvement (cardiac sarcoidosis (CS)) varies in the different geographical regions, but it has been reported that it is an absolutely important prognostic factor in this disease. Complete atrioventricular block is the most common, and ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation the second most common arrhythmia in this disease, both of which are associated with cardiac sudden death. Diagnosing CS is sometimes difficult because of the non-specific ECG and echocardiographic findings, and CS is sometimes misdiagnosed as dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy or an idiopathic ventricular aneurysm, and therefore, endomyocardial biopsy is important, but has a low sensitivity. Another problem is the recognition of isolated types of CS. Recently, MRI and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography have been demonstrated to be useful tools for the non-invasive diagnosis of CS as well as therapeutic evaluation tools, but are still unsatisfactory. Treatment of CS is usually done by corticosteroid therapy to control inflammation, prevent fibrosis and protect from any deterioration of the cardiac function, but the long-term outcome is still in debate. Despite the advancement of non-pharmacological approaches for CS (pacing, defibrillators and catheter ablation) to improve the prognosis, there are still many issues remaining to resolve diagnosing and managing CS. Here, we attempt a review of the clinical evidence, with special focus on the current understanding of this disease and showing the current strategies and remaining problems of diagnosing and managing CS. PMID:26643814

  13. MRI and endosonography in preoperative staging of advanced rectal carcinomas after hypothermoradiochemotherapy; Magnetresonanztomographie und Endosonographie beim praeoperativen Staging fortgeschrittener Rektumkarzinome nach Hyperthermoradiochemotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, R.J. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany); Pegios, W. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany); Huenerbein, M. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany); Vogl, T.J. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany); Hidajat, N. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany); Gellermann, J. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany); Wust, P. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany); Rau, B. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany); Schlag, P. [Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Virchow-Klinikum, Medizinische Fakultaet, Humboldt-Univ., Berlin (Germany); Felix, R. [Chirurgische Abt., Robert-Roessle-Klinik, Berlin-Buch (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    Purpose: Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of staging of endorectal sonography (ES) and body coil MRI after preoperative hyperthermoradiochemotherapy in patients with advanced rectal cancer. Methods: Prospective analysis of MRI and ES in 30 patients after hyperthermoradiochemotherapy and correlation with histopathological patterns. Results: T-staging by MRI was correct in 47% and by ES in 53% of the cases. Despite similar accuracy of staging in T{sub 0}- and T{sub 1}-tumours, we found different accuracies concerning T{sub 2}-tumour staging about 63% versus 73% (MRI/ES), concerning perirectal infiltration 70% for both techniques, concerning invasion of adjacent organs 90% versus 87%, and concerning lymph node metastases without respect to the N-stage 63% versus 63%. Conclusion: Both imaging modalities provide useful information for operation planning despite limited accuracy after hyperthermoradiochemotherapy. The body coil MRI does not seem to be severely inferior to ES in posttherapeutic staging, despite better contour line imaging by ES. With respect to the determination of invasion of other organs, MRI seems to be more useful. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Vergleich der diagnostischen Aussagekraft von Endosonographie (ES) und MRT fuer das Staging nach praeoperativer Hyperthermoradiochemotherapie bei Patienten mit fortgeschrittenem Rektumkarzinom. Methodik: 30 Patienten wurden prospektiv mittels der MRT und ES nach Hyperthermoradiochemotherapie untersucht und die Ergebnisse mit dem histopathologischen Befund korreliert. Ergebnisse: Ein korrektes T-Staging ergab sich MR-tomographisch in 47% und endosonographisch in 53% der Faelle. Bei aehnlicher Treffsicherheit von MRT und ES bei den Stadien T{sub 0} und T{sub 1} zeigte sich im Stadium T{sub 2} eine Treffsicherheit von 63% gegenueber 73% (MRT/ES), bezueglich eines perirektalen Infiltrationsnachweises von 70% fuer beide Methoden, bezueglich einer Nachbarorganinfiltration von 90% gegenueber 87% und hinsichtlich eines

  14. Rationale and design of the Multidisciplinary Approach to Novel Therapies in Cardiology Oncology Research Trial (MANTICORE 101 - Breast): a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to determine if conventional heart failure pharmacotherapy can prevent trastuzumab-mediated left ventricular remodeling among patients with HER2+ early breast cancer using cardiac MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MANTICORE 101 - Breast (Multidisciplinary Approach to Novel Therapies in Cardiology Oncology Research) is a randomized trial to determine if conventional heart failure pharmacotherapy (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor or beta-blocker) can prevent trastuzumab-mediated left ventricular remodeling, measured with cardiac MRI, among patients with HER2+ early breast cancer. One hundred and fifty-nine patients with histologically confirmed HER2+ breast cancer will be enrolled in a parallel 3-arm, randomized, placebo controlled, double-blind design. After baseline assessments, participants will be randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio to an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (perindopril), beta-blocker (bisoprolol), or placebo. Participants will receive drug or placebo for 1 year beginning 7 days before trastuzumab therapy. Dosages for all groups will be systematically up-titrated, as tolerated, at 1 week intervals for a total of 3 weeks. The primary objective of this randomized clinical trial is to determine if conventional heart failure pharmacotherapy can prevent trastuzumab-mediated left ventricular remodeling among patients with HER2+ early breast cancer, as measured by 12 month change in left ventricular end-diastolic volume using cardiac MRI. Secondary objectives include 1) determine the evolution of left ventricular remodeling on cardiac MRI in patients with HER2+ early breast cancer, 2) understand the mechanism of trastuzumab mediated cardiac toxicity by assessing for the presence of myocardial injury and apoptosis on serum biomarkers and cardiac MRI, and 3) correlate cardiac biomarkers of myocyte injury and extra-cellular matrix remodeling with left ventricular remodeling on cardiac MRI in patients with HER2+ early breast cancer. Cardiac toxicity as a result of cancer therapies is now recognized as a significant health problem of increasing prevalence. To our knowledge, MANTICORE will be the first randomized trial testing proven heart failure pharmacotherapy in

  15. Rationale and design of the Multidisciplinary Approach to Novel Therapies in Cardiology Oncology Research Trial (MANTICORE 101 - Breast: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to determine if conventional heart failure pharmacotherapy can prevent trastuzumab-mediated left ventricular remodeling among patients with HER2+ early breast cancer using cardiac MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekowitz Justin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MANTICORE 101 - Breast (Multidisciplinary Approach to Novel Therapies in Cardiology Oncology Research is a randomized trial to determine if conventional heart failure pharmacotherapy (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor or beta-blocker can prevent trastuzumab-mediated left ventricular remodeling, measured with cardiac MRI, among patients with HER2+ early breast cancer. Methods/Design One hundred and fifty-nine patients with histologically confirmed HER2+ breast cancer will be enrolled in a parallel 3-arm, randomized, placebo controlled, double-blind design. After baseline assessments, participants will be randomized in a 1:1:1 ratio to an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (perindopril, beta-blocker (bisoprolol, or placebo. Participants will receive drug or placebo for 1 year beginning 7 days before trastuzumab therapy. Dosages for all groups will be systematically up-titrated, as tolerated, at 1 week intervals for a total of 3 weeks. The primary objective of this randomized clinical trial is to determine if conventional heart failure pharmacotherapy can prevent trastuzumab-mediated left ventricular remodeling among patients with HER2+ early breast cancer, as measured by 12 month change in left ventricular end-diastolic volume using cardiac MRI. Secondary objectives include 1 determine the evolution of left ventricular remodeling on cardiac MRI in patients with HER2+ early breast cancer, 2 understand the mechanism of trastuzumab mediated cardiac toxicity by assessing for the presence of myocardial injury and apoptosis on serum biomarkers and cardiac MRI, and 3 correlate cardiac biomarkers of myocyte injury and extra-cellular matrix remodeling with left ventricular remodeling on cardiac MRI in patients with HER2+ early breast cancer. Discussion Cardiac toxicity as a result of cancer therapies is now recognized as a significant health problem of increasing prevalence. To our knowledge, MANTICORE will be the first

  16. Flipping the advanced cardiac life support classroom with team-based learning: comparison of cognitive testing performance for medical students at the University of California, Irvine, United State

    OpenAIRE

    Boysen-Osborn, Megan; Anderson, Craig L.; Navarro, Roman; Yanuck, Justin; Strom, Suzanne; McCoy, Christopher E.; Youm, Julie; Ypma-Wong, Mary Frances; Langdorf, Mark I.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: It aimed to find if written test results improved for advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) taught in flipped classroom/team-based Learning (FC/TBL) vs. lecture-based (LB) control in University of California-Irvine School of Medicine, USA. Methods: Medical students took 2010 ACLS with FC/TBL (2015), compared to 3 classes in LB (2012-14) format. There were 27.5 hours of instruction for FC/TBL model (TBL 10.5, podcasts 9, small-group simulation 8 hours), and 20 (12 lecture, simulation 8...

  17. Cardiac cine MRI: Comparison of 1.5 T, non-enhanced 3.0 T and blood pool enhanced 3.0 T imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerretsen, S.C.; Versluis, B.; Bekkers, S.C.A.M. [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Leiner, T. [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands)], E-mail: leiner@rad.unimaas.nl

    2008-01-15

    Introduction: Cardiac cine imaging using balanced steady state free precession sequences (bSSFP) suffers from artefacts at 3.0 T. We compared bSSFP cardiac cine imaging at 1.5 T with gradient echo imaging at 3.0 T with and without a blood pool contrast agent. Materials and methods: Eleven patients referred for cardiac cine imaging underwent imaging at 1.5 T and 3.0 T. At 3.0 T images were acquired before and after administration of 0.03 mmol/kg gadofosveset. Blood pool signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), temporal variations in SNR, ejection fraction and myocardial mass were compared. Subjective image quality was scored on a four-point scale. Results: Blood pool SNR increased with more than 75% at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T (p < 0.001); after contrast administration at 3.0 T SNR increased with 139% (p < 0.001). However, variations in blood pool SNR at 3.0 T were nearly three times as high versus those at 1.5 T in the absence of contrast medium (p < 0.001); after contrast administration this was reduced to approximately a factor 1.4 (p = 0.21). Saturation artefacts led to significant overestimation of ejection fraction in the absence of contrast administration (1.5 T: 44.7 {+-} 3.1 vs. 3.0 T: 50.7 {+-} 4.2 [p = 0.04] vs. 3.0 T post contrast: 43.4 {+-} 2.9 [p = 0.55]). Subjective image quality was highest for 1.5 T (2.8 {+-} 0.3), and lowest for non-enhanced 3.0 T (1.7 {+-} 0.6; p = 0.006). Conclusions: GRE cardiac cine imaging at 3.0 T after injection of the blood pool agent gadofosveset leads to improved objective and subjective cardiac cine image quality at 3.0 T and to the same conclusions regarding cardiac ejection fraction compared to bSSFP imaging at 1.5 T.

  18. Cardiac cine MRI: Comparison of 1.5 T, non-enhanced 3.0 T and blood pool enhanced 3.0 T imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Cardiac cine imaging using balanced steady state free precession sequences (bSSFP) suffers from artefacts at 3.0 T. We compared bSSFP cardiac cine imaging at 1.5 T with gradient echo imaging at 3.0 T with and without a blood pool contrast agent. Materials and methods: Eleven patients referred for cardiac cine imaging underwent imaging at 1.5 T and 3.0 T. At 3.0 T images were acquired before and after administration of 0.03 mmol/kg gadofosveset. Blood pool signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), temporal variations in SNR, ejection fraction and myocardial mass were compared. Subjective image quality was scored on a four-point scale. Results: Blood pool SNR increased with more than 75% at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T (p < 0.001); after contrast administration at 3.0 T SNR increased with 139% (p < 0.001). However, variations in blood pool SNR at 3.0 T were nearly three times as high versus those at 1.5 T in the absence of contrast medium (p < 0.001); after contrast administration this was reduced to approximately a factor 1.4 (p = 0.21). Saturation artefacts led to significant overestimation of ejection fraction in the absence of contrast administration (1.5 T: 44.7 ± 3.1 vs. 3.0 T: 50.7 ± 4.2 [p = 0.04] vs. 3.0 T post contrast: 43.4 ± 2.9 [p = 0.55]). Subjective image quality was highest for 1.5 T (2.8 ± 0.3), and lowest for non-enhanced 3.0 T (1.7 ± 0.6; p = 0.006). Conclusions: GRE cardiac cine imaging at 3.0 T after injection of the blood pool agent gadofosveset leads to improved objective and subjective cardiac cine image quality at 3.0 T and to the same conclusions regarding cardiac ejection fraction compared to bSSFP imaging at 1.5 T

  19. Mathematical cardiac electrophysiology

    CERN Document Server

    Colli Franzone, Piero; Scacchi, Simone

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the main mathematical and numerical models in computational electrocardiology, ranging from microscopic membrane models of cardiac ionic channels to macroscopic bidomain, monodomain, eikonal models and cardiac source representations. These advanced multiscale and nonlinear models describe the cardiac bioelectrical activity from the cell level to the body surface and are employed in both the direct and inverse problems of electrocardiology. The book also covers advanced numerical techniques needed to efficiently carry out large-scale cardiac simulations, including time and space discretizations, decoupling and operator splitting techniques, parallel finite element solvers. These techniques are employed in 3D cardiac simulations illustrating the excitation mechanisms, the anisotropic effects on excitation and repolarization wavefronts, the morphology of electrograms in normal and pathological tissue and some reentry phenomena. The overall aim of the book is to present rigorously the mathematica...

  20. Quantitative DCE-MRI for prediction of pathological complete response following neoadjuvant treatment for locally advanced breast cancer: the impact of breast cancer subtypes on the diagnostic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drisis, Stylianos; Stathopoulos, Konstantinos; Chao, Shih-Li; Lemort, Marc [Institute Jules Bordet, Radiology Department, Brussels (Belgium); Metens, Thierry [Erasme University Hospital, Radiology Department, Brussels (Belgium); Ignatiadis, Michael [Institute Jules Bordet, Oncology Department, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-05-15

    To assess whether DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters obtained before and during chemotherapy can predict pathological complete response (pCR) differently for different breast cancer groups. Eighty-four patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer were retrospectively included. All patients underwent two DCE-MRI examinations, one before (EX1) and one during treatment (EX2). Tumours were classified into different breast cancer groups, namely triple negative (TNBC), HER2+ and ER+/HER2-, and compared with the whole population (WP). PK parameters Ktrans and Ve were extracted using a two-compartment Tofts model. At EX1, Ktrans predicted pCR for WP and TNBC. At EX2, maximum diameter (Dmax) predicted pCR for WP and ER+/HER2-. Both PK parameters predicted pCR in WP and TNBC and only Ktrans for the HER2+. pCR was predicted from relative difference (EX1 - EX2)/EX1 of Dmax and both PK parameters in the WP group and only for Ve in the TNBC group. No PK parameter could predict response for ER+/HER-. ROC comparison between WP and breast cancer groups showed higher but not statistically significant values for TNBC for the prediction of pCR Quantitative DCE-MRI can better predict pCR after neoadjuvant treatment for TNBC but not for the ER+/HER2- group. (orig.)

  1. Quantitative DCE-MRI for prediction of pathological complete response following neoadjuvant treatment for locally advanced breast cancer: the impact of breast cancer subtypes on the diagnostic accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess whether DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters obtained before and during chemotherapy can predict pathological complete response (pCR) differently for different breast cancer groups. Eighty-four patients who received neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer were retrospectively included. All patients underwent two DCE-MRI examinations, one before (EX1) and one during treatment (EX2). Tumours were classified into different breast cancer groups, namely triple negative (TNBC), HER2+ and ER+/HER2-, and compared with the whole population (WP). PK parameters Ktrans and Ve were extracted using a two-compartment Tofts model. At EX1, Ktrans predicted pCR for WP and TNBC. At EX2, maximum diameter (Dmax) predicted pCR for WP and ER+/HER2-. Both PK parameters predicted pCR in WP and TNBC and only Ktrans for the HER2+. pCR was predicted from relative difference (EX1 - EX2)/EX1 of Dmax and both PK parameters in the WP group and only for Ve in the TNBC group. No PK parameter could predict response for ER+/HER-. ROC comparison between WP and breast cancer groups showed higher but not statistically significant values for TNBC for the prediction of pCR Quantitative DCE-MRI can better predict pCR after neoadjuvant treatment for TNBC but not for the ER+/HER2- group. (orig.)

  2. Design, evaluation and application of an eight channel transmit/receive coil array for cardiac MRI at 7.0 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is to design, examine and apply an eight channel transmit/receive coil array tailored for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at 7.0 T that provides image quality suitable for clinical use, patient comfort, and ease of use. The cardiac coil array was designed to consist of a planar posterior section and a modestly curved anterior section. For radio frequency (RF) safety validation, numerical computations of the electromagnetic field (EMF) and the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution were conducted. In vivo cardiac imaging was performed using a 2D CINE FLASH technique. For signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) assessment reconstructed images were scaled in SNR units. The parallel imaging capabilities of the coil were examined using GRAPPA and SENSE reconstruction with reduction factors of up to R = 4. The assessment of the RF characteristics yielded a maximum noise correlation of 0.33. The baseline SNR advantage at 7.0 T was put to use to acquire 2D CINE images of the heart with a spatial resolution of 1 mm × 1 mm × 4 mm. The coil array supports 1D acceleration factors of up to R = 3 without impairing image quality significantly. For un-accelerated 2D CINE FLASH acquisitions the results revealed an SNR of approximately 140 for the left ventricular blood pool. Blood/myocardium contrast was found to be approximately 90 for un-accelerated 2D CINE FLASH acquisitions. The proposed 8 channel cardiac transceiver surface coil has the capability to acquire high contrast, high spatial and temporal resolution in vivo images of the heart at 7.0 T

  3. Design, evaluation and application of an eight channel transmit/receive coil array for cardiac MRI at 7.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gräßl, Andreas, E-mail: Andreas.Graessl@mdc-berlin.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Winter, Lukas, E-mail: Lukas.Winter@mdc-berlin.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Thalhammer, Christof, E-mail: Christof.Thalhammer@mdc-berlin.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Renz, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.Renz@mdc-berlin.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Siemens Healthcare, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Kellman, Peter, E-mail: kellmanp@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics, National Institutes of Health/NHLBI, Bethesda, MD (United States); Martin, Conrad, E-mail: Conrad.Martin@mdc-berlin.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian von, E-mail: florian.von-knobelsdorff@charite.de [Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility (B.U.F.F.), Max-Delbrueck-Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Roessle-Strasse 10, 13125 Berlin (Germany); HELIOS Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Department of Cardiology and Nephrology, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Experimental and Clinical Research Center (ECRC), Charité – University Medicine Campus Berlin Buch, 13125 Berlin (Germany); Tkachenko, Valeriy, E-mail: v.o.tkachenko@googlemail.com [Experimental and Clinical Research Center (ECRC), Charité – University Medicine Campus Berlin Buch, 13125 Berlin (Germany); and others

    2013-05-15

    The objective of this work is to design, examine and apply an eight channel transmit/receive coil array tailored for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging at 7.0 T that provides image quality suitable for clinical use, patient comfort, and ease of use. The cardiac coil array was designed to consist of a planar posterior section and a modestly curved anterior section. For radio frequency (RF) safety validation, numerical computations of the electromagnetic field (EMF) and the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution were conducted. In vivo cardiac imaging was performed using a 2D CINE FLASH technique. For signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) assessment reconstructed images were scaled in SNR units. The parallel imaging capabilities of the coil were examined using GRAPPA and SENSE reconstruction with reduction factors of up to R = 4. The assessment of the RF characteristics yielded a maximum noise correlation of 0.33. The baseline SNR advantage at 7.0 T was put to use to acquire 2D CINE images of the heart with a spatial resolution of 1 mm × 1 mm × 4 mm. The coil array supports 1D acceleration factors of up to R = 3 without impairing image quality significantly. For un-accelerated 2D CINE FLASH acquisitions the results revealed an SNR of approximately 140 for the left ventricular blood pool. Blood/myocardium contrast was found to be approximately 90 for un-accelerated 2D CINE FLASH acquisitions. The proposed 8 channel cardiac transceiver surface coil has the capability to acquire high contrast, high spatial and temporal resolution in vivo images of the heart at 7.0 T.

  4. Flow-weighted MRI of the lungs with the ECG-gated half-fourier FSE technique. Evaluation of the effect of the cardiac cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated temporal MR signal changes in the peripheral lung and proximal pulmonary vessels during the entire cardiac cycle in order to evaluate the characteristics of the diastolic-systolic subtraction method in the lung. In eight healthy volunteers free of lung diseases, changes in the MR signal during one breath-hold were investigated with the multiple electrocardiogram (ECG)-triggered half-Fourier single-shot fast-spin echo (SS-FSE) technique. The signal intensity-time course curve in the lung showed that biphasic signals decreased 20% to 47% at systole and 5% to 33% at mid-diastole, measured against the maximum signals at late diastole. This signal decrease in the peripheral lung was correlated to that in the proximal pulmonary vessels during an entire cardiac cycle (r=0.667 to 1.000). The best visualization of the lung was obtained at late diastole, when the intra-vascular flow in the lung was expected to be stagnant. Compared with the late diastolic SS-FSE images, the late diastolic-systolic subtracted SS-FSE images improved the signal-to-noise ratio in the lung as well as the signal-intensity ratio of the peripheral lung to surrounding tissues. Although the flow-induced signal dephasing in the lung was completely unavoidable and its amount was unpredictable even at late diastole, the diastolic-systolic subtracted SS-FSE images showed the relative differences in flow alteration during the cardiac cycle between the images at diastole and those at systole. The main characteristic of diastolic-systolic subtracted SS-FSE was the enhancement of visibility of cardiac-dependent signal changes in the lung due to the alteration in pulsatile flow. (author)

  5. A Rare Case of Left Ventricular Intramural Hemangioma Diagnosed Using 1.5-T Cardiac MRI with Histopathological Correlation and Successfully Treated by Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemangiomas are vascular tumors composed of blood vessels, frequently localized in the skin and subcutaneous muscles; their localization in the heart is exceptional. The most common localizations are the lateral walls of the left ventricle, the anterior wall, and the septum. Mostly, these tumors grow intracavitarily, rarely intramurally. We describe a singular case of left ventricular intramural hemangioma, detected and diagnosed using newer magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities, confirmed by histopathological results, and treated successfully by surgery.

  6. Automatic classification of scar tissue in late gadolinium enhancement cardiac MRI for the assessment of left-atrial wall injury after radiofrequency ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Daniel; Morris, Alan; Burgon, Nathan; McGann, Christopher; MacLeod, Robert; Cates, Joshua

    2012-03-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is a promising procedure for treating atrial fibrillation (AF) that relies on accurate lesion delivery in the left atrial (LA) wall for success. Late Gadolinium Enhancement MRI (LGE MRI) at three months post-ablation has proven effective for noninvasive assessment of the location and extent of scar formation, which are important factors for predicting patient outcome and planning of redo ablation procedures. We have developed an algorithm for automatic classification in LGE MRI of scar tissue in the LA wall and have evaluated accuracy and consistency compared to manual scar classifications by expert observers. Our approach clusters voxels based on normalized intensity and was chosen through a systematic comparison of the performance of multivariate clustering on many combinations of image texture. Algorithm performance was determined by overlap with ground truth, using multiple overlap measures, and the accuracy of the estimation of the total amount of scar in the LA. Ground truth was determined using the STAPLE algorithm, which produces a probabilistic estimate of the true scar classification from multiple expert manual segmentations. Evaluation of the ground truth data set was based on both inter- and intra-observer agreement, with variation among expert classifiers indicating the difficulty of scar classification for a given a dataset. Our proposed automatic scar classification algorithm performs well for both scar localization and estimation of scar volume: for ground truth datasets considered easy, variability from the ground truth was low; for those considered difficult, variability from ground truth was on par with the variability across experts.

  7. Fetal Electrocardiogram (fECG Gated MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn N.J. Paley

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI-compatible system to enable gating of a scanner to the heartbeat of a foetus for cardiac, umbilical cord flow and other possible imaging applications. We performed radiofrequency safety testing prior to a fetal electrocardiogram (fECG gated imaging study in pregnant volunteers (n = 3. A compact monitoring device with advanced software capable of reliably detecting both the maternal electrocardiogram (mECG and fECG simultaneously was modified by the manufacturer (Monica Healthcare, Nottingham, UK to provide an external TTL trigger signal from the detected fECG which could be used to trigger a standard 1.5 T MR (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA gating system with suitable attenuation. The MR scanner was tested by triggering rapidly during image acquisition at a typical fetal heart rate (123 beats per minute using a simulated fECG waveform fed into the gating system. Gated MR images were also acquired from volunteers who were attending for a repeat fetal Central Nervous System (CNS examination using an additional rapid cardiac imaging sequence triggered from the measured fECG. No adverse safety effects were encountered. This is the first time fECG gating has been used with MRI and opens up a range of new possibilities to study a developing foetus.

  8. Advanced life support therapy and on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients: Applying signal processing and pattern recognition methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trygve Eftestøl

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In the US alone, several hundred thousands die of sudden cardiac arrests each year. Basic life support defined as chest compressions and ventilations and early defibrillation are the only factors proven to increase the survival of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and are key elements in the chain of survival defined by the American Heart Association. The current cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines treat all patients the same, but studies show need for more individualiza- tion of treatment. This review will focus on ideas on how to strengthen the weak parts of the chain of survival including the ability to measure the effects of therapy, improve time efficiency, and optimize the sequence and quality of the various components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  9. Chest MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - chest; Magnetic resonance imaging - chest; NMR - chest; MRI of the thorax; Thoracic MRI ... healthy enough to filter the contrast. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  10. MRI of cardiovascular malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastler, Bruno [Centre Hospitalier Univ. Jean Minjoz, Besancon (France); Universite de Franche-Comte, Besancon (FR). Lab. I4S (Health, Innovation, Intervention, Imaging, Engineering); Centre Hospitalier Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Dept. of Radiology

    2011-07-01

    MRI is a non-invasive and non-ionizing imaging modality that is perfectly suited for the diagnosis and follow-up of both pediatric and adult congenital heart disease. It provides a large field of view and has the unique ability to depict complex cardiac and vascular anatomy and to measure cardiac function and flow within one examination. MRI is the ideal complement to echocardiography whenever the information provided by the latter is limited. This book has been conceived as a self-teaching manual that will assist qualified radiologists, cardiologists, and pediatricians, as well as those in training. It is richly illustrated with numerous images and drawings that cover all usual and most unusual anomalies. The principal author, Professor Bruno Kastler, is head of radiology at Besancon University Hospital, France and is board certified in both radiology and cardiology. (orig.)

  11. Harmonic phase interference for the detection of tag line crossings and beyond in homogeneous strain analysis of cardiac tagged MRI data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Homogenous strain analysis (HSA) was devel oped to evaluate regional cardiac function using tagged cine magnetic resonance images of heart. Current cardiac applications of HSA are however limited in accurately detecting tag intersections within the myocardial wall, producing consistent triangulation of tag cells throughout the image series and achieving optimal spatial resolution due to the large size of the triangles. To address these issues, this article introduces a harmonic phase (HARP) interfer ence method. In principle, as in the standard HARP analysis, the method uses harmonic phases associated with the two of the four fundamental peaks in the spectrum of a tagged image. However, the phase associated with each peak is wrapped when estimated digitally. This article shows that special combination of wrapped phases results in an image with unique intensity pattern that can be exploited to auto matically detect tag intersections and to produce reliable triangulation with regularly organized partitioning of the mesh for HSA. In addition, the method offers new oppor tunities and freedom for evaluating myocardial function when the power and angle of the complex filtered spectra are mathematically modified prior to computing the phase. For example, the triangular elements can be shifted spatially by changing the angle and/or their sizes can be reduced by changing the power. Interference patterns obtained under a variety of power and angle conditions were presented and specific features observed in the results were explained.

  12. Comparison of three multichannel transmit/receive radiofrequency coil configurations for anatomic and functional cardiac MRI at 7.0T: implications for clinical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To implement, examine, and compare three multichannel transmit/receive coil configurations for cardiovascular MR (CMR) at 7T. Three radiofrequency transmit-receive (TX/RX) coils with 4-, 8-, and 16-coil elements were used. Ten healthy volunteers (seven males, age 28 ± 4 years) underwent CMR at 7T. For all three RX/TX coils, 2D CINE FLASH images of the heart were acquired. Cardiac chamber quantification, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analysis, parallel imaging performance assessment, and image quality scoring were performed. Mean total examination time was 29 ± 5 min. All images obtained with the 8- and 16-channel coils were diagnostic. No significant difference in ejection fraction (EF) (P > 0.09) or left ventricular mass (LVM) (P > 0.31) was observed between the coils. The 8- and 16-channel arrays yielded a higher mean SNR in the septum versus the 4-channel coil. The lowest geometry factors were found for the 16-channel coil (mean ± SD 2.3 ± 0.5 for R = 4). Image quality was rated significantly higher (P < 0.04) for the 16-channel coil versus the 8- and 4-channel coils. All three coil configurations are suitable for CMR at 7.0T under routine circumstances. A larger number of coil elements enhances image quality and parallel imaging performance but does not impact the accuracy of cardiac chamber quantification. (orig.)

  13. Comparison of three multichannel transmit/receive radiofrequency coil configurations for anatomic and functional cardiac MRI at 7.0T: implications for clinical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winter, Lukas; Graessl, Andreas; Hezel, Fabian; Thalhammer, Christof [Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility, Berlin (Germany); Kellman, Peter [National Institutes of Health/NHLBI, Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics, Bethesda, MD (United States); Renz, Wolfgang [Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility, Berlin (Germany); Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany); Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian von; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette [Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility, Berlin (Germany); HELIOS Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Department of Cardiology and Nephrology, Berlin (Germany); Charite Medical Faculty and the Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Tkachenko, Valeriy [Charite Medical Faculty and the Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany); Niendorf, Thoralf [Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility, Berlin (Germany); Charite Medical Faculty and the Max-Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine, Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    To implement, examine, and compare three multichannel transmit/receive coil configurations for cardiovascular MR (CMR) at 7T. Three radiofrequency transmit-receive (TX/RX) coils with 4-, 8-, and 16-coil elements were used. Ten healthy volunteers (seven males, age 28 {+-} 4 years) underwent CMR at 7T. For all three RX/TX coils, 2D CINE FLASH images of the heart were acquired. Cardiac chamber quantification, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analysis, parallel imaging performance assessment, and image quality scoring were performed. Mean total examination time was 29 {+-} 5 min. All images obtained with the 8- and 16-channel coils were diagnostic. No significant difference in ejection fraction (EF) (P > 0.09) or left ventricular mass (LVM) (P > 0.31) was observed between the coils. The 8- and 16-channel arrays yielded a higher mean SNR in the septum versus the 4-channel coil. The lowest geometry factors were found for the 16-channel coil (mean {+-} SD 2.3 {+-} 0.5 for R = 4). Image quality was rated significantly higher (P < 0.04) for the 16-channel coil versus the 8- and 4-channel coils. All three coil configurations are suitable for CMR at 7.0T under routine circumstances. A larger number of coil elements enhances image quality and parallel imaging performance but does not impact the accuracy of cardiac chamber quantification. (orig.)

  14. The role of advanced imaging techniques in cystic fibrosis follow-up: is there a place for MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puderbach, Michael; Eichinger, Monika [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is caused by mutations in the CFTR-gene and remains one of the most frequent lethal inherited diseases in the Caucasian population. Given the progress in CF therapy and the consecutive improvement in prognosis, monitoring of disease progression and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions with repeated imaging of the CF lung plays an increasingly important role. So far, the chest radiograph has been the most widely used imaging modality to monitor morphological changes in the CF lung. CT is the gold standard for assessment of morphological changes of airways and lung parenchyma. Considering the necessity of life-long repeated imaging studies, the cumulative radiation doses reached with CT is problematic for CF patients. A sensitive, non-invasive and quantitative technique without radiation exposure is warranted for monitoring of disease activity. In previous studies, MRI proved to be comparable to CT regarding the detection of morphological changes in the CF lung without using ionising radiation. Furthermore, MRI was shown to be superior to CT regarding assessment of functional changes of the lung. This review presents the typical morphological and functional MR imaging findings with respect to MR-based follow-up of CF lung disease. MRI offers a variety of techniques for morphological and functional imaging of the CF lung. Using this radiation free technique short- and long-term follow-up studies are possible enabling an individualised guidance of the therapy. (orig.)

  15. The role of advanced imaging techniques in cystic fibrosis follow-up: is there a place for MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is caused by mutations in the CFTR-gene and remains one of the most frequent lethal inherited diseases in the Caucasian population. Given the progress in CF therapy and the consecutive improvement in prognosis, monitoring of disease progression and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions with repeated imaging of the CF lung plays an increasingly important role. So far, the chest radiograph has been the most widely used imaging modality to monitor morphological changes in the CF lung. CT is the gold standard for assessment of morphological changes of airways and lung parenchyma. Considering the necessity of life-long repeated imaging studies, the cumulative radiation doses reached with CT is problematic for CF patients. A sensitive, non-invasive and quantitative technique without radiation exposure is warranted for monitoring of disease activity. In previous studies, MRI proved to be comparable to CT regarding the detection of morphological changes in the CF lung without using ionising radiation. Furthermore, MRI was shown to be superior to CT regarding assessment of functional changes of the lung. This review presents the typical morphological and functional MR imaging findings with respect to MR-based follow-up of CF lung disease. MRI offers a variety of techniques for morphological and functional imaging of the CF lung. Using this radiation free technique short- and long-term follow-up studies are possible enabling an individualised guidance of the therapy. (orig.)

  16. MRI and low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  17. Whole-heart cine MRI in a single breath-hold. A compressed sensing accelerated 3D acquisition technique for assessment of cardiac function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to perform functional MR imaging of the whole heart in a single breath-hold using an undersampled 3 D trajectory for data acquisition in combination with compressed sensing for image reconstruction. Materials and Methods: Measurements were performed using an SSFP sequence on a 3 T whole-body system equipped with a 32-channel body array coil. A 3 D radial stack-of-stars sampling scheme was utilized enabling efficient undersampling of the k-space and thereby accelerating data acquisition. Compressed sensing was applied for the reconstruction of the missing data. A validation study was performed based on a fully sampled dataset acquired by standard Cartesian cine imaging of 2 D slices on a healthy volunteer. The results were investigated with regard to systematic errors and resolution losses possibly introduced by the developed reconstruction. Subsequently, the proposed technique was applied for in-vivo functional cardiac imaging of the whole heart in a single breath-hold of 27 s. The developed technique was tested on three healthy volunteers to examine its reproducibility. Results: By means of the results of the simulation (temporal resolution: 47 ms, spatial resolution: 1.4 x 1.4 x 8 mm, 3 D image matrix: 208 x 208 x 10), an overall acceleration factor of 10 has been found where the compressed sensing reconstructed image series shows only very low systematic errors and a slight in-plane resolution loss of 15 %. The results of the in-vivo study (temporal resolution: 40.5 ms, spatial resolution: 2.1 x 2.1 x 8 mm, 3 D image matrix: 224 x 224 x 12) performed with an acceleration factor of 10.7 confirm the overall good image quality of the presented technique for undersampled acquisitions. Conclusion: The combination of 3 D radial data acquisition and model-based compressed sensing reconstruction allows high acceleration factors enabling cardiac functional imaging of the whole heart within only one breath-hold. The image quality in the

  18. Whole-heart cine MRI in a single breath-hold. A compressed sensing accelerated 3D acquisition technique for assessment of cardiac function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wech, T.; Koestler, H. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Radiology; Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Comprehensive Heart Failure Center; Pickl, W.; Tran-Gia, J.; Ritter, C.; Hahn, D. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Radiology; Beer, M. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Radiology; Graz Univ. (Austria). University Hospital Radiology

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to perform functional MR imaging of the whole heart in a single breath-hold using an undersampled 3 D trajectory for data acquisition in combination with compressed sensing for image reconstruction. Materials and Methods: Measurements were performed using an SSFP sequence on a 3 T whole-body system equipped with a 32-channel body array coil. A 3 D radial stack-of-stars sampling scheme was utilized enabling efficient undersampling of the k-space and thereby accelerating data acquisition. Compressed sensing was applied for the reconstruction of the missing data. A validation study was performed based on a fully sampled dataset acquired by standard Cartesian cine imaging of 2 D slices on a healthy volunteer. The results were investigated with regard to systematic errors and resolution losses possibly introduced by the developed reconstruction. Subsequently, the proposed technique was applied for in-vivo functional cardiac imaging of the whole heart in a single breath-hold of 27 s. The developed technique was tested on three healthy volunteers to examine its reproducibility. Results: By means of the results of the simulation (temporal resolution: 47 ms, spatial resolution: 1.4 x 1.4 x 8 mm, 3 D image matrix: 208 x 208 x 10), an overall acceleration factor of 10 has been found where the compressed sensing reconstructed image series shows only very low systematic errors and a slight in-plane resolution loss of 15 %. The results of the in-vivo study (temporal resolution: 40.5 ms, spatial resolution: 2.1 x 2.1 x 8 mm, 3 D image matrix: 224 x 224 x 12) performed with an acceleration factor of 10.7 confirm the overall good image quality of the presented technique for undersampled acquisitions. Conclusion: The combination of 3 D radial data acquisition and model-based compressed sensing reconstruction allows high acceleration factors enabling cardiac functional imaging of the whole heart within only one breath-hold. The image quality in the

  19. Automated Segmentation of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Nilsson, Jens Chr.; Grønning, Bjørn A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be an accurate and precise technique to assess cardiac volumes and function in a non-invasive manner and is generally considered to be the current gold-standard for cardiac imaging [1]. Measurement of ventricular volumes, muscle mass and function...

  20. Assessment of myocardial changes in athletes with native T1 mapping and cardiac functional evaluation using 3 T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görmeli, Cemile Ayşe; Görmeli, Gökay; Yağmur, Jülide; Özdemir, Zeynep Maraş; Kahraman, Ayşegül Sağır; Çolak, Cemil; Özdemir, Ramazan

    2016-06-01

    Intensive physical exercise leads to increases in left ventricular muscle mass and wall thickness. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging allows the assessment of functional and morphological changes in an athlete's heart. In addition, a native T1 mapping technique has been suggested as a non-contrast method to detect myocardial fibrosis. The aim of this study was to show the correlation between athletes' cardiac modifications and myocardial fibrosis with a native T1 mapping technique. A total of 41 healthy non-athletic control subjects and 46 athletes underwent CMR imaging. After the functional and morphological assessments, native T1 mapping was performed in all subjects using 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging. Most of the CMR findings were significantly higher in athletes who had ≥5 years of sports activity when compared with non-athletic controls and athletes who had <5 years of sports activity. Significantly higher results were shown in native T1 values in athletes who had <5 years of sports activity, but there were no significant differences in the left ventricular end-diastolic volume, left ventricular end-diastolic mass, or interventricular septal wall thickness between non-athletic controls and athletes who had <5 years of sports activity. The native T1 mapping technique has the potential to discriminate myocardial fibrotic changes in athletes when compared to a normal myocardium. The T1 mapping method might be a feasible technique to evaluate athletes because it does not involve contrast, is non-invasive and allows for easy evaluation of myocardial remodeling. PMID:26920720

  1. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI texture analysis for pretreatment prediction of clinical and pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruel, Jose R; Heldahl, Mariann G; Goa, Pål E; Pickles, Martin; Lundgren, Steinar; Bathen, Tone F; Gibbs, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of texture analysis, applied to dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI), to predict the clinical and pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) before NAC is started. Fifty-eight patients with LABC were classified on the basis of their clinical response according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) guidelines after four cycles of NAC, and according to their pathological response after surgery. T1 -weighted DCE-MRI with a temporal resolution of 1 min was acquired on a 3-T Siemens Trio scanner using a dedicated four-channel breast coil before the onset of treatment. Each lesion was segmented semi-automatically using the 2-min post-contrast subtracted image. Sixteen texture features were obtained at each non-subtracted post-contrast time point using a gray level co-occurrence matrix. Appropriate statistical analyses were performed and false discovery rate-based q values were reported to correct for multiple comparisons. Statistically significant results were found at 1-3 min post-contrast for various texture features for the prediction of both the clinical and pathological response. In particular, eight texture features were found to be statistically significant at 2 min post-contrast, the most significant feature yielding an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.77 for response prediction for stable disease versus complete responders after four cycles of NAC. In addition, four texture features were found to be significant at the same time point, with an AUC of 0.69 for response prediction using the most significant feature for classification based on the pathological response. Our results suggest that texture analysis could provide clinicians with additional information to increase the accuracy of prediction of an individual response before NAC is started. PMID:24840393

  2. 前列腺癌MRI诊断技术研究进展%Advances in MRI diagnosis of prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张龙敏; 刘爱连

    2014-01-01

    前列腺癌是世界上第二常见的男性恶性肿瘤,我国前列腺癌的发病率亦呈逐年上升趋势.MRI有着良好的软组织分辨率及多方位成像优势,能较好地显示前列腺的解剖结构及相邻的组织结构,随着MRI技术的不断发展,其对前列腺癌的诊断发挥着越来越重要的作用.该文从前列腺癌MRI常规序列的影像表现着手,对各种功能MRI在前列腺癌的诊断和鉴别诊断中的应用进行了详细地论述,如MR灌注加权成像、MR波谱、MR扩散加权成像、MR扩散张量成像、体素内不相干运动扩散加权成像、MR磁敏感加权成像等,介绍了功能MRI相对于常规扫描的优势及其所能提供的更多的影像学资料,通过系列半定量和定量数据,能进一步提供前列腺癌的血流灌注、水分子扩散、微循环状态、物质代谢及生化成分变化等信息.%Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in the world,and the incidence of prostate cancer in China shows an upward trend.MRI has high soft tissue resolution and mnulti-dimensional imaging advantages,and it can better show the anatomy of the prostate and adjacent tissue structures.With the development of MR technique,it plays a more and more important role in prostate cancer diagnosis.This review starts from the imaging performance of routine MRI sequence of prostate cancer,and a variety of functional MRI applications in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of prostate cancer are described in detail,such as MR perfusion-weighted imaging,MR spectroscopy,MR diffusion-weighted imaging,MR diffusion tensor imaging,intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted imaging,MR susceptibility-weighted imaging.Meanwhile this review introduces that functional MRI has more advantages and can provide more image information than routine MRI sequence.According to a series of semi-quantitative and quantitative data,functional MRI can further provide the blood perfusion of prostate cancer

  3. Postmortem imaging of sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Katarzyna; Grabherr, Silke; Jackowski, Christian; Bollmann, Marc Daniel; Doenz, Franceso; Mangin, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Postmortem imaging is increasingly used in forensic practice in cases of natural deaths related to cardiovascular diseases, which represent the most common causes of death in developed countries. While radiological examination is generally considered to be a good complement for conventional autopsy, it was thought to have limited application in cardiovascular pathology. At present, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), CT angiography, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are used in postmortem radiological investigation of cardiovascular pathologies. This review presents the actual state of postmortem imaging for cardiovascular pathologies in cases of sudden cardiac death (SCD), taking into consideration both the advantages and limitations. The radiological evaluation of ischemic heart disease (IHD), the most frequent cause of SCD in the general population of industrialized countries, includes the examination of the coronary arteries and myocardium. Postmortem CT angiography (PMCTA) is very useful for the detection of stenoses and occlusions of coronary arteries but less so for the identification of ischemic myocardium. MRI is the method of choice for the radiological investigation of the myocardium in clinical practice, but its accessibility and application are still limited in postmortem practice. There are very few reports implicating postmortem radiology in the investigation of other causes of SCD, such as cardiomyopathies, coronary artery abnormalities, and valvular pathologies. Cardiomyopathies representing the most frequent cause of SCD in young athletes cannot be diagnosed by echocardiography, the most widely available technique in clinical practice for the functional evaluation of the heart and the detection of cardiomyopathies. PMCTA and MRI have the potential to detect advanced stages of diseases when morphological substrate is present, but these methods have yet to be sufficiently validated for postmortem cases. Genetically determined

  4. Cellular and Functional Imaging of Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yijen L.; Ye, Qing

    2011-01-01

    Heart transplantation is now an established treatment for patients suffering from end-stage heart diseases. With the advances in immunosuppressive treatment, the survival rate for transplant patients has improved greatly. However, allograft rejection, both acute and chronic, after heart transplantation is still a limitation leading to morbidity and mortality. The current clinical gold standard for screening rejection is endomyocardial biopsy (EMB), which is not only invasive, but also error-prone, due to the limited sample size and the site location of sampling. It would be highly desirable to have reliable and noninvasive alternatives for EMB in monitoring cardiac allograft rejection. The objective of this review is to highlight how cardiovascular imaging can contribute to noninvasively detecting and to evaluating both acute and chronic allograft rejection after heart transplantation, in particular, cardiovascular MRI (CMRI); and how CMRI can assess both immune cell infiltration at the rejecting organ, and the cardiac dysfunctions resulting from allograft rejection. PMID:21359095

  5. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.;

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...... February 23 to 27, 2015. Specifically, we summarise the three days of invited presentations from active researchers in this and associated fields augmented by round table discussions and dialogue boards with specific topics. These include the use of PET/MRI in cardiovascular disease, paediatrics, oncology......, neurology and multi-parametric imaging, the latter of which was suggested as a key promoting factor for the wider adoption of integrated PET/MRI. Discussions throughout the workshop and a poll taken on the final day demonstrated that attendees felt more strongly that PET/MRI has further advanced in both...

  6. Learning distance function for regression-based 4D pulmonary trunk model reconstruction estimated from sparse MRI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitanovski, Dime; Tsymbal, Alexey; Ionasec, Razvan; Georgescu, Bogdan; Zhou, Shaohua K.; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2011-03-01

    Congenital heart defect (CHD) is the most common birth defect and a frequent cause of death for children. Tetralogy of Fallot (ToF) is the most often occurring CHD which affects in particular the pulmonary valve and trunk. Emerging interventional methods enable percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation, which constitute an alternative to open heart surgery. While minimal invasive methods become common practice, imaging and non-invasive assessment tools become crucial components in the clinical setting. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) are techniques with complementary properties and ability to acquire multiple non-invasive and accurate scans required for advance evaluation and therapy planning. In contrary to CT which covers the full 4D information over the cardiac cycle, cMRI often acquires partial information, for example only one 3D scan of the whole heart in the end-diastolic phase and two 2D planes (long and short axes) over the whole cardiac cycle. The data acquired in this way is called sparse cMRI. In this paper, we propose a regression-based approach for the reconstruction of the full 4D pulmonary trunk model from sparse MRI. The reconstruction approach is based on learning a distance function between the sparse MRI which needs to be completed and the 4D CT data with the full information used as the training set. The distance is based on the intrinsic Random Forest similarity which is learnt for the corresponding regression problem of predicting coordinates of unseen mesh points. Extensive experiments performed on 80 cardiac CT and MR sequences demonstrated the average speed of 10 seconds and accuracy of 0.1053mm mean absolute error for the proposed approach. Using the case retrieval workflow and local nearest neighbour regression with the learnt distance function appears to be competitive with respect to "black box" regression with immediate prediction of coordinates, while providing transparency to the

  7. 胶质瘤的MR影像学研究进展%Advances in Research of MRI on the Gliomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖丹玲; 梁碧玲

    2006-01-01

    胶质瘤是颅内最常见的原发性肿瘤.近年来,随着影像学技术的进步,胶质瘤的诊断由既往单纯形态学水平,深入到分子水平.本文介绍MR灌注成像(perfusion weighted imaging,PWI)、磁共振弥散加权成像(diffusion weighted imaging,DWI)与弥散张量成像(diffusion tensor imaging,DTI)、磁共振波谱(magnetic resonance spectroscopy,MRS)、功能磁共振(functional MRI,fMRI)等新技术在胶质瘤诊断上的应用.这些新的进展对于胶质瘤的诊断与鉴别诊断,明确肿瘤级别,疗效监测及判断预后等具有重要意义.

  8. Cardiac imaging: Current and emerging applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankharia B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT scan have made big inroads as modalities used for evaluation of various pathologies of the heart. Cardiac MRI is typically used for perfusion and viability studies as well as to study various cardiomyopathies, valvular diseases and the pericardium. It has been used in the evaluation of congenital heart diseases over the last two decades. Cardiac CT is used mainly for the evaluation of the coronary arteries, typically in the setting of "to rule out coronary artery disease".

  9. Regional Microstructural and Volumetric Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Abnormalities in the Corpus Callosum of Neonates With Congenital Heart Defect Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmann, Cornelia; Singer, Jitka; Latal, Beatrice; Knirsch, Walter; Makki, Malek

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the structural development of the corpus callosum in term neonates with congenital heart defect before and after surgery using diffusion tensor imaging and 3-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We compared parallel and radial diffusions, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy, and volume of 5 substructures of the corpus callosum: genu, rostral body, body, isthmus, and splenium. Compared to healthy controls, we found a significantly lower volume of the splenium and total corpus callosum and a higher radial diffusion and lower fractional anisotropy in the splenium of patients presurgery; a lower volume in all substructures in the postsurgery group; higher radial diffusion in the rostral body, body, and splenium; and a higher apparent diffusion coefficient in the splenium of postsurgery patients. Similar fractional anisotropy changes in congenital heart defect patients were reported in preterm infants. Our findings in apparent diffusion coefficient in the splenium of these patients (pre and postsurgery) are comparable to findings in preterm neonates with psychomotor delay. Delayed maturation of the isthmus was also reported in preterm infants. PMID:26129977

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... types of clips used for brain aneurysms some types of metal coils placed within blood vessels nearly all cardiac defibrillators and pacemakers You ... called MR angiography (MRA) provides detailed images of blood vessels in the ... the opening of certain types of MRI machines. The presence of an implant ...

  11. Blocked-micropores, surface functionalized, bio-compatible and silica-coated iron oxide nanocomposites as advanced MRI contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles have been found promising in several biomedical applications for tagging, imaging, sensing and separation in recent years. In this article, a systematic study of the design and development of surface-modification schemes for silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) via a one-pot, in situ method at room temperature is presented. Silica-coated IONP were prepared in a water-in-oil microemulsion, and subsequently the surface was modified via addition of organosilane reagents to the microemulsion system. The structure and the morphology of the as synthesized nanoparticles have been investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and measurement of N2 adsorption–desorption. Electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images of the nanoparticles showed the highly crystalline nature of the IONP structures. Nitrogen adsorption indicates microporous and blocked-microporous structures for the silica-coated and amine functionalized silica-coated IONP, respectively which could prove less cytotoxicity of the functionalized final product. Besides, the colloidal stability of the final product and the presence of the modified functional groups on top of surface layer have been proven by zeta-potential measurements. Owing to the benefit from the inner IONP core and the hydrophilic silica shell, the as-synthesized nanocomposites were exploited as an MRI contrast enhancement agent. Relaxometric results prove that the surface functionalized IONP have also signal enhancement properties. These surface functionalized nanocomposites are not only potential candidates for highly efficient contrast agents for MRI, but could also be used as ultrasensitive biological-magnetic labels, because they are in nanoscale size, having magnetic properties, blocked-microporous and are well dispersible in biological environment.

  12. Blocked-micropores, surface functionalized, bio-compatible and silica-coated iron oxide nanocomposites as advanced MRI contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darbandi, Masih, E-mail: masih.darbandi@uni-due.de [Vanderbilt University, Department of Physics and Vanderbilt Institute of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (VINSE) (United States); Laurent, Sophie [University of Mons, Department of General, Organic and Biomedical Chemistry NMR and Molecular Imaging Laboratory (Belgium); Busch, Martin [University of Duisburg-Essen, Nanoparticle Process Technology, Faculty of Engineering and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany); Li Zian [University of Duisburg-Essen, Faculty of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany); Yuan Ying; Krueger, Michael [University of Freiburg, Department of Microsystems Engineering and Freiburg Materials Research Centre (Germany); Farle, Michael [University of Duisburg-Essen, Faculty of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany); Winterer, Markus [University of Duisburg-Essen, Nanoparticle Process Technology, Faculty of Engineering and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany); Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N. [University of Mons, Department of General, Organic and Biomedical Chemistry NMR and Molecular Imaging Laboratory (Belgium); Wende, Heiko [University of Duisburg-Essen, Faculty of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles have been found promising in several biomedical applications for tagging, imaging, sensing and separation in recent years. In this article, a systematic study of the design and development of surface-modification schemes for silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) via a one-pot, in situ method at room temperature is presented. Silica-coated IONP were prepared in a water-in-oil microemulsion, and subsequently the surface was modified via addition of organosilane reagents to the microemulsion system. The structure and the morphology of the as synthesized nanoparticles have been investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and measurement of N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption. Electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images of the nanoparticles showed the highly crystalline nature of the IONP structures. Nitrogen adsorption indicates microporous and blocked-microporous structures for the silica-coated and amine functionalized silica-coated IONP, respectively which could prove less cytotoxicity of the functionalized final product. Besides, the colloidal stability of the final product and the presence of the modified functional groups on top of surface layer have been proven by zeta-potential measurements. Owing to the benefit from the inner IONP core and the hydrophilic silica shell, the as-synthesized nanocomposites were exploited as an MRI contrast enhancement agent. Relaxometric results prove that the surface functionalized IONP have also signal enhancement properties. These surface functionalized nanocomposites are not only potential candidates for highly efficient contrast agents for MRI, but could also be used as ultrasensitive biological-magnetic labels, because they are in nanoscale size, having magnetic properties, blocked-microporous and are well dispersible in biological environment.

  13. Unveiling nonischemic cardiomyopathies with cardiac magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Niti R; Peterson, Tyler J; Young, Phillip M; Araoz, Philip A; Glockner, James; Mankad, Sunil V; Williamson, Eric E

    2014-02-01

    Cardiomyopathy is defined as a heterogeneous group of myocardial disorders with mechanical or electrical dysfunction. Identification of the etiology is important for accurate diagnosis, treatment and prognosis, but continues to be challenging. The ability of cardiac MRI to non-invasively obtain 3D-images of unparalleled resolution without radiation exposure and to provide tissue characterization gives it a distinct advantage over any other diagnostic tool used for evaluation of cardiomyopathies. Cardiac MRI can accurately visualize cardiac morphology and function and also help identify myocardial edema, infiltration and fibrosis. It has emerged as an important diagnostic and prognostic tool in tertiary care centers for work up of patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. This review covers the role of cardiac MRI in evaluation of nonischemic cardiomyopathies, particularly in the context of other diagnostic and prognostic imaging modalities. PMID:24417294

  14. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of a patient with an magnetic resonance imaging conditional permanent pacemaker

    OpenAIRE

    Chris B. Pepper; Mohan Sivananthan; Artis, Nigel J.; Hogarth, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used as the optimum modality for cardiac imaging. An aging population and rising numbers of patients with permanent pacemakers means many such individuals may require cardiac MRI scanning in the future. Whilst the presence of a permanent pacemaker is historically regarded as a contra-indication to MRI scanning, pacemaker systems have been developed to limit any associated risks. No reports have been published regarding the use of such d...

  15. Comparison of different cardiac MRI sequences at 1.5T/3.0T with respect to signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios - initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare image quality, signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of different MRI sequences for cardiac imaging at 1.5 T and 3.0 T in volunteers. Material and Methods: 10 volunteers (5 male, 5 female) with a mean age of 33 years (±8) without any history of cardiac diseases were examined on a GE Signa 3.0 T and a GE Signa 1.5 T TwinSpeed Excite (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI, USA) scanner using a 4-element phased array surface coil (same design) on the same day. For tissue characterization ECG gated Fast Spinecho (FSE) T1- (Double IR), T1-STIR (Triple IR) and T2-weighted sequences in transverse orientation were used. For functional analysis a steady state free precession (SSFP-FIESTA) sequence was performed in the 4-chamber, 2-chamber long axis and short axis view. The flip angle used for the SSFP sequence at 3.0 T was reduced from 45 to 30 to keep short TR times while staying within the pre-defined SAR limitations. All other sequence parameters were kept constant. Results: All acquisitions could successfully be completed for the 10 volunteers. The mean SNR 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T was remarkably increased (p2 - (160% SNR increase), the STIR-T1- (123%) and the T1- (91%) weighted FSE. Similar results were found comparing CNR at 3.0 T and 1.5 T. The mean SNR achieved using the SSFP sequences was more than doubled by 3.0 T (150%), but did not have any significant effect on the CNR. The image quality at 3.0 T did not appear to be improved, and was considered to be significantly worse when using SSFP sequences. Artefacts like shading in the area of the right ventricle (RV) were found to be more present at 3.0 T using FSE sequences. After a localized shim had been performed in 5/10 volunteers at the infero-lateral wall of the left ventricle (LV) with the SSFP sequences at 3.0 T no significant increase in artefacts could be detected. (orig.)

  16. Cardiac function, perfusion, metabolism and innervation following autologous stem cell therapy for acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction. A FINCELL-INSIGHT sub-study with PET and MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JuhaW.Koskenvuo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Beneficial mechanisms of bone marrow cell (BMC therapy for acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarct (STEMI are largely unknown in humans. Therefore, we evaluated the feasibility of serial positron emission tomography (PET and MRI studies to provide insight into the effects of BMCs on the healing process of ischemic myocardial damage. Methods: Nineteen patients with successful primary reteplase thrombolysis (mean 2.4 hours after symptoms for STEMI were randomized for BMC therapy (2.9 x 106 CD34+ cells or placebo after bone marrow aspiration in a double-blind, multi-center study. Three days post-MI, coronary angioplasty and paclitaxel eluting stent implantation preceded either BMC or placebo therapy. Cardiac PET and MRI studies were performed 7-12 days after therapies and repeated after six months, and images were analyzed at a central core laboratory. Results: In BMC treated patients, there was a decrease in [11C]-HED defect size (-4.9±4.0% vs. -1.6±2.2%, p=0.08 and an increase in [18F]-FDG uptake in the infarct area at risk (0.06±0.09 vs. -0.05±0.16, p=0.07 compared to controls, as well as less left ventricular dilatation (-4.4±13.3 mL/m2 vs. 8.0±16.7 mL/m2, p=0.12 at six-months follow-up. However, BMC treatment was inferior to placebo in terms of changes in rest perfusion in the area at risk (-0.09±0.17 vs. 0.10±0.17, p=0.03 and infarct size (0.4±4.2 g vs. -5.1±5.9 g, p=0.047, and no effect was observed on ejection fraction (EF (p=0.37. Conclusions: After the acute phase of STEMI, BMC therapy showed only minor trends of long-term benefit in patients with rapid successful thrombolysis. There was a trend of more decrease in innervation defect size and enhanced glucose metabolism in the infarct related myocardium and also a trend of less ventricular dilatation in the BMC treated group compared to placebo. However, no consistently better outcome was observed in the BMC treated group compared to placebo.

  17. Advanced echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance in congenital heart disease : insights in right ventricular mechanics and clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, Anna Elisabeth van der

    2011-01-01

    The thesis provides new insights into advanced echocardiographic and magnetic resonance imaging techniques for comprehensive mechanical assessment of the right ventricle in healthy children and in pediatric patients with right ventricular dysfunction. It is shown that the right ventricle does not co

  18. MRI Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a large magnet and radio waves to look at organs and structures inside your body. Health care professionals use MRI scans to diagnose a variety of conditions, from ...

  19. Advanced echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance in congenital heart disease: insights in right ventricular mechanics and clinical implications

    OpenAIRE

    Hulst, Anna Elisabeth van der

    2011-01-01

    The thesis provides new insights into advanced echocardiographic and magnetic resonance imaging techniques for comprehensive mechanical assessment of the right ventricle in healthy children and in pediatric patients with right ventricular dysfunction. It is shown that the right ventricle does not contract synchronously in the longitudinal direction and that this is related to right ventricular function. Various echocardiographic (Tissue Doppler imaging, Speckle tracking, 3D echocardiography) ...

  20. Burkitt’s Lymphoma Presented as Advanced Ovarian Cancer without Evidence of Lymphadenopathy: CT and MRI Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Lucia Manganaro; Silvia Bernardo; Maria Eleonora Sergi; Paolo Sollazzo; Valeria Vinci; Alessandra De Grazia; Anna Clerico; Maria Giovanna Mollace; Matteo Saldari

    2013-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is a rare non-Hodgkin's lymphoma which can occasionally involve the ovary and may cause confusion for the clinician since its presentation might mimic other much more frequent tumors. We present a case of a 23-year-old woman with sporadic Burkitt’s lymphoma presented as advanced ovarian cancer with bilateral ovarian masses, peritoneal carcinomatosis, ascites, and marked elevation of CA-125. Liver involvement and atypical bone lesions, such as the cranial vault and the ili...

  1. An open-label study to investigate the cardiac safety profile of cabazitaxel in patients with advanced solid tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maison-Blanche, Pierre; Dakhil, Shaker; Baron, Ari;

    2014-01-01

    : Patients with advanced solid tumors were treated with cabazitaxel 25 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks. Digital ECG recordings were obtained during Cycle 1 over 24 h after dosing. The primary end point was effect of cabazitaxel on QT interval corrected by the Fridericia formula (QTcF). Secondary end points were...... additional ECG parameters (QT, PR and QRS intervals, and heart rate), plasma pharmacokinetics of cabazitaxel and overall clinical safety. RESULTS: The pharmacodynamic (ECG) population included 94 patients. In 63 patients with a full 24-h ECG evaluation, the maximum upper bound of 90 % confidence interval (CI......PURPOSE: This study assessed the cardiovascular safety of cabazitaxel, based on thorough evaluation of QT and non-QT variables, and the relationship between pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic electrocardiographic (ECG) profiles and the occurrence of Grade ≥3 cardiovascular adverse events. METHODS...

  2. MRI-detectable polymeric micelles incorporating platinum anticancer drugs enhance survival in an advanced hepatocellular carcinoma model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinh NQ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nguyen Quoc Vinh,1 Shigeyuki Naka,1 Horacio Cabral,2 Hiroyuki Murayama,1 Sachiko Kaida,1 Kazunori Kataoka,2 Shigehiro Morikawa,3 Tohru Tani4 1Department of Surgery, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan; 2Department of Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Nursing, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan; 4Biomedical Innovation Center, Shiga University of Medical Science, Shiga, Japan Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most intractable and lethal cancers; most cases are diagnosed at advanced stages with underlying liver dysfunction and are frequently resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The development of tumor-targeting systems may improve treatment outcomes. Nanomedicine platforms are of particular interest for enhancing chemotherapeutic efficiency, and they include polymeric micelles, which enable targeting of multiple drugs to solid tumors, including imaging and therapeutic agents. This allows concurrent diagnosis, targeting strategy validation, and efficacy assessment. We used polymeric micelles containing the T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent gadolinium-diethylenetriaminpentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA and the parent complex of the anticancer drug oxaliplatin [(1,2-diaminocyclohexaneplatinum(II (DACHPt] for simultaneous imaging and therapy in an orthotopic rat model of HCC. The Gd-DTPA/DACHPt-loaded micelles were injected into the hepatic artery, and magnetic resonance imaging performance and antitumor activity against HCC, as well as adverse drug reactions were assessed. After a single administration, the micelles achieved strong and specific tumor contrast enhancement, induced high levels of tumor apoptosis, and significantly suppressed tumor size and growth. Moreover, the micelles did not induce severe adverse reactions and significantly improved survival outcomes in comparison to oxaliplatin or

  3. Flipping the advanced cardiac life support classroom with team-based learning: comparison of cognitive testing performance for medical students at the University of California, Irvine, United State

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: It aimed to find if written test results improved for advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) taught in flipped classroom/team-based Learning (FC/TBL) vs. lecture-based (LB) control in University of California-Irvine School of Medicine, USA. Methods: Medical students took 2010 ACLS with FC/TBL (2015), compared to 3 classes in LB (2012-14) format. There were 27.5 hours of instruction for FC/TBL model (TBL 10.5, podcasts 9, small-group simulation 8 hours), and 20 (12 lecture, simulation 8 hours) in LB. TBL covered 13 cardiac cases; LB had none. Seven simulation cases and didactic content were the same by lecture (2012-14) or podcast (2015) as was testing: 50 multiple-choice questions (MCQ), 20 rhythm matchings, and 7 fill-in clinical cases. Results: 354 students took the course (259 [73.1%] in LB in 2012-14, and 95 [26.9%] in FC/TBL in 2015). Two of 3 tests (MCQ and fill-in) improved for FC/TBL. Overall, median scores increased from 93.5% (IQR 90.6, 95.4) to 95.1% (92.8, 96.7, P=0.0001). For the fill-in test: 94.1% for LB (89.6, 97.2) to 96.6% for FC/TBL (92.4, 99.20 P=0.0001). For MC: 88% for LB (84, 92) to 90% for FC/TBL (86, 94, P=0.0002). For the rhythm test: median 100% for both formats. More students failed 1 of 3 tests with LB vs. FC/TBL (24.7% vs. 14.7%), and 2 or 3 components (8.1% vs. 3.2%, P=0.006). Conversely, 82.1% passed all 3 with FC/TBL vs. 67.2% with LB (difference 14.9%, 95% CI 4.8-24.0%). Conclusion: A FC/TBL format for ACLS marginally improved written test results. PMID:26893399

  4. Flipping the advanced cardiac life support classroom with team-based learning: comparison of cognitive testing performance for medical students at the University of California, Irvine, United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Boysen-Osborn

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: It aimed to find if written test results improved for advanced cardiac life support (ACLS taught in flipped classroom/team-based Learning (FC/TBL vs. lecture-based (LB control in University of California-Irvine School of Medicine, USA. Methods: Medical students took 2010 ACLS with FC/TBL (2015, compared to 3 classes in LB (2012-14 format. There were 27.5 hours of instruction for FC/TBL model (TBL 10.5, podcasts 9, small-group simulation 8 hours, and 20 (12 lecture, simulation 8 hours in LB. TBL covered 13 cardiac cases; LB had none. Seven simulation cases and didactic content were the same by lecture (2012-14 or podcast (2015 as was testing: 50 multiple-choice questions (MCQ, 20 rhythm matchings, and 7 fill-in clinical cases. Results: 354 students took the course (259 [73.1%] in LB in 2012-14, and 95 [26.9%] in FC/TBL in 2015. Two of 3 tests (MCQ and fill-in improved for FC/TBL. Overall, median scores increased from 93.5% (IQR 90.6, 95.4 to 95.1% (92.8, 96.7, P=0.0001. For the fill-in test: 94.1% for LB (89.6, 97.2 to 96.6% for FC/TBL (92.4, 99.20 P=0.0001. For MC: 88% for LB (84, 92 to 90% for FC/TBL (86, 94, P=0.0002. For the rhythm test: median 100% for both formats. More students failed 1 of 3 tests with LB vs. FC/TBL (24.7% vs. 14.7%, and 2 or 3 components (8.1% vs. 3.2%, P=0.006. Conversely, 82.1% passed all 3 with FC/TBL vs. 67.2% with LB (difference 14.9%, 95% CI 4.8-24.0%. Conclusion: A FC/TBL format for ACLS marginally improved written test results.

  5. 心脏MRI的应用现状与新技术进展%The current status and technical advances in cardiac MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兆琪; 徐磊

    2013-01-01

    在过去的20年间,心脏MRI技术飞速发展.目前心脏MRI能可靠地获得心血管的形态、功能、灌注及心肌活性等综合信息.其对血流动力学、代谢及冠状动脉的研究也逐渐兴起,当前的研究从解剖和功能逐步深入到细胞和分子水平.MRI无电离辐射,具有多方位和多参数成像及可重复性高等优势.已越来越广泛地应用于心血管疾病的诊断、治疗决策和预后评价中.作者就心脏MRI的应用现状及新技术的进展进行简要介绍.

  6. MRI Physics Workshop:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Saedi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge of the basic principle of imaging physics helps better understanding of normal anatomy and pathological imaging findings of the diseases."n"n This is more necessary in advanced imaging techniques like MRI because of the complexity of the basic physics of the technique. In basic MRI physics workshop, we discuss about this technique from the primary concepts. The content is very simplified and is showed by slides, animation and easy pictures for better understanding. In the beginning of the lecture, the structure of atoms and their magnetic characteristics are explained and then step by step, we learn how to use this character to produce signal and usages of it to make an image. Also basic pulse sequence will be explained subsequently. This workshop is recommended for all radiologists, residents of radiology, technologists and anyone who wants to know more about MRI.    

  7. 3 T MRI in paediatrics: Challenges and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3 T MRI is being increasingly performed for clinical purposes in paediatrics, primarily because of the potential to improve spatial and temporal resolution - these can assist in overcoming the unique anatomic, physiologic and behavioural challenges of imaging children. The increased spatial resolution improves the capacity to image small patients; with particular reference to smaller structures such as the inner ear, brachial plexus, biliary system and the vascular system. The challenges inherent to imaging at high field strength remain pertinent especially, the altered T1 contrast, artefacts (susceptibility, chemical shift and B1 inhomogeneity) and safety issues, including specific absorption rate - several of these are circumvented due to software and hardware advances, or by trade off of some of the increased signal. The above mentioned challenges also create opportunities at 3 T, with improvement in MR angiography, arterial spin labelling, functional MRI, susceptibility weighted imaging, and MR spectroscopy - all of which have distinctive applications in paediatrics. Whole body imaging also becomes more practical because of the capacity for faster scans. 3 T MRI has the potential to image all the systems in paediatrics. However, neonatal brain and paediatric spine imaging have specific challenges at 3 T. Several factors also limit cardiac imaging at present. Further improvements in coil technology and newer sequences may help overcome the challenges that remain

  8. 3 T MRI in paediatrics: Challenges and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagia, Charuta [Department of Medical Imaging, Royal Children' s Hospital and Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Flemington Road, Parkville 3052 (Australia); Ditchfield, Michael [Department of Medical Imaging, Royal Children' s Hospital and Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Flemington Road, Parkville 3052 (Australia)], E-mail: michael.ditchfield@rch.org.au

    2008-11-15

    3 T MRI is being increasingly performed for clinical purposes in paediatrics, primarily because of the potential to improve spatial and temporal resolution - these can assist in overcoming the unique anatomic, physiologic and behavioural challenges of imaging children. The increased spatial resolution improves the capacity to image small patients; with particular reference to smaller structures such as the inner ear, brachial plexus, biliary system and the vascular system. The challenges inherent to imaging at high field strength remain pertinent especially, the altered T1 contrast, artefacts (susceptibility, chemical shift and B1 inhomogeneity) and safety issues, including specific absorption rate - several of these are circumvented due to software and hardware advances, or by trade off of some of the increased signal. The above mentioned challenges also create opportunities at 3 T, with improvement in MR angiography, arterial spin labelling, functional MRI, susceptibility weighted imaging, and MR spectroscopy - all of which have distinctive applications in paediatrics. Whole body imaging also becomes more practical because of the capacity for faster scans. 3 T MRI has the potential to image all the systems in paediatrics. However, neonatal brain and paediatric spine imaging have specific challenges at 3 T. Several factors also limit cardiac imaging at present. Further improvements in coil technology and newer sequences may help overcome the challenges that remain.

  9. MRI-Guided Electrophysiology Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry R. Halperin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Catheter ablation is a first-line treatment for many cardiac arrhythmias and is generally performed under X-ray fluoroscopy guidance. However, current techniques for ablating complex arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia are associated with sub-optimal success rates and prolonged radiation exposure. Pre-procedure 3-D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has improved understanding of the anatomic basis of complex arrhythmias and is being used for planning and guidance of ablation procedures. A particular strength of MRI compared to other imaging modalities is the ability to visualize ablation lesions. Post-procedure MRI is now being applied to assess ablation lesion location and permanence with the goal of identifying factors leading to procedure success and failure. In the future, intra-procedure real-time MRI, together with the ability to image complex 3-D arrhythmogenic anatomy and target additional ablation to regions of incomplete lesion formation, may allow for more successful treatment of even complex arrhythmias without exposure to ionizing radiation. Development of clinical grade MRI-compatible electrophysiology devices is required to transition intra-procedure MRI from preclinical studies to more routine use in patients.

  10. Contrast agents for MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrast agents are divided into two categories. The first one is paramagnetic compounds, including lanthanides like gadolinium, which mainly reduce the longitudinal (T1) relaxation property and result in a brighter signal. The second class consists of super-paramagnetic magnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) such as iron oxides, which have a strong effect on the transversal (T2) relaxation properties. SPMNPs have the potential to be utilized as excellent probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For instance, clinically benign iron oxide and engineered ferrite nanoparticles provide a good MRI probing capability for clinical applications. Furthermore, the limited magnetic property and inability to escape from the reticuloendothelial system (RES) of the used nanoparticles impede their further advancement. Therefore, it is necessary to develop the engineered magnetic nanoparticle probes for the next-generation molecular MRI. Considering the importance of MRI in diagnosing diseases, this paper presents an overview of recent scientific achievements in the development of new synthetic SPMNP probes whereby the sensitive and target-specific observation of biological events at the molecular and cellular levels is feasible. - Highlights: • This paper studies the contrast agents for MRI. • Fe―Co alloys and Mn-ferrites exhibit suitable contrast enhancement. • Nonhydrolytic thermal-decomposition synthetic method is suitable to produce MNPs. • This method allows controlling the size, magnetic dopants, magneto-crystalline anisotropy. • The increase in the superparamagnetic size leads to the contrast-enhancement

  11. Use of MRI: Multiple ways to enhance electrophysiology procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smink, J.; Weiss, S.; Wiethoff, A.; Gijsbers, G.

    2011-01-01

    This white paper summarizes the various ways in which MR may improve cardiac electrophysiology procedures of both types, catheter ablation and cardiac resynchronization therapy. The report gives an overview of how applications do or may benefit from pre-, post- and evenintra-operative MRI, focussin

  12. Rejection in the cardiac transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard chest radiography remains the most frequent applied method for monitoring post surgical cardiac transplant patients. Evidence suggests that after the 1st month cardiac enlargement is indeed a useful indicator of rejection, sometimes being caused by pericardial effusion and/or changes in left ventricular mass. Opportunistic infections, either pulmonary lesions or mediastinal abscesses, as well as malignant tumours may all occur and require evaluation or exclusion. Conventional computed transmission tomography is an excellent technique for surveying the entire thorax relatively non-invasively and is recommended whenever pulmonary, cardiac or mediastinal changes are unexplained. Coronary arteriography with or without digital subtraction remains the definitive method for examining the coronary arteries. Left ventricular function can be evaluated with either angiography or other non-invasive methods including such techniques as echocardiography and nuclear medicine. More recently monoclonal antibody labels for antimyosin show promise for identifying rejection. Ultrafast CT scanning is now available in a number of centres. It allows millisecond cross-sectional cine-tomography of the heart as well as of the whole chest, and also provides 3-D quantitative analyses of end-diastolic and systolic function including regional wall thickening dynamics and estimations of myocardial mass. Right, as well as left-sided cardiac chambers, are demonstrated routinely during the same ultrafast CT procedure. MRI, like ultrafast CT, is a new technique still being explored. MRI as well as MR spectroscopy are regarded as diagnostic radiology procedures. (author). 32 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  13. Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced MRI in myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis focuses on one aspect of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for noninvasive screening of ischemic heart disease: the identification and quantification of acutely infarcted myocardium using gadolineum-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced T1-weighted MRI in a clinical and experimental setting. (author). 296 refs.; 34 figs.; 4 tabs

  14. Walking with Gianluca Di Bella during the development of clinical cardiac imaging

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis and management of many cardiac diseases has been established in clinical practice. It provides anatomic and functional information and is the most precise technique for quantification of ventricular volume, function and mass. Among cardiac MRI sequences used in clinical practice, delayed contrast enhancement is an accurate and reliable method used in the diagnosis of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies. In addition, new technolo...

  15. Trends in Cardiac Pacemaker Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswara Sarma Mallela

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future.

  16. Epigenetic regulation in cardiac fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ming; Yu; Yong; Xu

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis represents an adoptive response in the heart exposed to various stress cues. While resolution of the fibrogenic response heralds normalization of heart function, persistent fibrogenesis is usually associated with progressive loss of heart function and eventually heart failure. Cardiac fibrosis is regulated by a myriad of factors that converge on the transcription of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins, a process the epigenetic machinery plays a pivotal role. In this minireview, we summarize recent advances regarding the epigenetic regulation of cardiac fibrosis focusing on the role of histone and DNA modifications and non-coding RNAs.

  17. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attack or other heart problem. You might consider cardiac rehab if you have had: Heart attack Coronary heart disease (CHD) Heart failure Angina (chest pain) Heart or heart valve surgery Heart transplant Procedures such as angioplasty and stenting In some ...

  18. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program to help people who have A heart attack Angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting for coronary heart disease A heart valve repair or replacement A ...

  19. Human atlas of the cardiac fiber architecture: study on a healthy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombaert, Herve; Peyrat, Jean-Marc; Croisille, Pierre; Rapacchi, Stanislas; Fanton, Laurent; Cheriet, Farida; Clarysse, Patrick; Magnin, Isabelle; Delingette, Hervé; Ayache, Nicholas

    2012-07-01

    Cardiac fibers, as well as their local arrangement in laminar sheets, have a complex spatial variation of their orientation that has an important role in mechanical and electrical cardiac functions. In this paper, a statistical atlas of this cardiac fiber architecture is built for the first time using human datasets. This atlas provides an average description of the human cardiac fiber architecture along with its variability within the population. In this study, the population is composed of ten healthy human hearts whose cardiac fiber architecture is imaged ex vivo with DT-MRI acquisitions. The atlas construction is based on a computational framework that minimizes user interactions and combines most recent advances in image analysis: graph cuts for segmentation, symmetric log-domain diffeomorphic demons for registration, and log-Euclidean metric for diffusion tensor processing and statistical analysis. Results show that the helix angle of the average fiber orientation is highly correlated to the transmural depth and ranges from -41° on the epicardium to +66° on the endocardium. Moreover, we find that the fiber orientation dispersion across the population (±13°) is lower than for the laminar sheets (±31°) . This study, based on human hearts, extends previous studies on other mammals with concurring conclusions and provides a description of the cardiac fiber architecture more specific to human and better suited for clinical applications. Indeed, this statistical atlas can help to improve the computational models used for radio-frequency ablation, cardiac resynchronization therapy, surgical ventricular restoration, or diagnosis and followups of heart diseases due to fiber architecture anomalies. PMID:22481815

  20. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Costello BT; Nadel J.; Taylor AJ

    2016-01-01

    Benedict T Costello,1,2 James Nadel,3 Andrew J Taylor,1,21Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Alfred Hospital, 2Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, 3School of Medicine, University of Notre Dame, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Cardiac sarcoidosis is a rare but life-threatening condition, requiring a high degree of clinical suspicion and low threshold for investigation to make the diagnosis. The cardiac manifestations include heart failure, conducting syst...

  1. MRI EVALUATION OF SUPRATENTORIAL TUMOURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumours represents 1.7% of all cancers and contributes 1.8% of all cancer deaths. Of all the brain tumours 80% are supratentorial.1 Magnetic Resonance Imaging is an important modality, having higher sensitivity for detecting intracranial pathology. Multiplanar imaging is possible with MRI which helps in detection, localization and characterization of the lesion. The MRI examination has helped in early diagnosis, accurate localization of the tumour with prompt initiation of appropriate medical or surgical therapy. Recent advances like Magnetic Resonance (MR spectroscopy, MR fluoroscopy with stereotactic guided biopsy have revolutionized the role of MRI in study of intracranial tumours.

  2. Abdominal MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidney and ureter Insulinoma Islet of Langerhans tumor Medullary cystic disease Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I Multiple endocrine neoplasia ( ... kidney and ureter Insulinoma Kidney stones Lymphofollicular ... kidney disease MRI Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I Multiple endocrine ...

  3. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  4. [MRI in coma survivors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshibanda, L; Vanhaudenhuyse, A; Bruno, M A; Boly, M; Soddu, A; Laureys, S; Moonen, G

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic and non-traumatic brain injured disorders of consciousness patients are still challenging for diagnosis, prognosis, ethical and socio-economic reasons. Currently, there remains a high rate of misdiagnosis of the vegetative state (Schnakers, et al. 2009). Recent advances in MRI techniques (diffusion tensor, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and functional imaging) provide data that could improve the diagnostic and prognostic evaluation and management of these patients. PMID:20085015

  5. Accelerating Dynamic Cardiac MR Imaging Using Structured Sparse Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nian Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressed sensing (CS has produced promising results on dynamic cardiac MR imaging by exploiting the sparsity in image series. In this paper, we propose a new method to improve the CS reconstruction for dynamic cardiac MRI based on the theory of structured sparse representation. The proposed method user the PCA subdictionaries for adaptive sparse representation and suppresses the sparse coding noise to obtain good reconstructions. An accelerated iterative shrinkage algorithm is used to solve the optimization problem and achieve a fast convergence rate. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method improves the reconstruction quality of dynamic cardiac cine MRI over the state-of-the-art CS method.

  6. MRI Detects Myocardial Iron in the Human Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Ghugre, Nilesh R; Enriquez, Cathleen M.; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Nelson, Marvin D.; Coates, Thomas D.; Wood, John C.

    2006-01-01

    Iron-induced cardiac dysfunction is a leading cause of death in transfusion-dependent anemia. MRI relaxation rates R2(1/T2) and R2∗(1∕T2∗) accurately predict liver iron concentration, but their ability to predict cardiac iron has been challenged by some investigators. Studies in animal models support similar R2 and R2∗ behavior with heart and liver iron, but human studies are lacking. To determine the relationship between MRI relaxivities and cardiac iron, regional variations in R2 and R2∗ we...

  7. MRI-conditional pacemakers: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira AM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available António M Ferreira,1,2 Francisco Costa,2 António Tralhão,2 Hugo Marques,3 Nuno Cardim,1 Pedro Adragão1,2 1Cardiology Department, Hospital da Luz, 2Cardiology Department, Hospital Santa Cruz- CHLO, 3Radiology Department, Hospital da Luz, Lisbon, Portugal Abstract: Use of both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and pacing devices has undergone remarkable growth in recent years, and it is estimated that the majority of patients with pacemakers will need an MRI during their lifetime. These investigations will generally be denied due to the potentially dangerous interactions between cardiac devices and the magnetic fields and radiofrequency energy used in MRI. Despite the increasing reports of uneventful scanning in selected patients with conventional pacemakers under close surveillance, MRI is still contraindicated in those circumstances and cannot be considered a routine procedure. These limitations prompted a series of modifications in generator and lead engineering, designed to minimize interactions that could compromise device function and patient safety. The resulting MRI-conditional pacemakers were first introduced in 2008 and the clinical experience gathered so far supports their safety in the MRI environment if certain conditions are fulfilled. With this technology, new questions and controversies arise regarding patient selection, clinical impact, and cost-effectiveness. In this review, we discuss the potential risks of MRI in patients with electronic cardiac devices and present updated information regarding the features of MRI-conditional pacemakers and the clinical experience with currently available models. Finally, we provide some guidance on how to scan patients who have these devices and discuss future directions in the field. Keywords: pacemakers, magnetic resonance imaging, MRI, MRI-conditional devices, safety

  8. Integration of DCE-MRI and DW-MRI Quantitative Parameters for Breast Lesion Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Fusco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of an imaging protocol combining dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI in patients with suspicious breast lesions. Materials and Methods. A total of 31 breast lesions (15 malignant and 16 benign proved by histological examination in 26 female patients were included in this study. For both DCE-MRI and DW-MRI model free and model based parameters were computed pixel by pixel on manually segmented ROIs. Statistical procedures included conventional linear analysis and more advanced techniques for classification of lesions in benign and malignant. Results. Our findings indicated no strong correlation between DCE-MRI and DW-MRI parameters. Results of classification analysis show that combining of DCE parameters or DW-MRI parameter, in comparison of single feature, does not yield a dramatic improvement of sensitivity and specificity of the two techniques alone. The best performance was obtained considering a full combination of all features. Moreover, the classification results combining all features are dominated by DCE-MRI features alone. Conclusion. The combination of DWI and DCE-MRI does not show a potential to dramatically increase the sensitivity and specificity of breast MRI. DCE-MRI alone gave the same performance as in combination with DW-MRI.

  9. Cardiac Stem Cells: Biology and Clinical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Goichberg, Polina; Chang, Jerway; Liao, Ronglih; Leri, Annarosa

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Heart disease is the primary cause of death in the industrialized world. Cardiac failure is dictated by an uncompensated reduction in the number of viable and fully functional cardiomyocytes. While current pharmacological therapies alleviate the symptoms associated with cardiac deterioration, heart transplantation remains the only therapy for advanced heart failure. Therefore, there is a pressing need for novel therapeutic modalities. Cell-based therapies involving cardiac stem ...

  10. Hepato-cardiac disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yasser; Mahrous; Fouad; Reem; Yehia

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mutual relationship between the liver and the heart is important for both hepatologists and cardiologists. Hepato-cardiac diseases can be classified into heart diseases affecting the liver, liver diseases affecting the heart, and conditions affecting the heart and the liver at the same time. Differential diagnoses of liver injury are extremely important in a cardiologist’s clinical practice calling for collaboration between cardiologists and hepatologists due to the many other diseases that can affect the liver and mimic haemodynamic injury. Acute and chronic heart failure may lead to acute ischemic hepatitis or chronic congestive hepatopathy. Treatment in these cases should be directed to the primary heart disease. In patients with advanced liver disease, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy may develop including hemodynamic changes, diastolic and systolic dysfunctions, reduced cardiac performance and electrophysiological abnormalities. Cardiac evaluation is important for patients with liver diseases especially before and after liver transplantation. Liver transplantation may lead to the improvement of all cardiac changes and the reversal of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. There are systemic diseases that may affect both the liver and the heart concomitantly including congenital, metabolic and inflammatory diseases as well as alcoholism. This review highlights these hepatocardiac diseases

  11. Mapping cardiac fiber orientations from high-resolution DTI to high-frequency 3D ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xulei; Wang, Silun; Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wagner, Mary B.; Fei, Baowei

    2014-03-01

    The orientation of cardiac fibers affects the anatomical, mechanical, and electrophysiological properties of the heart. Although echocardiography is the most common imaging modality in clinical cardiac examination, it can only provide the cardiac geometry or motion information without cardiac fiber orientations. If the patient's cardiac fiber orientations can be mapped to his/her echocardiography images in clinical examinations, it may provide quantitative measures for diagnosis, personalized modeling, and image-guided cardiac therapies. Therefore, this project addresses the feasibility of mapping personalized cardiac fiber orientations to three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound image volumes. First, the geometry of the heart extracted from the MRI is translated to 3D ultrasound by rigid and deformable registration. Deformation fields between both geometries from MRI and ultrasound are obtained after registration. Three different deformable registration methods were utilized for the MRI-ultrasound registration. Finally, the cardiac fiber orientations imaged by DTI are mapped to ultrasound volumes based on the extracted deformation fields. Moreover, this study also demonstrated the ability to simulate electricity activations during the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) process. The proposed method has been validated in two rat hearts and three canine hearts. After MRI/ultrasound image registration, the Dice similarity scores were more than 90% and the corresponding target errors were less than 0.25 mm. This proposed approach can provide cardiac fiber orientations to ultrasound images and can have a variety of potential applications in cardiac imaging.

  12. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  13. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resonance Imaging (MRI) What is an MRI? MRI stands for Magnetic Resonance Imaging. It is an important ... MRI is often used for diagnosis or for monitoring disease. For example, if someone is having severe ...

  15. MRI Safety during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z MRI Safety During Pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) Illness ... during the exam? Contrast material MRI during pregnancy Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) If you are pregnant and your doctor ...

  16. Portable MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  17. Portable MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-29

    This project proposes to: (1) provide the power of MRI to situations where it presently isn't available; (2) perform the engineering required to move from lab to a functional prototype; and (3) leverage significant existing infrastructure and capability in ultra-low field MRI. The reasons for doing this: (1) MRI is the most powerful tool for imaging soft-tissue (e.g. brain); (2) Billions don't have access due to cost or safety issues; (3) metal will heat/move in high magnetic fields; (4) Millions of cases of traumatic brain injury in US alone; (5) even more of non-traumatic brain injury; (6) (e.g. stroke, infection, chemical exposure); (7) Need for early diagnostic; (8) 'Signature' wound of recent conflicts; (9) 22% of injuries; (10) Implications for post-traumatic stress disorder; and (11) chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  18. Cardiac CT angiography in children with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siripornpitak, Suvipaporn, E-mail: ssiripornpitak@yahoo.com [Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Pornkul, Ratanaporn [Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Khowsathit, Pongsak [Pediatric Cardiac Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Layangool, Thanarat; Promphan, Worakan [Pediatric Cardiology Unit, Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health, Bangkok (Thailand); Pongpanich, Boonchob [Pediatric Cardiac Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Cardiac imaging plays an important role in both congenital and acquired heart diseases. Cardiac computed tomography (angiography) cCT(A) is a non-invasive, increasingly popular, complementary modality to echocardiography in evaluation of congenital heart diseases (CHD) in children. Despite radiation exposure, cCT(A) is now commonly used for evaluation of the complex CHD, giving information of both intra-cardiac and extra-cardiac anatomy, coronary arteries, and vascular structures. This review article will focus on the fundamentals and essentials for performing cCT(A) in children, including radiation dose awareness, basic techniques, and strengths and weaknesses of cCT(A) compared with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI), and applications. The limitations of this modality will also be discussed, including the CHD for which cMRI may be substituted.

  19. Cardiac CT angiography in children with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac imaging plays an important role in both congenital and acquired heart diseases. Cardiac computed tomography (angiography) cCT(A) is a non-invasive, increasingly popular, complementary modality to echocardiography in evaluation of congenital heart diseases (CHD) in children. Despite radiation exposure, cCT(A) is now commonly used for evaluation of the complex CHD, giving information of both intra-cardiac and extra-cardiac anatomy, coronary arteries, and vascular structures. This review article will focus on the fundamentals and essentials for performing cCT(A) in children, including radiation dose awareness, basic techniques, and strengths and weaknesses of cCT(A) compared with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI), and applications. The limitations of this modality will also be discussed, including the CHD for which cMRI may be substituted

  20. Feasibility of Detecting Pulmonary Embolism Using Noncontrast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of detecting pulmonary emboli utilizing noncontrast magnetic resonance imaging techniques in patients with known pulmonary embolism. Materials and Methods. Eleven patients were enrolled in a study to evaluate right ventricular function by cardiac MRI in patients diagnosed with acute pulmonary embolism on CT pulmonary angiogram. Cardiac MRI was performed as soon as possible following pulmonary embolism detection. Two independent observers reviewed the precontrast portion of each MRI, scoring right, left, and lobar arteries as positive or negative for PE. The CTs were reviewed and interpreted in the same manner. Results. MRI was obtained on average of 40 hours after the CT. Forty-eight vessels were affected by PE on CT, 69% of which were identified on MRI. All eight pulmonary emboli located in the right or left pulmonary arteries were detected on MRI. Of the 15 pulmonary emboli that were not detected on MRI, 7 were subsegmental, 6 were segmental, and 2 were located in a branch not included in the MRI field of view. Conclusions. Most pulmonary emboli detected on CT were identified on noncontrast MRI, even though our MRI protocol was not optimized for pulmonary artery visualization

  1. Fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  2. Fetal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C. [University Hospital of Vienna (Austria). Division of Neuroradiology

    2004-07-01

    New, ultrafast sequences have made it possible to obtain MR images of the fetus without maternal sedation or immobilization of the fetus itself. While fetal MRI began as an adjunct to ultrasound, it has now been shown that MRI can provide additional information that may change prognosis, the management of pregnancy, or the treatment of the newborn child. It is of particular value in the assessment of malformations of the central nervous system. The steady development and adaptation of MR-sequences to the needs of fetal imaging has led to new indications that can support prognostic and therapeutic decisions. (orig.)

  3. Quantitative Myocardial Perfusion with Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Imaging in MRI and CT: Theoretical Models and Current Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Pelgrim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and computed tomography (CT, including higher spatial and temporal resolution, have made the prospect of performing absolute myocardial perfusion quantification possible, previously only achievable with positron emission tomography (PET. This could facilitate integration of myocardial perfusion biomarkers into the current workup for coronary artery disease (CAD, as MRI and CT systems are more widely available than PET scanners. Cardiac PET scanning remains expensive and is restricted by the requirement of a nearby cyclotron. Clinical evidence is needed to demonstrate that MRI and CT have similar accuracy for myocardial perfusion quantification as PET. However, lack of standardization of acquisition protocols and tracer kinetic model selection complicates comparison between different studies and modalities. The aim of this overview is to provide insight into the different tracer kinetic models for quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis and to address typical implementation issues in MRI and CT. We compare different models based on their theoretical derivations and present the respective consequences for MRI and CT acquisition parameters, highlighting the interplay between tracer kinetic modeling and acquisition settings.

  4. MRI of plants and foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van As, Henk; van Duynhoven, John

    2013-04-01

    The importance and prospects for MRI as applied to intact plants and to foods are presented in view of one of humanity's most pressing concerns, the sustainable and healthy feeding of a worldwide increasing population. Intact plants and foods have in common that their functionality is determined by complex multiple length scale architectures. Intact plants have an additional level of complexity since they are living systems which critically depend on transport and signalling processes between and within tissues and organs. The combination of recent cutting-edge technical advances and integration of MRI accessible parameters has the perspective to contribute to breakthroughs in understanding complex regulatory plant performance mechanisms. In food science and technology MRI allows for quantitative multi-length scale structural assessment of food systems, non-invasive monitoring of heat and mass transport during shelf-life and processing, and for a unique view on food properties under shear. These MRI applications are powerful enablers of rationally (re)designed food formulations and processes. Limitations and bottlenecks of the present plant and food MRI methods are mainly related to short T2 values and susceptibility artefacts originating from small air spaces in tissues/materials. We envisage cross-fertilisation of solutions to overcome these hurdles in MRI applications in plants and foods. For both application areas we witness a development where MRI is moving from highly specialised equipment to mobile and downscaled versions to be used by a broad user base in the field, greenhouse, food laboratory or factory. PMID:23369439

  5. State of the Art in Cardiac Hybrid Technology: PET/MR

    OpenAIRE

    Nappi, Carmela; El Fakhri, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous PET/MRI is an emerging technique combining two powerful imaging modalities in a single device. The wide variety of available tracers for perfusion and metabolic studies and the high sensitivity of positron emission tomography (PET) combined with the high spatial resolution and soft tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in depicting cardiac morphology and function as well as MRI's absence of ionizing radiation makes PET/MRI very attractive to radiologists and clinici...

  6. Cardiac arrest in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tress Erika

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners.

  7. Cardiac arrest in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tress, Erika E; Kochanek, Patrick M; Saladino, Richard A; Manole, Mioara D

    2010-07-01

    Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners. PMID:20930971

  8. Cardiac Pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A complete survey of physiological biophysical,clinical and engineering aspects of cardiac facing,including the history and an assessment of possible future developments.Among the topics studied are: pacemakers, energy search, heart stimulating with pacemakers ,mathematical aspects of the electric cardio stimulation chronic, pacemaker implants,proceeding,treatment and control

  9. Prognostic value of cardiovascular MRI in diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite an increased cardiovascular risk in patients with diabetes mellitus they are a heterogeneous population with very different individual manifestation of diseases; therefore, a profound stratification is recommended. Clinical examinations and blood biomarkers are typically used in diabetic patients to determine the risk for developing cardio-cerebrovascular events. Cardiac as well as whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including cardiovascular sequences are established methods for clinical diagnostics. Their significance in predicting the outcome and the corresponding risk stratification for patients with diabetes is becoming increasingly more important based on recent study results. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) in cardiac MRI detects silent myocardial ischemia in up to 30 % of diabetic patients, which is associated with a hazard ratio of 3-6 for cardiovascular events. Regional left ventricular wall motion abnormalities and decreased ejection fraction also have a prognostic value in diabetics. Based on whole-body MRI, the vessel score as well as carotid artery stenosis have been evaluated as additional predictors for cardio-cerebrovascular events. The MRI-based predictors have independent and incremental prognostic value beyond traditional risk stratification for cardio-cerebrovascular events; however, only the comprehensive assessment of whole-body MRI including angiography allows the identification of patients who remain free of cardio-cerebrovascular events over a period of 6 years. Cardiac MRI, particularly the detection of LGE, can be recommended for risk stratification of patients with diabetes mellitus. The clinical relevance of the added prognostic value of whole-body MRI needs to be clarified in further studies. (orig.)

  10. Sodium MRI in human heart: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottomley, Paul A

    2016-02-01

    This paper offers a critical review of the properties, methods and potential clinical application of sodium ((23)Na) MRI in human heart. Because the tissue sodium concentration (TSC) in heart is about ~40 µmol/g wet weight, and the (23)Na gyromagnetic ratio and sensitivity are respectively about one-quarter and one-11th of that of hydrogen ((1)H), the signal-to-noise ratio of (23)Na MRI in the heart is about one-6000th of that of conventional cardiac (1)H MRI. In addition, as a quadrupolar nucleus, (23)Na exhibits ultra-short and multi-component relaxation behavior (T1 ~ 30 ms; T2 ~ 0.5-4 ms and 12-20 ms), which requires fast, specialized, ultra-short echo-time MRI sequences, especially for quantifying TSC. Cardiac (23)Na MRI studies from 1.5 to 7 T measure a volume-weighted sum of intra- and extra-cellular components present at cytosolic concentrations of 10-15 mM and 135-150 mM in healthy tissue, respectively, at a spatial resolution of about 0.1-1 ml in 10 min or so. Currently, intra- and extra-cellular sodium cannot be unambiguously resolved without the use of potentially toxic shift reagents. Nevertheless, increases in TSC attributable to an influx of intra-cellular sodium and/or increased extra-cellular volume have been demonstrated in human myocardial infarction consistent with prior animal studies, and arguably might also be seen in future studies of ischemia and cardiomyopathies--especially those involving defects in sodium transport. While technical implementation remains a hurdle, a central question for clinical use is whether cardiac (23)Na MRI can deliver useful information unobtainable by other more convenient methods, including (1)H MRI. PMID:25683054

  11. SU-E-P-10: Imaging in the Cardiac Catheterization Lab - Technologies and Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterly, K [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease in the cardiac catheterization laboratory is often aided by a multitude of imaging technologies. The purpose of this work is to highlight the contributions to patient care offered by the various imaging systems used during cardiovascular interventional procedures. Methods: Imaging technologies used in the cardiac catheterization lab were characterized by their fundamental technology and by the clinical applications for which they are used. Whether the modality is external to the patient, intravascular, or intracavity was specified. Specific clinical procedures for which multiple modalities are routinely used will be highlighted. Results: X-ray imaging modalities include fluoroscopy/angiography and angiography CT. Ultrasound imaging is performed with external, trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE), and intravascular (IVUS) transducers. Intravascular infrared optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is used to assess vessel endothelium. Relatively large (>0.5 mm) anatomical structures are imaged with x-ray and ultrasound. IVUS and IVOCT provide high resolution images of vessel walls. Cardiac CT and MRI images are used to plan complex cardiovascular interventions. Advanced applications are used to spatially and temporally merge images from different technologies. Diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease frequently utilizes angiography and intra-vascular imaging, and treatment of complex structural heart conditions routinely includes use of multiple imaging modalities. Conclusion: There are several imaging modalities which are routinely used in the cardiac catheterization laboratory to diagnose and treat both coronary artery and structural heart disease. Multiple modalities are frequently used to enhance the quality and safety of procedures. The cardiac catheterization laboratory includes many opportunities for medical physicists to contribute substantially toward advancing patient care.

  12. SU-E-P-10: Imaging in the Cardiac Catheterization Lab - Technologies and Clinical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular disease in the cardiac catheterization laboratory is often aided by a multitude of imaging technologies. The purpose of this work is to highlight the contributions to patient care offered by the various imaging systems used during cardiovascular interventional procedures. Methods: Imaging technologies used in the cardiac catheterization lab were characterized by their fundamental technology and by the clinical applications for which they are used. Whether the modality is external to the patient, intravascular, or intracavity was specified. Specific clinical procedures for which multiple modalities are routinely used will be highlighted. Results: X-ray imaging modalities include fluoroscopy/angiography and angiography CT. Ultrasound imaging is performed with external, trans-esophageal echocardiography (TEE), and intravascular (IVUS) transducers. Intravascular infrared optical coherence tomography (IVOCT) is used to assess vessel endothelium. Relatively large (>0.5 mm) anatomical structures are imaged with x-ray and ultrasound. IVUS and IVOCT provide high resolution images of vessel walls. Cardiac CT and MRI images are used to plan complex cardiovascular interventions. Advanced applications are used to spatially and temporally merge images from different technologies. Diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease frequently utilizes angiography and intra-vascular imaging, and treatment of complex structural heart conditions routinely includes use of multiple imaging modalities. Conclusion: There are several imaging modalities which are routinely used in the cardiac catheterization laboratory to diagnose and treat both coronary artery and structural heart disease. Multiple modalities are frequently used to enhance the quality and safety of procedures. The cardiac catheterization laboratory includes many opportunities for medical physicists to contribute substantially toward advancing patient care

  13. MRI zoo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Christoffer

    The basic idea was to use MRI to produce a sequence of 3D gray scale image slices of various animals, subsequentlyimaged with a clinical CT system. For this purpose, these animals were used: toad, lungfish, python snake and a horseshoe crab. Each animal was sacrificed according to standard proced...

  14. Fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasonography is the method of choice for prenatal malformation screening, but it does not always provide sufficient information for correct diagnosis or adequate abnormality evaluation. Fetal MRI is increasingly being used to complete sonographic findings. It was initially used for evaluation of cerebral abnormalities but is increasingly being applied to other fetal areas. In vivo investigation of fetal brain maturation has been enhanced by MRI. An adequate analysis of fetal chest and abdomen can be achieved with fast T2-, T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). The advantages include the great field of view and the excellent soft tissue contrast. This allows correct diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia and evaluation of the consequences on pulmonary growth. Other pulmonary malformations, such as cystic adenomatoid malformation, sequestration and brochogenic cysts, can also be easily identified. Renal position can be quickly determined using DWI sequences and renal agenesia can be easily diagnosed with only one sequence. Prenatal MRI is virtually as effective as postnatal examination, dispenses with transport of a potentially very ill newborn, and provides logistic advantages. Therefore, prenatal MRI is useful for adequate postnatal treatment of newborns with malformations. (orig.)

  15. Contribution of MRI in lung cancer staging

    OpenAIRE

    A. Khalil; Bouhela, T; Carette, MF

    2013-01-01

    Major advances in the WB-MRI in the initial evaluation and follow-up of patients with lung cancer have been performed in recent years. Multicentric studies using different magnet systems are necessary to confirm these promising results.

  16. Response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteeg, Henneke; Schiffer, Angélique A; Widdershoven, Jos W; Meine, Mathias M; Doevendans, Pieter A; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a promising treatment for a subgroup of patients with advanced congestive heart failure and a prolonged QRS interval. Despite the majority of patients benefiting from CRT, 10-40% of patients do not respond to this treatment and are labeled as nonresponders...

  17. Molecular therapies for cardiac arrhythmias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.J. Boink

    2013-01-01

    Despite the ongoing advances in pharmacology, devices and surgical approaches to treat heart rhythm disturbances, arrhythmias are still a significant cause of death and morbidity. With the introduction of gene and cell therapy, new avenues have arrived for the local modulation of cardiac disease. Th

  18. Evaluation of apical subtype of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebed, Kalie Y; Al Adham, Raed I; Bishu, Kalkidan; Askew, J Wells; Klarich, Kyle W; Araoz, Philip A; Foley, Thomas A; Glockner, James F; Nishimura, Rick A; Anavekar, Nandan S

    2014-09-01

    Apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is an uncommon variant of HC. We sought to characterize cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings among apical HC patients. This was a retrospective review of consecutive patients with a diagnosis of apical HC who underwent cardiac MRI examinations at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) from August 1999 to October 2011. Clinical and demographic data at the time of cardiac MRI study were abstracted. Cardiac MRI study and 2-dimensional echocardiograms performed within 6 months of the cardiac MRI were reviewed; 96 patients with apical HC underwent cardiac MRI examinations. LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 130.7 ± 39.1 ml and 44.2 ± 20.9 ml, respectively. Maximum LV thickness was 19 ± 5 mm. Hypertrophy extended beyond the apex into other segments in 57 (59.4%) patients. Obstructive physiology was seen in 12 (12.5%) and was more common in the mixed apical phenotype than the pure apical (19.3 vs 2.6%, p = 0.02). Apical pouches were noted in 39 (40.6%) patients. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was present in 70 (74.5%) patients. LGE was associated with severe symptoms and increased maximal LV wall thickness. In conclusion, cardiac MRI is well suited for studying the apical form of HC because of difficulty imaging the cardiac apex with standard echocardiography. Cardiac MRI is uniquely suited to delineate the presence or absence of an apical pouch and abnormal myocardial LGE that may have implications in the natural history of apical HM. In particular, the presence of abnormal LGE is associated with clinical symptoms and increased wall thickness. PMID:25037678

  19. Cardiac rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chlumský, Jaromír; Holá, Dana; Hlaváček, Karel; Michal, Michal; Švec, Alexander; Špatenka, Jaroslav; Dušek, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac sarcoma is a very rare neoplasm and is difficult to diagnose. The case of a 51-year-old man with a left atrial tumour, locally recurrent three months after its surgical removal, is presented. Computed tomography showed metastatic spread to the lung parenchyma. On revised histology, the mass extirpated was a sarcoma. Because of the metastatic spread, further therapy was symptomatic only; the patient died 15 months after the first manifestation of his problems. Immunohistochemical stain...

  20. MRI of the pulmonary parenchyma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaging of the pulmonary parenchyma represents a unique challenge for MRI. Limited signal is caused by low proton density, susceptibility artifacts, and physiological motion (cardiac pulsation, respiration). Recently, further improvements in MRI techniques have widened the potential for investigations of pulmonary parenchymal disease. These include very short echo times, ultrafast turbo-spin-echo acquisitions, projection reconstruction technique, breathhold imaging, ECG triggering, contrast agents (perfusion imaging, aerosols), sodium imaging, hyperpolarized noble gas imaging, and oxygen enhancement. By using widely available techniques, MRI is helpful in the assessment of (a) acute alveolitic processes in chronic infiltrative lung disease, (b) detection and characterization of pulmonary nodules, (c) detection, characterization, and follow-up of pneumonia, (d) differentiation of obstructive atelectasis from non-obstructive atelectasis and infarctions, and (e) measurements of lung water content. Chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, and emphysema are not readily assessable by routine MRI techniques. More sophisticated techniques are under investigation for MR imaging of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. They represent the beginning of functional MR imaging of the lung which will be established in the future. (orig.)

  1. MRI of the pulmonary parenchyma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauczor, H.U.; Kreitner, K.F. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie

    1999-07-01

    Imaging of the pulmonary parenchyma represents a unique challenge for MRI. Limited signal is caused by low proton density, susceptibility artifacts, and physiological motion (cardiac pulsation, respiration). Recently, further improvements in MRI techniques have widened the potential for investigations of pulmonary parenchymal disease. These include very short echo times, ultrafast turbo-spin-echo acquisitions, projection reconstruction technique, breathhold imaging, ECG triggering, contrast agents (perfusion imaging, aerosols), sodium imaging, hyperpolarized noble gas imaging, and oxygen enhancement. By using widely available techniques, MRI is helpful in the assessment of (a) acute alveolitic processes in chronic infiltrative lung disease, (b) detection and characterization of pulmonary nodules, (c) detection, characterization, and follow-up of pneumonia, (d) differentiation of obstructive atelectasis from non-obstructive atelectasis and infarctions, and (e) measurements of lung water content. Chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, and emphysema are not readily assessable by routine MRI techniques. More sophisticated techniques are under investigation for MR imaging of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. They represent the beginning of functional MR imaging of the lung which will be established in the future. (orig.)

  2. Spinal cord motion. Influence of respiration and cardiac cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winklhofer, S. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Schoth, F. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Stolzmann, P. [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Krings, T. [Toronto Western Hospital, ON (Canada). Div. of Neuroradiology; Mull, M.; Wiesmann, M. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Stracke, C.P. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Alfried-Krupp-Hospital, Essen (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology

    2014-11-15

    To assess physiological spinal cord motion during the cardiac cycle compared with the influence of respiration based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Anterior-posterior spinal cord motion within the spinal canal was assessed in 16 healthy volunteers (median age, 25 years) by cardiac-triggered and cardiac-gated gradient echo pulse sequence MRI. Image acquisition was performed during breath-holding, normal breathing, and forced breathing. Normal spinal cord motion values were computed using descriptive statistics. Breathing-dependent differences were assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and compared with the cardiac-based cord motion. A normal value table was set up for the spinal cord motion of each vertebral cervico-thoracic-lumbar segment. Significant differences in cord motion were found between cardiac-based motion while breath-holding and the two breathing modalities (P < 0.01 each). Spinal cord motion was found to be highest during forced breathing, with a maximum in the lower cervical spinal segments (C5; mean, 2.1 mm ± 1.17). Image acquisition during breath-holding revealed the lowest motion. MRI permits the demonstration and evaluation of cardiac and respiration-dependent spinal cord motion within the spinal canal from the cervical to lumbar segments. Breathing conditions have a considerably greater impact than cardiac activity on spinal cord motion.

  3. Spinal cord motion. Influence of respiration and cardiac cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess physiological spinal cord motion during the cardiac cycle compared with the influence of respiration based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Anterior-posterior spinal cord motion within the spinal canal was assessed in 16 healthy volunteers (median age, 25 years) by cardiac-triggered and cardiac-gated gradient echo pulse sequence MRI. Image acquisition was performed during breath-holding, normal breathing, and forced breathing. Normal spinal cord motion values were computed using descriptive statistics. Breathing-dependent differences were assessed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and compared with the cardiac-based cord motion. A normal value table was set up for the spinal cord motion of each vertebral cervico-thoracic-lumbar segment. Significant differences in cord motion were found between cardiac-based motion while breath-holding and the two breathing modalities (P < 0.01 each). Spinal cord motion was found to be highest during forced breathing, with a maximum in the lower cervical spinal segments (C5; mean, 2.1 mm ± 1.17). Image acquisition during breath-holding revealed the lowest motion. MRI permits the demonstration and evaluation of cardiac and respiration-dependent spinal cord motion within the spinal canal from the cervical to lumbar segments. Breathing conditions have a considerably greater impact than cardiac activity on spinal cord motion.

  4. Battlefield MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging is the best method for non-invasive imaging of soft tissue anatomy, saving countless lives each year. It is regarded as the gold standard for diagnosis of mild to moderate traumatic brain injuries. Furthermore, conventional MRI relies on very high, fixed strength magnetic fields (> 1.5 T) with parts-per-million homogeneity, which requires very large and expensive magnets.

  5. The combination of FDG PET and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI improves the prediction of disease-free survival in patients with advanced breast cancer after the first cycle of neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of FDG PET/CT and MRI in predicting disease-free survival (DFS) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and surgery in patients with advanced breast cancer. The analysis included 54 women with advanced breast cancer. All patients received three cycles of NAC, underwent curative surgery, and then received three cycles of additional chemotherapy. Before and after the first cycle of NAC, all patients underwent sequential PET/CT and MRI. All patients were analysed using a diverse range of parameters. including maximal standardized uptake value (SUV), percent change in SUV (ΔSUV), initial slope of the enhancement curve (MRslope), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), tumour size, change in MRslope (ΔMRslope), change in ADC (ΔADC), change in tumour size (Δsize) and other clinicopathological parameters. The relationships between covariates and DFS after surgery were analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method and the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. Time-dependent receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the optimal cut-off values of imaging parameters for DFS. Of the 54 patients, 13 (24 %) experienced recurrence at a median follow-up of 38 months (range 25 - 45 months). Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that a lesser decline in SUV, a lesser decline in MRslope, a lesser increase in ADC, and ER negativity were significantly associated with a poorer DFS (P = 0.0006, ΔSUV threshold -41 %; P = 0.0016, ΔMRslope threshold -6 %; P = 0.011, ΔADC threshold 11 %; and P = 0.0086, ER status, respectively). Patients with a combination of ΔSUV >-41 % and ΔMRslope >-6 % showed a significantly higher recurrence rate (77.8 %) than the remaining of patients (13.3 %, P < 0.0001). Functional parameters of both FDG PET and MRI after the first cycle of NAC are useful for predicting DFS in patients with advanced breast cancer. This approach could lead to an improvement in patient care because

  6. The combination of FDG PET and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI improves the prediction of disease-free survival in patients with advanced breast cancer after the first cycle of neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Ilhan; Kim, Byung II; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, 75 Nowongil, Nowon Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Molecular Imaging Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Woo Chul; Kim, Hyun-Ah; Kim, Eun-Kyu [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Department of Surgery, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jihyun; Byun, Byung Hyun [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, 75 Nowongil, Nowon Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Ae; Kim, Kyeong Min [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Molecular Imaging Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ko Woon [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Department of Radiology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS), Department of Pathology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); You, Eun Young [Gachon University School of Medicine and Science, Department of Radiology, Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of FDG PET/CT and MRI in predicting disease-free survival (DFS) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and surgery in patients with advanced breast cancer. The analysis included 54 women with advanced breast cancer. All patients received three cycles of NAC, underwent curative surgery, and then received three cycles of additional chemotherapy. Before and after the first cycle of NAC, all patients underwent sequential PET/CT and MRI. All patients were analysed using a diverse range of parameters. including maximal standardized uptake value (SUV), percent change in SUV (ΔSUV), initial slope of the enhancement curve (MRslope), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), tumour size, change in MRslope (ΔMRslope), change in ADC (ΔADC), change in tumour size (Δsize) and other clinicopathological parameters. The relationships between covariates and DFS after surgery were analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method and the multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. Time-dependent receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the optimal cut-off values of imaging parameters for DFS. Of the 54 patients, 13 (24 %) experienced recurrence at a median follow-up of 38 months (range 25 - 45 months). Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that a lesser decline in SUV, a lesser decline in MRslope, a lesser increase in ADC, and ER negativity were significantly associated with a poorer DFS (P = 0.0006, ΔSUV threshold -41 %; P = 0.0016, ΔMRslope threshold -6 %; P = 0.011, ΔADC threshold 11 %; and P = 0.0086, ER status, respectively). Patients with a combination of ΔSUV >-41 % and ΔMRslope >-6 % showed a significantly higher recurrence rate (77.8 %) than the remaining of patients (13.3 %, P < 0.0001). Functional parameters of both FDG PET and MRI after the first cycle of NAC are useful for predicting DFS in patients with advanced breast cancer. This approach could lead to an improvement in patient care because

  7. Evaluation of cardiac tumors with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, Antonio [Clinica Las Nieves, MR Unit, Jaen (Spain); Ribes, Ramon [Reina Sofia Hospital, MR Unit, Radiology Department, Cordoba (Spain); Caro, Pilar [MR Unit, Dadisa, Cadiz (Spain); Vida, Jose [San Juan De Dios Hospital, MR Unit, Resalta, Cordoba (Spain); Erasmus, Jeremy J. [University of Texas, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Primary cardiac neoplasms are rare, and are more commonly benign than malignant. However, metastases are by far the most common cardiac neoplasms. MRI allows evaluation of myocardial infiltration, pericardial involvement and/or extracardiac extension. MRI overcomes the usual limitations of echocardiography and assesses more accurately changes in cardiac function. Specific tumoral characterization is only possible in cases of myxoma, lipoma, fibroma and hemangioma. Suggestive features of malignancy are right side location, extracardiac extension, inhomogeneity in signal intensity of the tumor and pericardial effusion. The use of intravenous contrast material improves tumor characterization and depiction of tumor borders. MRI also allows differentiation of tumor from other nontumoral masses such as intracavitary tumors or fibromuscular elements of the posterior wall of the right atrium. (orig.)

  8. Postmortem cardiac imaging in fetuses and children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Andrew M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Cardiorespiratory Division, Level 7, Old Nurses Home, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, London (United Kingdom); Arthurs, Owen J. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, London (United Kingdom); Sebire, Neil J. [UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, London (United Kingdom); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Histopathology, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Fetal and pediatric cardiac autopsies have a crucial role in the counseling of parents with regard to both the cause of death of their child and the implications of such findings for future pregnancies, as well as for quality assurance of antenatal screening programs and antemortem diagnostic procedures. Postmortem imaging allows an opportunity to investigate the heart in situ prior to dissection, and both postmortem CT and postmortem MRI have shown excellent accuracy in detecting the majority of clinically significant cardiac lesions in the perinatal and pediatric population. As less-invasive autopsy becomes increasingly popular, clinical guidelines for maximal diagnostic yield in specific circumstances can be developed. (orig.)

  9. Postmortem cardiac imaging in fetuses and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetal and pediatric cardiac autopsies have a crucial role in the counseling of parents with regard to both the cause of death of their child and the implications of such findings for future pregnancies, as well as for quality assurance of antenatal screening programs and antemortem diagnostic procedures. Postmortem imaging allows an opportunity to investigate the heart in situ prior to dissection, and both postmortem CT and postmortem MRI have shown excellent accuracy in detecting the majority of clinically significant cardiac lesions in the perinatal and pediatric population. As less-invasive autopsy becomes increasingly popular, clinical guidelines for maximal diagnostic yield in specific circumstances can be developed. (orig.)

  10. A new stress test device for cardiac nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique has been developed to exercise human subjects during acquisition of MRI and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy data in order to determine the effects of increased cardiac work on myocardial function and metabolism. (author). 6 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Cardiac conduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cardiac conduction system is a group of specialized cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals ... to contract. The main components of the cardiac conduction system are the SA node, AV node, bundle ...

  12. Prenatal MRI diagnosis of fetal cerebral tuberous sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuberous sclerosis (TS) is an autosomal dominant phakomatosis. A high percentage of spontaneous mutations leads to the diagnosis of new cases in normal families. This diagnosis is suspected at antenatal ultrasound on the discovery of multiple cardiac tumors. Antenatal cerebral ultrasound shows a normal appearance in affected fetuses. Eight fetuses with multiple cardia tumors were studied with antenatal MRI with, in five cases, an abnormal appearance showing hyperintense subependymal and cortical nodules on T1-weighted images. Among the three remaining patients MRI was non-contributive in one due to movement artefact, one had abnormal postnatal MRI consistent with TS and one had a normal postnatal and clinical examination. We conclude that MRI is a valuable tool in making the diagnosis of TS in fetuses with multiple cardiac tumors. (orig.)

  13. Prenatal MRI diagnosis of fetal cerebral tuberous sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonigo, P. [Dept. of Pediatric Imaging, Hopital des Enfants-Malades, Paris (France); Elmaleh, A. [Dept. of Pediatric Imaging, Hopital des Enfants-Malades, Paris (France); Fermont, L. [Pediatric Cardiology Dept., Inst. de Puericulture, Paris (France); Delezoide, A.L. [Fetal Pathology Dept., Hopital des Enfants-Malades, Paris (France); Mirlesse, V. [Fetal Medicine Unit, Inst. de Puericulture, Paris (France); Brunelle, F. [Dept. of Pediatric Imaging, Hopital des Enfants-Malades, Paris (France)

    1996-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TS) is an autosomal dominant phakomatosis. A high percentage of spontaneous mutations leads to the diagnosis of new cases in normal families. This diagnosis is suspected at antenatal ultrasound on the discovery of multiple cardiac tumors. Antenatal cerebral ultrasound shows a normal appearance in affected fetuses. Eight fetuses with multiple cardia tumors were studied with antenatal MRI with, in five cases, an abnormal appearance showing hyperintense subependymal and cortical nodules on T1-weighted images. Among the three remaining patients MRI was non-contributive in one due to movement artefact, one had abnormal postnatal MRI consistent with TS and one had a normal postnatal and clinical examination. We conclude that MRI is a valuable tool in making the diagnosis of TS in fetuses with multiple cardiac tumors. (orig.)

  14. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... 8 MB) Also available in Other Language versions . Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for making ...

  15. What Is Chest MRI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Chest MRI? Chest MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a safe, noninvasive test. "Noninvasive" means that ... your chest wall, heart, and blood vessels. Chest MRI uses radio waves, magnets, and a computer to ...

  16. Knee MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI - knee ... radiologist see certain areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ... less anxious. Your provider may suggest an "open" MRI, in which the machine is not as close ...

  17. Recent Advances in Nuclear Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Woo

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear cardiology is one of the major fields of nuclear medicine practice. Myocardial perfusion studies using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have played a crucial role in the management of coronary artery diseases. Positron emission tomography (PET) has also been considered an important tool for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion. However, the recent development of computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies and growing concerns about the radiation exposure of patients remain serious challenges for nuclear cardiology. In response to these challenges, remarkable achievements and improvements are currently in progress in the field of myocardial perfusion imaging regarding the applicable software and hardware. Additionally, myocardial perfusion positron emission tomography (PET) is receiving increasing attention owing to its unique capability of absolute myocardial blood flow estimation. An F-18-labeled perfusion agent for PET is under clinical trial with promising interim results. The applications of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and F-18 sodium fluoride (NaF) to cardiovascular diseases have revealed details on the basic pathophysiology of ischemic heart diseases. PET/MRI seems to be particularly promising for nuclear cardiology in the future. Restrictive diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis, are effectively evaluated using a variety of nuclear imaging tools. Considering these advances, the current challenges of nuclear cardiology will become opportunities if more collaborative efforts are devoted to this exciting field of nuclear medicine. PMID:27540423

  18. Contemporary Breast Radiotherapy and Cardiac Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboa, Debra Nana; Evans, Suzanne Buckley

    2016-01-01

    Long-term cardiac effects are an important component of survivorship after breast radiotherapy. The pathophysiology of cardiotoxicity, history of breast radiotherapy, current methods of cardiac avoidance, modern outcomes, context of historical outcomes, quantifying cardiac effects, and future directions are reviewed in this article. Radiation-induced oxidative stress induces proinflammatory cytokines and is a process that potentiates late effects of fibrosis and intimal proliferation in endothelial vasculature. Breast radiation therapy has changed substantially in recent decades. Several modern technologies exist to improve cardiac avoidance such as deep inspiration breath hold, gating, accelerated partial breast irradiation, and use of modern 3-dimensional planning. Modern outcomes may vary notably from historical long-term cardiac outcomes given the differences in cardiac dose with modern techniques. Methods of quantifying radiation-related cardiotoxicity that correlate with future cardiac risks are needed with current data exploring techniques such as measuring computed tomography coronary artery calcium score, single-photon emission computed tomography imaging, and biomarkers. Placing historical data, dosimetric correlations, and relative cardiac risk in context are key when weighing the benefits of radiotherapy in breast cancer control and survival. Estimating present day cardiac risk in the modern treatment era includes challenges in length of follow-up and the use of confounding cardiotoxic agents such as evolving systemic chemotherapy and targeted therapies. Future directions in both multidisciplinary management and advancing technology in radiation oncology may provide further improvements in patient risk reduction and breast cancer survivorship. PMID:26617212

  19. Mechanical Regulation of Cardiac Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HuseyinCagatayYalcin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical forces are an essential contributor to and unavoidable component of cardiac formation, both inducing and orchestrating local and global molecular and cellular changes. Experimental animal studies have contributed substantially to understanding the mechanobiology of heart development. More recent integration of high-resolution imaging modalities with computational modeling has greatly improved our quantitative understanding of hemodynamic flow in heart development. Merging these latest experimental technologies with molecular and genetic signaling analysis will accelerate our understanding of the relationships integrating mechanical and biological signaling for proper cardiac formation. These advances will likely be essential for clinically translatable guidance for targeted interventions to rescue malforming hearts and/or reconfigure malformed circulations for optimal performance. This review summarizes our current understanding on the levels of mechanical signaling in the heart and their roles in orchestrating cardiac development.

  20. Diffusion MRI Simulation with the Virtual Imaging Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lihui; Camarasu-Pop, Sorina; Tristan, Glatard; Zhu, Yue-Min; Magnin, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Myocardial fiber architecture plays an important role in ensuring normal mechanical and electrical properties of the heart.However, due to limitations of existing imaging techniques, little is known about the fiber structure of in vivo human heart.Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) is one of the most potential techniques for mapping in-vivo cardiac fiberarchitecture. However, in the absence of the ground truth information and with influence of MRI scanner noise and artifacts, itis di...

  1. MRI for the evaluation of pectus excavatum

    OpenAIRE

    Marcovici, Peter A.; LoSasso, Barry E.; Kruk, Peter; Dwek, Jerry R.

    2011-01-01

    Pectus excavatum, the most common congenital deformity of the anterior chest wall, is both a cosmetic and functional abnormality. The degree of abnormal chest wall deformity determines its functional effect, particularly its cardiac and pulmonary impact. Although CT scanning is the most widely used cross-sectional imaging technique used to measure the Haller index, the radiation exposure is reason to seek other alternatives. At our institution, we have introduced a rapid MRI technique for thi...

  2. Value of MRI in predicting sudden cardiac death in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy%MRI预测缺血性心肌病患者并发心源性猝死的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林长坚; 金奇; 吴立群

    2011-01-01

    @@ 冠心病是心源性猝死(sudden cardiac death,SCD)者最常见的病因,所占百分率可达80%[1].由冠心病导致心肌瘢痕形成的缺血性心肌病患者,其SCD发生率明显升高[2-3].射血分数降低是此类患者发生SCD的重要预测因子,但该指标仍缺乏较高的特异度及灵敏度[4].目前,SCD的预测主要围绕心肌电不稳定机制展开,包括T波电交替、心率振荡和心率变异性等[5].但对于缺血性心肌病患者产生心肌电不稳定的病理基质,如心肌瘢痕、瘢痕边缘区的检测,同样能提供有效的预测价值.近年来迅速发展的心脏磁共振(cardiac magnetic resonance,CMR)技术具有很高的组织分辨率和无创性等优点,可显示缺血性心肌病患者的心肌瘢痕及瘢痕边缘区,有助于SCD的危险分层及预测.

  3. [Advanced resuscitation of adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, F.K.; Lauritsen, T.L.; Torp-Pedersen, C.

    2008-01-01

    International and European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines for Resuscitation 2005 implicate major changes in resuscitation, including new universal treatment algorithms. This brief summary of Guidelines 2005 for advanced resuscitation of adult cardiac arrest victims is based upon the ERC...

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of congenital cardiac abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging will not replace echocardiography as the simplest and most definitive method of establishing a noninvasive diagnosis in young patients with congenital cardiac malformations, nor will it replace radionuclide angiography for relatively noninvasive detection and quantitation of cardiac shunts. Magnetic resonance imaging is a complementary noninvasive imaging procedure that can answer some questions left in doubt by echocardiography (mainly extracardiac artery and vein assessments) or radionuclide angiography and used as a preferred follow-up imaging method in certain clinical circumstances. In addition, MRI can be a first-line modality for cardiovascular imaging in older patients in whom adequate echo windows are not available. Angiocardiography remains necessary to provide vital physiological data, i.e., chamber pressures, shunt volumes, oxygen saturations, and pulmonary vascular resistance; however, MRI could negate some follow-up catheterizations in appropriate clinical circumstances. High-resolution proton MRI tomography should ultimately permit the accurate evaluation of ventricular volumes, myocardial mass, and the assessment of regional wall motion and ejection fractions. Paramagnetic substances such as manganese ion may ultimately provide a basis for myocardial perfusion imaging. The potential for MRI evaluation of tissue characterization, noninvasive blood-flow measurements, and myocardial metabolism assessment in intriguing and awaits clinical evaluation

  5. MANAGEMENT OF ALLOSENSITIZED CARDIAC TRANSPLANT CANDIDATES

    OpenAIRE

    Velez, Mauricio; Johnson, Maryl R.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac transplantation remains the best treatment in advanced heart failure patients with a high risk of death. However, an inadequate supply of donor hearts decreases the likelihood of transplantation for many patients. Ventricular assist devices (VAD) are being increasingly used as a bridge to transplant in patients who may not survive long enough to receive a heart. This expansion in VAD use has been associated with increasing rates of allosensitization in cardiac transplant candidates. A...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) KidsHealth > For Teens > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Print A A A Text Size What's ... Exam Safety Getting Your Results What Is MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a type of safe, painless testing ...

  7. Comparative Aspects of Cardiac Adaptation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    New York : Springer, 2013 - (Ošťádal, B.; Dhalla, N.), s. 3-18 ISBN 978-1-4614-5202-7. - (Advances in Biochemistry in Health and Disease) R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/1308 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cardiac adaptation * poikilotherms * homeotherms Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  8. Understanding the physiology of complex congenital heart disease using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complex congenital heart diseases are often associated with complex alterations in hemodynamics. Understanding these key hemodynamic changes is critical to making management decisions including surgery and postoperative management. Existing tools for imaging and hemodynamic assessment like echocardiography, computed tomography and cardiac catheterization have inherent limitations. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as a powerful bouquet of tools that allow not only excellent imaging, but also a unique insight into hemodynamics. This article introduces the reader to cardiac MRI and its utility through the clinical example of a child with a complex congenital cyanotic heart disease

  9. Diffusion MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  10. Non cardiopatic and cardiopatic beta thalassaemic patients: quantitative and qualitative cardiac iron deposition evaluation with MRI; Pazienti {beta} talassemici non cardiopatici e cardiopatici: valutazione quantitativa e qualitativa del deposito di ferro cardiaco con RM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macarini, Luca; Marini, Stefania; Scardapane, Arnaldo [Bari Univ., Bari (Italy). DIMIMP-Sezione di Diagnostica per Immagini; Pietrapertosa, Anna [Bari Univ., Bari (Italy). MIDIM-Cattedra di Ematologia II; Ettore, Giovanni Carlo [Foggia Univ., Foggia (Italy). Cattedra di Radiologia

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: Cardiomyopathy is one of the major complications of {beta} thalassaemia major as a result of transfusion iron overload. The aim of our study is to evaluate with MR if there is any difference of iron deposition signal intensity (SI) or distribution between non-cardiopatic and cardiopatic thalassaemic patients in order to establish if there is a relationship between cardiopathy and iron deposition. Materials and methods: We studied 20 patients affected by {beta} thalassaemia major, of whom 10 cardiopatic and 10 non-cardiopatic, and 10 healthy volunteers as control group. Serum ferritin and left ventricular ejection fraction were calculated in thalassaemic patients. All patients were examinated using a 1.5 MR unit with ECG-gated GE cine-MR T2*-weighted, SE T1-weighted and GE T2*-weighted sequences. In all cases, using an adequate ROI, the myocardial and skeletal muscle signal intensity (SI), the myocardial/skeletal muscle signal intensity radio (SIR) and the SI average of the myocardium and skeletal muscle were calculated for every study group. The qualitative evaluation of iron deposition distribution was independently performed by three radiologists who analysed the extension, the site and the morphology of iron deposition on the MR images and reported their observations on the basis of a four-level rating scale: 0 (absent), 1 (limited), 2 (partial), 3 (widespread deposition). The results of quantitative and qualitative evaluation were analysed with statistical tests. Results: Cardiac iron deposition was found in 8/10 non-cardiopatic thalassaemic patients and in all cardiopatic thalassaemic patients. We noticed a significant SI difference (p>0.05) between the healthy volunteer control group and the thalassaemic patients with iron deposition, but no significant SI difference in iron deposition between non-cardiopatic thalassaemic patients in the areas evaluated. The qualitative evaluation revealed a different distribution of iron deposition between the two

  11. Cardiac arrest: resuscitation and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Kaustubha D; Halperin, Henry R; Becker, Lance B

    2015-06-01

    The modern treatment of cardiac arrest is an increasingly complex medical procedure with a rapidly changing array of therapeutic approaches designed to restore life to victims of sudden death. The 2 primary goals of providing artificial circulation and defibrillation to halt ventricular fibrillation remain of paramount importance for saving lives. They have undergone significant improvements in technology and dissemination into the community subsequent to their establishment 60 years ago. The evolution of artificial circulation includes efforts to optimize manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation, external mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation devices designed to augment circulation, and may soon advance further into the rapid deployment of specially designed internal emergency cardiopulmonary bypass devices. The development of defibrillation technologies has progressed from bulky internal defibrillators paddles applied directly to the heart, to manually controlled external defibrillators, to automatic external defibrillators that can now be obtained over-the-counter for widespread use in the community or home. But the modern treatment of cardiac arrest now involves more than merely providing circulation and defibrillation. As suggested by a 3-phase model of treatment, newer approaches targeting patients who have had a more prolonged cardiac arrest include treatment of the metabolic phase of cardiac arrest with therapeutic hypothermia, agents to treat or prevent reperfusion injury, new strategies specifically focused on pulseless electric activity, which is the presenting rhythm in at least one third of cardiac arrests, and aggressive post resuscitation care. There are discoveries at the cellular and molecular level about ischemia and reperfusion pathobiology that may be translated into future new therapies. On the near horizon is the combination of advanced cardiopulmonary bypass plus a cocktail of multiple agents targeted at restoration of normal metabolism and

  12. Temperature Management After Cardiac Arrest: An Advisory Statement by the Advanced Life Support Task Force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee and the Council on Cardiopulmonary, Critical Care, Perioperative and Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnino, Michael W; Andersen, Lars W; Berg, Katherine M; Reynolds, Joshua C; Nolan, Jerry P; Morley, Peter T; Lang, Eddy; Cocchi, Michael N; Xanthos, Theodoros; Callaway, Clifton W; Soar, Jasmeet

    2016-01-01

    For more than a decade, mild induced hypothermia (32 °C-34 °C) has been standard of care for patients remaining comatose after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm, and this has been extrapolated to survivors of cardiac arrest with initially nonshockable rhythms and to patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest. Two randomized trials published in 2002 reported a survival and neurological benefit with mild induced hypothermia. One recent randomized trial reported similar outcomes in patients treated with targeted temperature management at either 33 °C or 36 °C. In response to these new data, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation Advanced Life Support Task Force performed a systematic review to evaluate 3 key questions: (1) Should mild induced hypothermia (or some form of targeted temperature management) be used in comatose post-cardiac arrest patients? (2) If used, what is the ideal timing of the intervention? (3) If used, what is the ideal duration of the intervention? The task force used Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology to assess and summarize the evidence and to provide a consensus on science statement and treatment recommendations. The task force recommends targeted temperature management for adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with an initial shockable rhythm at a constant temperature between 32 °C and 36 °C for at least 24 hours. Similar suggestions are made for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with a nonshockable rhythm and in-hospital cardiac arrest. The task force recommends against prehospital cooling with rapid infusion of large volumes of cold intravenous fluid. Additional and specific recommendations are provided in the document. PMID:26449873

  13. Cardiac perception and cardiac control. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, D

    1977-12-01

    The evidence regarding specific cardiac perception and discrimination, and its relationship to voluntary cardiac control, is critically reviewed. Studies are considered in three sections, depending on the method used to assess cardiac perception: questionnaire assessment, discrimination procedures, and heartbeat tracking. The heartbeat tracking procedure would appear to suffer least from interpretative difficulties. Recommendations are made regarding the style of analysis used to assess heartbeat perception in such tracking tasks. PMID:348240

  14. Evaluation of cardiac structures and function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To assess the capability of magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)in evaluating the cardiac structures and function in the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy(HCM).Methods:Fourteen healthy volunteers and eighteen cases with HCM verified by history,clinical presentation,electrocardiogram and echocardiography(ECG)were performed with MRI.The myocardial thickness of interventricular septum at the basal segment and that of posterolateral free wall of the left ventricle(LV)were measured.Some indexes for evaluating cardiac function were measured using ARGUS auto-quantitative program.Resuits:The myocardial thickness of septum at the basal segment had significant difference between the HCM patients and the healthy volunteers.There was no significant difference between MRI and ECG in examining end-diastolic volume,ejection fraction of the LV.Conclusion:MRI can fully provide more information on the abnormalities of cardiac anatomy and function;thus,it is of great value in clinical application.

  15. Neuromuscular blockade in cardiac surgery: An update for clinicians

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmerling Thomas; Russo Gianluca; Bracco David

    2008-01-01

    There have been great advancements in cardiac surgery over the last two decades; the widespread use of off-pump aortocoronary bypass surgery, minimally invasive cardiac surgery, and robotic surgery have also changed the face of cardiac anaesthesia. The concept of "Fast-track anaesthesia" demands the use of nondepolarising neuromuscular blocking drugs with short duration of action, combining the ability to provide (if necessary) sufficiently profound neuromuscular blockade during surgery and i...

  16. Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery: Transapical Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive cardiac surgery is less traumatic and therefore leads to quicker recovery. With the assistance of engineering technologies on devices, imaging, and robotics, in conjunction with surgical technique, minimally invasive cardiac surgery will improve clinical outcomes and expand the cohort of patients that can be treated. We used transapical aortic valve implantation as an example to demonstrate that minimally invasive cardiac surgery can be implemented with the integration of surgical techniques and engineering technologies. Feasibility studies and long-term evaluation results prove that transapical aortic valve implantation under MRI guidance is feasible and practical. We are investigating an MRI compatible robotic surgical system to further assist the surgeon to precisely deliver aortic valve prostheses via a transapical approach. Ex vivo experimentation results indicate that a robotic system can also be employed in in vivo models.

  17. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  18. Cardiac MRI in children and adolescents who have undergone surgical repair of right-sided congenital heart disease. Automated left ventricular volumes and function analysis and effects of different manual adjustments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rompel, O.; Janka, R.; May, M.S.; Lell, M.M.; Uder, M.; Hammon, M. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Gloeckler, M.; Dittrich, S. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Pediatric Cardiology; Cesnjevar, R. [University Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    2015-12-15

    To evaluate automated segmentation and the effects of different manual adjustments regarding left ventricular parameter quantification in cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) data on children and adolescents who have undergone surgical repair of right-sided congenital heart disease (CHD). Dedicated software (syngo.via, Siemens AG) was used to automatically segment and/or manually adjust the end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV), myocardial mass (MM) and ejection fraction (EF) before/after manual apex/base adjustment (ADJ-step 1) and after manual apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment (ADJ-step 2; reference standard). MR data of 40 patients (13.1 ± 3.1y, 4-17y) with repaired CHD with decreased pulmonary blood flow (CHD-DPBF) were evaluated. Intra- and inter-rater reliability was determined for 10 randomly selected patients. The software correctly detected the left ventricle in 38/40 (95 %) patients. EDV after automated segmentation: 119.1 ± 44.0ml; after ADJ-step 1: 115.8 ± 39.5 ml; after ADJ-step 2: 116.2 ± 39.4 ml. The corresponding results for ESV were 52.0 ± 18.5/49.6 ± 16.9/49.7 ± 16.4 ml; for SV 67.1 ± 28.5/66.2 ± 25.4/66.5 ± 25.5 ml; for EF 55.5 ± 7.3/56.7 ± 6.6/56.7 ± 6.3%; for MM 83.7 ± 35.9/76.2 ± 28.3/74.6 ± 27.2 g. Significant differences were found for ESV/MM/EF comparing the automated segmentation results with these after ADJ-step 1 and ADJ-step 2. No significant differences were found when comparing all results of ADJ-step 1 and ADJ-step 2 or when comparing EDV/SV results. Intra- and inter-rater reliability was excellent. The mean time effort was 63.4 ± 6.9 s for the automated segmentation, 74.2 ± 8.9 s for ADJ-step 1 and 269.5 ± 39.4 s for ADJ-step 2. Automated left ventricular volumes and function analysis in children and adolescents with surgically treated CHD proved to be feasible with excellent intra- and inter-rater reliability. Automated segmentation with manual apex/base adjustment provided

  19. Cardiac MRI in children and adolescents who have undergone surgical repair of right-sided congenital heart disease. Automated left ventricular volumes and function analysis and effects of different manual adjustments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate automated segmentation and the effects of different manual adjustments regarding left ventricular parameter quantification in cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) data on children and adolescents who have undergone surgical repair of right-sided congenital heart disease (CHD). Dedicated software (syngo.via, Siemens AG) was used to automatically segment and/or manually adjust the end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), stroke volume (SV), myocardial mass (MM) and ejection fraction (EF) before/after manual apex/base adjustment (ADJ-step 1) and after manual apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment (ADJ-step 2; reference standard). MR data of 40 patients (13.1 ± 3.1y, 4-17y) with repaired CHD with decreased pulmonary blood flow (CHD-DPBF) were evaluated. Intra- and inter-rater reliability was determined for 10 randomly selected patients. The software correctly detected the left ventricle in 38/40 (95 %) patients. EDV after automated segmentation: 119.1 ± 44.0ml; after ADJ-step 1: 115.8 ± 39.5 ml; after ADJ-step 2: 116.2 ± 39.4 ml. The corresponding results for ESV were 52.0 ± 18.5/49.6 ± 16.9/49.7 ± 16.4 ml; for SV 67.1 ± 28.5/66.2 ± 25.4/66.5 ± 25.5 ml; for EF 55.5 ± 7.3/56.7 ± 6.6/56.7 ± 6.3%; for MM 83.7 ± 35.9/76.2 ± 28.3/74.6 ± 27.2 g. Significant differences were found for ESV/MM/EF comparing the automated segmentation results with these after ADJ-step 1 and ADJ-step 2. No significant differences were found when comparing all results of ADJ-step 1 and ADJ-step 2 or when comparing EDV/SV results. Intra- and inter-rater reliability was excellent. The mean time effort was 63.4 ± 6.9 s for the automated segmentation, 74.2 ± 8.9 s for ADJ-step 1 and 269.5 ± 39.4 s for ADJ-step 2. Automated left ventricular volumes and function analysis in children and adolescents with surgically treated CHD proved to be feasible with excellent intra- and inter-rater reliability. Automated segmentation with manual apex/base adjustment provided

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Safety What is MRI and how does ... What is MRI and how does it work? Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a way of obtaining very ...

  1. Technological Solutions for Cardiac Surgery in the Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Rony-Reuven Nir; Gil Bolotin

    2013-01-01

    The current review addresses contemporary technological advances in cardiac surgery performed on octogenarian patients, namely off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), proximal anastomosis device, routine use of intraoperative epiaortic ultrasound, proximal anastomosis without clamping, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), and brain protection during cardiac surgery.

  2. Leadless Cardiac Pacemakers: Back to the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marc A; Neuzil, Petr; Dukkipati, Srinivas R; Reddy, Vivek Y

    2015-09-01

    Despite significant advances in battery longevity, lead performance, and programming features since the first implanted permanent pacemaker was developed, the basic design of cardiac pacemakers has remained relatively unchanged over the past 50 years. Because of inherent limitations in their design, conventional (transvenous) pacemakers are prone to multiple potential short- and long-term complications. Accordingly, there has been intense interest in a system able to provide the symptomatic and potentially lifesaving therapies of cardiac pacemakers while mitigating many of the risks associated with their weakest link-the transvenous lead. Leadless cardiac pacing represents the future of cardiac pacing systems, similar to the transition that occurred from the use of epicardial pacing systems to the familiar transvenous systems of today. This review summarizes the current evidence and potential benefits of leadless pacing systems, which are either commercially available (in Europe) or under clinical investigation. PMID:26337997

  3. Interventional MRI: update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lufkin, R.B. [Department of Radiology, University of California Los Angeles, School of Medicine, 10 833 Le Comte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1721 (United States); Gronemeyer, D.H.W.; Seibel, R.M.M. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Computerscience, University Witten/Herdecke (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Interventional MRI is in its early stages of development. Nevertheless, the design of new interventional MRI scanners that allow maximum direct access to the patient combined with the development of new interventional MRI pulse sequences and localization systems, means that the archetypal operating rooms of the 21st century may well contain dedicated interventional MRI units for combined radiological and surgical procedures. The present article looks at the state of interventional MRI today and looks ahead to what may be forthcoming in the not-too-distant future. After briefly discussing the instrumentation necessary for practical interventional MRI, the article will go on to describe a number of different approaches to, and clinical applications for, interventional MRI. The use of MRI in guiding and controlling tumor ablation, aspiration cytology and surgical biopsy of different body parts is described. (orig.) With 13 figs., 1 tab., 114 refs.

  4. Abdominal MRI scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear magnetic resonance - abdomen; NMR - abdomen; Magnetic resonance imaging - abdomen; MRI of the abdomen ... radiologist see certain areas more clearly. During the MRI, the person who operates the machine will watch ...

  5. Diffuse infiltrative cardiac tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the cardiac magnetic resonance images of an unusual form of cardiac tuberculosis. Nodular masses in a sheet-like distribution were seen to infiltrate the outer myocardium and pericardium along most of the cardiac chambers. The lesions showed significant resolution on antitubercular therapy

  6. Primary diagnosis of coronary artery disease by MRI and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Invasive coronary angiography is the gold standard for the primary diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). At most, only every other examination leads to revascularization therapy. The other coronary angiographies could be replaced by non-invasive examinations. Diagnosing CAD by cardiac MRI and CT can utilize three different strategies: detection of coronary calcifications; imaging of coronary artery stenoses; and detection of restricted myocardial perfusion reserve. Applications are coronary calcification scoring by CT, coronary angiography by MRI or CT, stress cine MRI, and stress perfusion MRI. All these methods are currently used clinically because of their high negative predictive value, i.e., a normal result mostly rules out a hemodynamically significant CAD. For a reasonable implication in clinical practice, however, the pre-test probability must be considered to avoid needless examinations. High pre-test probability invariably demands invasive coronary angiography for planning or performing revascularization therapy. Intermediate pre-test probability, on the contrary, justifies to defer further imaging studies if MRI or CT is normal. Thus, adequate selection of patients for cardiac MRI and CT may reduce the number of invasive coronary angiographies in the future. (orig.)

  7. Recommendations for real-time speech MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingala, Sajan Goud; Sutton, Brad P; Miquel, Marc E; Nayak, Krishna S

    2016-01-01

    Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (RT-MRI) is being increasingly used for speech and vocal production research studies. Several imaging protocols have emerged based on advances in RT-MRI acquisition, reconstruction, and audio-processing methods. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art, discusses technical considerations, and provides specific guidance for new groups entering this field. We provide recommendations for performing RT-MRI of the upper airway. This is a consensus statement stemming from the ISMRM-endorsed Speech MRI summit held in Los Angeles, February 2014. A major unmet need identified at the summit was the need for consensus on protocols that can be easily adapted by researchers equipped with conventional MRI systems. To this end, we provide a discussion of tradeoffs in RT-MRI in terms of acquisition requirements, a priori assumptions, artifacts, computational load, and performance for different speech tasks. We provide four recommended protocols and identify appropriate acquisition and reconstruction tools. We list pointers to open-source software that facilitate implementation. We conclude by discussing current open challenges in the methodological aspects of RT-MRI of speech. PMID:26174802

  8. MRI of Stroke Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Quan; Zhang, Zheng Gang; Chopp, Michael

    2009-01-01

    MRI is a vital tool for the measurement of acute stroke and has been used to visualize changes in activation patterns during stroke recovery. There is emerging interest on using MRI to monitor the structural substrates of spontaneous recovery and neurorestorative treatment of stroke. In this review, we describe the use of MRI and its associated challenges to measure vascular and neuronal remodeling in response to spontaneous and therapy-induced stroke recovery. We demonstrate that MRI methodo...

  9. Correlating tumor metabolic progression index measured by serial FDG PET-CT, apparent diffusion coefficient measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and blood genomics to patient’s outcome in advanced colorectal cancer: the CORIOLAN study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) may present various behaviours that define different courses of tumor evolution. There is presently no available tool designed to assess tumor aggressiveness, despite the fact that this is considered to have a major impact on patient outcome. CORIOLAN is a single-arm prospective interventional non-therapeutic study aiming mainly to assess the natural tumor metabolic progression index (TMPI) measured by serial FDG PET-CT without any intercurrent antitumor therapy as a prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) in patients with mCRC. Secondary objectives of the study aim to test the TMPI as a prognostic marker for progression-free survival (PFS), to assess the prognostic value of baseline tumor FDG uptake on PFS and OS, to compare TMPI to classical clinico-biological assessment of prognosis, and to test the prognostic value on OS and PFS of MRI-based apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and variation of vADC using voxel-based diffusion maps. Additionally, this study intends to identify genomic and epigenetic factors that correlate with progression of tumors and the OS of patients with mCRC. Consequently, this analysis will provide information about the signaling pathways that determine the natural and therapy-free course of the disease. Finally, it would be of great interest to investigate whether in a population of patients with mCRC, for which at present no known effective therapy is available, tumor aggressiveness is related to elevated levels of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and to patient outcome. Tumor aggressiveness is one of the major determinants of patient outcome in advanced disease. Despite its importance, supported by findings reported in the literature of extreme outcomes for patients with mCRC treated with chemotherapy, no objective tool allows clinicians to base treatment decisions on this factor. The CORIOLAN study will characterize TMPI using FDG-PET-based metabolic imaging of patients with chemorefractory m

  10. Advanced MRI increases the diagnostic accuracy of recurrent glioblastoma: Single institution thresholds and validation of MR spectroscopy and diffusion weighted MR imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Kazda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The accurate identification of glioblastoma progression remains an unmet clinical need. The aim of this prospective single-institutional study is to determine and validate thresholds for the main metabolite concentrations obtained by MR spectroscopy (MRS and the values of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC to enable distinguishing tumor recurrence from pseudoprogression. Thirty-nine patients after the standard treatment of a glioblastoma underwent advanced imaging by MRS and ADC at the time of suspected recurrence — median time to progression was 6.7 months. The highest significant sensitivity and specificity to call the glioblastoma recurrence was observed for the total choline (tCho to total N-acetylaspartate (tNAA concentration ratio with the threshold ≥1.3 (sensitivity 100.0% and specificity 94.7%. The ADCmean value higher than 1313 × 10−6 mm2/s was associated with the pseudoprogression (sensitivity 98.3%, specificity 100.0%. The combination of MRS focused on the tCho/tNAA concentration ratio and the ADCmean value represents imaging methods applicable to early non-invasive differentiation between a glioblastoma recurrence and a pseudoprogression. However, the institutional definition and validation of thresholds for differential diagnostics is needed for the elimination of setup errors before implementation of these multimodal imaging techniques into clinical practice, as well as into clinical trials.

  11. MRI in cranial tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Just, M.; Higer, H.P.; Betting, O.; Bockenheimer, S.; Pfannenstiel, P.

    1987-11-01

    A case of multiple intracranial tuberculomas is presented. CT and MRI findings are discussed and compared. MRI showed multiple tuberculomas characterised by the same signal intensity as the surrounding brain parenchyma. Differentiation could be achieved only by the perifocal oedema of the high signal intensity. Changes of the lesions during chemotherapy were monitored by CT and MRI and the results are presented. (orig.)

  12. MRI in cranial tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, M; Higer, H P; Betting, O; Bockenheimer, S; Pfannenstiel, P

    1987-11-01

    A case of multiple intracranial tuberculomas is presented. CT and MRI findings are discussed and compared. MRI showed multiple tuberculomas characterised by the same signal intensity as the surrounding brain parenchyma. Differentiation could be achieved only by the perifocal oedema of high signal intensity. Changes of the lesions during chemotherapy were monitored by CT and MRI and the results are presented. PMID:3691545

  13. fMRI Neuroinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Christensen, Mark Schram; Madsen, Kristoffer M.;

    2006-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) generates vast amounts of data. The handling, processing, and analysis of fMRI data would be inconceivable without computer-based methods. fMRI neuroinformatics is concerned with research, development, and operation of these methods. Reconstruction...

  14. MRI in acute poliomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornreich, L. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Dagan, O. [The Intensive Care Unit, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Beilinson Medical Campus, Petah Tiqva (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Imaging Department, The Schneider Children`s Medical Centre of Israel, Kaplan Street, Petah Tiqva 49202 (Israel)]|[Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    1996-05-01

    MRI can be used in the diagnosis of anterior horn infection and for assessing the extent of disease. There are no specific MRI signs to differentiate between the various possible pathogens. This is demonstrated in the present case of poliomyelitis, in which MRI of the spine played an important role in establishing the diagnosis. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  15. Getting an MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) Print A A A Text Size en ... Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed pictures of ...

  16. Getting an MRI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) Print A A A Text Size en ... Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed pictures of ...

  17. Getting an MRI

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Getting an MRI (Video) KidsHealth > For Kids > Getting an MRI (Video) Print A A A Text Size en español Obtención de una resonancia magnética, RM (video) An MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan creates detailed ...

  18. Dynamic MRI CSF imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Understanding of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow physiological and anatomical substrate underwent the revolutionary process during the last one hundred years, resulting with the theory of what we call today the 'bulk' flow. Due to almost incredible technological advance we experienced a prominent clinical and experimental advance in the field of CSF creation, flow, and absorption that have brought the 'bulk' flow theory partly under question. There are still a large number of uncertainties in our truly understanding of basic CSF flow physiology, but also pathology, that are persistently present, requesting further and ever more advanced investigation in order to provide the most adequate diagnosis for the benefit of the patient. It is my strong believe that the diagnostic reality nowadays is that we are still facing the major lack of understanding how is CSF actually created, what are the CSF pathways trough the intracranial and extracranial spaces, and finally where and how does CSF got absorbed. This certainly opens the space for numerous different theories pretending to give correct explanation of CSF physiological behavior. On the other hand, a proper and valuable technique which would provide us with the wanted information may still not be available at the present time. Therefore, as the radiologists examining the patients with CSF flow disorders, we are constantly challenged by the number of questions in an attempt to achieve the relevant and overall, accurate diagnostic information on the type of the CSF flow disorder, in order to facilitate the planning of the better individually optimized neurosurgical treatment. Though MRI, with mostly used phase-contrast but also technically older maximum dephasing techniques allows dynamic CSF flow visualization introducing us into the field of CSF hydrodynamics disorder diagnostics, we should face the fact that in the routine radiological examination with currently available and most dedicated

  19. Imaging features of cardiac myxoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the imaging features of cardiac myxoma and their diagnostic values. Methods: Twenty-two patrents with cardiac myxoma were reviewed retrospectively for the clinical, pathologic, and radiologic findings. Posteroanterior and lateral chest radiographs, American Imatron C-150 XP Electron Beam CT examination, and Germany Siemens 1.5T Magnetom Vision MR scan were performed on every patient. Results: (1) Radiographs of 17 patients with left atrial myxoma showed evidence of mitral valve obstruction in 14(82.3%), radiographs of 5 patients with right atrial myxoma demonstrated right atrium enlargement in 3(60%) respectively. (2) CT scans of 22 myxomas demonstrated 18 (81.8%) lesions were hypoattenuated and 4 (19.1%) were isoattenuated relative to the myocardium. Calcification or ossification was seen in 3 patients. All myxomas apart from massive one were found attaching to the atrial septum. Movie mode could dis- play the movement of myxoma across the atrioventicular valves. (3) MRI studies of 22 myxomas showed 19 (86.3%) heterogeneous signal intensity and 3 (13.7%) homogeneous. They exhibited slight high or homogeneous signal intensity with both T1- and T2-weighted sequences, and low signal intensity with cine gradient recalled echo sequences. Point of attachment was visible in 21 (95.4%) cases. Conclusion: The typical radiograph sign of cardiac myxomas is mitral valve obstruction, CT and MR can demonstrate intracavitary lobular masses attacthing to artrial spetum. The latter two kinds of examinations not only provide accurate assessment of the size, location, and attachment point of these lesions, but also have important qualitative diagnostic advantage. (authors)

  20. Imaging pitfalls, normal anatomy, and anatomical variants that can simulate disease on cardiac imaging as demonstrated on multidetector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in computed tomography have led to continuous improvement in cardiac imaging. Dedicated postprocessing capabilities, faster scan times, and cardiac gating methods reveal details of normal cardiac anatomy and anatomic variants that can mimic pathologic conditions. This article will review normal cardiac anatomy and variants that can mimic disease. Radiologists should be familiar with normal cardiac anatomy and anatomic variants to avoid misinterpretation of normal findings for pathologic processes

  1. OsiriX plugin for integrated cardiac imaging research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüllebrand, Markus; Hennemuth, Anja; Messroghli, Daniel; Kühne, Titus

    2014-03-01

    Strongly evolving imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nowadays provide a multitude of new complementary techniques for the analysis of cardiovascular tissue properties, function, and hemodynamics. The purpose of the presented work is to provide a research tool, which enables a quick validation of newly developed imaging techniques and supports the co-development of clinically usable analysis tools, which allow an integration with existing complementary examination methods. The concepts combined to this end consist of an integration with the open source research PACS OsiriX, an advanced heuristic DICOM classification and preprocessing as well as an integrative data model, which accumulates patient-specific image data, results and the data relations. Specific processing and analysis plugins can easily be integrated in such a way that they use the data integration and visualization infrastructure as well as results from other existing plugins. The presented example applications, such as the evaluation of slice orientations for cardiac function quantification or the integrated analysis of different types of image data for diagnosis of myocarditis show that the provided tool can be successfully used for a multitude of research applications in cardiovascular imaging.

  2. fMRI activation detection with EEG priors

    OpenAIRE

    Kalus, Stefanie; Sämann, Philipp; Czisch, Michael; Fahrmeir, Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of brain mapping techniques is to advance the understanding of the relationship between structure and function in the human brain in so-called activation studies. In this work, an advanced statistical model for combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) recordings is developed to fuse complementary information about the location of neuronal activity. More precisely, a new Bayesian method is proposed for enhancing fMRI activation detecti...

  3. Cine magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of cardiac structure and flow dynamics in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cine magnetic resonance imaging (Cine MRI) was performed in 20 patients aged 19 days to 13 years (mean 4.0 years), who had congenital heart disease confirmed at echocardiography or angiography. Prior to cine MRI, gated MRI was performed to evaluate for cardiac structure. Cine MRI was demonstrated by fast low fip angle shot imaging technique with a 30deg flip angle, 15 msec echo time, 30-40 msec pulse repetition time, and 128 x 128 acquisition matrix. Abnormalities of cardiac structure were extremely well defined in all patients by gated MRI. Intracardiac or intravascular blood flow were visualized in 17 (85%) of 20 patients by cine MRI. Left to right shunt flow through ventricular septal defect, atrial septal defect, and endocardial cushion defect were visualized with low signal intensity area. Low intensity jets flow through the site of re-coarctation of the aorta were also visualized. However, the good recording of cine MRI was not obtained because of artifacts in 3 of 20 patients (15%) who had severe congestive heart failure or respiratory arrhythmia. Gated MRI provides excellent visualization of fine structure, and cine MRI can provide high spatial resolution imaging of flow dynamic in a variety of congenital heart disease, noninvasively. (author)

  4. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  5. MRI for the evaluation of pectus excavatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pectus excavatum, the most common congenital deformity of the anterior chest wall, is both a cosmetic and functional abnormality. The degree of abnormal chest wall deformity determines its functional effect, particularly its cardiac and pulmonary impact. Although CT scanning is the most widely used cross-sectional imaging technique used to measure the Haller index, the radiation exposure is reason to seek other alternatives. At our institution, we have introduced a rapid MRI technique for this purpose, which utilizes a single-axial 2-D FIESTA acquisition. (orig.)

  6. MRI for the evaluation of pectus excavatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcovici, Peter A. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); LoSasso, Barry E. [Children' s Hospital and Health Center, Department of Surgery, San Diego, CA (United States); Kruk, Peter; Dwek, Jerry R. [Children' s Hospital and Health Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Pectus excavatum, the most common congenital deformity of the anterior chest wall, is both a cosmetic and functional abnormality. The degree of abnormal chest wall deformity determines its functional effect, particularly its cardiac and pulmonary impact. Although CT scanning is the most widely used cross-sectional imaging technique used to measure the Haller index, the radiation exposure is reason to seek other alternatives. At our institution, we have introduced a rapid MRI technique for this purpose, which utilizes a single-axial 2-D FIESTA acquisition. (orig.)

  7. High-resolution functional MRI of the human amygdala at 7 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sladky, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.sladky@meduniwien.ac.at [MR Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Baldinger, Pia; Kranz, Georg S. [Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Tröstl, Jasmin [MR Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Höflich, Anna; Lanzenberger, Rupert [Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Moser, Ewald [MR Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Windischberger, Christian, E-mail: christian.windischberger@meduniwien.ac.at [MR Centre of Excellence, Medical University of Vienna, Lazarettgasse 14, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Center for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-05-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become the primary non-invasive method for investigating the human brain function. With an increasing number of ultra-high field MR systems worldwide possibilities of higher spatial and temporal resolution in combination with increased sensitivity and specificity are expected to advance detailed imaging of distinct cortical brain areas and subcortical structures. One target region of particular importance to applications in psychiatry and psychology is the amygdala. However, ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging of these ventral brain regions is a challenging endeavor that requires particular methodological considerations. Ventral brain areas are particularly prone to signal losses arising from strong magnetic field inhomogeneities along susceptibility borders. In addition, physiological artifacts from respiration and cardiac action cause considerable fluctuations in the MR signal. Here we show that, despite these challenges, fMRI data from the amygdala may be obtained with high temporal and spatial resolution combined with increased signal-to-noise ratio. Maps of neural activation during a facial emotion discrimination paradigm at 7 T are presented and clearly show the gain in percental signal change compared to 3 T results, demonstrating the potential benefits of ultra-high field functional MR imaging also in ventral brain areas.

  8. High-resolution functional MRI of the human amygdala at 7 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become the primary non-invasive method for investigating the human brain function. With an increasing number of ultra-high field MR systems worldwide possibilities of higher spatial and temporal resolution in combination with increased sensitivity and specificity are expected to advance detailed imaging of distinct cortical brain areas and subcortical structures. One target region of particular importance to applications in psychiatry and psychology is the amygdala. However, ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging of these ventral brain regions is a challenging endeavor that requires particular methodological considerations. Ventral brain areas are particularly prone to signal losses arising from strong magnetic field inhomogeneities along susceptibility borders. In addition, physiological artifacts from respiration and cardiac action cause considerable fluctuations in the MR signal. Here we show that, despite these challenges, fMRI data from the amygdala may be obtained with high temporal and spatial resolution combined with increased signal-to-noise ratio. Maps of neural activation during a facial emotion discrimination paradigm at 7 T are presented and clearly show the gain in percental signal change compared to 3 T results, demonstrating the potential benefits of ultra-high field functional MR imaging also in ventral brain areas

  9. Gastrointestinal complications and cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Sara J

    2014-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) complications are an uncommon but potentially devastating complication of cardiac surgery. The reported incidence varies between .3% and 5.5% with an associated mortality of .3-87%. A wide range of GI complications are reported with bleeding, mesenteric ischemia, pancreatitis, cholecystitis, and ileus the most common. Ischemia is thought to be the main cause of GI complications with hypoperfusion during cardiac surgery as well as systemic inflammation, hypothermia, drug therapy, and mechanical factors contributing. Several nonischemic mechanisms may contribute to GI complications, including bacterial translocation, adverse drug reactions, and iatrogenic organ injury. Risk factors for GI complications are advanced age (>70 years), reoperation or emergency surgery, comorbidities (renal disease, respiratory disease, peripheral vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiac failure), perioperative use of an intra-aortic balloon pump or inotrope therapy, prolonged surgery or cardiopulmonary bypass, and postoperative complications. Multiple strategies to reduce the incidence of GI complications exist, including risk stratification scores, targeted inotrope and fluid therapy, drug therapies, and modification of cardiopulmonary bypass. Currently, no single therapy has consistently proven efficacy in reducing GI complications. Timely diagnosis and treatment, while tailored to the specific complication and patient, is essential for optimal management and outcomes in this challenging patient population. PMID:25208431

  10. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helbing, Willem A. [Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Paediatrics (Division of Cardiology), Sp-2.429, P.O. Box 2060, CB, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Ouhlous, Mohamed [Erasmus Medical Centre - Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    MRI is an important additional tool in the diagnostic work-up of children with congenital heart disease. This review aims to summarise the role MRI has in this patient population. Echocardiography remains the main diagnostic tool in congenital heart disease. In specific situations, MRI is used for anatomical imaging of congenital heart disease. This includes detailed assessment of intracardiac anatomy with 2-D and 3-D sequences. MRI is particularly useful for assessment of retrosternal structures in the heart and for imaging large vessel anatomy. Functional assessment includes assessment of ventricular function using 2-D cine techniques. Of particular interest in congenital heart disease is assessment of right and single ventricular function. Two-dimensional and newer 3-D techniques to quantify flow in these patients are or will soon become an integral part of quantification of shunt size, valve function and complex flow patterns in large vessels. More advanced uses of MRI include imaging of cardiovascular function during stress and tissue characterisation of the myocardium. Techniques used for this purpose need further validation before they can become part of the daily routine of MRI assessment of congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  11. Implementation of Multi-parametric Prostate MRI in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierans, Andrea S; Taneja, Samir S; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2015-08-01

    While initial implementations of prostate MRI suffered from suboptimal performance in tumor detection, technological advances over the past decade have allowed modern multi-parametric prostate MRI (mpMRI) to achieve high diagnostic accuracy for detection, localization, and staging and thereby impact patient management. A particular emerging application of mpMRI is in the pre-biopsy setting to allow for MRI-targeted biopsy, for instance, through real-time MRI/ultrasound fusion, which may help reduce the over-detection of low-risk disease and selectively detect clinically significant cancers, in comparison with use of standard systematic biopsy alone. mpMRI and MRI-targeted biopsy are spreading beyond the large academic centers to increasingly be adopted within small and community practices. Aims of this review article are to summarize the hardware and sequences used for performing mpMRI, explore patient specific technical considerations, delineate approaches for study interpretation and reporting [including the recent American College of Radiology Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) version 2], and describe challenges and implications relating to the widespread clinical implementation of mpMRI. PMID:26077358

  12. Preoperative cardiac risk management

    OpenAIRE

    Vidaković Radosav; Poldermans Don; Nešković Aleksandar N.

    2011-01-01

    Approximately 100 million people undergo noncardiac surgery annually worldwide. It is estimated that around 3% of patients undergoing noncardiac surgery experience a major adverse cardiac event. Although cardiac events, like myocardial infarction, are major cause of perioperative morbidity or mortality, its true incidence is difficult to assess. The risk of perioperative cardiac complications depends mainly on two conditions: 1) identified risk factors, and 2) the type of the surgical p...

  13. Diffusion and perfusion MRI of the lung and mediastinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzler, Thomas; Schmid-Bindert, Gerald; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Fink, Christian

    2010-12-01

    With ongoing technical improvements such as multichannel MRI, systems with powerful gradients as well as the development of innovative pulse sequence techniques implementing parallel imaging, MRI has now entered the stage of a radiation-free alternative to computed tomography (CT) for chest imaging in clinical practice. Whereas in the past MRI of the lung was focused on morphological aspects, current MRI techniques also enable functional imaging of the lung allowing for a comprehensive assessment of lung disease in a single MRI exam. Perfusion imaging can be used for the visualization of regional pulmonary perfusion in patients with different lung diseases such as lung cancer, chronic obstructive lung disease, pulmonary embolism or for the prediction of postoperative lung function in lung cancer patients. Over the past years diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW-MRI) of the thorax has become feasible with a significant reduction of the acquisition time, thus minimizing artifacts from respiratory and cardiac motion. In chest imaging, DW-MRI has been mainly suggested for the characterization of lung cancer, lymph nodes and pulmonary metastases. In this review article recent MR perfusion and diffusion techniques of the lung and mediastinum as well as their clinical applications are reviewed. PMID:20627435

  14. Diffusion and perfusion MRI of the lung and mediastinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With ongoing technical improvements such as multichannel MRI, systems with powerful gradients as well as the development of innovative pulse sequence techniques implementing parallel imaging, MRI has now entered the stage of a radiation-free alternative to computed tomography (CT) for chest imaging in clinical practice. Whereas in the past MRI of the lung was focused on morphological aspects, current MRI techniques also enable functional imaging of the lung allowing for a comprehensive assessment of lung disease in a single MRI exam. Perfusion imaging can be used for the visualization of regional pulmonary perfusion in patients with different lung diseases such as lung cancer, chronic obstructive lung disease, pulmonary embolism or for the prediction of postoperative lung function in lung cancer patients. Over the past years diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW-MRI) of the thorax has become feasible with a significant reduction of the acquisition time, thus minimizing artifacts from respiratory and cardiac motion. In chest imaging, DW-MRI has been mainly suggested for the characterization of lung cancer, lymph nodes and pulmonary metastases. In this review article recent MR perfusion and diffusion techniques of the lung and mediastinum as well as their clinical applications are reviewed.

  15. Denoising human cardiac diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images using sparse representation combined with segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, L. J.; Zhu, Y. M.; Liu, W. Y.; Croisille, P.; Pu, Z. B.; Robini, M.; Magnin, I. E.

    2009-03-01

    Cardiac diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) is noise sensitive, and the noise can induce numerous systematic errors in subsequent parameter calculations. This paper proposes a sparse representation-based method for denoising cardiac DT-MRI images. The method first generates a dictionary of multiple bases according to the features of the observed image. A segmentation algorithm based on nonstationary degree detector is then introduced to make the selection of atoms in the dictionary adapted to the image's features. The denoising is achieved by gradually approximating the underlying image using the atoms selected from the generated dictionary. The results on both simulated image and real cardiac DT-MRI images from ex vivo human hearts show that the proposed denoising method performs better than conventional denoising techniques by preserving image contrast and fine structures.

  16. Noninvasive carotid plaque characterization by black blood MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Management of atherosclerotic carotid arteries requires both plaque characterization and determination of the degree of stenosis, especially when carotid stenting (GAS) is being considered for severe carotid stenosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that high-resolution MRI can identify plaque components, such as the lipid-rich necrotic core, intraplaque hemorrhage, fibrous tissue, and the calcification present in human carotid atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of black blood MRI (BB-MRI) for accurately identifying the plaque components in vivo. Twenty-six consecutive patients scheduled for carotid endarterectomy (CEA) underwent a BB-MRI examination within 2 weeks before the surgical procedure using a 1.5-T Philips scanner with a protocol that generated 2 contrast weightings (T1 and T2). The MR images were acquired using cardiac gating to minimize motion artifact and fat suppression to reduce MR signals from subcutaneous fatty tissue. The plaque evaluations obtained by BB-MRI were compared with the intra-operative video recordings, the excised specimens, and the histological sections. With BB-MRI, the combination of the signal intensities in the T1- and T2- weighted images for each component (lipid deposits, intra-plaque hemorrhage, fibrous plaque, and calcification) showed findings that corresponded with the excised specimens. Complex morphological features could also be assessed by BB-MRI. BB-MRI is a useful method for noninvasively imaging and characterizing atherosclerotic carotid arteries. This MRI technique can provide valuable information that can be used to decide whether to perform a CEA or a GAS in patients with severe carotid stenosis. Furthermore, BB-MRI appears to be a useful tool for the investigation of the pathogenesis and natural history of carotid atherosclerosis. (author)

  17. Tumor disease and associated congenital abnormalities on prenatal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Fetal tumors can have a devastating effect on the fetus, and may occur in association with congenital malformations. In view of the increasing role of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to prenatal ultrasonography (US), we sought to demonstrate the visualization of fetal tumors, with regard to congenital abnormalities, on MRI. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 18 fetuses with tumors depicted on fetal MRI after suspicious US findings. An MRI standard protocol was used to diagnose tumors judged as benign or malignant. All organ systems were assessed for tumor-related complications and other congenital malformations. Available US results and histopathology were compared with MRI. Results: There were 13/18 (72.2%) benign and 5/18 (27.8%) malignant tumors diagnosed: a cerebral primitive neuroectodermal tumor in 1/18, head–neck teratomas in 4/18; ventricular rhabdomyomas in 4/18; a cardiac teratoma in 1/18; a hepatoblastoma in 1/18; neuroblastomas in 2/18; a cystic hemorrhagic adrenal hyperplasia in 1/18; a pelvic leiomyoma in 1/18; sacrococcygeal teratomas in 3/18. Tumor-related complications were present in 13/18 (72.2%) cases; other congenital abnormalities in 3/18 (16.7%). MRI diagnosis and histology were concordant in 8/11 (72.7%) cases. In 6/12 (50%) cases, US and MRI diagnoses were concordant, and, in 6/12 (50%) cases, additional MRI findings changed the US diagnosis. Conclusion: Our MRI results demonstrate the visualization of fetal tumors, with frequently encountered tumor-related complications, and other exceptional congenital abnormalities, which may provide important information for perinatal management. Compared to prenatal US, MRI may add important findings in certain cases.

  18. MRI in psychiatry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulert, Christoph [UKE, Hamburg (Germany). Psychiatry Neuroimaging Branch; Shenton, Martha E. (ed.) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Psychiatry and Radiology

    2014-07-01

    This is the first comprehensive textbook on the use of MRI in psychiatry covering imaging techniques, brain systems and a review of findings in different psychiatric disorders. The book is divided into three sections, the first of which covers in detail all the major MRI-based methodological approaches available today, including fMRI, EEG-fMRI, DTI, and MR spectroscopy. In addition, the role of MRI in imaging genetics and combined brain stimulation and imaging is carefully explained. The second section provides an overview of the different brain systems that are relevant for psychiatric disorders, including the systems for perception, emotion, cognition, and reward. The final part of the book presents the MRI findings that are obtained in all the major psychiatric disorders using the previously discussed techniques. Numerous carefully chosen images support the informative text, making this an ideal reference work for all practitioners and trainees with an interest in this flourishing field.

  19. Left ventricular aneurysm and ventricular tachycardia as initial presentation of cardiac sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Jmeian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Cardiac sarcoidosis (CS is a rare, potentially fatal disease. It has a wide range of clinical presentations that range from asymptomatic electrocardiogram changes to sudden cardiac death. Ventricular aneurysms and ventricular tachycardia are seen late in the disease, and are rarely the presenting manifestation of the disease. Diagnosis of CS is challenging and often missed or delayed. Case Report: We report a 35-year-old patient who presented with sustained ventricular tachycardia and ST-elevation on electrocardiogram. Cardiac catheterization showed normal coronaries and left ventricular aneurysm. Subsequent 2D-echocardiography showed an infiltrative disease pattern. Cardiac MRI was done and showed late gadolinium enhancement in the septum, apex and lateral wall. The patient was diagnosed with cardiac sarcoidosis and treated with immune suppression and antiarrhythmic agent. In addition underwent AICD implantation. Conclusion: Our case highlights the importance of suspecting cardiac sarcoidosis in young patients presenting with electrocardiogram changes, and present an atypical presentation of this disease.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Head Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head ... limitations of MRI of the Head? What is MRI of the Head? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ...