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Sample records for carcinus maenas genetic

  1. Histopathological effects of trypanorhynch metacestodes in the digestive gland of a novel host, Carcinus maenas (Decapoda)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gurney, R. H.; Nowak, B. F.; Dyková, Iva; Kuris, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 1 (2004), s. 63-69. ISSN 0177-5103 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : Trypanorhyncha * Carcinus maenas * crustacean pathology Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.583, year: 2004

  2. Mechanosensory properties of the mouthpart setae of the European shore crab Carcinus maenas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Anders Lydik

    2005-01-01

    , maxilliped 2 and 3, of the European shore crab Carcinus maenas. The mechanoreceptors were found to respond to either displacements of the entire seta or bending of the setal shaft. The displacement-sensitive cells encode both the amplitude and the velocity of the displacement and about half were found to be...

  3. Isolation, sequence analysis, and physiological properties of enkephalins in the nervous tissue of the shore crab Carcinus maenas L.

    OpenAIRE

    Lüschen, W; Buck, F; Willig, A; Jaros, P P

    1991-01-01

    [Leu]- and [Met]enkephalin from thoracic ganglia of the shore crab Carcinus maenas have been purified to homogeneity by a reversed-phase HPLC procedure. Automated gas-phase sequencing revealed a primary structure identical with that of enkephalins from vertebrates. The immunoreactive material in different parts of the nervous system of C. maenas was measured by RIA. Isolated crustacean [Leu]enkephalin shows physiological properties identical to synthetic [Leu]enkephalin in our bioassay. The e...

  4. Accumulation and depuration of okadaic acid esters in the European green crab ( Carcinus maenas ) during a feeding study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kevin; Cold, Ulrik; Fischer, Knud

    2008-01-01

    Soft shell crab is a seafood delicacy in many parts of the world. In Denmark, it has been investigated whether a commercial production of soft shell European green crabs (Carcinus maenas) would be feasible. In relation to this, a feeding study was performed to examine if occurrence of DSP toxins in...

  5. Competition and niche segregation following the arrival of Hemigrapsus takanoi in the formerly Carcinus maenas dominated Dutch delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, van den A.M.; Wijnhoven, S.; McLay, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    In a combined study including a 20 year monitoring programme of the benthic communities of four Dutch delta waters and a snapshot survey conducted in the Oosterschelde tidal bay in 2011, the populations of the native portunid European shore crab Carcinus maenas and the introduced varunid crabs Hemig

  6. Trophic level transfer of microplastic: Mytilus edulis (L.) to Carcinus maenas (L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the trophic transfer of microplastic from mussels to crabs. Mussels (Mytilus edulis) were exposed to 0.5 μm fluorescent polystyrene microspheres, then fed to crabs (Carcinus maenas). Tissue samples were then taken at intervals up to 21 days. The number of microspheres in the haemolymph of the crabs was highest at 24 h (15 033 ml−1 ± SE 3146), and was almost gone after 21 days (267 ml−1 ± SE 120). The maximum amount of microspheres in the haemolymph was 0.04% of the amount to which the mussels were exposed. Microspheres were also found in the stomach, hepatopancreas, ovary and gills of the crabs, in decreasing numbers over the trial period. This study is the first to show ‘natural’ trophic transfer of microplastic, and its translocation to haemolymph and tissues of a crab. This has implications for the health of marine organisms, the wider food web and humans. -- Highlights: ► Microplastic transferred in marine food chain. ► Microplastic transferred to haemolymph when ingested in food. ► Microplastic remains in organism for at least 21 days. -- This communication demonstrates trophic level transfer of microplastic particles from Mytilus edulis to Carcinus maenas

  7. Physiological responses to digestion in low salinity in the crabs Carcinus maenas and Cancer irroratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Chantelle M; Patton, Richard L; Whiteley, Nia M; Driedzic, William R; McGaw, Iain J

    2016-01-01

    Osmoregulation and digestion are energetically demanding, and crabs that move into low salinity environments to feed must be able to balance the demands of both processes. Achieving this balance may pose greater challenges for weak than for efficient osmoregulators. This study examined the rate of oxygen consumption (MO2) of Carcinus maenas (efficient osmoregulator) and Cancer irroratus (weak osmoregulator) as a function of feeding and hyposaline stress. The MO2 increased 2-fold in both species following feeding. The MO2 increased and remained elevated in fasted crabs during acute hyposaline exposure. When hyposaline stress occurred after feeding, C. maenas responded with an immediate summation of the MO2 associated with feeding and hyposaline stress, whereas C. irroratus reacted with a partial summation of responses in a salinity of 24‰, but were unable to sum responses in 16‰. C. irroratus exhibited longer gut transit times. This may be due to an inability to regulate osmotic water onload as efficiently as C. maenas. Mechanical digestion in crabs can account for a significant portion of SDA, and a short term interruption led to the delay in summation of metabolic demands. Although protein synthesis is reported to account for the majority of SDA, this did not appear to be the case here. Protein synthesis rates were higher in C. irroratus but neither feeding or salinity affected protein synthesis rates of either species which suggests that protein synthesis can continue in low salinity as long as substrates are available. PMID:26459987

  8. Competition and niche segregation following the arrival of Hemigrapsus takanoi in the formerly Carcinus maenas dominated Dutch delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brink, A. M.; Wijnhoven, S.; McLay, C. L.

    2012-10-01

    In a combined study including a 20 year monitoring programme of the benthic communities of four Dutch delta waters and a snapshot survey conducted in the Oosterschelde tidal bay in 2011, the populations of the native portunid European shore crab Carcinus maenas and the introduced varunid crabs Hemigrapsus takanoi and Hemigrapsus sanguineus were investigated. Whereas C. maenas was the most common shore crab in these waters, its numbers have declined on the soft sediment substrates during the last 20 years. As the two exotic crab species were first recorded in the Dutch delta in 1999, they could not have initiated the decline of the native C. maenas. However, within a few years H. takanoi completely dominated the intertidal hard substrate environments; the same environments on which juvenile C. maenas depend. On soft sediment substrate the native and exotic shore crab species are presently more or less equally abundant. H. takanoi might initially have taken advantage of the fact that C. maenas numbers were declining. Additionally H. takanoi are thriving in expanding oyster reefs of Crassostrea gigas (Pacific oyster) in the Dutch delta waters, which provide new habitat. Nowadays H. takanoi appears to be a fierce interference competitor or predator for small C. maenas specimens by expelling them from their shelters. These interactions have led to increased mortality of juvenile C. maenas. At present the C. maenas populations seem to be maintained by crabs that survive and reproduce on available soft sediment habitats where H. takanoi densities are low.

  9. An in situ postexposure feeding assay with Carcinus maenas for estuarine sediment-overlying water toxicity evaluations

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Susana M; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Guilhermino, Lúcia; Ribeiro, Rui

    2006-01-01

    This study developed and evaluated a short-term sublethal in situ toxicity assay for estuarine sediment-overlying waters, with the crab Carcinus maenas (L.) based on postexposure feeding. It consisted of a 48-h in situ exposure period followed by a short postexposure feeding period (30 min). A precise method for quantifying feeding, using the Polychaeta Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Müller as food source, was first developed. The sensitivity of the postexposure feeding response was verified b...

  10. Competition and niche segregation following the arrival of Hemigrapsus takanoi in the formerly Carcinus maenas dominated Dutch delta

    OpenAIRE

    van den Brink, A.M.; Wijnhoven, S.; McLay, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    In a combined study including a 20 year monitoring programme of the benthic communities of four Dutch delta waters and a snapshot survey conducted in the Oosterschelde tidal bay in 2011, the populations of the native portunid European shore crab Carcinus maenas and the introduced varunid crabs Hemigrapsus takanoi and Hemigrapsus sanguineus were investigated. Whereas C maenas was the most common shore crab in these waters, its numbers have declined on the soft sediment substrates during the la...

  11. N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activity in feral Carcinus maenas exposed to cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Effects of Cd on NAGase activity of crabs from low impacted and polluted sites. • Inhibition of epidermal NAGase by Cd in crabs from both sites. • Inhibition of NAGase in digestive gland only in crabs from low impacted site. • Glutathione role in enhanced tolerance to Cd of crabs from polluted site. - Abstract: Cadmium is a priority hazardous substance, persistent in the aquatic environment, with the capacity to interfere with crustacean moulting. Moulting is a vital process dictating crustacean growth, reproduction and metamorphosis. However, for many organisms, moult disruption is difficult to evaluate in the short term, what limits its inclusion in monitoring programmes. N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAGase) is an enzyme acting in the final steps of the endocrine-regulated moulting cascade, allowing for the cast off of the old exoskeleton, with potential interest as a biomarker of moult disruption. This study investigated responses to waterborne cadmium of NAGase activity of Carcinus maenas originating from estuaries with different histories of anthropogenic contamination: a low impacted and a moderately polluted one. Crabs from both sites were individually exposed for seven days to cadmium concentrations ranging from 1.3 to 2000 μg/L. At the end of the assays, NAGase activity was assessed in the epidermis and digestive gland. Detoxification, antioxidant, energy production, and oxidative stress biomarkers implicated in cadmium metabolism and tolerance were also assessed to better understand differential NAGase responses: activity of glutathione S-transferases (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) glutathione reductase (GR), levels of total glutathiones (TG), lipid peroxidation (LPO), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). Animals from the moderately polluted estuary had lower NAGase activity both in the epidermis and digestive gland than in the low impacted site. NAGase activity in the epidermis and

  12. N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activity in feral Carcinus maenas exposed to cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Sofia Raquel, E-mail: smesquita@ciimar.up.pt [Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); ICBAS – Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar, University of Porto, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira 228, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Ergen, Şeyda Fikirdeşici [Faculty of Science, Ankara University, Department of Biology, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey); Rodrigues, Aurélie Pinto [Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); ICBAS – Institute of Biomedical Sciences Abel Salazar, University of Porto, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira 228, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Oliva-Teles, M. Teresa; Delerue-Matos, Cristina [REQUIMTE, School of Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Rua Dr. António Bernardino de Almeida 431, 4200-072 Porto (Portugal); Guimarães, Laura, E-mail: lguimaraes@ciimar.up.pt [Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR/CIMAR), University of Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, P 4050-123 Porto (Portugal)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Effects of Cd on NAGase activity of crabs from low impacted and polluted sites. • Inhibition of epidermal NAGase by Cd in crabs from both sites. • Inhibition of NAGase in digestive gland only in crabs from low impacted site. • Glutathione role in enhanced tolerance to Cd of crabs from polluted site. - Abstract: Cadmium is a priority hazardous substance, persistent in the aquatic environment, with the capacity to interfere with crustacean moulting. Moulting is a vital process dictating crustacean growth, reproduction and metamorphosis. However, for many organisms, moult disruption is difficult to evaluate in the short term, what limits its inclusion in monitoring programmes. N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAGase) is an enzyme acting in the final steps of the endocrine-regulated moulting cascade, allowing for the cast off of the old exoskeleton, with potential interest as a biomarker of moult disruption. This study investigated responses to waterborne cadmium of NAGase activity of Carcinus maenas originating from estuaries with different histories of anthropogenic contamination: a low impacted and a moderately polluted one. Crabs from both sites were individually exposed for seven days to cadmium concentrations ranging from 1.3 to 2000 μg/L. At the end of the assays, NAGase activity was assessed in the epidermis and digestive gland. Detoxification, antioxidant, energy production, and oxidative stress biomarkers implicated in cadmium metabolism and tolerance were also assessed to better understand differential NAGase responses: activity of glutathione S-transferases (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) glutathione reductase (GR), levels of total glutathiones (TG), lipid peroxidation (LPO), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). Animals from the moderately polluted estuary had lower NAGase activity both in the epidermis and digestive gland than in the low impacted site. NAGase activity in the

  13. The effects of a competitor on the foraging behaviour of the shore crab Carcinus maenas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Leela J; Cotton, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    Optimal Diet Theory suggests that individuals make foraging decisions that maximise net energy intake. Many studies provide qualitative support for this, but factors such as digestive constraints, learning, predation-risk and competition can influence foraging behaviour and lead to departures from quantitative predictions. We examined the effects of intraspecific competition within a classic model of optimal diet--the common shore crab, Carcinus maenas, feeding on the mussel, Mytilus edulis. Unexpectedly, we found that breaking time (Tb), eating time (Te), and handling time (Th) all decreased significantly in the presence of a conspecific. Reduced handling time in the presence of a competitor resulted in an increased rate of energy intake, raising the question of why crabs do not always feed in such a way. We suggest that the costs of decreased shell breaking time may be increased risk of claw damage and that crabs may be trading-off the potential loss of food to a competitor with the potential to damage their claw whilst breaking the shell more rapidly. It is well documented that prey-size selection by crabs is influenced by both the risk of claw damage and competition. However, our results are the first to demonstrate similar effects on prey handling times. We suggest that crabs maximise their long-term rate of energy intake at a scale far greater than individual foraging events and that in order to minimise claw damage, they typically break shells at a rate below their maximum. In the presence of a competitor, crabs appear to become more risk-prone and handle their food more rapidly, minimising the risk of kleptoparasitism. PMID:24691360

  14. The effects of a competitor on the foraging behaviour of the shore crab Carcinus maenas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leela J Chakravarti

    Full Text Available Optimal Diet Theory suggests that individuals make foraging decisions that maximise net energy intake. Many studies provide qualitative support for this, but factors such as digestive constraints, learning, predation-risk and competition can influence foraging behaviour and lead to departures from quantitative predictions. We examined the effects of intraspecific competition within a classic model of optimal diet--the common shore crab, Carcinus maenas, feeding on the mussel, Mytilus edulis. Unexpectedly, we found that breaking time (Tb, eating time (Te, and handling time (Th all decreased significantly in the presence of a conspecific. Reduced handling time in the presence of a competitor resulted in an increased rate of energy intake, raising the question of why crabs do not always feed in such a way. We suggest that the costs of decreased shell breaking time may be increased risk of claw damage and that crabs may be trading-off the potential loss of food to a competitor with the potential to damage their claw whilst breaking the shell more rapidly. It is well documented that prey-size selection by crabs is influenced by both the risk of claw damage and competition. However, our results are the first to demonstrate similar effects on prey handling times. We suggest that crabs maximise their long-term rate of energy intake at a scale far greater than individual foraging events and that in order to minimise claw damage, they typically break shells at a rate below their maximum. In the presence of a competitor, crabs appear to become more risk-prone and handle their food more rapidly, minimising the risk of kleptoparasitism.

  15. Effects of claw autotomy on green crab (Carcinus maenas) feeding rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummon Flynn, Paula S.; Mellish, Cassandra L.; Pickering, Tyler R.; Quijón, Pedro A.

    2015-09-01

    The European green crab (Carcinus maenas) is a voracious non-indigenous predator and a threat to Atlantic Canada's shellfish industry. Its foraging ability, however, may be affected by the occurrence of injuries such as the loss of a cheliped (claw). Given that green crab claws are differentiated into a major crusher and a minor cutter, we argue that autotomy (the reflexive loss of a limb) affects feeding rates, and that this effect depends on which particular claw is lost. We examined the incidence of injuries in two green crab populations of the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence during July-October, 2012. Then we experimentally assessed the influence of the loss of each type of claw upon crab feeding rates over two size-classes of American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria). Field injury surveys showed that 12.4% of the green crabs collected were missing a claw (the cutter and/or crusher claw). Injury rates increased linearly with crab size, and were found to vary with location. Laboratory experiments showed that, compared to intact crabs, the loss of the crusher claw reduced oyster mortality rates by ~ 93-100%. The loss of the crusher also reduced feeding on small soft-shell clams but only temporarily. The loss of the cutter claw had little impact on green crab feeding rates on oysters and soft-shell clams of either size. Combined, these results suggest that the loss of a claw has an effect on the ability of green crabs to consume commercially important species but this effect depends on which claw is lost and which prey is targeted. It follows that injury rates should be taken into consideration when monitoring and forecasting the potential impacts of green crab populations, particularly on oyster beds.

  16. An in situ postexposure feeding assay with Carcinus maenas for estuarine sediment-overlying water toxicity evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Susana M; Moreira-Santos, Matilde; Guilhermino, Lúcia; Ribeiro, Rui

    2006-01-01

    This study developed and evaluated a short-term sublethal in situ toxicity assay for estuarine sediment-overlying waters, with the crab Carcinus maenas (L.) based on postexposure feeding. It consisted of a 48-h in situ exposure period followed by a short postexposure feeding period (30 min). A precise method for quantifying feeding, using the Polychaeta Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Müller as food source, was first developed. The sensitivity of the postexposure feeding response was verified by comparing it to that of lethality, upon cadmium exposure. The influence of environmental conditions prevailing during exposure (salinity, temperature, substrate, light regime, and food availability) on postexposure feeding was also addressed. The potential of this in situ assay was then investigated by deploying organisms at ten sites, located in reference and contaminated Portuguese estuaries. Organism recovery ranged between 90% and 100% and a significant postexposure feeding depression (16.3-72.7%) was observed at all contaminated sites relatively to references. PMID:16002194

  17. Acute effects of chlorpyryphos-ethyl and secondary treated effluents on acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activities in Carcinus maenas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jihene Ghedira; Jamel Jebali; Zied Bouraoui; Mohamed Banni; Lassaad Chouba; Hamadi Boussetta

    2009-01-01

    The acute effects of commercial formulation of chlorpyrifos-ethyl (Dursban(r)) and the secondary treated industrial/urban effluent (STIUE) exposure on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) activities in hepatopancreas and gills of Mediterranean crab Carcinus maenas were investigated. After 2 d of exposure to chlorpyriphos-ethyl, the AChE activity was inhibited in both organs at concentrations of 3.12 and 7.82 μg/L, whereas the BuChE was inhibited only at higher concentration 7.82 μg/L of commercial preparation Dursban(r). The exposure of crabs to Dursban(r) (3.12 μg/L) showed a significant decrement of AChE activity at 24 and 48 h, whereas the BuChE was inhibited only after 24 h and no inhibition for both enzymes was observed after 72 h. Moreover, a significant repression of AChE activity was observed in both organs of C. maenas exposed to 5% of STIUE. Our experiments indicated that the measurement of AChE activity in gills and hepatopancreas of C. meanas would be useful biomarker of organophosphorous (OP) and of neurotoxic effects of STIUE in Tunisia.

  18. Glycoproteins from the cuticle of the Atlantic shore crab Carcinus maenas: I. Electrophoresis and Western-blot analysis by use of lectins

    OpenAIRE

    Compère, P.; Jaspar-Versali, M.-F.; Goffinet, G.

    2002-01-01

    The protein and glycoprotein content of four different neutral or acidic solvent extracts (0.5 M KCl, 10% EDTA, 0.1 N HCI, or 2% acetic acid) from the mineralized exoskeleton of a decapod crustacean, the Atlantic shore crab Carcinus maenas, were characterized by quantitative analysis of proteins, SDS-PAGE analysis, and probing with lectins on blots. The lectins used were Conconavalin A, Jacalin, soybean agglutinin, Maackia amurensis agglutinin II, and Sambucus nigra agglutinin. The results sh...

  19. Ingestion of Plastic Microfibers by the Crab Carcinus maenas and Its Effect on Food Consumption and Energy Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Andrew J R; Urbina, Mauricio A; Corr, Shauna; Lewis, Ceri; Galloway, Tamara S

    2015-12-15

    Microscopic plastic fragments (plastic type reported in the guts of marine organisms, but their effects once ingested are unknown. This study investigated the fate of polypropylene rope microfibers (1-5 mm in length) ingested by the crab Carcinus maenas and the consequences for the crab's energy budget. In chronic 4 week feeding studies, crabs that ingested food containing microfibers (0.3-1.0% plastic by weight) showed reduced food consumption (from 0.33 to 0.03 g d(-1)) and a significant reduction in energy available for growth (scope for growth) from 0.59 to -0.31 kJ crab d(-1) in crabs fed with 1% plastic. The polypropylene microfibers were physically altered by their passage through the foregut and were excreted with a smaller overall size and length and amalgamated into distinctive balls. These results support of the emerging paradigm that a key biological impact of microplastic ingestion is a reduction in energy budgets for the affected marine biota. We also provide novel evidence of the biotransformations that can affect the plastics themselves following ingestion and excretion. PMID:26529464

  20. An in situ postexposure feeding assay with Carcinus maenas for estuarine sediment-overlying water toxicity evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study developed and evaluated a short-term sublethal in situ toxicity assay for estuarine sediment-overlying waters, with the crab Carcinus maenas (L.) based on postexposure feeding. It consisted of a 48-h in situ exposure period followed by a short postexposure feeding period (30 min). A precise method for quantifying feeding, using the Polychaeta Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Mueller as food source, was first developed. The sensitivity of the postexposure feeding response was verified by comparing it to that of lethality, upon cadmium exposure. The influence of environmental conditions prevailing during exposure (salinity, temperature, substrate, light regime, and food availability) on postexposure feeding was also addressed. The potential of this in situ assay was then investigated by deploying organisms at ten sites, located in reference and contaminated Portuguese estuaries. Organism recovery ranged between 90% and 100% and a significant postexposure feeding depression (16.3-72.7%) was observed at all contaminated sites relatively to references. - A new sub-lethal toxicity assay is presented for marine invertebrates

  1. An in situ postexposure feeding assay with Carcinus maenas for estuarine sediment-overlying water toxicity evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Susana M. [Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas de Abel Salazar (ICBAS), Departamento de Estudos de Populacoes, Largo Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Moreira-Santos, Matilde [Instituto do Ambiente e Vida, Departamento de Zoologia da Universidade de Coimbra, Largo Marques de Pombal, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal); Guilhermino, Lucia [Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas de Abel Salazar (ICBAS), Departamento de Estudos de Populacoes, Largo Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Laboratorio de Ecotoxicologia, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Ribeiro, Rui [Instituto do Ambiente e Vida, Departamento de Zoologia da Universidade de Coimbra, Largo Marques de Pombal, 3004-517 Coimbra (Portugal)]. E-mail: rui.ribeiro@zoo.uc.pt

    2006-01-15

    This study developed and evaluated a short-term sublethal in situ toxicity assay for estuarine sediment-overlying waters, with the crab Carcinus maenas (L.) based on postexposure feeding. It consisted of a 48-h in situ exposure period followed by a short postexposure feeding period (30 min). A precise method for quantifying feeding, using the Polychaeta Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor Mueller as food source, was first developed. The sensitivity of the postexposure feeding response was verified by comparing it to that of lethality, upon cadmium exposure. The influence of environmental conditions prevailing during exposure (salinity, temperature, substrate, light regime, and food availability) on postexposure feeding was also addressed. The potential of this in situ assay was then investigated by deploying organisms at ten sites, located in reference and contaminated Portuguese estuaries. Organism recovery ranged between 90% and 100% and a significant postexposure feeding depression (16.3-72.7%) was observed at all contaminated sites relatively to references. - A new sub-lethal toxicity assay is presented for marine invertebrates.

  2. Amount and metal composition of midgut gland metallothionein in shore crabs (Carcinus maenas) after exposure to cadmium in the food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Knud Ladegaard; Bach, Louise Thornhøj; Bjerregaard, Poul, E-mail: poul@biology.sdu.dk

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Crabs were fed with Cd in concentrations of 1.1–5.1 μg g⁻¹ food. • Metallothionein concentrations only increased at 5.1 μg g⁻¹. • Cd contents of metallothionein increased linearly with exposure. • A marked influence by the variable Cu contents on metal composition was recorded. • Digestive gland metallothionein is a poor biomarker for Cd exposure. - Abstract: Accumulation of cadmium in aquatic invertebrates may compromise human food safety and anthropogenic additions of cadmium to coastal areas cause concern. Induction of crustacean metallothionein has been suggested as a useful biomarker for contamination of the aquatic environment with cadmium. We investigated how exposure to low concentrations of cadmium in the food affects the subcellular binding of cadmium with the shore crab Carcinus maenas as model organism. Approximately 80% of the assimilated cadmium was bound in the soluble fraction of the midgut gland and of this, 82% was found in the metallothionein fraction. Metallothionein synthesis was only induced at the highest exposure level. However, the number of cadmium atoms bound per molecule of metallothionein increased linearly with exposure, from approximately 0.18 in the control group to 1.4 in a group administered food containing 5.1 μg Cd g⁻¹. We noted a marked interaction between the presence of copper and zinc in the midgut gland and the binding of cadmium. The usefulness of crustacean midgut gland metallothionein as a biomarker for cadmium exposure at modest levels was questioned since exposures at levels producing significant increases in the tissue contents of the metal did not result in elevated concentrations of metallothionein in the midgut gland.

  3. Amount and metal composition of midgut gland metallothionein in shore crabs (Carcinus maenas) after exposure to cadmium in the food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Crabs were fed with Cd in concentrations of 1.1–5.1 μg g−1 food. • Metallothionein concentrations only increased at 5.1 μg g−1. • Cd contents of metallothionein increased linearly with exposure. • A marked influence by the variable Cu contents on metal composition was recorded. • Digestive gland metallothionein is a poor biomarker for Cd exposure. - Abstract: Accumulation of cadmium in aquatic invertebrates may compromise human food safety and anthropogenic additions of cadmium to coastal areas cause concern. Induction of crustacean metallothionein has been suggested as a useful biomarker for contamination of the aquatic environment with cadmium. We investigated how exposure to low concentrations of cadmium in the food affects the subcellular binding of cadmium with the shore crab Carcinus maenas as model organism. Approximately 80% of the assimilated cadmium was bound in the soluble fraction of the midgut gland and of this, 82% was found in the metallothionein fraction. Metallothionein synthesis was only induced at the highest exposure level. However, the number of cadmium atoms bound per molecule of metallothionein increased linearly with exposure, from approximately 0.18 in the control group to 1.4 in a group administered food containing 5.1 μg Cd g−1. We noted a marked interaction between the presence of copper and zinc in the midgut gland and the binding of cadmium. The usefulness of crustacean midgut gland metallothionein as a biomarker for cadmium exposure at modest levels was questioned since exposures at levels producing significant increases in the tissue contents of the metal did not result in elevated concentrations of metallothionein in the midgut gland

  4. A comparative study of metabolism and concentration factors of Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, Co and Mg in Carcinus maenas and Cancer irroratus ovaries during ovogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, Co, and Mg were analysed in the ovary of Carcinus maenas and Cancer irroratus during ovogenesis. In both ovaries, the relatives rates, expressed as parts per millions as a ratio of wet and dry weight, are the following: Mg>Zn>Fe>Cu>Mn>Co, while in the hemolymph of Cancer irroratus these relative rates are the following: Mg>Cu>Zn>Fe>Mn>Co. Compared to concentrations of these metals in sea water, Mg expected, all metals in the ovary of Cancer irroratus have a concentration factor upper than 1. Compared to the concentration of metals in the hemolymph is, for Fe, Mn, and Co, the concentration factor upper than 1, and for Cu, Zn and Mg, the concentration factor lower than 1. A study of correlations was done between the concentrations of metals considered in pairs, and between the concentrations of metals and the parameters: water content and gonad index

  5. The role of an ancestral hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated K+ channel in branchial acid-base regulation in the green crab, Carcinus maenas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehsenfeld, Sandra; Weihrauch, Dirk

    2016-03-15

    Numerous electrophysiological studies on branchial K(+) transport in brachyuran crabs have established an important role for potassium channels in osmoregulatory ion uptake and ammonia excretion in the gill epithelium of decapod crustaceans. However, hardly anything is known of the actual nature of these channels in crustaceans. In the present study, the identification of a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated potassium channel (HCN) in the transcriptome of the green crab Carcinus maenas and subsequent performance of quantitative real-time PCR revealed the ubiquitous expression of this channel in this species. Even though mRNA expression levels in the cerebral ganglion were found to be approximately 10 times higher compared with all other tissues, posterior gills still expressed significant levels of HCN, indicating an important role for this transporter in branchial ion regulation. The relatively unspecific K(+)-channel inhibitor Ba(2+), as well as the HCN-specific blocker ZD7288, as applied in gill perfusion experiments and electrophysiological studies employing the split gill lamellae revealed the presence of at least two different K(+)/NH4 (+)-transporting structures in the branchial epithelium of C. maenas. Furthermore, HCN mRNA levels in posterior gill 7 decreased significantly in response to the respiratory or metabolic acidosis that was induced by acclimation of green crabs to high environmental PCO2  and ammonia, respectively. Consequently, the present study provides first evidence that HCN-promoted NH4 (+) epithelial transport is involved in both branchial acid-base and ammonia regulation in an invertebrate. PMID:26787479

  6. Variations in ecdysteroid levels and Cytochrome p450 expression during moult and reproduction in male shore crabs Carcinus maenas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Styrishave, Bjarne; Rewitz, Kim; Lund, Torben;

    2004-01-01

    Ecdysteroid levels were investigated by HPLC-MS over the moult cycle and in relation to reproduction in male shore crabs Carcinus maenas. Ecdysone (E), 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and Ponasterone A (PoA) were quantified in the haemolymph, hepatopancreas and testis. Also, the expression of 2 recently...... discovered Cytochrome p(450) genes (CYP330A1 and CYP4C39) inducible by ecdysteroids was studied in the hepatopancreas by Northern blot hybridisation analysis. In the haemolymph and hepatopancreas, all 3 ecdysteroids varied over the moult cycle with high levels in premoult and low levels in postmoult and...

  7. Neuroendocrine disruption in the shore crab Carcinus maenas: Effects of serotonin and fluoxetine on chh- and mih-gene expression, glycaemia and ecdysteroid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Alexandrine; Monsinjon, Tiphaine; Delbecque, Jean-Paul; Olivier, Stéphanie; Poret, Agnès; Foll, Frank Le; Durand, Fabrice; Knigge, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Serotonin, a highly conserved neurotransmitter, controls many biological functions in vertebrates, but also in invertebrates. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as fluoxetine, are commonly used in human medication to ease depression by affecting serotonin levels. Their residues and metabolites can be detected in the aquatic environment and its biota. They may also alter serotonin levels in aquatic invertebrates, thereby perturbing physiological functions. To investigate whether such perturbations can indeed be expected, shore crabs (Carcinus maenas) were injected either with serotonin, fluoxetine or a combination of both. Dose-dependent effects of fluoxetine ranging from 250 to 750nM were investigated. Gene expression of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (chh) as well as moult inhibiting hormone (mih) was assessed by RT-qPCR at 2h and 12h after injection. Glucose and ecdysteroid levels in the haemolymph were monitored in regular intervals until 12h. Serotonin led to a rapid increase of chh and mih expression. On the contrary, fluoxetine only affected chh and mih expression after several hours, but kept expression levels significantly elevated. Correspondingly, serotonin rapidly increased glycaemia, which returned to normal or below normal levels after 12h. Fluoxetine, however, resulted in a persistent low-level increase of glycaemia, notably during the period when negative feedback regulation reduced glycaemia in the serotonin treated animals. Ecdysteroid levels were significantly decreased by serotonin and fluoxetine, with the latter showing less pronounced and less rapid, but longer lasting effects. Impacts of fluoxetine on glycaemia and ecdysteroids were mostly observed at higher doses (500 and 750nM) and affected principally the response dynamics, but not the amplitude of glycaemia and ecdysteroid-levels. These results suggest that psychoactive drugs are able to disrupt neuroendocrine control in decapod crustaceans, as they interfere with the

  8. In vivo and in vitro cadmium accumulation during the moult cycle of the male shore crab Carcinus maenas-interaction with calcium metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of moult stage on cadmium accumulation and distribution was investigated in vivo in male shore crabs Carcinus maenas exposed to 1 mg Cd l-1 for 7 days. The accumulation of cadmium in all tissues examined was markedly higher in postmoult (A1-2 and B1-2) compared to intermoult (C1, C3 and C4) and premoult (D0-3). In addition, elevated levels of cadmium were found in gills of late premoult (D2-3) animals. The total amount of cadmium accumulated in the tissues (haemolymph, gills, midgut gland and muscle) increased from 43 μg Cd in early premoult (D0-1) to 391 μg Cd in late postmoult (B1-2). Gills and midgut gland were the primary cadmium accumulating tissues in C4-intermoult and premoult (D0-3); in early postmoult (A1-2) haemolymph and midgut gland were the main cadmium containing tissues, while midgut gland dominated in late postmoult (B1-2) and early intermoult (C1 and C3). A detailed account of calcium distribution in haemolymph, gills, midgut gland, muscle and exoskeleton during the moult cycle is presented. Mechanistic links between cadmium and calcium uptake in posterior gills of C4-intermoult and early postmoult (A1-2) crabs were explored using an in vitro gill perfusion technique. Calcium and cadmium influxes were markedly higher in postmoult compared to intermoult. No differences between intermoult and postmoult effluxes were found for either calcium or cadmium. From intermoult to postmoult net influx increased from 2.4 to 29 μmol Ca2+ g-1 wwgill h-1 and from 0.24 to 25 nmol Cd2+ g-1 wwgill h-1. The results indicate that the postmoult increase in cadmium influx is due to increased active transport of cadmium, at least partly, by accidental uptake via calcium transporting proteins. The in vitro net influx rates corresponded accurately to the observed in vivo accumulation of both cadmium and calcium. Although cadmium accumulation and distribution are clearly linked to changes in calcium requirements, cadmium did not interfere with calcium

  9. Laboratory simulation system, using Carcinus maenas as the model organism, for assessing the impact of CO2 leakage from sub-seabed injection and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Romero, Araceli; Jiménez-Tenorio, Natalia; Riba, Inmaculada; Blasco, Julián

    2016-01-01

    The capture and storage of CO2 in sub-seabed geological formations has been proposed as one of the potential options to decrease atmospheric CO2 concentrations in order to mitigate the abrupt and irreversible consequences of climate change. However, it is possible that CO2 leakages could occur during the injection and sequestration procedure, with significant repercussions for the marine environment. We investigate the effects of acidification derived from possible CO2 leakage events on the European green crab, Carcinus maenas. To this end, a lab-scale experiment involving direct release of CO2 was conducted at pH values between 7.7 and 6.15. Female crabs were exposed for 10 days to sediment collected from two different coastal areas, one with relatively uncontaminated sediment (RSP) and the other with known contaminated sediment (MZ and ML), under the pre-established seawater pH conditions. Survival rate, histopathological damage and metal (Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Cr, Cd and Pb) and As accumulation in gills and hepatopancreas tissue were employed as endpoints. In addition, the obtained results were compared with the results of the physico-chemical characterization of the sediments, which included the determination of the metals Fe, Mn, Cu, Zn, Cr, Pb and Cd, the metalloid As, certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), as well as nonchemical sediment properties (grain size, organic carbon and total organic matter). Significant associations were observed between pH and the histological damage. Concentrations of Fe, Mn, Cr, Pb, Cd and PAHs in sediment, presented significant negative correlations with the damage to gills and hepatopancreas, and positive correlations with metal accumulation in both tissues. The results obtained in this study reveal the importance of sediment properties in the biological effects caused by possible CO2 leakage. However, a clear pattern was not observed between metal accumulation in tissues and p

  10. In vivo and in vitro cadmium accumulation during the moult cycle of the male shore crab Carcinus maenas-interaction with calcium metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norum, Ulrik [Institute of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark)]. E-mail: ulrik@biology.sdu.dk; Bondgaard, Morten [Institute of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Pedersen, Thomas V. [Institute of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Bjerregaard, Poul [Institute of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark)

    2005-03-25

    The effect of moult stage on cadmium accumulation and distribution was investigated in vivo in male shore crabs Carcinus maenas exposed to 1 mg Cd l{sup -1} for 7 days. The accumulation of cadmium in all tissues examined was markedly higher in postmoult (A{sub 1-2} and B{sub 1-2}) compared to intermoult (C{sub 1}, C{sub 3} and C{sub 4}) and premoult (D{sub 0-3}). In addition, elevated levels of cadmium were found in gills of late premoult (D{sub 2-3}) animals. The total amount of cadmium accumulated in the tissues (haemolymph, gills, midgut gland and muscle) increased from 43 {mu}g Cd in early premoult (D{sub 0-1}) to 391 {mu}g Cd in late postmoult (B{sub 1-2}). Gills and midgut gland were the primary cadmium accumulating tissues in C{sub 4}-intermoult and premoult (D{sub 0-3}); in early postmoult (A{sub 1-2}) haemolymph and midgut gland were the main cadmium containing tissues, while midgut gland dominated in late postmoult (B{sub 1-2}) and early intermoult (C{sub 1} and C{sub 3}). A detailed account of calcium distribution in haemolymph, gills, midgut gland, muscle and exoskeleton during the moult cycle is presented. Mechanistic links between cadmium and calcium uptake in posterior gills of C{sub 4}-intermoult and early postmoult (A{sub 1-2}) crabs were explored using an in vitro gill perfusion technique. Calcium and cadmium influxes were markedly higher in postmoult compared to intermoult. No differences between intermoult and postmoult effluxes were found for either calcium or cadmium. From intermoult to postmoult net influx increased from 2.4 to 29 {mu}mol Ca{sup 2+} g{sup -1} ww{sub gill} h{sup -1} and from 0.24 to 25 nmol Cd{sup 2+} g{sup -1} ww{sub gill} h{sup -1}. The results indicate that the postmoult increase in cadmium influx is due to increased active transport of cadmium, at least partly, by accidental uptake via calcium transporting proteins. The in vitro net influx rates corresponded accurately to the observed in vivo accumulation of both cadmium

  11. The selective advantage of host feminization: a case study of the green crab Carcinus maenas and the parasitic barnacle Sacculina carcini

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Tommy; Nielsen, Anders Isberg; Stig-Jørgensen, Anders Isak;

    2012-01-01

    Male crabs infected by parasitic barnacles (Rhizocephala) are known to be morphologically feminized. Here, we investigate morphological chances in green crabs, Carcinus maenas, induced by the parasitic barnacle Sacculina carcini. Infected males acquire a broader, longer and segmented abdomen......, fringed with marginal setae. Copulatory appendages and pereopods are reduced in length, and the chelae become smaller. The feminization show great individual variation. Males with scars from lost externae, the parasites reproductive organ situated under the abdomen, are less modified than males carrying...... an externa, and the feminization is more pronounced in smaller than in larger males. No super-feminization is evident in female crabs that remain morphologically unaffected by infection. The protective value of a parasitically induced enlargement of the male abdomen may constitute an adaptation that...

  12. Color change and camouflage in juvenile shore crabs Carcinus maenas

    OpenAIRE

    Martin eStevens; Alice E Lown; Wood, Louisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Camouflage is perhaps the most widespread anti-predator defense in nature, with many different types thought to exist. Of these, resembling the general color and pattern of the background (background matching) is likely to be the most common. Background matching can be achieved by adaptation of individual appearance to different habitats or substrates, behavioral choice, and color change. Although the ability to change coloration for camouflage over a period of hours or days is likely to be w...

  13. Purification and characterization of a cadmium-induced metallothionein from the shore crab Carcinus maenas (L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, K L; Pedersen, S N; Højrup, P;

    1994-01-01

    , gel filtration and reversed-phase h.p.l.c. The complete amino acid sequences of both variants have been elucidated by m.s. and automated sequence analysis on S-methylated proteins or fragments produced by cleavage of the S-methylated proteins with Staphylococcus aureus proteinase. The two variants...

  14. Effect of Microplastic on the Gills of the Shore Crab Carcinus maenas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Andrew J R; Urbina, Mauricio A; Goodhead, Rhys; Moger, Julian; Lewis, Ceri; Galloway, Tamara S

    2016-05-17

    Microscopic plastic debris (microplastics, plastic concentration added. Carboxylated (COOH) and aminated (NH2) polystyrene microspheres were distributed differently across the gill surface, although neither had a significant adverse impact on gill function. These results illustrate the extent of the physiological effects of microplastics compared to the physiological resilience of shore crabs in maintaining osmoregulatory and respiratory function after acute exposure to both anthropogenic plastics and natural particles. PMID:27070459

  15. Effects of substrate type on growth and mortality of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis ) exposed to the predator Carcinus maenas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rikke; Dolmer, Per

    2002-01-01

    different substrate types in combined field and laboratory experiments. The experiments showed that complexity of the substrate increased blue mussel survival significantly, through a decrease in predation pressure. However, increased intraspecific competition for food on the complex substrate resulted in...

  16. Population genetics of C. Maenas : oceanography and larval dispersal

    OpenAIRE

    Domingues, Carla Sofia Portela

    2010-01-01

    Decifrar a complexa interacção entre os ciclos de vida de espécies marinhas e a oceanografia revela-se fundamental para a compreensão do fluxo genético e da conectividade no meio marinho. Nas espécies marinhas com desenvolvimento indirecto o fluxo de genes entre populações depende da distância que separa as populações, bem como da interacção entre a duração do desenvolvimento larvar, do comportamento das larvas e dos padrões de circulação oceânica. A conectividade larvar inf...

  17. Effects of different dietary of protein and lipid levels on the growth of freshwater prawns (Macrobrachium carcinus) broodstock

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Benítez-Mandujano; Jesús T. Ponce-Palafox

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTObjective. Evaluate the effects of varying dietary protein and lipid levels on the growth and body composition of adult freshwater prawns, Macrobrachium carcinus (Linnaeus 1758), in a recirculation system for 11 weeks (77 days). Materials and methods. The experimental treatments were assigned in triplicate. Six test diets were formulated with three different protein levels (35, 40 and 45%) and two lipid levels (8 and 13%). Results. The highest survival rate, growth indices and feed ut...

  18. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  19. First cytochemical study of haemocytes from the crab Carcinus aestuarii (Crustacea, Decapoda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Matozzo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, a morphological study of haemocytes from the crab Carcinus aestuarii was carried out by means of light microscopy and differing cytochemical assays. Analysis of haemocyte size frequency distribution (performed by means of a Coulter Counter revealed the presence of two distinct haemocyte fractions in C. aestuarii haemolymph, depending on cell size. The first fraction was of about 3-5 µm in diameter and 30-50 fL in volume, the second was of about 6-12 µm in diameter and over 200 fL in volume. Mean cell diameter and volume were 8.20±1.7 µm and 272.30±143.5 fL, respectively. Haemocytes observed under light microscope were distinguished in three cell types: granulocytes (28%; 11.94±1.43 µm in diameter with evident cytoplasmic granules, semigranulocytes (27%; 12.38±1.76 µm in diameter with less granules than granulocytes, and hyalinocytes (44%; 7.88±1.6 µm in diameter without granules. In addition, a peculiar cell type was occasionally found (about 1%: it was 25-30 µm in diameter and had a great vacuole and a peripheral cytoplasm with granules. Granulocyte and semigranulocyte granules stained in vivo with Neutral Red, indicating that they were lysosomes. Giemsa’s dye confirmed that granulocytes and semigranulocytes were larger than hyalinocytes. Pappenheim’s panoptical staining and Ehrlich’s triacid mixture allowed to distinguish granule-containing cells (including semigranulocytes in acidophils (64%, basophils (35% and neutrophils (1%. Hyalinocytes showed always a basophilic cytoplasm. Haemocytes were positive to the PAS reaction for carbohydrates, even if cytoplasm carbohydrate distribution varied among cell types. Lastly, lipids were found on cell membrane and in cytoplasm of all haemocyte types in the form of black spots produced after Sudan Black B staining. The morphological characterisation of C. aestuarii haemocytes by light microscopy was necessary before performing both ultrastructural and functional

  20. PROTOCOLO PARA LA EXTRACCIÓN DE ADN METAGENÓMICO BACTERIANO DEL LANGOSTINO Macrobrachium carcinus L

    OpenAIRE

    J. Ulises González-de la Cruz; H. Delfin-González; Ma. C. de la Cruz-Leyva; R. A. Rojas-Herrera; M. Zamudio-Maya

    2011-01-01

    En este trabajo se adecuó un protocolo para la extracción de ADN metagenómico (ADNmg) bacteriano del sistema digestivo (intestino, estómago y hepatopáncreas) del langostino Macrobrachium carcinus L., tomando como referencia la metodología de extracción de ADN bacteriano de suelos y sedimentos (Rojas-Herrera et al., 2008). Esta metodología constaba de lisis enzimática, física, mecánica y química; después de una serie de ensayos se suprimió la lisis enzimática. Sin embargo, el éxito de la extra...

  1. Utjecaj zagađenosti mora na histoenzimsku aktivnost u škrgama i nekim organima probavnog sustava glavatog cipla (Mugil cephalus) i običnog vodara (Carcinus aestuari Nardo).

    OpenAIRE

    Mihelić, Damir; Slavica, Alen; Gjurčević-Kantura, Vesna; Janicki, Zdravko; Babić, Krešimir

    1999-01-01

    More je svakim danom sve onečišćenije različitim organskim i anorganskim tvarima. Onečišćenja, posebice u lukama, bilo organska bilo anorganska nepovoljno utjeću na žive organizme u moru. Riba glavati cipal (Mugil cephalus) je redovito prisutna u lukama gdje ima obilje hrane, a uz nju se često može naći i rak obični vodar (Carcinus aestuari Nardo). Istražili smo aktivnost oksidativnih enzima (LDH, SDH i NADPH) u škrgama, jetri, probavnoj žlijezdi, želucu i crijevima glavatog cipla i običnog v...

  2. Competition and niche segregation following the arrival of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brink, A.M.; Wijnhoven, S.; McLay, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    In a combined study including a 20 year monitoring programme of the benthic communities of four Dutch delta waters and a snapshot survey conducted in the Oosterschelde tidal bay in 2011, the populations of the native portunid European shore crab Carcinus maenas and the introduced varunid crabs Hemig

  3. [Genetics and genetic counseling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzi, Claudia; Liut, Francesca; Dallera, Nadia; Mazza, Cinzia; Magistroni, Riccardo; Savoldi, Gianfranco; Scolari, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent genetic disease, characterized by progressive development of bilateral renal cysts. Two causative genes have been identified: PKD1 and PKD2. ADPKD phenotype is highly variable. Typically, ADPKD is an adult onset disease. However, occasionally, ADPKD manifests as very early onset disease. The phenotypic variability of ADPKD can be explained at three genetic levels: genic, allelic and gene modifier effects. Recent advances in molecular screening for PKD gene mutations and the introduction of the new next generation sequencing (NGS)- based genotyping approach have generated considerable improvement regarding the knowledge of genetic basis of ADPKD. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the genetics of ADPKD, focusing on new insights in genotype-phenotype correlation and exploring novel clinical approach to genetic testing. Evaluation of these new genetic information requires a multidisciplinary approach involving a nephrologist and a clinical geneticist. PMID:27067213

  4. New Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > The New Genetics The New Genetics Living Laboratories Classroom Poster Order a Free Copy ... Piece to a Century-Old Evolutionary Puzzle Computing Genetics Model Organisms RNA Interference The New Genetics is ...

  5. Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic counseling provides information and support to people who have, or may be at risk for, genetic disorders. A ... meets with you to discuss genetic risks. The counseling may be for yourself or a family member. ...

  6. Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  7. Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... go for genetic counseling, such as: A family history of a genetic condition To learn about genetic screening for diseases that are more common in certain ethnic groups (e.g., sickle cell disease in African Americans and Tay-Sachs disease in Ashkenazi Jews) To discuss abnormal results ...

  8. Imaging Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Karen E.; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2009-01-01

    Imaging genetics is an experimental strategy that integrates molecular genetics and neuroimaging technology to examine biological mechanisms that mediate differences in behavior and the risks for psychiatric disorder. The basic principles in imaging genetics and the development of the field are discussed.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Genetic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Health Conditions Explore the signs ...

  10. Genetic barcodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weier, Heinz -Ulrich G

    2015-08-04

    Herein are described multicolor FISH probe sets termed "genetic barcodes" targeting several cancer or disease-related loci to assess gene rearrangements and copy number changes in tumor cells. Two, three or more different fluorophores are used to detect the genetic barcode sections thus permitting unique labeling and multilocus analysis in individual cell nuclei. Gene specific barcodes can be generated and combined to provide both numerical and structural genetic information for these and other pertinent disease associated genes.

  11. Consistent individual differences in haemolymph density reflect risk propensity in a marine invertebrate

    OpenAIRE

    Fürtbauer, Ines

    2015-01-01

    While the literature on consistent individual differences in correlated suites of physiological and behavioural traits is steadily growing for vertebrates, invertebrates have received less attention. The few studies that do exist have measured temporary physiological states (or responses), rather than consistent individual physiological traits. Here, I explore the consistency of individual differences in physiology and behaviour of n=53 shore crabs (Carcinus maenas) by repeatedly measuring ha...

  12. Persistent organic pollutants in the Scheldt estuary: Environmental distribution and bioaccumulation.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Ael, E.; Covaci, A.; Blust, R.; Bervoets, L

    2012-01-01

    Levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were determined in the sediment and several species (European flounder, Platichthys flesus; common sole, Solea solea; Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis; shore crab, Carcinus maenas; brown shrimp, Crangon crangon; blue mussel, Mytilus edulis and bristle worms, Polychaeta) from 7 locations in the Scheldt estuary (SE, the Netherlands–Belgium). Overall POP levels in the se...

  13. Corrigendum to "Persistent organic pollutants in the Scheldt estuary: Environmental distribution and bioaccumulation" [Environ. Int. 48C (2012) 17-27

    OpenAIRE

    Van Ael, E.; Covaci, A.; Blust, R.; Bervoets, L

    2014-01-01

    Levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) were determined in the sediment and in several species (European flounder, Platichthys flesus; common sole, Solea solea; Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis; shore crab, Carcinus maenas; brown shrimp, Crangon crangon; blue mussel, Mytilus edulis and bristle worms, Polychaeta) from 7 locations in the Scheldt estuary (SE, the Netherlands–Belgium). Overall POP levels in the...

  14. Signaled avoidance in the eye withdrawal reflex of the green crab

    OpenAIRE

    Abramson, Charles I.; ARMSTRONG, PHILIP M.; Feinman, Robin A.; Feinman, Richard D.

    1988-01-01

    Learning in a signaled avoidance procedure was studied in the eye withdrawal reflex of the green crab, Carcinus maenas. A puff of air to the eye, which causes eye retraction, was used as the unconditioned stimulus (US). A mild vibration on the carapace, which has no effect on untrained animals, was used as a warning (conditioned) stimulus (CS). Eye withdrawal during the CS led to the omission of the otherwise scheduled US. Acquisition was rapid, reaching about 75% avoidance after 30 trials. E...

  15. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorhaus Daniel B

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions.

  16. Genetic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, John

    1973-01-01

    Presents a review of genetic engineering, in which the genotypes of plants and animals (including human genotypes) may be manipulated for the benefit of the human species. Discusses associated problems and solutions and provides an extensive bibliography of literature relating to genetic engineering. (JR)

  17. Community shelter use in response to two benthic decapod predators in the Long Island Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, David M; Reagan, Dugan; Crivello, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    To investigate community shelter effects of two invasive decapod species, Hemigrapsus sanguineus and Carcinus maenas, in the Long Island Sound (LIS), we deployed artificial shelters in the intertidal and immediate subtidal zones. These consisted of five groups during the summer: a control, a resident H. sanguineus male or female group, and a resident C. maenas male or female group. We quantified utilization of the shelters at 24 h by counting crabs and fish present. We found significant avoidance of H. sanguineus in the field by benthic hermit crabs (Pagurus spp.) and significant avoidance of C. maenas by the seaboard goby (Gobiosoma ginsburgi). The grubby (Myoxocephalus aenaeus) avoided neither treatment, probably since it tends to be a predator of invertebrates. H. sanguineus avoided C. maenas treatments, whereas C. maenas did not avoid any treatment. Seasonal deployments in the subtidal indicated cohabitation of a number of benthic species in the LIS, with peak shelter use corresponding with increased predation and likely reproductive activity in spring and summer for green crabs (C. maenas), hermit crabs (Pagurus spp.), seaboard gobies (G. ginsburgi), and grubbies (Myoxocephalus aenaeus). PMID:27547570

  18. Genetic Breakthrough

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new calf breeding technique shows promise for treating malignant tumors Chinese scientists have successfully bred a genetically altered cow capable of producing cancer-curing proteins for human beings.

  19. Genetic Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Online Health Resources For Health Professionals Competency & Curricular Resources Genetics 101 Genomic Medicine and Health Care ... Role of the NHGRI in the Federal Legislative Process Genome Statute and Legislation Database Human Subjects Research ...

  20. Genetic Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Online Health Resources For Health Professionals Competency & Curricular Resources Genetics 101 Genomic Medicine and Health Care ... of DNA. Think of it as a shuffling process, called recombination. The single chromosome in a reproductive ...

  1. Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 21 (Down syndrome) . Other trisomies include trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome) and trisomy 18 (Edwards syndrome) . Monosomy is ... which there is an extra chromosome. Trisomy 13 (Patau Syndrome): A genetic disorder that causes serious heart ...

  2. RNA genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, E. (Instituto de Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Canto Blanco, Madrid (ES)); Holland, J.J. (California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (USA). Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA genetics: Retroviruses, Viroids, and RNA recombination, Volume 2. Topics covered include: Replication of retrovirus genomes, Hepatitis B virus replication, and Evolution of RNA viruses.

  3. Ciona Genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Veeman, Michael T.; Chiba, Shota; Smith, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Ascidians, such as Ciona, are invertebrate chordates with simple embryonic body plans and small, relatively non-redundant genomes. Ciona genetics is in its infancy compared to many other model systems, but it provides a powerful method for studying this important vertebrate outgroup. Here we give basic methods for genetic analysis of Ciona, including protocols for controlled crosses both by natural spawning and by the surgical isolation of gametes; the identification and propagation of mutant...

  4. What is Genetic Counseling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1983) For information on genetic counselors and genetic counseling training programs, please download this helpful brochure from the Association of Genetic Counseling Program Directors: Who are Genetic Counselors? Practicing genetic ...

  5. Genetic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, M.; Alonso-Blanco, C.; Stam, P.

    2006-01-01

    The Mendelian analysis of genetic variation, available as induced mutants or as natural variation, requires a number of steps that are described in this chapter. These include the determination of the number of genes involved in the observed trait's variation, the determination of dominance relation

  6. Genetic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1948-1953 a large scale field survey was conducted to investigate the possible genetic effects of A-bomb radiation on over 70,000 pregnancy terminations in the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The indices of possible genetic effect including sex ratio, birth weight, frequency of malformation, stillbirth, neonatal death, deaths within 9 months and anthropometric measurements at 9 months of age for these children were investigated in relation to their parent's exposure status to the A-bomb. There were no detectable genetic effects in this sample, except for a slight change in sex ratio which was in the direction to be expected if exposure had induced sex-linked lethal mutations. However, continued study of the sex ratio, based upon birth certificates in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for 1954-1962, did not confirm the earlier trend. Mortality in these children of A-bomb survivors is being followed using a cohort of 54,000 subjects. No clearly significant effect of parental exposure on survival of the children has been demonstrated up to 1972 (age 17 on the average). On the basis of the regression data, the minimal genetic doubling dose of this type of radiation for mutations resulting in death is estimated at 46 rem for the father and 125 rem for the mother. (auth.)

  7. Genetic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter, we present a comprehensive analysis of the major classes of genetic diseases that would be increased as a result of an increased gonadal radiation exposure to a human population. The risk analysis takes on two major forms: the increase in genetic disease that would be observed in the immediate offspring of the exposed population, and the subsequent transmission of the newly induced mutations through future generations. The major classes of genetic disease will be induced at different frequencies, and will also impact differentially in terms of survivability and fertility on the affected individuals and their descendants. Some classes of disease will be expected to persist for only a few generations at most. Other types of genetic disease will persist through a longer period. The classes of genetic diseases studied are: dominant gene mutation, X-linked gene mutation, chromosome disorders and multifactorial disorders which involve the interaction of many mutant genes and environmental factors. For each of these classes we have derived the general equations of mutation induction for the male and female germ cells of critical importance in the mutation process. The frequency of induced mutations will be determined initially by the dose received, the type of radiation and, to some extent at high dose, by the manner in which the dose is received. We have used the modeling analyses to predict the outcomes for two nuclear power plant accident scenarios, the first in which the population receives a chronic dose of 0.1 Gy (10 rad) over a 50-year period, the second in which an equivalent population receives an acute dose of 2 Gy. In both cases the analyses are projected over a period of five generations

  8. Genetic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modeling analyses are used to predict the outcomes for two nuclear power plant accident scenarios, the first in which the population received a chronic dose of 0.1 Gy (10 rad) over a 50 year period, the second in which an equivalent population receives acute dose of 2 Gy. In both cases the analyses are projected over a period of five generations. The risk analysis takes on two major forms: the increase in genetic disease that would be observed in the immediate offspring of the exposed population, and the subsequent transmission of the newly induced mutations through future generations. The classes of genetic diseases studied are: dominant gene mutation, X-linked gene mutation, chromosome disorders and multifactorial disorders which involve the interaction of many mutant genes and environmental factors. 28 references, 3 figures, 5 tables

  9. Cancer Genetics Services Directory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Overview–for health professionals Research NCI Cancer Genetics Services Directory This directory lists professionals who provide services related to cancer genetics (cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, genetic susceptibility testing, ...

  10. Genetic Testing (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Genetic Testing KidsHealth > For Parents > Genetic Testing Print A A ... blood, skin, bone, or other tissue is needed. Genetic Testing During Pregnancy For genetic testing before birth, pregnant ...

  11. Genetic risks and genetic model specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Jinfeng; Yuan, Ao; Li, Qizhai; Gastwirth, Joseph L

    2016-08-21

    Genetic risks and genetic models are often used in design and analysis of genetic epidemiology studies. A genetic model is defined in terms of two genetic risk measures: genotype relative risk and odds ratio. The impacts of choosing a risk measure on the resulting genetic models are studied in the power to detect association and deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in cases using genetic relative risk. Extensive simulations demonstrate that the power of a study to detect associations using odds ratio is lower than that using relative risk with the same value when other parameters are fixed. When the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium holds in the general population, the genetic model can be inferred by the deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in only cases. Furthermore, it is more efficient than that based on the deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in all cases and controls. PMID:27181372

  12. Genetics and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Well with Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Genetics and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Studying twins has ... percent, and for non-identical pairs, even lower. Genetics and ankylosing spondylitis Each rheumatic disease has its ...

  13. Genetic Testing for ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your area, please visit www.nsgc.org . Genetic Testing Genetic testing can help determine the cause of FALS ... couples planning on having children to pursue prenatal testing. Genetic testing does not: Currently change medical treatment. Diagnose ...

  14. Specific Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links from the National Institutes of Health. Specific Genetic Disorders Many human diseases have a genetic component. ... Condition in an Adult The Undiagnosed Diseases Program Genetic Disorders Achondroplasia Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Antiphospholipid Syndrome ...

  15. Genetics of the Connectome

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Paul M.; Ge, Tian; Glahn, David C.; Jahanshad, Neda; Nichols, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Connectome genetics attempts to discover how genetic factors affect brain connectivity. Here we review a variety of genetic analysis methods – such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS), linkage and candidate gene studies – that have been fruitfully adapted to imaging data to implicate specific variants in the genome for brain-related traits. We then review studies of that emphasized the genetic influences on brain connectivity. Some of these perform genetic analysis of brain integrity an...

  16. Acidification and warming affect both a calcifying predator and prey, but not their interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landes, Anja; Zimmer, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Both ocean warming and acidification have been demonstrated to affect the growth, performance and reproductive success of calcifying invertebrates. However, relatively little is known regarding how such environmental change may affect interspecific interactions. We separately treated green crabs...... Carcinus maenas and periwinkles Littorina littorea under conditions that mimicked either ambient conditions (control) or warming and acidification, both separately and in combination, for 5 mo. After 5 mo, the predators, prey and predator-prey interactions were screened for changes in response to...... environmental change. Acidification negatively affected the closer-muscle length of the crusher chela and correspondingly the claw-strength increment in C. maenas. The effects of warming and/or acidification on L. littorea were less consistent but indicated weaker shells in response to acidification. On the...

  17. Alzheimer's Disease Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center Home About Alzheimer’s ... Plan National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Fact Sheet The Genetics of Disease ...

  18. Genetic Brain Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form ... mutation is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the ...

  19. Prenatal screening and genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alderson, P; Aro, A R; Dragonas, T;

    2001-01-01

    Although the term 'genetic screening' has been used for decades, this paper discusses how, in its most precise meaning, genetic screening has not yet been widely introduced. 'Prenatal screening' is often confused with 'genetic screening'. As we show, these terms have different meanings, and we...... examine definitions of the relevant concepts in order to illustrate this point. The concepts are i) prenatal, ii) genetic screening, iii) screening, scanning and testing, iv) maternal and foetal tests, v) test techniques and vi) genetic conditions. So far, prenatal screening has little connection...... with precisely defined genetics. There are benefits but also disadvantages in overstating current links between them in the term genetic screening. Policy making and professional and public understandings about screening could be clarified if the distinct meanings of prenatal screening and genetic screening were...

  20. Genetics Home Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Genetics Home Reference Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of ... of this page please turn Javascript on. The Genetics Home Reference (GHR) Web site — ghr.nlm.nih. ...

  1. Genetics by the Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Genetics by the Numbers By Chelsea Toledo and Kirstie ... June 11, 2012 Scholars have been studying modern genetics since the mid-19th century, but even today ...

  2. Genetics and the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find us on YouTube Follow us on Instagram Genetics and the Brain by Carl Sherman September 10, ... effects that may be responsible. How Much Is Genetic? [x] , [xi] , [xii] , [xiii] A basic question in ...

  3. Frontotemporal Dementia: Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calendar of Events Fundraising Events Conferences Press Releases Genetics of FTD After receiving a diagnosis of FTD ... that recent advances in science have brought the genetics of FTD into much better focus. In 2012, ...

  4. Genetics of Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Latin America Information For... Media Policy Makers Genetics of Hearing Loss Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... of hearing loss in babies is due to genetic causes. There are also a number of things ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: adermatoglyphia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions adermatoglyphia adermatoglyphia Enable Javascript to ...

  6. Genetic Brain Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form of a ... is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the brain. ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: phenylketonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) Disease InfoSearch: Phenylketonuria Genetic Science Learning Center, University of Utah Genetics Education Materials for School Success (GEMSS) MalaCards: phenylketonuria March of Dimes Montreal Children's Hospital My46 Trait Profile New England Consortium of Metabolic ...

  8. Genetic Testing and PXE

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Donate Search form Search You are here Home › Genetic Testing and PXE Shi Y, Terry SF, Terry ... LG, Gerard GF. Development of a rapid, reliable genetic test for pseudoxanthoma elasticum . J Mol Diagn . 2007 ...

  9. Genetic Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Newly Diagnosed Patients There are over 6,000 genetic disorders that can be passed down through the ... mission to help prevent, manage and treat inherited genetic diseases. View our latest News Brief here . You ...

  10. A role for haemolymph oxygen capacity in heat tolerance of eurythermal crabs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FolcoGiomi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat tolerance in aquatic ectotherms is constrained by a mismatch, occurring at high temperatures, between oxygen delivery and demand which compromises the maintenance of aerobic scope. The present study analyses how the wide thermal tolerance range of an eurythermal model species, the green crab Carcinus maenas is supported and limited by its ability to sustain efficient oxygen transport to tissues. Similar to other eurytherms, C. maenas sustains naturally occurring acute warming events through the integrated response of circulatory and respiratory systems. The response of C. maenas to warming is characterized by two phases. During initial warming, oxygen consumption and heart rate increase while stroke volume and haemolymph oxygen partial pressures decrease. During further warming, dissolved oxygen levels in the venous compartment decrease below the threshold of full haemocyanin oxygen saturation. The progressive release of haemocyanin bound oxygen with further warming follows an exponential pattern, thereby saving energy in oxygen transport and causing an associated leveling off of metabolic rate. According to the concept of oxygen and capacity limited thermal tolerance, this indicates that the thermal tolerance window is widened by the increasing contribution of haemocyanin oxygen transport and associated energy savings in cardiocirculation. Haemocyanin bound oxygen sustains cardiac performance to cover the temperature range experienced by C. maenas in the field. To our knowledge this is the first study providing evidence of a relationship between thermal tolerance and blood (haemolymph oxygen transport in eurythermal invertebrates.

  11. Genetics of language

    OpenAIRE

    Ramus, F.; Fisher, S.

    2009-01-01

    It has long been hypothesised that the human faculty to acquire a language is in some way encoded in our genetic program. However, only recently has genetic evidence been available to begin to substantiate the presumed genetic basis of language. Here we review the first data from molecular genetic studies showing association between gene variants and language disorders (specific language impairment, speech sound disorder, developmental dyslexia), we discuss the biological function of these ge...

  12. Behavioral genetics and taste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachmanov Alexander A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review focuses on behavioral genetic studies of sweet, umami, bitter and salt taste responses in mammals. Studies involving mouse inbred strain comparisons and genetic analyses, and their impact on elucidation of taste receptors and transduction mechanisms are discussed. Finally, the effect of genetic variation in taste responsiveness on complex traits such as drug intake is considered. Recent advances in development of genomic resources make behavioral genetics a powerful approach for understanding mechanisms of taste.

  13. Trade-off between increased survival and reduced growth for blue mussels living on Pacific oyster reefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eschweiler, Nina; Christensen, Helle Torp

    2011-01-01

    Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg 1793) have been introduced into the Wadden Sea (North Sea, Germany) in the mid of the 1980s and have invaded native blue mussel Mytilus edulis (L.) beds. The latter turned into oyster reefs where mussels seem to be relegated to the bottom in between the...... much larger oysters. By combining field and laboratory experiments, we reveal how mussels react to cohabitation with the invasive oysters. Mussels subjected to direct contact with crabs Carcinus maenas migrate from top to bottom positions between oysters in both field and laboratory experiments within...

  14. Report: Human cancer genetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Marilyn; ALBERTSON Donna

    2006-01-01

    The short report will be focused on the genetic basis and possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis, common types of cancer, the importance of genetic diagnosis of cancer, and the methodology of cancer genetic diagnosis. They will also review presymptomatic testing of hereditary cancers, and the application of expression profiling to identify patients likely to benefit from particular therapeutic approaches.

  15. Statistics for Learning Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Abigail Sheena

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the knowledge and skills that biology students may need to help them understand statistics/mathematics as it applies to genetics. The data are based on analyses of current representative genetics texts, practicing genetics professors' perspectives, and more directly, students' perceptions of, and performance in,…

  16. Prenatal screening and genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alderson, P.; Aro, A.R.; Dragonas, T.; Ettorre, E.; Hemminki, E.; Jalinoja, P.; Santalahti, P.; Tijmstra, T.

    2001-01-01

    Although the term 'genetic screening' has been used for decades, this paper discusses how, in its most precise meaning, genetic screening has not yet been widely introduced. 'Prenatal screening' is often confused with 'genetic screening'. As we show, these terms have different meanings, and we exami

  17. GENETICS AND GENOMICS OF PLANT GENETIC RESOURCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Börner A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant genetic resources play a major role for global food security. The most significant and widespread mean of conserving plant genetic resources is ex situ conservation. Most conserved accessions are kept in specialized facilities known as genebanks maintained by public or private institutions. World-wide 7.4 million accessions are stored in about 1,500 ex situ genebanks.In addition, series of genetic stocks including chromosome substitution lines, alloplasmic lines, single chromosome recombinant lines, introgression lines, etc. have been created. Analysing these genetic stocks many qualitative and quantitative inherited traits were associated to certain chromosomes, chromosome arms or introgressed segments. Today, genetic stocks are supplemented by a huge number of genotyped mapping populations. Beside progenies of bi-parental crosses (doubled haploid lines, recombinant inbred lines, etc. panels for association mapping were created recently.In our presentation we give examples for the successful utilisation of genebank accessions and genetic stocks for genetic and genomic studies. Using both segregation and association mapping approaches, data on mapping of loci/marker trait associations for a range of different traits are presented.

  18. Feline genetics: clinical applications and genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Leslie A

    2010-11-01

    DNA testing for domestic cat diseases and appearance traits is a rapidly growing asset for veterinary medicine. Approximately 33 genes contain 50 mutations that cause feline health problems or alterations in the cat's appearance. A variety of commercial laboratories can now perform cat genetic diagnostics, allowing both the veterinary clinician and the private owner to obtain DNA test results. DNA is easily obtained from a cat via a buccal swab with a standard cotton bud or cytological brush, allowing DNA samples to be easily sent to any laboratory in the world. The DNA test results identify carriers of the traits, predict the incidence of traits from breeding programs, and influence medical prognoses and treatments. An overall goal of identifying these genetic mutations is the correction of the defect via gene therapies and designer drug therapies. Thus, genetic testing is an effective preventative medicine and a potential ultimate cure. However, genetic diagnostic tests may still be novel for many veterinary practitioners and their application in the clinical setting needs to have the same scrutiny as any other diagnostic procedure. This article will review the genetic tests for the domestic cat, potential sources of error for genetic testing, and the pros and cons of DNA results in veterinary medicine. Highlighted are genetic tests specific to the individual cat, which are a part of the cat's internal genome. PMID:21147473

  19. All about Genetics (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy All About Genetics KidsHealth > For Parents > All About Genetics Print A ... way they pick up special laboratory dyes. continue Genetic Problems Errors in the genetic code or "gene ...

  20. How Is Genetic Testing Done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing How is genetic testing done? How is genetic testing done? Once a person decides to proceed with ... is called informed consent . For more information about genetic testing procedures: The Genetic Science Learning Center at the ...

  1. Genetic technology: Promises and problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, M. S.

    1975-01-01

    Issues concerning the use of genetic technology are discussed. Some areas discussed include treating genetic disease, prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion, screening for genetic disease, and genetic counseling. Policy issues stemming from these capabilities are considered.

  2. Molecular genetics made simple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Sh. Kassem

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetics have undoubtedly become an integral part of biomedical science and clinical practice, with important implications in deciphering disease pathogenesis and progression, identifying diagnostic and prognostic markers, as well as designing better targeted treatments. The exponential growth of our understanding of different genetic concepts is paralleled by a growing list of genetic terminology that can easily intimidate the unfamiliar reader. Rendering genetics incomprehensible to the clinician however, defeats the very essence of genetic research: its utilization for combating disease and improving quality of life. Herein we attempt to correct this notion by presenting the basic genetic concepts along with their usefulness in the cardiology clinic. Bringing genetics closer to the clinician will enable its harmonious incorporation into clinical care, thus not only restoring our perception of its simple and elegant nature, but importantly ensuring the maximal benefit for our patients.

  3. BPA genetic monitoring - BPA Genetic Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Initiated in 1989, this study monitors genetic changes associated with hatchery propagation in multiple Snake River sub-basins for Chinook salmon and steelhead. We...

  4. Genetic selection and conservation of genetic diversity*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, H D

    2012-08-01

    For 100s of years, livestock producers have employed various types of selection to alter livestock populations. Current selection strategies are little different, except our technologies for selection have become more powerful. Genetic resources at the breed level have been in and out of favour over time. These resources are the raw materials used to manipulate populations, and therefore, they are critical to the past and future success of the livestock sector. With increasing ability to rapidly change genetic composition of livestock populations, the conservation of these genetic resources becomes more critical. Globally, awareness of the need to steward genetic resources has increased. A growing number of countries have embarked on large scale conservation efforts by using in situ, ex situ (gene banking), or both approaches. Gene banking efforts have substantially increased and data suggest that gene banks are successfully capturing genetic diversity for research or industry use. It is also noteworthy that both industry and the research community are utilizing gene bank holdings. As pressures grow to meet consumer demands and potential changes in production systems, the linkage between selection goals and genetic conservation will increase as a mechanism to facilitate continued livestock sector development. PMID:22827378

  5. Genetic epidemiology of diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Permutt, M. Alan; Wasson, Jonathon; Cox, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    Conventional genetic analysis focuses on the genes that account for specific phenotypes, while traditional epidemiology is more concerned with the environmental causes and risk factors related to traits. Genetic epidemiology is an alliance of the 2 fields that focuses on both genetics, including allelic variants in different populations, and environment, in order to explain exactly how genes convey effects in different environmental contexts and to arrive at a more complete comprehension of t...

  6. Genetic toxicology: web resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert R

    2002-04-25

    Genetic toxicology is the scientific discipline dealing with the effects of chemical, physical and biological agents on the heredity of living organisms. The Internet offers a wide range of online digital resources for the field of Genetic Toxicology. The history of genetic toxicology and electronic data collections are reviewed. Web-based resources at US National Library of Medicine (NLM), including MEDLINE, PUBMED, Gateway, Entrez, and TOXNET, are discussed. Search strategies and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) are reviewed in the context of genetic toxicology. The TOXNET group of databases are discussed with emphasis on those databases with genetic toxicology content including GENE-TOX, TOXLINE, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, Integrated Risk Information System, and Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System. Location of chemical information including chemical structure and linkage to health and regulatory information using CHEMIDPLUS at NLM and other databases is reviewed. Various government agencies have active genetic toxicology research programs or use genetic toxicology data to assist fulfilling the agency's mission. Online resources at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) are outlined. Much of the genetic toxicology for pharmaceuticals, industrial chemicals and pesticides that is performed in the world is regulatory-driven. Regulatory web resources are presented for the laws mandating testing, guidelines on study design, Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations, and requirements for electronic data collection and reporting. The Internet provides a range of other supporting resources to the field of genetic toxicology. The web links for key professional societies and journals in genetic toxicology are listed. Distance education, educational media resources, and job placement services are also

  7. Imaging genetics of schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have seen an explosive growth of interest in the application of imaging genetics to understand neurogenetic mechanisms of schizophrenia. Imaging genetics applies structural and functional neuroimaging to study subjects carrying genetic risk variants that relate to a psychiatric disorder. We review selected aspects of this literature, starting with a widely studied candidate gene - the catechol-0-methyltransferase gene (COMT)- discussing other candidate genes in the dopaminergic s...

  8. PCR in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Since the introduction in the mid-1980s of analyses of minisatellites for DNA analyses, a revolution has taken place in forensic genetics. The subsequent invention of the PCR made it possible to develop forensic genetics tools that allow both very informative routine investigations and still more...... and more advanced, special investigations in cases concerning crime, paternity, relationship, disaster victim identification etc. The present review gives an update on the use of DNA investigations in forensic genetics....

  9. Welcome to Neurology: Genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Pulst, Stefan M.

    2015-01-01

    The powers of human genetics and genetic technologies have transformed the complexities of neurology and neuroscience at the basic, translational, and now also the clinical level. We have left an era of black and white views of causative genetic variation and are entering a period of more than 50 shades of grey, fascinated with DNA variants that increase or decrease risk, epigenetic modification, and an unexpectedly large number of variants of unknown or potentially pathogenic significance. L...

  10. Is genetic evolution predictable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, David L; Orgogozo, Virginie

    2009-02-01

    Ever since the integration of Mendelian genetics into evolutionary biology in the early 20th century, evolutionary geneticists have for the most part treated genes and mutations as generic entities. However, recent observations indicate that all genes are not equal in the eyes of evolution. Evolutionarily relevant mutations tend to accumulate in hotspot genes and at specific positions within genes. Genetic evolution is constrained by gene function, the structure of genetic networks, and population biology. The genetic basis of evolution may be predictable to some extent, and further understanding of this predictability requires incorporation of the specific functions and characteristics of genes into evolutionary theory. PMID:19197055

  11. Genetics Home Reference: trimethylaminuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Primary Trimethylaminuria Genetic Testing Registry: Trimethylaminuria Monell Chemical Senses Center: TMAU & Body Malodors National Human Genome Research Institute: Diagnosis and Treatment of Trimethylaminuria ...

  12. Genetics of complex diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, Erling; Møller, Gert Lykke; Koefoed, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    A complex disease with an inheritable component is polygenic, meaning that several different changes in DNA are the genetic basis for the disease. Such a disease may also be genetically heterogeneous, meaning that independent changes in DNA, i.e. various genotypes, can be the genetic basis...... for the disease. Each of these genotypes may be characterized by specific combinations of key genetic changes. It is suggested that even if all key changes are found in genes related to the biology of a certain disease, the number of combinations may be so large that the number of different genotypes may be close...

  13. Genetics and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    One of the major changes in developmental psychology during the past 50 years has been the acceptance of the important role of nature (genetics) as well as nurture (environment). Past research consisting of twin and adoption studies has shown that genetic influence is substantial for most domains of developmental psychology. Present research…

  14. Genetically engineered foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetically Engineered Plants. FDA.gov. www.fda.gov/food/foodscienceresearch/biotechnology/ucm346030.htm . Last updated July 22, 2014. Accessed Nov. 3, 2014. Key S, Ma JK, Drake PM. Genetically modified plants and human health. J R Soc Med . 2008;101:290-8. ...

  15. [Human genetics and ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zergollern, L

    1990-01-01

    Many new problems and dilemmas have occurred in the practice of medical geneticists with the development of human genetics and its subdisciplines--molecular genetics, ethic genetics and juridical genetics. Devoid of the possibility to get adequate education, genetic informer or better to say, counsellor, although a scientist and a professional who has already formed his ethic attitudes, often finds himself in a dilemma when he has to decide whether a procedure made possible by progress of science is ethical or not. Thus, due to different attitudes, same decision is ethical for some, while for the others it is not. Ethic committees are groups of moral and good people trying to find an objective approach to certain genetic and ethic problems. There are more and more ethically unanswered questions in modern human genetics, and particularly in medical genetics. Medical geneticist-ethicist still encounters numerous problems in his work. These are, for example, experiments with human gametes and embryos, possibilities of hybridization of human gametes with animal gametes, in vitro fertilization, detection of heterozygotes and homozygotes for monogene diseases. early detection of chromosomopathies, substitute mothers, homo and hetero insemination, transplantation of fetal and cadeveric organs, uncontrolled consumption of alcohol and drugs, environmental pollution, etc. It is almost impossible to create a single attitude which shall be shared by all those engaged in human health protection. Therefore, it is best to have a neutral eugenetic attitude which allows free ethical choice of each individual, in any case, for the well-being of man. PMID:2366624

  16. Genetic effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data are reviewed from studies on the genetic effects of x radiation in mice and the extrapolation of the findings for estimating genetic hazards in man is discussed. Data are included on the frequency of mutation induction following acute or chronic irradiation of male or female mice at various doses and dose rates

  17. Genetics in the courts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coyle, Heather; Drell, Dan

    2000-12-01

    Various: (1)TriState 2000 Genetics in the Courts (2) Growing impact of the new genetics on the courts (3)Human testing (4) Legal analysis - in re G.C. (5) Legal analysis - GM ''peanots'', and (6) Legal analysis for State vs Miller

  18. THE MEANING OF GENETICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja Adolphs

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Research into the public understanding of genetics has greatly expanded lately. At the same time inatters relating to biotechnology have scizcd the public's attention. Corpus linguistics has long asked questions about how meaning is created and changed in the public sphere through language use. However, linking Corpus linguistics to the study of the public understanding of science is something too few have done. To correct this trend, we apply methods from corpus linguistics and cognitive linguistics to study how people talk about genetics. We do so by analysiny the mieaning of words like gene, genes, genetic, genetics, and genetically as found in various spoken and written corpora. Specifically, we examine how they take on certain (e.g. figurative connotations and modulate in context.

  19. Possible causes for growth variability and summer growth reduction in juvenile plaice Pleuronectes platessa L. in the western Dutch Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veer, Henk W.; Jung, Alexa Sarina; Freitas, Vânia; Philippart, Catharina J. M.; Witte, Johannes IJ.

    2016-05-01

    Growth variability within individuals and among groups and locations and the phenomenon of summer growth reduction has been described for juvenile flatfish in a variety of European coastal areas whereby the underlying causes still remain elusive. Potential mechanisms were tested for juvenile plaice Pleuronectes platessa L. in the western Dutch Wadden Sea, by analysing published and unpublished information from long-term investigations (1986-present). Growth variability did occur and could be explained by differences induced by environmental variability (water temperature), and by non-genetic irreversible adaptation and sex. Dynamic Energy Budget analysis indicated that especially sexually-dimorphic growth in combination with variability in sex ratio could explain most of the variability in growth and the increase in the range of the size of individuals within the population over time. Summer growth reduction was not only observed among 0-group plaice in the intertidal, but also in the subtidal and tidal gullies as well as among I- and II-group plaice. Intraspecific competition for food was not detected but some support for interspecific competition with other predators was found. Also resource competition (due to crowding) with the other abundant epibenthic species (0-, I- and II-group flounder Platichthys flesus; the brown shrimp Crangon crangon; the shore crab Carcinus maenas; the goby species Pomatoschistus minutus and Pomatoschistus microps) could not explain the summer growth reduction. The observed growth reduction coincided with a decrease in stomach content, especially of regenerating body parts of benthic prey items. It is hypothesised that macrozoobenthos becomes less active after the spring phytoplankton bloom, reducing prey availability for juvenile plaice in summer, causing a reduction in food intake and hence in growth.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions congenital hypothyroidism congenital hypothyroidism Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Genetic Testing Registry: Congenital hypothyroidism Genetic Testing Registry: Hypothyroidism, ... Encyclopedia: Congenital Hypothyroidism These resources ...

  1. Genetics, Disease Prevention and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the genetic terms used on this page Genetics, Disease Prevention and Treatment Overview How can learning ... gov] Top of page How can knowing about genetics help treat disease? Every year, more than two ...

  2. Conservation genetics of Iberian raptors

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez–Cruz, B.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I provide an overview of conservation genetics and describe the management actions in the wild that can benefit from conservation genetic studies. I describe the genetic factors of risk for the survival of wild species, the consequences of loss of genetic diversity, inbreeding and outbreeding depression, and the use of genetic tools to delimitate units of conservation. Then I introduce the most common applications of conservation genetics in the management of wild populations. I...

  3. Conservation genetics of Iberian raptors

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Cruz, Begoña

    2011-01-01

    [EN] In this paper I provide an overview of conservation genetics and describe the management actions in the wild that can benefit from conservation genetic studies. I describe the genetic factors of risk for the survival of wild species, the consequences of loss of genetic diversity, inbreeding and outbreeding depression, and the use of genetic tools to delimitate units of conservation. Then I introduce the most common applications of conservation genetics in the management of wild populatio...

  4. On Derivations Of Genetic Algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A genetic algebra is a (possibly non-associative) algebra used to model inheritance in genetics. In application of genetics this algebra often has a basis corresponding to genetically different gametes, and the structure constant of the algebra encode the probabilities of producing offspring of various types. In this paper, we find the connection between the genetic algebras and evolution algebras. Moreover, we prove the existence of nontrivial derivations of genetic algebras in dimension two

  5. Statistics for Learning Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Abigail Sheena

    This study investigated the knowledge and skills that biology students may need to help them understand statistics/mathematics as it applies to genetics. The data are based on analyses of current representative genetics texts, practicing genetics professors' perspectives, and more directly, students' perceptions of, and performance in, doing statistically-based genetics problems. This issue is at the emerging edge of modern college-level genetics instruction, and this study attempts to identify key theoretical components for creating a specialized biological statistics curriculum. The goal of this curriculum will be to prepare biology students with the skills for assimilating quantitatively-based genetic processes, increasingly at the forefront of modern genetics. To fulfill this, two college level classes at two universities were surveyed. One university was located in the northeastern US and the other in the West Indies. There was a sample size of 42 students and a supplementary interview was administered to a select 9 students. Interviews were also administered to professors in the field in order to gain insight into the teaching of statistics in genetics. Key findings indicated that students had very little to no background in statistics (55%). Although students did perform well on exams with 60% of the population receiving an A or B grade, 77% of them did not offer good explanations on a probability question associated with the normal distribution provided in the survey. The scope and presentation of the applicable statistics/mathematics in some of the most used textbooks in genetics teaching, as well as genetics syllabi used by instructors do not help the issue. It was found that the text books, often times, either did not give effective explanations for students, or completely left out certain topics. The omission of certain statistical/mathematical oriented topics was seen to be also true with the genetics syllabi reviewed for this study. Nonetheless

  6. Genetics of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Apurva; Srivastava, Neena; Mittal, Balraj

    2016-10-01

    Numerous classical genetic studies have proved that genes are contributory factors for obesity. Genes are directly responsible for obesity associated disorders such as Bardet-Biedl and Prader-Willi syndromes. However, both genes as well as environment are associated with obesity in the general population. Genetic epidemiological approaches, particularly genome-wide association studies, have unraveled many genes which play important roles in human obesity. Elucidation of their biological functions can be very useful for understanding pathobiology of obesity. In the near future, further exploration of obesity genetics may help to develop useful diagnostic and predictive tests for obesity treatment. PMID:27605733

  7. Genetically Engineered Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ruanbao (Inventor); Gibbons, William (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The disclosed embodiments provide cyanobacteria spp. that have been genetically engineered to have increased production of carbon-based products of interest. These genetically engineered hosts efficiently convert carbon dioxide and light into carbon-based products of interest such as long chained hydrocarbons. Several constructs containing polynucleotides encoding enzymes active in the metabolic pathways of cyanobacteria are disclosed. In many instances, the cyanobacteria strains have been further genetically modified to optimize production of the carbon-based products of interest. The optimization includes both up-regulation and down-regulation of particular genes.

  8. Trading green backs for green crabs: evaluating the commercial shellfish harvest at risk to European green crab invasion [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/32t

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E Mach

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nonnative species pose a threat to native biodiversity and can have immense impacts on biological communities, altering the function of ecosystems. How much value is at risk from high-impact invasive species, and which parameters determine variation in that value, constitutes critical knowledge for directing both management and research, but it is rarely available. We evaluated the value of the commercial shellfish harvest that is at risk in nearshore ecosystems of Puget Sound, Washington State, USA, from the invasive European green crab, Carcinus maenas. We assessed this value using a simple static ecological model combined with an economic model using data from Puget Sound’s shellfish harvest and revenue and the relationship between C. maenas abundance and the consumption rate of shellfish. The model incorporates a range in C. maenas diet preference, calories consumed per year, and crab densities. C. maenas is likely to prey on commercially harvested hardshell clams, oysters, and mussels, which would likely reduce additional revenue from processing and distribution, and the number of jobs associated with these fisheries. The model results suggest possible revenue losses of these shellfish ranging from $1.03-23.8 million USD (2.8-64% losses, with additional processing and distrubution losses up to $17.6 million USD and 442 job positions each year associated with a range of plausible parameter values. The broad range of values reflects the uncertainty in key factors underlying impacts, factors that are highly variable across invaded regions and so not knowable a priori. However, future research evaluating species invasions can reduce the uncertainty of impacts by characterizing several key parameters: density of individuals, number of arrivals, predation and competition interactions, and economic impacts. This study therefore provides direction for research to inform more accurate estimates of value-at-risk, and suggests substantial motivation

  9. Trading green backs for green crabs: evaluating the commercial shellfish harvest at risk from European green crab invasion [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4jf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E Mach

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonnative species pose a threat to native biodiversity and can have immense impacts on biological communities, altering the function of ecosystems. How much value is at risk from high-impact invasive species, and which parameters determine variation in that value, constitutes critical knowledge for directing both management and research, but it is rarely available. We evaluated the value of the commercial shellfish harvest that is at risk in nearshore ecosystems of Puget Sound, Washington State, USA, from the invasive European green crab, Carcinus maenas. We assessed this value using a simple static ecological model combined with an economic model using data from Puget Sound’s shellfish harvest and revenue and the relationship between C. maenas abundance and the consumption rate of shellfish. The model incorporates a range in C. maenas diet preference, calories consumed per year, and crab densities. C. maenas is likely to prey on commercially harvested hardshell clams, oysters, and mussels, which would likely reduce additional revenue from processing and distribution, and the number of jobs associated with these fisheries. The model results suggest possible revenue losses of these shellfish ranging from $1.03-23.8 million USD year-1 (2.8-64% losses, with additional processing and distribution losses up to $17.6 million USD and 442 job positions each year associated with a range of plausible parameter values. The broad range of values reflects the uncertainty in key factors underlying impacts, factors that are highly variable across invaded regions and so not knowable a priori. However, future research evaluating species invasions can reduce the uncertainty of impacts by characterizing several key parameters: density of individuals, number of arrivals, predation and competition interactions, and economic impacts. This study therefore provides direction for research to inform more accurate estimates of value-at-risk, and suggests substantial

  10. Genetic epidemiology, genetic maps and positional cloning.

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, Newton E.

    2003-01-01

    Genetic epidemiology developed in the middle of the last century, focused on inherited causes of disease but with methods and results applicable to other traits and even forensics. Early success with linkage led to the localization of genes contributing to disease, and ultimately to the Human Genome Project. The discovery of millions of DNA markers has encouraged more efficient positional cloning by linkage disequilibrium (LD), using LD maps and haplotypes in ways that are rapidly evolving. T...

  11. Genetic variability and population genetic structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájková, Petra

    Banská Bystrica : Faculty of Natural Sciences, Matthias Belius University, 2010 - (Urban, P.; Kadlečík, J.; Topercer, J.; Kadlečíková, Z.), s. 54-55 ISBN 978-80-557-0030-4 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB600930804 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : Eurasian otter * genetics Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  12. Genetics Home Reference: piebaldism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be a feature of other conditions, such as Waardenburg syndrome ; these conditions have other genetic causes and additional ... 140S. Review. Citation on PubMed Spritz RA. Piebaldism, Waardenburg syndrome, and related disorders of melanocyte development. Semin Cutan ...

  13. Review of genetic concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, practitioners of medicine have become increasingly aware of the importance of genetics in the understanding of physical and mental health and in the management of disease. The last decades have witnessed unprecedented developments in genetics that have increased our understanding of the basic processes of heredity enormously. New techniques and understanding have provided insights directly applicable to medicine. The fundamental fact of heredity may be considered the ability of living organisms to produce offspring that resemble their parents more than others. One of the basic characteristics of the human condition is the uniqueness and diversity of all individuals. This results from their genetic individuality (with the exception of identical twins) and the interaction of the genetic constitution (the genome) with the environment, which is generally unique to the individual as well. In short, the interaction of genes with the environment is what confers biologic uniqueness to all humans

  14. Genetics Home Reference: nephronophthisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which can include liver fibrosis, heart abnormalities, or mirror image reversal of the position of one or ... management of various health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related ...

  15. Genetics Blood Card Use

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — SOP guiding collection of blood for genetics analysis. Provides stepwise instructions and guidance on how to collect DNA sample using a whole blood blot card

  16. Genetics Home Reference: aniridia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eyes. Rarely, people with aniridia have behavioral problems, developmental delay, and problems detecting odors. Related Information What does it mean if a disorder seems to run in my family? What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: preeclampsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions preeclampsia preeclampsia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Preeclampsia is a complication of pregnancy in which affected ...

  18. LSD and Genetic Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishotsky, Norman I.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Reviews studies of the effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) on man and other organisms. Concludes that pure LSD injected in moderate doses does not cause chromosome or detectable genetic damage and is not a teratogen or carcinogen. (JM)

  19. Genetics Home Reference: achromatopsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnosis & Management These resources address the diagnosis or management of achromatopsia: GeneReview: Achromatopsia Genetic Testing Registry: Achromatopsia MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Color Vision Test These resources from MedlinePlus offer information about ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: choroideremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diagnosis & Management These resources address the diagnosis or management of choroideremia: GeneReview: Choroideremia Genetic Testing Registry: Choroideremia MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Vision - night blindness MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Visual field These resources ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: retinoblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions retinoblastoma retinoblastoma Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Retinoblastoma is a rare type of eye cancer that ...

  2. Genetics for the ophthalmologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthikeyan A Sadagopan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The eye has played a major role in human genomics including gene therapy. It is the fourth most common organ system after integument (skin, hair and nails, nervous system, and musculoskeletal system to be involved in genetic disorders. The eye is involved in single gene disorders and those caused by multifactorial etiology. Retinoblastoma was the first human cancer gene to be cloned. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy was the first mitochondrial disorder described. X-Linked red-green color deficiency was the first X-linked disorder described. The eye, unlike any other body organ, allows directly visualization of genetic phenomena such as skewed X-inactivation in the fundus of a female carrier of ocular albinism. Basic concepts of genetics and their application to clinical ophthalmological practice are important not only in making a precise diagnosis and appropriate referral, but also in management and genetic counseling.

  3. Genetics of Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A A A Listen En Español Genetics of Diabetes You've probably wondered how you developed diabetes. ... to develop diabetes than others. What Leads to Diabetes? Type 1 and type 2 diabetes have different ...

  4. Genetic radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three types of genetic damage arising from irradiation are identified; (1) gene or point mutations at the level of the DNA molecule, which contains the genetic code. (2) chromosome breakage which may lead to translocations (3) uncontrolled distribution of the chromosomes into the daughter cells. Tabular information is drawn mainly from the UNSCEAR report, 1977, on the risk factors of genetic damage from various irradiation levels. Some detailed effects on genetic structure are described for recessive mutations, dominant mutations and trans-locations. Experimental work has in some cases been guided by X-ray irradiation with single and double dose effects, including tests on mice, for which subsequent herdity may be examined. (G.C.)

  5. Genetics Home Reference: schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions schizophrenia schizophrenia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Schizophrenia is a mental health disorder classified as a ...

  6. Genetic Sample Inventory - NRDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database archives genetic tissue samples from marine mammals collected in the North-Central Gulf of Mexico from 2010-2015. The collection includes samples from...

  7. Genetic Sample Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database archives genetic tissue samples from marine mammals collected primarily from the U.S. east coast. The collection includes samples from field programs,...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: cystinuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for This Page Claes DJ, Jackson E. Cystinuria: mechanisms and management. Pediatr Nephrol. 2012 Nov;27(11): ... with a qualified healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Contact Us Selection Criteria for Links ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: SADDAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Open All Close All Description SADDAN (severe achondroplasia with developmental delay and acanthosis nigricans) is a ... address the diagnosis or management of SADDAN: GeneReview: Achondroplasia Genetic Testing Registry: Severe achondroplasia with developmental delay ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: pseudoachondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related to another disorder of bone growth called achondroplasia , but without that disorder's characteristic facial features. More ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (1 link) Health Topic: Dwarfism Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions achondroplasia achondroplasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Achondroplasia is a form of short-limbed dwarfism. The ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: galactosialidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases ISMRD: The International Advocate for Glycoprotein Storage Diseases ... Maaswinkel-Mooy P, Smit V, van der Hoeven M, Bakker J, Campos Y, d'Azzo A. New mutations in two Dutch patients with early infantile galactosialidosis. Mol Genet Metab. ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions narcolepsy narcolepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder that disrupts the ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: sialidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes named? ... Morrone A. Type II sialidosis: review of the clinical spectrum and identification of a new splicing defect with chitotriosidase assessment in two patients. J ...

  15. Genetics of SCID

    OpenAIRE

    Cossu Fausto

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Human SCID (Severe Combined Immunodeficiency) is a prenatal disorder of T lymphocyte development, that depends on the expression of numerous genes. The knowledge of the genetic basis of SCID is essential for diagnosis (e.g., clinical phenotype, lymphocyte profile) and treatment (e.g., use and type of pre-hematopoietic stem cell transplant conditioning). Over the last years novel genetic defects causing SCID have been discovered, and the molecular and immunological mechanisms of SCID ...

  16. Applications of Genetic Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunholt, Hans; Toma, Laura

    1996-01-01

    In this report a study of genetic programming (GP) has been performed with respect to a number of applications such as Symbolic function regression, Solving Symbolic Differential Equations, Image encoding, the ant problem etc.......In this report a study of genetic programming (GP) has been performed with respect to a number of applications such as Symbolic function regression, Solving Symbolic Differential Equations, Image encoding, the ant problem etc....

  17. Genetics of bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerner B

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Berit Kerner Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Bipolar disorder is a common, complex genetic disorder, but the mode of transmission remains to be discovered. Many researchers assume that common genomic variants carry some risk for manifesting the disease. The research community has celebrated the first genome-wide significant associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and bipolar disorder. Currently, attempts are under way to translate these findings into clinical practice, genetic counseling, and predictive testing. However, some experts remain cautious. After all, common variants explain only a very small percentage of the genetic risk, and functional consequences of the discovered SNPs are inconclusive. Furthermore, the associated SNPs are not disease specific, and the majority of individuals with a “risk” allele are healthy. On the other hand, population-based genome-wide studies in psychiatric disorders have rediscovered rare structural variants and mutations in genes, which were previously known to cause genetic syndromes and monogenic Mendelian disorders. In many Mendelian syndromes, psychiatric symptoms are prevalent. Although these conditions do not fit the classic description of any specific psychiatric disorder, they often show nonspecific psychiatric symptoms that cross diagnostic boundaries, including intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, attention deficit, impulse control deficit, and psychosis. Although testing for chromosomal disorders and monogenic Mendelian disorders is well established, testing for common variants is still controversial. The standard concept of genetic testing includes at least three broad criteria that need to be fulfilled before new genetic tests should be introduced: analytical validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility. These criteria are

  18. Genetics of Diabetes Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Doria, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    A large body of evidence indicates that the risk of developing chronic diabetic complications is under the control of genetic factors. Previous studies using a candidate gene approach have uncovered a number of genetic loci that may shape this risk, such as the VEGF gene for retinopathy, the ELMO1 gene for nephropathy, and the ADIPOQ gene for coronary artery disease. Recently, a new window has opened on identifying these genes through genome-wide association studies. Such systematic approach ...

  19. Genetics of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Simon F

    2015-01-01

    Asthma runs in families, and children of asthmatic parents are at increased risk of asthma. Prediction of disease risk is pivotal for the clinician when counselling atopic families. However, this is not always an easy task bearing in mind the vast and ever-increasing knowledge about asthma genetics...... of methods and advances in asthma genetics in an attempt to help the clinician keep track of the most important knowledge in the field....

  20. Genetic Sequential Dynamical Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Avino-Diaz, Maria A.; Ortiz, Humberto; Moreno, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    The whole complex process to obtain a protein encoded by a gene is difficult to include in a mathematical model. There are many models for describing different aspects of a genetic network. Finding a better model is one of the most important and interesting questions in computational biology. Sequential dynamical systems have been developed for a theory of computer simulation, and in this paper, a genetic sequential dynamical system is introduced. A gene is considered to be a function which c...

  1. Primer on molecular genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This report is taken from the April 1992 draft of the DOE Human Genome 1991--1992 Program Report, which is expected to be published in May 1992. The primer is intended to be an introduction to basic principles of molecular genetics pertaining to the genome project. The material contained herein is not final and may be incomplete. Techniques of genetic mapping and DNA sequencing are described.

  2. Genetics and developmental biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported on research activities in the fields of mutagenesis in Haemophilus influenzae and Escherichia coli; radioinduced chromosomal aberrations in mammalian germ cells; effects of uv radiation on xeroderma pigmentosum skin cells; mutations in Chinese hamster ovary cells; radioinduced hemoglobin variants in the mouse; analysis of mutants in yeast; Drosophila genetics; biochemical genetics of Neurospora; DNA polymerase activity in Xenopus laevis oocytes; uv-induced damage in Bacillus subtilis; and others

  3. Genetic Factors of Obesity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazura, Ivan; Ochoa-Rebato, E.

    Budapest: Eötvös University Press, 2010 - (Bodzsár, E.; Susanne, C.), s. 119-140. (Biennial Books of the EAA. 6). ISBN 978-963-88941-0-6 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : aetiology of obesity * genetic factors * obesity genes * polymorphism * obesity -associated syndromes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  4. Genetics of Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Scherer, S.; Magee, P T

    1990-01-01

    Candida albicans is among the most common fungal pathogens. Infections caused by C. albicans and other Candida species can be life threatening in individuals with impaired immune function. Genetic analysis of C. albicans pathogenesis is complicated by the diploid nature of the species and the absence of a known sexual cycle. Through a combination of parasexual techniques and molecular approaches, an effective genetic system has been developed. The close relationship of C. albicans to the more...

  5. Online Genetic Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Milani, Alfredo

    2004-01-01

    This paper present a technique based on genetic algorithms for generating online adaptive services. Online adaptive systems provide flexible services to a mass of clients/users for maximising some system goals, they dynamically adapt the form and the content of the issued services while the population of clients evolve over time. The idea of online genetic algorithms (online GAs) is to use the online clients response behaviour as a fitness function in order to produce the next ...

  6. Genetic epidemiology: Psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Barton, Anne C

    2002-01-01

    The existence of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct clinical entity remains a topic of debate; some authors propose that it is simply the co-occurrence of psoriasis and inflammatory arthritis. However, a distinct entity is likely to have distinct susceptibility factors in addition to those that contribute to psoriasis and inflammatory arthritis alone. These aetiological factors may be genetic and/or environmental, and in this review, the evidence for distinct psoriatic arthritis genetic suscep...

  7. Genetics of Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gasser, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The etiology of most cases of Parkinson's disease (PD) remains unknown. In recent years, however, research has successfully focused on genetic factors contributing to the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Causative mutations have been identified in several monogenically inherited forms of the disease. Although these genetic forms of PD are usually rare, the gene discoveries are likely to identify molecular pathways that are also relevant in the sporadic disorder. These studies have led to...

  8. Contemporary Genetics for Gender Researchers: Not Your Grandma's Genetics Anymore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salk, Rachel H.; Hyde, Janet S.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past century, much of genetics was deterministic, and feminist researchers framed justified criticisms of genetics research. However, over the past two decades, genetics research has evolved remarkably and has moved far from earlier deterministic approaches. Our article provides a brief primer on modern genetics, emphasizing contemporary…

  9. What was classical genetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, C Kenneth

    2004-12-01

    I present an account of classical genetics to challenge theory-biased approaches in the philosophy of science. Philosophers typically assume that scientific knowledge is ultimately structured by explanatory reasoning and that research programs in well-established sciences are organized around efforts to fill out a central theory and extend its explanatory range. In the case of classical genetics, philosophers assume that the knowledge was structured by T. H. Morgan's theory of transmission and that research throughout the later 1920s, 30s, and 40s was organized around efforts to further validate, develop, and extend this theory, I show that classical genetics was structured by an integration of explanatory reasoning (associated with the transmission theory) and investigative strategies (such as the 'genetic approach'). The investigative strategies, which have been overlooked in historical and philosophical accounts, were as important as the so-called laws of Mendelian genetics. By the later 1920s, geneticists of the Morgan school were no longer organizing research around the goal of explaining inheritance patterns; rather, they were using genetics to investigate a range of biological phenomena that extended well beyond the explanatory domain of transmission theories. Theory-biased approaches in history and philosophy of science fail to reveal the overall structure of scientific knowledge and obscure the way it functions. PMID:15682554

  10. Synthetic Genetic Array Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Elena; Costanzo, Michael; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Genetic interaction studies have been used to characterize unknown genes, assign membership in pathway and complex, and build a comprehensive functional map of a eukaryotic cell. Synthetic genetic array (SGA) methodology automates yeast genetic analysis and enables systematic mapping of genetic interactions. In its simplest form, SGA consists of a series of replica pinning steps that enable construction of haploid double mutants through automated mating and meiotic recombination. Using this method, a strain carrying a query mutation, such as a deletion allele of a nonessential gene or a conditional temperature-sensitive allele of an essential gene, can be crossed to an input array of yeast mutants, such as the complete set of approximately 5000 viable deletion mutants. The resulting output array of double mutants can be scored for genetic interactions based on estimates of cellular fitness derived from colony-size measurements. The SGA score method can be used to analyze large-scale data sets, whereas small-scale data sets can be analyzed using SGAtools, a simple web-based interface that includes all the necessary analysis steps for quantifying genetic interactions. PMID:27037072

  11. Genetic of uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichi, Francesco; Carrai, Paola; Srivastava, Sunil K; Lowder, Careen Y; Nucci, Paolo; Neri, Piergiorgio

    2016-06-01

    Immune-mediated uveitis may be associated with a systemic disease or may be localized to the eye. T-cell-dependent immunological events are increasingly being regarded as extremely important in the pathogenesis of uveitis. Several studies have also shown that macrophages are major effectors of tissue damage in uveitis. Uveitis phenotypes can differ substantially, and most uveitis diseases are considered polygenic with complex inheritance patterns. This review attempts to present the current state of knowledge from in vitro and in vivo research on the role of genetics in the development and clinical course of uveitis. A review of the literature in the PubMed, MEDLINE, and Cochrane databases was conducted to identify clinical trials, comparative studies, case series, and case reports describing host genetic factors as well as immune imbalance which contribute to the development of uveitis. The search was limited to primary reports published in English with human subjects from 1990 to the present, yielding 3590 manuscripts. In addition, referenced articles from the initial searches were hand searched to identify additional relevant reports. After title and abstract selection, duplicate elimination, and manual search, 55 papers were selected for analysis and reviewed by the authors for inclusion in this review. Studies have demonstrated associations between various genetic factors and the development and clinical course of intraocular inflammatory conditions. Genes involved included genes expressing interleukins, chemokines, chemokine receptors, and tumor necrosis factor and genes involved in complement system. When considering the genetics of uveitis, common threads can be identified. Genome-wide scans and other genetic methods are becoming increasingly successful in identifying genetic loci and candidate genes in many inflammatory disorders that have a uveitic component. It will be important to test these findings as uveitis-specific genetic factors. Therefore, the

  12. Genetics of otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, J Christopher

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence, both from animal and human studies, that host genetic factors can influence the risk of developing otitis media (OM). The role of genetics in OM has been elucidated through studies with monozygotic and dizygotic twins, analyses linking genetic polymorphisms to OM susceptibility, and genome scans. Several twin studies have shown a strong genetic component to middle ear effusion risk, with the estimate of the role of heredity for the proportion of time with middle ear effusions being around 0.7. Genetic polymorphisms in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, human leukocyte antigen, and mannose-binding lectin have been variously linked with OM and upper respiratory infection susceptibility. Several genome linkage studies have identified chromosomal regions associated with chronic OM, including 3p, 10q, 10q22.3, 17q12 and 19q. A number of candidate genes are associated with these sites. Given the current state of understanding of the role of genetics in OM, a family history of OM should be ascertained for all patients. Children with a strong family history of OM should be considered as candidates for a more aggressive early treatment of OM, particularly if other risk factors are present. These children may be earlier candidates for the placement of tympanostomy tubes and/or adenoidectomy. Existing data do not support routine genetic testing to determine a child's susceptibility to OM; however, given the advances in whole genome sequencing, such testing may someday play a role in the management of the OM patient. PMID:21358196

  13. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on this page Frequently Asked Questions About Genetic Counseling What are genetic professionals and what do they ... genetics nurses. Top of page What is genetic counseling and evaluation? Genetic professionals work as members of ...

  14. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more information about genetic testing? What is genetic testing? Genetic testing uses laboratory methods to look at your ... What are the benefits and drawbacks of genetic testing? Benefits: Genetic testing may be beneficial whether the test identifies ...

  15. The Genetics of Eating Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Berrettini, Wade

    2004-01-01

    The eating disorders anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa traditionally have been viewed as sociocultural in origin. However, recent behavioral genetic findings suggest substantial genetic influence on these disorders. Molecular genetic research of these disorders is in its infancy, but initial results are promising. This article reviews findings from family, twin, and molecular genetic studies that support substantial genetic influences on disordered eating and highlights additional areas fo...

  16. Genetical background of intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkiert-Czarnecka, Anna; Haus, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Intelligence as an ability to reason, think abstractly and adapt effectively to the environment is a subject of research in the field of psychology, neurobiology, and in the last twenty years genetics as well. Genetical testing of twins carried out from XX century indicated heritebility of intelligence, therefore confirmed an influence of genetic factor on cognitive processes. Studies on genetic background of intelligence focus on dopaminergic (DRD2, DRD4, COMT, SLC6A3, DAT1, CCKAR) and adrenergic system (ADRB2, CHRM2) genes as well as, neutrofins (BDNF) and oxidative stress genes (LTF, PRNP). Positive effect of investigated gene polymorphism was indicated by variation c.957C>T DRD2 gene (if in polymorphic site is thymine), polymorphism c.472G>A COMT gene (presence of adenine) and also gene ADRB2 c.46A->G (guanine), CHRM2 (thymine in place c.1890A>T) and BDNF (guanine in place c.472G>A) Obtained results indicate that intelligence is a feature dependent not only on genetic but also an environmental factor. PMID:27333929

  17. Genetics of gallstone disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal B

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Gallstone disease is a complex disorder where both environmental and genetic factors contribute towards susceptibility to the disease. Epidemiological and family studies suggest a strong genetic component in the causation of this disease. Several genetically derived phenotypes in the population are responsible for variations in lipoprotein types, which in turn affect the amount of cholesterol available in the gall bladder. The genetic polymorphisms in various genes for apo E, apo B, apo A1, LDL receptor, cholesteryl ester transfer and LDL receptor-associated protein have been implicated in gallstone formation. However, presently available information on genetic differences is not able to account for a large number of gallstone patients. The molecular studies in the animal models have not only confirmed the present paradigm of gallstone formation but also helped in identification of novel genes in humans, which might play an important role in pathogenesis of the disease. Precise understanding of such genes and their molecular mechanisms may provide the basis of new targets for rational drug designs and dietary interventions.

  18. Integrated genetic analysis microsystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project and the ongoing DNA sequencing of the genomes of other animals, bacteria, plants and others, a wealth of new information about the genetic composition of organisms has become available. However, as the demand for sequence information grows, so does the workload required both to generate this sequence and to use it for targeted genetic analysis. Microfabricated genetic analysis systems are well poised to assist in the collection and use of these data through increased analysis speed, lower analysis cost and higher parallelism leading to increased assay throughput. In addition, such integrated microsystems may point the way to targeted genetic experiments on single cells and in other areas that are otherwise very difficult. Concomitant with these advantages, such systems, when fully integrated, should be capable of forming portable systems for high-speed in situ analyses, enabling a new standard in disciplines such as clinical chemistry, forensics, biowarfare detection and epidemiology. This review will discuss the various technologies available for genetic analysis on the microscale, and efforts to integrate them to form fully functional robust analysis devices. (topical review)

  19. Genetics of Vesicoureteral Reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nino, F; Ilari, M; Noviello, C; Santoro, L; Rätsch, I M; Martino, A; Cobellis, G

    2016-02-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) is the retrograde passage of urine from the bladder to the upper urinary tract. It is the most common congenital urological anomaly affecting 1-2% of children and 30-40% of patients with urinary tract infections. VUR is a major risk factor for pyelonephritic scarring and chronic renal failure in children. It is the result of a shortened intravesical ureter with an enlarged or malpositioned ureteric orifice. An ectopic embryonal ureteric budding development is implicated in the pathogenesis of VUR, which is a complex genetic developmental disorder. Many genes are involved in the ureteric budding formation and subsequently in the urinary tract and kidney development. Previous studies demonstrate an heterogeneous genetic pattern of VUR. In fact no single major locus or gene for primary VUR has been identified. It is likely that different forms of VUR with different genetic determinantes are present. Moreover genetic studies of syndromes with associated VUR have revealed several possible candidate genes involved in the pathogenesis of VUR and related urinary tract malformations. Mutations in genes essential for urinary tract morphogenesis are linked to numerous congenital syndromes, and in most of those VUR is a feature. The Authors provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the VUR. The different genes and signaling pathways controlling the embryonal urinary tract development are analyzed. A better understanding of VUR genetic bases could improve the management of this condition in children. PMID:27013925

  20. Darwin's contributions to genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y-S; Zhou, X-M; Zhi, M-X; Li, X-J; Wang, Q-L

    2009-01-01

    Darwin's contributions to evolutionary biology are well known, but his contributions to genetics are much less known. His main contribution was the collection of a tremendous amount of genetic data, and an attempt to provide a theoretical framework for its interpretation. Darwin clearly described almost all genetic phenomena of fundamental importance, such as prepotency (Mendelian inheritance), bud variation (mutation), heterosis, reversion (atavism), graft hybridization (Michurinian inheritance), sex-limited inheritance, the direct action of the male element on the female (xenia and telegony), the effect of use and disuse, the inheritance of acquired characters (Lamarckian inheritance), and many other observations pertaining to variation, heredity and development. To explain all these observations, Darwin formulated a developmental theory of heredity - Pangenesis - which not only greatly influenced many subsequent theories, but also is supported by recent evidence. PMID:19638672

  1. Intelligence, race, and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J; Grigorenko, Elena L; Kidd, Kenneth K

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors argue that the overwhelming portion of the literature on intelligence, race, and genetics is based on folk taxonomies rather than scientific analysis. They suggest that because theorists of intelligence disagree as to what it is, any consideration of its relationships to other constructs must be tentative at best. They further argue that race is a social construction with no scientific definition. Thus, studies of the relationship between race and other constructs may serve social ends but cannot serve scientific ends. No gene has yet been conclusively linked to intelligence, so attempts to provide a compelling genetic link of race to intelligence are not feasible at this time. The authors also show that heritability, a behavior-genetic concept, is inadequate in regard to providing such a link. PMID:15641921

  2. Genetic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the induction of germ cell mutations in mammals international and national committees developed concepts for quantifying radiation-induced genetic risk in humans. Genetic effects dominated the thinking o the UNSCEAR (United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effect of Atomic Radiation) Report in 1958, the BEAR (Biological Effects of Atomic Radiations) Report form the National Academy of Sciences, the National Research Council in 1956, and the British counterpart, the Medical Research Council , in 1956. an interesting personal account of the development of the work of the BEIR (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations) and UNSCEAR Committee was published recently by Russell. The quality of risk estimation depends on the data base and on the concepts used. The current status of both aspects for quantifying genetic risk is reviewed in this paper

  3. Genetically engineered yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprising an active fermentation pathway producing 3-HP expresses an exogenous gene expressing the aminotransferase YhxA from Bacillus cereus AH1272 catalysing a transamination reaction between beta-alanine and pyruvate to produce malonate semialde......A genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprising an active fermentation pathway producing 3-HP expresses an exogenous gene expressing the aminotransferase YhxA from Bacillus cereus AH1272 catalysing a transamination reaction between beta-alanine and pyruvate to produce malonate...

  4. Genetics and caries: prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Rezende Vieira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Caries remains the most prevalent non-contagious infectious disease in humans. It is clear that the current approaches to decrease the prevalence of caries in human populations, including water fluoridation and school-based programs, are not enough to protect everyone. The scientific community has suggested the need for innovative work in a number of areas in cariology, encompassing disease etiology, epidemiology, definition, prevention, and treatment. We have pioneered the work on genetic studies to identify genes and genetic markers of diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic value. This paper summarizes a presentation that elaborated on these initial findings.

  5. Cartesian genetic programming

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Julian F

    2011-01-01

    Cartesian Genetic Programming (CGP) is a highly effective and increasingly popular form of genetic programming. It represents programs in the form of directed graphs, and a particular characteristic is that it has a highly redundant genotype - phenotype mapping, in that genes can be noncoding. It has spawned a number of new forms, each improving on the efficiency, among them modular, or embedded, CGP, and self-modifying CGP. It has been applied to many problems in both computer science and applied sciences. This book contains chapters written by the leading figures in the development and appli

  6. The genetics of the epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Achkar, Christelle M; Olson, Heather E; Poduri, Annapurna; Pearl, Phillip L

    2015-07-01

    While genetic causes of epilepsy have been hypothesized from the time of Hippocrates, the advent of new genetic technologies has played a tremendous role in elucidating a growing number of specific genetic causes for the epilepsies. This progress has contributed vastly to our recognition of the epilepsies as a diverse group of disorders, the genetic mechanisms of which are heterogeneous. Genotype-phenotype correlation, however, is not always clear. Nonetheless, the developments in genetic diagnosis raise the promise of a future of personalized medicine. Multiple genetic tests are now available, but there is no one test for all possible genetic mutations, and the balance between cost and benefit must be weighed. A genetic diagnosis, however, can provide valuable information regarding comorbidities, prognosis, and even treatment, as well as allow for genetic counseling. In this review, we will discuss the genetic mechanisms of the epilepsies as well as the specifics of particular genetic epilepsy syndromes. We will include an overview of the available genetic testing methods, the application of clinical knowledge into the selection of genetic testing, genotype-phenotype correlations of epileptic disorders, and therapeutic advances as well as a discussion of the importance of genetic counseling. PMID:26008807

  7. Improved genetic operator for genetic algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林峰; 杨启文

    2002-01-01

    The mutation operator has been seldom improved because ressearchers hardly suspect its ability to prevent genetic algorithm(GA) from converging prematurely.Due to its importance to GA,the authors of this paper study influence on the diversity of genes in the same locus,and point out that traditional mutation,to some extent,can result in premature convergence of genes(PCG) in the same locus.The above drawback of the traditional mutation operator causes the loss of critical alleles.Inspired by digital technique,we introduce two kinds of boolean operation into GA to develop a novel mutation operator and discuss its contribution of preventing the loss of critical alleles.The experimental results of function optimizatioin show that the improved mutation operator can effectively prevent premature convegence,and can provide a wide selection range of control parameters for GA.

  8. Improved genetic operator for genetic algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林峰; 杨启文

    2002-01-01

    The mutation operator has been seldom improved because researchers ha rdly suspect its ability to prevent genetic algorithm (GA) from converging prema turely. Due to its i mportance to GA, the authors of this paper study its influence on the diversity of genes in the same locus, and point out that traditional mutation, to some ext ent, can result in premature convergence of genes (PCG) in the same locus. The a bove drawback of the traditional mutation operator causes the loss of critical a lleles. Inspired by digital technique, we introduce two kinds of boolean operati on into GA to develop a novel mutation operator and discuss its contribution to preventing the loss of critical alleles. The experimental results of function op timization show that the improved mutation operator can effectively prevent prem ature convergence, and can provide a wide selection range of control parameters for GA.

  9. Genetic testing: a conceptual exploration.

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmern, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore a number of conceptual issues surrounding genetic testing. It looks at the meaning of the terms, genetic information and genetic testing in relation to the definition set out by the Advisory Committee on Genetic Testing in the UK, and by the Task Force on Genetic Testing in the USA. It argues that the special arrangements that may be required for the regulation of genetic tests should not be determined by reference to the nature or technology of the test, but by...

  10. Genetic Immunity to AIDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In an article on genetic immunity to AIDS published in Science magazine, American and Chinese scientists claim to have discovered why certain HIV carriers do not develop full-blown AIDS. They say that the key to this conundrum lies in a particular protein in the endocrine system that inhibits development of HIV.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: vitiligo

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Exp Dermatol. 2009 Jul;18(7):583-5. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0625.2008.00826.x. ... Med Surg. 2009 Jun;28(2):86-92. doi: 10.1016/j.sder.2009.04.008. Review. ... Genet. 2012 May 6;44(6):676-80. doi: 10.1038/ng.2272. Citation on PubMed or ...

  12. BACTERIOPHAGE: BIOLOGY AND GENETICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophage are viruses that infect bacteria. Bacteriophage are very small and made up of a protein coat with an inner core containing their genetic material. They infect bacterium, by attaching to the bacterial cell and injecting their nucleic acids into the bacteria. The phages then use the bac...

  13. Molecular genetics of ependymoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yao; Stephen C.Mack; Michael D.Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer death in children,with ependymoma being the third most common and posing a significant clinical burden.Its mechanism of pathogenesis,reliable prognostic indicators,and effective treatments other than surgical resection have all remained elusive.Until recently,cytogenetic techniques,and lack of cell lines and animal models.Ependymoma heterogeneity,which manifests as variations in tumor location,patient age,histological grade,and clinical behavior,together with the observation of a balanced genomic profile in up to 50% of cases,presents additional challenges in understanding the development and progression of this disease.Despite these difficulties,we have made significant headway in the past decade in identifying the genetic alterations and pathways involved in ependymoma tumorigenesis through collaborative efforts and the application of microarray-based genetic (copy number) and transcriptome profiling platforms.Genetic characterization of ependymoma unraveled distinct mRNA-defined subclasses and led to the identification of radial glial cells as its cell type of origin.This review summarizes our current knowledge in the molecular genetics of ependymoma and proposesfuture research directions necessary to further advance this field.

  14. Safe genetically engineered plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of genetic engineering to plants has provided genetically modified plants (GMPs, or transgenic plants) that are cultivated worldwide on increasing areas. The most widespread GMPs are herbicide-resistant soybean and canola and insect-resistant corn and cotton. New GMPs that produce vaccines, pharmaceutical or industrial proteins, and fortified food are approaching the market. The techniques employed to introduce foreign genes into plants allow a quite good degree of predictability of the results, and their genome is minimally modified. However, some aspects of GMPs have raised concern: (a) control of the insertion site of the introduced DNA sequences into the plant genome and of its mutagenic effect; (b) presence of selectable marker genes conferring resistance to an antibiotic or an herbicide, linked to the useful gene; (c) insertion of undesired bacterial plasmid sequences; and (d) gene flow from transgenic plants to non-transgenic crops or wild plants. In response to public concerns, genetic engineering techniques are continuously being improved. Techniques to direct foreign gene integration into chosen genomic sites, to avoid the use of selectable genes or to remove them from the cultivated plants, to reduce the transfer of undesired bacterial sequences, and make use of alternative, safer selectable genes, are all fields of active research. In our laboratory, some of these new techniques are applied to alfalfa, an important forage plant. These emerging methods for plant genetic engineering are briefly reviewed in this work

  15. Genetics of Retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallipatna, Ashwin; Marino, Meghan; Singh, Arun D

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is a malignant retinal tumor that affects young children. Mutations in the RB1 gene cause retinoblastoma. Mutations in both RB1 alleles within the precursor retinal cell are essential, with one mutation that may be germline or somatic and the second one that is always somatic. Identification of the RB1 germline status of a patient allows differentiation between sporadic and heritable retinoblastoma variants. Application of this knowledge is crucial for assessing short-term (risk of additional tumors in the same eye and other eye) and long-term (risk of nonocular malignant tumors) prognosis and offering cost-effective surveillance strategies. Genetic testing and genetic counseling are therefore essential components of care for all children diagnosed with retinoblastoma. The American Joint Committee on Cancer has acknowledged the importance of detecting this heritable trait and has introduced the letter "H" to denote a heritable trait of all cancers, starting with retinoblastoma (in publication). In this article, we discuss the clinically relevant aspects of genetic testing and genetic counseling for a child with retinoblastoma. PMID:27488068

  16. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  17. Genetics of diabetes complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkayyali, Sami; Lyssenko, Valeriya

    2014-10-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia and duration of diabetes are the major risk factors associated with development of micro- and macrovascular complications of diabetes. Although it is believed that hyperglycemia induces damage to the particular cell subtypes, e.g., mesangial cells in the renal glomerulus, capillary endothelial cells in the retina, and neurons and Schwann cells in peripheral nerves, the exact mechanisms underlying these damaging defects are not yet well understood. Clustering of micro- and macrovascular complications in families of patients with diabetes suggests a strong genetic susceptibility. However, until now only a handful number of genetic variants were reported to be associated with either nephropathy (ACE, ELMO1, FRMD3, and AKR1B1) or retinopathy (VEGF, AKR1B1, and EPO), and only a few studies were carried out for genetic susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases (ADIPOQ, GLUL) in patients with diabetes. It is, therefore, obvious that the accumulation of more data from larger studies and better phenotypically characterized cohorts is needed to facilitate genetic discoveries and unravel novel insights into the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. PMID:25169573

  18. Safe genetically engineered plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosellini, D; Veronesi, F [Dipartimento di Biologia Vegetale e Biotecnologie Agroambientali e Zootecniche, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, Borgo XX giugno 74, 06121 Perugia (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    The application of genetic engineering to plants has provided genetically modified plants (GMPs, or transgenic plants) that are cultivated worldwide on increasing areas. The most widespread GMPs are herbicide-resistant soybean and canola and insect-resistant corn and cotton. New GMPs that produce vaccines, pharmaceutical or industrial proteins, and fortified food are approaching the market. The techniques employed to introduce foreign genes into plants allow a quite good degree of predictability of the results, and their genome is minimally modified. However, some aspects of GMPs have raised concern: (a) control of the insertion site of the introduced DNA sequences into the plant genome and of its mutagenic effect; (b) presence of selectable marker genes conferring resistance to an antibiotic or an herbicide, linked to the useful gene; (c) insertion of undesired bacterial plasmid sequences; and (d) gene flow from transgenic plants to non-transgenic crops or wild plants. In response to public concerns, genetic engineering techniques are continuously being improved. Techniques to direct foreign gene integration into chosen genomic sites, to avoid the use of selectable genes or to remove them from the cultivated plants, to reduce the transfer of undesired bacterial sequences, and make use of alternative, safer selectable genes, are all fields of active research. In our laboratory, some of these new techniques are applied to alfalfa, an important forage plant. These emerging methods for plant genetic engineering are briefly reviewed in this work.

  19. Safe genetically engineered plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosellini, D.; Veronesi, F.

    2007-10-01

    The application of genetic engineering to plants has provided genetically modified plants (GMPs, or transgenic plants) that are cultivated worldwide on increasing areas. The most widespread GMPs are herbicide-resistant soybean and canola and insect-resistant corn and cotton. New GMPs that produce vaccines, pharmaceutical or industrial proteins, and fortified food are approaching the market. The techniques employed to introduce foreign genes into plants allow a quite good degree of predictability of the results, and their genome is minimally modified. However, some aspects of GMPs have raised concern: (a) control of the insertion site of the introduced DNA sequences into the plant genome and of its mutagenic effect; (b) presence of selectable marker genes conferring resistance to an antibiotic or an herbicide, linked to the useful gene; (c) insertion of undesired bacterial plasmid sequences; and (d) gene flow from transgenic plants to non-transgenic crops or wild plants. In response to public concerns, genetic engineering techniques are continuously being improved. Techniques to direct foreign gene integration into chosen genomic sites, to avoid the use of selectable genes or to remove them from the cultivated plants, to reduce the transfer of undesired bacterial sequences, and make use of alternative, safer selectable genes, are all fields of active research. In our laboratory, some of these new techniques are applied to alfalfa, an important forage plant. These emerging methods for plant genetic engineering are briefly reviewed in this work.

  20. Pregnancy, cardiomyopathies, and genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Tintelen, J. Peter; Pieper, Petronella G.; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.; Van den Berg, Maarten P.

    2014-01-01

    Although familial forms of cardiomyopathy such as hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy have been recognized for decades, it is only recently that much of the genetic basis of these inherited cardiomyopathies has been elucidated. This has provided important insights into the pathophysiological mech

  1. GENETIC ASPECTS OF AUTISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastas LAKOSKI

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available In the first paper on the syndrome of autism, Kanner described it as innate and inborn. He drew attention to the abnormalities in infancy without evidence of prior normal development and the intellectual, non emotional qualities shown by many of the parents and grandparents. Subsequently, the supposed lack of parental warmth led many clinicians to abandon the notions of constitutional deficit in the child and instead to postulate a psychogenic origin etiology was likely, genetic factors probably did not play a major role. Attention was draw to the low rate of autism in siblings, the lack of chromosome anomalies, and the similarities with syndromes associated with known brain trauma. Although the rate of autism in siblings was indeed low, it was much higher than in the general population rate providing a strong pointer to the genetic factors. The recognition that this was so, associated with the parallel finding of apparently high familiar loading for language delay, stimulated the first, systematic, twin study of autism, which suggested a strong genetic component. Subsequent research has produced findings in the same direction, although many questions remain unanswered. In this paper the evidence that has accumulated on genetic influences on autism is summarized and the remained dilemmas on this field are discussed.

  2. Genetic Building Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberg, Ezra

    2004-01-01

    The "Central Dogma" of genetics states that one gene, located in a DNA molecule, is ultimately translated into one protein. As important as this idea is, many teachers shy away from teaching the actual mechanism of gene translation, and many students find the concepts abstract and inaccessible. This article describes a unit, called Genetics…

  3. Genetics and Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good progress is being made on genetics and genomics of sugar beet, however it is in process and the tools are now being generated and some results are being analyzed. The GABI BeetSeq project released a first draft of the sugar beet genome of KWS2320, a dihaploid (see http://bvseq.molgen.mpg.de/Gen...

  4. General cardinality genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler; Bhattacharyya; Vose

    1997-01-01

    A complete generalization of the Vose genetic algorithm model from the binary to higher cardinality case is provided. Boolean AND and EXCLUSIVE-OR operators are replaced by multiplication and addition over rings of integers. Walsh matrices are generalized with finite Fourier transforms for higher cardinality usage. Comparison of results to the binary case are provided. PMID:10021767

  5. Genetic Determinants of Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. López León (Sandra)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the studies in this genetic epidemiological thesis was to investigate candidate genes that play a role in the etiology of depression and to obtain new insights about biological pathways that may be involved in this disorder. The introduction of the thesis presents a review of

  6. Genetically Engineering Entomopathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H; Lovett, B; Fang, W

    2016-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi have been developed as environmentally friendly alternatives to chemical insecticides in biocontrol programs for agricultural pests and vectors of disease. However, mycoinsecticides currently have a small market share due to low virulence and inconsistencies in their performance. Genetic engineering has made it possible to significantly improve the virulence of fungi and their tolerance to adverse conditions. Virulence enhancement has been achieved by engineering fungi to express insect proteins and insecticidal proteins/peptides from insect predators and other insect pathogens, or by overexpressing the pathogen's own genes. Importantly, protein engineering can be used to mix and match functional domains from diverse genes sourced from entomopathogenic fungi and other organisms, producing insecticidal proteins with novel characteristics. Fungal tolerance to abiotic stresses, especially UV radiation, has been greatly improved by introducing into entomopathogens a photoreactivation system from an archaean and pigment synthesis pathways from nonentomopathogenic fungi. Conversely, gene knockout strategies have produced strains with reduced ecological fitness as recipients for genetic engineering to improve virulence; the resulting strains are hypervirulent, but will not persist in the environment. Coupled with their natural insect specificity, safety concerns can also be mitigated by using safe effector proteins with selection marker genes removed after transformation. With the increasing public concern over the continued use of synthetic chemical insecticides and growing public acceptance of genetically modified organisms, new types of biological insecticides produced by genetic engineering offer a range of environmentally friendly options for cost-effective control of insect pests. PMID:27131325

  7. Genetics Home Reference: globozoospermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of DPY19L2 causes infertility in man by blocking sperm head elongation and acrosome formation. Am J Hum Genet. 2011 Mar 11;88(3):351-61. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2011.02.007. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Koscinski I, Elinati E, Fossard ...

  8. Genetic support groups in the delivery of comprehensive genetic services.

    OpenAIRE

    Black, R. B.; Weiss, J O

    1989-01-01

    This research sought information about the services provided by genetic support groups, their members' experiences in obtaining genetic and related services, and members' recommendations for improving services. Results from a survey of 43 directors of genetic support groups showed that these organizations not only provide their members with a wide range of informational and supportive services but also address the need for education of both the public and health professionals about genetic di...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Waardenburg syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Waardenburg syndrome Waardenburg syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Waardenburg syndrome is a group of genetic conditions that can ...

  10. American Society of Human Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Awards August 9, 2016 Media Advisory: American Society of Human Genetics 2016 Annual Meeting July 26, ... McKusick Leadership Award June 30, 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics, Incorporated 9650 Rockville Pike • Bethesda, ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: ocular albinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions ocular albinism ocular albinism Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Ocular albinism is a genetic condition that primarily affects ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: arginase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in ammonia may lead to episodes of irritability, refusal to eat, and vomiting. In some affected individuals, ... Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are genetic conditions diagnosed? How ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: pachyonychia congenita

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with genetically confirmed pachyonychia congenita. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2012 Oct;67(4):680-6. doi: 10. ... molecular genetic features of pachyonychia congenita. J Invest Dermatol. 2011 May;131(5):1015-7. doi: 10. ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Northern epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Northern epilepsy Northern epilepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Northern epilepsy is a genetic condition that causes recurrent seizures ( ...

  15. Selected Readings in Genetic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Thomas R.; Robinson, Sandra K.

    1973-01-01

    Describes different sources of readings for understanding issues and concepts of genetic engineering. Broad categories of reading materials are: concerns about genetic engineering; its background; procedures; and social, ethical and legal issues. References are listed. (PS)

  16. Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... W X Y Z Test Your Knowledge Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms Designed to help learners at ... Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) created the Talking Glossary of Genetic Terms to help everyone understand the ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Partington syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Partington syndrome Partington syndrome Enable ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: dystonia 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions dystonia 6 dystonia 6 Enable ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Friedreich ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Friedreich ataxia Friedreich ataxia Enable ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: MEGDEL syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions MEGDEL syndrome MEGDEL syndrome Enable ...

  1. NCI Dictionary of Genetics Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    A dictionary of more than 150 genetics-related terms written for healthcare professionals, developed to support the comprehensive, evidence-based, peer-reviewed PDQ cancer genetics information summaries.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Leigh syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Leigh syndrome Leigh syndrome Enable ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: androgenetic alopecia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions androgenetic alopecia androgenetic alopecia Enable ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome Enable ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Canavan disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Canavan disease Canavan disease Enable ...

  6. Genetics Home Reference: adiposis dolorosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions adiposis dolorosa adiposis dolorosa Enable ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome Crouzonodermoskeletal syndrome Enable ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: cryptogenic cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions cryptogenic cirrhosis cryptogenic cirrhosis Enable ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Cushing disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Cushing disease Cushing disease Enable ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Sandhoff disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) Health Topic: Degenerative Nerve Diseases Health Topic: Tay-Sachs Disease Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 ... UK) National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association Genetic Testing Registry (1 ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Ochoa syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Ochoa syndrome Ochoa syndrome Enable ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Maffucci syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Maffucci syndrome Maffucci syndrome Enable ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Miller syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Miller syndrome Miller syndrome Enable ...

  14. Behavioral Genetics and Child Temperament

    OpenAIRE

    Saudino, Kimberly J.

    2005-01-01

    Most temperament theories presume a biological basis to those behavioral tendencies thought to be temperamental in origin. Behavioral genetic methods can be used to test this assumption. Twin and adoption studies suggest that individual differences in infant and child temperament are genetically influenced. However, behavioral genetics has much more to offer to the study of temperament than simple heritability estimates. The present paper describes some recent findings from behavioral genetic...

  15. Genetic Algorithms and Quantum Computation

    OpenAIRE

    Giraldi, Gilson A.; Portugal, Renato; Thess, Ricardo N.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, researchers have applied genetic algorithms (GAs) to address some problems in quantum computation. Also, there has been some works in the designing of genetic algorithms based on quantum theoretical concepts and techniques. The so called Quantum Evolutionary Programming has two major sub-areas: Quantum Inspired Genetic Algorithms (QIGAs) and Quantum Genetic Algorithms (QGAs). The former adopts qubit chromosomes as representations and employs quantum gates for the search of the best ...

  16. Foundations of genetic algorithms 1991

    CERN Document Server

    FOGA

    1991-01-01

    Foundations of Genetic Algorithms 1991 (FOGA 1) discusses the theoretical foundations of genetic algorithms (GA) and classifier systems.This book compiles research papers on selection and convergence, coding and representation, problem hardness, deception, classifier system design, variation and recombination, parallelization, and population divergence. Other topics include the non-uniform Walsh-schema transform; spurious correlations and premature convergence in genetic algorithms; and variable default hierarchy separation in a classifier system. The grammar-based genetic algorithm; condition

  17. UNDERSTANDING OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISMS

    OpenAIRE

    Željko Kaluđerović; Jovana Potpara

    2012-01-01

    During the last sixteen years biotechnology, genetic engineering, transgenic organisms or genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have been raising numerous controversies. In the scientific sphere, genetic engineering and GMOs represent a special challenge for geneticists, breeders and physicians, in philosophy it is a topic of interest for bioethicists and agricultural ethicists, environmentalists are interested in the interconnectictions between new technology and environment protection, for ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Kabuki syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hum Genet. 2012 Apr;57(4):223-7. doi: 10.1038/jhg.2012.28. Epub 2012 Mar ... Hum Genet. 2009 May;54(5):304-9. doi: 10.1038/jhg.2009.30. Epub 2009 Apr ... Genet. 2012 Jan 13;90(1):119-24. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2011.11.021. Epub ...

  19. Population genetics without intraspecific data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorne, Jeffrey L; Choi, Sang Chul; Yu, Jiaye;

    2007-01-01

    populations, and parameters of interspecific models should have population genetic interpretations. We show, with two examples, how population genetic interpretations can be assigned to evolutionary models. The first example considers the impact of RNA secondary structure on sequence change, and the second...... genetic interpretation. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Aug...

  20. Genetic Counseling in Mental Retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Peter

    The task of the genetic counselor who identifies genetic causes of mental retardation and assists families to understand risk of recurrence is described. Considered are chromosomal genetic disorders such as Down's syndrome, inherited disorders such as Tay-Sachs disease, identification by testing the amniotic fluid cells (amniocentresis) in time…

  1. Familial pancreatic cancer: genetic advances

    OpenAIRE

    Rustgi, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    This review by Rustgi elaborates on the known genetic syndromes that underlie familial pancreatic cancer. It aims to delineate the subtypes of syndromic hereditary pancreatic cancer in which germline genetic mutations have been identified and nonsyndromic familial pancreatic cancer in which genetic information is emerging.

  2. Genetic influence on prolonged gestation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Maja; Bille, Camilla; Olesen, Annette Wind;

    2004-01-01

    twin pairs, which indicates genetic effects. Biometric modeling suggested that genetic factors account for 23% to 30% of the liability to prolonged gestation. The difference in concordance rate between monozygotic and dizygotic male twin pairs was small, and the best fitting model indicated no genetic...

  3. Genetic secrets: Protecting privacy and confidentiality in the genetic era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothstein, M.A. [ed.

    1998-07-01

    Few developments are likely to affect human beings more profoundly in the long run than the discoveries resulting from advances in modern genetics. Although the developments in genetic technology promise to provide many additional benefits, their application to genetic screening poses ethical, social, and legal questions, many of which are rooted in issues of privacy and confidentiality. The ethical, practical, and legal ramifications of these and related questions are explored in depth. The broad range of topics includes: the privacy and confidentiality of genetic information; the challenges to privacy and confidentiality that may be projected to result from the emerging genetic technologies; the role of informed consent in protecting the confidentiality of genetic information in the clinical setting; the potential uses of genetic information by third parties; the implications of changes in the health care delivery system for privacy and confidentiality; relevant national and international developments in public policies, professional standards, and laws; recommendations; and the identification of research needs.

  4. Genetic engineering in biotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedate, C.A.; Morales, J.C.; Lopez, E.H.

    1981-09-01

    The objective of this book is to encourage the use of genetic engineering for economic development. The report covers: (1) Precedents of genetic engineering; (2) a brief description of the technology, including the transfer of DNA in bacteria (vectors, E. coli and B. subtilis hosts, stages, and technical problems), practical examples of techniques used and their products (interferon; growth hormone; insulin; treatment of blood cells, Talasemia, and Lesch-Nyhan syndrome; and more nutritious soya), transfer to higher organisms, and cellular fusion; (3) biological risks and precautions; (4) possible applications (production of hydrogen, hydrocarbons, alcohol, chemicals, enzymes, peptides, viral antigens, monoclonal antibodies, genes, proteins, and insecticides; metal extraction; nitrogen fixation; biodegradation; and new varieties of plants and animals; and (5) international activities.

  5. The expanded genetic alphabet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshev, Denis A; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2015-10-01

    All biological information, since the last common ancestor of all life on Earth, has been encoded by a genetic alphabet consisting of only four nucleotides that form two base pairs. Long-standing efforts to develop two synthetic nucleotides that form a third, unnatural base pair (UBP) have recently yielded three promising candidates, one based on alternative hydrogen bonding, and two based on hydrophobic and packing forces. All three of these UBPs are replicated and transcribed with remarkable efficiency and fidelity, and the latter two thus demonstrate that hydrogen bonding is not unique in its ability to underlie the storage and retrieval of genetic information. This Review highlights these recent developments as well as the applications enabled by the UBPs, including the expansion of the evolution process to include new functionality and the creation of semi-synthetic life that stores increased information. PMID:26304162

  6. Genetics of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rielly, Darren D; Rahman, Proton

    2014-10-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) represents a group of inflammatory rheumatic diseases that cluster within families and possess overlapping clinical features. The pathogenesis of SpA encompasses a complex array of genetic, immunological and environmental factors. In this article, we will briefly review the genetics of PsA, and then focus on the genes that may be potentially linked either directly or indirectly to the immunopathology of the Th-17 pathway. The most consistent and dominant genetic effect of PsV and PsA is located on chromosome 6p21.3 within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, which accounts for approximately one-third of the genetic contribution of PsV and PsA. To date, 36 genes have reached genome-wide significance, accounting for approximately 22% of psoriasis (PsV) heritability. Prominent genes identified via GWAS include HLA-Cw6, IL12B, IL23R, IL23A, TNIP1, TNFAIP3, LCE3B-LCE3C, TRAF3IP2, NFkBIA, FBXL19, TYK2, IFIH1, REL, and ERAP1. Genes identified in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has largely echoed those in PsV and include HLA-B/C, HLA-B, IL-12B, IL-23R, TNIP1, TRAF3IP2, FBXL19, and REL. The lack of identified genetic susceptibility loci is largely attributed to the much smaller number of PsA patients and the greater clinical heterogeneity of PsA. Searching for different types of genetic variants such as small CNVs and/or insertions/deletions has also led to the identification of several genes with a function relative to PsV in particular including DEFB4, LCE3C_LCE3B, and IL-22 gene (exon 1). The candidate genes identified in PsV/PsA have highlighted pathways of critical importance to psoriatic disease including distinct signaling pathways comprised of barrier integrity, innate immune response and adaptive immune response, mediated primarily by Th-17 and Th-1 signalling. While GWAS studies have yielded great insights into the genes that contribute to the pathogenesis of PsV and PsA, replication in large cohorts, fine-mapping and resequencing

  7. "Genetically Engineered" Nanoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimeck, Gerhard; Salazar-Lazaro, Carlos H.; Stoica, Adrian; Cwik, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    The quantum mechanical functionality of nanoelectronic devices such as resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs), quantum well infrared-photodetectors (QWIPs), quantum well lasers, and heterostructure field effect transistors (HFETs) is enabled by material variations on an atomic scale. The design and optimization of such devices requires a fundamental understanding of electron transport in such dimensions. The Nanoelectronic Modeling Tool (NEMO) is a general-purpose quantum device design and analysis tool based on a fundamental non-equilibrium electron transport theory. NEW was combined with a parallelized genetic algorithm package (PGAPACK) to evolve structural and material parameters to match a desired set of experimental data. A numerical experiment that evolves structural variations such as layer widths and doping concentrations is performed to analyze an experimental current voltage characteristic. The genetic algorithm is found to drive the NEMO simulation parameters close to the experimentally prescribed layer thicknesses and doping profiles. With such a quantitative agreement between theory and experiment design synthesis can be performed.

  8. Genetics of Tobacco Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maserejian Nancy

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The worldwide prevalence of tobacco use is widespread, resulting in nearly 4.5 million deaths every year. Nicotine is addictive and has psychopharmacological effects that maintain the use of tobacco products. Several studies have documented a strong hereditary component to tobacco use. The present article reviews results from twin and adoption studies and proceeds to present association studies of specific genes that may be involved in tobacco use. Cholinergic receptor nicotinic beta polypeptide 2, serotonin receptor and transporter genes, dopamine receptor and transporter genes, and the cytochrome P450A6 gene are reviewed. Linkage studies help to identify regions of the genome that may be worth further investigation. The paper concludes with a discussion of the limitations of genetic research and the future of genetic epidemiology in this domain.

  9. Lanoteplase Genetics Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfner, R

    2000-12-01

    Lanoteplase, a modified form of a tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) lacking fibronectin finger-like and epidermal growth factor domains, was developed by the Genetics Institute for the potential treatment of thromboembolic disorders. Suntory, the Japanese licensee, has filed an NDA in Japan for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction (MI) [301222]. It was also licensed to Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS) for worldwide development (excluding Japan, China, South Korea and Taiwan) [178225]. BMS conducted phase III trials for acute MI [272490] but discontinued development and returned the license to Genetics Institute during 1999 [359688]. In February 1999, Lehman Brothers predicted the drug had a 60% probability of reaching market, with an estimated first launch date in 2000. The analysts predicted peak sales would occur in 2006, with peak sales of $200 million in the US and US $100 million in the rest of the world at that time [319225]. PMID:11249701

  10. Advances in human genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, H.; Hirschhorn, K. (eds.)

    1993-01-01

    This book has five chapters covering peroxisomal diseases, X-linked immunodeficiencies, genetic mutations affecting human lipoproteins and their receptors and enzymes, genetic aspects of cancer, and Gaucher disease. The chapter on peroxisomes covers their discovery, structure, functions, disorders, etc. The chapter on X-linked immunodeficiencies discusses such diseases as agammaglobulinemia, severe combined immunodeficiency, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, animal models, linkage analysis, etc. Apolipoprotein formation, synthesis, gene regulation, proteins, etc. are the main focus of chapter 3. The chapter on cancer covers such topics as oncogene mapping and the molecular characterization of some recessive oncogenes. Gaucher disease is covered from its diagnosis, classification, and prevention, to its organ system involvement and molecular biology.

  11. Genetics of Childhood Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, Struan F A; Jianhua Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a major health problem and an immense economic burden on the health care systems both in the United States and the rest of the world. The prevalence of obesity in children and adults in the United States has increased dramatically over the past decade. Besides environmental factors, genetic factors are known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of obesity. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed strongly associated genomic variants associated with most common ...

  12. Genetic diversity in populations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martínková, Natália; Zemanová, Barbora

    Brno: Akademické nakladatelství CERM, 2011 - (Jarkovský, J.), s. 21-27 ISBN 978-80-7204-756-7. [International Summer School on Computational Biology /7./. Lednice (CZ), 15.09.2011-17.09.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : nucleotide diversity * haplotype diversity * heterozygosity * Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  13. Genetics and alcoholism

    OpenAIRE

    Edenberg, Howard J.; Foroud, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol is widely consumed, but excessive use creates serious physical, psychological and social problems and contributes to many diseases. Alcoholism (alcohol dependence, alcohol use disorders) is a maladaptive pattern of excessive drinking leading to serious problems. Abundant evidence indicates that alcoholism is a complex genetic disease, with variations in a large number of genes affecting risk. Some of these genes have been identified, including two genes of alcohol me...

  14. Genetics of Alzheimer Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bekris, Lynn M.; Yu, Chang-En; Bird, Thomas D.; Tsuang, Debby W.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common causes of neurodegenerative disorder in the elderly individuals. Clinically, patients initially present with short-term memory loss, subsequently followed by executive dysfunction, confusion, agitation, and behavioral disturbances. Three causative genes have been associated with autosomal dominant familial AD (APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2) and 1 genetic risk factor (APOEε4 allele). Identification of these genes has led to a number of animal models that have ...

  15. Molecular Genetics in Glaucoma

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yutao; Allingham, R. Rand

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma is a family of diseases whose pathology is defined by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells. Clinically, glaucoma presents as a distinctive optic neuropathy with associated visual field loss. Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG), chronic angle closure glaucoma (ACG), and exfoliation glaucoma (XFG) are the most prevalent forms of glaucoma globally and are the most common causes of glaucoma-related blindness worldwide. A host of genetic and environmental factors contribute to gl...

  16. Genetic and molecular epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    John P A Ioannidis

    2007-01-01

    Genetic and molecular epidemiology covers a vast area of research. Given the rapid changes in this field, discussing a research agenda is a precarious and ambitious task. A representative set of high‐priority concepts will be presented here, each of which alone could be the topic of a long series of essays. The wish list includes issues of full transparency and integration of information, dealing efficiently with complex multidimensional biology, juxtaposing the genome and environmental expos...

  17. Genetically Modified Organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Claro Llaguno

    2001-01-01

    Recent reports have brought to public attention concerns about Bt corn and genetically modified organisms (GMO) in general. The timing, it seems, is most appropriate considering two related developments early this year: the final approval of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety in Montreal on January 29, 2001, and the OECD Edinburgh Conference on GM food safety last February 28- March 1, 2001. The protocol makes clear that GMOs include all living modified organisms (LMO) defined as "any living...

  18. Genetics of bovine vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Leach, Richard Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Infectious disease is an important issue for animal breeders, farmers and governments. Solutions to control infectious disease are needed and research focused on the genetic loci determining variation in immune-related traits has the potential to deliver solutions. The primary aim of this thesis is to discover regions of the bovine genome which influence the immune response post immunisation. To accomplish this two types of immunising agents, a Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus (FMD...

  19. Genetics in Pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Lowry, R. Brian

    1988-01-01

    The prevalence of genetic disease in the pediatric population is considerable and probably accounts for at least 50% of childhood deaths and 25% of hospital pediatric admissions. A simple three-generation family history is often very useful, as is background information on ethnicity and consanguinity. A preponderance of affected males in a family should immediately suggest an X-linked recessive disorder which may have widespread implications for female relatives in the family. Chromosomal err...

  20. Genetics of congenital hypothyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Park, S.; Chatterjee, V

    2005-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism is the most common neonatal metabolic disorder and results in severe neurodevelopmental impairment and infertility if untreated. Congenital hypothyroidism is usually sporadic but up to 2% of thyroid dysgenesis is familial, and congenital hypothyroidism caused by organification defects is often recessively inherited. The candidate genes associated with this genetically heterogeneous disorder form two main groups: those causing thyroid gland dysgenesis and those causin...

  1. Genetic engineering of cyanobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jacob Hedemand

    , including genetic tools that allow metabolic engineering. The cyanobacterial phylum represents a diverse group of aerobic photosynthetic bacteria that are widespread in nature. Cyanobacteria shaped our atmosphere by oxygen evolution through the splitting of water using energy from sunlight. The sole carbon...... source for growth in autotrophic cyanobacteria is CO2, which is reduced to carbohydrates during photosynthesis. Simple input requirements, fast growth rates and tolerance of adverse environmental conditions make cyanobacteria attractive candidates for large scale production of energy or value added...

  2. Pig ham genetic traceability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dall'Olio

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowing meat product origin is an important factor to assure consumer safety. A definitive method to solve this question is to identify, through molecular genetics analysis, a sample collected from the alive animal and a sample collected on the processed product. The only way to assure the origin of meat and meat products is by the proved identity of both genotypes for each different analyzed loci. Identity test was utilized to achieve individual traceability of meat for cattle......

  3. Genetics and Osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Albagha, O.M.E.; Ralston, S H

    2006-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, many advances have been made in understanding the mechanisms by which genetic factors regulate susceptibility to osteoporosis. It has become clear from studies in man and experimental animals that different genes regulate BMD at different skeletal sites and in men and women. Linkage studies have identified several chromosomal regions that regulate BMD, but only a few causative genes have been discovered so far using this approach. In contrast, significant advances have...

  4. Clustering using Genetic Algorithms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kudová, Petra

    Ostrava : VŠB Technická univerzita, 2007 - (Snášel, V.; Platoš, J.), s. 1-11 ISBN 978-80-248-1332-5. [WETDAP 2007. Workshop in Conjunction with Znalosti 2007 /1./. Ostrava (CZ), 22.02.2007-22.02.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET100300414 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : evolutionary techniques * genetic algorithms * unsupervised learning * clustering Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  5. Clustering Genetic Algorithm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kudová, Petra

    Los Alamitos : IEEE, 2007 - (Tjoa, A.; Wagner, R.), s. 138-142 ISBN 978-0-7695-2932-5. [ETID '07. International Workshop on Evolutionary Techniques /1./, DEXA 2007 International Conference /18./. Regensburg (DE), 03.09.2007-07.09.2007] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET100300414 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : clustering * genetic algorithms * k-means Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  6. Genetically Modified Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claro Llaguno

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports have brought to public attention concerns about Bt corn and genetically modified organisms (GMO in general. The timing, it seems, is most appropriate considering two related developments early this year: the final approval of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety in Montreal on January 29, 2001, and the OECD Edinburgh Conference on GM food safety last February 28- March 1, 2001. The protocol makes clear that GMOs include all living modified organisms (LMO defined as "any living organism that possesses a novel combination of genetic material obtained through the use of modern biotechnology". This includes seeds, live fish, and other organisms intentionally obtained for release to the environment. It would seem that the common understanding about GMOs as referring to farm-to-table products is perforce expanded to embrace genetically modified farm animals and aquatic resources. Being a trade agreement, the Montreal accord primarily deals with the safety issues related to the transboundary movement of LMOs around the globe. The OECD conference on the other hand, called for an international body "to address all sides of the GM debate" in response to the public outcry, particularly in Western Europe, regarding the risks the new products pose to human health and the environment. Some points of contention, which remain unresolved, include issues such as whether countries should be allowed to develop their own GM food based on their needs, and whether a global moratorium on GMOs and mandatory labeling should be enforced worldwide.

  7. Genetics of osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urano, Tomohiko [Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Inoue, Satoshi, E-mail: INOUE-GER@h.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Geriatric Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Department of Anti-Aging Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Division of Gene Regulation and Signal Transduction, Research Center for Genomic Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Saitama (Japan)

    2014-09-19

    Highlights: • Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with osteoporosis were identified. • SNPs mapped close to or within VDR and ESR1 are associated with bone mineral density. • WNT signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in regulating bone mineral density. • Genetic studies will be useful for identification of new therapeutic targets. - Abstract: Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue, which increases susceptibility to fractures. BMD is a complex quantitative trait with normal distribution and seems to be genetically controlled (in 50–90% of the cases), according to studies on twins and families. Over the last 20 years, candidate gene approach and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with low BMD, osteoporosis, and osteoporotic fractures. These SNPs have been mapped close to or within genes including those encoding nuclear receptors and WNT-β-catenin signaling proteins. Understanding the genetics of osteoporosis will help identify novel candidates for diagnostic and therapeutic targets.

  8. Darwin and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, Brian; Charlesworth, Deborah

    2009-11-01

    Darwin's theory of natural selection lacked an adequate account of inheritance, making it logically incomplete. We review the interaction between evolution and genetics, showing how, unlike Mendel, Darwin's lack of a model of the mechanism of inheritance left him unable to interpret his own data that showed Mendelian ratios, even though he shared with Mendel a more mathematical and probabilistic outlook than most biologists of his time. Darwin's own "pangenesis" model provided a mechanism for generating ample variability on which selection could act. It involved, however, the inheritance of characters acquired during an organism's life, which Darwin himself knew could not explain some evolutionary situations. Once the particulate basis of genetics was understood, it was seen to allow variation to be passed intact to new generations, and evolution could then be understood as a process of changes in the frequencies of stable variants. Evolutionary genetics subsequently developed as a central part of biology. Darwinian principles now play a greater role in biology than ever before, which we illustrate with some examples of studies of natural selection that use DNA sequence data and with some recent advances in answering questions first asked by Darwin. PMID:19933231

  9. Algebras in genetics

    CERN Document Server

    Wörz-Busekros, Angelika

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of these notes is to give a rather complete presentation of the mathematical theory of algebras in genetics and to discuss in detail many applications to concrete genetic situations. Historically, the subject has its origin in several papers of Etherington in 1939- 1941. Fundamental contributions have been given by Schafer, Gonshor, Holgate, Reiers¢l, Heuch, and Abraham. At the moment there exist about forty papers in this field, one survey article by Monique Bertrand from 1966 based on four papers of Etherington, a paper by Schafer and Gonshor's first paper. Furthermore Ballonoff in the third section of his book "Genetics and Social Structure" has included four papers by Etherington and Reiers¢l's paper. Apparently a complete review, in par­ ticular one comprising more recent results was lacking, and it was difficult for students to enter this field of research. I started to write these notes in spring 1978. A first german version was finished at the end of that year. Further revision and tran...

  10. Genetic bases for glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, Nobuo

    2010-05-01

    Glaucoma is the leading cause of visual impairment and blindness throughout the world. Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG; MIM 137760) is the main type of glaucoma in most populations, and more than 20 genetic loci for POAG have been reported. Only three causative genes have been identified in these loci, viz. myocilin (MYOC), optineurin (OPTN), and WD repeat domain 36 (WDR36). However, mutations in these genes account for only a small percentage of the patients with POAG. Some of these glaucoma cases have a Mendelian inheritance pattern, and a considerable fraction of the cases result from a large number of variants in several genes each contributing small effects. Glaucoma is considered to be a common disease such as diabetes mellitus, coronary disease, Crohn disease, and several( )common cancers. The main technological approaches used to identify the genes associated with glaucoma are the candidate gene approach, linkage analysis, case-control association study, and genome-wide association study. Association studies have found about 27 genes related to POAG, but the glaucoma-causing effects of these genes need to be investigated in more detail. The current trend is to use case-control association studies or genome-wide association studies to map the genes associated with glaucoma. Such studies are expected to greatly advance our understanding of the genetic basis of glaucoma, and to provide information on the effectiveness of glaucoma therapy. This review gives an overview on the genetic aspects of glaucoma. PMID:20431268

  11. Genetic Alterations in Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumor and have a dismal prognosis. Understanding the genetic alterations that drive glioma formation and progression may help improve patient prognosis by identification of novel treatment targets. Recently, two major studies have performed in-depth mutation analysis of glioblastomas (the most common and aggressive subtype of glioma). This systematic approach revealed three major pathways that are affected in glioblastomas: The receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathway, the TP53 pathway and the pRB pathway. Apart from frequent mutations in the IDH1/2 gene, much less is known about the causal genetic changes of grade II and III (anaplastic) gliomas. Exceptions include TP53 mutations and fusion genes involving the BRAF gene in astrocytic and pilocytic glioma subtypes, respectively. In this review, we provide an update on all common events involved in the initiation and/or progression across the different subtypes of glioma and provide future directions for research into the genetic changes

  12. Genetics of osteoporosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with osteoporosis were identified. • SNPs mapped close to or within VDR and ESR1 are associated with bone mineral density. • WNT signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in regulating bone mineral density. • Genetic studies will be useful for identification of new therapeutic targets. - Abstract: Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue, which increases susceptibility to fractures. BMD is a complex quantitative trait with normal distribution and seems to be genetically controlled (in 50–90% of the cases), according to studies on twins and families. Over the last 20 years, candidate gene approach and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with low BMD, osteoporosis, and osteoporotic fractures. These SNPs have been mapped close to or within genes including those encoding nuclear receptors and WNT-β-catenin signaling proteins. Understanding the genetics of osteoporosis will help identify novel candidates for diagnostic and therapeutic targets

  13. Genetic Algorithms and Local Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Darrell

    1996-01-01

    The first part of this presentation is a tutorial level introduction to the principles of genetic search and models of simple genetic algorithms. The second half covers the combination of genetic algorithms with local search methods to produce hybrid genetic algorithms. Hybrid algorithms can be modeled within the existing theoretical framework developed for simple genetic algorithms. An application of a hybrid to geometric model matching is given. The hybrid algorithm yields results that improve on the current state-of-the-art for this problem.

  14. Genetic influences on pulmonary function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Truls S; Thomsen, Simon; van der Sluis, Sophie;

    2011-01-01

    Heritability of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)), forced vital capacity (FVC), and peak expiratory flow (PEF) has not been previously addressed in large twin studies. We evaluated the genetic contribution to individual differences observed in FEV(1), FVC, and PEF using data from the...... component sex-limitation models were applied to evaluate possible genetic differences between the sexes for FEV(1), FVC, and PEF. Estimates were adjusted for age, height, and smoking. For FEV(1), additive genetic effects of 61% (95% CI 56-65) were observed. For FVC, the additive genetic contribution was 26......% (3-49%) and the dominant genetic contribution was 29% (4-54%). For PEF, our models showed an additive genetic contribution of 43% (31-52%) for men, but genetic influences were not significant in women. We found no significant differences between dizygotic same-sex twins and dizygotic opposite...

  15. Integration of molecular genetic technology with quantitative genetic technology for maximizing the speed of genetic improvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jack; C.M.; DEKKERS

    2005-01-01

    To date,most genetic progress for quantita-tive traits in livestock has been made by selec-tion on phenotype or on estimates of breedingvalues(BBV)derived from phenotype,withoutknowledge of the number of genes that affect thetrait or the effects of each gene.In this quantita-tive genetic approach to genetic improvement,the genetic architecture of traits of interest hasessentially been treated as a‘black box’.De-spite this,the substantial rates of genetic im-provement that have been and continue to be a-chie...

  16. The primary headaches: genetics, epigenetics and a behavioural genetic model

    OpenAIRE

    Montagna, Pasquale

    2008-01-01

    The primary headaches, migraine with (MA) and without aura (MO) and cluster headache, all carry a substantial genetic liability. Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), an autosomal dominant mendelian disorder classified as a subtype of MA, is due to mutations in genes encoding neural channel subunits. MA/MO are considered multifactorial genetic disorders, and FHM has been proposed as a model for migraine aetiology. However, a review of the genetic studies suggests that the FHM genes are not invo...

  17. Genetic effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter, the BEIR Committee has reviewed and reevaluated the data that are pertinent to the estimation of genetic risks to humans from low levels of ionizing radiation. The present report summarizes the methods and conclusions of previous committees. In deriving new risk figures, it places rather more emphasis on the results of the studies of Japanese atomic-bomb survivors than have previous BEIR reports. However, the committee has also made use of the extensive radiation studies carried out with mice, which are briefly reviewed. 174 ref

  18. Genetic disorders in portraits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, A E

    1996-12-18

    Many artists have depicted genetic disorders in portrait paintings. In some instances such disorders can be identified in self-portraits, most notably the tetralogy of Fallot in the Dutch painter Dick Ket, or in portraits of the famous, such as the Habsburg jaw in the Emperor Charles V. But it is in other portraits that most examples can be found, such as the different types of dwarfism depicted by Velázquez. A table listing over 70 examples is provided. PMID:8985496

  19. Abundance of non-native crabs in intertidal habitats of New England with natural and artificial structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovely, Christina M; O'Connor, Nancy J; Judge, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    Marine habitats containing complex physical structure (e.g., crevices) can provide shelter from predation for benthic invertebrates. To examine effects of natural and artificial structure on the abundance of intertidal juvenile crabs, 2 experiments were conducted in Kingston Bay, Massachusetts, USA, from July to September, 2012. In the first experiment, structure was manipulated in a two-factor design that was placed in the high intertidal for 3 one-week periods to test for both substrate type (sand vs. rock) and the presence or absence of artificial structure (mesh grow-out bags used in aquaculture, ∼0.5 m(2) with 62 mm(2) mesh openings). The Asian shore crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, and small individuals of the green crab, Carcinus maenas, were observed only in the treatments of rocks and mesh bag plus rocks. Most green crabs were small (bags placed on a muddy sand substrate in the low intertidal zone: mesh grow-out bags without shells, grow-out bags with oyster shells, and grow-out bags containing live oysters. Replicate bags were deployed weekly for 7 weeks in a randomized complete block design. All crabs collected in the bags were juvenile C. maenas (1-15 mm carapace width), and numbers of crabs differed 6-fold among treatments, with most crabs present in bags with live oysters (29.5 ± 10.6 m(-2) [mean ± S.D.]) and fewest in bags without shells (4.9 ± 3.7 m(-2)). Both C. maenas and H. sanguineus occurred in habitats with natural structure (cobble rocks). The attraction of juvenile C. maenas to artificial structure consisting of plastic mesh bags containing both oyster shells and living oysters could potentially impact oyster aquaculture operations. PMID:26401456

  20. Genetic Aspects of Nephrotic Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Shivani

    a modifier. Nonetheless, such a combination might have variable penetrance and hence different age of onset. Thus, genetic testing in SRNS is important as it might give clues to the cause and save exposure of immunosuppressive medications in future patients with same genotype. Families comprising...... steroid dependence or become frequent relapsers. Repeated courses of corticosteroid treatment often cause significant associated morbidity. Familial occurrence of SSNS is rare and suggests a potential genetic origin. However, very little data on molecular genetics of familial SSNS is available in...... literature and no causal genes have yet been identified. Genetic aspects of NS bear important implications in therapeutic decisions and genetic counselling in SRNS patients and family members. During the present Ph.D. project we have studied the influence of genetic factors in patients with SRNS and familial...

  1. Genetic manipulation of francisella tularensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogaj, Xhavit; Klose, Karl E

    2010-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes the disease tularemia. F. tularensis subsp. tularensis causes the most severe disease in humans and has been classified as a Category A select agent and potential bioweapon. There is currently no vaccine approved for human use, making genetic manipulation of this organism critical to unraveling the genetic basis of pathogenesis and developing countermeasures against tularemia. The development of genetic techniques applicable to F. tularensis have lagged behind those routinely used for other bacteria, primarily due to lack of research and the restricted nature of the biocontainment required for studying this pathogen. However, in recent years, genetic techniques, such as transposon mutagenesis and targeted gene disruption, have been developed, that have had a dramatic impact on our understanding of the genetic basis of F. tularensis virulence. In this review, we describe some of the methods developed for genetic manipulation of F. tularensis. PMID:21607086

  2. Genetics of SCID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cossu Fausto

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human SCID (Severe Combined Immunodeficiency is a prenatal disorder of T lymphocyte development, that depends on the expression of numerous genes. The knowledge of the genetic basis of SCID is essential for diagnosis (e.g., clinical phenotype, lymphocyte profile and treatment (e.g., use and type of pre-hematopoietic stem cell transplant conditioning. Over the last years novel genetic defects causing SCID have been discovered, and the molecular and immunological mechanisms of SCID have been better characterized. Distinct forms of SCID show both common and peculiar (e.g., absence or presence of nonimmunological features aspects, and they are currently classified into six groups according to prevalent pathophysiological mechanisms: impaired cytokine-mediated signaling; pre-T cell receptor defects; increased lymphocyte apoptosis; defects in thymus embryogenesis; impaired calcium flux; other mechanisms. This review is the updated, extended and largely modified translation of the article "Cossu F: Le basi genetiche delle SCID", originally published in Italian language in the journal "Prospettive in Pediatria" 2009, 156:228-238.

  3. Genetically engineered plasmonic nanoarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestiere, Carlo; Pasquale, Alyssa J; Capretti, Antonio; Miano, Giovanni; Tamburrino, Antonello; Lee, Sylvanus Y; Reinhard, Björn M; Dal Negro, Luca

    2012-04-11

    In the present Letter, we demonstrate how the design of metallic nanoparticle arrays with large electric field enhancement can be performed using the basic paradigm of engineering, namely the optimization of a well-defined objective function. Such optimization is carried out by coupling a genetic algorithm with the analytical multiparticle Mie theory. General design criteria for best enhancement of electric fields are obtained, unveiling the fundamental interplay between the near-field plasmonic and radiative photonic coupling. Our optimization approach is experimentally validated by surface-enhanced Raman scattering measurements, which demonstrate how genetically optimized arrays, fabricated using electron beam lithography, lead to order of ten improvement of Raman enhancement over nanoparticle dimer antennas, and order of one hundred improvement over optimal nanoparticle gratings. A rigorous design of nanoparticle arrays with optimal field enhancement is essential to the engineering of numerous nanoscale optical devices such as plasmon-enhanced biosensors, photodetectors, light sources and more efficient nonlinear optical elements for on chip integration. PMID:22381056

  4. Genetics and plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunet, Nathanaël; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2016-01-01

    There are only three grand theories in biology: the theory of the cell, the theory of the gene, and the theory of evolution. Two of these, the cell and gene theories, originated in the study of plants, with the third resulting in part from botanical considerations as well. Mendel's elucidation of the rules of inheritance was a result of his experiments on peas. The rediscovery of Mendel's work in 1900 was by the botanists de Vries, Correns, and Tschermak. It was only in subsequent years that animals were also shown to have segregation of genetic elements in the exact same manner as had been shown in plants. The story of developmental biology is different - while the development of plants has long been studied, the experimental and genetic approaches to developmental mechanism were developed via experiments on animals, and the importance of genes in development (e.g., Waddington, 1940) and their use for understanding developmental mechanisms came to botanical science much later - as late as the 1980s. PMID:27238367

  5. Genetic circuit design automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Alec A K; Der, Bryan S; Shin, Jonghyeon; Vaidyanathan, Prashant; Paralanov, Vanya; Strychalski, Elizabeth A; Ross, David; Densmore, Douglas; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-04-01

    Computation can be performed in living cells by DNA-encoded circuits that process sensory information and control biological functions. Their construction is time-intensive, requiring manual part assembly and balancing of regulator expression. We describe a design environment, Cello, in which a user writes Verilog code that is automatically transformed into a DNA sequence. Algorithms build a circuit diagram, assign and connect gates, and simulate performance. Reliable circuit design requires the insulation of gates from genetic context, so that they function identically when used in different circuits. We used Cello to design 60 circuits forEscherichia coli(880,000 base pairs of DNA), for which each DNA sequence was built as predicted by the software with no additional tuning. Of these, 45 circuits performed correctly in every output state (up to 10 regulators and 55 parts), and across all circuits 92% of the output states functioned as predicted. Design automation simplifies the incorporation of genetic circuits into biotechnology projects that require decision-making, control, sensing, or spatial organization. PMID:27034378

  6. Genetic basis of cohesinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbero JL

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available José L Barbero Cellular and Molecular Biology Department, Biological Research Center, Madrid, Spain Abstract: Cohesin is a ring-form multifunctional protein complex, which was discovered during a search for molecules that keep sister chromatids together during segregation of chromosomes during cell division. In the past decade, a large number of results have also demonstrated a need for the cohesin complex in other crucial events in the life cycle of the cell, including DNA duplication, heterochromatin formation, DNA double-strand break repair, and control of gene expression. The dynamics of the cohesin ring are modulated by a number of accessory and regulatory proteins, known as cohesin cofactors. Loss of function of the cohesin complex is incompatible with life; however, mutations in the genes encoding for cohesin subunits and/or cohesin cofactors, which have very little or a null effect on chromosome segregation, represent a newly recognized class of human genetic disorders known as cohesinopathies. A number of genetic, biochemical, and clinical approaches, and importantly, animal models, can help us to determine the underlying mechanisms for these human diseases. Keywords: cohesin, cohesinopathies, Cornelia de Lange syndrome, Roberts syndrome, control, gene expression, insulators

  7. Behaviour Genetics of Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Budimir

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of pigs can be divided into several categories, which include maternal behavior, aggressive behavior, sexual behavior, feeding behavior, and various other forms of emotional behavior. Domestication has caused many changes in the original behaviour of boar, such as in reproductive and sexual behaviour, and has lead to a general increase in social tolerance between animals. Further modifications in behaviour are also possible, as suggested by the optimization of environmental factors which affect maternal behavior. The behaviour of a sow after farrowing appeared as a consequence of natural selection for protection of piglets from predators in the wild boar population, and affects the survival of piglets and the longevity of the sow in breeding. The behavior of the sows which includes the protection of the piglets from predators appears as a consequence of natural selection in the wild boar population. Familiarity with the molecular mechanisms which determine the patterns of behavior enables understanding of behavioral problems such as aggressiveness and helps the improvement of the well-being of pigs. Research conducted on pigs has determined that there are regions on chromosomes 2, 6, 10, 14, and 15, and chromosome X which can explain the genetic aspect of appearance of some behavioral patterns in sows. The goal of this paper is to illustrate the behavioral patterns appeared in the populations of domestic breeds of pigs and their genetic aspects, which knowledge may provide some help in improving the production qualities and creating higher economic gain during production.

  8. Genetics for the General Internist

    OpenAIRE

    Laukaitis, Christina M.

    2011-01-01

    The internist’s goal is to determine a patient’s disease risk and to implement preventative interventions. Genetic evaluation is a powerful risk assessment tool and new interventions target previously untreatable genetic disorders. The purpose of this review is to educate the general internist about common genetic conditions affecting adult patients with special emphasis on diagnoses with an effective intervention, including hereditary cancer syndromes and cardiovascular disorders. Basic tene...

  9. Graphical models for genetic analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Steffen Lilholt; Sheehan, Nuala A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces graphical models as a natural environment in which to formulate and solve problems in genetics and related areas. Particular emphasis is given to the relationships among various local computation algorithms which have been developed within the hitherto mostly separate areas of...... graphical models and genetics. The potential of graphical models is explored and illustrated through a number of example applications where the genetic element is substantial or dominating....

  10. Genetic Manipulation of Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Bouillaut, Laurent; McBride, Shonna M; Sorg, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive, spore forming, anaerobic, intestinal bacterium and is the most common cause of antibiotic-associated colitis. For many years this organism was considered genetically intractable, but in the past 10 years, multiple methods have been developed or adapted for genetic manipulation of C. difficile. This unit describes the molecular techniques used for genetic modification of this organism, including methods for gene disruption, complementation, plasmid int...

  11. The evolutionary genetics of canalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatt, Thomas

    2005-09-01

    Evolutionary genetics has recently made enormous progress in understanding how genetic variation maps into phenotypic variation. However why some traits are phenotypically invariant despite apparent genetic and environmental changes has remained a major puzzle. In the 1940s, Conrad Hal Waddington coined the concept and term "canalization" to describe the robustness of phenotypes to perturbation; a similar concept was proposed by Waddington's contemporary Ivan Ivanovich Schmalhausen. This paper reviews what has been learned about canalization since Waddington. Canalization implies that a genotype's phenotype remains relatively invariant when individuals of a particular genotype are exposed to different environments (environmental canalization) or when individuals of the same single- or multilocus genotype differ in their genetic background (genetic canalization). Consequently, genetic canalization can be viewed as a particular kind of epistasis, and environmental canalization and phenotypic plasticity are two aspects of the same phenomenon. Canalization results in the accumulation of phenotypically cryptic genetic variation, which can be released after a "decanalizing" event. Thus, canalized genotypes maintain a cryptic potential for expressing particular phenotypes, which are only uncovered under particular decanalizing environmental or genetic conditions. Selection may then act on this newly released genetic variation. The accumulation of cryptic genetic variation by canalization may therefore increase evolvability at the population level by leading to phenotypic diversification under decanalizing conditions. On the other hand, under canalizing conditions, a major part of the segregating genetic variation may remain phenotypically cryptic; canalization may therefore, at least temporarily, constrain phenotypic evolution. Mechanistically, canalization can be understood in terms of transmission patterns, such as epistasis, pleiotropy, and genotype by environment

  12. Genetic Manipulation of Francisella Tularensis

    OpenAIRE

    Zogaj, Xhavit; Klose, Karl E.

    2011-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes the disease tularemia. F. tularensis subsp. tularensis causes the most severe disease in humans and has been classified as a Category A select agent and potential bioweapon. There is currently no vaccine approved for human use, making genetic manipulation of this organism critical to unraveling the genetic basis of pathogenesis and developing countermeasures against tularemia. The development of genetic techniques appl...

  13. Clinical Genetic Testing in Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Mefford, Heather C.

    2015-01-01

    New technologies for mutation detection in the human genome have greatly increased our understanding of epilepsy genetics. Application of genomic technologies in the clinical setting allows for more efficient genetic diagnosis in some patients; therefore, it is important to understand the types of tests available and the types of mutations that can be detected. Making a genetic diagnosis improves overall patient care by enhancing prognosis and recurrence risk counseling and informing treatmen...

  14. Population Characteristics in Forensic Genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Faltus, Václav

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present some methods used in forensic genetics. Forensic genetics is only one part of a wide spectrum of sciences called forensics. It includes identification of victims of natural disasters, mass transportation accidents and industry accidents. It also includes identification of offenders of a crime and determination of paternity. Our current work involves analysis of the genetic data from the Czech population. Therefore and in concordance with other international...

  15. Identical twins in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Morling, Niels

    2015-01-01

    The increase in the number of forensic genetic loci used for identification purposes results in infinitesimal random match probabilities. These probabilities are computed under assumptions made for rather simple population genetic models. Often, the forensic expert reports likelihood ratios, where...... published results accounting for close familial relationships. However, we revisit the discussion to increase the awareness among forensic genetic practitioners and include new information on medical and societal factors to assess the risk of not considering a monozygotic twin as the true perpetrator...

  16. A century of poultry genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Tixier-Boichard, M.; Leenstra, F.R.; Flock, D.; Hocking, A D; Weigend, S

    2012-01-01

    The 20th Century saw an astonishing advance in our understanding of genetics and the scientific basis of the genetic improvement of farm animals. The application of genetic principles to chickens in the 1950s and 1960s led to a rapid change in the productivity and efficiency of laying hens and broiler chickens, turkeys and ducks. Subsequently, the application of increasingly powerful computers and sophisticated mathematical algorithms has increased the range of traits that could be successful...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: nemaline myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NORD) University of Kansas Medical Center Resource List: Muscular Dystrophy/Atrophy GeneReviews (1 link) Nemaline Myopathy Genetic Testing Registry (11 links) Nemaline myopathy Nemaline myopathy ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Salih myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myopathy with fatal cardiomyopathy Salih CMD Salih congenital muscular dystrophy Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus ( ...

  19. Genetic Doping and Health Damages

    OpenAIRE

    AA Fallahi Fallahi; AA Ravasi Ravasi; DD Farhud Farhud

    2011-01-01

    "nBackground: Use of genetic doping or gene transfer technology will be the newest and the lethal method of doping in fu­ture and have some unpleasant consequences for sports, athletes, and outcomes of competitions. The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) defines genetic doping as "the non-therapeutic use of genes, genetic elements, and/or cells that have the capac­ity to enhance athletic performance". The purpose of this review is to consider genetic doping, health damages a...

  20. On Gene Concepts and Teaching Genetics: Episodes from Classical Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burian, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the teaching of advanced high school courses or undergraduate courses for non-biology majors about genetics or history of genetics. It will probably be difficult to take the approach described here in a high school science course, although the general approach could help improve such courses. It would be ideal for a college…

  1. Plant Genetic Resources: Selected Issues from Genetic Erosion to Genetic Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Karl Hammer; Yifru Teklu

    2008-01-01

    Plant Genetic Resources (PGR) continue to play an important role in the development of agriculture. The following aspects receive a special consideration:1. Definition. The term was coined in 1970. The genepool concept served as an important tool in the further development. Different approaches are discussed.2. Values of Genetic Resources. A short introduction is highlighting this problem and stressing the economic usfulness of PGR.3. Genetic Erosion. Already observed by E. Baur in 1914, this...

  2. Genetics of metabolic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Otto; Langemann, Dirk; Beffa, Roland

    2016-09-01

    Herbicide resistance has become a major issue for many weeds. Metabolic resistance refers to the biochemical processes within organisms that degrade herbicides to less toxic compounds, resulting in a shift of the dose response curve. This type of resistance involves polygenic inheritance. A model is presented linking the biochemical pathway of amino acid synthesis and the detoxifying pathway of an inhibitor of the key enzyme ALS. From this model, resistance factors for each biotype are derived, which are then applied to a polygenic population genetic model for an annual weed plant. Polygenic inheritance is described by a new approach based on tensor products of heredity matrices. Important results from the model are that low dose regimes favour fast emergence of resistant biotypes and that the emergence of resistant biotypes occurs as abrupt outbreaks. The model is used to evaluate strategies for the management of metabolic resistance. PMID:27424952

  3. Genetically modified bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagona, Antonia P; Grigonyte, Aurelija M; MacDonald, Paul R; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-04-18

    Phages or bacteriophages, viruses that infect and replicate inside bacteria, are the most abundant microorganisms on earth. The realization that antibiotic resistance poses a substantial risk to the world's health and global economy is revitalizing phage therapy as a potential solution. The increasing ease by which phage genomes can be modified, owing to the influx of new technologies, has led to an expansion of their natural capabilities, and a reduced dependence on phage isolation from environmental sources. This review will discuss the way synthetic biology has accelerated the construction of genetically modified phages and will describe the wide range of their applications. It will further provide insight into the societal and economic benefits that derive from the use of recombinant phages in various sectors, from health to biodetection, biocontrol and the food industry. PMID:26906932

  4. Genetics of Childhood Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a major health problem and an immense economic burden on the health care systems both in the United States and the rest of the world. The prevalence of obesity in children and adults in the United States has increased dramatically over the past decade. Besides environmental factors, genetic factors are known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of obesity. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have revealed strongly associated genomic variants associated with most common disorders; indeed there is general consensus on these findings from generally positive replication outcomes by independent groups. To date, there have been only a few GWAS-related reports for childhood obesity specifically, with studies primarily uncovering loci in the adult setting instead. It is clear that a number of loci previously reported from GWAS analyses of adult BMI and/or obesity also play a role in childhood obesity.

  5. Radiation in genetic engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation as used in genetic engineering involves producing changes in the hereditary units of existing plants and animals by the use of radiation. The desired results of such irradiation is to increase the quality and/or quantity of such plants or animals. The mode of radiation interaction with biological samples or cells is described by the 'Target theory'. This theory considers the radiosensitive portion of the medium as target to be hit by radiation particles. Cellular effect of radiation can be divided into two types, i.e. effect on cell division and effects on cell metabolism. As a result of radiation induced changes to DNA and proteins, visible damage to chromosome can sometimes be seen. Every radiation, even a single beta particle may be of great importance and consequence if it hits a vital component in a particular manner. Hence even normal background radiation induces mutation and may help in the natural evolution process. (A.S.)

  6. Genetic effects, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomes of the children of A-bomb survivors and appropriate control groups in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have been investigated to see if there are any genetic effects of A-bomb irradiation on the germ cell chromosomes of their parents. Data thus obtained have been compared with those derived from surveys on consecutive live-born infants undertaken by investigators in western countries, as well as those from induced abortuses in Japan, in terms of the frequency of individuals with both sex chromosome aneuploidy and autosomal balanced structural rearrangements. A preliminary statistical analysis shows no significant difference in frequency of chromosome anomalies in children born to the exposed compared with children of non-exposed parents, or with neonates or abortuses. The need for continuing this survey is clearly indicated. (auth.)

  7. Genetic study on yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research during the past year has moved ahead on several fronts. A major compilation of all the genetic mapping data for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been completed. The map describes the location of over 300 genes on 17 chromosomes. A report on this work will appear in Microbiological Reviews in December 1980. Recombinant DNA procedures have been introduced into the experiments and RAD52 (one of the genes involved in recombination and repair damage), has been successfully cloned. This clone will be used to determine the gene product. Diploid cells homozygous for RAD52 have exceptionally high frequencies of mitotic loss of chromosomes. This loss is stimulated by ionizing radiation. This effect is a very significant finding. The effect has also been seen with certain other RAD mutants

  8. Agrobacterium: nature's genetic engineer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nester, Eugene W

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium was identified as the agent causing the plant tumor, crown gall over 100 years ago. Since then, studies have resulted in many surprising observations. Armin Braun demonstrated that Agrobacterium infected cells had unusual nutritional properties, and that the bacterium was necessary to start the infection but not for continued tumor development. He developed the concept of a tumor inducing principle (TIP), the factor that actually caused the disease. Thirty years later the TIP was shown to be a piece of a tumor inducing (Ti) plasmid excised by an endonuclease. In the next 20 years, most of the key features of the disease were described. The single-strand DNA (T-DNA) with the endonuclease attached is transferred through a type IV secretion system into the host cell where it is likely coated and protected from nucleases by a bacterial secreted protein to form the T-complex. A nuclear localization signal in the endonuclease guides the transferred strand (T-strand), into the nucleus where it is integrated randomly into the host chromosome. Other secreted proteins likely aid in uncoating the T-complex. The T-DNA encodes enzymes of auxin, cytokinin, and opine synthesis, the latter a food source for Agrobacterium. The genes associated with T-strand formation and transfer (vir) map to the Ti plasmid and are only expressed when the bacteria are in close association with a plant. Plant signals are recognized by a two-component regulatory system which activates vir genes. Chromosomal genes with pleiotropic functions also play important roles in plant transformation. The data now explain Braun's old observations and also explain why Agrobacterium is nature's genetic engineer. Any DNA inserted between the border sequences which define the T-DNA will be transferred and integrated into host cells. Thus, Agrobacterium has become the major vector in plant genetic engineering. PMID:25610442

  9. Plant Genetic Resources: Selected Issues from Genetic Erosion to Genetic Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Hammer

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant Genetic Resources (PGR continue to play an important role in the development of agriculture. The following aspects receive a special consideration:1. Definition. The term was coined in 1970. The genepool concept served as an important tool in the further development. Different approaches are discussed.2. Values of Genetic Resources. A short introduction is highlighting this problem and stressing the economic usfulness of PGR.3. Genetic Erosion. Already observed by E. Baur in 1914, this is now a key issue within PGR. The case studies cited include Ethiopia, Italy, China, S Korea, Greece and S. Africa. Modern approaches concentrate on allelic changes in varieties over time but neglect the landraces. The causes and consequences of genetic erosion are discussed.4. Genetic Resources Conservation. Because of genetic erosion there is a need for conservation. PGR should be consigned to the appropriate method of conservation (ex situ, in situ, on-farm according to the scientific basis of biodiversity (genetic diversity, species diversity, ecosystem diversity and the evolutionary status of plants (cultivated plants, weeds, related wild plants (crop wild relatives.5. GMO. The impact of genetically engineered plants on genetic diversity is discussed.6. The Conclusions and Recommendations stress the importance of PGR. Their conservation and use are urgent necessities for the present development and future survival of mankind.

  10. Medical Genetics Is Not Eugenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Ruth Schwartz

    2008-01-01

    The connection that critics make between medical genetics and eugenics is historically fallacious. Activists on the political right are as mistaken as activists on the political left: Genetic screening was not eugenics in the past, is not eugenics in the present, and, unless its technological systems become radically transformed, will not be…

  11. National Dairy Genetic Evaluation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Dairy Genetic Evaluation Program is a continuation of ongoing USDA collaboration with the U.S. dairy industry on genetic evaluation of dairy cattle since 1908. Data are provided by dairy records processing centers (yield, health, pedigree, and reproduction traits), breed registry societ...

  12. Next-generation human genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Shendure, Jay

    2011-01-01

    The field of human genetics is being reshaped by exome and genome sequencing. Several lessons are evident from observing the rapid development of this area over the past 2 years, and these may be instructive with respect to what we should expect from 'next-generation human genetics' in the next few years.

  13. Genetic disorders as collective phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic disorders due to human chromosome aberrations in number are discussed from the point of view of Molecular Genetics. The etiology of trisomy is discussed in the light of the collective variables recently introduced and an age-dependent metabolic disorder is suggested as a possible etiological factor. (author). 11 refs

  14. Basic notions about genetic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First the genetic processes such as DNA and its chemical composition, cross breeding, chromosomes and their build-up, oogenesis, spermatogenesis, chromosomal division are described. Thus the genetic effects of radiation can be better explained: mutations, structural and numerical aberrations in chromosomes, and evolution are dealt with. (G.H.)

  15. Defining asthma in genetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, GH; Postma, DS; Meijer, G.

    1999-01-01

    Genetic studies have been hampered by the lack of a gold standard to diagnose asthma. The complex nature of asthma makes it more difficult to identify asthma genes. Therefore, approaches to define phenotypes, which have been successful in other genetically complex diseases, may be applied to define

  16. Kingman and mathematical population genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Ewens, Warren J.; Watterson, Geoffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical population genetics is only one of Kingman's many research interests. Nevertheless, his contribution to this field has been crucial, and moved it in several important new directions. Here we outline some aspects of his work which have had a major influence on population genetics theory.

  17. Genetic bank of domestic fowl

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pojezdná, A.; Bainová, Z.; Bainová, H.; Chudárková, A.; Bryjová, Anna; Bryja, J.; Vinkler, Michal

    Brno: Ústav biologie obratlovců AV ČR, 2013 - (Bryja, J.; Řehák, Z.; Zukal, J.). s. 180-181 ISBN 978-80-87189-14-6. [Zoologické dny. 07.02.2013-08.02.2013, Brno] Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : domestic fowl * genetic diversity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  18. Genetic Differences and School Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, William T.

    2005-01-01

    The author considers whether differences in genetic endowment may account for racial and ethnic differences in school readiness. While acknowledging an important role for genes in explaining differences "within" races, he nevertheless argues that environment explains most of the gap "between" blacks and whites, leaving little role for genetics.…

  19. Behavior genetics: Bees as model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The honeybee Apis mellifera (Apidae) is a model widely used in behavior because of its elaborate social life requiring coordinate actions among the members of the society. Within a colony, division of labor, the performance of tasks by different individuals, follows genetically determined physiological changes that go along with aging. Modern advances in tools of molecular biology and genomics, as well as the sequentiation of A. mellifera genome, have enabled a better understanding of honeybee behavior, in particular social behavior. Numerous studies show that aspects of worker behavior are genetically determined, including defensive, hygienic, reproductive and foraging behavior. For example, genetic diversity is associated with specialization to collect water, nectar and pollen. Also, control of worker reproduction is associated with genetic differences. In this paper, I review the methods and the main results from the study of the genetic and genomic basis of some behaviors in bees.

  20. Future possibilities in migraine genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudkjøbing, Laura Aviaja; Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Olesen, Jes

    2012-01-01

    Migraine with and without aura (MA and MO, respectively) have a strong genetic basis. Different approaches using linkage-, candidate gene- and genome-wide association studies have been explored, yielding limited results. This may indicate that the genetic component in migraine is due to rare...... variants; capturing these will require more detailed sequencing in order to be discovered. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) techniques such as whole exome and whole genome sequencing have been successful in finding genes in especially monogenic disorders. As the molecular genetics research progresses......, the technology will follow, rendering these approaches more applicable in the search for causative migraine genes in MO and MA. To date, no studies using NGS in migraine genetics have been published. In order to gain insight into the future possibilities of migraine genetics, we have looked at NGS studies...

  1. Genetic diversity in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, John C; Carlton, Jane M

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in genetic characterisation of Trichomonas vaginalis isolates show that the extensive clinical variability in trichomoniasis and its disease sequelae are matched by significant genetic diversity in the organism itself, suggesting a connection between the genetic identity of isolates and their clinical manifestations. Indeed, a high degree of genetic heterogeneity in T vaginalis isolates has been observed using multiple genotyping techniques. A unique two-type population structure that is both local and global in distribution has been identified, and there is evidence of recombination within each group, although sexual recombination between the groups appears to be constrained. There is conflicting evidence in these studies for correlations between T vaginalis genetic identity and clinical presentation, metronidazole susceptibility, and the presence of T vaginalis virus, underscoring the need for adoption of a common standard for genotyping the parasite. Moving forward, microsatellite genotyping and multilocus sequence typing are the most robust techniques for future investigations of T vaginalis genotype-phenotype associations. PMID:23702460

  2. Scientific discovery using genetic programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keijzer, Maarten

    2001-01-01

    Genetic Programming is capable of automatically inducing symbolic computer programs on the basis of a set of examples or their performance in a simulation. Mathematical expressions are a well-defined subset of symbolic computer programs and are also suitable for optimization using the genetic...... programming paradigm. The induction of mathematical expressions based on data is called symbolic regression. In this work, genetic programming is extended to not just fit the data i.e., get the numbers right, but also to get the dimensions right. For this units of measurement are used. The main contribution...... in this work can be summarized as: The symbolic expressions produced by genetic programming can be made suitable for analysis and interpretation by using units of measurements to guide or restrict the search. To achieve this, the following has been accomplished: A standard genetic programming system...

  3. Genetic disorders producing compressive radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Joseph M

    2006-11-01

    Back pain is a frequent complaint seen in neurological practice. In evaluating back pain, neurologists are asked to evaluate patients for radiculopathy, determine whether they may benefit from surgery, and help guide management. Although disc herniation is the most common etiology of compressive radiculopathy, there are many other causes, including genetic disorders. This article is a discussion of genetic disorders that cause or contribute to radiculopathies. These genetic disorders include neurofibromatosis, Paget's disease of bone, and ankylosing spondylitis. Numerous genetic disorders can also lead to deformities of the spine, including spinal muscular atrophy, Friedreich's ataxia, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, familial dysautonomia, idiopathic torsional dystonia, Marfan's syndrome, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, the extent of radiculopathy caused by spine deformities is essentially absent from the literature. Finally, recent investigation into the heritability of disc degeneration and lumbar disc herniation suggests a significant genetic component in the etiology of lumbar disc disease. PMID:17048153

  4. Reverse genetics with animal viruses. NSV reverse genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New strategies to genetically manipulate the genomes of several important animal pathogens have been established in recent years. This article focuses on the reverse genetics techniques, which enables genetic manipulation of the genomes of non-segmented negative-sense RNA viruses. Recovery of a negative-sense RNA virus entirely from cDNA was first achieved for rabies virus in 1994. Since then, reverse genetic systems have been established for several pathogens of medical and veterinary importance. Based on the reverse genetics technique, it is now possible to design safe and more effective live attenuated vaccines against important viral agents. In addition, genetically tagged recombinant viruses can be designed to facilitate serological differentiation of vaccinated animals from infected animals. The approach of delivering protective immunogens of different pathogens using a single vector was made possible with the introduction of the reverse genetics system, and these novel broad-spectrum vaccine vectors have potential applications in improving animal health in developing countries. (author)

  5. Chicago Center for Jewish Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Overview Risk of Hereditary Cancer Hereditary Breast & Ovarian Cancer Colon Cancer Lynch Syndrome Cancer Counseling Other Hereditary Cancer Syndromes Cancer Support Organizations Our Statement on BRCA and Genetic Screening Health & Genetics Through a Jewish Lens Genetic Carrier ...

  6. Genetics 101 --The Hereditary Material of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 Genetics 101 — The Hereditary Material of Life Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Genetics is the study of heredity, the process in ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic conditions treated or managed? What is genetic testing? How can I find a genetics professional in my area? Other Names for This Condition De Vivo disease encephalopathy due to GLUT1 deficiency G1D glucose ...

  8. Crop Genetics: The Seeds of Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeYoung, H. Garrett

    1983-01-01

    Current research in plant genetics is described. Benefits of this research (which includes genetic engineering applications) will include reduction/elimination of crop diseases, assurance of genetic stability, and the creation of new crop varieties. (JN)

  9. Conservation genetics of Iberian raptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez–Cruz, B.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I provide an overview of conservation genetics and describe the management actions in the wild that can benefit from conservation genetic studies. I describe the genetic factors of risk for the survival of wild species, the consequences of loss of genetic diversity, inbreeding and outbreeding depression, and the use of genetic tools to delimitate units of conservation. Then I introduce the most common applications of conservation genetics in the management of wild populations. In a second part of the paper I review the conservation genetic studies carried on the Iberian raptors. I introduce several studies on the Spanish imperial eagle, the bearded vulture, the black vulture and the red kite that were carried out using autosomal microsatellite markers and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequencing. I describe studies on the lesser kestrel and Egyptian vulture that additionally applied major histocompatibility complex (MHC markers, with the purpose of incorporating the study of non–neutral variation. For every species I explain how these studies can be and/or are applied in the strategy of conservation in the wild.

  10. Genetics of Proteasome Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldrin V. Gomes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteasome is a large, multiple subunit complex that is capable of degrading most intracellular proteins. Polymorphisms in proteasome subunits are associated with cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, neurological diseases, and cancer. One polymorphism in the proteasome gene PSMA6 (−8C/G is associated with three different diseases: type 2 diabetes, myocardial infarction, and coronary artery disease. One type of proteasome, the immunoproteasome, which contains inducible catalytic subunits, is adapted to generate peptides for antigen presentation. It has recently been shown that mutations and polymorphisms in the immunoproteasome catalytic subunit PSMB8 are associated with several inflammatory and autoinflammatory diseases including Nakajo-Nishimura syndrome, CANDLE syndrome, and intestinal M. tuberculosis infection. This comprehensive review describes the disease-related polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with human diseases and the physiological modulation of proteasome function by these polymorphisms. Given the large number of subunits and the central importance of the proteasome in human physiology as well as the fast pace of detection of proteasome polymorphisms associated with human diseases, it is likely that other polymorphisms in proteasome genes associated with diseases will be detected in the near future. While disease-associated polymorphisms are now readily discovered, the challenge will be to use this genetic information for clinical benefit.

  11. Department of Genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: There are five independent research groups in the Department conducting the following lines of investigations: 1. Regulation of sulfur amino acid metabolism in fungi, focusing on cloning and characterisation of structural and regulatory genes in Aspergillus nidulans. 2. Identification and characterization of S. cerevisiae genes involved in the regulation of tRNA biosynthesis and control of translation fidelity in cytosolic and mitochondrial systems. 3. Mechanism of DNA repair and mutagenesis by using mutations in DNA polymerases, mismatch repair and radiation sensitivity genes to study their influence on the generation of mutations in nondividing, resting cells (adaptive mutations) in S. cerevisiae. 4. Pleiotropic effects of the S. cerevisiae IRR1 gene, particularily on colony formation and sister chromatid cohesion. 5. Regulation of heme synthesis in S. cerevisiae: the analysis of structure-function relationship of ferrochelatase (the last enzyme of the pathway). 6. Role of RSP5 the ubiquitin-protein ligase of S. cerevisiae in protein import to mitochondria and endocytosis of plasma membrane proteins. 7. Molecular analysis of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene in Polish 6-GDP deficient subjects. 8. Genetic and phylogenic studies of the Polish Bison bonasus population with the use of nuclear and mitochondrial markers

  12. Genetically conditioned male sterility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey is given of two different types of genetically controlled male sterility in higher plants. 'Functional' male sterility is due to the action of mutated genes causing a misdifferentiation of the growing points in different specific ways. Under the influence of the genes of this group either the stamens or the archespore tissues are not differentiated. In other mutants functionable male germ cells are produced but cannot be used for fertilizing the egg cells because the anthers remain closed or anthers and stigma become spatially separated from each other. Other genes of the group are responsible for the transformation of stamens into carpels, i.e. for a change of the hermaphrodite flower into a unisexually female one. A second type of male sterility is due to the action of ms genes influencing the course of micro-sporogenesis directly. They cause the breakdown of this process in a specific meiotic stage characteristic for each gene of the group. This breakdown is introduced by the degeneration of PMCs, microspores, or pollen grains preventing the production of male germ cells. The female sex organs remain uninfluenced. (author)

  13. Safflower: genetics and breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of genetic studies related to the breeding of improved cultivars of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) indicated that it was possible to modify the following over a wide range: duration of the rosette stage, stem length, branching habit, degree of spininess, head number, head size, flower morphology, mating system, seed size, hull thickness and thereby oil and protein contents, and fatty acid composition of the oil. Safflower breeders have concentrated most of their efforts on identifying and evaluating the great range of variability in cultivated safflower and its closely related wild species, and not on exploring means to increase variability. Limited experiments with gamma rays and ethyl methanesulphonate indicated that additional variability could be induced. Mutagenic agents should be used to obtain the following: resistance to foliar diseases where resistant germplasm is not available, increased levels of resistance to Phytophthora root rot, resistance to dodder and orobanche, resistance to insect pests, earlier maturity, and additional modifications in the fatty acid composition of the oil. (author)

  14. Genetic aspects of strabismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Rosane da Cruz

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the genetic aspects of strabismus. Methods: Ophthalmic and orthoptic evaluations were performed prospectively on 110 strabismic probands and 478 relatives. We used 3 different criteria in the diagnosis of strabismus: primary diagnosis (dx1 defined as any manifest horizontal or vertical deviation, a secondary diagnosis (dx2 including esophoria (>7 prism diopters or exophoria (>9 prism diopters, and a tertiary diagnosis (dx3 including abnormal fusional amplitudes, accommodative convergence/accommodation (AC/A ratio, and/or stereopsis; monofixation syndrome; 4 prism diopters base out; and/or abnormal Maddox test responses. Analyses were carried out within mating types. Results: Hypotheses of autosomal dominant or recessive inheritance with no sporadics were rejected. Based on the dx1, 25% of the families had more than one individual affected and there was vertical transmission in 13%; adding dx2 there were 36% of the families with more than one affected and 21% had vertical transmission; and adding dx3, there were 73% with more than one affected and 51% with vertical transmission. Conclusions: There is evidence for a pattern consistent with an autosomal dominant form of strabismus in most families.

  15. Genetic aspects of pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolačkov, Katarzyna; Tupikowski, Krzysztof; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grażyna

    2012-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas are derived from chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla which synthesize and secrete catecholamines, thus affecting the cardiovascular system and metabolic processes. Pheochromocytoma is a tumor of the following multicarcinoma hereditary syndromes: type 2 multiple endocrine neoplasia, von Hippel-Lindau disease, type 1 neurofibromatosis and the pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas syndrome. Pheochromocytomas are relatively rare, and because of non-specific manifestation of these tumors and the possible lack of signs and symptoms for extended periods of time, the diagnosis may be delayed, which may, in turn, lead to death. Pheochromocytomas may occur sporadically. However, due to the frequent incidence of hereditary forms of these cancers, the presymptomatic genetic testing of family members with a positive family history is indicated, thus allowing for selecting people with higher risk of cancer. Early detection of the syndrome and the coexisting tumors (which may be malignant) may lead to a correct diagnosis, regular surveillance, preventive examinations and implementation of appropriate early treatment. Recent examinations have shown significant involvement of RET, VHL, NF1, SDHB and SDHD as well as the newly discovered KIF1Bβ, TMEM127 and MAX genes in pathogenesis of these tumors. The microarray-gene expression studies, based on the analysis of cellular pathways, have revealed two distinct clusters indicating two different routes of tumorgenesis. The genotype-phenotype correlations are still being studied and future research can give us clearer information about the function of these genes, which may prove crucial from the clinical point of view. PMID:23457139

  16. Genetic susceptibility to radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, E. J.; Brenner, D. J.; Worgul, B.; Smilenov, L.

    In the context of space radiation, it is important to know whether the human population includes genetically predisposed radiosensitive subsets. One possibility is that haploinsufficiency for ATM confers radiosensitivity, and this defect involves 1 3% of the population. Using knock-out mice we chose to study cataractogenesis in the lens and oncogenic transformation in mouse embryo fibroblasts to assay for effects of ATM deficiency. Radiation induced cataracts appeared earlier in the heterozygous versus wild-type animals following exposure to either gamma rays or 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. In addition, it was found that embryo fibroblasts of Atm heterozygotes showed an increased incidence of oncogenic transformation compared with their normal litter-matched counterparts. From these data we suggest that Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes could indeed represent a societally significant radiosensitive subpopulation. Knock-out mice are now available for other genes including BRCA1 and 2, and Mrad9. An exciting possibility is the creation of double heterozygotes for pairs of mutated genes that function in the same signal transduction pathway, and consequently confer even greater radiosensitivity.

  17. An investigation of genetic algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic algorithms mimic biological evolution by natural selection in their search for better individuals within a changing population. they can be used as efficient optimizers. This report discusses the developing field of genetic algorithms. It gives a simple example of the search process and introduces the concept of schema. It also discusses modifications to the basic genetic algorithm that result in species and niche formation, in machine learning and artificial evolution of computer programs, and in the streamlining of human-computer interaction. (author). 3 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs

  18. Genetic Testing for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Control and Prevention Lynch Syndrome, Genetics Home Reference, U.S. National Library of Medicine Cancer Genetic Services Directory, National Cancer Institute Find-A-Counselor, National ...

  19. [The genetic language: grammar, semantics, evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, V A

    1993-05-01

    The genetic language is a collection of rules and regularities of genetic information coding for genetic texts. It is defined by alphabet, grammar, collection of punctuation marks and regulatory sites, semantics. There is a review of these general attributes of genetic language, including also the problems of synonymy and evolution. The main directions of theoretical investigations of genetic language and neighbouring questions are formulated: (1) cryptographic problems, (2) analysis of genetic texts, (3) theoretical-linguistic problems, (4) evolutionary linguistic questions. The problem of genetic language becomes one of the key ones of molecular genetics, molecular biology and gene engineering. PMID:8335231

  20. Genetic predisposition for cancer : genes and genetic counseling

    OpenAIRE

    Rantala, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer accounts for one third of all female cancer cases worldwide. A hereditary component accounts for 10-15% of all breast and ovarian cancer cases. The overall aim of this thesis is to evaluate and improve genetic diagnostic and genetic counseling in hereditary cancer patients. A total of 215 counselees were enrolled to a questionnaire study which aimed to conceptualize risk perception and worry for cancer before and one week after initial oncogenetic counseling and one year a...

  1. Mouse Genetic and Phenotypic Resources for Human Genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Paul N. Schofield; Hoehndorf, Robert; Gkoutos, Georgios V

    2012-01-01

    The use of model organisms to provide information on gene function has proved to be a powerful approach to our understanding of both human disease and fundamental mammalian biology. Large-scale community projects using mice, based on forward and reverse genetics, and now the pan-genomic phenotyping efforts of the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC), are generating resources on an unprecedented scale which will be extremely valuable to human genetics and medicine. We discuss the ...

  2. Lateral genetic transfer and the construction of genetic exchange communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skippington, Elizabeth; Ragan, Mark A

    2011-09-01

    Lateral genetic transfer (LGT) is a major source of phenotypic innovation among bacteria. Determinants for antibiotic resistance and other adaptive traits can spread rapidly, particularly by conjugative plasmids, but also phages and natural transformation. Each successive step from the uptake of foreign DNA, its genetic recombination and regulatory integration, to its establishment in the host population presents differential barriers and opportunities. The emergence of successive multidrug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus illustrates the ongoing role of LGT in the combinatorial assembly of pathogens. The dynamic interplay among hosts, vectors, DNA elements, combinations of genetic determinants and environments constructs communities of genetic exchange. These relations can be abstracted as a graph, within which an exchange community might correspond to a path, transitively closed set, clique or near-clique. We provide a set-based definition, and review the features of actual genetic exchange communities (GECs), adopting first a knowledge-driven approach based on literature, and then a synoptic data-centric bioinformatic approach. GECs are diverse, but share some common features. Differential opportunity and barriers to lateral genetic transfer create bacterial communities of exchange. PMID:21223321

  3. Scheduling with genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennel, Theron R.; Underbrink, A. J., Jr.; Williams, George P. W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    In many domains, scheduling a sequence of jobs is an important function contributing to the overall efficiency of the operation. At Boeing, we develop schedules for many different domains, including assembly of military and commercial aircraft, weapons systems, and space vehicles. Boeing is under contract to develop scheduling systems for the Space Station Payload Planning System (PPS) and Payload Operations and Integration Center (POIC). These applications require that we respect certain sequencing restrictions among the jobs to be scheduled while at the same time assigning resources to the jobs. We call this general problem scheduling and resource allocation. Genetic algorithms (GA's) offer a search method that uses a population of solutions and benefits from intrinsic parallelism to search the problem space rapidly, producing near-optimal solutions. Good intermediate solutions are probabalistically recombined to produce better offspring (based upon some application specific measure of solution fitness, e.g., minimum flowtime, or schedule completeness). Also, at any point in the search, any intermediate solution can be accepted as a final solution; allowing the search to proceed longer usually produces a better solution while terminating the search at virtually any time may yield an acceptable solution. Many processes are constrained by restrictions of sequence among the individual jobs. For a specific job, other jobs must be completed beforehand. While there are obviously many other constraints on processes, it is these on which we focussed for this research: how to allocate crews to jobs while satisfying job precedence requirements and personnel, and tooling and fixture (or, more generally, resource) requirements.

  4. Attitudes towards genetic testing: analysis of contradictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jallinoja, P; Hakonen, A; Aro, A R;

    1998-01-01

    A survey study was conducted among 1169 people to evaluate attitudes towards genetic testing in Finland. Here we present an analysis of the contradictions detected in people's attitudes towards genetic testing. This analysis focuses on the approval of genetic testing as an individual choice and o...... scientific studies on attitudes towards genetic testing as well as in the health care context, e.g. in genetic counselling.......A survey study was conducted among 1169 people to evaluate attitudes towards genetic testing in Finland. Here we present an analysis of the contradictions detected in people's attitudes towards genetic testing. This analysis focuses on the approval of genetic testing as an individual choice and on...... the confidence in control of the process of genetic testing and its implications. Our analysis indicated that some of the respondents have contradictory attitudes towards genetic testing. It is proposed that contradictory attitudes towards genetic testing should be given greater significance both in...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: xeroderma pigmentosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions xeroderma pigmentosum xeroderma pigmentosum Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Xeroderma pigmentosum , which is commonly known as XP, is an ...

  6. Genetic testing in domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Leslie A

    2012-12-01

    Varieties of genetic tests are currently available for the domestic cat that support veterinary health care, breed management, species identification, and forensic investigations. Approximately thirty-five genes contain over fifty mutations that cause feline health problems or alterations in the cat's appearance. Specific genes, such as sweet and drug receptors, have been knocked-out of Felidae during evolution and can be used along with mtDNA markers for species identification. Both STR and SNP panels differentiate cat race, breed, and individual identity, as well as gender-specific markers to determine sex of an individual. Cat genetic tests are common offerings for commercial laboratories, allowing both the veterinary clinician and the private owner to obtain DNA test results. This article will review the genetic tests for the domestic cat, and their various applications in different fields of science. Highlighted are genetic tests specific to the individual cat, which are a part of the cat's genome. PMID:22546621

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Rotor syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Rotor syndrome Rotor syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Rotor syndrome is a relatively mild condition characterized by ...

  8. Community genetics. Its definition 2010

    OpenAIRE

    ten Kate, Leo P.; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Anand, Sonia; Bittles, Alan; Cassiman, Jean-Jacques; Christianson, Arnold; Cornel, Martina C.; Hamamy, Hanan; Kääriäinen, Helena; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Marais, David; Penchaszadeh, Victor B.; Rahman, Proton; Schmidtke, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a definition of the medical field of community genetics. It starts with a brief historical overview, defines the requirements for an adequate definition, presents the definition, and discusses the constituent parts of the definition.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Joubert syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Joubert syndrome Joubert syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Joubert syndrome is a disorder that affects many parts ...

  10. Multivariate permutation tests in genetics.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Arboretti Giancristofaro

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we provide some new statistical results for hypotheses testing in genetics particularly referred to multivariate allelic association studies. An extensive power simulation study is also provided on permutation solutions.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions cystic fibrosis cystic fibrosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease characterized by the buildup ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Turner syndrome Turner syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition that affects development in ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: polycythemia vera

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions polycythemia vera polycythemia vera Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Polycythemia vera is a condition characterized by an increased number ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions atopic dermatitis atopic dermatitis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Atopic dermatitis (also known as atopic eczema) is a disorder ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: multiminicore disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) Malignant Hyperthermia Association of the United States Muscular Dystrophy UK: Congenital Myopathies Resource list from the University of Kansas Medical Center GeneReviews (1 link) Multiminicore Disease Genetic Testing Registry (3 links) Minicore myopathy with external ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: proopiomelanocortin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) Encyclopedia: ACTH Health Topic: Obesity Health Topic: Obesity in Children Additional NIH Resources (3 links) National Heart Lung ... Support and Advocacy Resources (4 links) Genetics of Obesity Study Healthy Children.org National Adrenal Diseases Foundation Obesity Action Coalition ...

  17. Genetics of Ophraella leaf beetles

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This proposal is to collect samples of each species of Ophraella leaf beetle encountered, not to exceed 50 specimens per species, for genetic analysis using DNA...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Rett syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Rett syndrome Rett syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... autism-dementia-ataxia-loss of purposeful hand use syndrome Rett disorder Rett's disorder Rett's syndrome RTS RTT Related ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Fryns syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... childhood. Many of these children have had severe developmental delay and intellectual disability. Related Information What does it mean if a disorder seems to run in my family? What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? ...

  20. Alcohol Alert: Genetics of Alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Reports » Alcohol Alert » Alcohol Alert Number 84 Alcohol Alert Number 84 Print Version The Genetics of ... immune defense system. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Alcohol Breakdown Some of the first genes linked to ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Fanconi anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Fanconi anemia Fanconi anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Fanconi anemia is a condition that affects many parts of ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Roberts syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mechanism underlying Roberts syndrome involves loss of ESCO2 acetyltransferase activity. Hum Mol Genet. 2008 Jul 15;17( ... Zou H. Two human orthologues of Eco1/Ctf7 acetyltransferases are both required for proper sister-chromatid cohesion. ...

  3. Genetics of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, Venkatesan; Kanthimathi, Sekar; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2016-09-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has now become a major public health problem because of its prevalence and its associated complications during pregnancy. Earlier studies have suggested that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and GDM might have similar pathophysiology, such as increased insulin resistance, decreased insulin secretion resulting in hyperglycaemia. Evidence for a genetic basis of GDM has been poorly understood. To some extent, the current advancement in genomic techniques has thrown better light on the genetics of GDM. Based on the candidate gene approach and genome wide association studies, genetic loci in several genes that are responsible for insulin secretion, insulin resistance, lipid and glucose metabolism and other pathways have shown association with the GDM susceptibility. Understanding the possible underlying genetic factors of GDM would help us in gaining knowledge on the pathophysiologic mechanism of the disease. PMID:27582142

  4. Genetics Home Reference: myasthenia gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... K. Recent advances in genetic predisposition of myasthenia gravis. Biomed Res Int. 2013;2013:404053. doi: 10.1155/2013/404053. Epub ... for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about a personal health condition should consult with ...

  5. Genetic engineering of Geobacillus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kananavičiūtė, Rūta; Čitavičius, Donaldas

    2015-04-01

    Members of the genus Geobacillus are thermophiles that are of great biotechnological importance, since they are sources of many thermostable enzymes. Because of their metabolic versatility, geobacilli can be used as whole-cell catalysts in processes such as bioconversion and bioremediation. The effective employment of Geobacillus spp. requires the development of reliable methods for genetic engineering of these bacteria. Currently, genetic manipulation tools and protocols are under rapid development. However, there are several convenient cloning vectors, some of which replicate autonomously, while others are suitable for the genetic modification of chromosomal genes. Gene expression systems are also intensively studied. Combining these tools together with proper techniques for DNA transfer, some Geobacillus strains were shown to be valuable producers of recombinant proteins and industrially important biochemicals, such as ethanol or isobutanol. This review encompasses the progress made in the genetic engineering of Geobacillus spp. and surveys the vectors and transformation methods that are available for this genus. PMID:25659824

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Sotos syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gene are the primary cause of Sotos syndrome , accounting for up to 90 percent of cases. Other ... Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Sotos' syndrome Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: retroperitoneal fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions retroperitoneal fibrosis retroperitoneal fibrosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Retroperitoneal fibrosis is a disorder in which inflammation and extensive ...

  8. Dissecting genetic effects with imprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José MÁlvarez-Castro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Models of genetic effects are mathematical representations of a genotype-to-phenotype (GP map that, rather than accounting for a raw map assigning phenotypes to genotypes, rely on parameters with deliberate evolutionary meaning—additive and interaction effects. In this article, the conceptual particularities of genetic imprinting and their implications on models of genetic effects are analyzed. The molecular mechanisms by which imprinted loci affect the relationship between genotypes and phenotypes are known to be singular. Despite its epigenetic nature, the (parent-of-origin-dependent way in which the alleles of imprinted genes are modified and segregate in each generation is precisely determined, and thus amenable to be represented through conventional models of genetic effects. The Natural and Orthogonal Interactions (NOIA model framework is here extended to account for imprinting as a tool for a more thorough analysis of the evolutionary implications of this phenomenon. The resulting theory improves and generalizes previous proposals for modelling imprinting.

  9. Inconclusive TSC Genetic Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic test does, essentially, is look for a “spelling error” in one of these genes that causes ... one or the other) has a mutation, or “spelling error” in it, it is not read correctly ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: genitopatellar syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome have distinct clinical features reflecting distinct molecular mechanisms. Hum Mutat. 2012 Nov;33(11):1520-5. ... with a qualified healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Contact Us Selection Criteria for Links ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cicardi M. C1-inhibitor deficiency and angioedema: molecular mechanisms and clinical progress. Trends Mol Med. 2009 Feb; ... with a qualified healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Contact Us Selection Criteria for Links ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Huntington disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Citation on PubMed Jones L, Hughes A. Pathogenic mechanisms in Huntington's disease. Int Rev Neurobiol. 2011;98: ... with a qualified healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Contact Us Selection Criteria for Links ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hyperinsulinism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Z, Arya VB, Hussain K. Hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia:genetic mechanisms, diagnosis and management. J Clin Res Pediatr Endocrinol. ... Shyng SL, Stanley CA. Clinical characteristics and biochemical mechanisms of congenital hyperinsulinism associated with dominant KATP channel ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: FG syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the clinical phenotype and an algorithm for diagnostic testing. Genet Med. 2009 Nov;11(11):769-75. Dessay S, Moizard MP, Gilardi JL, Opitz JM, Middleton-Price H, Pembrey M, Moraine C, Briault S. FG syndrome: ...

  15. Genetic epidemiology of Scheuermann's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damborg, Frank; Engell, Vilhelm; Nielsen, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    The genetic/environmental etiology of Scheuermann's disease is unclear. We estimated the heritability of the disease using an etiological model adjusted for sex and time of diagnosis, and examined whether the prevalence of Scheuermann's disease was constant over time....

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Hashimoto thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Hashimoto thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Hashimoto thyroiditis is a condition that affects the function ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Perry syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are ... ZK, Yamada T, Benarroch EE. Neurodegeneration involving putative respiratory neurons in Perry syndrome. Acta Neuropathol. 2008 Feb; ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: cyclic neutropenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions cyclic neutropenia cyclic neutropenia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Cyclic neutropenia is a disorder that causes frequent infections and ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that causes chronic abnormal inflammation, ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: psoriatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions psoriatic arthritis psoriatic arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Psoriatic arthritis is a condition involving joint inflammation (arthritis) that ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Jewish heritage and people of Norwegian, Icelandic, or Dutch ancestry. Related Information What information about a genetic ... an increased likelihood of developing cancer, not the disease itself. Not all people who inherit mutations in ...

  2. The Genetics of Febrile Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Dipak Ram; Richard Newton

    2016-01-01

    Investigators from Virginia Commonwealth University, Norwegian Center for Epilepsy and University of Southern Denmark carried out twin studies to analyse the genetic influence of developing epilepsy after febrile seizures.

  3. Technological Innovations in Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wienroth, Matthias; Morling, Niels; Williams, Robin

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the nature of four waves of technological innovations in forensic genetics alongside the social, legal and ethical aspect of these innovations. It emphasises the way in which technological advances and their socio-legal frameworks are co-produced, shaping technology expectati......This paper discusses the nature of four waves of technological innovations in forensic genetics alongside the social, legal and ethical aspect of these innovations. It emphasises the way in which technological advances and their socio-legal frameworks are co-produced, shaping technology...... expectations, social identities, and legal institutions. It also considers how imagined and actual uses of forensic genetic technologies are entangled with assertions about social order, affirmations of common values and civil rights, and promises about security and justice. Our comments seek to encourage...... the participation of scientific actors in the development of anticipatory governance deliberations concerning the widening application of forensic genetics in an increasing number of criminal and civil jurisdictions....

  4. Genetics Home Reference: lactose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions lactose intolerance lactose intolerance Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Lactose intolerance is an impaired ability to digest lactose, a ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Arts syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Arts syndrome Arts syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Arts syndrome is a disorder that causes serious neurological ...

  6. Genetics of irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henström, Maria; D'Amato, Mauro

    2016-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common condition with a complex and largely unknown etiology. There is no cure, and treatment options are mainly directed to the amelioration of symptoms. IBS causes reduced quality of life and poses considerable repercussions on health and socioeconomic systems. There is a heritable component in IBS, and genetic research is a valuable tool for the identification of causative pathways, which will provide important insight into the pathophysiology. However, although some gene-hunting efforts have been conducted and a few risk genes proposed, IBS genetic research is lagging behind compared to other complex diseases. In this mini-review, we briefly summarize existing genetic studies, discuss the main challenges in IBS genetic research, and propose strategies to overcome these challenges for IBS gene discovery. PMID:26873717

  7. Genetics Home Reference: osteogenesis imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... proteins that are used to assemble type I collagen. This type of collagen is the most abundant protein in bone, skin, ... gene. These genetic changes reduce the amount of type I collagen produced in the body, which causes bones to ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Carney complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Carney complex Carney complex Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Carney complex is a disorder characterized by an increased risk ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: alpha thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Disease Control and Prevention Centre for Genetics Education (Australia) Cooley's Anemia Foundation: Fact sheet about alpha thalassemia Disease InfoSearch: Alpha-Thalassemia Genomics Education Programme (UK) Information Center for Sickle Cell and ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: beta thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Disease Control and Prevention Centre for Genetics Education (Australia) Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory: Your Genes Your Health Disease InfoSearch: Beta Thalassemia Genomics Education Programme (UK) MalaCards: dominant beta-thalassemia Merck Manual ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions Alzheimer disease Alzheimer disease Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Alzheimer disease is a degenerative disease of the brain ...

  12. [Population genetics of plant pathogens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen; Zhan, Jia-Sui

    2012-02-01

    Comparing to natural ecosystems, the evolution of plant pathogens in agricultural ecosystems is generally faster due to high-density monocultures, large-scale application of agrochemicals, and international trade in agricultural products. Knowledge of the population genetics and evolutionary biology of plant pathogens is necessary to understand disease epidemiology, effectively breed and use resistant cultivars, and control plant diseases. In this article, we outlined the aims of population genetic studies in plant pathogens, discuss contributions of five evolutionary forces (i.e., mutation, gene flow, recombination, random genetic drift, and natural selection) to origin, maintenance, and distribution of genetic variation in time and space, and gave an overview of current research status in this field. PMID:22382057

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Angelman syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ). The life expectancy of people with this condition ... health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Caffey disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bones can lead to curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ) or limit expansion of the chest, resulting in ... health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: cleidocranial dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... knees; and an abnormal curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ). Characteristic facial features may include a wide, short ... health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: campomelic dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may develop an abnormal curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ) and other spine abnormalities that compress the spinal ... health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Hennekam syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ), and inward- and upward-turning feet ( clubfeet ). The ... health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Aicardi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading to progressive abnormal curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ). They often have gastrointestinal problems such as constipation ... health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: cap myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or a spine that curves to the side ( scoliosis ). The name cap myopathy comes from characteristic abnormal ... health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: centronuclear myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ). Rarely, individuals with centronuclear myopathy have a weakened ... health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Andermann syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individuals also develop abnormal curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ), which may require surgery. Andermann syndrome also results ... health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: familial dysautonomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain, poor balance, abnormal curvature of the spine ( scoliosis ), poor bone quality and increased risk of bone ... health conditions: Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Surgery and Rehabilitation Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Related Information How are ...

  3. Genetic manipulation of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Myriam; Rodrigues, Paulo; Progulske-Fox, Ann

    2007-06-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, an oral anaerobic bacterium, is an important etiological agent of periodontal disease and may contribute to cardiovascular disease, preterm birth, and diabetes as well. Therefore, genetic studies are of crucial importance in investigating molecular mechanisms of P. gingivalis virulence. Although molecular genetic tools have been available for many bacterial species for some time, genetic manipulations of Porphyromonas species were not developed until more recently and remain limited. In this unit, current molecular genetic approaches for mutant construction in P. gingivalis using the suicide vector pPR-UF1 and the transposon Tn4351 are described, as are protocols for performing electroporation and conjugation. Furthermore, a technique to restore the wild-type phenotype of the mutant by complementation using vector pT-COW is provided. Finally, a description of a noninvasive reporter system allowing the study of gene expression and regulation in P. gingivalis completes this unit. PMID:18770611

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Netherton syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NS Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes named? ... Weibel L, Deraison C, Hovnanian A. Clinical expression and new SPINK5 splicing defects in Netherton syndrome: unmasking a frequent founder ...

  5. Genetic factors in sleep disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Parkes, J. D.; Lock, C B

    1989-01-01

    Several sleep disorders have a genetic basis. These conditions include the narcoleptic syndrome, sleep walking, periodic movements in sleep, circadian delay syndromes and familial insomnia. These disorders illustrate different control mechanisms involved in sleep and wakefulness, including those determining the prevalence and timing of NREM and REM activity, somatomotor inhibition and excitation, autonomic discharge, and the circadian framework of sleep. The genetic defect in narcolepsy has b...

  6. Molecular genetics of intellectual disability

    OpenAIRE

    Bessa, C.; Lopes, F.; Maciel, P.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this chapter is to review the current knowledge of the genetic causes of intellectual disability, focusing on alterations at the chromosomal and single gene level, with particular mention to the new technological developments, including array technologies and next-generation sequencing, which allowed an enormous increase in yield from genetic studies. The cellular and physiological pathways that seem to be most affected in intellectual disability will also be addressed. Fina...

  7. Genetics of Complex Airway Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cookson, William O C; Moffatt, Miriam F

    2011-01-01

    The past 3 years have seen highly significant genetic effects identified for a wide variety of common complex diseases, including the airway disorders of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. It appears that only a portion of the genetically mediated susceptibility to complex diseases has been identified, and there is much left to be discovered. This review briefly describes the results of the genome-wide association studies of asthma and gives an overview of the parallel and incr...

  8. Genetic epidemiology of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wiklund, Fredrik

    2004-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a major health burden throughout the world, yet the etiology of prostate cancer is poorly understood. Evidence has accumulated supporting the existence of a hereditary form of this disease. Improved understanding of the genetic mechanisms underlying the development and progression of prostate cancer would be a major advance for improved prevention, detection and treatment strategies. This thesis evaluates different aspects of the genetic epidemiology of prostate cancer. In ...

  9. Developmental genetics in primitive chordates.

    OpenAIRE

    P. SORDINO; L. Belluzzi; De Santis, R; Smith, W.C.

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of the genetics and genomics of urochordates testify to a renewed interest in this chordate subphylum, believed to be the most primitive extant chordate relatives of the vertebrates. In addition to their primitive nature, many features of their reproduction and early development make the urochordates ideal model chordates for developmental genetics. Many urochordates spawn large numbers of transparent and externally developing embryos on a daily basis. Additionall...

  10. Genetic epidemiology: Systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Yasmeen A.; Bruce, Ian N.

    2001-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is the prototype multisystem autoimmune disease. A strong genetic component of susceptibility to the disease is well established. Studies of murine models of systemic lupus erythematosus have shown complex genetic interactions that influence both susceptibility and phenotypic expression. These models strongly suggest that several defects in similar pathways, e.g. clearance of immune complexes and/or apoptotic cell debris, can all result in disease expression. Stud...

  11. : Genetic heterogeneity of bipolar disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieu, Flavie; Dizier, Marie-Hélène; Etain, Bruno; Jamain, Stéphane; Rietschel, Marcella; Maier, Wolfgang; Albus, Margot; Mckeon, Patrick; Roche, Siobhan; Blackwood, Douglas; Muir, Walter,; Henry, Chantal; Malafosse, Alain; Preisig, Martin; Ferrero, François

    2010-01-01

    Bipolar disorder has a genetic component, but the mode of inheritance remains unclear. A previous genome scan conducted in 70 European families led to detect eight regions linked to bipolar disease. Here, we present an investigation of whether the phenotypic heterogeneity of the disorder corresponds to genetic heterogeneity in these regions using additional markers and an extended sample of families. The MLS statistic was used for linkage analyses. The predivided sample test and the maximum l...

  12. Human Capital and Genetic Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Sequeira, Tiago; Santos, Marcelo,; Ferreira-Lopes, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The determinants of human capital have been studied sparsely in the literature. Although there is a huge literature on the determinants of schooling linked with the quality of schooling, there are not many contributions that explore the deep determinants of investment in, quantity and quality of human capital. This paper investigates the relationship between human capital and the ancestral genetic diversity of populations. It highlights a strong hump-shaped relationship between genetic divers...

  13. Genetic control of bone mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudin, Eveline; Fijalkowski, Igor; Hendrickx, Gretl; Van Hul, Wim

    2016-09-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a quantitative traits used as a surrogate phenotype for the diagnosis of osteoporosis, a common metabolic disorder characterized by increased fracture risk as a result of a decreased bone mass and deterioration of the microarchitecture of the bone. Normal variation in BMD is determined by both environmental and genetic factors. According to heritability studies, 50-85% of the variance in BMD is controlled by genetic factors which are mostly polygenic. In contrast to the complex etiology of osteoporosis, there are disorders with deviating BMD values caused by one mutation with a large impact. These mutations can result in monogenic bone disorders with either an extreme high (sclerosteosis, Van Buchem disease, osteopetrosis, high bone mass phenotype) or low BMD (osteogenesis imperfecta, juvenile osteoporosis, primary osteoporosis). Identification of the disease causing genes, increased the knowledge on the regulation of BMD and highlighted important signaling pathways and novel therapeutic targets such as sclerostin, RANKL and cathepsin K. Genetic variation in genes involved in these pathways are often also involved in the regulation of normal variation in BMD and osteoporosis susceptibility. In the last decades, identification of genetic factors regulating BMD has proven to be a challenge. Several approaches have been tested such as linkage studies and candidate and genome wide association studies. Although, throughout the years, technological developments made it possible to study increasing numbers of genetic variants in populations with increasing sample sizes at the same time, only a small fraction of the genetic impact can yet be explained. In order to elucidate the missing heritability, the focus shifted to studying the role of rare variants, copy number variations and epigenetic influences. This review summarizes the genetic cause of different monogenic bone disorders with deviating BMD and the knowledge on genetic factors

  14. Genetic risks for cardiovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zafarmand, M. H.

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD), which involves the heart, brain, and peripheral circulation, is a major health problem world-wide. The development of atherosclerosis is a complex process, and several established risk factors are involved. Nevertheless, these established risk factors do not fully explain the occurrence of CVD and further insight is required in factors such as genetic determinants that may identify individuals at risk. In this thesis we worked on the genetic basis...

  15. Genetic testing and risk interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talya Miron-Shatz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Genetic screening for BRCA1 and BRCA2 gives women the opportunity for early detection, surveillance, and intervention. One key feature of genetic testing and counseling is the provision of personal lifetime risk. However, little attention has been paid to how women interpret lifetime risk information, despite the fact that they base screening, treatment and family planning decisions on such information. To study this vital issue, we set out to test the ability of women to choose the most appropriate interpretation of National Cancer Institute's (NCI message about lifetime risk of developing cancer for a woman with altered BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Participants included 277 women who had not undergone genetic testing or had cancer and 207 women who had undergone genetic testing or had cancer. Over 50\\% of the women who had not undergone genetic testing or had cancer and 40\\% of those who had undergone genetic testing or had cancer misunderstood NCI's information. Furthermore, in line with a growing body of research, we found that high numeracy level (objective or subjective is positively associated with a woman's ability to correctly interpret NCI's message.

  16. Genetic Causes of Generalized Epilepsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbig, Ingo

    2015-06-01

    Generalized epilepsies, particularly the idiopathic or genetic generalized epilepsies (GGEs), represent some of the most common epilepsies. Clinical genetic data including family studies and twin studies provide compelling evidence for a prominent genetic impact. The first decade of the 21st century was marked by progress in understanding the basic biology of generalized epilepsies including generalized/genetic epilepsies with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) and GGE through studies of large families, discovering causative mutations in SCN1A, SCN1B, GABRG2, and GABRA1. Subsequently, recurrent microdeletions at 15q13.3, 16p13.11, and 15q11.2 were found to be relevant risk factors for nonfamilial GGE. Genes for epileptic encephalopathies such as SLC2A1 were rediscovered in GGE, highlighting the biological continuum between different epilepsies. Genome-wide studies examining common genetic risk factors identified common variants in SCN1A, indicating a convergence of shared pathophysiological pathways in various types of epilepsies. In the era of next-generation sequencing, however, the GGEs appear more complex than expected, and small or moderately sized studies give only a limited genetic perspective. Thus, there is a strong impetus for large collaborative investigations on an international level. PMID:26060908

  17. Genetic divergence of tomato subsamples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Pugnal Mattedi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the genetic variability of a species is crucial for the progress of a genetic breeding program and requires characterization and evaluation of germplasm. This study aimed to characterize and evaluate 101 tomato subsamples of the Salad group (fresh market and two commercial controls, one of the Salad group (cv. Fanny and another of the Santa Cruz group (cv. Santa Clara. Four experiments were conducted in a randomized block design with three replications and five plants per plot. The joint analysis of variance was performed and characteristics with significant complex interaction between control and experiment were excluded. Subsequently, the multicollinearity diagnostic test was carried out and characteristics that contributed to severe multicollinearity were excluded. The relative importance of each characteristics for genetic divergence was calculated by the Singh's method (Singh, 1981, and the less important ones were excluded according to Garcia (1998. Results showed large genetic divergence among the subsamples for morphological, agronomic and organoleptic characteristics, indicating potential for genetic improvement. The characteristics total soluble solids, mean number of good fruits per plant, endocarp thickness, mean mass of marketable fruit per plant, total acidity, mean number of unmarketable fruit per plant, internode diameter, internode length, main stem thickness and leaf width contributed little to the genetic divergence between the subsamples and may be excluded in future studies.

  18. Sex Determination, Sex Ratios, and Genetic Conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werren, John H.; Beukeboom, Leo W.

    1998-01-01

    Genetic mechanisms of sex determination are unexpectedly diverse and change rapidly during evolution. We review the role of genetic conflict as the driving force behind this diversity and turnover. Genetic conflict occurs when different components of a genetic system are subject to selection in oppo

  19. Nonmotor symptoms in genetic Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasten, Meike; Kertelge, Lena; Brüggemann, Norbert;

    2010-01-01

    To review current knowledge on nonmotor symptoms (NMS), particularly psychiatric features, in genetic Parkinson disease (PD) and to provide original data for genetic and idiopathic PD.......To review current knowledge on nonmotor symptoms (NMS), particularly psychiatric features, in genetic Parkinson disease (PD) and to provide original data for genetic and idiopathic PD....

  20. Genetic coding and gene expression - new Quadruplet genetic coding model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar Singh, Rama

    2012-07-01

    Successful demonstration of human genome project has opened the door not only for developing personalized medicine and cure for genetic diseases, but it may also answer the complex and difficult question of the origin of life. It may lead to making 21st century, a century of Biological Sciences as well. Based on the central dogma of Biology, genetic codons in conjunction with tRNA play a key role in translating the RNA bases forming sequence of amino acids leading to a synthesized protein. This is the most critical step in synthesizing the right protein needed for personalized medicine and curing genetic diseases. So far, only triplet codons involving three bases of RNA, transcribed from DNA bases, have been used. Since this approach has several inconsistencies and limitations, even the promise of personalized medicine has not been realized. The new Quadruplet genetic coding model proposed and developed here involves all four RNA bases which in conjunction with tRNA will synthesize the right protein. The transcription and translation process used will be the same, but the Quadruplet codons will help overcome most of the inconsistencies and limitations of the triplet codes. Details of this new Quadruplet genetic coding model and its subsequent potential applications including relevance to the origin of life will be presented.

  1. A bioelectronic system for the monitoring of cardiac activity in mussels and crabs and its application in environmental assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kholodkevich, Sergey V.; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Lehtonen, Kari;

    , SRCES RAS has carried out studies contributing to ecosystem health assessment basing on evaluation of the physiological state of organisms by the means of noninvasive fiber-optic monitoring of heartbeat of selected invertebrate species (Mytilus edulis, Macoma balthica, Carcinus maenas). During the 2...... mollusks and crabs under standard test stimuli and the development of new biomarkers based on heart rate of aquatic invertebrates. Responses to treatments with standard test stimuli provide integral information of the adaptive capacities of organisms. The results of these studies demonstratedsignificant...... geographical variability in cardiac responses in organisms related to the ecological/pollution status of the studied sites. Conclusively, the system for non-invasive monitoring of heart rate and its variability in selected invertebrates developed and tested under the BEAST project can be applied as an early...

  2. Isolation and identification of a cardioactive peptide from Tenebrio molitor and Spodoptera eridania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, K; Liao, S; Reynolds, S E; Ota, R B; Hackett, M; Schooley, D A

    1993-12-01

    We isolated several cardioactive peptides from extracts of whole heads of the mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, and the southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania, using a semi-isolated heart of Manduca sexta for bioassay. We have now isolated from each species the peptide with the strongest effect on rate of contraction of the heart. The peptides were identified using micro Edman sequencing and mass spectrometric methods. This cardioactive peptide has the same primary structure from both species: Pro-Phe-Cys-Asn-Ala-Phe-Thr-Gly-Cys-NH2, a cyclic nonapeptide which is identical to crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) originally isolated from the shore crab, Carcinus maenas, and subsequently isolated from Locusta migratoria and Manduca sexta. This is additional evidence that CCAP has widespread occurrence in arthropoda. PMID:8129851

  3. Comparative study of predatory responses in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) produced in suspended long line cultures or collected from natural bottom mussel beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Helle Torp; Dolmer, Per; Petersen, Jens Kjerulf; Tørring, Ditte Bruunshøj

    2011-01-01

    Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) are a valuable resource for commercial shellfish production and may also have uses as a tool in habitat improvement, because mussel beds can increase habitat diversity and complexity. A prerequisite for both commercial mussel production and habitat improvement is...... the availability of seed mussels collected with minimum impact on the benthic ecosystem. To examine whether mussels collected in suspended cultures can be used for bottom culture production and as tool in habitat improvement, the differences in predatory defence responses between suspended and bottom...... mussels exposed to the predatory shore crab (Carcinus maenas L.) were tested in laboratory experiments and in the field. Predatory defence responses (byssal attachment and aggregation) and morphological traits were tested in laboratory, while growth and mortality were examined in field experiments...

  4. Parasit-manipulation: Rodkrebs-infektion svækker strandkrabbers konkurrenceevne

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Karen; Mouritsen, Kim Nørgaard; Glenner, Henrik;

    I dette studie undersøger vi effekterne af rodkrebsen Sacculina carcini på dens vært, den europæiske strandkrabbe (Carcinus maenas), med fokus på parasit-inducerede ændringer i krabbens aggressivitet. Da han-krabber bliver morfologisk og adfærdsmæssigt feminiseret af parasitten, er hypotesen at...... køn med forskellige parasit-stadier blev sat op imod ikke-parasitterede krabber af samme størrelse og af begge køn, resulterende i 12 forskellige interaktioner. En blåmusling (Mytilus edulis) blev brugt som den begrænsede ressource, hvilken krabberne kæmpede om i 30 minutter. Alle interaktioner blev...

  5. The crab Neohelice (= Chasmagnathus) granulata: an emergent animal model from emergent countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivak, Eduardo D.

    2010-09-01

    Neohelice granulata (previously known as Chasmagnathus granulata and C. granulatus) is a burrowing semiterrestrial crab found in the intertidal zone of estuaries, salt marshes and mangroves of the South-western Atlantic Ocean. Beginning in the late 1989s, an explosion of publications appeared in international journals dealing with its ecology, physiology, toxicology and behavior. A bibliometric analysis using the Scopus database allowed detecting 309 papers that deal with this species during the period 1986-2009. The number of papers per year increased continuously, reaching a mean annual value of 22.6 during the last 5 years; a great majority of them were authored by researchers from Argentina and Brazil. Neohelice granulata has become now one of the most studied crab species, after Carcinus maenas, Callinectes sapidus, Scylla serrata and Cancer pagurus and C. magister, and it can be considered as an emergent animal model for biochemical, physiological and ecological research.

  6. Burrowing and avoidance behaviour in marine organisms exposed to pesticide-contaminated sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohlenberg, F.; Kiorboe, T.

    1983-02-01

    Behavioural effects of marine sediment contaminated with pesticides (6000 ppm parathion, 200 ppm methyl parathion, 200 ppm malathion) were studied in a number of marine organisms in laboratory tests and in situ. The burrowing behaviour in Macoma baltica, Cerastoderma edule, Abra alba, Nereis diversicolor and Scoloplos armiger was impaired in the contaminated sediment compared to control. The impairment was most pronounced in the laboratory tests, where almost no burrowing occured. In a very simple laboratory set-up, highly significant avoidance of the contaminated sediment was demonstrated for Crangon crangon and Solea solea, but not for Carcinus maenas and Pomatoschistus minutus. The validity of both behavioural tests was supported by in situ observations and investigations on the distribution of the species. It is concluded that both tests are useful tools in the assessment of the impact of contaminated sediments.

  7. Overcoming Challenges in Engineering the Genetic Code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajoie, M J; Söll, D; Church, G M

    2016-02-27

    Withstanding 3.5 billion years of genetic drift, the canonical genetic code remains such a fundamental foundation for the complexity of life that it is highly conserved across all three phylogenetic domains. Genome engineering technologies are now making it possible to rationally change the genetic code, offering resistance to viruses, genetic isolation from horizontal gene transfer, and prevention of environmental escape by genetically modified organisms. We discuss the biochemical, genetic, and technological challenges that must be overcome in order to engineer the genetic code. PMID:26348789

  8. Obtaining genetic testing in pediatric epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ream, Margie A; Patel, Anup D

    2015-10-01

    The steps from patient evaluation to genetic diagnosis remain complicated. We discuss some of the genetic testing methods available along with their general advantages and disadvantages. We briefly review common pediatric epilepsy syndromes with strong genetic association and provide a potentially useful algorithm for genetic testing in drug-resistant epilepsy. We performed an extensive literature review of available information as it pertains to genetic testing and genetics in pediatric epilepsy. If a genetic disorder is suspected as the cause of epilepsy, based on drug resistance, family history, or clinical phenotype, timely diagnosis may reduce overall cost, limit the diagnostic odyssey that can bring much anxiety to families, improve prognostic accuracy, and lead to targeted therapy. Interpretation of complicated results should be performed only in collaboration with geneticists and genetic counselors, unless the ordering neurologist has a strong background in and understanding of genetics. Genetic testing can play an important role in the care provided to patients with epilepsy. PMID:26345167

  9. What Is Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic testing? What is direct-to-consumer genetic testing? Traditionally, genetic tests have been available only through healthcare providers ... testing. For more information about direct-to-consumer genetic testing: The American College of Medical Genetics, which is ...

  10. The New Genetics and Natural versus Artificial Genetic Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mae-Wan Ho

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The original rationale and impetus for artificial genetic modification was the “central dogma” of molecular biology that assumed DNA carries all the instructions for making an organism, which are transmitted via RNA to protein to biological function in linear causal chains. This is contrary to the reality of the “fluid genome” that has emerged since the mid-1970s. In order to survive, the organism needs to engage in natural genetic modification in real time, an exquisitely precise molecular dance of life with RNA and DNA responding to and participating in “downstream” biological functions. Artificial genetic modification, in contrast, is crude, imprecise, and interferes with the natural process. It drives natural systems towards maximum biosemiotic entropy as the perturbations are propagated and amplified through the complex cascades of interactions between subsystems that are essential for health and longevity.

  11. Imaging genetics of FOXP2 in dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Wilcke, Arndt; Ligges, Carolin; Burkhardt, Jana; Alexander, Michael; Wolf, Christiane; Quente, Elfi; Ahnert, Peter; Becker, Albert; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Cichon, Sven; Boltze, Johannes; Hoffmann, Per; Kirsten, Holger

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Dyslexia is a developmental disorder characterised by extensive difficulties in the acquisition of reading or spelling. Genetic influence is estimated at 50-70%. However, the link between genetic variants and phenotypic deficits is largely unknown. Our aim was to investigate a role of genetic variants of FOXP2, a prominent speech and language gene, in dyslexia using imaging genetics. This technique combines functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and genetics to i...

  12. Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular genetic studies on obligate anaerobic bacteria have lagged behind similar studies in aerobes. However, the current interest in biotechnology, the involvement of anaerobes in disease and the emergence of antibioticresistant strains have focused attention on the genetics of anaerobes. This article reviews molecular genetic studies in Bacteroides spp., Clostridium spp. and methanogens. Certain genetic systems in some anaerobes differ from those in aerobes and illustrate the genetic diversity among bacteria

  13. The Virtual Genetics Lab II: Improvements to a Freely Available Software Simulation of Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Brian T.

    2012-01-01

    The Virtual Genetics Lab II (VGLII) is an improved version of the highly successful genetics simulation software, the Virtual Genetics Lab (VGL). The software allows students to use the techniques of genetic analysis to design crosses and interpret data to solve realistic genetics problems involving a hypothetical diploid insect. This is a brief…

  14. On the Implementation and Use of a Genetic Algorithm with Genetic Acquisitions

    OpenAIRE

    Mateescu, George Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A genetic algorithm is convergent when genetic mutations occur on the objective function gradient direction. These genetic mutations are called genetic acquisitions (Mateescu, 2005). We improved the algorithm and its implementation by using the characteristics of parents in order to generate new individuals. Finally, we applied the genetic algorithm in order to find the parameters of a Cobb-Douglas function.

  15. Genetic maps and physical units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationships between physical and genetic units are examined. Genetic mapping involves the detection of linkage of genes and the measurement of recombination frequencies. The genetic distance is measured in map units and is proportional to the recombination frequencies between linked markers. Physical mapping of genophores, particularly the simple genomes of bacteriophages and bacterial plasmids can be achieved through heteroduplex analysis. Genetic distances are dependent on recombination frequencies and, therefore, can only be correlated accurately with physical unit lengths if the recombination frequency is constant throughout the entire genome. Methods are available to calculate the equivalent length of DNA per average map unit in different organisms. Such estimates indicate significant differences from one organism to another. Gene lengths can also be calculated from the number of amino acids in a specified polypeptide and relating this to the number of nucleotides required to code for such a polypeptide. Many attempts have been made to relate microdosimetric measurements to radiobiological data. For irradiation effects involving deletion of genetic material such a detailed correlation may be possible in systems where heteroduplex analysis or amino acid sequencing can be performed. The problems of DNA packaging and other functional associations within the cell in interpreting data is discussed

  16. Yeasts: from genetics to biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, S; Berkovitz Siman-Tov, R; Poli, G

    1995-01-01

    Yeasts have been known and used in food and alcoholic fermentations ever since the Neolithic Age. In more recent times, on the basis of their peculiar features and history, yeasts have become very important experimental models in both microbiological and genetic research, as well as the main characters in many fermentative production processes. In the last 40 years, advances in molecular biology and genetic engineering have made possible not only the genetic selection of organisms, but also the genetic modification of some of them, especially the simplest of them, such as bacteria and yeasts. These discoveries have led to the availability of new yeast strains fit to fulfill requests of industrial production and fermentation. Moreover, genetically modified and transformed yeasts have been constructed that are able to produce large amounts of biologically active proteins and enzymes. Thus, recombinant yeasts make it easier to produce drugs, biologically active products, diagnostics, and vaccines, by inexpensive and relatively simple techniques. Yeasts are going to become more and more important in the "biotechnological revolution" by virtue of both their features and their very long and safe use in human nutrition and industry. PMID:9003692

  17. Yeasts: From genetics to biotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, S.; Poli, G. [Univ. of Milan (Italy); Siman-Tov, R.B. [Univ. of Jerusalem, Rehovot (Israel)

    1995-12-31

    Yeasts have been known and used in food and alcoholic fermentations ever since the Neolithic Age. In more recent times, on the basis of their peculiar features and history, yeasts have become very important experimental models in both microbiological and genetic research, as well as the main characters in many fermentative production processes. In the last 40 years, advances in molecular biology and genetic engineering have made possible not only the genetic selection of organisms, but also the genetic modification of some of them, especially the simplest of them, such as bacteria and yeasts. These discoveries have led to the availability of new yeast strains fit to fulfill requests of industrial production and fermentation. Moreover, genetically modified and transformed yeasts have been constructed that are able to produce large amounts of biologically active proteins and enzymes. Thus, recombinant yeasts make it easier to produce drugs, biologically active products, diagnostics, and vaccines, by inexpensive and relatively simple techniques. Yeasts are going to become more and more important in the {open_quotes}biotechnological revolution{close_quotes} by virtue of both their features and their very long and safe use in human nutrition and industry. 175 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Community Genetic Services in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Atri Barzanjeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to report a description of the primary, secondary, and tertiary level services available for genetic disorders in Iran. For the purpose of this study, essential data were collected from every facility providing community genetic services in Tabriz city of Iran using a prestructured checklist. Technical information was filled in the predesigned forms using diagnostic records of each client/patient. Information was also gathered from community genetic services clients through a face-to-face interview at these facilities to assess the quality of services provided. Primary prevention measures were available in 80 percent of centres in the study population. Diagnostic techniques were fully available in the study area both in public and private sectors. Screening of congenital hypothyroidism and thalassemia has been successfully performed across the country by the Ministry of Health. Other screening programs have also been initiated by the country health authorities for neural tube defects, Down syndrome, and phenylketonuria. The high cost of genetic services at secondary and tertiary levels does not allow many people to get access to these services despite their needs. Governments will therefore need to allocate necessary resources to make the essential genetic services available for everyone needing these in the community.

  19. Genetic Doping and Health Damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Fallahi Fallahi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Use of genetic doping or gene transfer technology will be the newest and the lethal method of doping in fu­ture and have some unpleasant consequences for sports, athletes, and outcomes of competitions. The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA defines genetic doping as "the non-therapeutic use of genes, genetic elements, and/or cells that have the capac­ity to enhance athletic performance". The purpose of this review is to consider genetic doping, health damages and risks of new genes if delivered in athletes."nMethods: This review, which is carried out by reviewing relevant publications, is primarily based on the journals available in GOOGLE, ELSEVIER, PUBMED in fields of genetic technology, and health using a combination of keywords (e.g., ge­netic doping, genes, exercise, performance, athletes until July 2010."nConclusion: There are several genes related to sport performance and if they are used, they will have health risks and sever dam­ages such as cancer, autoimmunization, and heart attack.

  20. Evolving Molecular Genetics of Glioblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-Ju Li; Jin-Quan Cai; Cheng-Yin Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To summary the recent advances in molecular research of glioblastoma (GBM) and current trends in personalized therapy of this disease.Data Sources: Data cited in this review were obtained mainly from PubMed in English up to 2015, with keywords "molecular", "genetics", "GBM", "isocitrate dehydrogenase", "telomerase reverse transcriptase", "epidermal growth factor receptor", "PTPRZ1-MET", and "clinical treatment".Study Selection: Articles regarding the morphological pathology of GBM, the epidemiology of GBM, genetic alteration of GBM, and the development of treatment for GBM patients were identified, retrieved, and reviewed.Results: There is a large amount of data supporting the view that these recurrent genetic aberrations occur in a specific context of cellular origin, co-oncogenic hits and are present in distinct patient populations.Primary and secondary GBMs are distinct disease entities that affect different age groups of patients and develop through distinct genetic aberrations.These differences are important, especially because they may affect sensitivity to radio-and chemo-therapy and should thus be considered in the identification of targets for novel therapeutic approaches.Conclusion: This review highlights the molecular and genetic alterations of GBM, indicating that they are of potential value in the diagnosis and treatment for patients with GBM.

  1. Genetically modified organisms and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamand, E

    1999-12-01

    The genetic modification of organisms for food use has raised serious concern about the potential for adverse effects on the environment, ecosystems and on the health of humans and animals. As a relatively new technology, its impacts remain uncertain but could range from disturbances to the genetic functioning of individual organisms to a reduction in the biodiversity of farmland. As a result, the question of how to monitor for potential impacts is beset with problems. The fact that genetic modification can be used on a range of organisms for a variety of purposes means that those developing monitoring systems will need to be as imaginative as those developing GMOs. In the case of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for food use, concern has focussed on the transfer of genes to other organisms, the potential for effects on non-target organisms, or on the health of humans and animals, and the likelihood of adverse effects on wildlife due to changes in farming practice. As with other new and unfamiliar technologies, genetic modification is also plagued by the problem of uncertainty. Novel genes are inserted randomly into the genome of the host organisms, and this leads to the possibility of unexpected effects. Unanticipated environmental disasters, such as the concentration of persistent organic pollutants in ecosystems at high latitudes, have highlighted the need for monitoring despite the obvious difficulties inherent in monitoring for unexpected effects. PMID:11529177

  2. The Genetics of Nephrotic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheault, Michelle N; Gbadegesin, Rasheed A

    2016-03-01

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is a common pediatric kidney disease and is defined as massive proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, and edema. Dysfunction of the glomerular filtration barrier, which is made up of endothelial cells, glomerular basement membrane, and visceral epithelial cells known as podocytes, is evident in children with NS. While most children have steroid-responsive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS), approximately 20% have steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) and are at risk for progressive kidney dysfunction. While the cause of SSNS is still not well understood, there has been an explosion of research into the genetic causes of SRNS in the past 15 years. More than 30 proteins regulating the function of the glomerular filtration barrier have been associated with SRNS including podocyte slit diaphragm proteins, podocyte actin cytoskeletal proteins, mitochondrial proteins, adhesion and glomerular basement membrane proteins, transcription factors, and others. A genetic cause of SRNS can be found in approximately 70% of infants presenting in the first 3 months of life and 50% of infants presenting between 4 and 12 months, with much lower likelihood for older patients. Identification of the underlying genetic etiology of SRNS is important in children because it allows for counseling of other family members who may be at risk, predicts risk of recurrent disease after kidney transplant, and predicts response to immunosuppressive therapy. Correlations between genetic mutation and clinical phenotype as well as genetic risk factors for SSNS and SRNS are reviewed in this article. PMID:27617138

  3. Genetics of sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refaat, Marwan M; Hotait, Mostafa; London, Barry

    2015-07-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as death within 1 h of symptom onset (witnessed) or within 24 h of being observed alive and symptom free (unwitnessed). It affects more than 3 million people annually worldwide and affects approximately 1/1000 people each year in the USA. Familial studies of syndromes with Mendelian inheritance, candidate genes analyses, and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have helped our understanding of the genetics of SCD. We will review the genetics of arrhythmogenic hereditary syndromes with Mendelian inheritance from familial studies with structural heart disease (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy) as well as primary electrical causes (long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, and short QT syndrome). In addition, we will review the genetics of intermediate phenotypes for SCD such as coronary artery disease and electrocardiographic variables (QT interval, QRS duration, and RR interval). Finally, we will review rare and common variants that are associated with SCD in the general population and were identified from candidate gene analyses and GWAS. Our understanding of the genetics of SCD will improve by the use of next-generation sequencing/whole-exome sequencing as well as whole-genome sequencing which have the potential to discover unsuspected common and rare genetic variants that might be associated with SCD. PMID:26026997

  4. Molecular genetics of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaert, Julie; Prenen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 90% of colorectal cancer cases are sporadic without family history or genetic predisposition, while in less than 10% a causative genetic event has been identified. Historically, colorectal cancer classification was only based on clinical and pathological features. Many efforts have been made to discover the genetic and molecular features of colorectal cancer, and there is more and more evidence that these features determine the prognosis and response to (targeted) treatment. Colorectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease, with three known major molecular groups. The most common is the chromosomal instable group, characterized by an accumulation of mutations in specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The second is the microsatellite instable group, caused by dysfunction of DNA mismatch repair genes leading to genetic hypermutability. The CpG Island Methylation phenotype is the third group, distinguished by hypermethylation. Colorectal cancer subtyping has also been addressed using genome-wide gene expression profiling in large patient cohorts and recently several molecular classification systems have been proposed. In this review we would like to provide an up-to-date overview of the genetic aspects of colorectal cancer. PMID:24714764

  5. The dawn of active genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantz, Valentino M; Bier, Ethan

    2016-01-01

    On December 18, 2014, a yellow female fly quietly emerged from her pupal case. What made her unique was that she had only one parent carrying a mutant allele of this classic recessive locus. Then, one generation later, after mating with a wild-type male, all her offspring displayed the same recessive yellow phenotype. Further analysis of other such yellow females revealed that the construct causing the mutation was converting the opposing chromosome with 95% efficiency. These simple results, seen also in mosquitoes and yeast, open the door to a new era of genetics wherein the laws of traditional Mendelian inheritance can be bypassed for a broad variety of purposes. Here, we consider the implications of this fundamentally new form of "active genetics," its applications for gene drives, reversal and amplification strategies, its potential for contributing to cell and gene therapy strategies, and ethical/biosafety considerations associated with such active genetic elements. Also watch the Video Abstract. PMID:26660392

  6. Conventional radiology and genetic dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A research project was established in 1984 to evaluate the expected genetic abnormalities due to radiation received by the population attending the Outpatient Radiological Service due to medical radiological practices. The study was conducted in 1985 (12 weeks chosen by random). The equivalent gonadal dose was the chosen parameter, representing the social cost of the radiology. Samples of 2945 men and 2929 women were considered in the study. The number of genetic abnormalities, in relation to the mean age of reproduction (a generation every 30 years) was 2.13 cases per million in the first generation and 15.97 cases per million at equilibrium. Our interpretation is that both the method and the expected genetic detriment are suitable procedures for the characterization of the Radiological service as a radiation source

  7. Genetic studies in alcohol research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karp, R.W. [National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (United States)

    1994-12-15

    The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) supports research to elucidate the specific genetic factors, now largely unknown, which underlie susceptibility to alcoholism and its medical complications (including fetal alcohol syndrome). Because of the genetic complexity and heterogeneity of alcoholism, identification of the multiple underlying factors will require the development of new study designs and methods of analysis of data from human families. While techniques of genetic analysis of animal behavioral traits (e.g., targeted gene disruption, quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping) are more powerful that those applicable to humans (e.g., linkage and allelic association studies), the validation of animal behaviors as models of aspects of human alcoholism has been problematic. Newly developed methods for mapping QTL influencing animal behavioral traits can not only permit analyses of human family data to be directly informed by the results of animal studies, but can also serve as a novel means of validating animal models of aspects of alcoholism. 55 refs.

  8. How to measure genetic heterogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic information of organisms is coded as a string of four letters, A, T, G and C, a sequence in macromolecules called deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). DNA sequence offers blueprint of organisms and its heterogeneity determines identity and variation of species. The quantitation of this genetic heterogeneity is fundamental to understand biology. We compared previously-reported three measures, covariance matrix expression of list of loci (pair-wise r2), the most popular index in genetics, and its multi-dimensional form, Ψ, and entropy-based index, ε. Thereafter we proposed two methods so that we could handle the diplotypic heterogeneity and quantitate the conditions where the number of DNA sequence samples is much smaller than the number of possible variants.

  9. Genetics and Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Sarah G; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Rosas, Ivan O

    2016-06-01

    Significant progress has been made in elucidating the genetics of parenchymal lung diseases, particularly idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs). IIPs are a heterogeneous group of diffuse interstitial lung diseases of uncertain etiology, diagnosed only after known causes of interstitial lung disease have been excluded. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is the most common IIP. Through candidate gene approaches and genome wide association studies, much light has been shed on the genetic origins of IIPs, enhancing our understanding of risk factors and pathogenesis. However, significant work remains to be accomplished in identifying novel genetic variants and characterizing the function of validated candidate genes in lung pathobiology, their interplay with environmental factors, and ultimately translating these discoveries to patient care. PMID:27231858

  10. Genetic alterations in pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Roland M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer of the exocrine pancreas represents the fifth leading cause of cancer death in the Western population with an average survival after diagnosis of 3 to 6 months and a five-year survival rate under 5%. Our understanding of the molecular carcinogenesis has improved in the last few years due to the development of novel molecular biological techniques. Pancreatic cancer is a multi-stage process resulting from the accumulation of genetic changes in the somatic DNA of normal cells. In this article we describe major genetic alterations of pancreatic cancer, mutations in the proto-oncogene K-RAS and the tumor suppressors INK4A, TP53 and DPC4/SMAD4. The accumulation of these genetic changes leads to a profound disturbance in cell cycle regulation and continuous growth. The knowledge of the underlying molecular mechanisms will offer new therapeutic and diagnostic options and hopefully improve the outcome of this aggressive disease.

  11. GENETICS ASPECTS OF DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana-Elena Sauca

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy is a clinical syndrome characterized by persistent albuminuria, a relentless decline in GFR, raised arterial blood pressure, and increased relative mortality for cardiovascular diseases. The pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy is multifactorial, with contributions from metabolic abnormalities, hemodynamic alteration, and various growth and genetic factors. The identification of the main genes would allow the detection of those individuals at high risk for diabetic nephropathy and better understanding of its pathophysiologyas well.The present review discusses the main information available in literature regarding some genetic variants (involved in the renin-angiotensin system, glucose and lipid metabolism and some cytoskeleton proteins that reaffirms the importance of genetic factors in diabetic nephropathy.

  12. Genetic Engineering Workshop Report, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, J; Slezak, T

    2010-11-03

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Bioinformatics group has recently taken on a role in DTRA's Transformation Medical Technologies (TMT) program. The high-level goal of TMT is to accelerate the development of broad-spectrum countermeasures. To achieve this goal, there is a need to assess the genetic engineering (GE) approaches, potential application as well as detection and mitigation strategies. LLNL was tasked to coordinate a workshop to determine the scope of investments that DTRA should make to stay current with the rapid advances in genetic engineering technologies, so that accidental or malicious uses of GE technologies could be adequately detected and characterized. Attachment A is an earlier report produced by LLNL for TMT that provides some relevant background on Genetic Engineering detection. A workshop was held on September 23-24, 2010 in Springfield, Virginia. It was attended by a total of 55 people (see Attachment B). Twenty four (44%) of the attendees were academic researchers involved in GE or bioinformatics technology, 6 (11%) were from DTRA or the TMT program management, 7 (13%) were current TMT performers (including Jonathan Allen and Tom Slezak of LLNL who hosted the workshop), 11 (20%) were from other Federal agencies, and 7 (13%) were from industries that are involved in genetic engineering. Several attendees could be placed in multiple categories. There were 26 attendees (47%) who were from out of the DC area and received travel assistance through Invitational Travel Orders (ITOs). We note that this workshop could not have been as successful without the ability to invite experts from outside of the Beltway region. This workshop was an unclassified discussion of the science behind current genetic engineering capabilities. US citizenship was not required for attendance. While this may have limited some discussions concerning risk, we felt that it was more important for this first workshop to focus on the scientific state of

  13. Genetic signatures of heroin addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Ding-Lieh; Shen, Tsu-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Chen, Kuang-Chi; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Heroin addiction is a complex psychiatric disorder with a chronic course and a high relapse rate, which results from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Heroin addiction has a substantial heritability in its etiology; hence, identification of individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction may help prevent the occurrence and relapse of heroin addiction and its complications. The study aimed to identify a small set of genetic signatures that may reliably predict the individuals with a high genetic propensity to heroin addiction. We first measured the transcript level of 13 genes (RASA1, PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CD74, CEBPB, AUTS2, ENO2, IMPDH2, HAT1, MBD1, and RGS3) in lymphoblastoid cell lines in a sample of 124 male heroin addicts and 124 male control subjects using real-time quantitative PCR. Seven genes (PRKCB, PDK1, JUN, CEBPG, CEBPB, ENO2, and HAT1) showed significant differential expression between the 2 groups. Further analysis using 3 statistical methods including logistic regression analysis, support vector machine learning analysis, and a computer software BIASLESS revealed that a set of 4 genes (JUN, CEBPB, PRKCB, ENO2, or CEBPG) could predict the diagnosis of heroin addiction with the accuracy rate around 85% in our dataset. Our findings support the idea that it is possible to identify genetic signatures of heroin addiction using a small set of expressed genes. However, the study can only be considered as a proof-of-concept study. As the establishment of lymphoblastoid cell line is a laborious and lengthy process, it would be more practical in clinical settings to identify genetic signatures for heroin addiction directly from peripheral blood cells in the future study. PMID:27495086

  14. Imaging genetics of anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domschke, Katharina; Dannlowski, Udo

    2010-11-15

    Anxiety disorders are frequent and burdensome psychiatric diseases. Despite their moderate to strong heritabilities, the search for candidate genes has been limited by methodological shortcomings hitherto, e.g., the use of clinically defined, but neurobiologically heterogeneous categorical phenotypes. Investigating neurobiological response patterns associated with fear processing as an intermediate phenotype might aid in overcoming these difficulties. The existing imaging literature on the neurobiological correlates of fear processing and anxiety disorders points to a pivotal role of the amygdala in the human fear circuit. Therefore, amygdala responsiveness to anxiety-related stimuli was suggested as an intermediate phenotype for anxiety disorders. The present article provides an overview of imaging genetic studies investigating genetic effects on amygdala responsiveness with particular emphasis on recent imaging genetic findings in anxiety-related traits, panic disorder and social phobia. The existing studies consistently reveal strong genetic effects on the responsiveness of the fear circuit, particularly of genetic variants previously discussed as potential susceptibility variants for anxiety, e.g., the COMT 158val allele or the 5-HTTLPR short allele. Further research will be necessary involving larger sample sizes to allow for investigating gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. More evolved statistical and neuroimaging methods such as effective connectivity measures could lead to a better understanding of imaging endophenotypes and the nature of gene-brain relationships. Longitudinal studies in patient samples will be required to elucidate how genetically influenced neurobiological intermediate phenotypes are associated with subtype, severity and the course of anxiety disorders, thereby having the potential for developing individualized therapy regimes derived from neurobiological research. PMID:19944771

  15. Marburg Virus Reverse Genetics Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Maria Schmidt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The highly pathogenic Marburg virus (MARV is a member of the Filoviridae family and belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Reverse genetics systems established for MARV have been used to study various aspects of the viral replication cycle, analyze host responses, image viral infection, and screen for antivirals. This article provides an overview of the currently established MARV reverse genetic systems based on minigenomes, infectious virus-like particles and full-length clones, and the research that has been conducted using these systems.

  16. Genetic variation in dieback resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lobo, Albin; Hansen, Jon Kehlet; McKinney, Lea Vig;

    2014-01-01

    -eastern Zealand, Denmark, and confirmed the presence of substantial genetic variation in ash dieback susceptibility. The average crown damage increased in the trial from 61% in 2009 to 66% in 2012 and 72% in 2014, while the estimated heritability was 0.42 in both 2009 and 2012 but increased to 0.53 in 2014....... Genetic correlation between assessments was 0.88 between 2009 and 2012 and 0.91 between 2009 and 2014, suggesting fairly good possibilities for early selection of superior genotypes in the presence of high infection levels in the trial. The level of crown damage had strong negative effect on growth and...

  17. [A genetic ID for tomorrow?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perbal, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Dozens of private companies have emerged in 2005, with the commercial purpose of offering the public a wide variety of personal genetic tests - direct-to-consumer personal genome tests. Simultaneously, a collaborative research initiative on individual sequencing - the Personal Genome Project - was born in Harvard University, then online. This text provides an analysis of the promises and limits of the proposed individual sequencing. First, the scope and quality of individual predictive genetic sequencing are still far from being acquired. Moreover, it is necessary to question the ethical standards of confidentiality and respect for privacy in the connected information era. PMID:26211982

  18. Genetic engineering of Minnesota superfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, P B

    1996-01-01

    There is a chronic need to develop growth-enhanced fish for aquaculture. To meet this need we have developed techniques for genetically engineering fish to grow larger and faster. We found that the major difficulty in genetically engineering fish is the extremely high rate of mosaicism due to the late integration of transgenes into the genome. This delay also reduces the chances of passage of the transgene through the germ line. Consequently, we have engineered new vectors and mechanisms for accelerating the rate of integration of exogenous DNA into fish chromosomes. PMID:8652135

  19. Population genetics of African ungulates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Eline

    Molecular genetic techniques were used to gain insights into the evolutionary forces that have shaped the present day diversity of African savannah ungu-lates, which constitute the most species-rich mega faunal assemblage on earth. The studies included in this thesis represent individual species......-specific data sets, which are used to elucidate evolutionary processes of importance to the savannah ungulate community. Patterns of DNA variation were analyzed to assess the genetic signatures of Pleistocene refugia and investigate aspects of speciation, intraspecific structuring, hybridization, and historic...

  20. Dietary management and genetic predisposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Holbæk; Larsen, Lesli Hingstrup

    2013-01-01

    Today, dietary recommendations are based on recommended daily intake for the general population, and only a few subgroups are considered for additional dietary advice. Nutrigenetics aim to optimize health and prevent disease. Particularly for lifestyle disease, such as obesity, which has increased......, copy number variation, and epigenetics might identify additional genetic contributions to obesity, and the use of omics data with integration of nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics will identify genetic subgroups who will benefit from specific dietary advice to optimize health and prevent disease. Keywords......: Diet . Mutation . Obesity . Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) . Gene-diet interaction . Weight loss . Weight regain...

  1. Proinflammatory Status, Genetics and Atherosclerosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poledne, R.; Lorenzová, A.; Stávek, P.; Valenta, Zdeněk; Hubáček, J.; Suchánek, R.; Piťha, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, Suppl. 2 (2009), S111-S118. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : atherosclerosis * inflammation * C-reactive protein * genetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.430, year: 2009 http://www.biomed.cas.cz/physiolres/pdf/58%20Suppl%202/58_S111.pdf

  2. Genetic Programming with Simple Loops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Yuesheng; WANG Baozhong; KANG Lishan

    1999-01-01

    A kind of loop function LoopN inGenetic Programming (GP) is proposed.Different from other forms of loopfunction, such as While-Do and Repeat-Until, LoopNtakes only oneargument as its loop body and makes its loop body simply run N times,soinfinite loops will never happen. The problem of how to avoid too manylayers ofloops in Genetic Programming is also solved. The advantage ofLoopN in GP is shown bythe computational results in solving the mowerproblem.

  3. Metabolomics of genetically modified crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Carolina; Ibáñez, Clara; Valdés, Alberto; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Cañas, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs) making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not) the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade. PMID:25334064

  4. Metabolomics of Genetically Modified Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Simó

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade.

  5. Non-invasive genetic methods in conservation genetics: advantages and disadvantages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bryja, Josef

    Antalya : European Science Foundation, 2007. s. 15. [Conservation genetics: updating concepts and methods. 22.01.2007-23.01.2007, Antalya] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Keywords : conservation genetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  6. Genetic data for groundfish - Genetics and genomics of northeastern Pacific groundfish

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Conduct genetic analyses of groundfish in the northeastern Pacific, with a focus on population genetics and genomics of rockfishes and sablefish. Genetic data for...

  7. Linkage: from particulate to interactive genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Raphael

    2003-01-01

    Genetics was established on a strict particulate conception of heredity. Genetic linkage, the deviation from independent segregation of Mendelian factors, was conceived as a function of the material allocation of the factors to the chromosomes, rather than to the multiple effects (pleiotropy) of discrete factors. Although linkage maps were abstractions they provided strong support for the chromosomal theory of inheritance. Direct Cytogenetic evidence was scarce until X-ray induced major chromosomal rearrangements allowed direct correlation of genetic and cytological rearrangements. Only with the discovery of the polytenic giant chromosomes in Drosophila larvae in the 1930s were the virtual maps backed up by physical maps of the genetic loci. Genetic linkage became a pivotal experimental tool for the examination of the integration of genetic functions in development and in evolution. Genetic mapping has remained a hallmark of genetic analysis. The location of genes in DNA is a modern extension of the notion of genetic linkage. PMID:12778899

  8. Genetic variations in multiple myeloma I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsted, A.; Klausen, T.W.; Vogel, Ulla Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    variability in a population. The complex interplay between environment and genes for the development of cancer may therefore be influenced by genetic variations. A genetic variation may change the function of the gene, and if the genetic variation is associated with the risk of disease, that particular gene......Few risk factors have been established for the plasma cell disorder multiple myeloma, but some of these like African American ethnicity and a family history of B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases suggest a genetic component for the disease. Genetic variation represents the genetic basis of...

  9. Genetic control of hippocampal neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Pozniak, Christine D.; Pleasure, Samuel J.

    2006-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus is under complex genetic control. A recent comparative study of two inbred mouse strains using quantitative trait locus analysis has revealed that cell survival is most highly correlated with neurogenesis and identified candidate genes for further investigation.

  10. Brain imaging, genetics and emotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleman, Andre; Swart, Marte; van Rijn, Sophie

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews the published evidence on genetically driven variation in neurotransmitter function and brain circuits involved in emotion. Several studies point to a role of the serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism in amygdala activation during emotion perception. We also discuss other po

  11. USDA lettuce breeding and genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lettuce industry of California requires continued development of improved, adapted cultivars to meet new disease and insect problems, changes in the market, and changes in growing procedures. The USDA lettuce breeding and genetics project aims to incorporate valuable traits into crisphead, mixed...

  12. Genetic Technology and Food Security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossman, M.R.

    2014-01-01

    In the United States and globally, producers cultivate millions of hectares of genetically modified crops. In the United States, the USDA, EPA, and FDA govern authorization of GMOs under federal laws and agency regulations. Because food produced from GMOs is not considered materially different from

  13. Molecular Genetics of Mitochondrial Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lee-Jun C.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disorders (RCDs) are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases because of the fact that protein components of the RC are encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes and are essential in all cells. In addition, the biogenesis, structure, and function of mitochondria, including DNA…

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Majeed syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the skin, most often a condition known as Sweet syndrome. The symptoms of Sweet syndrome include fever and the development of painful bumps ... NORD): Osteomyelitis National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD): Sweet Syndrome GeneReviews (1 link) Majeed Syndrome Genetic Testing Registry ( ...

  15. Genetic analysis of rare disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Berg, Stéphanie M; von Bornemann Hjelmborg, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Twin concordance rates provide insight into the possibility of a genetic background for a disease. These concordance rates are usually estimated within a frequentistic framework. Here we take a Bayesian approach. For rare diseases, estimation methods based on asymptotic theory cannot be applied due...

  16. Ethical dilemmas in clinical genetics.

    OpenAIRE

    Young, I D

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a survey of medical and paramedical opinion relating to various difficult ethical issues in clinical genetics. These include the confidentiality of the doctor-patient relationship, prenatal diagnosis and termination, and Huntington's chorea. It is suggested that this method provides a useful means of assessing what is ethically acceptable in contemporary society.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: clopidogrel resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic polymorphisms in CYP2C9 and CYP2C19 on the pharmacokinetics of clinically used drugs. Drug Metab Pharmacokinet. 2013; ... races treated with clopidogrel: A systematic review and meta-analysis. J Huazhong Univ Sci Technolog Med Sci. 2015 ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by the combination of vision loss and hearing loss beginning early in life. Retinitis pigmentosa is also a feature of several other genetic syndromes, including Bardet-Biedl syndrome ; Refsum disease ; and neuropathy, ... for retinitis pigmentosa lead to a gradual loss of rods and cones in the retina. The ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Gorlin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Syndrome Life Support Network Gorlin Syndrome Group National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) GeneReviews (1 link) Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome Genetic Testing Registry (1 link) Gorlin syndrome Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (1 link) ...

  20. Genetic predisposition to Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling, Jónrit; Petersen, Maria Skaalum; Grandjean, Philippe;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the genetic variants of CYP2D6 and HFE are more frequent in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients compared with controls in a population where the prevalence of these variants and PD are increased. METHODS: Blood samples were collected from 79 PD patients and 154 con...

  1. What Is Genetic Ancestry Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of test because Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA test results, which represent only single ancestral lines, do ... relationships. On a larger scale, combined genetic ancestry test results from many people can be used ... promotes the use of DNA testing in genealogy. The American Society of Human ...

  2. Genetic determinants of eating disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slof-Op 't Landt, Margarita Cornelia Theodora

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, a series of studies on different aspects of the genetics of eating disorders is presented. The heritability of disordered eating behavior and attitudes in relation with body mass index (BMI) was evaluated in a large adolescent twin-family sample ascertained through the Netherlands Tw

  3. Radiation genetics. Status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Republic of Kazakhstan on the base of Republican Scientific and Research Center for Mother and Child Health Protection the comprehensive medical-genetical testing of rural population living in immediate proximity from Semipalatinsk test site is carried out. Besides of general medical-genetic characteristics of examined population the frequency and structure of congenital diseases of newborns from 1970 to 1995 were determined. 67.5 thousand parturitions outcomes in researched area and 21.5 thousand ones in control district (Akmola region) are studied. Both the frequency and the structure of chromosomal aberration of population living on contaminated by radionuclides territories is researched as well. Perspective trends in field of clinical radiation genetics are outlined, there are as follows: - application of early diagnostics and prophylaxis of radiation-induced pathology of both the stochastic and nonstochastic characters; - conducting of biologic dosimetry; - wide application of peri-conception prophylaxis of genetic disorders; - application of anti-mutagens and special food-stuffs making for both the reducing of the absorption and the accumulation of radionuclides in organism; - introduction of long-term programs of correction of developing pathologies caused by multifactorial influence of environment

  4. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chin, Jason W; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2015-02-03

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This Condition Kahler-Bozzolo disease Kahler disease Kahler's disease medullary plasmacytoma myelomatosis plasma cell dyscrasia plasma cell myelomas Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes named? Additional Information & ... and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Multiple myeloma Additional NIH ...

  6. Statistical methods in spatial genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guillot, Gilles; Leblois, Raphael; Coulon, Aurelie;

    2009-01-01

    to keep abreast with the latest methodological developments, we review the statistical toolbox available to analyse population genetic data in a spatially explicit framework. We mostly focus on statistical concepts but also discuss practical aspects of the analytical methods, highlighting not only...

  7. Genetic influences on political ideologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatemi, Peter K; Medland, Sarah E; Klemmensen, Robert;

    2014-01-01

    families and a 2010 Swedish sample involving 3,334 individuals from 2,607 families. No polymorphisms reached genome-wide significance in the meta-analysis. The combined evidence suggests that political ideology constitutes a fundamental aspect of one's genetically informed psychological disposition, but as...

  8. Genetic Predisposition to Retinoblastoma (Rb)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    Determination of 8 cytogenetic indicators in 14 cases of Rb,their 21 parents and 14 normal controls revealed various degrees ofchromosome instability and nondisjunction in the patients and their parents,indicating the presence of genetic neoplastic predisposition to neoplasm inRb patients.Eye Science 1993;9:149-152.

  9. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  10. Genetic susceptibility to environmental toxicants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    The toxicological challenges to the chemical industry have in recent years been greatly affected by the rapid innovation and development of analytical, molecular and genetic technologies. ECETOC recognises the importance of developing the technical and intellectual skill bases in academia and ind...

  11. Genetic epistemology and nataturalized epistemology

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, Pascal

    1998-01-01

    Jean Piaget's genetic epistemology is not a normative epistemology, and it aims at being a form of naturalized epistemology. I try to show that in spite of that, Piaget was well well aware of the normative aspects in epistemology and tried to account for them.

  12. Genetics of the dominant ataxias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Dineke S.; van de Warrenburg, Bart P. C.

    2011-01-01

    The relevant clinical, genetic, and cell biologic aspects of the dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are reviewed in this article. SCAs are diseases of the entire nervous system; in addition to cerebellar ataxia, the central (but not obligate) disease feature, many noncerebellar comp

  13. Statistical aspects of forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben

    This PhD thesis deals with statistical models intended for forensic genetics, which is the part of forensic medicine concerned with analysis of DNA evidence from criminal cases together with calculation of alleged paternity and affinity in family reunification cases. The main focus of the thesis...

  14. Imagining a Genetic Seed Bank

    OpenAIRE

    Cassarino, Stacie

    2012-01-01

    If “magical thinking,” to use her words, is essential to Suzanne Anker’s practice of integrating science and visual art, it is also indispensable to the viewer entering her recent exhibition, Genetic Seed Bank, at the Art | Sci Gallery in the California Nanosystems Institute at UCLA.

  15. Genetic susceptibility to Candida infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeekens, S.P.; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Kullberg, B.J.; Netea, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Candida spp. are medically important fungi causing severe mucosal and life-threatening invasive infections, especially in immunocompromised hosts. However, not all individuals at risk develop Candida infections, and it is believed that genetic variation plays an important role in host susceptibility

  16. Genetic Factors of Ophthalmic Importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Zane F.

    Reviewed are chromosomal anomalies affecting one's eyes. Brief descriptions are given of the genetic etiology of bilateral retinoblastoma (malignant tumors), aniridia (absence of the iris), cataracts, congenital glaucoma, Reginitis Pigmentosa (progressive deterioration of the visual cells), Choroidermia (degeneration of the vascular coat of the…

  17. Genetics problem solving and worldview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Esther

    The research goal was to determine whether worldview relates to traditional and real-world genetics problem solving. Traditionally, scientific literacy emphasized content knowledge alone because it was sufficient to solve traditional problems. The contemporary definition of scientific literacy is, "The knowledge and understanding of scientific concepts and processes required for personal decision-making, participation in civic and cultural affairs and economic productivity" (NRC, 1996). An expanded definition of scientific literacy is needed to solve socioscientific issues (SSI), complex social issues with conceptual, procedural, or technological associations with science. Teaching content knowledge alone assumes that students will find the scientific explanation of a phenomenon to be superior to a non-science explanation. Formal science and everyday ways of thinking about science are two different cultures (Palmer, 1999). Students address this rift with cognitive apartheid, the boxing away of science knowledge from other types of knowledge (Jedege & Aikenhead, 1999). By addressing worldview, cognitive apartheid may decrease and scientific literacy may increase. Introductory biology students at the University of Minnesota during fall semester 2005 completed a written questionnaire-including a genetics content-knowledge test, four genetic dilemmas, the Worldview Assessment Instrument (WAI) and some items about demographics and religiosity. Six students responded to the interview protocol. Based on statistical analysis and interview data, this study concluded the following: (1) Worldview, in the form of metaphysics, relates to solving traditional genetic dilemmas. (2) Worldview, in the form of agency, relates to solving traditional genetics problems. (3) Thus, worldview must be addressed in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the sides of the upper legs and calves. Veins deep in the limbs can also be ... prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome is estimated ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... those of people with a genetic condition called Marfan syndrome . For example, they may have long, slender ... has signs and symptoms similar to those of Marfan syndrome and another genetic condition called Loeys-Dietz ...

  20. What Are the Types of Genetic Tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detailed information about newborn screening. For information about forensic DNA testing, refer to the fact sheet about forensic ... Centre for Genetics Education and a page about forensic DNA analysis from the Genetic Science Learning Center at ...