WorldWideScience

Sample records for carcinogenic agents uv

  1. Environmental carcinogenic agents and cancer prevention. Risk assessment and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many agents in our environment have been established as being carcinogenic, and in most cases, the carcinogenic properties of these agents were identified because of high-dose occupational or accidental exposure. Risk characterization, taking into account the dose-response relationship, and exposure assessment are essential for risk assessment and subsequent cancer prevention. Based on scientific risk assessment, risk management should be conducted practically by considering the economic, social, political, and other technical issues and by balancing the risks and benefits. Asbestos and environmental tobacco smoke are typical examples of established carcinogenic agents in the general environment, contributing to low-dose exposure. Further epidemiological studies are required to investigate the carcinogenicity of low-dose exposure to known carcinogenic agents such as arsenic and cadmium through dietary intake, radiation via medical and natural exposure, and air pollution due to diesel exhaust. In contrast, occupational chemical exposure to 1,2-dichloropropane and/or dichloromethane, whose carcinogenicity had not been established, was suggested to cause cholangiocarcinoma among workers involved in offset color proof-printing only after a rare situation of high-dose exposure was unveiled. Continuous monitoring of unusual cancer occurrences in target populations such as workers in occupational and regional settings as well as exposure reduction to suspected carcinogenic agents to levels as low as reasonably achievable is essential for reducing the risk of cancer due to environmental carcinogens. (author)

  2. Mechanisms of cellular transformation by carcinogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 14 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: DNA Modification by Chemical Carcinogens; Role of DNA Lesions and Repair in the Transformation of Human Cells; The Induction and Regulation of Radiogenic Transformation In Vitro: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms; Cellular Transformation by Adenoviruses; and The fos Gene

  3. Mechanisms of cellular transformation by carcinogenic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunberger, D.; Goff, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 14 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: DNA Modification by Chemical Carcinogens; Role of DNA Lesions and Repair in the Transformation of Human Cells; The Induction and Regulation of Radiogenic Transformation In Vitro: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms; Cellular Transformation by Adenoviruses; and The fos Gene.

  4. Enhanced replication of UV-damaged Simian virus 40 DNA in carcinogen-treated mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The replication of UV-damaged Simian virus 40 (SV40) in carcinogen-treated monkey cells has been studied to elucidate the mechanism of carcinogen-enhanced reactivation. Carcinogen enhanced reactivation is the observed increase in UV-irradiated virus survival in host cells treated with low doses of carcinogen compared to UV-irradiated virus survival in untreated hosts. Carcinogen treatment of monkey kidney cells with either N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene (AAAF) or UV radiation leads to an enhanced capacity to replicate UV-damaged virus during the first round of infection. To further define the mechanism leading to enhanced replication, a detailed biochemical analysis of replication intermediates in carcinogen-treated cells was performed. Several conclusions can be drawn. First enhanced replication can be observed in the first four rounds of replication after UV irradiation of viral templates. The second major finding is that the relaxed circular intermediate model proposed for the replication of UV-damaged templates in untreated cells appears valid for replication of UV-damaged templates in carcinogen-treated cells. Possible mechanisms and the supporting evidence are discussed and future experiments outlined

  5. DNA repair in mammalian cells exposed to combinations of carcinogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells defective in one or more aspects of repair are killed and often mutagenized more readily than normal cells by DNA damaging agents, and humans whose cells are deficient in repair are at an increased carcinogenic risk compared to normal individuals. The excision repair of uv induced pyrimidine dimers is a well studied system, but the details of the steps in this repair system are far from being understood in human cells. We know that there are a number of chemicals that mimic uv in that normal human cells repair DNA damage from both these agents and from uv by a long patch excision repair system, and that xeroderma pigmentosum cells defective in repair of uv are also defective in the repair of damage from these chemicals. The chemicals we have investigated are AAAF, 4-NQO, DMBA-epoxide, and ICR-170. We describe experiments, using several techniques, in which DNA excision repair is measured after treatment of various human cell strains with combinations of uv and these agents. If two agents have a common rate limiting step then, at doses high enough to saturate the repair system, one would expect the observed repair after a treatment with a combination of agents to be equal to that from one agent alone. Such is not the case for normal human or excision-deficient XP cells. In the former repair is additive and in the latter repair is usually appreciably less than that observed with either agent alone. Models that attempt to explain these surprising results involve complexes of enzymes and cofactors

  6. Carcinogenic effect of sequential artificial sunlight and UV-A irradiation in hairless mice. Consequences for solarium 'therapy'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carcinogenic effect of artificial UV sunlight followed by UV-A irradiation in human solaria doses has been studied with the use of the hairless mouse as an animal model. Artificial sunlight exposure alone induced only a moderate skin tumor incidence (animals with at least one tumor) of 0.15 after one year, and UV-A irradiation alone induced no tumor formation. However, the combination of artificial sunlight exposure and subsequent UV-A irradiation significantly increased the tumor incidence to 0.72. We conclude that, in humans, tanning with UV-A for cosmetic purposes may not be an innocuous procedure

  7. Carcinogenic effect of sequential artificial sunlight and UV-A irradiation in hairless mice. Consequences for solarium 'therapy'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staberg, B; Wulf, H C; Poulsen, T; Klemp, P; Brodthagen, H

    1983-08-01

    The carcinogenic effect of artificial UV sunlight followed by UV-A irradiation in human solaria doses has been studied with the use of the hairless mouse as an animal model. Artificial sunlight exposure alone induced only a moderate skin tumor incidence (animals with at least one tumor) of 0.15 after one year, and UV-A irradiation alone induced no tumor formation. However, the combination of artificial sunlight exposure and subsequent UV-A irradiation significantly increased the tumor incidence to 0.72. We conclude that, in humans, tanning with UV-A for cosmetic purposes may not be an innocuous procedure. PMID:6870317

  8. Screening tests for determination of cytotoxic agent, mutagens and carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegelberg, T.; Koerdel, W.; Goertz, T.; Thriemer, A.

    1983-01-01

    It is supposed that chemical substances are the primary factors responsible for the development of tumors and genetic damages. From this results the urgend demand to examine at least the frequently applied and suspicious substances on possibly health-affecting effects. The performance of these examinations with experimental animals requires a lot of time and financial support and has increasingly been criticised in public with regard to protection of animals. Experience gained in the U.S.A. revealed that the carcinogenicity test of one single substance performed with animal experiments takes approximately 3 years and costs about 300,000 Dollars. Therefore the application of cell cultures for such examinations and tests has been postulated and discussed for several years. Cell cultures require only little space and generally the observed effects develop after only a short time. Objectification and statistical assessment (due to high cell amounts per test) can be performed without any problems.

  9. Chemical carcinogenic and mutagenic agents in the workplace, Poland, 2008–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Konieczko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this paper is to present a concise but comprehensive information on the occurrence of carcinogenic or mutagenic agents in Polish enterprises and the number of workers exposed to those agents reported to the central register by employers. Objectives and responsibilities of the register, as well as the range and methods of data gathering are discussed. Material and Methods: Data concerning carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances and technological processes reported to central register in 2008-2010 were analyzed. Results: In 2008-2010 more than 300 carcinogenic or mutagenic chemical substances were reported to the register. Approximately 2500 plants reported above 150 000 per-person-exposures annually. Among all technological processes regarded as occupational carcinogens, hardwood dusts exposure (about 660 companies; 11 000-13 000 exposed workers each year and exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs present in coal products (117-125 plantsl 3000 exposed per year were reported. Conclusions: The most widespread carcinogenic/mutagenic substances were: benzene, chromium(VI compounds: potassium dichromate and chromate, chromium(VI trioxide and other chromium compounds, ethylene oxide, asbestos, benzo[a]pyrene and gasoline. The highest number of men was exposed to particular PAHs and benzene , and the majority of women was exposed to benzene, potassium dichromate and chromate, acrylamide, ethylene oxide and gasoline. The lack of clear-cut definitione of occupational exposure to carcinogen creates a problem faced by employers in defining the accurate number of exposed workers. Med Pr 2013;64(2:181–192

  10. Occupational UV exposure of environmental agents in Valencia, Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Serrano Jareño, María Antonia; Cañada, Javier; Moreno Esteve, Juan Carlos; Gurrea Ysasi, Gonzalo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to measure UV exposure of environmental agents in their occupational schedules in summer in Valencia province (Spain) using VioSpor personal dosimeters attached to several parts of their bodies. Due to its geographical situation, Valencia receives large UVR doses throughout the year, and the work of environmental agents is directly related to the protection, care, and custody of natural, often in mountainous areas. Comparison with the occupational UV exposure limit sh...

  11. Matrix of occupational exposures to carcinogenic agents and pesticides in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European data system CAREX converts national numbers of workers in 55 sectors and estimated proportions of workers exposed to carcinogenic agents into numbers of workers exposed to each agent. CAREX is applied and modified in Costa Rica (TICAREX) for the first time outside Europe. 27 carcinogenic agents and 7 groups of pesticides were included. Numbers of exposed were estimated separately for men and women. The most frequent agents in the 1.3 million labor force of Costa Rica were solar radiation (333,000 workers); diesel engine emissions (278,000); paraquat and diquat (175,000); environmental tobacco smoke (71,000); chromium (VI) compounds (55,000); benzene (52,000); mancozeb, maneb and zineb (49,000); chlorothalonil (38,000); wood dust (32,000); silica dust (27,000); benomyl (19,000); lead and its inorganic compounds (19,000); tetrachloroethylene (18,000); and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (17,000). Owing to the different occupational distribution between the genders, formaldehyde, radon and methylene chloride were more frequent than pesticides, chromium (VI), wood dust, and silica dust in women. Agriculture, construction, personal and domestic services, land and water transport and allied services, pottery and similar industries, manufacture of wood products, mining, forestry, fishing, manufacture of electric products, and bars and restaurants were sectors with frequent exposures. Substantial reduction of occupational and environmental exposures to these agents would improve considerably public and occupational health. Reduction of occupational exposures is usually also followed by improvement of environmental quality. Monitoring of exposures and health of workers and the general public is essential in the control of environmental contamination and human exposures. This report presents details of the exposures matrix, which is the basis of TICAREX. (author)

  12. Detection and impact on cancer causation of persons exhibiting abnormal susceptibility to carcinogenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The so-called 'late biological effects', like cancer and genetic consequences and cytotoxic effects (cell killing, at higher doses), were once thought to be an inevitable consequence of a given level of exposure, whether to background radiation, to chemicals in our biosphere, or form spontaneous damage, the 'wear and tear' of living. The measurement of exposure, which results in living organisms in the formation of a related amount of DNA damage, became a surrogate for the end-effects that constitute risk. This may not be entirely appropriate. The concept of 'equal exposure -- equal risk' assumes a homogeneous response of individuals. However, there are subgroups within the human population of persons whose cultured cells exhibit abnormal sensitivity to specific carcinogenic agents and who may be at increased risk of cancer induced by these of similar agents. Modern molecular biology has shown that the majority of the damage in DNA is repaired by enzymatic DNA repair processes that restitute or ameliorate the lesions and restore normal DNA structure and function. In this view, it is not the initial damage that is of consequence but rather the residual damage left after the repair processes have acted. Since the vast majority of the initial DNA damage undergoes repair normally, variation in the efficiency of these processes in different persons may affect the actual risk of exposure. The human side of the cancer causation formula, that is, considerable importance. To understand how human DNA repair processes function, our laboratories at Chalk River have studied 'mutant' human cell strains in tissue culture. Generally, these DNA repair-defective cell strains are derived from individual donors with heritable disorders that are associated with carcinogen-hypersensitivity and cancer-proneness. Such studies, together with related epidemiological research, have highlighted the importance of this new 'human' factor in carcinogenesis

  13. Carcinogenic effect of sequential artificial sunlight and UV-A irradiation in hairless mice. Consequences for solarium 'therapy'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staberg, B.; Wulf, H.C.; Poulsen, T.; Klemp, P.; Brodthagen, H.

    1983-08-01

    The carcinogenic effect of artificial UV sunlight followed by UV-A irradiation in human solaria doses has been studied with the use of the hairless mouse as an animal model. Artificial sunlight exposure alone induced only a moderate skin tumor incidence (animals with at least one tumor) of 0.15 after one year, and UV-A irradiation alone induced no tumor formation. However, the combination of artificial sunlight exposure and subsequent UV-A irradiation significantly increased the tumor incidence to 0.72. We conclude that, in humans, tanning with UV-A for cosmetic purposes may not be an innocuous procedure.

  14. Exposure of Finnish population to solar UV radiation and consequent carcinogenic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huurto, L.; Jansen, C. [Turku Univ. Hospital, Turku (Finland); Jokela, K. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Depletion of stratospheric ozone increases irradiance of terrestrial ultraviolet (UV) radiation at short wavelengths, which may be harmful to the human health. To understand quantitatively the risks caused by increasing UV radiation to the Finnish population, the actual UV exposure of the population has to be assessed. It was shown that the snow reflection increases the UV exposure to the face and eyes particularly in the northern Finland. In 1993 exceptionally low ozone levels persisted up to the end of May, which resulted in a theoretical increase in the annual UV dose ranging from 8 % to 13 % in Finland. The maximal increase in the measured erythemally effective dose rate was 34 % on 23 April, when compared with the theoretical normal value. During this study exposure models have been developed. The models have been combined them with Green`s radiation transfer model to estimate annual facial UV doses received by different groups of Finnish population. Also, an updated estimate for increase in skin cancer incidence due to the ozone depletion is presented. It is estimated that the maximal increase in UV doses caused by the depletion of the stratospheric ozone will be 12 % in the first years of the next century in Finland. This may result in increase in skin carcinomas by 20-30 % if the people do not improve their protection against solar UV radiation. At the moment the annual facial UV dose of the Finnish indoor worker varies from 3 % to 6 % of the annual ambient dose. In the worst case an outdoor worker may receive even 16% of the annual ambient dose. However, the doses received by indoor workers during vacation to an untanned skin may be more harmful due to the increased risk of malignant melanoma.

  15. Immunological detection and quantification of DNA components structurally modified by alkylating carcinogens, mutagens and chemotherapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detection and quantification of defined reaction products of chemical mutagens and carcinogens (and of many cancer chemotherapeutic agents) with DNA require highly sensitive analytical techniques. The exceptional capability of immunoglobulins to recognize subtle alterations of molecular structure (especially when monoclonal antibodies are used to maximize specificity), outstanding sensitivity of immunoanalysis by high-affinity antibodies, and the fact that radioactively-labelled agents are not required suggest the utility of a radioimmunoassay to recognize and quantitate alkylated DNA products. We have recently developed a set of high-affinity monoclonal antibodies (secreted by mouse x mouse as well as by rat x rat hybridomas; antibody affinity constants, 109 to > 1010 lmol) specifically directed against several DNA alkylation products with possible relevance in relation to both mutagenesis and malignant transformation of mammalian cells. These alkylation products include 06-N-butyldeoxyguanosine, and 04-ethyldeoxythymidine. When used in a radioimmunassay, an antibody specific for 06-ethyldeoxyguanosine, for example, will detect this product at an 06-ethyldeoxyguanosine/deoxyguanosine molar ratio of approx. 3 x 10-7 in a hydrolysate of 100 ug of DNA. The limit of detection can be lowered further if the respective alkyldeoxynucleosides are separated by HPLC from the DNA hydrolysate prior to the RIA. The anti-alkyldeoxynucleoside monoclonal antibodies can also be used to visualize, by immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy combined with electronic image intensification, specific alkylation products in the nuclear DNA of individual cells, and to localize structurally modified bases in double-stranded DNA molecules by transmission electron microscopy

  16. Immunosuppressive and carcinogenic effect of UV light; Apoptosis and lysis of mouse spleen cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmful effects of UV light involves cell killing, mutagenesis and neoplastic transformation of exposed cells. The effect of UV light depends on the wavelength, dose irradiation, type of exposed cells, endogeny substance, experimental condition that can increase or decrease sensibility of the cells on the UV light. The loss of viability is the end point of cellular dysfunction, however, UV irradiation may affect cells function before it is perish. We examined the killing modes of cell death, necrosis or apoptosis, depending on the way of the cellular elements involved in process. Necrosis is a pothologic response involving a dramatic increase in cell volume that ultimately leads to cell lysis, usually caused by damaging of cell membrane. Apoptosis or genetically programmed cell death is result of complex cell mechanisms. Mouse spleen cells were diluted to 8.5·106/mL in Hanks' solution. Cells spread in thin layers (2mm) in glass Petri dishes were exposed to the different doses of UVC light. After irradiation and staining with fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and propidium iodide (PI) solution, the viable cells, as well as apoptosis were observed under fluorescent microscope. Immediately after UV irradiation the number of viable cell rapidly decreased. Lower doses of UVC light caused apoptosis as well as necrosis of exposed cells. Around 10% of spleen cells commit suicide after UVC exposure. There was significantly higher percentage of apoptotic cell than in control non irradiated sample. The highest fluence (1280J/m2) of UVC light, lysed considerable number of lymphocytes, around 80%. Small fraction (15%) of cells survived used UVC light. Noticed resistance of spleen cells is not completely clear, but results suggest that it due to the present of mature lymphocytes, which could not proliferate, and are less sensitive to UV light. In spite of this our results confirm that UVC light is capable to cause DNA damage, apoptosis and necrosis of mouse spleen cells. (author)

  17. Fire fighting trainers' exposure to carcinogenic agents in smoke diving simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Juha; Mäkelä, Mauri; Mikkola, Jouni; Huttu, Ismo

    2010-01-15

    It is well known that fire fighters are potentially exposed to various carcinogenic agents at a fire scene. An almost unheeded issue, however, is fire fighters' exposure to carcinogenic agents in smoke diving simulators. Biomonitoring (urinary muconic acid, 1-naphthol and 1-pyrenol), dermal (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and occupational hygiene measurements (cyanides, hydrogen cyanide, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds and formaldehyde) were used to determine how the burning material, the type of simulator and protective clothing used affect fire fighting trainers' exposure. The highest excretion of 1-pyrenol (sampled 6h after end of exposure, in average 4.3-9.2nmol/L) and emissions of benzene (1.0-2.5mg/m(3)) and hydrogen cyanide (0.2-0.9mg/m(3)) were measured during the burning of conifer plywood and chipboard, and the lowest when pure pine and spruce wood (1.5nmol/L, 0.6mg/m(3), and 0.05mg/m(3)) was burned. However the safest burning material seemed to be propane (1.0nmol/L, 0.2mg/m(3), and not measured). The type of simulator used affected trainers' exposure very clearly. The highest dermal whole body exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in the fire house simulator (in average 1200ng/cm(2)). Clearly lower exposure levels were measured in container training sessions (760ng/cm(2)), where the average dermal exposure level was 35% lower than in the fire house. The exposure levels (30ng/cm(2)) in the gas simulator in turn, were only 4% of the levels in container training sessions. The amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons decreased by 80% on trainers' hands when they used under gloves (in average 8.7ng/cm(2)) compared to those (48.4ng/cm(2)) who did not. There was not difference in protection efficiency against polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons between tested fire suits (Brage and Bristol). PMID:19576276

  18. Sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and mutation induction by UV light in UV-sensitive CHO cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three UV-sensitive (UVs) mutants isolated from a CHO cell line were analyzed for survival after exposure to H2O2, EMS, MMC, CCNU, X-rays and for mutation induction after UV-irradiation. The UVs mutants showed normal sensitivities to EMS and H2O2, whereas they were hypersensitive to the bifunctional alkylating agents MMC and CCNU and to hypoxic X-irradiation. Compared to parental cells, one of the UV-sensitive clones showed approximately 3- and 7-fold enhancement in the mutagenic response per unit UV dose for 6-thioguanine and ouabain resistance, respectively. (Auth.)

  19. An investigation of carcinogenic agents at the Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes a study with the following results: 1. Three of the metals reported as carcinogens, arsenic, chromium, and nickel, were found within the...

  20. The Carcinogenic Agent Azoxymethane (AOM) Enhances Early Inflammation-induced Colon Crypt Pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venning, Freja Albjerg; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Kissow, Hannelouise

    2013-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice transplanted with CD4+ T cells depleted of CD25+ regulatory T cells develop colitis within 2-3 weeks after the T cell transfer. In the present study we studied the effect of the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM) on the colon crypt pathology of normal SCID...... mice and SCID mice with transfer colitis. AOM by itself did result in neither weight loss nor inflammation although treatment affected crypt widths and numbers. Although AOM together with T cell transfer did not increase the level of gut inflammation including COX-2 expression, AOM increased crypt...

  1. Ferns and lycopods--a potential treasury of anticancer agents but also a carcinogenic hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomšík, Pavel

    2014-06-01

    Many species of seedless vascular plants-ferns and lycopods-have been used as food and folk medicine since ancient times. Some of them have become the focus of intensive research concerning their anticancer properties. Studies on the anticancer effect of crude extracts are being increasingly replaced by bioactivity-guided fractionation, as well as detailed assessment of the mechanism of action. Numerous compounds-especially flavonoids such as amentoflavone and protoapigenone, and also simpler phenolic compounds, steroids, alkaloids and terpenoids-were isolated and found to be cytotoxic, particularly pro-apoptotic, or to induce cell cycle arrest in cancer cell lines in vitro. In in vivo experiments, some fern-derived compounds inhibited tumour growth with little toxicity. On the other hand, many ferns-not only the well-known Bracken (Pteridium)-may pose a significant hazard to human health due to the fact that they contain carcinogenic sesquiterpenoids and their analogues. The objective of this review is to summarise the recent state of research on the anticancer properties of ferns and lycopods, with a focus on their characteristic bioactive constituents. The carcinogenic hazard posed by ferns is also mentioned. PMID:24123573

  2. Carcinogenicity study of the emulsifier TOSOM and the release agent TOS in Wistar rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Otto A.; KRISTIANSEN, E.; GRY, J.; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard; OLSEN, P.; THORUP, I.

    1993-01-01

    Groups of 60 Wistar rats of each sex were fed diets containing 3, 6 or 12% of the margarine emulsifier TOSOM (thermally oxidized soybean oil interacted with mono- and diglycerides of fatty acids) for 2.5 yr. In addition, three groups of 60 rats of each sex were fed two products of the release agent...... TOS (thermally oxidized soybean oil) in dietary levels of 1.2% TOS(G) (TOS from Grindsted Product A/S, Denmark) and 0.3 and 1.2% TOS(N) (TOS from Nexus Aps, Denmark), respectively for 2.5 yr. 120 rats of each sex fed a diet containing mono- and diglycerides served as controls. The diets given to all...

  3. 32P-Postlabeling test for covalent DNA binding of chemicals in vivo: Application to a variety of aromatic carcinogens and methylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcinogen--DNA adducts were detected and determined by 32P-postlabeling assay after exposure of mouse or rat tissues in vivo to a total of 28 compounds comprising 7 arylamines and derivatives, 3 azo compounds, 2 nitroaromatics, 12 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and 4 methylating agents. DNA was isolated from mouse skin, mouse liver, and rat liver after treatment with the individual carcinogens, then digested enzymatically to deoxyribonucleoside 3'-monophosphates, which were converted to 5'-32P-labeled deoxyribonucleoside 3',5'-bisphosphates by T4 polynucleotide kinase-catalyzed [32P]phosphate transfer from [gamma-32P]ATP. The nucleotides were resolved by anion-exchange t.l.c. on polyethyleneimine-cellulose and detected by autoradiography. The determination of low levels of DNA binding of the aromatic carcinogens entailed the removal of normal nucleotides prior to the resolution of adduct nucleotides. For this purpose, an alternative procedure employing reversed-phase t.l.c. was devised which offered advantages for the detection of quantitatively minor adducts. The procedures described enabled the detection of 1 aromatic DNA adduct in approximately 10(8) normal nucleotides, while the limit of detection of methylated adducts was 1 adduct in approximately 6 X 10(5) nucleotides. The results show that a great number of carcinogen-DNA adducts of diverse structure are substrates for 32P-labeling by polynucleotide kinase-catalyzed phosphorylation. Because covalent DNA adduct formation in vivo appears to be an essential property of the majority of chemical carcinogens, 32P-postlabeling analysis of carcinogen--DNA adducts in mammalian tissues may serve as a test for the screening of chemicals for potential carcinogenicity

  4. Direct spectral analysis and determination of high content of carcinogenic bromine in bread using UV pulsed laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehder, A O; Gondal, Mohammed A; Dastageer, Mohamed A; Habibullah, Yusuf B; Iqbal, Mohammed A; Oloore, Luqman E; Gondal, Bilal

    2016-06-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied for the detection of carcinogenic elements like bromine in four representative brands of loaf bread samples and the measured bromine concentrations were 352, 157, 451, and 311 ppm, using Br I (827.2 nm) atomic transition line as the finger print atomic transition. Our LIBS system is equipped with a pulsed laser of wavelength 266 nm with energy 25 mJ pulse(-1), 8 ns pulse duration, 20 Hz repetition rate, and a gated ICCD camera. The LIBS system was calibrated with the standards of known concentrations in the sample (bread) matrix and such plot is linear in 20-500 ppm range. The capability of our system in terms of limit of detection and relative accuracy with respect to the standard inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) technique was evaluated and these values were 5.09 ppm and 0.01-0.05, respectively, which ensures the applicability of our system for Br trace level detection, and LIBS results are in excellent agreement with that of ICPMS results. PMID:26950676

  5. UV-generated free radicals (FR) in skin: Their prevention by sunscreens and their induction by self-tanning agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, K.; Seifert, M.; Herrling, Th.; Fuchs, J.

    2008-05-01

    In the past few years, the cellular effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induced in skin have become increasingly recognized. Indeed, it is now well known that UV irradiation induces structural and cellular changes in all the compartments of skin tissue. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is the first and immediate consequence of UV exposure and therefore the quantitative determination of free radical reactions in the skin during UV radiation is of primary importance for the understanding of dermatological photodamage. The RSF method (radical sun protection factor) herein presented, based on electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR), enables the measurement of free radical reactions in skin biopsies directly during UV radiation. The amount of free radicals varies with UV doses and can be standardized by varying UV irradiance or exposure time. The RSF method allows the determination of the protective effect of UV filters and sunscreens as well as the radical induction capacity of self-tanning agents as dihydroxyacetone (DHA). The reaction of the reducing sugars used in self-tanning products and amino acids in the skin layer (Maillard reaction) leads to the formation of Amadori products that generate free radicals during UV irradiation. Using the RSF method three different self-tanning agents were analyzed and it was found, that in DHA-treated skin more than 180% additional radicals were generated during sun exposure with respect to untreated skin. For this reason the exposure duration in the sun must be shortened when self-tanners are used and photoaging processes are accelerated.

  6. Acrylamide, an in vivo thyroid carcinogenic agent, induces DNA damage in rat thyroid cell lines and primary cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chico Galdo, V; Massart, C; Jin, L; Vanvooren, V; Caillet-Fauquet, P; Andry, G; Lothaire, P; Dequanter, D; Friedman, M; Van Sande, J

    2006-09-26

    Chronic treatment of rats with acrylamide induces various tumors among which thyroid tumors are the most frequent. The aim of the present study was to develop an in vitro model of acrylamide action on thyroid cells to allow the investigation of the mechanism of this tumorigenic action. The first part of the study considered as targets, characteristics of thyroid metabolism, which could explain the thyroid specificity of acrylamide action: the cAMP mitogenic effect and the important H2O2 generation by thyroid cells. However, acrylamide did not modulate H2O2 or cAMP generation in the thyroid cell models studied. No effect on thyroid cell proliferation was observed in the rat thyroid cell line FRTL5. On the other hand, as shown by the comet assay, acrylamide induced DNA damage, as the positive control H2O2 in the PC Cl3 and FRTL5 rat thyroid cell lines, as well as in thyroid cell primary cultures. The absence of effect of acrylamide on H2AX histone phosphorylation suggests that this effect does not reflect the induction of DNA double strand breaks. DNA damage leads to the generation of mutations. It is proposed that such mutations could play a role in the carcinogenic effect of acrylamide. The mechanism of this effect can now be studied in this in vitro model. PMID:16859826

  7. Chemopreventive Effects of the p53-Modulating Agents CP-31398 and Prima-1 in Tobacco Carcinogen-Induced Lung Tumorigenesis in A/J Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinthalapally V. Rao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Expression of the p53 tumor suppressor protein is frequently altered in tobacco-associated lung cancers. We studied chemopreventive effects of p53-modulating agents, namely, CP-31398 and Prima-1, on 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK-induced lung adenoma and adenocarcinoma formation in female A/J mice. Seven-week-old mice were treated with a single dose of NNK (10 µmol/mouse by intraperitoneal injection and, 3 weeks later, were randomized to mice fed a control diet or experimental diets containing 50 or 100 ppm CP-31398 or 150 or 300 ppm Prima-1 for either 17 weeks (10 mice/group or 34 weeks (15 mice/group to assess the efficacy against lung adenoma and adenocarcinoma. Dietary feeding of 50 or 100 ppm CP-31398 significantly suppressed (P < .0001 lung adenocarcinoma by 64% and 73%, respectively, after 17 weeks and by 47% and 56%, respectively, after 34 weeks. Similarly, 150 or 300 ppm Prima-1 significantly suppressed (P < .0001 lung adenocarcinoma formation by 56% and 62%, respectively, after 17 weeks and 39% and 56%, respectively, after 34 weeks. Importantly, these results suggest that both p53 modulators cause a delay in the progression of adenoma to adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical analysis of lung tumors from mice exposed to p53-modulating agents showed a significantly reduced tumor cell proliferation and increased accumulation of wild-type p53 in the nucleus. An increase in p21- and apoptotic-positive cells was also observed in lung tumors of mice exposed to p53-modulating agents. These results support a chemopreventive role of p53-modulating agents in tobacco carcinogen-induced lung adenocarcinoma formation.

  8. Mutational interactions between near-UV radiation and DNA damaging agents in Escherichia coli: the role of near-UV-induced modifications in growth and macromolecular synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutational interactions between near-ultraviolet (334 nm, 365 nm) radiation and DNA damaging agents (far-UV (254 nm) and ethyl-methanesulphonate (EMS)) were studied in strains of Escherichia coli B/r trp thy with different susceptibilities to near-UV-induced growth delay (wild-type, rel and sr). Far-UV induced reversion to tryptophan independence is reduced while forward mutation to streptomycin is enhanced by prior exposure of the rel+ srd+ strains to near-UV radiation. The observed interactions are reduced (rel) or absent (srd) in the two mutant strains as are the corresponding growth and macromolecular synthesis delays normally observed after near-UV treatment. Quantitatively, the degree of interaction induced by near-UV pre-treatment correlates closely with the degree of protein synthesis inhibition. A mechanism is proposed for the contrasting interactions at the two genetic loci based on the different pathways by which pre-mutagenic lesions may be processed. The primary chromophore for the mutational interactions would appear to be 4-thiouracil-containing transfer RNA. (author)

  9. Multiple functional UV devices based on III-Nitride quantum wells for biological warfare agent detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin; Savage, Susan; Persson, Sirpa; Noharet, Bertrand; Junique, Stéphane; Andersson, Jan Y.; Liuolia, Vytautas; Marcinkevicius, Saulius

    2009-02-01

    We have demonstrated surface normal detecting/filtering/emitting multiple functional ultraviolet (UV) optoelectronic devices based on InGaN/GaN, InGaN/AlGaN and AlxGa1-xN/AlyGa1-yN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures with operation wavelengths ranging from 270 nm to 450 nm. Utilizing MQW structure as device active layer offers a flexibility to tune its long cut-off wavelength in a wide UV range from solar-blind to visible by adjusting the well width, well composition and barrier height. Similarly, its short cut-off wavelength can be adjusted by using a GaN or AlGaN block layer on a sapphire substrate when the device is illuminated from its backside, which further provides an optical filtering effect. When a current injects into the device under forward bias the device acts as an UV light emitter, whereas the device performs as a typical photodetector under reverse biases. With applying an alternating external bias the device might be used as electroabsorption modulator due to quantum confined Stark effect. In present work fabricated devices have been characterized by transmission/absorption spectra, photoresponsivity, electroluminescence, and photoluminescence measurements under various forward and reverse biases. The piezoelectric effect, alloy broadening and Stokes shift between the emission and absorption spectra in different InGaN- and AlGaN-based QW structures have been investigated and compared. Possibilities of monolithic or hybrid integration using such multiple functional devices for biological warfare agents sensing application have also be discussed.

  10. Investigating the stability of gadolinium based contrast agents towards UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birka, Marvin; Roscher, Jörg; Holtkamp, Michael; Sperling, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2016-03-15

    Since the 1980s, the broad application of gadolinium(Gd)-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has led to significantly increased concentrations of Gd in the aqueous environment. Little is known about the stability of these highly polar xenobiotics under environmental conditions, in wastewater and in drinking water treatment. Therefore, the stability of frequently applied Gd-based MRI contrast agents towards UV radiation was investigated. The hyphenation of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and of HILIC with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) provided quantitative elemental information as well as structural information. The contrast agents Gd-DTPA, Gd-DOTA and Gd-BT-DO3A showed a high stability in irradiation experiments applying a wavelength range from 220 nm to 500 nm. Nevertheless, the degradation of Gd-BOPTA as well as the formation of Gd-containing transformation products was observed by means of HILIC-ICP-MS. Matrix-dependent irradiation experiments showed a degradation of Gd-BOPTA down to 3% of the initial amount in purified water after 300 min, whereas the degradation was slowed down in drinking water and surface water. Furthermore, it was observed that the sum of species continuously decreased with proceeding irradiation in all matrices. After irradiation in purified water for 300 min only 16% of the sum of species was left. This indicates a release of Gd(III) ions from the complex in course of irradiation. HILIC-ESI-MS measurements revealed that the transformation products mostly resulted from O-dealkylation and N-dealkylation reactions. In good correlation with retention times, the majority of transformation products were found to be more polar than Gd-BOPTA itself. Based on accurate masses, sum formulas were obtained and structures could be proposed. PMID:26802476

  11. Comparison of UV irradiation and p-fluorphenylaline as selective agents for production of aromatic compounds in plant cell culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resistance to UV irradiation, and to the toxicity of p-fluorophenylalanine, can both be mediateted in plants by enhanced synthesis of aromatic compounds. These selective agents were applied to cell cultures of Nicotiana tabacum, Anchusa officinalis and Catharanthus roseur, and the production of aromatic metabolites in the resulting resistant lines of each species was compared. While Nicotiana and Anchusa cultures responded to each selective agent ith an enhanced accumulation of aromatic compounds, the Catharanthus cultures acquired resistance through other, unknown, mechanisms. Some degree of cross-resistance was observed between cultures selected individually for resistance to each agent (author). 26 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  12. Acrylamide carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaunig, James E

    2008-08-13

    The induction of cancer by chemicals is a multiple-stage process. Acrylamide is carcinogenic to experimental mice and rats, causing tumors at multiple organ sites in both species when given in drinking water or by other means. In mice, acrylamide increased the incidence and multiplicity of lung tumors and skin tumors. In two bioassays in rats, acrylamide administered in drinking water consistently induced mesotheliomas of the testes, thyroid tumors, and mammary gland tumors. In addition, brain tumors appeared to be increased. In one of the rat bioassays, pituitary tumors, pheochromocytomas, uterine tumors, and pituitary tumors were noted. The conversion of acrylamide metabolically to the reactive, mutagenic, and genotoxic product, glycidamide, can occur in both rodent and humans. Glycidamide and frequently acrylamide have been positive for mutagenicity and DNA reactivity in a number of in vitro and in vivo assays. The effects of chronic exposure of glycidamide to rodents have not been reported. Epidemiologic studies of workers for possible health effects from exposures to acrylamide have not shown a consistent increase in cancer risk. Although an increase in the risk for pancreatic cancer (almost double) was seen in highly exposed workers, no exposure response relationship could be determined. The mode of action remains unclear for acrylamide-induced rodent carcinogenicity, but support for a genotoxic mechanism based on in vitro and in vivo DNA reactivity assays cannot be ruled out. In addition, the pattern of tumor formation in the rat following chronic exposure supports a genotoxic mode of action but also suggests a potential role of endocrine modification. PMID:18624430

  13. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Wanibuchi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P450 inducers, such as phenobarbital, a-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate.

  14. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakehashi, Anna; Wei, Min [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-Ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan); Fukushima, Shoji [Japan Bioassay Research Center, Japan Industrial Safety and Health Association, 2445 Hirasawa, Hadano, Kanagawa 257-0015 (Japan); Wanibuchi, Hideki, E-mail: wani@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-Ku, Osaka 545-8585 (Japan)

    2013-10-28

    This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P{sub 450} inducers, such as phenobarbital, α-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate.

  15. Oxidative Stress in the Carcinogenicity of Chemical Carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review highlights several in vivo studies utilizing non-genotoxic and genotoxic chemical carcinogens, and the mechanisms of their high and low dose carcinogenicities with respect to formation of oxidative stress. Here, we survey the examples and discuss possible mechanisms of hormetic effects with cytochrome P450 inducers, such as phenobarbital, α-benzene hexachloride and 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane. Epigenetic processes differentially can be affected by agents that impinge on oxidative DNA damage, repair, apoptosis, cell proliferation, intracellular communication and cell signaling. Non-genotoxic carcinogens may target nuclear receptors and induce post-translational modifications at the protein level, thereby impacting on the stability or activity of key regulatory proteins, including oncoproteins and tumor suppressor proteins. We further discuss role of oxidative stress focusing on the low dose carcinogenicities of several genotoxic carcinogens such as a hepatocarcinogen contained in seared fish and meat, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, arsenic and its metabolites, and the kidney carcinogen potassium bromate

  16. UV-induced immune suppression and photocarcinogenesis: Chemoprevention by dietary botanical agents

    OpenAIRE

    Santosh K. Katiyar

    2007-01-01

    Studies of immune-suppressed transplant recipients and patients with biopsy-proven skin cancer have confirmed that ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced immune suppression is a risk factor for the development of skin cancer in humans. UV radiation suppresses the immune system in several ways. The UVB spectrum inhibits antigen presentation, induces the release of immunosuppressive cytokines, and elicits DNA damage that is a molecular trigger of UV-mediated immunosuppression. It is therefore impor...

  17. Mutagenic and carcinogenic properties of drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter results of oxidation treatments with chlorine, ozone, chlorine dioxide, and ultraviolet (UV), with respect to their effects on activity (Ames test) in drinking water supplies are reviewed. In addition, the authors present the preliminary results of a pilot plant study on the effects of chlorine and chlorine dioxide on mutagenicity. Furthermore, results of several carcinogenicity studies performed with organic drinking water concentrates are discussed in relation to the results of a Dutch carcinogenicity study with mutagenic drinking water concentrates

  18. Using carcinogenic agents in the research laboratories. Rules and procedure; Norme e procedure per l'utilizzo di agenti cancerogeni nei laboratori di ricerca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombard, C.C.; Mancini, C. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente

    1999-07-01

    The carcinogenic risk represents a main problem of Health and Safety at Work Act. Chemical carcinogens regulation has been recently improved by the Italian Decree No. 626/94. The aim of the present work is to outline the criteria for the protection of working people in a complex workplace such as research laboratories, focusing on its peculiar occupational health factors, such as the hazardous exposure to a vast array of chemicals also due to the frequent turnover in the personnel activities. [Italian] Il tema dell'esposizione ad agenti cancerogeni costituisce un vasto e complesso problema di igiene del lavoro e medicina preventiva. Limitatamente ai cancerogeni chimici, un impulso importante in materia di prevenzione e' venuto dalla promulgazione del D.lgs. 626/94 e successive modificazioni. Il presente lavoro ha lo scopo di fornire indicazioni concrete per la messa in atto delle misure di prevenzione e protezione dei lavoratori, ponendo particolare attenzione ai laboratori di ricerca che costituiscono ambienti lavorativi, particolari caratterizzati dal gran numero di agenti manipolati e dal continuo mutamento delle attivita' e del personale.

  19. Carcinogenic effects of radiation-introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The weight of experimental evidence reviewed indicates that UV damage to DNA, probably pyrimidine dimers, is the best molecular candidate for the initiating damage that leads to skin cancer. It is postulated that the carcinogenic action spectrum should be similar to the DNA action spectrum filtered through the upper layer of skin

  20. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF POLYURETHANE ACRYLATES FOR UV CURABLE COATING AGENTS

    OpenAIRE

    MI NA PARK; YOUNG SOO KANG; SUN WHA OH; BYUNG HYUN AHN; MYUNG JUN MOON

    2007-01-01

    The single hydroxyl-terminated urethane acrylate oligomers were synthesized from 2-mercaptoethanol (2-MEOH), alkyl (methyl, butyl, and 2-ethylhexyl) acrylate, and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN, initiator), with dibutyltin dilaurate (DBTDL) as a catalyst. 2-MEOH was used as a functional chain transfer agent. Poly(alkyl urethane) acrylate oligomers were obtained by the reaction of single hydroxyl-terminated polyalkyl acrylates and 2-isocyanatoethyl acrylate. They were characterized by NMR, F...

  1. Rodent Carcinogenicity Dataset

    OpenAIRE

    Fjodorova, Natalja; Novič, Marjana

    2013-01-01

    The rodent carcinogenicity dataset was compiled from the Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDBAS) and was applied for the classification of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for the prediction of carcinogenicity based on the counter-propagation artificial neural network (CP ANN) algorithm. The models were developed within EU-funded project CAESAR for regulatory use. The dataset contains the following information: common information about chemicals (ID, chemical name, an...

  2. Status of miniature integrated UV resonance fluorescence and Raman sensors for detection and identification of biochemical warfare agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, William F.; Bhartia, Rohit; Taspin, Alexandre; Lane, Arthur; Conrad, Pamela; Sijapati, Kripa; Reid, Ray D.

    2005-11-01

    Laser induced native fluorescence (LINF) is the most sensitive method of detection of biological material including microorganisms, virus', and cellular residues. LINF is also a sensitive method of detection for many non-biological materials as well. The specificity with which these materials can be classified depends on the excitation wavelength and the number and location of observation wavelengths. Higher levels of specificity can be obtained using Raman spectroscopy but a much lower levels of sensitivity. Raman spectroscopy has traditionally been employed in the IR to avoid fluorescence. Fluorescence rarely occurs at wavelength below about 270nm. Therefore, when excitation occurs at a wavelength below 250nm, no fluorescence background occurs within the Raman fingerprint region for biological materials. When excitation occurs within electronic resonance bands of the biological target materials, Raman signal enhancement over one million typically occurs. Raman sensitivity within several hundred times fluorescence are possible in the deep UV where most biological materials have strong absorption. Since the Raman and fluorescence emissions occur at different wavelength, both spectra can be observed simultaneously, thereby providing a sensor with unique sensitivity and specificity capability. We will present data on our integrated, deep ultraviolet, LINF/Raman instruments that are being developed for several applications including life detection on Mars as well as biochemical warfare agents on Earth. We will demonstrate the ability to discriminate organic materials based on LINF alone. Together with UV resonance Raman, higher levels of specificity will be demonstrated. In addition, these instruments are being developed as on-line chemical sensors for industrial and municipal waste streams and product quality applications.

  3. The ISS Carcinogens Data Bank (BDC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Data Bank on Carcinogens (Banca Dati Cancerogeni, BDC) is a factual data bank, available on the Istituto Superiore di Sanita web site, aimed at supporting the risk management decision making of central and local administrators. It can also represent a valuable tool for industry. The available information on carcinogenicity evaluations/classifications produced by European Union and by other institutions (IARC, USEPA, NTP, CCTN) is presented in a concise form accompanied by bibliographic references enabling the users to consult the original sources and, in some cases, to be directly connected to the relevant web site. The classifications carried out by each organization in accordance with its own criteria assign the examined agents to specific qualitative categories and do not include quantitative assessment. BDC intends to provide an easy tool for experts, researchers and risk managers dealing with carcinogenic agents

  4. The multitude and diversity of environmental carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have recently proposed that lifestyle-related factors, screening and aging cannot fully account for the present overall growing incidence of cancer. In order to propose the concept that in addition to lifestyle related factors, exogenous environmental factors may play a more important role in carcinogenesis than it is expected, and may therefore account for the growing incidence of cancer, we overview herein environmental factors, rated as certainly or potentially carcinogenic by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). We thus analyze the carcinogenic effect of microorganisms (including viruses), radiations (including radioactivity, UV and pulsed electromagnetic fields) and xenochemicals. Chemicals related to environmental pollution appear to be of critical importance, since they can induce occupational cancers as well as other cancers. Of major concerns are: outdoor air pollution by carbon particles associated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; indoor air pollution by environmental tobacco smoke, formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds such as benzene and 1,3 butadiene, which may particularly affect children, and food pollution by food additives and by carcinogenic contaminants such as nitrates, pesticides, dioxins and other organochlorines. In addition, carcinogenic metals and metalloids, pharmaceutical medicines and cosmetics may be involved. Although the risk fraction attributable to environmental factors is still unknown, this long list of carcinogenic and especially mutagenic factors supports our working hypothesis according to which numerous cancers may in fact be caused by the recent modification of our environment

  5. Pretreatment with UV light renders the chromatin in human fibroblasts more susceptible to the DNA-damaging agents bleomycin, gamma radiation and 8-methoxypsoralen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Confluent human fibroblast cultures were pretreated with either 254 nm UV light (UV) or methyl methanesulphonate (MMS), incubated at 370C and subsequently challenged on ice with bleomycin (BLM), gamma-radiation or 8-methoxy-psoralen (MOP). The resulting number of challenge-induced DNA damages (measured as DNA strand breaks or cross-links) were compared with the numbers induced in similarly challenged but non-pretreated control cells. It was found that the timing of the subsequent challenge of cells pretreated with UV did significantly affect the amount of induced DNA damage. When the challenging agents were administered after a 10-20 min incubation period following UV pretreatment, the amount of induced DNA damage was increased 50% over control cells. In contrast, the timing of the subsequent challenge of cells pretreated with MMS has no influence on the level of challenge-induced damage. It is hypothesized that UV-irradiated chromatin undergoes a time-dependent decondensation that renders it more susceptible to the induction of strand breaks and cross-links by BLM, gamma-radiation and MOP. A possible role for chromatin decondensation in UV-induced excision repair is discussed. (author)

  6. Metabolic activation of chemical carcinogens to reactive electrophiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiations and ultraviolet light constitute the principal known physical carcinogens. Likewise, a great variety and large number of chemicals and over 50 DNA and RNA viruses comprise the known chemical and viral carcinogens. These three categories of carcinogenic agents include the great majority of extrinsic agents known to induce cancer in mammals. Man is clearly susceptible to the action of physical and chemical carcinogens and, indeed, was the first species in which the activities of some of these agents were demonstated. It seems certain that viral carcinogenic information is involved in the etiology of at least some human tumors, but ethical and methodological problems have made it difficult to obtain unequivocal data. Given the long availability of experimental carcinogens of these three classes, there is surprisingly little known of their interrelationships in the production of cancer in experimental animals. The objective of this brief review is to present some salient aspects of experimental chemical carcinogenesis and an analysis of how some of these features relate to the mechanisms of action of radiation carcinogens

  7. Beryllium: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beryllium (Be) has physical-chemical properties, including low density and high tensile strength, which make it useful in the manufacture of products ranging from space shuttles to golf clubs. Despite its utility, a number of standard setting agencies have determined that beryllium is a carcinogen. Only a limited number of studies, however, have addressed the underlying mechanisms of the carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of beryllium. Importantly, mutation and chromosomal aberration assays have yielded somewhat contradictory results for beryllium compounds and whereas bacterial tests were largely negative, mammalian test systems showed evidence of beryllium-induced mutations, chromosomal aberrations, and cell transformation. Although inter-laboratory differences may play a role in the variability observed in genotoxicity assays, it is more likely that the different chemical forms of beryllium have a significant effect on mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Because workers are predominantly exposed to airborne particles which are generated during the machining of beryllium metal, ceramics, or alloys, testing of the mechanisms of the mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of beryllium should be performed with relevant chemical forms of beryllium

  8. Carcinogenic risks of radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionising radiations are known since the end of the 19th century. Early, after being discovered, they were applied in Medicine and the association with an increased number of different malignant tumors was proved. This paper presents a literature review concerning epidemiological proof of radiation induced cancer, molecular mechanisms and factors that increase or decrease the carcinogenic action of ionizing radiations

  9. Chemistry of carcinogenic metals.

    OpenAIRE

    Martell, A E

    1981-01-01

    The periodic distribution of known and suspected carcinogenic metal ions is described, and the chemical behavior of various types of metal ions is explained in terms of the general theory of hard and soft acids and bases. The chelate effect is elucidated, and the relatively high stability of metal chelates in very dilute solutions is discussed. The concepts employed for the chelate effect are extended to explain the high stabilities of macrocyclic and cryptate complexes. Procedures for the us...

  10. The carcinogenicity of chromium

    OpenAIRE

    Norseth, Tor

    1981-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of chromium compounds is reviewed with specific attention to the gaps in knowledge for risk estimation and research needs. The most important problems at present are whether trivalent chromium compounds cause cancer, and whether there is a difference in cancer causing effects between the soluble and the slightly soluble hexavalent compounds in the practical exposure situation. Dose estimates for risk estimation based on epidemiological investigations are also lacking. Pres...

  11. Carcinogen risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the methods by which risk factors for carcinogenic hazards are determined and the limitations inherent in the process. From statistical and epidemiological studies, the major identifiable factors related to cancer in the United States were determined to be cigarette smoking, diet, reproductive and sexual behavior, infections, ultraviolet and ionizing radiation, and alcohol consumption. The incidence of lung cancer due to air pollutants was estimated to be less than 2%. Research needs were discussed

  12. Food derived carcinogenic amnoimidazoazaarenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik

    Carcinogenic aminoimidazoazaarenes are formed during cooking of meat and fish. Important factors for the formation of these compounds are meat type, cooking temperature and time. The compounds are genotoxic in bacterial and mammalian cells. In animal feeding studies the compounds tested so far were...... adducts with DNA. Adducts with 2-deoxyguanosine have been characterized for a number of aminoimidazoazaarenes. Adducts with DNA have also been found in animals after exposure to these compounds. In \\:iw major metabolic detoxification pathways are ring hydroxylation followed by conjugation and conjugation...... of the exocyclic amino group. Estimations of human cancer risk have indicated that ingestion of food containing aminoimidazoazaarenes are of importance....

  13. Comparison of rat olfactory mucosal responses to carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chloracetanilides

    OpenAIRE

    Genter, M.B.; Warner, B.M.; Medvedovic, M.; Sartor, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Alachlor and butachlor are chloracetanilide herbicides that induce olfactory tumors in rats, whereas propachlor does not. The mechanism by which alachlor induces tumors is distinct from many other nasal carcinogens, in that alachlor induces a gradual de-differentiation of the olfactory mucosa (OM) to a more respiratory-like epithelium, in contrast to other agents that induce cytotoxicity, followed by an aberrant regenerative response. We studied biochemical and genomic effects of these compou...

  14. Response of human epidermal keratinocytes to UV light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents a study on the response of human epidermal keratinocytes to UV light as well as to other agents like 4-NQO and TPA. The effects of ultraviolet (UV) light on the protein synthesis in cultured keratinocytes are presented in ch. III. The next chapter describes the construction of a cDNA library using mRNA isolated from UV irradiated kernatinocytes. This library was differentially screened with cDNA probes synthesized on mRNA from either UV irradiated or nonirradiated cells. Several groups of cDNA clones corresponding to transcripts whose level in the cytoplasm seem to be affected by exposure to UV light have been isolated and characterized by cross-hybridization, sequencing and Northern blot analysis. More detailed analysis of some of the cDNA clones is presented in the two chapters following ch. IV. The complete cDNA sequence of the proteinase inhibitor cystatin A and the modulation of its expression by UV light and the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO) in keratinocytes are described in ch. V. Two other groups of cDNA clones have been isolated which do not cross-hybridize with each other on Southern blots. However, the primary structures of the proteins deduced from the nucleotide sequences of these two groups of cDNA clones are very similar. 212 refs.; 33 figs.; 2 tabs

  15. Arsenic Is A Genotoxic Carcinogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen; however, there is controversy over whether or not it should be considered a genotoxic carcinogen. Many possible modes of action have been proposed on how arsenic induces cancer, including inhibiting DNA repair, altering methylation patter...

  16. Quantitative estimation of diacerein in bulk and in capsule formulation using hydrotropic solubilizing agents by UV-spectrophotometry and the first order derivative using the area under curve method

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Ramchandra; Pravin O. Patil; Patil, Manohar U.; Deshmukh, Prashant K.; Sanjay B. Bari

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to develop and validate two simple, rapid, and economical UV-spectrophotometric and the first-order derivative methods using the area under curve method for estimation of diacerein in bulk and in capsule formulation. Materials and Methods: In this study, hydrotrophic solution of 8 M urea and 0.5 M potassium citrate were employed as the solubilizing agent to solubilize a poorly water-soluble drug, diacerein. In the UV-spectrophotometry method, two wavelengths 2...

  17. Cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of carcinogenic aromatic amides and polycyclic hydrocarbons and ultraviolet irradiation in normally repairing and repair-deficient (xeroderma pigmentosum) diploid human skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cloning ability of fibroblasts taken from a xeroderma pigmentosum patient proved 2.5 to 3.5 times more sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of active derivatives of carcinogens or to uv irradiation than that of normal cells. They also exhibited a corresponding 2.5- to 3.5-fold greater increase in the frequency of induced mutations to 8-azaguanine resistance per survivor, which might have been expected since these XP cells exhibit less than 20 percent of the DNA-repairing capacity of the normal cells following exposure to such DNA-damaging agents

  18. Cell killing and mutagenesis by alkylating agents and UV irradiation in wild-type and deoxycytidine-kinase-deficient Friend murine leukaemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild-type (clone 707) Friend murine leukaemia cells were compared with two ara-C-resistant subclones in terms of sensitivity to cell killing and mutagenesis to 6-thioguanine resistance following treatment with ethyl methane sulphonate, methyl methane sulphonate and UV irradiation. The ara-C-resistant subclones, 707DKE and 707DK48, had respective deoxycytidine kinase activities of 6.7 and 5.4% the values found in wild-type cells. No clear pattern of altered sensitivity to cell killing or mutagenesis emerged between the wild-type cells and the ara-C-resistant subclones. These results do not provide evidence for a role of deoxycytidine kinase in determining sensitivity to mutagenic agents in the Friend cell line. (author)

  19. Metabolism, genotoxicity, and carcinogenicity of comfrey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Nan; Guo, Lei; Fu, Peter P; Fuscoe, James C; Luan, Yang; Chen, Tao

    2010-10-01

    Comfrey has been consumed by humans as a vegetable and a tea and used as an herbal medicine for more than 2000 years. Comfrey, however, produces hepatotoxicity in livestock and humans and carcinogenicity in experimental animals. Comfrey contains as many as 14 pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PA), including 7-acetylintermedine, 7-acetyllycopsamine, echimidine, intermedine, lasiocarpine, lycopsamine, myoscorpine, symlandine, symphytine, and symviridine. The mechanisms underlying comfrey-induced genotoxicity and carcinogenicity are still not fully understood. The available evidence suggests that the active metabolites of PA in comfrey interact with DNA in liver endothelial cells and hepatocytes, resulting in DNA damage, mutation induction, and cancer development. Genotoxicities attributed to comfrey and riddelliine (a representative genotoxic PA and a proven rodent mutagen and carcinogen) are discussed in this review. Both of these compounds induced similar profiles of 6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (DHP)-derived DNA adducts and similar mutation spectra. Further, the two agents share common mechanisms of drug metabolism and carcinogenesis. Overall, comfrey is mutagenic in liver, and PA contained in comfrey appear to be responsible for comfrey-induced toxicity and tumor induction. PMID:21170807

  20. HPLC-UV Method for the Identification and Screening of Hydroquinone, Ethers of Hydroquinone and Corticosteroids Possibly Used as Skin-Whitening Agents in Illicit Cosmetic Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Pascal; Maggio, Annie-Françoise; Bancilhon, Marjorie; Lassu, Nelly; Gornes, Hervé; Brenier, Charlotte; Lempereur, Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Corticosteroids, hydroquinone and its ethers are regulated in cosmetics by the Regulation 1223/2009. As corticosteroids are forbidden to be used in cosmetics and cannot be present as contaminants or impurities, an identification of one of these illicit compounds deliberately introduced in these types of cosmetics is enough for market survey control. In order to quickly identify skin-whitening agents present in illegal cosmetics, this article proposes an HPLC-UV method for the identification and screening of hydroquinone, 3 ethers of hydroquinone and 39 corticosteroids that may be found in skin-whitening products. Two elution gradients were developed to separate all compounds. The main solvent gradient (A) allows the separation of 39 compounds among the 43 compounds considered in 50 min. Limits of detection on skin-whitening cosmetics are given. For compounds not separated, a complementary gradient elution (B) using the same solvents is proposed. Between 2004 and 2009, a market survey on "skin-whitening cosmetic" was performed on 150 samples and highlights that more than half of the products tested do not comply with the Cosmetic Regulation 1223/2009 (amending the Council Directive 76/768/EEC). PMID:26462503

  1. Alternative strawberry disease management strategy: combing low UV-C irradiation in dark, disabling pathogen’s UV-C repair mechanism, and preventing pathogen establishment with biocontrol agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    The limitations of current fungicides necessitate a search for new approaches. Low-dose or sub-lethal UV-C irradiation (12.36 J/m2) alone is not effective in controlling fungal diseases, especially when the plants are exposed to UV-C irradiation during the day. We found, however, that application ...

  2. Utilização de linhagens diplóides uvsH//uvsH de Aspergillus nidulans (Ascomycetes para a avaliação do potencial recombinagênico de agentes químicos e físicos uvsH//uvsH diploid strain favors an efficient method to evaluate the recombinagenic effect of chemical and physical agents in Aspergillus nidulans (Ascomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francielle Baptista

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available O ascomiceto Aspergillus nidulans apresenta-se como um excelente sistema para o estudo da recombinação somática, por passar grande parte de seu ciclo celular em G2 e por apresentar mutações uvs que promovem aumento das freqüências normais de recombinação mitótica (uvsF e uvsH. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo obter uma nova linhagem diplóide de A. nidulans, com características apropriadas para estudos da recombinagênese, tais como: hetererozigose para marcadores nutricionais e de coloração de conidios e homozigose para a mutação uvsH. A maior sensibilidade do diplóide uvsH//uvsH no monitoramento de eventos de recombinação mitótica foi demonstrada através dos mais altos índices de recombinação mitótica espontânea por ele apresentados, em comparação com o diplóide uvsH+//uvsH +. A nova linhagem apresenta-se como uma ferramenta versátil, podendo ser utilizada em diferentes estudos relacionados à recombinação mitótica em A. nidulansAscomycete Aspergillus nidulans is an excellent system for mitotic crossing-over studies. This is due to the fact that much of its cell cycle is passed in G2 and presents uvs mutations that increase frequencies of normal mitotic recombinations (uvsF and uvsH. The aim of this research was to obtain a new diploid strain of A. nidulans with proper characteristics for recombinagenesis investigations, or rather, heterozygous for nutritional markers and conidia coloration and homozygous for uvsH mutation. Higher sensitivity of diploid uvsH//uvsH in the monitoring of mitotic recombination events was shown by higher indexes of the diploid’s spontaneous mitotic recombination when compared with diploid uvsH+//uvsH +. New strain is a versatile tool that may be used in different studies on mitotic recombination in A. nidulans

  3. Is peroxisome proliferation an obligatory precursor step in the carcinogenicity of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP)?

    OpenAIRE

    Melnick, R L

    2001-01-01

    Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), a peroxisome proliferator, has been listed by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and by the National Toxicology Program as a possible or reasonably anticipated human carcinogen because it induces dose-related increases in liver tumors in both sexes of rats and mice. Recently, the suggestion has been advanced that DEHP should be considered unlikely to be a human carcinogen because it is claimed that the carcinogenic effects of this agent in...

  4. EVALUATION OF THE POTENTIAL CARCINOGENICITY OF CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyclophosphamide is a probable human carcinogen, classified as weight-of-evidence Group B1 under the EPA Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment (U.S. EPA, 1986a).Evidence on potential carcinogenicity from animal studies is "Sufficient," and the evidence from human studies is "...

  5. Understanding arsenic carcinogenicity by the use of animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although numerous epidemiological studies have indicated that human arsenic exposure is associated with increased incidences of bladder, liver, skin, and lung cancers, limited attempts have been made to understand mechanisms of carcinogenicity using animal models. Dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), an organic arsenic compound, is a major metabolite of ingested inorganic arsenics in mammals. Recent in vitro studies have proven DMA to be a potent clastogenic agent, capable of inducing DNA damage including double strand breaks and cross-link formation. In our attempts to clarify DMA carcinogenicity, we have recently shown carcinogenic effects of DMA and its related metabolites using various experimental protocols in rats and mice: (1) a multi-organ promotion bioassay in rats; (2) a two-stage promotion bioassay by DMA of rat urinary bladder and liver carcinogenesis; (3) a 2-year carcinogenicity test of DMA in rats; (4) studies on the effects of DMA on lung carcinogenesis in rats; (5) promotion of skin carcinogenesis by DMA in keratin (K6)/ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) transgenic mice; (6) carcinogenicity of DMA in p53(+/-) knockout and Mmh/8-OXOG-DNA glycolase (OGG1) mutant mice; (7) promoting effects of DMA and related organic arsenicals in rat liver; (8) promoting effects of DMA and related organic arsenicals in a rat multi-organ carcinogenesis test; and (9) 2-year carcinogenicity tests of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and trimethylarsine oxide (TMAO) in rats. The results revealed that the adverse effects of arsenic occurred either by promoting and initiating carcinogenesis. These data, as covered in the present review, suggest that several mechanisms may be involved in arsenic carcinogenesis

  6. Mutagens and carcinogens - Occurrence and role during chemical and biological evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner-Sorolla, A.; Oro, J.

    1981-01-01

    The roles of mutagenic and carcinogenic substances in early biologic evolution is examined, along with terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources of mutagens and carcinogens. UV solar radiation is noted to have served to stimulate prebiotic life while also causing harmful effects in plants and animals. Aromatic compounds have been found in meteorites, and comprise leukemogens, polycyclic hydrocarbons, and nitrasamine precursors. Other mutagenic sources are volcanoes, and the beginning of evolution with mutagenic substances is complicated by the appearance of malignancies due to the presence of carcinogens. The atmosphere of the Precambrian period contained both mutagens and early carcinogens and, combined with volcanic activity discharges, formed an atmospheric chemical background analogous to the background ionizing radiation. Carcinogenesis is concluded to be intrinsic to nature, having initiated evolution and, eventually, cancer cells.

  7. Potential co-carcinogens in the uranium mine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies of increased incidence of lung cancer in uranium miners have focussed on the relationship between lung cancer and miners' exposure to radon daughters and smoking. However, epidemiologic analyses of uranium miner populations also include the effects of exposure to external gamma rays, long-lived alpha emitters and other non-radioactive workplace contaminants. The diversity and variability of miner exposures to potentially carcinogenic substances and combinations of substances, and the natural difficulties involved in the study of lung cancer in human populations, make the assessment of the relative effects of causative agents difficult if not impossible. Moreover, concentrations of most of the substances have rarely been measured in mine environments, and data on human response to these substances is sparse. Nonetheless, research on the potential effects of such substances is required to understand the potential hazards in the mining environment. This paper examines the potential carcinogenic and co-carcinogenic effects of agents other than ionizing radiation, which may currently be present in uranium mine atmospheres

  8. Comparison of the dose-effect relationship for UV radiation and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation and ultraviolet radiation (UV) are both physical agents with mutagenic and carcinogenic properties. However, there are some basic differences in the fundamental mechanism of their interaction with biological material that may have consequences for risk assessment. In this paper the dose-effect relationships for gamma radiation and UV at cellular level will be used to demonstrate the different radio-biological effectiveness of both agents. The results will be discussed in the framework of a biophysical model, based on the assumption that DNA doublestranded lesions are crucial for the cytotoxic action. After exposure to ionizing radiation, the lesions are fixed immediately following irradiation, but after UV exposure the lethal lesions are recognized only in the next DNA synthesis phase. The combination of this concept with the mechanism of lesion induction and the possibility of repair, leads to different dose and time relationships for the radiation effects of both agents. The possible consequences for risk assessment at low levels will be discussed. (author). 9 refs.; 5 figs

  9. UV-induced skin damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar radiation induces acute and chronic reactions in human and animal skin. Chronic repeated exposures are the primary cause of benign and malignant skin tumors, including malignant melanoma. Among types of solar radiation, ultraviolet B (290-320 nm) radiation is highly mutagenic and carcinogenic in animal experiments compared to ultraviolet A (320-400 nm) radiation. Epidemiological studies suggest that solar UV radiation is responsible for skin tumor development via gene mutations and immunosuppression, and possibly for photoaging. In this review, recent understanding of DNA damage caused by direct UV radiation and by indirect stress via reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA repair mechanisms, particularly nucleotide excision repair of human cells, are discussed. In addition, mutations induced by solar UV radiation in p53, ras and patched genes of non-melanoma skin cancer cells, and the role of ROS as both a promoter in UV-carcinogenesis and an inducer of UV-apoptosis, are described based primarily on the findings reported during the last decade. Furthermore, the effect of UV on immunological reaction in the skin is discussed. Finally, possible prevention of UV-induced skin cancer by feeding or topical use of antioxidants, such as polyphenols, vitamin C, and vitamin E, is discussed

  10. In vivo Comet assay on isolated kidney cells to distinguish genotoxic carcinogens from epigenetic carcinogens or cytotoxic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesslany, Fabrice; Zennouche, Nadia; Simar-Meintières, Sophie; Talahari, Ismaïl; Nkili-Mboui, Esther-Nadège; Marzin, Daniel

    2007-06-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the ability of the alkaline in vivo Comet assay (pH>13) to distinguish genotoxic carcinogens from epigenetic carcinogens when performed on freshly isolated kidney cells and to determine the possible interference of cytotoxicity by assessing DNA damage induced by renal genotoxic, epigenetic or toxic compounds after enzymatic isolation of kidney cells from OFA Sprague-Dawley male rats. The ability of the Comet assay to distinguish (1) genotoxicity versus cytotoxicity and (2) genotoxic versus non-genotoxic (epigenetic) carcinogens, was thus investigated by studying five known genotoxic renal carcinogens acting through diverse mechanisms of action, i.e. streptozotocin, aristolochic acids, 2-nitroanisole, potassium bromate and cisplatin, two rodent renal epigenetic carcinogens: d-limonene and ciclosporine and two nephrotoxic compounds: streptomycin and indomethacin. Animals were treated once with the test compound by the appropriate route of administration and genotoxic effects were measured at the two sampling times of 3-6 and 22-26h after treatment. Regarding the tissue processing, the limited background level of DNA migration observed in the negative control groups throughout all experiments demonstrated that the enzymatic isolation method implemented in the current study is appropriate. On the other hand, streptozotocin, 20mg/kg, used as positive reference control concurrently to each assay, caused a clear increase in the mean Olive Tail Moment median value, which allows validating the current methodology. Under these experimental conditions, the in vivo rodent Comet assay demonstrated good sensitivity and good specificity: all the five renal genotoxic carcinogens were clearly detected in at least one expression period either directly or indirectly, as in the case of cisplatin: for this cross-linking agent, the significant decrease in DNA migration observed under standard electrophoresis conditions was clearly amplified

  11. Electrophoretic mobility of PM2 DNA treated with ultimate chemical carcinogens or with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superhelical DNA of the Pseudomonas phage PM2 was irradiated with UV-light or reacted with covalently binding carcinogens, such as 7-bromomethyl-benz[a]anthracene, (Ac)2ONFln, K-region epoxides, and alkylating agents. Migration velocity of the DNA products was determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. In gels of more than 1.3%-1.9% agarose, modified PM2 DNA exhibited a dose-(concentration-)dependent decrease of migration velocity. This phenomenon is probably due to a decrease in superhelix density which caused the compact DNA coil to assume eventually an open-circular conformation. Comparison of the extent of DNA modification with the decrease of migration velocity revealed that the superhelical structure sensitively reflected the chemical DNA alterations. DNA species exhibiting in 1.6% agarose gels, a migration velocity of up to 30% of that of control DNA showed an increase of velocity in 0.4% agarose. Therefore, in 1.3%-1.9% agarose gels, the decrease of superhelix density is accompanied by an increase of the frictional coefficient, whereas in 0.4%-0.9% agarose gels the same decrease of superhelix density apparently led to a higher degree of flexibility of the macromolecule and/or exposure of additional electric charges. (orig.)

  12. Analysis of mutagenic and carcinogenic risks: nitrates, nitrites, N-Nitroso compounds. Comparison with radioactive risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report comes within the scope of the general studies on mutagenic and carcinogenic agents other than ionizing radiations. Through feeding, way of life and working activities, man is exposed to genotoxic risks of N-nitroso compounds (NNC). In spite of differences in the molecular modes of action, there exists some analogy between the effects of radiation exposures and those of NNC: DNA is the target in either instance. Unlike radiations, NNC are alkylating agents. The whole activation process of carcinogens arises from mechanisms leading to DNA repair

  13. Application of the two-stage clonal expansion model in characterizing the joint effect of exposure to two carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we describe application of the two-stage clonal expansion model to characterize the joint effect of exposure to two carcinogens. This biologically based model of carcinogenesis provides a useful framework for the quantitative description of carcinogenic risks and for defining agents that act as initiators, promoters, and completers. Depending on the mechanism of action, the agent-specific relative risk following exposure to two carcinogens can be additive, multiplicative, or supramultiplicative, with supra-additive relative risk indicating a synergistic effect between the two agents. Maximum-likelihood methods for fitting the two-stage clonal expansion model with intermittent exposure to two carcinogens are described and illustrated, using data on lung-cancer mortality among Colorado uranium miners exposed to both radon and tobacco smoke

  14. Antiradiation UV Vaccine: UV Radiation, Biological effects, lesions and medical management - immune-therapy and immune-protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    moderate and high doses of UV and ionizing radiation induce cell death by necrosis and generate systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), toxic multiple organ injury (TMOI), toxic multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (TMODS),and finally, toxic multiple organ failure (TMOF). [D.Popov et al.2012, Fliedner T.et al. 2005, T. Azizova et al. 2004] UV-B is a complete carcinogen that is absorbed by DNA and directly damages DNA. DNA damage induced by UV-B irradiation typically includes the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimmers (CPD) and 6-4 photoproducts (6-4P)[IARC, Working Group Reports, M.Saraiya et al. 2004]. The pre-vaccinated animals seem to have a blunted injury response relative to the unvaccinated animals, presumably by reduction in the inflammatory response and secondary injury effects. The mechanism of action of the antiradiation vaccine, needs further evaluation. Conclusion: A UV antiradiation vaccine appears to demonstrate efficacy as a prophylactic agent for acute solar burns and toxicity. An antiradiation UV vaccine could be used in conjunction with adjunctive measures, e.g. antioxidants and UV barriers to reduce UV radiation toxicity. The authors of this experiments would like to propose further development work of the antiradiation UV vaccine to enhance the armamentarium for prophylaxis and prevention of the various forms skin cancer.

  15. UV Radiation and the Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Scott

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available UV radiation (UV is classified as a “complete carcinogen” because it is both a mutagen and a non-specific damaging agent and has properties of both a tumor initiator and a tumor promoter. In environmental abundance, UV is the most important modifiable risk factor for skin cancer and many other environmentally-influenced skin disorders. However, UV also benefits human health by mediating natural synthesis of vitamin D and endorphins in the skin, therefore UV has complex and mixed effects on human health. Nonetheless, excessive exposure to UV carries profound health risks, including atrophy, pigmentary changes, wrinkling and malignancy. UV is epidemiologically and molecularly linked to the three most common types of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, which together affect more than a million Americans annually. Genetic factors also influence risk of UV-mediated skin disease. Polymorphisms of the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R gene, in particular, correlate with fairness of skin, UV sensitivity, and enhanced cancer risk. We are interested in developing UV-protective approaches based on a detailed understanding of molecular events that occur after UV exposure, focusing particularly on epidermal melanization and the role of the MC1R in genome maintenance.

  16. UV-induced erythema model: a tool in dermatopharmacology for testing the topical activity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, J; Izquierdo, I; Barbanoj, M J; Moreno, J; Lauroba, J; Jané, F

    1988-05-01

    UV-induced erythema is a well known inflammatory model applied both in animal and human skin to test the activity of topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compounds in a great variety of pharmaceutical formulations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory efficacy of piroxicam in two different topical formulations (cream 0.5, 1 and 1.5% and gel 1%) as compared to three non-steroidal compounds, benzydamine, etofenamate and indomethacin (cream 5%), on erythema induced after UV-injury on the back of 5 healthy subjects. The results showed that piroxicam in cream formulation, indomethacin cream and etofenamate gel have a similar effect, decreasing the erythema size 7 h after irradiation. However, benzydamine cream and piroxicam gel showed no effect with this method. We may conclude that this model is adequate and precise for selecting the most appropriate galenic dosage form for an active compound in terms of its clinical efficacy when topically administered. PMID:3398651

  17. Enhancement of DNA repair capacity of mammalian cells by carcinogen treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine whether DNA excision repair is enhanced in mammalian cells in response to DNA damage, as it is in bacteria as part of the SOS response, we used an expression vector-host cell reactivation assay to measure cellular DNA repair capacity. When UV-damaged chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) vector DNA was introduced into monkey cells (CV-1), the level of CAT activity was inversely related to the UV fluence due to inhibition of CAT gene expression by UV photoproducts. When CV-1 cells were treated with either UV radiation or mitomycin C, 24-48 h before transfection, CAT expression from the UV-irradiated plasmid was increased. This increase also occurred in a line of normal human cells, but not in repair-deficient human xeroderma pigmentosum cells. We confirmed that this increase in CAT expression was due to repair, and not to production of damage-free templates by recombination; the frequency of generation of supF+ recombinants after transfection with UV-irradiated pZ189 vectors carrying different point mutations in the supF gene did not significantly increase in carcinogen-treated CV-1 cells. From these results we conclude that carcinogen treatment enhances the excision-repair capacity of normal mammalian cells

  18. Carcinogen-inflicted DNA damage causes a dramatic increase in the degradation of chromatin-bound poly(ADP-ribose) in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A characteristic response of eukaryotic cells to treatment with carcinogens is de novo poly(ADP-ribosylation) of chromatin proteins, a reaction which acts to modulate subsequent DNA excision repair by a hitherto unidentified molecular mechanism. DNA strand breaks represent the molecular signal which activates the chromatin enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and thus stimulates poly(ADP-ribose) biosynthesis. They have now observed that carcinogen-inflicted DNA damage may also cause a more than 600-fold stimulation of the degradation of protein-bound poly(ADP-ribose) in chromatin of rat hepatocytes in primary culture. As a consequence, the metabolic half-life of the polymer decreases from 7.7 h in undamaged control cells to 5.5 min and 2.5 min following damage of cells with 45 and 150 J/m2 of UV light of 254 nm, respectively. Similarly, damage of hepatocellular DNA inflicted with either 20, 50 or 200 μM N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, a monofunctional alkylating agent, caused a dramatic decrease in the polymer half-life to 5.1 min, 2.3 min, and 41 sec, respectively. Therefore, their results suggest that the dynamic removal of polymeric ADP-ribose residues from their chromatin acceptors represents an obligatory postincisional event in DNA excision repair of mammalian cells

  19. Biomonitoring of exposure to chemical carcinogens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šrám, Radim

    Poland : Institute of Nuclear Physics, 2002. s. -. [NATO advanced research workshop (Human monitoring for genetic effects). 23.06.2002-27.06.2002, Krakow - Poland] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : carcinogens Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  20. Skin Cancer and UV Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarbuk Anita

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of skin cancer is increasing by epidemic proportions. Basal cell cancer remains the most common skin neoplasm, and simple excision is generally curative. On the other hand, aggressive local growth and metastasis are common features of malignant melanoma, which accounts for 75% of all deaths associated with skin cancer. The primary cause of skin cancer is long exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UV-R crossed with the amount of skin pigmentation and family genetics. It is believed that in childhood and adolescence, 80% of UV-R gets absorbed while in the remaining, 20 % gets absorbed later in the lifetime. This suggests that proper and early photoprotection may reduce the risk of subsequent occurrence of skin cancer. Reducing the exposure time to sunlight, using sunscreens and protective textiles are the three ways of UV protection. Most people think that all the clothing will protect them, but it does not provide full sun screening properties. Literature sources claim that only 1/3 of the spring and summer collections tested give off proper UV protection. This is very important during the summer months, when UV index is the highest. Fabric UV protection ability highly depends on large number of factors such as type of fiber, fabric surface, construction, porosity, density, moisture content, type and concentration of dyestuff, fluorescent whitening agents, UV-B protective agents (UV absorbers, as well as nanoparticles, if applied. For all of these reasons, in the present paper, the results of UV protecting ability according to AS/NZS 4399:1996 will be discussed to show that standard clothing materials are not always adequate to prevent effect of UV-R to the human skin; and to suggest the possibilities for its improvement for this purpose enhancing light conversion and scattering. Additionally, the discrepancy in UV protection was investigated in distilled water as well as Adriatic Sea water.

  1. Development of HPLC and UV spectrophotometric methods for the determination of ascorbic acid using hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin and triethanolamine as photostabilizing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the effect of complex formation with triethanolamine (TEA) alone and in combination with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) on the photostability of ascorbic acid was evaluated for exposure to artificial and diffuse daylight. The first-order rate constants for the photodegradation reactions were determined. The data obtained showed that these complexes strongly reduced the photodegradation process with an 11- and 35-fold increase in the photostability of ascorbic acid, depending of the ligand concentration and the irradiation source. The multicomponent complex gave a significantly better stabilization for exposure to light than TEA alone. Due to the fact that the complexation extended the exposure of ascorbic acid to light (without molecular changes), UV spectrophotometric and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods were developed for the quantitative determination of the vitamin in pure form and in pharmaceutical preparations. These methods were statistically validated, all the validation parameters were found to be within the acceptance range. These results demonstrate that the proposed methods are suitable for the quality control of ascorbic acid, providing simple, rapid, precise, accurate and convenient approaches for routine analysis of bulk drug and pharmaceutical formulations.

  2. Appraisal of alternative skin model for the study of epidermal restoration following exposure to various environmental stress agents: ionising radiation and UV B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human skin is a major target tissue for ionising radiation (IR) and UV B. We developed a skin explant model and used 2 types of keratinocytes to study survival and oxidative stress induced by these radiations. We examined oxidative damages by measuring R.O.S. produced and cellular anti-oxidant defenses induced. We observed into skin exposed to IR a modulation of genes expression implied in the control of oxidative stress, confirmed by the decrease of catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymatic activities. The imbalance observed between anti- and pro-apoptotic genes expression shows that keratinocytes apoptosis may be partly dependent on radio-induced R.O.S. production. We showed the difference of radiosensitivity between N.H.E.K. and Ha Ca.T., which may be linked to their differential oxidative responses. In addition, during re-epithelialising, we demonstrated that activated N.H.E.K. after IR express keratin 6, release pro-inflammatory cytokines and proliferate, without modification of their differentiation. Treatment of N.H.E.K. with geranyl geranylacetone (G.G.A.) has a beneficial effect on their radio-induced activation by increasing IL-1 release, their migration in scrapped area and their survival. G.G.A. has an anti apoptotic ability (induction of Hsp70- caspase-3 pathway) and migratory properties (P38/RhoA activation) on N.H.E.K., but after IR, only caspase-3 pathway is induced. This work thus contributes to the understanding of cutaneous damages after IR and G.G.A. mechanism of action which accelerates re-epithelialising. (author)

  3. Carcinogenic potential of various energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the health impacts of different sources of energy should include a comparison of the potential carcinogenic effects of the radioactive and chemical substances produced by various sources. In general, these potential health effects are too small to be measured directly and are therefore estimated by extrapolation, on the basis of a linear dose-response model, from measurable effects at high dose levels. Estimates of the carcinogenic potential of various energy sources available in North America are given in this paper. For most if not all of the energy sources for which data are currently available, it would appear that the known biological benefits in terms of life expectancy greatly outweigh all the potential harm due to carcinogenic (and genetic) effects on human beings, when expressed in the same terms, i.e. life expectancy. (author)

  4. Evaluation of damage to DNA induced by UV-C radiation and chemical agents using electrochemical biosensor based on low molecular weight DNA and screen-printed carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Evaluation of damage to DNA induced by UV-C radiation and chemical agents. ► Utilization of an electrochemical DNA biosensor based on low molecular weight DNA. ► Utilization of screen-printed carbon electrode as an electrical transducer. ► Complex detection of double-stranded DNA damage. - Abstract: There is great interest and need to detect and evaluate damage to DNA by environmental factors. In the present paper, simple electrochemical DNA biosensors composed of commercially available screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) and low molecular weight double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) recognition layer are reported and applied to the detection of damage to DNA by UV-C radiation and reactive oxygen species produced by the Fenton type reaction in model as well as mineral water samples with additives. Complex DNA biosensor response is based on square-wave voltammetric intrinsic signal of the guanine moiety as well as that of the intercalative indicator thioridazine, cyclic voltammetric response of the [Fe(CN)6]3−/4− indicator in solution and on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy when the measurements can be performed in the same solution. For the last two types of measurements, the biosensor was also used with an interface between the SPCE and DNA formed by a composite of carboxylated single-walled carbon nanotubes and chitosan to enhance the transducer conductivity. Individual electrochemical/electrical signals depend on the time of biosensor incubation in a cleavage medium and their profiles characterize process of deep DNA degradation.

  5. Rapid screening of potential human bladder carcinogens: genotoxicity in meiosis repair deficient Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, L M; Reichert, D F; Lamm, D L

    1989-11-01

    To find a quick screen of potential bladder carcinogens, a genotoxicity test in Drosophila melanogaster stocks containing DNA repair mutations was evaluated. Meiosis repair deficient male Drosophila melanogaster mei-9, mei-41, and the double mutant mei-9-41 were allowed to mate with attached -x females on media containing the test agent. Genotoxic agents produce DNA damage which accumulates and can be lethal in mei males, whereas the attached -x females are able to repair the damage and survive. Thus, the sex ratio of the progeny is a measure of genotoxicity which can be correlated with mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. In this study, tea, coffee, and saccharin were not genotoxic (p greater than 0.3). Dose dependent toxicity was observed in bracken fern (p less than 0.001). The known mutagen and bladder carcinogen, cyclophosphamide, was highly genotoxic (p less than .001). Drosophila genotoxicity not only permits rapid screening of mutagens, but may also have advantages over other systems in the screening of potential bladder carcinogens. PMID:2509735

  6. Biomonitoring human exposure to environmental carcinogenic chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmer, P.B.; Sepai, O.; Lawrence, R.;

    1996-01-01

    detecting carcinogen-induced damage to DNA and proteins, and subsequent biological effects. These methods were validated with the occupational exposures, which showed evidence of DNA and/or protein and/or chromosome damage in workers in a coke oven plant, garage workers exposed to diesel exhaust and workers...

  7. Detection of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens in Xpc−/−p53+/− mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accurate assessment of the carcinogenic potential of chemicals and pharmaceutical drugs is essential to protect humans and the environment. Therefore, substances are extensively tested before they are marketed to the public. Currently, the rodent two-year bioassay is still routinely used to assess the carcinogenic potential of substances. However, over time it has become clear that this assay yields false positive results and also has several economic and ethical drawbacks including the use of large numbers of animals, the long duration, and the high cost. The need for a suitable alternative assay is therefore high. Previously, we have proposed the Xpa*p53 mouse model as a very suitable alternative to the two-year bioassay. We now show that the Xpc*p53 mouse model preserves all the beneficial traits of the Xpa*p53 model for sub-chronic carcinogen identification and can identify both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Moreover, Xpc*p53 mice appear to be more responsive than Xpa*p53 mice towards several genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Furthermore, Xpc*p53 mice are far less sensitive than Xpa*p53 mice for the toxic activity of DNA damaging agents and as such clearly respond in a similar way as wild type mice do. These advantageous traits of the Xpc*p53 model make it a better alternative for in vivo carcinogen testing than Xpa*p53. This pilot study suggests that Xpc*p53 mice are suited for routine sub-chronic testing of both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens and as such represent a suitable alternative to possibly replace the murine life time cancer bioassay. Highlights: ► The Xpc*p53 mouse model is able to identify genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. ► Time, animals and cost can be significantly reduced compared to the 2-year bioassay. ► Xpc*p53 mice are more advantageous for carcinogen identification than Xpa*p53 mice. ► Xpc*p53 mice exhibit a wild type response upon exposure to genotoxicants.

  8. Carcinogens formed when Meat is Cooked

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felton, J S; Salmon, C P; Knize, M G

    2003-05-30

    Diet has been associated with varying cancer rates in human populations for many years, yet the causes of the observed variation in cancer patterns have not been adequately explained (Wynder et al. 1977). Along with the effect of diet on human cancer incidence is the strong evidence that mutations are the initiating events in the cancer process (Vogelstein et al. 1992). Foods, when heated, are a good source of genotoxic carcinogens that very likely are a cause for some of these events(Doll et al. 1981). These carcinogens fall into two chemical classes: heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). There is ample evidence that many of these compounds are complete carcinogens in rodents(El-Bayoumy et al. 1995; Ohgaki et al. 1991). Heterocyclic aromatic amines are among the most potent mutagenic substances ever tested in the Ames/Salmonella mutagenicity test (Wakabayashi et al. 1992). Both classes of carcinogen cause tumors in rodents at multiple sites, (El-Bayoumy et al. 1995; Ohgaki et al. 1991) many of which are common tumor sites in people on a Western diet. An HAA, PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine), and a PAH, B[a]P (benzo[a]pyrene), of comparable carcinogenic potency caused mammary gland tumors in a feeding study in female rats (El-Bayoumy et al. 1995). In addition, PhIP has recently been shown to cause carcinomas in the prostate of the male rat (Shirai et al. 1997). Complementing the rodent cancer studies are numerous human case-control and prospective studies suggesting a relationship between overheated beef, chicken, and lamb, and cancer of the colon, breast, prostate, and stomach (Sinha et al. 1999; Ward et al. 1997; Zheng et al. 1998).

  9. UV Light Induces Dedoping of Polyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Kaitsuka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available UV (Ultra-Violet light-driven change in optical absorption of polyaniline (PANI is reported. Irradiation of UV light to PANI/camphor sulfonic acid prepared by electrochemical polymerization allows dedoping of the PANI. Especially, UV light irradiation in the presence of a radical trap agent effectively reduces (dedoping the PANI. The result in this study is quite simple; however, this may be a first report for light-induced dedoping (color change of a conductive polymer.

  10. Predictions for the outcome of rodent carcinogenicity bioassays: identification of trans-species carcinogens and noncarcinogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Tennant, R W; Spalding, J.

    1996-01-01

    Thirty chemicals or substances currently undergoing long-term carcinogenicity bioassays in rodents have been used in a project to further evaluate methods and information that may have the capability of predicting potential carcinogens. In our predictions the principal information used includes structural alerts and in vitro test results for Salmonella mutagenicity, relative subchronic toxicity, and the sites and types of pathology found in subchronic (90-day) studies. This group of chemicals...

  11. Multicomponent criteria for predicting carcinogenicity: dataset of 30 NTP chemicals.

    OpenAIRE

    Huff, J; Weisburger, E; Fung, V A

    1996-01-01

    This article is in response to the challenge issued to the scientific community by the National Toxicology Program to predict the carcinogenicity potential of 30 chemicals previously selected for long-term carcinogenicity testing. Utilizing the available toxicologic, genetic, and structural information on 30 chemicals previously selected for long-term carcinogenicity testing, we predict that 16 chemicals (53%) would induce some indication of carcinogenic activity in rodents; we further predic...

  12. EVALUATION OF THE POTENTIAL CARCINOGENICITY OF COKE OVEN EMISSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coke oven emissions are known human carcinogens, classified as weight-of-evidence Group A under the EPA Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment (U.S. EPA, 1986a). vidence on potential carcinogenicity from animal studies is "Sufficient,". and the evidence rom human studies is "S...

  13. EVALUATION OF THE POTENTIAL CARCINOGENICITY OF TRYPAN BLUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trypan blue is a probable human carcinogen, classified as weight-of-evidence Group B2 under the EPA Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment (U.S. EPA, 1986a). vidence on potential carcinogenicity from animal studies is "Sufficient," and the evidence from human studies is "No Da...

  14. STAT3 as a chemoprevention target in carcinogen-induced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Peyser, ND; Wang, L.; Zeng, Y.; Acquafondata, M.; Freilino, ML; Li, H.; M. Sen; Gooding, WE; Satake, M; Wang, Z.; Johnson; Grandis, JR

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a frequently fatal disease due in large part to a high rate of second primary tumor (SPT) formation. The 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO) mouse model of oral carcinogenesis provides a robust system in which to study chemopreventive agents in the context of chemically-induced HNSCC tumors. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a potent oncogene that is hyperactivated by tyrosine phosphorylation early in HNSCC carcinogenes...

  15. Current and emerging challenges in toxicopathology: Carcinogenic threshold of phenobarbital and proof of arsenic carcinogenicity using rat medium-term bioassays for carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the last 25 years, Prof. Nobuyuki Ito and his laboratory have focused on the development of liver medium-term bioassay system for detection of carcinogens in F344 rats utilizing glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P)-positive foci as an end point marker. In this presentation, the outline and samples of medium-term bioassay systems were described. Furthermore, our data demonstrated the presence of a threshold for the non-genotoxic carcinogen, phenobarbital (PB), and the lack of linearity in the low-dose area of the dose-response curve, providing evidence for hormesis. In addition, the establishment and applications of multiorgan carcinogenicity bioassay (DMBDD model), used for the examination of the carcinogenicity of genotoxic and non-genotoxic chemicals, are discussed. Dimethylarsinic acid, one of organic arsenics, was found to be carcinogenic in rat bladder using DMBDD model and carcinogenicity test

  16. Temporal aspects of tumorigenic response to individual and mixed carcinogens. Progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research proposed here is designed to obtain a better understanding of the temporal kinetics of tumor induction when one or more carcinogens are present simultaneously or sequentially for prolonged periods of time. Studies done to date under this contract have shown that carcinogenesis in mouse skin by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogens is consistent with the induction of dependent and autonomous cell transformations by the carcinogen followed by the conversion of autonomous tumor cells into malignancies at a rate which is determined by the level of carcinogen exposure. Dependent cell transformations remain latent in the skin unless expressed by a promoting agent. Dependent neoplasia appears to follow one-hit kinetics while malignancy is a multihit endpoint. Dose-related and time-related aspects of tumor induction are separable in the initiation-promotion system of mouse skin which along with rat skin and hamster lung is being used as a model for testing hypotheses. Results to date provide the basis for a new interpretation of the linear non-threshold extrapolation model. The broad aim of the study is to provide a basis or rationale for estimating risks associated with prolonged exposures to carcinogens found in the environment and to predict how different tissues and species respond to the carcinogens, promoters, and cocarcinogens

  17. The multitude and diversity of environmental carcinogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Belpomme, Dominique; Irigaray, Philippe; Hardell, Lennart; Clapp, Richard; Montagnier, Luc; Epstein, Slava; Sasco, Annie

    2007-01-01

    We have recently proposed that lifestyle-related factors, screening and aging cannot fully account for the present overall growing incidence of cancer. In order to propose the concept that in addition to lifestyle related factors, exogenous environmental factors may play a more important role in carcinogenesis than it is expected, and may therefore account for the growing incidence of cancer, we overview herein environmental factors, rated as certainly or potentially carcinogenic by the Inter...

  18. RADON AND CARCINOGENIC RISK IN MOSCOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Golovanev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: comparative evaluation of carcinogenic risk inMoscowfrom radon in indoor and atmospheric pollutants.Materials and methods: the lung cancer incidence in Moscow; radiation-hygienic passport of the territory; .U.S. EPA estimated average age at all and radon induced deaths, years of life lost; Report of UNSCEAR 2006 and WHO handbook on indoor radon, 2009. Trend analysis of incidence; evaluation of the excess relative risk; assessment of ratio radon-induced population risk and published values оf total population carcinogenic risk from chemical carcinogens.Results: it is shown that the 304 cases of lung cancer per year (1. 85 10-3 on average from 2006 to 2011 (21280diseases for 70 years in addition to background level induced by radon; the differences in average trends of all lungcancer incidence in the districts can exceed 25%.Conclusion. The potential of risk reduction by measures of mitigation radon concentration exceeds 5 times the cost efficiency to reduce emissions from vehicles and can reduce cancer incidence, on average 236 cases per year; population risk 16520 cases over 70 years or save not less than 2832 person-years of life per year. The annual effect of reducing losses from not-survival of 12 years as a result of radon-induced lung cancer deaths exceeds 14160000 dollars. The evaluating of the carcinogenic risk from radon in accordance with the definition of population risk increases the predictive evaluation of the effectiveness of preventive measures more than twice.

  19. Carcinogenic risk of hot-particle exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been suggested that spatially non-uniform radiation exposures, such as those from small radioactive particles ('hot particles'), may be very much more carcinogenic than when the same amount of energy is deposited uniformly throughout a tissue volume. This review provides a brief summary of in vivo and in vitro experimental findings, and human epidemiology data, which can be used to evaluate the veracity of this suggestion. Overall, this supports the contrary view and indicates that average dose, as advocated by the ICRP, is likely to provide a reasonable estimate of carcinogenic risk (within a factor of ∼ ±3). There are few human data with which to address this issue. The limited data on lung cancer mortality following occupational inhalation of plutonium aerosols, and the incidence of liver cancer and leukaemia due to thorotrast administration for clinical diagnosis, do not appear to support a significant enhancement factor. Very few animal studies, including mainly lung and skin exposures, provide any indication of a hot-particle enhancement for carcinogenicity. Some recent in vitro malignant transformation experiments provide evidence for an enhanced cell transformation for hot-particle exposures but, properly interpreted, the effect is modest. Few studies extend below absorbed doses of ∼ 0.1 Gy. (review)

  20. Impact and compliance: OSHA Carcinogen Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, A.F. Jr.; Crowder, C.; Wisniewski, S.; Russell, T.; Senn, K.

    1980-06-26

    This document provides an examination of various aspects of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)Carcinogen Policy. To satisfy the dimensions of the Policy's broad, general nature, a two-fold approach was taken. Throughout, the focus is on the possible effects of the Policy's implementation, but this is first approached as it generally will effect research and compliance activities across broad industry sectors, while specific impacts on DOE are addressed separately. To overview and integrate these approaches, and to provide a quick reference for further information, an outline of information is presented. General or industry-wide applications are addressed both in the Summary and Overview of the Policy (Chapters I and II) and in the discussion of the Model Standard (Chapter V). Also included is a copy of the Policy itself in the General Industry Standards and interpretations Change 10. Sections specifically addressed to the major concerns of DOE and its contractors are a discussion of implications for action regarding the synthetic fuels program, a comparison of the OSHA Model Regulations and the FE OSH Manual Standards for Carcinogens, and finally, a list of known carcinogens in coal gasification/liquefaction. Together, these elements illustrate the broad scope of the policy's impact, which economic and other constraining consequences begin to become visible. Measures to minimize these consequences are a common underlying theme to each of the sections.

  1. Modulation of immune function by UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to its carcinogenic activity, ultraviolet (UV) radiation is capable of modifying certain immunologic reactions. Immunologic alterations induced in mice by UV radiation include both local and distant effects. Local alterations result from a direct effect of UV radiation on an immune reaction that takes place at the site of irradiation. Distant alterations are those in which exposure of skin to UV radiation at one site modifies an immune reaction occurring at a distant, unexposed site. Based on recent studies, the authors propose that there may be two types of distant alterations. One is nonspecific, may be due to accumulation of leukocytes at the site of UV-induced inflammation, and is exemplified by the suppression of delayed hypersensitivity and local graft-versus-host (GVH) reactions. The second may result from DNA damage, may involve a soluble mediator, and is manifested by the systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity and the formation of antigen-specific suppressor T lymphocytes. These immunologic effects of exposure to UV radiation may be important in the pathogenesis of skin cancer and other cutaneous diseases

  2. Increased UV exposure in Finland in 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exceptionally low total ozone, up to 40% below the normal level, was measured over Northern Europe during winter and spring in 1992 and 1993. In 1993 the depletion persisted up to the end of May, resulting in a significant increase of biologically effective UV radiation. The increases were significantly smaller in 1992 and 1994 than in 1993. The UV exposure of the Finnish population was evaluated through measurements and theoretical calculations. The increase in measured erythemal (International Lighting Commission) UV falling onto horizontal surfaces on clear days was determined relative to model calculations for an average ozone amount. The increase was on average 10% from April to May 1993, and the maximal measured increase was 34%. Theoretical calculations for both erythemal and carcinogenic (Skin Cancer Utrecht-Philadelphia) UV indicated that in 1993 the theoretical annual increase to a vertical (cylinder) surface ranged from 8 to 13% in Finland. The reflection of UV from snow considerably increases facial UV doses in Northern Finland. (author)

  3. Increased UV exposure in Finland in 1993.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, K; Leszczynski, K; Visuri, R; Ylianttila, L

    1995-07-01

    Exceptionally low total ozone, up to 40% below the normal level, was measured over Northern Europe during winter and spring in 1992 and 1993. In 1993 the depletion persisted up to the end of May, resulting in a significant increase of biologically effective UV radiation. The increases were significantly smaller in 1992 and 1993 than in 1993. The UV exposure of the Finnish population was evaluated through measurements and theoretical calculations. The increase in measured erythemal (International Lighting Commission) UV falling onto horizontal surfaces on clear day was determined relative to model calculations for an average ozone amount. The increase was on average 10% from April to May 1993, and the maximal measured increase was 34%. Theoretical calculations for both erythemal and carcinogenic (Skin Cancer Utrecht--Philadelphia) UV indicated that in 1993 the theoretical annual increase to a vertical (cylinder) surface ranged from 8 to 13% in Finland. The reflection of UV from snow considerably increases facial UV doses in Northern Finland. PMID:7638253

  4. Carcinogenic potential of hydrotreated petroleum aromatic extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, S M; Hend, R W; van der Wiel, A; Hunt, P F

    1985-06-01

    Five experimental petroleum extracts were produced from luboil distillates derived from Middle East paraffinic crude by solvent extraction and severe hydrotreatment. The polycyclic aromatic content (PCA) of the extracts was determined by dimethyl sulphoxide extraction and ranged from 3.7-9.2% w/w. The five extracts were evaluated for their potential to induce cutaneous and systemic neoplasia in female mice derived from Carworth Farm No 1 strain (CF1). The test substances were applied undiluted (0.2 ml per application) to the shorn dorsal skin twice weekly for up to 78 weeks, with 48 mice in each treatment group and 96 in the untreated control group; two further groups, each of 48 mice, were similarly treated either with a non-hydrotreated commercial aromatic extract (PCA content, 19.7% w/v) or with a low dose of benzo(a)pyrene (12.5 micrograms/ml acetone). The mice were housed individually in polypropylene cages in specified pathogen free conditions. The incidence of cutaneous and systemic tumours was determined from histological analysis of haematoxylin and eosin stained tissue sections. The results were correlated with the PCA content of the extracts and compared with those from female mice exposed to a non-hydrotreated commercial aromatic extract. Four of the hydrotreated extracts were carcinogenic for murine skin; the two products with the lower PCA contents were less carcinogenic than the products with the higher PCA contents and all were less carcinogenic than the commercial extract. One extract with the lowest PCA content was non-carcinogenic. Thus refining by severe hydrotreatment was an effective method of reducing the carcinogenic potential of petroleum aromatic extracts. Although other physicochemical properties may influence the biological activity of oil products, the PCA content determined by dimethyl sulphoxide extraction may be a useful indicator of the potential of oil products to induce cutaneous tumours in experimental animals. There was no

  5. Ochratoxin A: An overview on toxicity and carcinogenicity in animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Manderville, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a ubiquitous mycotoxin produced by fungi of improperly stored food products. OTA is nephrotoxic and is suspected of being the main etiological agent responsible for human Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN) and associated urinary tract tumours. Striking similarities between OTA-induced porcine nephropathy in pigs and BEN in humans are observed. International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified OTA as a possible human carcinogen (group 2B). Currently, the mode of carcinogenic action by OTA is unknown. OTA is genotoxic following oxidative metabolism. This activity is thought to play a central role in OTA-mediated carcinogenesis and may be divided into direct (covalent DNA adduction) and indirect (oxidative DNA damage) mechanisms of action. Evidence for a direct mode of genotoxicity has been derived from the sensitive 32P-postlabelling assay. OTA facilitates guanine-specific DNA adducts in vitro and in rat and pig kidney orally dosed, one adduct comigrates with a synthetic carbon (C)-bonded C8-dG OTA adduct standard. In this paper, our current understanding of OTA toxicity and carcinogenicity are reviewed. The available evidence suggests that OTA is a genotoxic carcinogen by induction of oxidative DNA lesions coupled with direct DNA adducts via quinone formation. This mechanism of action should be used to establish acceptable intake levels of OTA from human food sources. PMID:17195275

  6. IARC Monographs: 40 Years of Evaluating Carcinogenic Hazards to Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Aaron; Vineis, Paolo; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Andersen, Aage; Anto, Josep M.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Beland, Frederick A.; Berrington, Amy; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Brownson, Ross C.; Bucher, John R.; Cantor, Kenneth P.; Cardis, Elisabeth; Cherrie, John W.; Christiani, David C.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Coggon, David; Comba, Pietro; Demers, Paul A.; Dement, John M.; Douwes, Jeroen; Eisen, Ellen A.; Engel, Lawrence S.; Fenske, Richard A.; Fleming, Lora E.; Fletcher, Tony; Fontham, Elizabeth; Forastiere, Francesco; Frentzel-Beyme, Rainer; Fritschi, Lin; Gerin, Michel; Goldberg, Marcel; Grandjean, Philippe; Grimsrud, Tom K.; Gustavsson, Per; Haines, Andy; Hartge, Patricia; Hansen, Johnni; Hauptmann, Michael; Heederik, Dick; Hemminki, Kari; Hemon, Denis; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hoppin, Jane A.; Huff, James; Jarvholm, Bengt; Kang, Daehee; Karagas, Margaret R.; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Kjuus, Helge; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kriebel, David; Kristensen, Petter; Kromhout, Hans; Laden, Francine; Lebailly, Pierre; LeMasters, Grace; Lubin, Jay H.; Lynch, Charles F.; Lynge, Elsebeth; ‘t Mannetje, Andrea; McMichael, Anthony J.; McLaughlin, John R.; Marrett, Loraine; Martuzzi, Marco; Merchant, James A.; Merler, Enzo; Merletti, Franco; Miller, Anthony; Mirer, Franklin E.; Monson, Richard; Nordby, Karl-Cristian; Olshan, Andrew F.; Parent, Marie-Elise; Perera, Frederica P.; Perry, Melissa J.; Pesatori, Angela Cecilia; Pirastu, Roberta; Porta, Miquel; Pukkala, Eero; Rice, Carol; Richardson, David B.; Ritter, Leonard; Ritz, Beate; Ronckers, Cecile M.; Rushton, Lesley; Rusiecki, Jennifer A.; Rusyn, Ivan; Samet, Jonathan M.; Sandler, Dale P.; de Sanjose, Silvia; Schernhammer, Eva; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Seixas, Noah; Shy, Carl; Siemiatycki, Jack; Silverman, Debra T.; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Allan H.; Smith, Martyn T.; Spinelli, John J.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Stallones, Lorann; Stayner, Leslie T.; Steenland, Kyle; Stenzel, Mark; Stewart, Bernard W.; Stewart, Patricia A.; Symanski, Elaine; Terracini, Benedetto; Tolbert, Paige E.; Vainio, Harri; Vena, John; Vermeulen, Roel; Victora, Cesar G.; Ward, Elizabeth M.; Weinberg, Clarice R.; Weisenburger, Dennis; Wesseling, Catharina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Zahm, Shelia Hoar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Programme for the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans has been criticized for several of its evaluations, and also for the approach used to perform these evaluations. Some critics have claimed that failures of IARC Working Groups to recognize study weaknesses and biases of Working Group members have led to inappropriate classification of a number of agents as carcinogenic to humans. Objectives: The authors of this Commentary are scientists from various disciplines relevant to the identification and hazard evaluation of human carcinogens. We examined criticisms of the IARC classification process to determine the validity of these concerns. Here, we present the results of that examination, review the history of IARC evaluations, and describe how the IARC evaluations are performed. Discussion: We concluded that these recent criticisms are unconvincing. The procedures employed by IARC to assemble Working Groups of scientists from the various disciplines and the techniques followed to review the literature and perform hazard assessment of various agents provide a balanced evaluation and an appropriate indication of the weight of the evidence. Some disagreement by individual scientists to some evaluations is not evidence of process failure. The review process has been modified over time and will undoubtedly be altered in the future to improve the process. Any process can in theory be improved, and we would support continued review and improvement of the IARC processes. This does not mean, however, that the current procedures are flawed. Conclusions: The IARC Monographs have made, and continue to make, major contributions to the scientific underpinning for societal actions to improve the public’s health. Citation: Pearce N, Blair A, Vineis P, Ahrens W, Andersen A, Anto JM, Armstrong BK, Baccarelli AA, Beland FA, Berrington A, Bertazzi PA, Birnbaum LS, Brownson RC, Bucher JR, Cantor KP

  7. Molecular biomarkers of oxidative stress associated with bromate carcinogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potassium bromate (KBrO3) is a chemical oxidizing agent found in drinking water as a disinfection byproduct of surface water ozonation. Chronic exposures to KBrO3 cause renal cell tumors in rats, hamsters and mice and thyroid and testicular mesothelial tumors in rats. Experimental evidence indicates that bromate mediates toxicological effects via the induction of oxidative stress. To investigate the contribution of oxidative stress in KBrO3-induced cancer, male F344 rats were administered KBrO3 in their drinking water at multiple concentrations for 2-100 weeks. Gene expression analyses were performed on kidney, thyroid and mesothelial cell RNA. Families of mRNA transcripts differentially expressed with respect to bromate treatment included multiple cancer, cell death, ion transport and oxidative stress genes. Multiple glutathione metabolism genes were up-regulated in kidney following carcinogenic (400 mg/L) but not non-carcinogenic (20 mg/L) bromate exposures. 8-Oxodeoxyguanosine glycosylase (Ogg1) mRNA was up-regulated in response to bromate treatment in kidney but not thyroid. A dramatic decrease in global gene expression changes was observed following 1 mg/L compared to 20 mg/L bromate exposures. In a separate study oxygen-18 (18O) labeled KBrO3 was administered to male rats by oral gavage and tissues were analyzed for 18O deposition. Tissue enrichment of 18O was observed at 5 and 24 h post-KBr18O3 exposure with the highest enrichment occurring in the liver followed by the kidney, thyroid and testes. The kidney dose response observed was biphasic showing similar statistical increases in 18O deposition between 0.25 and 50 mg/L (equivalent dose) KBr18O3 followed by a much greater increase above 50 mg/L. These results suggest that carcinogenic doses of potassium bromate require attainment of a threshold at which oxidation of tissues occurs and that gene expression profiles may be predictive of these physiological changes in renal homeostasis

  8. Childhood cancer: Overview of incidence trends and environmental carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahm, S.H.; Devesa, S.S. [National Cancer Inst., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1995-09-01

    An estimated 8000 children 0 to 14 years of age are diagnosed annually with cancer in the United States. Leukemia and brain tumors are the most common childhood malignancies, accounting for 30 and 20% of newly diagnosed cases, respectively. From 1975 to 1978 to 1987 to 1990, cancer among white children increased slightly from 12.8 to 14.1/100,000. Increases are suggested for leukemia, gliomas, and, to a much lesser extent, Wilms` tumor. There are a few well-established environmental causes of childhood cancer such as radiation, chemotherapeutic agents, and diethylstilbestrol. Many other agents such as electromagnetic fields, pesticides, and some parental occupational exposures are suspected of playing roles, but the evidence is not conclusive at this time. Some childhood exposures such as secondhand cigarette smoke may contribute to cancers that develop many years after childhood. For some exposures such as radiation and pesticides data suggest that children may be more susceptible to the carcinogenic effects than similarly exposed adults. 143 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. Carcinogenesis related to intense pulsed light and UV exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedelund, L; Lerche, C; Wulf, H C;

    2006-01-01

    preoperative UV-exposed mice (p=0.94) and from 22 to 23 weeks in pre- and postoperative UV-exposed mice (p=0.11). IPL rejuvenation of lightly pigmented skin did not induce pigmentary changes (p=1.00). IPL rejuvenation of UV-pigmented skin resulted in an immediate increased skin pigmentation and a subsequent......This study examines whether intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment has a carcinogenic potential itself or may influence ultraviolet (UV)-induced carcinogenesis. Secondly, it evaluates whether UV exposure may influence IPL-induced side effects. Hairless, lightly pigmented mice (n=144) received three...... IPL treatments at 2-week intervals. Simulated solar radiation was administered preoperatively [six standard erythema doses (SED) four times weekly for 11 weeks] as well as pre- and postoperatively (six SED four times weekly up to 26 weeks). Skin tumors were assessed weekly during a 12-month...

  10. UV-induced skin cancer in a hairless mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gruijl, F R; Forbes, P D

    1995-07-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a very common carcinogen in our environment, but epidemiological data on the relationship between skin cancers and ambient solar UV radiation are very restricted. In hairless mice the process of UV carcinogenesis can be studied in depth. Experiments with this animal model have yielded quantitative data on how tumor development depends on dose, time and wavelength of the UV radiation. In combination with epidemiological data, these experimental results can be transposed to humans. Comparative studies on molecular, cellular and physiological changes in mouse and man can further our fundamental understanding of UV carcinogenesis in man. This is likely to improve risk assessments such as those related to stratospheric ozone depletion, and to yield well-targeted intervention schemes, e.g. prescribing a specific drug or diet, for high-risk individuals. PMID:7646487

  11. Carcinogen-induced damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human cells respond to carcinogen-induced damage in their DNA in at least two ways. The first response, excision repair, proceeds by at least three variations, depending on the nature of the damage. Nucleotide excision results in relatively large repair patches but few free DNA breaks, since the endonuclease step is limiting. Apurinic repair is characterized by the appearance of numerous breaks in the DNA and by short repair patches. The pathways behave as though they function independently. Lymphoic cells derived from a xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C patient are deficient in their ability to perform nucleotide excision and also to excise 6 methoxyguanine adducts, but they are apurinic repair competent. Organisms may bypass damage in their DNA. Lymphoblastoid cells, including those derived from xeroderma pigmentosum treated with 3H-anti-BPDE, can replicate their DNA at low doses of carcinogen. Unexcised 3H is found in the light or parental strand of the resulting hybrid DNA when replication occurs in medium with BrdUrd. This observation indicates a bypass reaction occurring by a mechanism involving branch migration at DNA growing points. Branch migration in DNA preparations have been observed, but the evidence is that most occurs in BrdUrd-containing DNA during cell lysis. The measurement of the bifilarly substituted DNA resulting from branch migration is a convenient method of estimating the proportion of new synthesis remaining in the vicinity of the DNA growing point. Treatment with carcinogens or caffeine results in accumulation of DNA growing points accompanied by the synthesis of shortened pieces of daughter DNA

  12. RADON AND CARCINOGENIC RISK IN MOSCOW

    OpenAIRE

    S. M. Golovanev

    2015-01-01

    Objective: comparative evaluation of carcinogenic risk inMoscowfrom radon in indoor and atmospheric pollutants.Materials and methods: the lung cancer incidence in Moscow; radiation-hygienic passport of the territory; .U.S. EPA estimated average age at all and radon induced deaths, years of life lost; Report of UNSCEAR 2006 and WHO handbook on indoor radon, 2009. Trend analysis of incidence; evaluation of the excess relative risk; assessment of ratio radon-induced population risk and published...

  13. Radiation equivalency: A conceptual relationship for indexing the carcinogenic properties of radiation and environmental pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Tier-Two type of bioassay complimentary to the National Cancer Institute whole-animal protocol has been proposed based upon relating the antitumor cell-mediated immune responses induced by the test substance to those immune effects induced by a localized exposure to X-rays, a concept which termed the substance's Radiation Equivalency. The conceptual principle for the Radiation Equivalency entails the hypothesis that a mutagenic/carcinogenic insult results in the development of transformed ''foreign-like'' cells which then initiate their specific recognition by the host's immune system. This immune sensitization can then be quantitated by measuring the increased injury and killing of cultured tumor cells by the now so-called educated peripheral blood lymphoid-cells obtained from the exposed animals. The authors proposed that all carcinogenic agents will interact with their particular organoismal components in a constant fashion to induce such antitumor immune responses, thus permitting the experimental results to be interpreted according to the Law of Mass Action. The findings have been accordingly described in terms of Michaelis-Menton kinetics with specific experimental comparisons in the rate presented between the colon carcinogen, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), and the X-irradiation effects upon the localized hypoxic small bowel to obtain a Radiation Equivalency value for the chemical. Similar measurements have also been utilized for the analysis of mutagens/carcinogens present in the urine obtained from DMH-exposed rats such to arrive at its Radiation Equivalency. Previous findings have been summarized together, all of which suggest that the Radiation Equivalency concept may readily serve as a method for indexing the carcinogenic properties of various environmental pollutants

  14. Indoor air-assessment: Indoor concentrations of environmental carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the report, indoor concentration data are presented for the following general categories of air pollutants: radon-222, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), asbestos, gas phase organic compounds, formaldehyde, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), pesticides, and inorganic compounds. These pollutants are either known or suspect carcinogens (i.e., radon-222, asbestos) or more complex mixtures or classes of compounds which contain known or suspect carcinogens. Concentration data for individual carcinogenic compounds in complex mixtures are usually far from complete. The data presented for complex mixtures often include compounds which are not carcinogenic or for which data are insufficient to evaluate carcinogenicity. Their inclusion is justified, however, by the possibility that further work may show them to be carcinogens, cocarcinogens, initiators or promotors, or that they may be employed as markers (e.g., nicotine, acrolein) for the estimation of exposure to complex mixtures

  15. Trace elements and carcinogenicity: a subject in review

    OpenAIRE

    Mulware, Stephen Juma

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is known to be a multi-step process, which involves different stages including initiation, promotion, progression and metastasis. Chemical carcinogens including most trace elements can change any of these processes to induce their carcinogenic effects. Various studies confirm that cancer arises from the accumulation of irreversible DNA damage, which results from multiple mutations in critical genes in the body organ. Chemical carcinogens most often directly or after xenobiotic metaboli...

  16. Effects of combined exposure of F344 rats to inhaled 239PuO2 and a chemical carcinogen (NNK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Workers in nuclear weapons facilitates have a significant potential for exposure to chemical carcinogens and to radiation from external sources or from internally deposited radionuclides such as 239Pu. Although the carcinogenic effects of inhaled 239Pu and many chemicals have been studied individually, very little information is available on their combined effects. One chemical carcinogen that workers could be exposed to, via tobacco smoke, is the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(N-Methyl-N-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), a product of the curing of tobacco and pyrolysis of nicotine in tobacco. NNK causes lung tumors in rats, regardless of the route of administration and to a lesser extent tumors in the liver, nasal passages, and pancreas. The purpose of this study is to characterize the effects of combined exposure of rats to NNK and internally deposited plutonium, as well as to these agents alone

  17. A review of mechanisms of acrylamide carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besaratinia, Ahmad; Pfeifer, Gerd P

    2007-03-01

    The fact that acrylamide, a proven rodent carcinogen, is present in significant quantities (up to several mg/kg of foodstuff) in a wide range of commonly consumed human foods is alarming. Attempts to determine a possible involvement of dietary acrylamide in human cancers have not been conclusive, however. To resolve the carcinogenicity of acrylamide to humans, the as yet unknown mechanism of action of acrylamide needs to be unraveled. The present review is a synopsis of research on the known and hypothetical modes of action of acrylamide of relevance for carcinogenesis. Both genotoxic and non-genotoxic modes of action of acrylamide are discussed with special emphasis on DNA adduct-targeted mutagenesis. Mechanistic data are presented from various experimental systems including in vitro experiments and in vivo rodent and human studies with special focus on mouse models. Human exposure data, including estimates of daily intake of dietary acrylamide in different populations and the corresponding cancer risk assessments are provided. The significant gaps in knowledge, which currently preclude a more definitive evaluation of human cancer risk due to exposure to dietary acrylamide, are highlighted. Future directions for research on acrylamide and cancer are outlined, and potential challenges are underscored. PMID:17234719

  18. Estimation of carcinogenicity using molecular fragments tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Lu, Jing; Wang, Fei; Shen, Qiancheng; Zheng, Mingyue; Luo, Xiaomin; Zhu, Weiliang; Jiang, Hualiang; Chen, Kaixian

    2012-08-27

    Carcinogenicity is an important toxicological endpoint that poses high concern to drug discovery. In this study, we developed a method to extract structural alerts (SAs) and modulating factors of carcinogens on the basis of statistical analyses. First, the Gaston algorithm, a frequent subgraph mining method, was used to detect substructures that occurred at least six times. Then, a molecular fragments tree was built and pruned to select high-quality SAs. The p-value of the parent node in the tree and that of its children nodes were compared, and the nodes that had a higher statistical significance in binomial tests were retained. Finally, modulating factors that suppressed the toxic effects of SAs were extracted by three self-defining rules. The accuracy of the 77 SAs plus four SA/modulating factor pairs model for the training set, and the test set was 0.70 and 0.65, respectively. Our model has higher predictive ability than Benigni's model, especially in the test set. The results highlight that this method is preferable in terms of prediction accuracy, and the selected SAs are useful for prediction as well as interpretation. Moreover, our method is convenient to users in that it can extract SAs from a database using an automated and unbiased manner that does not rely on a priori knowledge of mechanism of action. PMID:22834690

  19. Carcinogenicity/tumour promotion by NDL PCB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrenk, D. [Kaiserslautern Univ. (Germany). Food Chemistry and Environmental Toxicology

    2004-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) belong to the group of persistent environmental pollutants exhibiting neurotoxic, teratogenic and tumour-promoting effects in experimental animal models. PCB congeners can be divided into 'dioxinlike' and 'non-dioxinlike' congeners on the basis of their ability to act as aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists. Like the most toxic dioxin congener 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) 'dioxinlike' PCBs bind to the AhR and show characteristic effects on the expression of AhR-regulated genes including the induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1. On the other hand, 'non-dioxinlike' PCB congeners have a lower or no binding affinity to the AhR, but exhibit a 'phenobarbital-type' induction of CYP 2B1/2 activity. A carcinogenic potential of PCBs has been demonstrated with technical mixtures such as Aroclors or Clophens. In these studies the liver and the thyroid gland were found to be the principal target organs of PCB-mediated carcinogenesis in rodents. No studies have been published, however, on the carcinogenicity of individual congeners. In two-stage initiation-promotion protocols in rats, both technical mixtures and individual 'dioxinlike' and 'non-dioxinlike' congeners were reported to act as liver tumour promoters.

  20. Hepatic metabolism of carcinogenic β-asarone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartus, Alexander T; Stegmüller, Simone; Simson, Nadine; Wahl, Andrea; Neef, Sylvia; Kelm, Harald; Schrenk, Dieter

    2015-09-21

    β-Asarone (1) belongs to the group of naturally occurring phenylpropenes like eugenol or anethole. Compound 1 is found in several plants, e.g., Acorus calamus or Asarum europaeum. Compound 1-containing plant materials and essential oils thereof are used to flavor foods and alcoholic beverages and as ingredients of many drugs in traditional phytomedicines. Although 1 has been claimed to have several positive pharmacological effects, it was found to be genotoxic and carcinogenic in rodents (liver and small intestine). The mechanism of action of carcinogenic allylic phenylpropenes consists of the metabolic activation via cytochrome P450 enzymes and sulfotransferases. In vivo experiments suggested that this pathway does not play a major role in the carcinogenicity of the propenylic compound 1 as is the case for other propenylic compounds, e.g., anethole. Since the metabolic pathways of 1 have not been investigated and its carcinogenic mode of action is unknown, we investigated the metabolism of 1 in liver microsomes of rats, bovines, porcines, and humans using (1)H NMR, HPLC-DAD, and LC-ESI-MS/MS techniques. We synthesized the majority of identified metabolites which were used as reference compounds for the quantification and final verification of metabolites. Microsomal epoxidation of the side chain of 1 presumably yielded (Z)-asarone-1',2'-epoxide (8a) which instantly was hydrolyzed to the corresponding erythro- and threo-configurated diols (9b, 9a) and the ketone 2,4,5-trimethoxyphenylacetone (13). This was the main metabolic pathway in the metabolism of 1 in all investigated liver microsomes. Hydroxylation of the side chain of 1 led to the formation of three alcohols at total yields of less than 30%: 1'-hydroxyasarone (2), (E)- and (Z)-3'-hydroxyasarone (4 and 6), with 6 being the mainly formed alcohol and 2 being detectable only in liver microsomes of Aroclor 1254-pretreated rats. Small amounts of 4 and 6 were further oxidized to the corresponding carbonyl

  1. Inhibiting the regeneration of N-nitrosodimethylamine in drinking water by UV photolysis combined with ozonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is a highly carcinogenic compound that is suspected of carcinogenic activity in the human body. A variety of methods are used to remove NDMA from water, but the main degradation products, dimethylamine (DMA) and NO2-, are also precursors for NDMA formation. UV irradiation combined with ozonation (UV/O3) was examined in this investigation for its ability to inhibit the regeneration of NDMA after degradation. Both the degradation products and the regeneration potential of NDMA were compared between UV irradiation alone and UV/O3. The yields of DMA and NO2- in the UV/O3 process were less than for UV irradiation alone. Yields of DMA and NO2- were 2.25 mg L-1 and 3.22 mg L-1 from UV irradiation, while they were 0.92 mg L-1 and 0.45 mg L-1 from the UV/O3 process. Furthermore, the regeneration of NDMA was also less after the UV/O3 process than after UV irradiation. The concentration of regenerated NDMA was more than 51.8 μg L-1 after UV irradiation regardless of the dosage of Cl2. However, the concentration of regenerated NDMA in the UV/O3 process was less than 7.37 μg L-1 under the same conditions. Consequently, the UV/O3 process was more effective than UV irradiation alone in inhibiting NDMA regeneration. The inhibition of NDMA regeneration was due to a decrease in DMA and NO2- produced by the UV/O3 process. As the major products generated from NDMA, NO2- and DMA were likely to be oxidized by ozone and hydroxyl radicals (·OH). In addition, the reaction between NDMA and ·OH would possibly generate methylamine as the only product, leading to a decrease in the production of DMA by the UV/O3 process.

  2. Effects of garlic on cellular doubling time and DNA strand breaks caused by UV light and BPL, enhanced with catechol and TPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    3T3 cell cultures were exposed to UV light and Beta-Propiolactone. Neoplastic cell transformation (TF) was demonstrated after concurrent addition of catechol, or repeated addition of TPA. Addition of garlic to all fluences/concentrations of the carcinogen/cocarcinogen/promoter groups reduced the number of transformed foci/dish by at least 40%. Since the cell cycle is prolonged following exposure to carcinogens, it is likely the cell requires a longer time to repair this damage. The doubling time (DT) was extended from 12 to 36 hrs. when cells were exposed to BPL and from 12 o 28 hrs. when cells were exposed to 3.0J/M2/sec. If an anticarcinogenic compound is also added, it is reasonable to assume that the cell cycle may be further elongated. The cell cycle, denoted by DT was lengthened from 12 to 47 hrs and from 12 to 86 hrs for BPL and UVC, respectively. The extensions occurred in a dope dependent manner. The concentrations of the cocarcinogen and promoter remained constant throughout the experiment. When strand breaks were determined at the same dose sequences, by alkaline elution, more repair was seen with garlic where the lowest and middle doses of BPL were used and almost no decrease in % DNA eluted was seen with UVC exposed cells. With catechol, there was a two-fold decrease in % DNA eluted at the lowest and middle fluences. When TPA was added, all three fluences of UVC showed more than a threefold decrease in % DNA eluted. BPS with both TPA and catechol, again showed a reduction in strand breaks only low and middle doses. Both a direct-acting alkylating agent, BPL, and a physical carcinogen, UVC, were homogeneously affected, in terms of doubling time, but not when strand break repair was examined. A separate mechanism may be responsible for repair, and the mechanism associated with combinations of physical carcinogen enhancing agents combined with some non-carcinogens may be more profoundly affected by some natural products

  3. Mechanisms underlying UV-induced immune suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skin cancer is the most prevalent form of human neoplasia. Estimates suggest that in excess of one million new cases of skin cancer will be diagnosed this year alone in the United States (www.cancer.org/statistics). Fortunately, because of their highly visible location, skin cancers are more rapidly diagnosed and more easily treated than other types of cancer. Be that as it may, approximately 10,000 Americans a year die from skin cancer. The cost of treating non-melanoma skin cancer is estimated to be in excess of US$ 650 million a year [J.G. Chen, A.B. Fleischer, E.D. Smith, C. Kancler, N.D. Goldman, P.M. Williford, S.R. Feldman, Cost of non-melanoma skin cancer treatment in the United States, Dermatol. Surg. 27 (2001) 1035-1038], and when melanoma is included, the estimated cost of treating skin cancer in the United States is estimated to rise to US$ 2.9 billion annually (www.cancer.org/statistics). Because the morbidity and mortality associated with skin cancer is a major public health problem, it is important to understand the mechanisms underlying skin cancer development. The primary cause of skin cancer is the ultraviolet (UV) radiation found in sunlight. In addition to its carcinogenic potential, UV radiation is also immune suppressive. In fact, data from studies with both experimental animals and biopsy proven skin cancer patients suggest that there is an association between the immune suppressive effects of UV radiation and its carcinogenic potential. The focus of this manuscript will be to review the mechanisms underlying the induction of immune suppression following UV exposure. Particular attention will be directed to the role of soluble mediators in activating immune suppression

  4. Mechanisms underlying UV-induced immune suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullrich, Stephen E. [Department of Immunology, University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, South Campus Research Building 1, 7455 Fannin St., P.O. Box 301402, Houston, TX 77030-1903 (United States)]. E-mail: sullrich@mdanderson.org

    2005-04-01

    Skin cancer is the most prevalent form of human neoplasia. Estimates suggest that in excess of one million new cases of skin cancer will be diagnosed this year alone in the United States (www.cancer.org/statistics). Fortunately, because of their highly visible location, skin cancers are more rapidly diagnosed and more easily treated than other types of cancer. Be that as it may, approximately 10,000 Americans a year die from skin cancer. The cost of treating non-melanoma skin cancer is estimated to be in excess of US$ 650 million a year [J.G. Chen, A.B. Fleischer, E.D. Smith, C. Kancler, N.D. Goldman, P.M. Williford, S.R. Feldman, Cost of non-melanoma skin cancer treatment in the United States, Dermatol. Surg. 27 (2001) 1035-1038], and when melanoma is included, the estimated cost of treating skin cancer in the United States is estimated to rise to US$ 2.9 billion annually (www.cancer.org/statistics). Because the morbidity and mortality associated with skin cancer is a major public health problem, it is important to understand the mechanisms underlying skin cancer development. The primary cause of skin cancer is the ultraviolet (UV) radiation found in sunlight. In addition to its carcinogenic potential, UV radiation is also immune suppressive. In fact, data from studies with both experimental animals and biopsy proven skin cancer patients suggest that there is an association between the immune suppressive effects of UV radiation and its carcinogenic potential. The focus of this manuscript will be to review the mechanisms underlying the induction of immune suppression following UV exposure. Particular attention will be directed to the role of soluble mediators in activating immune suppression.

  5. Biological effects of mutagenic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increasing body of evidence that mutagenic agents (biological, chemical and physical) play an important role in the etiology of human diseases. Mutations may occur in the germinal as well as in the somatic cells. Mutations of the germ cells may result on infertility or fertilization of damaged cells, the later leading to abortion or birth of a malformed fetus. Somatic-cells mutations may have various biological effects, depending on the period of the human life at which the mutation occurs. If it occurs during the prenatal life, a teratogenic or carcinogenic effect will be observed. If the somatic cell is damaged during the postnatal life, this will lead to neoplastic transformation. Therefore it is extremely important to know the mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic effects of various biological, chemical and physical agents in order to eliminate them from our environment. (author). 13 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  6. Comparison of N-nitrosodiethylamine degradation in water by UV irradiation and UV/O3: Efficiency, product and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N-Nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) is a member of nitrosamines, which is strong carcinogenic. In order to explore an effective treatment method for NDEA removal from water, sole UV irradiation and UV/O3 were carried out in this study. The removal efficiency, degradation products and pathways were compared between those two processes. Results showed that NDEA removal efficiency achieved 99% within 15 min by both UV and UV/O3. Degradation reaction well followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. Water pH had different effect on NDEA degradation in those two processes. Acidic and neutral conditions were good for NDEA degradation by sole UV irradiation. However, NDEA underwent rapid degradation under various pH conditions in the UV/O3 process. Though the ozone introduction in the UV/O3 process had little effect on NDEA degradation efficiency, it had significant effect on its degradation products and pathways. Methylamine, dimethylamine, ethylamine and diethylamine were observed as aliphatic amine products of NDEA degradation in both two processes. They were assumed to arise due to N-N bond fission under UV irradiation, or due to the reaction of NDEA and hydroxyl radicals in the UV/O3 process.

  7. Is nitrous oxide a genotoxic carcinogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, Michael R; Hammond, Timothy G

    2015-07-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) has been widely used as a dental and surgical anaesthetic for over 150 years. However, results from a recent study suggested that increased DNA damage was seen in lymphocytes from surgical patients and this led to its continued clinical use to be questioned. The data can be challenged on technical grounds and must be considered with other studies in order to assess any possible risk. There are other studies indicating that N2O has weak genotoxicity in man, but these are confused by exposure of the populations to other anaesthetic gases including isoflurane and sevoflurane, both of which have also been reported to increase DNA damage. It should be noted that the suggested genotoxic mechanisms are all indirect, including folate deficiency, oxidative stress and homocysteine toxicity. Further, results from in vitro studies indicate that N2O has no direct DNA reactivity as negative results were obtained in a bacterial mutation (Ames) test and an assay for mutation at the hprt locus in Chinese hamster lung cells. Although not performed to definitive study designs, no evidence of carcinogenicity was seen in two long-term tests in mice and another in rats. Although there is some evidence that N2O is weakly genotoxic in humans, this appears to be similar to that reported for isoflurane and sevoflurane and all the postulated mechanisms have clear thresholds with no evidence of direct DNA reactivity. Because any potential genotoxic mechanism would have a threshold, it seems reasonable to conclude that neither occasional high exposure to patients as an anaesthetic nor low-level exposure to staff within published recommended exposure limits presents any significant carcinogenic risk. PMID:25852088

  8. Chemical mechanisms of the interaction between radiation and chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is evidence to suggest that ionizing radiation and chemical carcinogens can act synergistically to produce deleterious biological effects. In addition, many carcinogens undergo metabolic activation in vivo. This activation, initiated by biochemical redox reactions, can be simulated chemically, electrochemically, photochemically and radiation chemically. The principal reactive species formed by the action of ionizing radiation on aqueous solutions of macromolecules and mammalian cells, are hydroxyl radicals and superoxide anions. Pulse and steady-state radiolysis studies of model chemical systems have established that these species can 'activate' chemical carcinogens by a radical oxidation process, and that the resulting activated carcinogens can subsequently react with nucleophilic sites on DNA and other potential target macromolecules. Rate constants for some of the fast reactions involved in the radiation activation of carcinogens and in the subsequent carcinogen-DNA interactions have been determined, together with the yields of radiation-induced covalent DNA-carcinogen binding. A redox models for radiation-induced chemical carcinogenesis is proposed which describes a possible mechanism of action involving free radical species generated in the aqueous cellular milieu, which diffuse to and react with carcinogens located within the micro-environment of the cell. Preliminary experiments suggest that protection against radiation and chemical carcinogenesis can be achieved by radical scavenging or by competitive free radical inhibition

  9. Carcinogens in the Workplace: A Scientific, Political and Social Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Atherley, Gordon; Whiting, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Investigation, assessment, and management of carcinogenic risks are not only scientific but also political responsibilities. In Canada, this becomes cumbersome, since local, provincial and federal policies are involved. The process also involves workers and management. This article outlines Canadian legislative experience, the principles involved, the methods of risk assessment, and the classification of carcinogens in the workplace.

  10. Workshop on problem areas associated with developing carcinogen guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-06-01

    A workshop was conducted to discuss problem areas associated with developing carcinogen guidelines. Session topics included (1) definition of a carcinogen for regulatory purposes; (2) potency; (3) risk assessment; (4) uncertainties; (5) de minimis quantity; and (6) legal and regulatory issues. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  11. Researchers exploring faster alternatives to 2-year test for carcinogenicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Charlie

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: Animals;Animals,Laboratory;biomarkers of exposure & effect: validation;Carcinogenicity Tests;Carcinogens;Female;metabolism;methods;Male;Mice;Pharmaceutical Preparations;Predictive Value of Tests;Prognosis;Rats;standards;Species Specificity;trends;Time Factors;Tumor Markers,Biological;United States;United States Environmental Protection Agency;United States Food and Drug Administration.

  12. 29 CFR 1926.1103 - 13 carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 13 carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.). 1926.1103 Section 1926.1103 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... § 1926.1103 13 carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.). Note: The requirements applicable to...

  13. 29 CFR 1915.1003 - 13 carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 13 carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.). 1915.1003 Section 1915.1003 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Hazardous Substances § 1915.1003 13 carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.). Note: The requirements...

  14. 29 CFR 1910.1003 - 13 Carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... employees, designated representatives, and the Assistant Secretary in accordance with 29 CFR 1910.1020 (a... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 13 Carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.). 1910.1003 Section... Substances § 1910.1003 13 Carcinogens (4-Nitrobiphenyl, etc.). (a) Scope and application. (1) This...

  15. The potential carcinogenic risk of tanning beds: clinical guidelines and patient safety advice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2009, the WHO listed ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a group 1 carcinogen. In spite of this, each year, millions of people tan indoor in Western countries. The aim of this review is to summarize evidence of tanning bed carcinogenesis and to present guidelines for use of tanning beds and patient safety advice. A narrative review of the literature was conducted based on both PubMed and Medline searches and on literature review of the retrieved papers. Use of indoor tanning beds represents a significant and avoidable risk factor for the development of both melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. Frequent tanners are more often adolescent females. Tanning beds have additional potential adverse effects such as burns, solar skin damage, infection, and possibly also addictive behavior. The effort in preventing UV light-induced carcinogenesis should currently be aimed at developing new strategies for public health information. Tanning beds are one preventable source of UV radiation. In the majority of people solar UV radiation continues to be the major factor and therefore anti-tanning campaigns must always include sunbathers

  16. Lymphocyte reactivity of workers exposed to carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic chemicals.

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, S.; Taylor, G; Hurst, W; Wilson, P.; Costello, C B

    1981-01-01

    Immunological studies have shown an increased lymphocyte reactivity in patients with early stage bladder cancer and individuals with pre-stage T1 exposed to bladder carcinogens (2-naphthylamine and industrial 1-naphthylamine containing 4-8% 2-naphthylamine) before 1952-that is, those at high risk of developing bladder cancer. Because of the close chemical similarity of Tobias acid (2-naphthylamine-1 sulphonic acid) to 2-naphthylamine, the lymphocytotoxicity of workers exposed to this chemical...

  17. [MATline, a job-exposure matrix for the prevision of exposure to carcinogens: new functions and potential applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Umberto; Gilardi, Luisella; Santoro, Silvano; Orengia, Manuela; Marighella, Massimo; Coffano, Maria Elena

    2013-01-01

    MATline, the job-exposure matrix for carcinogenic agents, is a data bank free accessible online. It provides data as classification and toxicological properties of carcinogenic agents, and a list of industrial processes with potential exposure to each carcinogen agent, and an up-to-date estimation of the number of activities and workers related to the industrial process on Regional basis. It also lists the target organs for which a causal relationship with the agent has been established. MATline was recently updated with the new classifications introduced by Regulation EC No. 1272/2008 (CLP). The Authorisation List or the Restriction of the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization of Chemicals (REACh) regulation specifically mark chemicals. The matrix is helpful for professionals in the public health sector to identify in advance the potential sources of exposure, and prioritise intervention plans; for occupational physicians to help identifying causes of occupational cancer cases; for health professionals in the private sector to address chemical risks; for company physicians to validate health surveillance plans; for trade unions to independently check formation contents provided to workers potentially exposed to such risks. PMID:23585435

  18. Detection of genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens in Xpc{sup −/−}p53{sup +/−} mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melis, Joost P.M. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Speksnijder, Ewoud N. [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Kuiper, Raoul V. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Dutch Molecular Pathology Center, Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Salvatori, Daniela C.F. [Leiden University Medical Center, Central Animal Facility, Leiden (Netherlands); Schaap, Mirjam M. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands); Maas, Saskia [Leiden University Medical Center, Central Animal Facility, Leiden (Netherlands); Robinson, Joke; Verhoef, Aart; Benthem, Jan van; Luijten, Mirjam [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Steeg, Harry van, E-mail: Harry.van.Steeg@rivm.nl [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    An accurate assessment of the carcinogenic potential of chemicals and pharmaceutical drugs is essential to protect humans and the environment. Therefore, substances are extensively tested before they are marketed to the public. Currently, the rodent two-year bioassay is still routinely used to assess the carcinogenic potential of substances. However, over time it has become clear that this assay yields false positive results and also has several economic and ethical drawbacks including the use of large numbers of animals, the long duration, and the high cost. The need for a suitable alternative assay is therefore high. Previously, we have proposed the Xpa*p53 mouse model as a very suitable alternative to the two-year bioassay. We now show that the Xpc*p53 mouse model preserves all the beneficial traits of the Xpa*p53 model for sub-chronic carcinogen identification and can identify both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Moreover, Xpc*p53 mice appear to be more responsive than Xpa*p53 mice towards several genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. Furthermore, Xpc*p53 mice are far less sensitive than Xpa*p53 mice for the toxic activity of DNA damaging agents and as such clearly respond in a similar way as wild type mice do. These advantageous traits of the Xpc*p53 model make it a better alternative for in vivo carcinogen testing than Xpa*p53. This pilot study suggests that Xpc*p53 mice are suited for routine sub-chronic testing of both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens and as such represent a suitable alternative to possibly replace the murine life time cancer bioassay. Highlights: ► The Xpc*p53 mouse model is able to identify genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. ► Time, animals and cost can be significantly reduced compared to the 2-year bioassay. ► Xpc*p53 mice are more advantageous for carcinogen identification than Xpa*p53 mice. ► Xpc*p53 mice exhibit a wild type response upon exposure to genotoxicants.

  19. Inhibitory effect of diet related sulphydryl compounds on the formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, N R; Choughuley, A S

    1992-08-31

    N-Nitroso compounds (NOCs) are known to be strong carcinogens in various animals including primates (Preussman and Stewart, (1984) N-Nitroso Compounds). Human exposure to these compounds can be by ingestion or inhalation of preformed NOCs or by endogenous nitrosation from naturally occurring precursors (Bartsch and Montesano, Carcinogenesis, 5 (1984) 1381-1393; Tannebaum (1979) Naturally Occuring Carcinogens, Mutagens and Modulators of Carcinogenesis; Shephard et al., Food Chem. Toxicol., 25 (1987) 91-108). Several factors present in the diet can modify levels of endogenously formed nitrosamines by acting as catalysts or inhibitors. Compounds in the human diet that alter nitrosamine formation would thus play an important role in carcinogenesis study. Earlier researchers have reported the nitrite scavenging nature of sulphydryl compounds (Williams, Chem. Soc. Rev., 15 (1983) 171-196). We therefore studied the modifying effect of sulphydryl compounds viz., cysteine (CE), cystine (CI), glutathione (GU), cysteamine (CEA), cystamine (CEI), cysteic acid (CIA) and thioglycolic acid (TGA) on the nitrosation of model amines viz., pyrrolidine (PYR), piperidine (NPIP) and morpholine (NMOR). Many of these compounds are present in the food we consume. The present work also describes the inhibitory effect of onion and garlic juices on the nitrosation reactions. Both onion and garlic are known to contain sulphur compounds (Block, Sci. Am., 252 (1985) 114-119). Most of these compounds behave as antinitrosating agents and their inhibitory activity towards formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines, under different conditions is described. PMID:1516037

  20. Comparison of the oncogenic potential of several chemotherapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several chemotherapeutic drugs that have been routinely used in cancer treatment were tested for their carcinogenic potential. Two antitumor antibiotics (adriamycin and vincristine), an alkalating agent (melphalan), 5-azacytidine and the bifunctional agent cis-platinum that mimics alkylating agents and/or binds Oxygen-6 or Nitrogen-7 atoms of quanine were tested. Cell killing and cancer induction was assessed using in vitro transformation system. C3H/10T 1/2 cells, while normally exhibiting contact inhibition, can undergo transformation from normal contact inhibited cells to tumorgenic cells when exposed to chemical carcinogens. These cells have been used in the past by this laboratory to study oncogenic transformation of cells exposed to ionizing radiation and electron affinic compounds that sensitize hypoxic cells to x-rays. The endpoints of cell killing and oncogenic transformation presented here give an estimate of the carcinogenic potential of these agents

  1. An estimation of the carcinogenic risk associated with the intake of multiple relevant carcinogens found in meat and charcuterie products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Ángel Rodríguez; Boada, Luis D; Almeida-González, Maira; Mendoza, Zenaida; Ruiz-Suárez, Norberto; Valeron, Pilar F; Camacho, María; Zumbado, Manuel; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis A; Luzardo, Octavio P

    2015-05-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated a link between excessive meat consumption and the incidence of various cancers, especially colorectal cancer, and it has been suggested that environmental carcinogens present in meat might be related to the increased risk of cancer associated with this food. However, there are no studies evaluating the carcinogenic potential of meat in relation to its content of carcinogens. Our purpose was to emphasize the relevance of environmental carcinogens existing in meat as a determinant of the association between cancer and meat consumption. Because within Europe, Spain shows high consumption of meat and charcuterie, we performed this study focusing on Spanish population. Based on the preferences of consumers we acquired 100 samples of meat and charcuterie that reflect the variety available in the European market. We quantified in these samples the concentration of 33 chemicals with calculated carcinogenic potential (PAHs, organochlorine pesticides, and dioxin-like PCBs). The carcinogenic risk of these contaminants was assessed for each food using a risk ratio based on the current consumption of meat and charcuterie and the maximum tolerable intake of these foods depending on the level of contamination by the carcinogens they contain. Our results indicate that the current consumption of beef, pork, lamb, chicken, and "chorizo", represents a relevant carcinogenic risk for consumers (carcinogenic risk quotient between 1.33 and 13.98). In order to reduce carcinogenic risk, the study population should halve the monthly consumption of these foods, and also not to surpass the number of 5 servings of beef/pork/chicken (considered together). PMID:25659303

  2. Carcinogen-specific mutations in preferred Ras-Raf pathway oncogenes directed by strand bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Ross R; Gestl, Shelley A; Lu, Amy Q; Hoke, Alicia; Feith, David J; Gunther, Edward J

    2016-08-01

    Carcinogen exposures inscribe mutation patterns on cancer genomes and sometimes bias the acquisition of driver mutations toward preferred oncogenes, potentially dictating sensitivity to targeted agents. Whether and how carcinogen-specific mutation patterns direct activation of preferred oncogenes remains poorly understood. Here, mouse models of breast cancer were exploited to uncover a mechanistic link between strand-biased mutagenesis and oncogene preference. When chemical carcinogens were employed during Wnt1-initiated mammary tumorigenesis, exposure to either 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) or N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) dramatically accelerated tumor onset. Mammary tumors that followed DMBA exposure nearly always activated the Ras pathway via somatic Hras(CAA61CTA) mutations. Surprisingly, mammary tumors that followed ENU exposure typically lacked Hras mutations, and instead activated the Ras pathway downstream via Braf(GTG636GAG) mutations. Hras(CAA61CTA) mutations involve an A-to-T change on the sense strand, whereas Braf(GTG636GAG) mutations involve an inverse T-to-A change, suggesting that strand-biased mutagenesis may determine oncogene preference. To examine this possibility further, we turned to an alternative Wnt-driven tumor model in which carcinogen exposures augment a latent mammary tumor predisposition in Apc(min) mice. DMBA and ENU each accelerated mammary tumor onset in Apc(min) mice by introducing somatic, "second-hit" Apc mutations. Consistent with our strand bias model, DMBA and ENU generated strikingly distinct Apc mutation patterns, including stringently strand-inverse mutation signatures at A:T sites. Crucially, these contrasting signatures precisely match those proposed to confer bias toward Hras(CAA61CTA) versus Braf(GTG636GAG) mutations in the original tumor sets. Our findings highlight a novel mechanism whereby exposure history acts through strand-biased mutagenesis to specify activation of preferred oncogenes. PMID:27207659

  3. Identification and monitoring of non-radiological carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examines the feasibility of identifying and monitoring occupational exposures to non-radiological carcinogens in the workplace at Canadian nuclear establishments (Whiteshell Laboratories, Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, Cameco Limited and Canadian General Electric Company Limited). Recent epidemiological studies recommended that potential confounding factors of a non-radiological nature be identified and analyzed, particularly non-radiological carcinogens that may be present in the workplace at nuclear facilities. The feasibility of identifying and measuring occupational exposures to non-radiological carcinogens in Canadian nuclear facilities is examined. Also, the report describes the problem of chemical carcinogens and the mechanisms involved in chemical carcinogenesis; the epidemiology related to the problem, followed by a description of the analytical aspects of detection, monitoring and analysis of carcinogens, as well as a discussion on the regulatory aspects and the regulations in place; and the findings, recommendations and concluding remarks of this study. Several problem areas became apparent as the study proceeded. For example, the classification of a chemical as a human carcinogen is a difficult problem, as is its adequate monitoring and analysis. This situation reflects, in turn, the regulatory aspects in the workplace. A list of chemical carcinogens used industrially at the four Canadian nuclear facilities has been identified. The list includes arsenic, asbestos, benzene, cadmium, beryllium, nickel, polychlorinated biphenyls, lead and trichloroethylene. Several recommendations are made in relation to the need for practical and efficient monitoring methods for chemical carcinogens, the definition of radiation and chemical dose equivalencies, and the classification of human chemical carcinogens, as well as their disposal. (author). 122 refs., 8 tabs., 6 figs

  4. The Influences of SiO2 Flatting Agent (UV 55C) on the Properties of Epoxidized Soybean Oil Acrylate%SiO2消光剂(UV 55C)对环氧豆油丙烯酸酯性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢慕华; 耿云华

    2002-01-01

    考察了SiO2消光剂(UV 55C)对环氧豆油丙烯酸酯及其涂膜性能的影响.试验结果表明:SiO 2消光剂(UV 55C)的加入,降低了环氧豆油丙烯酸酯的固化速率和其涂膜的光泽度,但提高了其涂膜的硬度、耐磨性和附着力.

  5. Toxicity of smokeless tobacco in human oral epithelium with emphasis on carcinogen metabolism and regulation of programmed cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Vondracek, Martin

    2002-01-01

    The oral mucosa is globally a common site for cancer development. Primary risk factors include tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption whereas the contribution from usage of smokeless tobacco remains debated. The susceptibility of the human oral epithelium to carcinogens in tobacco likely depends on the presence of biotransformation enzymes, capable of metabolically activating or detoxifying these agents as well opposing influences from oxidative stress. Induction of program...

  6. UV Index Widget

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The UV Index Widget displays the ultraviolet (UV) Index providing a daily forecast of the expected risk of overexposure to the sun for a user-specified area of...

  7. Biologic markers in risk assessment for environmental carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, F.; Mayer, J.; Santella, R.M.; Brenner, D.; Jeffrey, A.; Latriano, L.; Smith, S.; Warburton, D.; Young, T.L.; Tsai, W.Y.; Brandt-Rauf, P. (Columbia Univ. School of Public Health, New York, NY (United States)); Hemminki, K. (Finnish School of Occupational Health, Helsinki (Finland))

    1991-01-01

    The potential of biologic markers to provide more timely and precise risk assessments for environmental carcinogens is viewed against the current state-of-the-art in biological monitoring/molecular epidemiology. Biologic markers such as carcinogen-DNA adducts and oncogene activation are currently considered valid qualitative indicators of potential risk, but for most chemical exposures research is needed to establish their validity as quantitative predictors of cancer risk. Biologic markers have, however, already provided valuable insights into the magnitude of interindividual variation in response to carcinogenic exposures, with major implications for risk assessment.

  8. Biologic markers in risk assessment for environmental carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of biologic markers to provide more timely and precise risk assessments for environmental carcinogens is viewed against the current state-of-the-art in biological monitoring/molecular epidemiology. Biologic markers such as carcinogen-DNA adducts and oncogene activation are currently considered valid qualitative indicators of potential risk, but for most chemical exposures research is needed to establish their validity as quantitative predictors of cancer risk. Biologic markers have, however, already provided valuable insights into the magnitude of interindividual variation in response to carcinogenic exposures, with major implications for risk assessment

  9. Studies on carcinogenicity or anticarcinogenicity of isonicotinic acid hydrazide and caffeine by nine-week assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to many surveys, cancer is one of the major causes of death in most developed countries and the incidence of cancer appears to be on the increase. Therefore, many studies on detection of carcinogenic or anticarcinogenic agents need urgently. The purpose of this investigation is evaluation the carcinogenic or anticarcinogenic effect of INH and caffeine, which were interpreted as showing either the presence or the absence of a carcinogenic or anticarcinogenic effect, using nine-week assay system. The non-inbred NIH(GP) newborn mice were injected subcutaneously with NIH(400,425, 450 or 480 μg/ head) or caffeine (75 or 100 μg/head) for evaluation of carcinogenicity. Caffeine (1 or 2 mg/ml of drinking water) was administered orally to the mice, which were injected subcutaneously with BP(500μg/head) at new-born, during 6 weeks after weaning for evaluation of anticarcinogenicity. Each group was killed at 9 weeks after the start of exanination. All major organs were examined grossly and histopathologically. Decreased lung adenoma incidence was observed statistically significant in mice fed with caffeine 1 mg(18.8%) or 2 mg(5.1%) per ml of drinking water compared to BP control group (41.3%). However, there was no statistical difference in the incidence of lung and other site tumor between the INH group and the normal control group or between caffeine injection group and normal control group. This result will be contribute to the prevention of cancer from the viewpoint of identifying carcinogenic or anticarcinogenic agents from the environment. (Author)

  10. Temporal aspects of tumorigenic response to individual and mixed carcinogens. Comprehensive progress report, June 1, 1975--May 31, 1978. [Mouse skin, rats, hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, R.E.; Burns, F.J.; Altshuler, B.

    1978-02-01

    The research proposed here is designed to obtain a better understanding of the temporal kinetics of tumor induction when one or more carcinogens are present simultaneously or sequentially for prolonged periods of time. Studies done to date under this contract have shown that carcinogenesis in mouse skin by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogens is consistent with the induction of dependent and autonomous cell transformations by the carcinogen followed by the conversion of autonomous tumor cells into malignancies at a rate which is determined by the level of carcinogen exposure. Dependent cell transformations remain latent in the skin unless expressed by a promoting agent. Dependent neoplasia appears to follow one-hit kinetics while malignancy is a multihit endpoint. Dose-related and time-related aspects of tumor induction are separable in the initiation-promotion system of mouse skin which along with rat skin and hamster lung is being used as a model for testing hypotheses. Results to date provide the basis for a new interpretation of the linear non-threshold extrapolation model. The broad aim of the study is to provide a basis or rationale for estimating risks associated with prolonged exposures to carcinogens found in the environment and to predict how different tissues and species respond to the same carcinogens.

  11. UV missile plume signatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neele, F.P.; Schleijpen, H.M.A.

    2002-01-01

    As a result of the deployment of UV missile warning systems, recent years have seen an increasing interest in threat assessment in the UV band. Unfortunately, due to the different nature of the physical processes that are needed to describe a missile signature in the UV, available codes for the IR c

  12. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic and Other Supporting Evidence of Carcinogenic Hazard

    OpenAIRE

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lawrence H. Lash; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2013-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence formin...

  13. Critical analysis of carcinogenicity study outcomes. Relationship with pharmacological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Kasper, Peter; Silva Lima, Beatriz; Jones, David R; Pasanen, Markku

    2016-08-01

    Predicting the outcome of life-time carcinogenicity studies in rats based on chronic (6-month) toxicity studies in this species is possible in some instances. This should reduce the number of such studies and hence have a significant impact on the total number of animals used in safety assessment of new medicines. From a regulatory perspective, this should be sufficient to grant a waiver for a carcinogenicity study in those cases where there is confidence in the outcome of the prediction. Pharmacological properties are a frequent key factor for the carcinogenic mode of action of some pharmaceuticals, but data-analysis on a large dataset has never been formally conducted. We have conducted an analysis of a dataset based on the perspective of the pharmacology of 255 compounds from industrial and regulatory sources. It is proposed that a pharmacological, class-specific, model may consist of an overall causal relationship between the pharmacological class and the histopathology findings in rats after 6 months treatment, leading to carcinogenicity outcome after 2 years. Knowledge of the intended drug target and pathway pharmacology should enhance the prediction of either positive or negative outcomes of rat carcinogenicity studies. The goal of this analysis is to review the pharmacological properties of compounds together with the histopathology findings from the chronic toxicity study in rodents in order to introduce an integrated approach to estimate the risk of human carcinogenicity of pharmaceuticals. This approach would allow scientists to define conditions under which 2-year rat carcinogenicity studies will or will not add value to such an assessment. We have demonstrated the possibility of a regulatory waiver for a carcinogenicity study in rats, as currently discussed in the International Council for Harmonization (ICH) - formerly known as the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH), by applying the proposed prediction approach in a number of case studies

  14. Biologic markers in risk assessment for environmental carcinogens

    OpenAIRE

    Perera, F.; Mayer, J.; Santella, R. M.; Brenner, D; Jeffrey, A.; Latriano, L; Smith, S.; Warburton, D; Young, T. L.; Tsai, W. Y.; Hemminki, K; Brandt-Rauf, P

    1991-01-01

    The potential of biologic markers to provide more timely and precise risk assessments for environmental carcinogens is viewed against the current state-of-the-art in biological monitoring/molecular epidemiology. Biologic markers such as carcinogen-DNA adducts and oncogene activation are currently considered valid qualitative indicators of potential risk, but for most chemical exposures research is needed to establish their validity as quantitative predictors of cancer risk. Biologic markers h...

  15. Carcinogenicity evaluations and ongoing studies: the IARC databases.

    OpenAIRE

    Vainio, H.; Coleman, M.; Wilbourn, J

    1991-01-01

    Many thousands of chemicals are produced industrially and many more occur naturally. Information on the toxicology of these chemicals is often minimal or absent. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has published evaluations of the carcinogenic risk to humans of over 700 chemicals, groups of chemicals, and complex mixtures as a regular series of monographs. A database has been created containing summaries of all the relevant epidemiological, animal carcinogenicity, and other...

  16. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, epidemiologic and other supporting evidence of carcinogenic hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A; Lash, Lawrence H; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z

    2014-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studies, bioassays in experimental animals, and toxicity and mechanism of action studies was used to conclude that TCE is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1). This article summarizes the key evidence forming the scientific bases for the IARC classification. Exposure to TCE from environmental sources (including hazardous waste sites and contaminated water) is common throughout the world. While workplace use of TCE has been declining, occupational exposures remain of concern, especially in developing countries. The strongest human evidence is from studies of occupational TCE exposure and kidney cancer. Positive, although less consistent, associations were reported for liver cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. TCE is carcinogenic at multiple sites in multiple species and strains of experimental animals. The mechanistic evidence includes extensive data on the toxicokinetics and genotoxicity of TCE and its metabolites. Together, available evidence provided a cohesive database supporting the human cancer hazard of TCE, particularly in the kidney. For other target sites of carcinogenicity, mechanistic and other data were found to be more limited. Important sources of susceptibility to TCE toxicity and carcinogenicity were also reviewed by the Working Group. In all, consideration of the multiple evidence streams presented herein informed the IARC conclusions regarding the carcinogenicity of TCE. PMID:23973663

  17. Skin cancer and solar UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gruijl, F R

    1999-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation in sunlight is the most prominent and ubiquitous physical carcinogen in our natural environment. It is highly genotoxic but does not penetrate the body any deeper than the skin. Like all organisms regularly exposed to sunlight, the human skin is extremely well adapted to continuous UV stress. Well-pigmented skin is clearly better protected than white Caucasian skin. The sun-seeking habits of white Caucasians in developed countries are likely to have contributed strongly to the increase in skin cancer observed over the last century. Skin cancer is by far the most common type of cancer in the U.S.A. and Australia, which appears to be the result of an 'unnatural displacement' of people with sun-sensitive skin to sub-tropical regions. Although campaigns have been successful in informing people about the risks of sun exposure, general attitudes and behaviour do not yet appear to have changed to the extent that trends in skin cancer morbidity and the corresponding burden on public healthcare will be reversed. The relationship between skin cancer and regular sun exposure was suspected by physicians in the late 19th century, and subsequently substantiated in animal experiments in the early part of the 20th century. UV radiation was found to be highly genotoxic, and DNA repair proved to be crucial in fending off detrimental effects such as mutagenesis and cell death. In fact, around 1940 it was shown that the wavelength dependence of mutagenicity paralleled the UV absorption by DNA. In the 1970s research on UV carcinogenesis received a new impetus from the arising concern about a possible future depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer: the resulting increases in ambient UV loads were expected to raise skin cancer incidences. Epidemiological studies in the last decades of the 20th century have greatly refined our knowledge on the aetiology of skin cancers. Analyses of gene mutations in skin carcinomas have identified UV radiation as the cause

  18. Induction of active melanocytes in mouse skin by carcinogens: a new method for detection of skin carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, K; Inui, N; Takeuchi, T

    1981-01-01

    Application of potent skin carcinogens, such as 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene, 3-methylcholanthrene, benzo[a]pyrene and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide, induced numerous dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa)-positive cells in the interfollicular epidermis of C57BL/6 mice in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Chrysene, a weak skin carcinogen, and croton oil, a tumor promoter, also induced 3--4 times more dopa-positive cells than acetone. Liver carcinogens, such as 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene and N-2-acetylaminofluorene, and non-carcinogenic aromatic hydrocarbons, such as anthracene, fluoranthene, fluorene and pyrene, did not induce increase in these cells. These results indicate that increase in the number of dopa-positive cells after application of chemicals is well correlated with the abilities of these compounds to induce skin carcinogenesis and suppress sebaceous glands. PMID:7273337

  19. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Hung [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chou, Pei-Hsin [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Pei-Jen, E-mail: chenpj@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-30

    Highlights: • We assess ecotoxicological impact of azole fungicides in the aquatic environment. • Carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic azoles show different CYP activities in medaka. • We compare azole-induced CYP expression and carcinogenesis between fish and rodents. • Liver CYP-enzyme induction is a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. • We suggest toxicity evaluation methods for azole fungicides using medaka fish. - Abstract: Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish

  20. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We assess ecotoxicological impact of azole fungicides in the aquatic environment. • Carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic azoles show different CYP activities in medaka. • We compare azole-induced CYP expression and carcinogenesis between fish and rodents. • Liver CYP-enzyme induction is a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. • We suggest toxicity evaluation methods for azole fungicides using medaka fish. - Abstract: Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish

  1. 复配抗菌剂对紫外光固化抗菌涂料性能的影响%Effect of Compound Antibacterial Agents on Properties of UV Curing Antimicrobial Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓慧; 宋伟强; 遆永周; 吕晓华; 邓刚; 孟闯

    2016-01-01

    采用紫外光固化技术,以自制抗菌剂三丁基对乙烯基苄基氯化鏻(DA)与甲基丙烯酰氧乙基十二烷基二甲基溴化铵(VP)复配作为抗菌单体,制备了紫外光固化抗菌涂料.研究了抗菌单体对固化膜性能的影响,并测试了紫外光固化抗菌涂料的理化性能和抗菌性能.结果表明:抗菌单体对固化膜性能有显著影响;当DA/VP用量比为0.4时,固化膜硬度、附着力和抗冲击性均能达到最佳;制备的紫外光固化抗菌涂料具有良好的抗菌性能,其各项理化性能均达到国家或行业标准.%The UV curable antimicrobial coating was prepared by UV curing technology with tributyl vinyl benzyl phosphonium chloride(DA)and methyl acryloyloxyethyl dodecyl dimethyl ammonium bromide(VP)as antibacterial monomer. The effect of antibacterial monomer ratio on the properties of the cured film was studied. The antibacterial properties and the physical and chemical properties of the UV cured coatings were tested. The results showed that the antibacterial monomer has a significant influence on the properties of cured film. When the amount of DA/VP ratio is 0.4,curing film hardness,adhesion,impact resistance and gloss can reach the optimum. The prepared UV curable antimicrobial coatings have excellent antibacterial properties ,and the physical and chemical properties have reached the national standard or industry standard.

  2. Two azole fungicides (carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil) exhibit different hepatic cytochrome P450 activities in medaka fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Hung; Chou, Pei-Hsin; Chen, Pei-Jen

    2014-07-30

    Conazoles are a class of imidazole- or triazole-containing drugs commonly used as fungicides in agriculture and medicine. The broad application of azole drugs has led to the contamination of surface aquifers receiving the effluent of municipal or hospital wastewater or agricultural runoff. Several triazoles are rodent carcinogens; azole pollution is a concern to environmental safety and human health. However, the carcinogenic mechanisms associated with cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) of conazoles remain unclear. We exposed adult medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) to continuous aqueous solutions of carcinogenic triadimefon and non-carcinogenic myclobutanil for 7 to 20 days at sub-lethal or environmentally relevant concentrations and assessed hepatic CYP activity and gene expression associated with CYP-mediated toxicity. Both triadimefon and myclobutanil induced hepatic CYP3A activity, but only triadimefon enhanced CYP1A activity. The gene expression of cyp3a38, cyp3a40, pregnane x receptor (pxr), cyp26b, retinoid acid receptor γ1 (rarγ1) and p53 was higher with triadimefon than myclobutanil. As well, yeast-based reporter gene assay revealed that 4 tested conazoles were weak agonists of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We reveal differential CYP gene expression with carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic conazoles in a lower vertebrate, medaka fish. Liver CYP-enzyme induction may be a key event in conazole-induced tumorigenesis. This information is essential to evaluate the potential threat of conazoles to human health and fish populations in the aquatic environment. PMID:24962053

  3. Arsenic Transformation Predisposes Human Skin Keratinocytes To UV-induced DNA Damage Yet Enhances Their Survival Apparently by Diminishing Oxidant Response

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yang(Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China); Kojima, Chikara; Chignell, Colin; Mason, Ronald; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic and UV, both human skin carcinogens, may act together as skin co-carcinogens. We find human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) are malignantly transformed by low-level arsenite (100 nM, 30 weeks; termed As-TM cells) and with transformation concurrently undergo full adaptation to arsenic toxicity involving reduced apoptosis and oxidative stress response to high arsenite concentrations. Oxidative DNA damage (ODD) is a possible mechanism in arsenic carcinogenesis and a hallmark o...

  4. Food Additives of Public Concern for their Carcinogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Gultekin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available No-Observed-Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL of food additives has been long determined on the basis of toxicological studies. Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI levels of food additives for human are derived from these NOAEL, and their legal limits are then established for the food products, intentionally added with food additives. However, recent studies demonstrated that consumption of some processed food containing certain food additives might have increased the risk of cancer in human although the legal limits of these additives in processed foods are well respected by the manufacturers. Possible reasons for increased carcinogenicity risk in processed foods containing these additives can be due to various factors: -interaction of additives with some food ingredients, -food processing may change the chemical formula of food additive to a formula to be acting similarly as carcinogenic compound, -a negative synergistic effects when combined with other additives, -improper storage conditions, and -unknown carcinogenic by-products occurring during the food processing. Due to the above mentioned factors we recommend that an additive, intentionally added to the food during processing must be traced officially for its carcinogenicity. In this review, we overviewed all of the food additives authorized in European Union. Therefore, the traceability issues of processed foods containing certain food additives, which have a negligible probability of carcinogenicity in legal limits, must be reinforced in the perspective of public health concerns.

  5. Evaluation of tests using DNA repair-deficient bacteria for predicting genotoxicity and carcinogenicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leifer, Z.; Kada, T.; Mandel, M.; Zeiger, E.; Stafford, R.; Rosenkranz, H.S.

    1981-01-01

    The detection of DNA-damaging agents by repair-deficient bacterial assays is based on the differential inhibition of growth of repair-proficient and repair-deficient bacterial pairs. The various methodologies used are described and recommendations are made for their improved use. In a survey of the literature through April 1979, 91 of 276 papers evaluated contained usable data, resulting in an analysis of 611 compounds that had been assayed in 1 or more of 55 pairs of repair-proficient and repair-deficient strains. The results indicate that a liquid suspension assay is more sensitive than a spot (diffusion) test. There was a 78% correspondence between results obtained with E. coli polA and Bacillus subtilis (H17/M45, 17A/45T) rec assay and between E. coli polA and Proteus mirabilis. In a comparison of test results with carcinogenicity data, 44 of 71 (62%) carcinogenic compounds assayed by the polA system were positive, 10 (14%) were negative, and 17 (24%) gave No Test or doubtful results. The results were analyzed with respect to chemical classes. E. coli polA detected the highest percentage of hydroxylamines and alkyl epoxides. The B. subtilis rec assay detected the highest percentage of nitrosamines and sulfur and nitrogen oxides. It is concluded that some of these test systems are effective tools for the detection of DNA-damaging and potentially carcinogenic compounds, especially if the assay is done in liquid suspension and if more than 1 pair of tester strains is used. Advantages and disadvantages of the assay are discussed and suggestions are made for improvements in the system.

  6. Arsenic transformation predisposes human skin keratinocytes to UV-induced DNA damage yet enhances their survival apparently by diminishing oxidant response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic arsenic and UV, both human skin carcinogens, may act together as skin co-carcinogens. We find human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) are malignantly transformed by low-level arsenite (100 nM, 30 weeks; termed As-TM cells) and with transformation concurrently undergo full adaptation to arsenic toxicity involving reduced apoptosis and oxidative stress response to high arsenite concentrations. Oxidative DNA damage (ODD) is a possible mechanism in arsenic carcinogenesis and a hallmark of UV-induced skin cancer. In the current work, inorganic arsenite exposure (100 nM) did not induce ODD during the 30 weeks required for malignant transformation. Although acute UV-treatment (UVA, 25 J/cm2) increased ODD in passage-matched control cells, once transformed by arsenic to As-TM cells, acute UV actually further increased ODD (> 50%). Despite enhanced ODD, As-TM cells were resistant to UV-induced apoptosis. The response of apoptotic factors and oxidative stress genes was strongly mitigated in As-TM cells after UV exposure including increased Bcl2/Bax ratio and reduced Caspase-3, Nrf2, and Keap1 expression. Several Nrf2-related genes (HO-1, GCLs, SOD) showed diminished responses in As-TM cells after UV exposure consistent with reduced oxidant stress response. UV-exposed As-TM cells showed increased expression of cyclin D1 (proliferation gene) and decreased p16 (tumor suppressor). UV exposure enhanced the malignant phenotype of As-TM cells. Thus, the co-carcinogenicity between UV and arsenic in skin cancer might involve adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure generally mitigating the oxidative stress response, allowing apoptotic by-pass after UV and enhanced cell survival even in the face of increased UV-induced oxidative stress and increased ODD. - Highlights: → Arsenic transformation adapted to UV-induced apoptosis. → Arsenic transformation diminished oxidant response. → Arsenic transformation enhanced UV-induced DNA damage.

  7. UV-induced effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liebsch, M.; Spielmann, H.; Pape, W.; Krul, C.; Deguercy, A.; Eskes, C.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Regulatory requirements: According to the current Notes for Guidance of the Scientific Committee on Cosmetic Products and Non-Food Products (SCCNFP), cosmetic ingredients and mixtures of ingredients absorbing UV light (in particular UV filter chemicals used, for example, to ensure the light stabilit

  8. WSO-UV project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachkov, Mikhail; Shustov, Boris; Gómez de Castro, Ana Ines

    2014-03-01

    During last three decades, astronomers have enjoyed continuous access to the 100-300 nm ultraviolet (UV) spectral range where the resonance transitions of the most abundant atoms and ions (at temperatures between 3000 and 300 000 K) reside. This UV range is not accessible from ground-based facilities. The successful International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observatory, the Russian ASTRON mission and successor instruments such as the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) mission or the COS and STIS spectrographs on-board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) prove the major impact of observations in the UV wavelength range in modern astronomy. Future access to space-based observatories is expected to be very limited. For the next decade, the post-HST era, the World Space Observatory - Ultraviolet (WSO-UV) will be the only 2-m class UV telescope with capabilities similar to the HST. WSO-UV will be equipped with instruments for imaging and spectroscopy and it will be a facility dedicated, full-time, to UV astronomy. In this article, we briefly outline the current status of the WSO-UV mission and the science management plan.

  9. Research Recommendations for Selected IARC-Classified Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ward, Elizabeth M; Schulte, Paul A; Straif, Kurt;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: There are some common occupational agents and exposure circumstances where evidence of carcinogenicity is substantial but not yet conclusive for humans. The objectives are to identify research gaps and needs for twenty agents prioritized for review based on evidence of widespread human......, focusing on research that would be important in resolving classification uncertainties. An expert meeting brought reviewers together to discuss each agent and the identified data gaps and approaches. DATA SYNTHESIS: Several overarching issues were identified that pertained to multiple agents; these...... included the importance of recognizing that carcinogenic agents can act through multiple toxicity pathways and mechanisms, including epigenetic mechanisms, oxidative stress and immuno- and hormonal modulation. CONCLUSIONS: Studies in occupational populations provide important opportunities to understand...

  10. Current issues in carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of publications dealing with study of radiation sources and biological evaluation of increasing doses of people irradiation under occupational and usual living conditions is presented. The existing natural and artifial irradiation sources are considered. It is noted that all types of ionizing radiations are characterized by high carcinogenic efficiency and can induce benign and malignant tumors practically in all organs. Statistically reliable data in experimental and epidemiological investigations were recorded under the effect of large and mean doses. Minor radiation doses not responsible for visible functional and morphological changes in early periods can cause pathological changes in delayed periods. The data on carcinogenic effect of relatively small radiation doses are available

  11. Environmental carcinogens in human target tissues in culture: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have accumulated more experimental evidences that demonstrated the comparative approaches with human cells will allow us to predict human risk with good accuracy following exposure to toxic chemicals. We also synthesized several carcinogenic DNA adducts, i.e., the major benzo[a]pyrene DNA adduct, 06-methyldeoxyguanosine, 7-methyl- deoxyguanosine and 2-methyl-deoxyguanosine to be used as standards for quantitating DNA adduct formation in carcinogen exposed cells. A simple synthetic method was developed for preparation of the major B[a]p DNA adduct with yields better than those reported. The main accomplishments related to the originally stated objectives are summarized. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  12. A call to expand regulation to all carcinogenic fibrous minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, F.; Steele, I.; Ambrosi, J.; Carbone, M.

    2013-05-01

    The regulatory term "asbestos" groups only the six fibrous minerals that were commercially used among approximately 400. The carcinogenicity of these six regulated minerals has been largely demonstrated and is related to fiber structure, fiber length/diameter ratio, and bio-persistence. From a public perception, the generic term "asbestos" refers to the fibrous minerals that cause asbestosis, mesothelioma and other cancers. However, other non-regulated fibrous minerals are potentially as dangerous as the regulatory asbestos because they share similar physical and chemical properties, epidemiological studies have demonstrated their relationship with asbestos-related diseases, and both in vitro and in vivo experiments have established the toxicity of these minerals. For example, the non-regulated asbestiform winchite and richterite minerals that contaminated the vermiculite mined from Libby, Montana, (USA) were associated with mesothelioma, lung cancer and asbestosis observed among the area's residents and miners. Many other examples of non-regulated carcinogenic fibrous minerals include, but are not limited to, antigorite, arfvedsonite, balangeroite, carlosturanite, erionite, fluoro-edenite, hornblende, mordenite, palygorskite, and sepiolite. To propose a regulatory definition that would provide protection from all carcinogenic fibers, we have conducted an interdisciplinary literature review to compare the characteristics of "asbestos" and of non-regulated mineral fibers that relate to carcinogenicity. We specifically studied two non-regulated fibrous minerals that are associated with asbestos-related diseases: the serpentine antigorite and the zeolite erionite. Both examples underscore the problem of regulation based on commercial, rather than scientific principles: 1) the occurrence of fibrous antigorite in materials used to pave roads has been correlated with high mesothelioma rates in New Caledonia. Antigorite was also the cause of asbestosis in Poland, and in

  13. [Is UV-A a cause of malignant melanoma?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moan, J

    1994-03-20

    The first action spectrum for cutaneous malignant melanoma was published recently (2). This spectrum was obtained using the fish Xiphophorus. If the same action spectrum applies to humans, the following statements are true: Sunbathing products (agents to protect against the sun) that absorb UV-B radiation provide almost no protection against cutaneous malignant melanoma. UV-A-solaria are more dangerous than expected so far. If people are determined to use artificial sources of radiation for tanning, they should choose UV-B-solaria rather than UV-A-solaria. Fluorescent tubes and halogen lamps may have weak melanomagnetic effects. Ozone depletion has almost no effect on the incidence rates of CMM, since ozone absorbs very little UV-A radiation. Sunbathing products which contain UV-A-absorbing compounds or neutral filters (like titanium oxide) provide real protection against cutaneous malignant melanoma, at least if they are photochemically inert. PMID:8191472

  14. Is UV-A radiation a cause of malignant melanoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first action spectrum for cutaneous malignant melanoma was published recently. This spectrum was obtained using the fish Xiphophorus. If the same action spectrum applies to humans, the following statements are true: Sunbathing products (agents to protect against the sun) that absorb UV-B radiation provide almost no protection against cutaneous malignant melanoma. UV-A-solaria are more dangerous than expected so far. If people are determined to use artificial sources of radiation for tanning, they should choose UV-B solaria rather than UV-A-solaria. Fluorescent tubes and halogen lamps may have weak melanomagenic effects. Ozone depletion has almost no effect on the incidence rates of CMM, since ozone absorbs very little UV-A radiation. Sunbathing products which contain UV-A-absorbing compounds or neutral filter (like titanium oxide) provide real protection against cutaneous malignant melanoma, at least if they are photochemically inert. 34 refs., 2 figs

  15. UV disinfection of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV radiation has been found to have advantages over chloration for the disinfection of water. New regulations for dietary conditions on Norwegian ships introduced in 1974 led to increased use of UV disinfection, and this has in the following years spread to waterworks. The present article is based on a study to determine possible limitation. The nature of the injuries to the microorganisms is first discussed, together with repair mechanisms. A table is given showing the energy required for 90 and 100 percent inactivation of a number of microorganisms. Some other factors affecting UV inactivation are briefly mentioned. (JIW)

  16. UV, stress and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence; Leduc, Cedric; Verbeke, Alix; Toussaint, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    Skin is a model of choice in studies on aging. Indeed, skin aging can be modulated by internal and external factors, reflecting its complexity. Two types of skin aging have been identified: intrinsic, mainly genetically determined and extrinsic-also called "photo-aging"-resulting on the impact of environmental stress and more precisely of UV rays. Simplified in vitro models, based on cellular senescence, have been developed to study the relationship between UV and aging. These models vary on the cell type (fibroblasts or keratinocytes, normal or immortalized) and the type of UV used (UVA or UVB). PMID:23467762

  17. Is UV-A radiation a cause of malignant melanoma. Er UV-A aarsak til malignt melanom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moan, J. (Det Norske Radiumhospital, Oslo (Norway))

    1994-03-01

    The first action spectrum for cutaneous malignant melanoma was published recently. This spectrum was obtained using the fish Xiphophorus. If the same action spectrum applies to humans, the following statements are true: Sunbathing products (agents to protect against the sun) that absorb UV-B radiation provide almost no protection against cutaneous malignant melanoma. UV-A-solaria are more dangerous than expected so far. If people are determined to use artificial sources of radiation for tanning, they should choose UV-B solaria rather than UV-A-solaria. Fluorescent tubes and halogen lamps may have weak melanomagenic effects. Ozone depletion has almost no effect on the incidence rates of CMM, since ozone absorbs very little UV-A radiation. Sunbathing products which contain UV-A-absorbing compounds or neutral filter (like titanium oxide) provide real protection against cutaneous malignant melanoma, at least if they are photochemically inert. 34 refs., 2 figs.

  18. 18. Adduct detection in human monitoring for carcinogen exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Determination of the covalently bound products (adducts) of carcinogens with DNA or proteins may be used for the monitoring of exposure to these compounds. Protein adducts are generally stable and are not enzymatically repaired, and the use of these for cxposure monitoring is normally carried out with globin or albumin, because

  19. Chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity study of erythritol in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lina, B.A.R.; Bos-Kuijpers, M.H.M.; Til, H.P.; Bär, A.

    1996-01-01

    The potential toxicity and carcinogenicity of erythritol, a low-calorie sugar substitute, were examined in Wistar Crl:(WI) WU BR rats. Groups of 50 rats of each sex consumed diets with 0, 2, 5, or 10% erythritol, or 10% mannitol, for a period of 104-107 weeks. To each of these main groups, two satel

  20. IARC Monographs: 40 Years of Evaluating Carcinogenic Hazards to Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pearce, Neil E; Blair, Aaron; Vineis, Paolo; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Andersen, Aage; Anto, Josep M; Armstrong, Bruce K; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Beland, Frederick A; Berrington, Amy; Bertazzi, Pier A; Birnbaum, Linda S; Brownson, Ross C; Bucher, John R; Cantor, Kenneth P; Cardis, Elisabeth; Cherrie, John W; Christiani, David C; Cocco, Pierluigi; Coggon, David; Comba, Pietro; Demers, Paul A; Dement, John M; Douwes, Jeroen; Eisen, Ellen A; Engel, Lawrence S; Fenske, Richard A; Fleming, Lora E; Fletcher, Tony; Fontham, Elizabeth; Forastiere, Francesco; Frentzel-Beyme, Rainer; Fritschi, Lin; Gerin, Michel; Goldberg, Marcel; Grandjean, Philippe; Grimsrud, Tom K; Gustavsson, Per; Haines, Andy; Hartge, Patricia; Hansen, Johnni; Hauptmann, Michael; Heederik, Dick; Hemminki, Kari; Hemon, Denis; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hoppin, Jane A; Huff, James; Jarvholm, Bengt; Kang, Daehee; Karagas, Margaret R; Kjaerheim, Kristina; Kjuus, Helge; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kriebel, David; Kristensen, Petter; Kromhout, Hans; Laden, Francine; Lebailly, Pierre; LeMasters, Grace; Lubin, Jay H; Lynch, Charles F; Lynge, Elsebeth; 't Mannetje, Andrea; McMichael, Anthony J; McLaughlin, John R; Marrett, Loraine; Martuzzi, Marco; Merchant, James A; Merler, Enzo; Merletti, Franco; Miller, Anthony; Mirer, Franklin E; Monson, Richard; Nordby, Karl-Kristian; Olshan, Andrew F; Parent, Marie-Elise; Perera, Frederica P; Perry, Melissa J; Pesatori, Angela C; Pirastu, Roberta; Porta, Miquel; Pukkala, Eero; Rice, Carol; Richardson, David B; Ritter, Leonard; Ritz, Beate; Ronckers, Cecile M; Rushton, Lesley; Rusiecki, Jennifer A; Rusyn, Ivan; Samet, Jonathan M; Sandler, Dale P; de Sanjose, Silvia; Schernhammer, Eva; Seniori Constantini, Adele; Seixas, Noah; Shy, Carl; Siemiatycki, Jack; Silvermann, Debra T; Simonato, Lorenzo; Smith, Allan H; Smith, Martyn T; Spinelli, John J; Spitz, Margaret R; Stallones, Lorann; Stayner, Leslie T; Steenland, Kyle; Stenzel, Mark; Stewart, Bernard W; Stewart, Patricia A; Symanski, Elaine; Terracini, Benedetto; Tolbert, Paige E; Vainio, Harri; Vena, John; Vermeulen, Roel; Victora, Cesar G; Ward, Elizabeth M; Weinberg, Clarice R; Weisenburger, Dennis; Wesseling, Catharina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Zahm, Shelia H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Programme for the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans has been criticized for several of its evaluations, and also the approach used to perform these evaluations. Some critics have claimed that IARC Working Groups' fa

  1. Modern Electrochemical Methods for Monitoring of Chemical Carcinogens

    OpenAIRE

    Zima, J; Moreira, J.; J. Barek

    2005-01-01

    This contribution is based on our presentation at the 1st International Symposium on Sensor Science, Paris, 16-20 June 2003. It presents recent results regarding the electrochemical determination of submicromolar and nanomolar concentrations of various carcinogenic substances (nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heterocyclic compounds, azo compounds, aromatic amino compounds, etc.) using both traditional (classical dropping mercury electrode, static mercury drop electrode, hanging merc...

  2. DETECTION OF CARCINOGENICITY BASED ON MUTAGENICITY IN ARABIDOPSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirty-seven synthetic chemicals plus two mycotoxins were tested for mutagenicity in an Arabidopsis embryo system. The results of this test, prokaryotic repair tests, bacterial mutation assays, eukaryotic cell systems, and in vivo tests were compared to the carcinogenicity classi...

  3. Non—Genotoxic Carcinogens.Approaches to Their Rish Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.A.CASTRO; M.I.DiazGomez; 等

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological studies support the idea that most human cancers are related to chemicals present in the human environment.In turn,chemicals are believed to cause cancer via either genotoxic or non-genotoxic mechanisms.There were described in literature several simple rapid and inexpensive short term ests to reasonably predict the genotoxic nature of chemicals but in contrast,there is no reliable test or battery of tests available to predict the carcinogenicity of non-genotoxic compounds and this poses a major problem to their rish assessment.In addition,there are conflictive opinions about rish assessment needs for both classes of carcinogens.Some workers elieve that for non-genotoxic carcinogens,thresholds for exposure can be drawn while others do not.In this review,the reasons behind both of these opinions and the present hypotheses about the mechanism of action of non-genotoxic carcinogens are described and analyzed in relation to future needs.

  4. Flavonoids and alkenylbenzenes: mechanisms of mutagenic action and carcinogenic risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Woude, van der H.; Jeurissen, S.M.F.; Schutte, M.E.; Alink, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    The present review focuses on the mechanisms of mutagenic action and the carcinogenic risk of two categories of botanical ingredients, namely the flavonoids with quercetin as an important bioactive representative, and the alkenylbenzenes, namely safrole, methyleugenol and estragole. For quercetin a

  5. Trichloroethylene: Mechanistic, epidemiologic and other supporting evidence of carcinogenic hazard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusyn, Ivan; Chiu, Weihsueh A.; Lash, Lawrence H.; Kromhout, Hans; Hansen, Johnni; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2014-01-01

    The chlorinated solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. The carcinogenic hazard of TCE was the subject of a 2012 evaluation by a Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Information on exposures, relevant data from epidemiologic studie

  6. COMPLEMENTARITY OF GENOTOXIC AND NONGENOTOXIC PREDICTORS OF RODENT CARCINOGENICITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty-one chemicals known to be carcinogenic in rodent bioassays were selected for study. he chemicals were administered by gavage in two dose levels to female Sprague-Dawley rats. he effects of these 21 chemicals on four biochemical assays (hepatic DNA damage by alkaline elutio...

  7. North American Magazine Coverage of Skin Cancer and Recreational Tanning Before and After the WHO/IARC 2009 Classification of Indoor Tanning Devices as Carcinogenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Jennifer E; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2015-09-01

    The mass media is an influential source of skin cancer information for the public. In 2009, the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer classified UV radiation from tanning devices as carcinogenic. Our objective was to determine if media coverage of skin cancer and recreational tanning increased in volume or changed in nature after this classification. We conducted a directed content analysis on 29 North American popular magazines (2007-2012) to investigate the overall volume of articles on skin cancer and recreational tanning and, more specifically, the presence of skin cancer risk factors, UV behaviors, and early detection information in article text (n = 410) and images (n = 714). The volume of coverage on skin cancer and recreational tanning did not increase significantly after the 2009 classification of tanning beds as carcinogenic. Key-related messages, including that UV exposure is a risk factor for skin cancer and that indoor tanning should be avoided, were not reported more frequently after the classification, but the promotion of the tanned look as attractive was conveyed more often in images afterwards (p < .01). Content promoting high-SPF sunscreen use increased after the classification (p < .01), but there were no significant positive changes in the frequency of coverage of skin cancer risk factors, other UV behaviors, or early detection information over time. The classification of indoor tanning beds as carcinogenic had no significant impact on the volume or nature of skin cancer and recreational tanning coverage in magazines. PMID:25189799

  8. Risk assessment of DNA-reactive carcinogens in food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk assessment of DNA-reactive carcinogens in food requires knowledge of the extent of DNA damage in the target organ which results from the competition between DNA adduct formation and repair. Estimates of DNA adduct levels can be made by direct measurement or indirectly as a consequence of their presence, for example, by tumor formation in animal models or exposed populations epidemiologically. Food-borne DNA-reactive carcinogens are present from a variety of sources. They are generally not intrinsically DNA-reactive but require bioactivation to DNA-reactive metabolites a process which may be modulated by the compound itself or the presence of other xenobiotics. A single DNA reactant may form several distinct DNA adducts each undergoing different rates of repair. Some DNA reactants may be photochemically activated or produce reactive oxygen species and thus indirect oxidative DNA damage. The levels of DNA adducts arising from exposures influenced by variations in the doses, the frequency with which an individual is exposed, and rates of DNA repair for specific adducts. Each adduct has a characteristic efficiency with which it induces mutations. Based on experience with the well-studied DNA-reactive food carcinogen aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a limit of 20 ppb or ∼30 μg/day has been set and is considered a tolerable daily intake (TDI). Since AFB1 is considered a potent carcinogen, doses of 32P-postlabeling or the use of surrogates such as hemoglobin adducts, together with approaches to evaluate the results. A discussion of approaches to estimating possible threshold effects for DNA-reactive carcinogens is made

  9. Carcinogenicity of the insulation wools: reassessment of the IARC evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R C; Davis, J M; Douglas, D; Gruber, U F; Hoskins, J A; Ilgren, E B; Johnson, N F; Rossiter, C E; Wagner, J C

    1991-08-01

    In assessing the health evidence concerning man-made mineral fibers, the chemical composition, surface activity, durability, and size of fibers have to be taken into account. Special-purpose fine glass fibers need to be separated from the insulation wools (glass, rock, and slag wool). The epidemiological evidence is sufficient to conclude that there has been no mesothelioma risk to workers producing or using glass wool, rock wool, or slag wool. The epidemiological studies have been large and powerful, and they show no evidence of a cause-effect relationship between lung cancer and exposure to glass wool, rock wool, or slag wool fibers. There is some evidence of a small cancer hazard attached to the manufacturing process in slag wool plants 20 to 50 years ago, when asbestos was used in some products and other carcinogenic substances were present. However, this hazard is not associated with any index of exposure to slag wool itself. Animal inhalation studies of ordinary insulation wools also show that there is no evidence of hazard associated with exposure to these relatively coarse, soluble fibers. The evidence of carcinogenicity is limited to experiments with special-purpose fine durable glass fibers or experimental fibers, and only when these fibers are injected directly into the pleural or peritoneal cavity. Multiple chronic inhalation studies of these same special-purpose fine glass fibers have not produced evidence of carcinogenicity. It is suggested that the present IARC evaluation of the carcinogenic risk of insulation wools should be revised to Category 3: not classifiable as to carcinogenicity to humans. PMID:1947241

  10. Characterization of UV radiation sensitive frog cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-one subclones of nine frog cell isolates were tested for sensitivity to a panel of DNA damaging agents. Two clones were identified which had a greater than wild type level of sensitivity to UV radiation but had a wild type level of sensitivity to the other agents. These clones were the haploid RRP602-7 and the diploid RRP802-1. RRP802-1 was found to be unstable with respect to UV sensitivity. The line was cloned in order to isolate stable sensitive and wild type derivatives. RRP802-1-16, a UV sensitive clone and RRP802-1-13, a clone with a wild type level of sensitivity to UV radiation, were isolated. The UV radiation sensitivity of RRP602-7, RRP802-1 and RRP802-1-16 did not correlate with cell size, cell shape, cell cycle distribution or ploidy. The cell cycle distribution after UV irradiation, the rate of DNA synthesis after UV-irradiation, the DNA polymerase α activity and the sister chromatid exchange frequency were all measured in RRP602-7, RRP802-1 and RRP802-1-16 in order to examine the DNA repair capacity. The presence of DNA repair pathways was examined directly in RRP602-7, RRP802-1 and RRP802-1-16. All were found to be proficient in photo-reactivation repair and postreplication repair of UV elicited DNA damage

  11. Light Conversion and Scattering in UV Protective Textiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grancarić Ana Marija

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary cause of skin cancer is believed to be a long exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UV-R crossed with the amount of skin pigmentation in the population. It is believed that in childhood and adolescence 80% of UV-R gets absorbed, whilst in the remaining 20% gets absorbed later in the lifetime. This suggests that proper and early photoprotection may reduce the risk of subsequent occurrence of skin cancer. Textile and clothing are the most suitable interface between environment and human body. It can show UV protection, but in most cases it does not provide full sun screening properties. UV protection ability highly depends on large number of factors such as type of fibre, fabric surface and construction, type and concentration of dyestuff, fluorescent whitening agent (FWA, UV-B protective agents, as well as nanoparticles, if applied. Based on electronically excited state by energy of UV-R (usually 340-370 nm, the molecules of FWAs show the phenomenon of fluorescence giving to white textiles high whiteness of outstanding brightness by reemitting the energy at the blue region (typically 420-470 nm of the spectrum. By absorbing UV-A radiation, optical brightened fabrics transform this radiation into blue fluorescence, which leads to better UV protection. Natural zeolites are rock-forming, microporous silicate minerals. Applied as nanoparticles to textile surface, it scatters the UV-R resulting in lower UV-A and UV-B transmission. If applied with other UV absorbing agents, e.g. FWAs, synergistic effect occurs. Silicones are inert, synthetic compounds with a variety of forms and uses. It provides a unique soft touch, is very resistant to washing and improves the property of fabric to protect against UV radiation. Therefore, the UV protective properties of cotton fabric achieved by light conversion and scattering was researched in this paper. For that purpose, the stilbene-derived FWAs were applied on cotton fabric in wide concentration

  12. Population variability in biological adaptive responses to DNA damage and the shapes of carcinogen dose-response curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcinogen dose-response curves for both ionizing radiation and chemicals are typically assumed to be linear at environmentally relevant doses. This assumption is used to ensure protection of the public health in the absence of relevant dose-response data. A theoretical justification for the assumption has been provided by the argument that low dose linearity is expected when an exogenous agent adds to an ongoing endogenous process. Here, we use computational modeling to evaluate (1) how two biological adaptive processes, induction of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, may affect the shapes of dose-response curves for DNA-damaging carcinogens and (2) how the resulting dose-response behaviors may vary within a population. Each model incorporating an adaptive process was capable of generating not only monotonic dose-responses but also nonmonotonic (J-shaped) and threshold responses. Monte Carlo analysis suggested that all these dose-response behaviors could coexist within a population, as the spectrum of qualitative differences arose from quantitative changes in parameter values. While this analysis is largely theoretical, it suggests that (a) accurate prediction of the qualitative form of the dose-response requires a quantitative understanding of the mechanism (b) significant uncertainty is associated with human health risk prediction in the absence of such quantitative understanding and (c) a stronger experimental and regulatory focus on biological mechanisms and interindividual variability would allow flexibility in regulatory treatment of environmental carcinogens without compromising human health

  13. Different mechanisms of modulation of gap junction communication by non-genotoxic carcinogens in rat liver in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a comparative study of the mechanisms by which three different rodent non-genotoxic carcinogens modulate connexin-mediated gap junction intercellular communication in male rat liver in vivo. In the case of the peroxisome proliferating agent Wy-14,643, a non-hepatotoxic dose of 50 mg/kg led to a marked loss of inter-hepatocyte dye transfer associated with a loss of both Cx32 and Cx26 protein expression. In contrast, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) at a non-hepatotoxic dose (25 mg/kg) was not found to alter Cx32 or Cx26 expression or to produce a measurable Cx32 serine phosphorylation but did give a small, significant reduction of cell communication. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) did not affect cell communication (despite a small significant reduction of Cx32 content) at a non-hepatotoxic dose. Both loss of communication and Cx32 expression was observed only at a dose that caused hepatocyte toxicity as evidenced by increased serum alanine aminotransferase activity. Overall, the findings emphasise that loss of gap junctional communication in vivo can contribute to carcinogenesis by non-genotoxic carcinogens through different primary mechanism. In contrast to Wy-14,643 and DDT, the results with CCl4 are consistent with a requirement for hepatotoxicity in its carcinogenic action

  14. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, 1H and 13C NMR) profiling and theoretical calculations of (2E)-2-[3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-1-phenylpropylidene]hydrazinecarboxamide: An anticonvulsant agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haress, Nadia G.; Govindarajan, Munusamy; AL-Wabli, Reem I.; Almutairi, Maha S.; Al-Alshaikh, Monirah A.; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A.; Attia, Mohamed I.

    2016-08-01

    Vibrational characteristics of the anticonvulsant agent, (2E)-2-[3-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-1-phenylpropylidene]hydrazinecarboxamide ((2E)-IPHC) have been investigated. The computational data are obtained by adopting ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and DFT/B3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p) methods. The most stable conformer is identified by a potential energy scan. The optimized geometrical parameters indicated that the overall symmetry of the most stable conformer is CS. Atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis is contained out and the chemical bondings between the atoms are as characterized. Mulliken atomic charges and simulated thermo-molecular (heat capacity and enthalpy) characteristics of the (2E)-IPHC molecule also have been analyzed. The magnitude of the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) of oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen atoms as well as phenyl and imidazole rings in the title molecule were investigated along with their contribution to the biological activity. The energy gap between HOMO and LUMO orbitals has been found to be 5.1334 eV in the gaseous phase. Excitation energies, oscillator strength and wavelengths were computed by the time-dependent density function theory (TD-DFT) approach. Predicted wavenumbers have been assigned and they are consistent with the experimental values. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of the (2E)-IPHC molecule were computed by the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and were compared with the experimental results.

  15. Biostatistical issues in the design and analysis of animal carcinogenicity experiments.

    OpenAIRE

    Portier, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    Two-year animal carcinogenicity experiments are used to evaluate the potential carcinogenicity from exposure to chemicals. The choice of exposure levels, the allocation of animals to doses, the length of exposure, and the choice of interim sacrifice times all affect the power of statistical tests for carcinogenic effects and the variance of interpolated estimates of carcinogenic risk. In this paper, one aspect of this problems is considered: the ability of tumor incidence data to provide info...

  16. Multiple mechanisms for the carcinogenic effects of asbestos and other mineral fibers.

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett, J C; Lamb, P W; Wiseman, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    Asbestos and other mineral fibers are carcinogenic to humans and animals but differ from many carcinogens in that they do not induce gene mutations. An understanding of these interesting human carcinogens, therefore, is an important problem in cancer research. Asbestos and other fibers induce predominantly two types of cancers: mesotheliomas and bronchogenic carcinomas. Fiber size is an important factor in the carcinogenic activity of these substances as has been shown for mesothelioma induct...

  17. Carcinogenesis related to intense pulsed light and UV exposure: an experimental animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedelund, L; Lerche, C; Wulf, H C; Haedersdal, M

    2006-12-01

    This study examines whether intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment has a carcinogenic potential itself or may influence ultraviolet (UV)-induced carcinogenesis. Secondly, it evaluates whether UV exposure may influence IPL-induced side effects. Hairless, lightly pigmented mice (n=144) received three IPL treatments at 2-week intervals. Simulated solar radiation was administered preoperatively [six standard erythema doses (SED) four times weekly for 11 weeks] as well as pre- and postoperatively (six SED four times weekly up to 26 weeks). Skin tumors were assessed weekly during a 12-month observation period. Side effects were evaluated clinically. No tumors appeared in untreated control mice or in just IPL-treated mice. Skin tumors developed in UV-exposed mice independently of IPL treatments. The time it took for 50% of the mice to first develop skin tumor ranged from 47 to 49 weeks in preoperative UV-exposed mice (p=0.94) and from 22 to 23 weeks in pre- and postoperative UV-exposed mice (p=0.11). IPL rejuvenation of lightly pigmented skin did not induce pigmentary changes (p=1.00). IPL rejuvenation of UV-pigmented skin resulted in an immediate increased skin pigmentation and a subsequent short-term reduced skin pigmentation (pIPL-induced pigment reduction (p=0.12). No texture changes were observed. Postoperative edema and erythema were increased by preoperative UV exposure (pIPL rejuvenation has no carcinogenic potential itself and does not influence UV-induced carcinogenesis. UV exposure influences the occurrence of side effects after IPL rejuvenation in an animal model. PMID:16964439

  18. Transplacental carcinogenicity of inorganic arsenic in the drinking water: induction of hepatic, ovarian, pulmonary, and adrenal tumors in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is a known human carcinogen, but development of rodent models of inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis has been problematic. Since gestation is often a period of high sensitivity to chemical carcinogenesis, we performed a transplacental carcinogenicity study in mice using inorganic arsenic. Groups (n=10) of pregnant C3H mice were given drinking water containing sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) at 0 (control), 42.5, and 85 ppm arsenite ad libitum from day 8 to 18 of gestation. These doses were well tolerated and body weights of the dams during gestation and of the offspring subsequent to birth were not reduced. Dams were allowed to give birth, and offspring were weaned at 4 weeks and then put into separate gender-based groups (n=25) according to maternal exposure level. The offspring received no additional arsenic treatment. The study lasted 74 weeks in males and 90 weeks in females. A complete necropsy was performed on all mice and tissues were examined by light microscopy in a blind fashion. In male offspring, there was a marked increase in hepatocellular carcinoma incidence in a dose- related fashion (control, 12%; 42.5 ppm, 38%; 85 ppm, 61%) and in liver tumor multiplicity (tumors per liver; 5.6-fold over control at 85 ppm). In males, there was also a dose-related increase in adrenal tumor incidence and multiplicity. In female offspring, dose-related increases occurred in ovarian tumor incidence (control, 8%; 42.5 ppm, 26%; 85 ppm, 38%) and lung carcinoma incidence (control, 0%; 42.5 ppm, 4%; 85 ppm, 21%). Arsenic exposure also increased the incidence of proliferative lesions of the uterus and oviduct. These results demonstrate that oral inorganic arsenic exposure, as a single agent, can induce tumor formation in rodents and establishes inorganic arsenic as a complete transplacental carcinogen in mice. The development of this rodent model of inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis has important implications in defining the mechanism of action for this common environmental

  19. Agent engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jiming; Zhong, Ning; Wang, Patrick S P

    2001-01-01

    Agent engineering concerns the development of autonomous computational or physical entities capable of perceiving, reasoning, adapting, learning, cooperating and delegating in a dynamic environment. It is one of the most promising areas of research and development in information technology, computer science and engineering. This book addresses some of the key issues in agent engineering: What is meant by "autonomous agents"? How can we build agents with autonomy? What are the desirable capabilities of agents with respect to surviving (they will not die) and living (they will furthermore enjoy

  20. Environmental UV photobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book looks at the global depletion of stratospheric ozone and the consequences of the predicted increases of solar ultraviolet radiation. The introductory chapter deals with a characterization of solar UV-B and how radiation in this waveband can be influenced by ozone reduction in different locations. Two chapters deal with some technical aspects of measuring and simulating solar UV-B radiation. Seven chapters deal with the adverse effects of various aspects of human health that are anticipated in response to a change in level of solar UV-B, four dealing specifically with skin cancer. Two chapters address the basic aspects of ultraviolet photobiology, and finally the book addresses the implications of ozone reduction for aquatic ecosystems and for terrestrial plants

  1. [Update on benzene: from industrial toxicant to environmental carcinogen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manno, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    Benzene, an industrial chemical myelotoxic at high doses in workers, is now an almost ubiquitous pollutant. It is also a no-threshold genotoxic carcinogen causing acute leukemia and other lymphoaematological tumours. Although its mechanism of action has not been fully clarified, benzene toxicity and carcinogenicity depend on metabolic activation. Polymorphism of activating and detoxifying enzymes (CYP, GST, NQO1) may be critical, therefore, in modulating individual susceptibility to benzene. Further uncertainty factors in assessing low level benzene exposure are the limited sensitivity and specificity of most exposure biomarkers, the frequent coexposure to other volatile organic chemicals (VOC), and the presence of non occupational sources of exposure, such as cigarette smoke and veicular traffic. The aim of this presentation is to introduce the main current critical issues in the risk assessment and the biological monitoring of occupational exposure to benzene at low doses. PMID:24303704

  2. Mammalian cell transformation: Mechanisms of carcinogenesis and assays for carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains nine sections, each consisting of several papers. The section titles are: Molecular Changes in Cell Transformation; Differentiation, Growth Control, and Cell Transformation; Mutagenesis and Cell Transformation; Tumor Promotion and Cell Transformation; Mechanisms of Transformation of Human Fibroblasts; Mechanisms of Transformation of Epithelial Cells; Mechanisms of C3H 10T12 Cell Transformation; Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Cell Transformation; and Use of Cell Transformation Assays for Carcinogen Testing

  3. The role of pancreatic islets in experimental pancreatic carcinogenicity.

    OpenAIRE

    ISHIKAWA, O; Ohigashi, H.; Imaoka, S.; Nakai, I.; Mitsuo, M.; Weide, L. van der; Pour, P. M.

    1995-01-01

    Our previous studies have suggested that the presence of intact islets is essential for the induction of pancreatic exocrine tumors in the Syrian hamster model. To validate this, we investigated the effect of the carcinogen, N-nitrosobis(2-oxo-propyl)amine (BOP) in hamsters, in which homologous isolated intact islets were transplanted into the submandibular gland (SMG). Freshly isolated pure islets from hamster donors were transplanted into the left SMG of 20 female host hamsters. Ten of thes...

  4. Cannabis and tobacco smoke are not equally carcinogenic

    OpenAIRE

    Melamede Robert

    2005-01-01

    Abstract More people are using the cannabis plant as modern basic and clinical science reaffirms and extends its medicinal uses. Concomitantly, concern and opposition to smoked medicine has occurred, in part due to the known carcinogenic consequences of smoking tobacco. Are these reactions justified? While chemically very similar, there are fundamental differences in the pharmacological properties between cannabis and tobacco smoke. Cannabis smoke contains cannabinoids whereas tobacco smoke c...

  5. Gene discovery for the carcinogenic human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    OpenAIRE

    Gasser Robin B; Smout Michael J; Sripa Manop; Sripa Banchob; Mulvenna Jason; Pinlaor Porntip; Laha Thewarach; Brindley Paul J; Loukas Alex

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) – cancer of the bile ducts – is associated with chronic infection with the liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini. Despite being the only eukaryote that is designated as a 'class I carcinogen' by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, little is known about its genome. Results Approximately 5,000 randomly selected cDNAs from the adult stage of O. viverrini were characterized and accounted for 1,932 contigs, representing ~14% of the entire tra...

  6. A role for sunlight in skin cancer: UV-induced p53 mutations in squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunlight is a carcinogen to which everyone is exposed. Its UV component is the major epidemiologic risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. Of the multiple steps in tumor progression, those that are sunlight-related would be revealed if they contained mutations specific to UV. In a series of New England and Swedish patients, the authors find that 14/24 (58%) of invasive squamous cell carcinomas of the skin contain mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene, each altering the amino acid sequence. Involvement of UV light in these p53 mutations is indicated by the presence in three of the tumors of a CC → TT double-base change, which is only known to be induced by UV. UV is also implicated by a UV-like occurrence of mutations exclusively at dipyrimidine sites, including a high frequency of C → T substitutions. p53 mutations in internal malignancies do not show these UV-specific mutations. The dipyrimidine specificity also implicates dipyrimidine photoproducts containing cytosine as oncogenic photoproducts. They believe these results identify a carcinogen-related step in a gene involved in the subsequent human cancer

  7. Cellular-signaling pathways unveil the carcinogenic potential of chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Giel; van de Water, Bob; Schoonen, Willem; Vrieling, Harry

    2013-06-01

    Most of the current in vitro carcinogenicity assays assess the potential carcinogenic properties of chemicals through the detection of inflicted DNA damage or subsequent chromosome damage and gene mutations. Unfortunately, these assays generally do not provide mechanistic insight into the reactive properties of a chemical. Upon chemical-induced damage of biomolecules, molecular sensors will activate general and damage-specific cellular response pathways that provide protection against the (geno)toxic and potential carcinogenic properties of chemicals. These cellular defense mechanisms include activation of cell-cycle checkpoints, DNA repair systems and induction of apoptosis or necrosis. Visualization of activated cellular-signaling pathways forms a powerful means to readily detect the genotoxic potential of chemical compounds and simultaneously gain insight into their reactive properties. Over the past years, various in vitro reporter assays have been developed that monitor activation of general and more specific cellular-signaling pathways, including the GreenScreen HC and ToxTracker assays. In this review we provide a perspective on how we can exploit activation of cellular signaling pathways to shed light on the mode of action of the chemical exposure and to develop sophisticated mechanism-based in vitro assays for cancer risk assessment. PMID:23339022

  8. Workplace carcinogen and pesticide exposures in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, Timo; Chaves, Jorge; Wesseling, Catharina; Chaverri, Fabio; Monge, Patricia; Ruepert, Clemens; Aragón, Aurora; Kogevinas, Manolis; Hogstedt, Christer; Kauppinen, Timo

    2003-01-01

    The CAREX data system converts national workforce volumes and proportions of workers exposed to workplace carcinogens into numbers of exposed in 55 industrial categories. CAREX was adapted for Costa Rica for 27 carcinogens and seven groups of pesticides. Widespread workplace carcinogens in the 1.3 million workforce of Costa Rica are solar radiation (333,000 workers), diesel engine exhaust (278,000), environmental tobacco smoke (71,000), hexavalent chromium compounds (55,000), benzene (52,000), wood dust (32,000), silica dust (27,000), lead and inorganic lead compounds (19,000), and polycyclic aromatic compounds (17,000). The most ubiquitous pesticides were paraquat and diquat (175,000), mancozeb, maneb, and zineb (49,000), chlorothalonil (38,000), benomyl (19,000), and chlorophenoxy herbicides (11,000). Among women, formaldehyde, radon, and methylene chloride overrode pesticides, chromium, wood dust, and silica dust in numbers of exposed. High-risk sectors included agriculture, construction, personal and household services, land and water transport and allied services, pottery and similar industries, woodworks, mining, forestry and logging, fishing, manufacturing of electrical machinery, and bar and restaurant personnel. PMID:12848237

  9. Artificial sweeteners--do they bear a carcinogenic risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihrauch, M R; Diehl, V

    2004-10-01

    Artificial sweeteners are added to a wide variety of food, drinks, drugs and hygiene products. Since their introduction, the mass media have reported about potential cancer risks, which has contributed to undermine the public's sense of security. It can be assumed that every citizen of Western countries uses artificial sweeteners, knowingly or not. A cancer-inducing activity of one of these substances would mean a health risk to an entire population. We performed several PubMed searches of the National Library of Medicine for articles in English about artificial sweeteners. These articles included 'first generation' sweeteners such as saccharin, cyclamate and aspartame, as well as 'new generation' sweeteners such as acesulfame-K, sucralose, alitame and neotame. Epidemiological studies in humans did not find the bladder cancer-inducing effects of saccharin and cyclamate that had been reported from animal studies in rats. Despite some rather unscientific assumptions, there is no evidence that aspartame is carcinogenic. Case-control studies showed an elevated relative risk of 1.3 for heavy artificial sweetener use (no specific substances specified) of >1.7 g/day. For new generation sweeteners, it is too early to establish any epidemiological evidence about possible carcinogenic risks. As many artificial sweeteners are combined in today's products, the carcinogenic risk of a single substance is difficult to assess. However, according to the current literature, the possible risk of artificial sweeteners to induce cancer seems to be negligible. PMID:15367404

  10. uv photobiology: excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are discussed: steps in nucleotide excision; damage to DNA by uv-endonuclease; use of complementation to study DNA repair in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells; role of BUDR photolysis in excision repair, relation between DNA repair defect and human disease; base excision repair; and excision repair by removal of damaged region of a base in DNA without excision

  11. Morphological transformation and effect on gap junction intercellular communication in Syrian hamster embryo cells as screening tests for carcinogens devoid of mutagenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivedal, E; Mikalsen, S O; Sanner, T

    2000-04-01

    A large fraction of chemicals observed to cause cancer in experimental animals is devoid of mutagenic activity. It is therefore of importance to develop methods that can be used to detect and study environmental carcinogenic agents that do not interact directly with DNA. Previous studies have indicated that induction of in vitro cell transformation and inhibition of gap junction intercellular communication are endpoints that could be useful for the detection of non-genotoxic carcinogens. In the present work, 13 compounds [chlordane, Arochlor 1260, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, 1,1,1-trichloro-2, 2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane, limonene, sodium fluoride, ethionine, o-anisidine, benzoyl peroxide, o-vanadate, phenobarbital, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate and clofibrate] have been tested for their ability to induce morphological transformation and affect intercellular communication in Syrian hamster embryo cells. The substances were selected on the basis of being proven or suspected non-genotoxic carcinogens, and thus difficult to detect in short-term tests. The data show that nine of the 13 compounds induced morphological transformation, and seven of the 13 inhibited intercellular communication in hamster embryo cells. Taken together, 12 of the 13 substances either induced transformation or caused inhibition of communication. The data suggest that the combined use of morphological transformation and gap junction intercellular communication in Syrian hamster embryo cells may be beneficial when screening for non-genotoxic carcinogens. PMID:10793297

  12. Evaluation of carcinogenic potential of the herbicide glyphosate, drawing on tumor incidence data from fourteen chronic/carcinogenicity rodent studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greim, Helmut; Saltmiras, David; Mostert, Volker; Strupp, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Abstract Glyphosate, an herbicidal derivative of the amino acid glycine, was introduced to agriculture in the 1970s. Glyphosate targets and blocks a plant metabolic pathway not found in animals, the shikimate pathway, required for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in plants. After almost forty years of commercial use, and multiple regulatory approvals including toxicology evaluations, literature reviews, and numerous human health risk assessments, the clear and consistent conclusions are that glyphosate is of low toxicological concern, and no concerns exist with respect to glyphosate use and cancer in humans. This manuscript discusses the basis for these conclusions. Most toxicological studies informing regulatory evaluations are of commercial interest and are proprietary in nature. Given the widespread attention to this molecule, the authors gained access to carcinogenicity data submitted to regulatory agencies and present overviews of each study, followed by a weight of evidence evaluation of tumor incidence data. Fourteen carcinogenicity studies (nine rat and five mouse) are evaluated for their individual reliability, and select neoplasms are identified for further evaluation across the data base. The original tumor incidence data from study reports are presented in the online data supplement. There was no evidence of a carcinogenic effect related to glyphosate treatment. The lack of a plausible mechanism, along with published epidemiology studies, which fail to demonstrate clear, statistically significant, unbiased and non-confounded associations between glyphosate and cancer of any single etiology, and a compelling weight of evidence, support the conclusion that glyphosate does not present concern with respect to carcinogenic potential in humans. PMID:25716480

  13. Carcinogenic and Non-Carcinogenic Assessment of Phthalates Exposure Through Consumption of Bottled Water During the Storage Time

    OpenAIRE

    M Zare Jeddi; Rastkari, N.; R Ahmadkhaniha; M Alimohammadi; M. Yunesian

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Bottles for packaging drinking water represent one of the most popular uses of plastic and polymer additives. Recently, public concerns related to possibility of exposure to chemicals through the consumption of polyethylene terephthalate bottled water has caused great concern to consumers. Phthalate esters, as a class of these compounds, are often classified as endocrine disruptors and one of them is a possible carcinogen for human. The aim of this study was to dete...

  14. Transformation by viral and cellular oncogenes of a mouse BALB/3T3 cell mutant resistant to transformation by chemical carcinogens.

    OpenAIRE

    Ono, M; Yakushinji, M; Segawa, K.; Kuwano, M

    1988-01-01

    The mouse cell line MO-5 is resistant to transformation by various chemical carcinogens and also by UV irradiation (C. Yasutake, Y. Kuratomi, M. Ono, S. Masumi, and M. Kuwano, Cancer Res. 47:4894-4899, 1987). Northern (RNA) blot analysis showed active expression of ras and myc genes in MO-5 and BALB/3T3 cells. The effect of transfection of various oncogenes on transformation was compared in MO-5 cells and parental BALB/3T3 cells. Activated c-H-ras, c-N-ras, and v-mos gene induced transformati...

  15. Neoplastic transformation of human breast epithelial cells by estrogens and chemical carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Jose; Tahin, Quivo; Lareef, M Hasan; Hu, Yun-Fu; Russo, Irma H

    2002-01-01

    Sporadic breast cancer, the most common cancer diagnosed in American and Northern European women, is gradually increasing in incidence in most Western countries. Prevention would be the most efficient way of eradicating this disease. This goal, however, cannot be accomplished until the specific agent(s) or mechanisms that initiate the neoplastic process are identified. Experimental studies have demonstrated that mammary cancer is a hormone-dependent multistep process that can be induced by a variety of compounds and mechanisms, that is, hormones, chemicals, radiation, and viruses, in addition to or in combination with genetic factors. Although estrogens have been shown to play a central role in breast cancer development, their carcinogenicity on human breast epithelial cells (HBECs) has not yet been clearly demonstrated. Breast cancer initiates in the undifferentiated lobules type 1, which are composed of three cell types: highly proliferating cells that are estrogen-receptor negative (ER-), nonproliferating cells that are ER positive (ER+), and very few (17p13.2. The relevance of these findings is highlighted by the observation that E(2)- and B[a]P-induced genomic alterations in the same loci found in ductal hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ, and invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. PMID:11921196

  16. Antibiotic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... either as public health or as non-public health antimicrobial agents. What is the difference between bacteriostats, sanitizers, disinfectants ... bacteria, however, there is considerable controversy surrounding their health benefits. The ... producing agents (Table of Antibacterials) have been used for many ...

  17. Degradation of antipyrine by UV, UV/H2O2 and UV/PS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The antipyrine decomposition exhibited a pseudo-first-order kinetics pattern well. • The kobs with irradiance or oxidant dosage presented a linear relationship well. • The kobs exhibit an exponential trend as a function of [AP]0 for three systems. • UV/H2O2 behaved best at pH 2.5–10, while UV/PS behaved best at pH 10.0–11.5. • Cost for chemicals was firstly taken into account in calculation of the EE/O values. -- Abstract: Degradation of antipyrine (AP) in water by three UV-based photolysis processes (i.e., direct UV, UV/H2O2, UV/persulfate (UV/PS)) was studied. For all the oxidation processes, the AP decomposition exhibited a pseudo-first-order kinetics pattern. Generally, UV/H2O2 and UV/PS significantly improved the degradation rate relevant to UV treatment alone. The pseudo-first-order degradation rate constants (kobs) were, to different degrees, affected by initial AP concentration, oxidant dose, pH, UV irradiation intensity, and co-existing chemicals such as humic acid, chloride, bicarbonate, carbonate and nitrate. The three oxidation processes followed the order in terms of treatment costs: UV/PS > UV > UV/H2O2 if the energy and chemical costs are considered. Finally, the AP degradation pathways in the UV/H2O2 and UV/PS processes are proposed. Results demonstrated that UV/H2O2 and UV/PS are potential alternatives to control water pollution caused by emerging contaminants such as AP

  18. New clues on carcinogenicity-related substructures derived from mining two large datasets of chemical compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbamaki, Azadi; Benfenati, Emilio; Golbamaki, Nazanin; Manganaro, Alberto; Merdivan, Erinc; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Gini, Giuseppina

    2016-04-01

    In this study, new molecular fragments associated with genotoxic and nongenotoxic carcinogens are introduced to estimate the carcinogenic potential of compounds. Two rule-based carcinogenesis models were developed with the aid of SARpy: model R (from rodents' experimental data) and model E (from human carcinogenicity data). Structural alert extraction method of SARpy uses a completely automated and unbiased manner with statistical significance. The carcinogenicity models developed in this study are collections of carcinogenic potential fragments that were extracted from two carcinogenicity databases: the ANTARES carcinogenicity dataset with information from bioassay on rats and the combination of ISSCAN and CGX datasets, which take into accounts human-based assessment. The performance of these two models was evaluated in terms of cross-validation and external validation using a 258 compound case study dataset. Combining R and H predictions and scoring a positive or negative result when both models are concordant on a prediction, increased accuracy to 72% and specificity to 79% on the external test set. The carcinogenic fragments present in the two models were compared and analyzed from the point of view of chemical class. The results of this study show that the developed rule sets will be a useful tool to identify some new structural alerts of carcinogenicity and provide effective information on the molecular structures of carcinogenic chemicals. PMID:26986491

  19. uv preilluminated gas switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have designed, built, and characterized uv preilluminated gas switches for a trigger circuit and a low inductance discharge circuit. These switches have been incorporated into a 54 x 76 x 150 cm pulser module to produce a 1 Ma output current rising at 5 x 1012 amps/sec with 1 ns jitter. Twenty such modules will be used on the Nova Inertial Confinement Fusion Laser System for plasma retropulse shutters

  20. uv preilluminated gas switches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, L.P.; Orham, E.L.; Stowers, I.F.; Braucht, J.R.

    1980-06-03

    We have designed, built, and characterized uv preilluminated gas switches for a trigger circuit and a low inductance discharge circuit. These switches have been incorporated into a 54 x 76 x 150 cm pulser module to produce a 1 Ma output current rising at 5 x 10/sup 12/ amps/sec with 1 ns jitter. Twenty such modules will be used on the Nova Inertial Confinement Fusion Laser System for plasma retropulse shutters.

  1. Effect of Radiation on the Functions of Carcinogenic Viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When carcinogenic viruses are irradiated under suitable experimental conditions with ultra-violet rays or ionizing radiation, the various viral functions can be dissociated and virions defective in certain functions can be obtained. These defects are real mutations; they are passed on to subsequent generations provided the virions affected remain capable of reproduction. It has been possible to obtain various types of mutant, e.g. hyper producers of virions, non-productive transformers, non-transforming producers. The production of these mutants opens up certain experimental possibilities with regard to the transformation mechanism and the possible consequences of irradiation in vivo. Attention will be devoted in particular to the increased oncogenic capability in vivo which is sometimes observed in pre-irradiated viruses, and also to the consequences of this effect in the radiotherapy of certain malignant infections. These studies are also of interest for analysing the structure of the viral genome and throwing light on that fraction of the genome which is responsible for the transforming capacity. In the case of small viruses with a single DNA molecule (polyoma, SV-40) it has been possible to measure the fraction of the molecule responsible for the transforming capacity. In the case of the Rous virus the experiments suggest that the viral RNA is made up of sub-units capable of independent replication, the transforming capacity being possessed by only one of these sub-units. The induced defect may reveal the presence of transforming capacity in a virus considered as non- oncogenic because the transformed cells are usually eliminated by the infective process. In this way irradiation could render carcinogenic a virus which is not carcinogenic under normal conditions. The paper covers work done at the various viral radiobiology laboratories of the Radium Institute during the last two years. (author)

  2. Appraisal of alternative skin model for the study of epidermal restoration following exposure to various environmental stress agents: ionising radiation and UV B; Evaluation d'un modele alternatif de peau dans l'etude de l'atteinte epidermique apres exposition a differents agents de stress environnementaux: rayonnements ionisants (RI) et ultra-violets B (UVB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isoir, M

    2006-06-15

    Human skin is a major target tissue for ionising radiation (IR) and UV B. We developed a skin explant model and used 2 types of keratinocytes to study survival and oxidative stress induced by these radiations. We examined oxidative damages by measuring R.O.S. produced and cellular anti-oxidant defenses induced. We observed into skin exposed to IR a modulation of genes expression implied in the control of oxidative stress, confirmed by the decrease of catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase enzymatic activities. The imbalance observed between anti- and pro-apoptotic genes expression shows that keratinocytes apoptosis may be partly dependent on radio-induced R.O.S. production. We showed the difference of radiosensitivity between N.H.E.K. and Ha Ca.T., which may be linked to their differential oxidative responses. In addition, during re-epithelialising, we demonstrated that activated N.H.E.K. after IR express keratin 6, release pro-inflammatory cytokines and proliferate, without modification of their differentiation. Treatment of N.H.E.K. with geranyl geranylacetone (G.G.A.) has a beneficial effect on their radio-induced activation by increasing IL-1 release, their migration in scrapped area and their survival. G.G.A. has an anti apoptotic ability (induction of Hsp70- caspase-3 pathway) and migratory properties (P38/RhoA activation) on N.H.E.K., but after IR, only caspase-3 pathway is induced. This work thus contributes to the understanding of cutaneous damages after IR and G.G.A. mechanism of action which accelerates re-epithelialising. (author)

  3. Unanticipated role of melanin in causing carcinogenic cyclobutane pyrimidine dimmers

    OpenAIRE

    Premi, Sanjay; Brash, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) instantaneously generates cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Paradoxically, we recently observed that UV enables the protective pigment melanin to create CPDs in the dark long after the exposure ends. UV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) oxidize melanin to create melanin carbonyls in a high-energy quantum state. These energetic melanin carbonyls transfer their energy to DNA in the dark, creating CPDs in the absence of UVR.

  4. Unanticipated role of melanin in causing carcinogenic cyclobutane pyrimidine dimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premi, Sanjay; Brash, Douglas E

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) instantaneously generates cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). Paradoxically, we recently observed that UV enables the protective pigment melanin to create CPDs in the dark long after the exposure ends. UV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) oxidize melanin to create melanin carbonyls in a high-energy quantum state. These energetic melanin carbonyls transfer their energy to DNA in the dark, creating CPDs in the absence of UVR. PMID:27308551

  5. The carcinogenic action of crystalline silica: a review of the evidence supporting secondary inflammation-driven genotoxicity as a principal mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borm, Paul J A; Tran, Lang; Donaldson, Ken

    2011-10-01

    In 1987 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified crystalline silica (CS) as a probable carcinogen and in 1997 reclassified it as a Group 1 carcinogen, i.e., that there was sufficient evidence for carcinogenicity in experimental animals and sufficient evidence for carcinogenicity in humans. The Working Group noted that "carcinogenicity in humans was not detected in all industrial circumstances studied, carcinogenicity may be dependent on inherent characteristics of the crystalline silica or on external factors affecting its biological activity or distribution of its polymorphs." This unusual statement that the physicochemical form of the CS influences its carcinogenicity is well understood at the toxicological level and arises as a consequence of the fact that CS activity depends on the reactivity of the CS surface, which can be blocked by a number of agents. We reviewed the literature on CS genotoxicity that has been published since the 1997 monograph, with special reference to the mechanism of CS genotoxicity. The mechanism of CS genotoxicity can be primary, a result of direct interaction of CS with target cells, or indirect, as a consequence of inflammation elicited by quartz, where the inflammatory cell-derived oxidants cause the genotoxicity. The review revealed a number of papers supporting the hypothesis that the CS genotoxic and inflammatory hazard is a variable one. In an attempt to attain a quantitative basis for the potential mechanism, we carried out analysis of published data and noted a 5-fold greater dose required to reach a threshold for genotoxic effects than for proinflammatory effects in the same cell line in vitro. When we related the calculated threshold dose at the proximal alveolar region for inflammation in a published study with the threshold dose for genotoxicity in vitro, we noted that a 60-120-fold greater dose was required for direct genotoxic effects in vitro. These data strongly suggests that inflammation is

  6. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens (initiators) as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells

  7. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlehofer, J.R.; Ehrbar, M.; zur Hausen, H.

    1986-07-15

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens (initiators) as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells.

  8. Results of screening NCI/NTP nongenotoxic carcinogens and genotoxic noncarcinogens with the ke test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interdependence of the electrophilic and carcinogenic properties of chemicals that was demonstrated two decades ago rekindled interest in the somatic mutation theory of carcinogenesis. Interest in this theory grew with the development of a reverse-mutation bacterial assay in the laboratory of B.N. Ames that permitted the mutagenic properties of the chemicals to be determined quickly and yielded results which indicated that ''carcinogens are mutagens.'' Subsequent validation studies of this bioassay, the Salmonella typhimurium/microsome or ''Ames test,'' by Ames' group and others provided additional support for the correlation between mutagenicity and carcinogenicity which led to the worldwide deployment of the Ames test in thousands of laboratories and to the development of more than 100 other short-term tests that continue to be used to identify potential carcinogens via various end-points of genotoxicity. This document discusses electrophilicity, mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity relationships as well as carcinogen-screening of chemicals. 28 refs., 4 tabs

  9. Joint action of a chemical carcinogen and a neoplastic virus to induce cancer in rabbits; results of exposing epidermal cells to a carcinogenic hydrocarbon at time of infection with the Shope papilloma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROGERS, S; ROUS, P

    1951-05-01

    Areas of rabbit skin previously rendered hyperplastic with turpentine were scarified, inoculated with the Shope papilloma virus, and covered with a dressing that contained 20-methylcholanthrene (MC) or 9:10-dimethyl-1:2-benzanthracene (9:10). The dressing was left on until healing had been well completed, a matter of 5 to 7 days. The papillomas which subsequently arose often appeared later, were fewer, and remained less vigorous than those due to the action of virus alone, but throughout several months they appeared to differ from these in no other ways. Then, more or less abruptly, the large majority became carcinomatous, frequently at several situations, whereas with few exceptions the control growths underwent no such alteration. The cancers were of the sorts ordinarily deriving, by secondary change, from epidermal cells infected with the virus. Collateral data have made plain that the hydrocarbons acted in their carcinogenic capacity to bring on the cancers. Indeed in control tests 9: 10 sometimes conferred latent neoplastic potentialities on uninoculated epidermis exposed to it while healing after scarification, a fact disclosed months later by painting these expanses with chloroform until hyperplasia occurred. Under the promoting influence of this agent papillomas formed which had the distinctive morphology of those induced by the chemical carcinogens. So strong and enduring were the effects of MC and 9:10 as to cause cancers to arise from many virus papillomas which were retrogressing after months of proliferation, that is to say under circumstances ordinarily unfavorable to malignant change. The facts justify the conclusion that the virus and the hydrocarbons acted jointly and in their carcinogenic capacities. PMID:14832395

  10. Estimated UV doses to psoriasis patients during climate therapy at Gran Canaria in March 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. N. Nilsen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease involving about 2–3% of the Norwegian population. Sun exposure has a positive effect on most psoriasis lesions, but ultraviolet (UV radiation also causes a direct DNA damage in the skin cells and comprises a carcinogenic potential. UV exposure on the skin causes a local as well as a systemic immune suppressive effect, but the relation between sun exposure and these biological effects is not well known. In March 2006 a study was carried out to investigate possible therapeutic outcome mechanisms in 20 psoriasis patients receiving climate therapy at Gran Canaria. This paper presents estimates of their individual skin UV-doses based on UV measurements and the patients' diaries with information on time spent in the sun.

    On the first day of exposure the patients received on average 5.1 Standard Erythema Doses (SED: median=4.0 SED, range 2.6–10.3 SED estimated to the skin. During the 15 days study they received 165.8 SED (range 104.3–210.1 SED. The reduction in PASI score was 72.8% on average, but there was no obvious relation between the improvement and the UV dose. The UV doses were higher than those found from climate therapy studies at other locations. It seems beneficial to use more strict exposure schedules that consider the available UV irradiance, depending on time of the day, time of the year and weather conditions.

  11. Prevention of cancer and the dose-effect relationship: the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    seldom occur. Promoting factors are agents that either perturb intercellular signalling or stimulate cell proliferation (e.g. hormones) or increase cell mortality: mechanical or chemical irritation (e.g. alcohol, bacteria, viruses) thereby inducing compensatory cell proliferation. Thus, gradually pre-cancerous cells become able to divide more rapidly with greater autonomy. This phase ends when a sub clone of cells has acquired the capacity of autonomous proliferation. The third phase is that of progression during which cells proliferate regularly without any stimulation. In one of the cells of one of the pre-cancerous lesions (e.g. polyps) a cell acquires the capacity of invading surrounding tissue or to metastasize. The whole carcinogenic process is very slow, extending over several decades, because the specific mutations seldom occur and the probability of an accumulation of several specific mutations in the same cell or cell lineage is very small. It can be accelerated by intense stimulation of cell proliferation or genetic instability. Ionizing radiations act firstly as a mutagen, however when the dose is high they also kill a significant proportion of cells and by a homeostatic mechanism they induce cell proliferation and clonal amplification. It has been claimed that even the smallest dose of radiation can induce a cancer. This concept is associated with the L.N.T. model and it is not based on scientific evidence. It has fuelled a fear of radiation which had detrimental consequences. Conversely the high efficacy of defense mechanisms against radio carcinogenesis, particularly when the tissue is not disorganized, can explain the lack of carcinogenic effect of contamination by small doses of radium or thorium which has been observed on radium dial painters or in patients injected with thorotrast. The study of second cancers in patients treated by radiotherapy could provide important information and should be actively pursued with two aims: reduce the incidence of

  12. Prostaglandin hydroperoxidase-catalyzed activation of certain N-substituted aryl renal and bladder carcinogens

    OpenAIRE

    Zenser, T V; Cohen, S M; Mattammal, M. B.; Wise, R. W.; Rapp, N. S.; Davis, B B

    1983-01-01

    Certain carcinogens are thought to induce renal and bladder cancer following metabolic activation. We propose a model system for this activation and provide supporting experimental evidence. This model proposes that renal and bladder carcinogens' entry into the urinary tract is facilitated, that carcinogens are activated by the prostaglandin hydroperoxidase activity of prostaglandin endoperoxide synthetase (PES), and that activation results in covalent binding to nucleic acids which can initi...

  13. Discrimination of Carcinogens by Hepatic Transcript Profiling in Rats Following 28-day Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Matsumoto

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at discriminating carcinogens on the basis of hepatic transcript profiling in the rats administrated with a variety of carcinogens and non-carcinogens. We conducted 28-day toxicity tests in male F344 rats with 47 carcinogens and 26 non- carcinogens, and then investigated periodically the hepatic gene expression profiles using custom microarrays. By hierarchical cluster analysis based on significantly altered genes, carcinogens were clustered into three major groups (Group 1 to 3. The formation of these groups was not affected by the gene sets used as well as the administration period, indicating that the grouping of carcinogens was universal independent of the conditions of both statistical analysis and toxicity testing. Seventeen carcinogens belonging to Group 1 were composed of mainly rat hepatocarcinogens, most of them being mutagenic ones. Group 2 was formed by three subgroups, which were composed of 23 carcinogens exhibiting distinct properties in terms of genotoxicity and target tissues, namely nonmutagenic hepatocarcinogens, and mutagenic and nonmutagenic carcinogens both of which are targeted to other tissues. Group 3 contained 6 carcinogens including 4 estrogenic substances, implying the group of estrogenic carcinogens. Gene network analyses revealed that the significantly altered genes in Group 1 included Bax, Tnfrsf6, Btg2, Mgmt and Abcb1b, suggesting that p53-mediated signaling pathway involved in early pathologic alterations associated with preceding mutagenic carcinogenesis. Thus, the common transcriptional signatures for each group might reflect the early molecular events of carcinogenesis and hence would enable us to identify the biomarker genes, and then to develop a new assay for carcinogenesis prediction.

  14. Predicting carcinogenicity of organic compounds based on CPDB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiuchao; Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Hui; Hu, Jingtian

    2015-11-01

    Cancer is a major killer of human health and predictions for the carcinogenicity of chemicals are of great importance. In this article, predictive models for the carcinogenicity of organic compounds using QSAR methods for rats and mice were developed based on the data from CPDB. The models was developed based on the data of specific target site liver and classified according to sex of rats and mice. Meanwhile, models were also classified according to whether there is a ring in the molecular structure in order to reduce the diversity of molecular structure. Therefore, eight local models were developed in the final. Taking into account the complexity of carcinogenesis and in order to obtain as much information, DRAGON descriptors were selected as the variables used to develop models. Fitting ability, robustness and predictive power of the models were assessed according to the OECD principles. The external predictive coefficients for validation sets of each model were in the range of 0.711-0.906, and for the whole data in each model were all greater than 0.8, which represents that all models have good predictivity. In order to study the mechanism of carcinogenesis, standardized regression coefficients were calculated for all predictor variables. In addition, the effect of animal sex on carcinogenesis was compared and a trend that female showed stronger tolerance for cancerogen than male in both species was appeared. PMID:26070146

  15. Ochratoxin A carcinogenicity involves a complex network of epigenetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Kuan, Maricel; Cavin, Christophe; Delatour, Thierry; Schilter, Benoît

    2008-08-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin occurring in a wide range of food products. Because of the limitation of human epidemiological data, the safety significance of OTA in food has to rely on animal data, with renal toxicity and carcinogenicity being considered the pivotal effects. The elucidation of the mechanism of action would improve the use of experimental animal data for risk assessment. Direct genotoxicity versus epigenetic mechanisms appears to be a key question. In the present review, the increasingly documented epigenetic cellular effects of OTA and their potential toxicological relevance are discussed. The information available suggests that OTA is unlikely to act through a single, well-defined mechanism of action. Instead, it is proposed that a network of interacting epigenetic mechanisms, including protein synthesis inhibition, oxidative stress and the activation of specific cell signalling pathways, is responsible for OTA carcinogenicity. From a risk assessment perspective, it has to be noted that the mechanisms proposed above depend mainly upon gene expression and enzyme activation, and are, therefore, likely to be thresholded. PMID:18649906

  16. Carcinogenic effects ofcircadian disruption:an epigenetic viewpoint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abbas Salavaty

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms refer to the endogenous rhythms that are generated to synchronize physiology and behavior with 24-h environmental cues. These rhythms are regulated by both external cues and molecular clock mechanisms in almost all cells. Disruption of circadian rhythms, which is called circadian disruption, affects many biological processes within the body and results in different long-term diseases, including cancer. Circadian regulatory pathways result in rhythmic epigenetic modiifcations and the formation of circadian epigenomes. Aberrant epigenetic modiifcations, such as hypermethylation, due to circadian disruption may be involved in the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. Several studies have indicated an epigenetic basis for the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption. In this review, I ifrst discuss some of the circadian genes and regulatory proteins. Then, I summarize the current evidence related to the epigenetic modiifcations that result in circadian disruption. In addition, I explain the carcinogenic effects of circadian disruption and highlight its potential role in different human cancers using an epigenetic view-point. Finally, the importance of chronotherapy in cancer treatment is highlighted.

  17. Review of genotoxicity and rat carcinogenicity investigations with astaxanthin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, James A; Bellion, Phillip; Beilstein, Paul; Rümbeli, Robert; Schierle, Joseph

    2016-03-01

    Synthetic astaxanthin has been extensively tested for safety. Genotoxicity studies including Ames and in vitro Micronucleus Tests show absence of genotoxic potential. Although a long-term mouse study showed no carcinogenicity potential, the rat carcinogenicity study with dietary dosages of 0 (control), 0 (placebo beadlet), 40, 200 and 1000 mg astaxanthin/kg bw/day showed an increased incidence of benign, hepatocellular adenoma in females only, at 200 mg/kg bw/day and above. There was no clear evidence of toxicity during the in-life phase. Discoloration of feces was observed and a reduction in body weight gain in all groups receiving beadlets, probably reflecting a nutritional influence. Blood sampling confirmed systemic exposure and some minor clinical chemistry differences in females at 200 and 1000 mg/kg bw/day. There was no effect on adjusted liver weight. Histopathological examination showed hepatic changes indicative of slight hepatotoxicity and hepatocyte regeneration in females at 200 and 1000 mg/kg bw/day, in addition to the adenoma. Taking into account this pathological background in the female rat, and a wide variety of other supporting information, it is concluded that the hepatocellular adenoma in female rats was secondary to hepatotoxicity and regeneration, and is most probably a species-specific phenomenon of doubtful human relevance. PMID:26713891

  18. Carcinogen specific dosimetry model for passive smokers of various ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies indicate that being exposed to second hand smoke increases the chance of developing lung cancer. Understanding the deposition of carcinogenic particles present in second hand smoke is necessary to understand the development of specific histologic type cancers. In this study, a deposition model is presented for subjects of various ages exposed to sidestream smoke. The model included particle dynamics of coagulation, hygroscopic growth, charge and cloud behavior. Concentrations were varied from the maximum measured indoor concentrations (106 particles/cm3) to what would be expected from wisps of smoke (108 particles/cm3). Model results agreed well with experimental data taken from human subject deposition measurements (four studies). The model results were used to determine the dose intensity (dose per unit airway surface area) of Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) in the respiratory tract for subjects of various ages. Model predictions for BaP surface concentration on the airway walls paralleled incident rates of tumors by location in the upper tracheobronchial region. Mass deposition efficiency was found to be larger for younger subjects, consistent with diffusion being the predominant mechanism for this particle size range. However, the actual dose intensity of BaP was found to be smaller for children than adults. This occurred due to the predominant effect of the smaller initial inhaled mass for children resulting from smaller tidal volumes. The resulting model is a useful tool to predict carcinogen specific particle deposition

  19. Systems biology perspectives on the carcinogenic potential of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review focuses on recent experimental and modeling studies that attempt to define the physiological context in which high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation increases epithelial cancer risk and the efficiency with which it does so. Radiation carcinogenesis is a two-compartment problem: ionizing radiation can alter genomic sequence as a result of damage due to targeted effects (TE) from the interaction of energy and DNA; it can also alter phenotype and multicellular interactions that contribute to cancer by poorly understood non-targeted effects (NTE). Rather than being secondary to DNA damage and mutations that can initiate cancer, radiation NTE create the critical context in which to promote cancer. Systems biology modeling using comprehensive experimental data that integrates different levels of biological organization and time-scales is a means of identifying the key processes underlying the carcinogenic potential of high-LET radiation. We hypothesize that inflammation is a key process, and thus cancer susceptibility will depend on specific genetic predisposition to the type and duration of this response. Systems genetics using novel mouse models can be used to identify such determinants of susceptibility to cancer in radiation sensitive tissues following high-LET radiation. Improved understanding of radiation carcinogenesis achieved by defining the relative contribution of NTE carcinogenic effects and identifying the genetic determinants of the high-LET cancer susceptibility will help reduce uncertainties in radiation risk assessment

  20. Formaldehyde in dentistry: a review of mutagenic and carcinogenic potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.B.; Chestner, S.B.

    1981-09-01

    For many years there has been controversy over the value of antimicrobial drugs for intracanal dressings in endodontics. Formocresol, a formaldehyde compound, has evolved as the preferred drug for routine endodontic procedures, as well as pediatric endodontics. The increase in the use of formaldehyde has been complicated by the introduction of paraformaldehyde pastes for filling root canals. Neither of these formulas has ever been standardized. The doses are arbitrary, and the common dose of formocresol has been shown to be many times greater than the minimum dose needed for effect. The efficacy of paraformaldehyde pastes is questionable and remains clouded by inconclusive evidence, conflicting research, inadequate terminology, and a lack of convincing statistical evidence. The clinical use and delivery of formocresol and paraformaldehyde pastes remain arbitrary and unscientific. Formaldehyde has a known toxic mutagenic and carcinogenic potential. Many investigations have been conducted to measure the risk of exposure to formaldehyde; it is clear that formaldehyde poses a carcinogenic risk in humans. There is a need to reevaluate the rationale underlying the use of formaldehyde in dentistry particularly in light of its deleterious effects.

  1. Neoplastic transformation of human diploid fibroblast cells by chemical carcinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakunaga, Takeo

    1978-01-01

    Cultured fibroblast cells derived from a skin biopsy sample taken from normal human adult were exposed to a potent carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide. Alterations of cell growth pattern such as higher density and piling up of cells were noticed in some fractions of cultures that were successively subcultured after nitroquinoline oxide treatment. Morphologically altered cells retained this growth pattern and became established lines of transformed cells without showing the limited life-span characteristic of normal cells in culture. The transformed cells showed a higher saturation density and the ability to grow in soft agar, properties that are usually correlated with neoplastic transformation of cells in culture. Selection of preexisting transformed human cells as a mechanism of this observed transformation seemed unlikely because clones of these normal cells could also be used to assess the transforming effect of nitroquinoline oxide. Preliminary results suggest that numerous cell divisions were required for the development of the transformation after nitroquinoline oxide treatment of these human cells. When the transformed cell lines were injected subcutaneously into nude (athymic) mice, solid tumors were produced at the site of inoculation. Treatment with N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine also induced cell transformation, in a manner similar to treatment with nitroquinoline oxide. However, transformation was not induced with (i) 4-aminoquinoline 1-oxide (a noncarcinogenic derivative of 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide), (ii) 3-methylcholanthrene (a carcinogen that cannot be metabolically activated by the target cells employed), or (iii) the solvent dimethyl sulfoxide. Images PMID:418410

  2. Predicting carcinogenicity of diverse chemicals using probabilistic neural network modeling approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Kunwar P., E-mail: kpsingh_52@yahoo.com [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi (India); Environmental Chemistry Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Gupta, Shikha; Rai, Premanjali [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi (India); Environmental Chemistry Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Robust global models capable of discriminating positive and non-positive carcinogens; and predicting carcinogenic potency of chemicals in rodents were developed. The dataset of 834 structurally diverse chemicals extracted from Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB) was used which contained 466 positive and 368 non-positive carcinogens. Twelve non-quantum mechanical molecular descriptors were derived. Structural diversity of the chemicals and nonlinearity in the data were evaluated using Tanimoto similarity index and Brock–Dechert–Scheinkman statistics. Probabilistic neural network (PNN) and generalized regression neural network (GRNN) models were constructed for classification and function optimization problems using the carcinogenicity end point in rat. Validation of the models was performed using the internal and external procedures employing a wide series of statistical checks. PNN constructed using five descriptors rendered classification accuracy of 92.09% in complete rat data. The PNN model rendered classification accuracies of 91.77%, 80.70% and 92.08% in mouse, hamster and pesticide data, respectively. The GRNN constructed with nine descriptors yielded correlation coefficient of 0.896 between the measured and predicted carcinogenic potency with mean squared error (MSE) of 0.44 in complete rat data. The rat carcinogenicity model (GRNN) applied to the mouse and hamster data yielded correlation coefficient and MSE of 0.758, 0.71 and 0.760, 0.46, respectively. The results suggest for wide applicability of the inter-species models in predicting carcinogenic potency of chemicals. Both the PNN and GRNN (inter-species) models constructed here can be useful tools in predicting the carcinogenicity of new chemicals for regulatory purposes. - Graphical abstract: Figure (a) shows classification accuracies (positive and non-positive carcinogens) in rat, mouse, hamster, and pesticide data yielded by optimal PNN model. Figure (b) shows generalization and predictive

  3. Uvs Nuur, Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The Uvs Nuur Basin in Mongolia and the Russian Federation is the northernmost of the enclosed basins of Central Asia. It takes its name from Uvs Nuur Lake, a large, shallow and very saline lake, very important for migrating birds. Inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2003, the site is made up of twelve protected areas representing major biomes of eastern Eurasia. The steppe ecosystem supports a rich diversity of birds and the desert is home to a number of rare gerbil, jerboas and the marbled polecat. The mountains are an important refuge for the endangered snow leopard, mountain sheep, and the Asiatic ibex. The image covers an area of 46 x 47.8 km, was acquired on September 4, 2001, and is located near 50.3 degrees north latitude, 90.7 degrees east longitude. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  4. Molecular basis of carcinogenicity of tungsten alloy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tungsten alloy of 91% tungsten, 6% nickel and 3% cobalt (WNC 91–6–3) induces rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into a rat thigh muscle. To investigate whether this effect is species-specific human HSkMc primary muscle cells were exposed to WNC 91–6–3 particles and responses were compared with those from a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6-C11). Toxicity was assessed by the adenylate kinase assay and microscopy, DNA damage by the Comet assay. Caspase 3 enzyme activity was measured and oligonucleotide microarrays were used for transcriptional profiling. WNC 91–6–3 particles caused toxicity in cells adjacent to the particles and also increased DNA strand breaks. Inhibition of caspase 3 by WNC 91–6–3 occurred in rat but not in human cells. In both rat and human cells, the transcriptional response to WNC 91–6–3 showed repression of transcripts encoding muscle-specific proteins with induction of glycolysis, hypoxia, stress responses and transcripts associated with DNA damage and cell death. In human cells, genes encoding metallothioneins were also induced, together with genes related to angiogenesis, dysregulation of apoptosis and proliferation consistent with pre-neoplastic changes. An alloy containing iron, WNF 97–2–1, which is non-carcinogenic in vivo in rats, did not show these transcriptional changes in vitro in either species while the corresponding cobalt-containing alloy, WNC 97–2–1 elicited similar responses to WNC 91–6–3. Tungsten alloys containing both nickel and cobalt therefore have the potential to be carcinogenic in man and in vitro assays coupled with transcriptomics can be used to identify alloys, which may lead to tumour formation, by dysregulation of biochemical processes. - Highlights: • Use of transcriptomics to identify likely carcinogenic tungsten alloys in vitro • Cobalt containing alloys cause oxidative stress, DNA-damage and perturb apoptosis. • Presence of cobalt causes changes in gene expression

  5. Molecular basis of carcinogenicity of tungsten alloy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Robert M.; Williams, Tim D.; Waring, Rosemary H.; Hodges, Nikolas J., E-mail: n.hodges@bham.ac.uk

    2015-03-15

    The tungsten alloy of 91% tungsten, 6% nickel and 3% cobalt (WNC 91–6–3) induces rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into a rat thigh muscle. To investigate whether this effect is species-specific human HSkMc primary muscle cells were exposed to WNC 91–6–3 particles and responses were compared with those from a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6-C11). Toxicity was assessed by the adenylate kinase assay and microscopy, DNA damage by the Comet assay. Caspase 3 enzyme activity was measured and oligonucleotide microarrays were used for transcriptional profiling. WNC 91–6–3 particles caused toxicity in cells adjacent to the particles and also increased DNA strand breaks. Inhibition of caspase 3 by WNC 91–6–3 occurred in rat but not in human cells. In both rat and human cells, the transcriptional response to WNC 91–6–3 showed repression of transcripts encoding muscle-specific proteins with induction of glycolysis, hypoxia, stress responses and transcripts associated with DNA damage and cell death. In human cells, genes encoding metallothioneins were also induced, together with genes related to angiogenesis, dysregulation of apoptosis and proliferation consistent with pre-neoplastic changes. An alloy containing iron, WNF 97–2–1, which is non-carcinogenic in vivo in rats, did not show these transcriptional changes in vitro in either species while the corresponding cobalt-containing alloy, WNC 97–2–1 elicited similar responses to WNC 91–6–3. Tungsten alloys containing both nickel and cobalt therefore have the potential to be carcinogenic in man and in vitro assays coupled with transcriptomics can be used to identify alloys, which may lead to tumour formation, by dysregulation of biochemical processes. - Highlights: • Use of transcriptomics to identify likely carcinogenic tungsten alloys in vitro • Cobalt containing alloys cause oxidative stress, DNA-damage and perturb apoptosis. • Presence of cobalt causes changes in gene expression

  6. Effect of long-wave UV radiation on mouse melanoma: an in vitro and in vivo study

    OpenAIRE

    Pastila, Riikka

    2006-01-01

    The skin cancer incidence has increased substantially over the past decades and the role of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in the etiology of skin cancer is well established. Ultraviolet B radiation (280-320 nm) is commonly considered as the more harmful part of the UV-spectrum due to its DNA-damaging potential and well-known carcinogenic effects. Ultraviolet A radiation (320-400 nm) is still regarded as a relatively low health hazard. However, UVA radiation is the predominant component in sunlig...

  7. A role for sunlight in skin cancer: UV-induced p53 mutations in squamous cell carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Brash, D E; Rudolph, J A; Simon, J A; Lin, A.; McKenna, G J; Baden, H P; Halperin, A J; Pontén, J

    1991-01-01

    Sunlight is a carcinogen to which everyone is exposed. Its UV component is the major epidemiologic risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. Of the multiple steps in tumor progression, those that are sunlight-related would be revealed if they contained mutations specific to UV. In a series of New England and Swedish patients, we find that 14/24 (58%) of invasive squamous cell carcinomas of the skin contain mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene, each altering the amino acid seq...

  8. Carcinogenic Parasite Secretes Growth Factor That Accelerates Wound Healing and Potentially Promotes Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smout, Michael J; Sotillo, Javier; Laha, Thewarach; Papatpremsiri, Atiroch; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Pimenta, Rafael N; Chan, Lai Yue; Johnson, Michael S; Turnbull, Lynne; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Giacomin, Paul R; Moran, Corey S; Golledge, Jonathan; Daly, Norelle; Sripa, Banchob; Mulvenna, Jason P; Brindley, Paul J; Loukas, Alex

    2015-10-01

    Infection with the human liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini induces cancer of the bile ducts, cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Injury from feeding activities of this parasite within the human biliary tree causes extensive lesions, wounds that undergo protracted cycles of healing, and re-injury over years of chronic infection. We show that O. viverrini secreted proteins accelerated wound resolution in human cholangiocytes, an outcome that was compromised following silencing of expression of the fluke-derived gene encoding the granulin-like growth factor, Ov-GRN-1. Recombinant Ov-GRN-1 induced angiogenesis and accelerated mouse wound healing. Ov-GRN-1 was internalized by human cholangiocytes and induced gene and protein expression changes associated with wound healing and cancer pathways. Given the notable but seemingly paradoxical properties of liver fluke granulin in promoting not only wound healing but also a carcinogenic microenvironment, Ov-GRN-1 likely holds marked potential as a therapeutic wound-healing agent and as a vaccine against an infection-induced cancer of major public health significance in the developing world. PMID:26485648

  9. Renal cell carcinomas of chronic kidney disease patients harbor the mutational signature of carcinogenic aristolochic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelaković, Bojan; Castells, Xavier; Tomić, Karla; Ardin, Maude; Karanović, Sandra; Zavadil, Jiri

    2015-06-15

    Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent dietary cytotoxin and carcinogen, and an established etiological agent underlying severe human nephropathies and associated upper urinary tract urothelial cancers, collectively designated aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). Its genome-wide mutational signature, marked by predominant A:T > T:A transversions occurring in the 5'-CpApG-3' trinucleotide context and enriched on the nontranscribed gene strand, has been identified in human upper urinary tract urothelial carcinomas from East Asian patients and in experimental systems. Here we report a whole-exome sequencing screen performed on DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded renal cell carcinomas (RCC) arising in chronic renal disease patients from a Balkan endemic nephropathy (EN) region. In the EN regions, the disease results from the consumption of bread made from wheat contaminated by seeds of Aristolochia clematitis, an AA-containing plant. In five of eight (62.5%) tested RCC tumor specimens, we observed the characteristic global mutational signature consistent with the mutagenic effects of AA. This signature was absent in the control RCC samples obtained from patients from a nonendemic, metropolitan region. By identifying a new tumor type associated with the AA-driven genome-wide mutagenic process in the context of renal disease, our results suggest new epidemiological and public health implications for the RCC incidence worldwide, particularly for the high-risk regions with unregulated use of AA-containing traditional herbal medicines. PMID:25403517

  10. Anti-carcinogenic and Anti-bacterial Properties of Selected Spices: Implications in Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjre, Anjali; Kathariya, Rahul; Bagul, Neeta; Pawar, Vivek

    2015-10-01

    "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food", as said by the father of medicine, Hippocrates in 431 B.C. Nature has provided us with a variety of treatment modalities in the form of food. For the first 5,000 years of civilization, humans relied on herbs and foods for medicine. Only in the past 60 years have we forgotten our medicinal "roots" in favor of patented medicines. While pharmaceutical ingredients have their value, we should not overlook the well-documented, non-toxic and inexpensive healing properties of food. As an individual we consume food several times a day without a complete understanding of its innate qualities. As part of a daily diet, food plays a significant role in helping our bodies function at their best. There are hundreds of extremely nutritious foods, but the items in this article do more than providing healthy nutrients. Many of them consist of ingredients with hidden pharmaceutical qualities ranging from anti-inflammatory to anti-carcinogenic agent. They not only boost our innate immunity but also act as an adjunct to medicines for specific treatment. Prevention and management of symptoms can often be improved significantly through the foods we consume regularly. This paper overviews these beneficial traits of food ingredients, consumed on a daily basis, in various oral diseases. PMID:26566515

  11. Malignant transformation in vitro: criteria, biological markers, and application in environmental screening of carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological markers which distinguish malignantly transformed fibroblasts from their normal counterpart include pleomorphic morphology, lowered requirement for nutritional factors, loss of density inhibition of growth, complex topography as discernible by scanning electron microscopy, loss in surface proteins, incomplete glycosylation of membrane glycolylipids and glycoproteins, increased production of specific proteases, decreased organization of the cytoskeleton, and acquisition of neoantigens. Several of these markers are not consistently found in transformed epithelial cells and therefore cannot serve to distinguish unequivocally neoplastic epithelial cells from the normal counterparts. The only criteria associated with the transformed nature of both fibroblasts and epithelial cells are the ability of the cells to proliferate in semisolid medium and to induce tumors in appropriate hosts. In vitro systems represent a powerful tool for screening the mutagenic/oncogenic potential of physical, chemical, and environmental agents. Fibroblasts rather than epithelial cells are preferred for this purpose at the present time because of the clear-cut phenotypic differences between the normal and the transformed cells. These systems have been useful in establishing that malignant transformation can be induced by doses as low as 1 rad of X rays or 0.1 rad of neutrons, and that fractionation at low dose levelsleads to enhanced transformation. They have been useful in identifying a large number of hazardous chemicals and in evaluating the relationship between the mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of radiation and chemicals

  12. Anti-carcinogenic and Anti-bacterial Properties of Selected Spices: Implications in Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjre, Anjali; Bagul, Neeta; Pawar, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    "Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food", as said by the father of medicine, Hippocrates in 431 B.C. Nature has provided us with a variety of treatment modalities in the form of food. For the first 5,000 years of civilization, humans relied on herbs and foods for medicine. Only in the past 60 years have we forgotten our medicinal "roots" in favor of patented medicines. While pharmaceutical ingredients have their value, we should not overlook the well-documented, non-toxic and inexpensive healing properties of food. As an individual we consume food several times a day without a complete understanding of its innate qualities. As part of a daily diet, food plays a significant role in helping our bodies function at their best. There are hundreds of extremely nutritious foods, but the items in this article do more than providing healthy nutrients. Many of them consist of ingredients with hidden pharmaceutical qualities ranging from anti-inflammatory to anti-carcinogenic agent. They not only boost our innate immunity but also act as an adjunct to medicines for specific treatment. Prevention and management of symptoms can often be improved significantly through the foods we consume regularly. This paper overviews these beneficial traits of food ingredients, consumed on a daily basis, in various oral diseases. PMID:26566515

  13. Agent, autonomous

    OpenAIRE

    Luciani, Annie

    2007-01-01

    The expression autonomous agents, widely used in virtual reality, computer graphics, artificial intelligence and artificial life, corresponds to the simulation of autonomous creatures, virtual (i.e. totally computed by a program), or embodied in a physical envelope, as done in autonomous robots.

  14. Occurrence of the carcinogenic compound ptaquiloside in the soil environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lars Holm; Kroghsbo, Stine; Frisvad, Jens Christian;

    2003-01-01

    Bracken (Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kuhn) is a common fern found on all continents except Antarctica. It is under suspicion of causing cancer among people who utilizes it as food. The main carcinogenic compound is thought to be the water-soluble compound ptaquiloside. Ptaquiloside-uptake may occur....... The ptaquiloside-content in the standing biomass, which could be transferred to the soil by the end of the growing season, ranged between 10 and 260 mgm2, with nine sites having ptaquiloside loads over 100 mgm2. The carbon-content in the O-horizon, the precipitation, the amount of Bracken-litter, the...... turnover rate and the size of Bracken-stands determined the ptaquiloside-content in the soil materials while the content in fronds was found to be a function of the frond-height and the light-exposure in the ecosystem....

  15. Active Galaxies in the UV

    OpenAIRE

    Kollatschny, Wolfram; Ting-Gui, Wang

    2006-01-01

    In this article we present different aspects of AGN studies demonstrating the importance of the UV spectral range. Most important diagnostic lines for studying the general physical conditions as well as the metalicities in the central broad line region in AGN are emitted in the UV. The UV/FUV continuum in AGN excites not only the emission lines in the immediate surrounding but it is responsible for the ionization of the intergalactic medium in the early stages of the universe. Variability stu...

  16. The Weight of Evidence Does Not Support the Listing of Styrene as "Reasonably Anticipated to be a Human Carcinogen" in NTP's Twelfth Report on Carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhomberg, Lorenz R; Goodman, Julie E; Prueitt, Robyn L

    2013-01-01

    Styrene was listed as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen" in the twelfth edition of the National Toxicology Program's Report on Carcinogens based on what we contend are erroneous findings of limited evidence of carcinogenicity in humans, sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals, and supporting mechanistic data. The epidemiology studies show no consistent increased incidence of, or mortality from, any type of cancer. In animal studies, increased incidence rates of mostly benign tumors have been observed only in certain strains of one species (mice) and at one tissue site (lung). The lack of concordance of tumor incidence and tumor type among animals (even within the same species) and humans indicates that there has been no particular cancer consistently observed among all available studies. The only plausible mechanism for styrene-induced carcinogenesis-a non-genotoxic mode of action that is specific to the mouse lung-is not relevant to humans. As a whole, the evidence does not support the characterization of styrene as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen," and styrene should not be listed in the Report on Carcinogens. PMID:23335843

  17. A carcinogenicity study of sucralose in the CD-1 mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, S W; Yuschak, M M; Amyes, S J; Aughton, P; Finn, J P

    2000-01-01

    The potential carcinogenicity of sucralose was evaluated by feeding groups of 52 male and 52 female CD-1 mice a diet containing sucralose at 0.3% (3000 ppm), 1.0% (10,000 ppm) or 3.0% (30,000 ppm) for 104 weeks. A group of 72 male and 72 female mice received diet without sucralose and served as controls. Week 1 achieved doses ranging from 543 to 5870mg/kg body weight/day in the low-dose males and high-dose females, respectively. Sucralose had no adverse effect on survival. No significant changes attributable to sucralose were found in the clinical condition or behaviour of the mice. Organ weights and the gross appearance of tissues were unaffected by treatment. The mean erythrocyte counts of females receiving the highest dietary concentration were slightly, but statistically significantly, lower than those of the controls after 104 weeks of treatment. Group mean body weight gain at the highest dietary concentration of sucralose was significantly less than that of the control in mice of both sexes. Food consumption, after correction for sucralose content, was lower for female mice, but not statistically significant. Water consumption for male mice receiving the highest dietary concentration was approximately 9% higher than that of the controls. There were statistically significant increases in the incidence of several non-neoplastic findings, but these were not considered to be related to sucralose administration. Treatment with sucralose did not increase the incidence of any tumour or influence the types of tumours observed. It was concluded that sucralose is not carcinogenic in CD-1 mice. The body weight gain and erythrocyte observations at the 3.0% dietary level were of limited biological significance as they were not accompanied by any histopathologic finding and had no impact on survival. The remaining dose levels were judged to have no effects. PMID:10882820

  18. The carcinogenicity of dietary acrylamide intake: A comparative discussion of epidemiological and experimental animal research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogervorst, J.G.F.; Baars, B.-J.; Schouten, L.J.; Konings, E.J.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2010-01-01

    Since 2002, it is known that the probable human carcinogen acrylamide is present in commonly consumed carbohydrate-rich foods, such as French fries and potato chips. In this review, the authors discuss the body of evidence on acrylamide carcinogenicity from both epidemiological and rodent studies, i

  19. Study of isotopic tracing related with mechanism of cancer caused by carcinogenic substance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the mechanism of cancer caused by carcinogenic substance, a project using 41Ca as tracer and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) as measurement method to investigate the origin of the increased Ca2+ when the cells are exposed to carcinogenic substances is being undertaken. Several results as bellow have been obtained

  20. Carcinogenic potential of some pesticides in a medium-term multi-organ bioassay in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, R; Cabral, R; Hoshiya, T; Hakoi, K; Ogiso, T; Boonyaphiphat, P; Shirai, T; Ito, N

    1993-05-28

    The carcinogenic potential of 5 pesticides was analyzed using a medium-term multi-organ bioassay for carcinogenicity. Male F344 rats were initially treated with 3 known carcinogens (diethylnitrosamine, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and N-bis(2-hydroxypropyl)nitrosamine) during a period of 4 weeks to induce neoplastic changes in a variety of organs, and then given one of 5 pesticides in the diet for a further 16 weeks. Neoplastic and pre-neoplastic lesions were found in the thyroid, kidney and urinary bladder with propineb, in the forestomach, kidney and thyroid with captan and folpet. The number of glutathione S-transferase placental-form-positive liver-cell foci was significantly increased in the captan- and phosmet-treated groups. Based on these findings, captan and propineb can be considered as carcinogens and carcinogenicity is suspected for folpet and phosmet. These results are in concordance with reported long-term carcinogenicity for captan, folpet and propineb. Daminozide was considered not to be carcinogenic. Thus, the present assay of 20 weeks' duration is useful for the prediction of potential carcinogens. PMID:8509224

  1. Modelling human facial UV exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are strong links between exposure to UV radiation and both adverse health outcomes (eg. skin cancer, cataracts) and protective health outcomes (e.g. the production of vitamin D). The aim of our research is to develop methods of estimating cumulative UV exposure in a manner suitable for risk-factor epidemiology. We have developed a flexible computer model that determines UV exposure over the human facial region (utilising exposure ratios as determined by polysuphone dosimeters) for various solar zenith angles (SZA). By adjusting latitude and time of year, researchers can estimate cumulative facial UV exposure for particular geographical locations and time periods. Copyright (2000) Australasian Radiation Protection Society Inc

  2. Climate therapy of psoriasis patients at Gran Canaria. High UV doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease involving about 2-3% of the European population. Sun exposure has a positive effect on most psoriasis lesions, but ultraviolet (UV) radiation also causes a direct DNA damage in the skin cells and comprises a carcinogenic potential. UV exposure on the skin causes a local as well as a systemic immune suppressive effect, but the relation between sun exposure and these biological effects is not well known. In March 2006 a study was carried out to investigate possible therapeutic outcome mechanisms in 20 psoriasis patients receiving climate therapy at Gran Canaria. This paper presents estimates of their individual skin UV doses based on UV measurements and patients' diaries with information on time spent in the sun. On the first day of exposure the patients received on average 5.1 Standard Erythema Doses (SED) estimated to the skin. During the 15 days study they received 166 SED. There was no significant correlation between the therapeutic improvement and the UV dose. The UV doses were higher than if they had followed the prescribed exposure schedule and also higher than doses found from climate therapy studies at other locations. It seems beneficial to focus on the prescribed exposure schedules. (author)

  3. Micro-total envelope system with silicon nanowire separator for safe carcinogenic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay K.; Ko, Dong-Hyeon; Vishwakarma, Niraj K.; Jang, Seungwook; Min, Kyoung-Ik; Kim, Dong-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    Exploration and expansion of the chemistries involving toxic or carcinogenic reagents are severely limited by the health hazards their presence poses. Here, we present a micro-total envelope system (μ-TES) and an automated total process for the generation of the carcinogenic reagent, its purification and its utilization for a desired synthesis that is totally enveloped from being exposed to the carcinogen. A unique microseparator is developed on the basis of SiNWs structure to replace the usual exposure-prone distillation in separating the generated reagent. Chloromethyl methyl ether chemistry is explored as a carcinogenic model in demonstrating the efficiency of the μ-TES that is fully automated so that feeding the ingredients for the generation is all it takes to produce the desired product. Syntheses taking days can be accomplished safely in minutes with excellent yields, which bodes well for elevating the carcinogenic chemistry to new unexplored dimensions. PMID:26916423

  4. The in vivo rodent test systems for assessment of carcinogenic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Jan-Willem; Spindler, Per

    2002-01-01

    mouse models, the RasH2 and Tg.AC transgenic mouse models, and the neonatal mouse model. The "ICH Guideline S1B on Testing for Carcinogenicity of Pharmaceuticals" advocates that carcinogenicity testing of pharmaceuticals, when needed, might be carried out choosing one 2-year rodent carcinogenicity study...... (rat) plus one other study that supplements the 2-year study and providing additional information that is not readily available from the 2-year study: either (1) a short- or medium-term in vivo rodent test system or (2) a 2-year carcinogenicity study in a second rodent species (mouse). Another topic of...... end of 2001. The use of the short- and medium-term rodent test systems were not considered appropriate for the assessment of carcinogenic potential of biotechnology-derived medicinal products....

  5. Micro-total envelope system with silicon nanowire separator for safe carcinogenic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay K; Ko, Dong-Hyeon; Vishwakarma, Niraj K; Jang, Seungwook; Min, Kyoung-Ik; Kim, Dong-Pyo

    2016-01-01

    Exploration and expansion of the chemistries involving toxic or carcinogenic reagents are severely limited by the health hazards their presence poses. Here, we present a micro-total envelope system (μ-TES) and an automated total process for the generation of the carcinogenic reagent, its purification and its utilization for a desired synthesis that is totally enveloped from being exposed to the carcinogen. A unique microseparator is developed on the basis of SiNWs structure to replace the usual exposure-prone distillation in separating the generated reagent. Chloromethyl methyl ether chemistry is explored as a carcinogenic model in demonstrating the efficiency of the μ-TES that is fully automated so that feeding the ingredients for the generation is all it takes to produce the desired product. Syntheses taking days can be accomplished safely in minutes with excellent yields, which bodes well for elevating the carcinogenic chemistry to new unexplored dimensions. PMID:26916423

  6. The role of nutritional lipids and antioxidants in UV-induced skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Homer S

    2015-01-01

    Two dietary tenets of the free radical theory of cancer require refinement. The first was dietary reduction of vulnerable free-radical targets, e.g., polyunsaturated lipids. The second was the addition of one or more antioxidants to the diet. Further, it was reported in 1939 that high levels of dietary fat exacerbated UV-carcinogenesis. Both lines of enquiry (dietary lipid and antioxidant effects on UV-carcinogenesis) were investigated. Both dietary lipids and antioxidants modified carcinogenic expression. Increasing levels of omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) exacerbated UV-carcinogenesis. However, omega-3 PUFA dramatically inhibited carcinogenic expression. It is probable that the action of omega-6 and-3 PUFA rests with differential metabolic intermediates, both tumor promoting and immune-modulating, that each PUFA generates through lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. Antioxidant supplementation with butylated hydroxytoluene or beta-carotene demonstrated that each exerted its own specific antioxidant mechanism(s). When introduced into the complex milieu of the cell with its own intricate and complex antioxidant defense system, detrimental effects may ensue. These results point to oversimplification of these dietary suggestions to reduce cancer risk and the necessity to refine these dietary recommendations. PMID:25961684

  7. Histomorphological and histomorphometrical investigations of early bone damage following incorporation of optimal carcinogenic doses of 239-plutonium in male rats of different age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is early damage to bone at small carcinogenic amounts of the nuclide, including heavy defects of bone structure and bone marrow osteoporotic features of trabecular bone and only histomorphometrically detectable changes in bone metabolism. The dependence of radiation dose to skeleton and the spacial distribution of the nuclide on age and growth of the experimental animals is demonstrated and correlated to the histological findings. It is also shown that growth and metabolism parameters of bone influence the decorporation performance of the chelating agent Zn-DTPA. (orig.)

  8. A REVIEW: HERBS USED AS ANTICANCER AGENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badri Nagarani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbs are the plants which will have desirable odour, taste and other medical uses. Anti-cancer agents are effective in cancer treatment. Here an attempt has been made to review some herbs used for the prevention and treatment of cancer. These herbs were found for posses anticancer, cytotoxic or antioxidant activity in various pre-clinical or clinical studies. Cancer is a disease in which body cells become abnormal and divide without control. Cancer cell may invade nearby tissues and they may spread through the blood stream & lymphatic system to other parts of the body. The search for anticancer agents from the plant sources alkaloids in earnest in the 1950s such as Vincristine, Vinblastine and the isolation of cytotoxic Podophyllotoxins will reduce white blood cell count and caused bone marrow depression in rats. Roots, leaves, stem, root, bark and fruity of the plant herbs are used in the treatment of cancer. The dietary antioxidants having anti carcinogenic property are in demand. Identification and characterization of these anti-carcinogens in the diet can be used for reducing the risk of human cancer. Tea (Camellia thea an evergreen plant contains antioxidants which prevent and repair cellular damage caused by reactive free radicals. Supervitamin drinks containing a combination of Hordeum vulgare, Medicago sativa and Spirulina enhances the activity of immune cells against cancer. Mentha species containing antioxidants prevent reocurrence of cancer.

  9. Pathological markers for non-genotoxic agent-associated carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, N; Hasegawa, R; Imaida, K; Masui, T; Takahashi, S; Shirai, T

    1992-12-01

    A variety of positive or negative enzyme altered foci have been proposed as preneoplastic marker lesions in the rat liver. Frozen sections are required in some cases. We have compared the suitability of various histochemically or immunohistochemically demonstrated markers and concluded that immunohistochemically-stained glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive foci are particularly useful for practical application in risk assessment. Advantages include ease of quantitative foci analysis on a number of samples since acetone or formalin-fixed paraffin blocks can be used and clear contrast of foci against the surrounding liver tissue facilitates recognition. We have established a liver medium-term bioassay model of 8 weeks' duration using diethylnitrosamine as an initiator and GST-P positive foci as the endpoint lesions. At present, 58 non-genotoxic chemicals for which carcinogenicity data are available have been examined and many carcinogenic agents, mostly liver carcinogens, have been satisfactorily detected as having carcinogenic potential. Exceptional examples are two peroxisome proliferators, clofibrate and DEHP. For these chemical, several peroxisomal enzymes such as catalase and enoyl CoA hydratase have been tested as markers. PMID:1471215

  10. Tobacco carcinogen induces both lung cancer and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatocellular carcinomas in ferrets which can be attenuated by lycopene supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Koichi; Liu, Chun; Tang, Sanyuan; Veeramachaneni, Sudipta; Hu, Kang-Quan; Smith, Donald E; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2016-09-01

    Early epidemiologic studies have reported that tobacco smoking, which is causally associated with liver cancer, is an independent risk factor for non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases (NAFLD). Lycopene from tomatoes has been shown to be a potential preventive agent against NAFLD and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In the present study, we investigated whether the tobacco carcinogen 4-(N-methyl-N-nitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) induces lesions in both lungs and livers of ferrets with or without lycopene intervention. Male ferrets (6 groups, n = 8-10) were treated either with NNK (50 mg/kg BW, i.p., once a month for four consecutive months) or saline with or without dietary lycopene supplementation (2.2 and 6.6 mg/kg BW/day, respectively) for 26 weeks. Results demonstrate that NNK exposure results in higher incidences of lung tumors, HCC and steatohepatitis (which is characterized by severe inflammatory cell infiltration with concurrent fat accumulation in liver, hepatocellular ballooning degeneration and increased NF-κB expression), as well as elevations in bilirubin and AST levels in ferrets. Lycopene supplementation at two doses prevented NNK-induced expressions of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the lung and NF-κB and CYP2E1 in the liver and attenuated the NNK-induced mortality and pathological lesions in both the lungs and livers of ferrets. The present study provided strong experimental evidence that the tobacco carcinogen NNK can induce both HCC and steatohepatitis in the ferrets and can be a useful model for studying tobacco carcinogen-associated NAFLD and liver cancer. Furthermore, lycopene could provide potential benefits against smoke carcinogen-induced pulmonary and hepatic injury. PMID:27116542

  11. Antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, N S

    1999-12-01

    At this year's ICAAC Meeting, new data on approximately 20 different antifungal agents were presented, while no new agents were disclosed. Drugs in late development include the triazoles, voriconazole (Pfizer Ltd) and Sch-56592 (Schering-Plough Corp), and the echinocandins, caspofungin (Merck & Co Inc) and FK-463 (Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Co Ltd). In contrast to previous years, presentations on these and earlier developmental compounds were relatively modest in scope, with few significant new data. Little new information appeared on the most recent novel class of agents, the sordarins (Glaxo Wellcome plc). Early clinical results were presented for FK-463, showing acceptable tolerability and dose-dependent efficacy in AIDS-associated esophageal candidiasis. A new liposomal formulation of nystatin (Nyotran; Aronex Pharmaceuticals Inc) was shown to be equivalent to conventional amphotericin B in empiric therapy of presumed fungal infection in neutropenic patients, but with reduced toxicity. Intravenous itraconazole (Janssen Pharmaceutica NV) was an effective prophylactic therapy in invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, while oral itraconazole was discussed as a treatment for fungal infection in heart and liver transplant patients. The allylamine compound, terbinafine (Novartis AG), showed good clinical efficacy against fungal mycetoma, a serious tropical infection. A major highlight was the first presentation of inhibitors of fungal efflux pumps as a strategy for overcoming resistance. MC-510027 (milbemycin alpha-9; Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc) and its derivatives, potentiated the antifungal activity of triazoles and terbinafine in a number of Candida spp. Another pump inhibitor, MC-005172 (Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc) showed in vivo potentiation of fluconazole in a mouse kidney infection model. Microcide Pharmaceuticals Inc also presented inhibitors of bacterial efflux pumps. PMID:16113946

  12. [Ozone decline and UV increase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, P; Trepte, S

    2004-02-01

    The following results have been obtained from long-term observations on the ozone layer and UV at the Meteorological Observatory Hohenpeigenberg:The seasonally varying decline of the ozone layer determines the maximum exposure to UV. Since ozone decline shows the highest rates in the spring months the UV exposure has most strongly increased in this time of the year. This is especially important because in spring the human skin is not adapted to UV exposure. Weather changes from day to day can induce rapid ozone reductions in spring about -30% which in turn is followed by an increase in UV of about 40%. Clouds, especially the transparent cirrus clouds (high clouds consisting of ice particles) have increased in frequency during spring and fall while a decrease is observed in summer. This change in cloudiness reduces the daily UV dose in spring and fall while it is enhanced in summer. With increasing height above sea level UV rises by roughly 10% per 1000 m (rule of thumb). Snow reflects the UV-radiation by up to 80% enhancing the UV-doses at relevant conditions. Strong volcano eruptions destroy ozone in the stratosphere additionally during 1-2 years after the eruption. Therafter the ozone layer recovers. In April 1993, after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo (1991), the UV burden was still 40% higher than average. Miniholes and streamers can appear unexpected on a short-time scale and cross over Central Europe within 1-2 days, thus enhancing UV irradiation. The human skin reacts to UV exposure depending on the type of skin. The campaign "Sonne(n) mit Verstand" of the Bavarian Ministries for Environment, for Health and for Education informs about the danger of UV radiation (see www.sonne-mit-ver-stand.de). The German Weather Service informs the public on present developments of the ozone layer and relevant topics byits ozone bulletin, which is also available via internet under (www.dwd.de/deFundE/Observator/MOHp/hp2/ozon/bulletin.htm). PMID:14770335

  13. Trading Agents

    CERN Document Server

    Wellman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Automated trading in electronic markets is one of the most common and consequential applications of autonomous software agents. Design of effective trading strategies requires thorough understanding of how market mechanisms operate, and appreciation of strategic issues that commonly manifest in trading scenarios. Drawing on research in auction theory and artificial intelligence, this book presents core principles of strategic reasoning that apply to market situations. The author illustrates trading strategy choices through examples of concrete market environments, such as eBay, as well as abst

  14. The Methoxyflavonoid Isosakuranetin Suppresses UV-B-Induced Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression and Collagen Degradation Relevant for Skin Photoaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hana; Lee, Eunjoo H; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cho, Man-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a main extrinsic factor for skin aging. Chronic exposure of the skin to UV radiation causes the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-1, and consequently results in alterations of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and skin photoaging. Flavonoids are considered as potent anti-photoaging agents due to their UV-absorbing and antioxidant properties and inhibitory activity against UV-mediated MMP induction. To identify anti-photoaging agents, in the present study we examined the preventative effect of methoxyflavonoids, such as sakuranetin, isosakuranetin, homoeriodictyol, genkwanin, chrysoeriol and syringetin, on UV-B-induced skin photo-damage. Of the examined methoxyflavonoids, pretreatment with isosakuranetin strongly suppressed the UV-B-mediated induction of MMP-1 in human keratinocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. Isosakuranetin inhibited UV-B-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling components, ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and p38 proteins. This result suggests that the ERK1/2 kinase pathways likely contribute to the inhibitory effects of isosakuranetin on UV-induced MMP-1 production in human keratinocytes. Isosakuranetin also prevented UV-B-induced degradation of type-1 collagen in human dermal fibroblast cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that isosakuranetin has the potential for development as a protective agent for skin photoaging through the inhibition of UV-induced MMP-1 production and collagen degradation. PMID:27598131

  15. UV survival of human mycoplasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inactivation by ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation of mycoplasma cells of five human strains was monitored by investigating the colony-forming ability. The survival curves of five strains tested indicated that the cells of Mycoplasma buccale only are single and homogenously susceptible to UV light. The effect of the repair inhibitor, caffeine, on the colony-forming ability of UV-irradiated cells was investigated with M. buccale because of its homogeneous susceptibility to UV light. The colony formation of irradiated cells was markedly depressed by post-irradiation treatment with caffeine at concentration that had little or no effect on the colony formation of unirradiated cells. The colony-forming units (CFU) of UV-irradiated cells which were kept in broth without caffeine in the dark increased without a lag as the time in the dark increased. The colony-forming ability of the irradiated cells completely recovered after 3 hr in the dark. However, when irradiated cells were kept in the presence of caffeine, no increase in their CFU was observed. The mode of action of caffeine on UV-irradiated cells closely resembles that described for other organisms which possess dark reactivation systems for UV-induced damage in deoxyribonucleic acid. Thus, the results obtained provide evidence for the existence of a dark repair function in M. buccale. (author)

  16. Classification of weakly carcinogenic human papillomavirus types: addressing the limits of epidemiology at the borderline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buonaguro Franco M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Virtually all cases of cervical cancer are caused by persistent infections with a restricted set of human papillomaviruses (HPV. Some HPV types, like HPV16 and HPV18, are clear and powerful carcinogens. However, the categorization of the most weakly carcinogenic HPV types is extremely challenging. The decisions are important for screening test and vaccine development. This article describes for open discussion an approach recently taken by a World Health Organization International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC Monographs Working Group to re-assess the carcinogenicity of different HPV types.

  17. Urban air carcinogens and their effects on health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechner, J.F.

    1994-11-01

    Airborne carcinogens may be relevant especially in metropolitan regions with extreme smog as a primary cause of lung cancer. Lung cancer is most common in urban environs and the incidence directly correlates with the size of the city. In addition, several, but not all formal epidemiological studies also suggest a positive correlation between lung cancer incidence and the intensity of air pollution exposure. There is further support for a role of air pollution; as of 1993, 4.4% of all of the bronchogenic adenocarcinoma cancer cases among Mexicans living in industrialized cities are under 40 years of age. It is plausible that chronic inhalation of automobile combustion products, factory emissions, and/or radon is at least partially responsible for the higher incidence of lung cancer exemplified by the never-smoking urban residents. The exceptionally high incidence of lung cancer cases among never-smokers living in highly industrialized Mexican cities offers a unique opportunity to use molecular epidemiology to test whether chronic inhalation of atmospheric pollutants increases the risk for this disease. Overall, the analysis of the genetic alterations in two cancer genes, and possibly the hprt locus should give new insight as to whether the urban never-smokers developed their cancers because of exposure to environmental pollutants.

  18. [Urban air pollution by carcinogenic N-nitrosamines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khesina, A Ia; Krivosheeva, L V; Sokol'skaia, N N; Koliadich, M N

    1996-01-01

    Moscow is used as an example to discuss the problem of urban atmospheric pollution by carcinogenic N-nitrosamines. An analytical method is proposed, which is based on the use of a Russian gas chromatograph compatible with a chemiluminescence detector, that is a TEA thermal energy analyzer (USA) having some modifications to reduce the time of analysis and loss during sample pretreatment. The minimal detected concentration is 3 ng/m3 for 2-hour sampling. The method identifies and quantifies 7 volatile N-nitrosamines: N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosodiethylamine, N-nitrosodibutylamine, N-nitrosodipropylamine, N-nitrosopiperidine, N-nitrosopyrrolidine, N-nitrosomorpholine. The pollution of the Moscow air was evaluated in the center of Moscow (30-60 ng/m3 for NDMA), in the industrial emission area (as high as several hundred ng/m3, and in the heavy traffic area (100 ng/m3 or more). It is proposed to study the working area for rubber and tire industries, to establish nitrosamine tolerances for these industries and maximum allowable discharge concentrations in the urban air and to monitor these parameters. PMID:8672956

  19. UV-type damage associated with ionizing radiation: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The induction of UV-type damage by ionizing radiation in repair deficient strains of E. coli is reviewed. Both photoreactivable and non-photoreactivable types of damage can be observed. The induction of UV-type damage is largely independent of the presence of free-radical reactive agents (e.g. oxygen and thiols), but is dependent upon the energy of the photon-or electron-beam used, the radiation geometry and the optical absorbance of the extracellular medium. On the basis of calculations and experimental evidence, it is clear that one mechanism whereby such damage arises is through the generation of Cerenkov emission. However, small yields of UV-type damage can be produced using X-rays whose energy is below the threshold for production of Cerenkov emission. In this instance, the damage induction mechanism is thought to involve a direct excitation process. (author)

  20. Sun, UV Radiation and Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Your Eyes and the Sun Sections The Sun, UV Radiation and Your Eyes ... Best Sunglasses Sun Smart UV Safety Infographic The Sun, UV Radiation and Your Eyes Written by: David ...

  1. Mechanism of UV photoreactivity of alkylsiloxane self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Tao; McArthur, Eric A; Borguet, Eric

    2005-05-26

    A molecular level understanding of the photoreactivity of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) becomes increasingly important as the spatial resolution starts to be limited by the size of the resist and the spatial extent of the photochemical reactions in photoresist micropatterning. To this end, a number of surface characterization techniques were combined to understand the reactive agents, reactive sites, kinetics, and reaction pathways in the UV photoreactivity of octadecylsiloxane (ODS) SAMs. Quantitative analysis of our results provides evidence that ground state atomic oxygen is the primary reactive agent for the UV degradation of ODS SAMs. UV degradation, which follows zero-order kinetics, results in the scission of alkyl chains instead of the siloxane headgroups. Our results suggest that the top of the ODS SAMs is the preferential reactive site. Using a novel, highly surface sensitive technique, fluorescence labeling of surface species, we identified the presence of submonolayer quantities chemical functional groups formed by the UV degradation. These groups are intermediates in a proposed mechanism based on hydrogen abstraction. PMID:16852200

  2. Radioprotective Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Kelle

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since1949, a great deal of research has been carried out on the radioprotective activity of various chemical substances. Thiol compounds, compounds which contain –SH radical, different classes of pharmacological agents and other compounds such as vitamine C and WR-2721 have been shown to reduce mortality when administered prior to exposure to a lethal dose of radiation. Recently, honey bee venom as well as that of its components melittin and histamine have shown to be valuable in reduction of radiation-induced damage and also provide prophylactic alternative treatment for serious side effects related with radiotherapy. It has been suggested that the radioprotective activity of bee venom components is related with the stimulation of the hematopoetic system.

  3. Low gloss UV-cured coatings for aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, Mark; Muschar, Harry

    2014-12-09

    A method of applying a low gloss coating to a substrate such as the exterior surface of an aircraft is disclosed. The coating composition comprising a polyene, a polythiol, a flatting agent and a coloring pigment is applied to the substrate and given a first dosage of UV radiation followed by a second dosage in which the second dosage is greater than the first resulting in an ultralow gloss coating.

  4. UV/EB curable psa's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describe both water-based and 100% solids UV/EB curable PSA's (Pressure Sensitive Adhesives) and their properties. A new acrylate monomer, ethoxylated nonyl phenol acrylate, has great utility in the formulation of water-based PSA's

  5. Determination of potentially carcinogenic compounds in food : trace analysis of vinylchloride, vinylidenechloride, acrylonitrile, epichlorohydrin and diethylpyrocarbonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lierop, van J.B.H.

    1979-01-01

    Toxicological evidence shows that some monomers present in packaging materials may be carcinogenic. These monomers, notably vinylchloride, vinylidenechloride, acrylonitrile and epichlorohydrin, may migrate from the packaging material into the food. Therefore, severe limits are set to the contents of

  6. AI AND SAR APPROACHES FOR PREDICTING CHEMICAL CARCINOGENICITY: SURVEY AND STATUS REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A wide variety of artificial intelligence (AI) and structure-activity relationship (SAR approaches have been applied to tackling the general problem of predicting rodent chemical carcinogenicity. Given the diversity of chemical structures and mechanisms relative to this endpoin...

  7. 78 FR 15020 - Report on Carcinogens Webinar on Pentachlorophenol; Notice of Public Webinar and Registration...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Report on Carcinogens Webinar on Pentachlorophenol; Notice of Public Webinar and Registration Information SUMMARY: The National Toxicology Program (NTP) announces a public webinar, ``Human cancer studies on exposure to pentachlorophenol (PCP):...

  8. Carcinogenicity prediction of noncongeneric chemicals by augmented top priority fragment classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalegno, Mosè; Sello, Guido

    2016-04-01

    Carcinogenicity prediction is an important process that can be performed to cut down experimental costs and save animal lives. The current reliability of the results is however disputed. Here, a blind exercise in carcinogenicity category assessment is performed using augmented top priority fragment classification. The procedure analyses the applicability domain of the dataset, allocates in clusters the compounds using a leading molecular fragment, and a similarity measure. The exercise is applied to three compound datasets derived from the Lois Gold Carcinogenic Database. The results, showing good agreement with experimental data, are compared with published ones. A final discussion on our viewpoint on the possibilities that the carcinogenicity modelling of chemical compounds offers is presented. PMID:26878128

  9. A review of biosensing techniques for detection of trace carcinogen contamination in food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanming; Yu, Yue; Li, Zhiliang; Wu, Tao

    2015-04-01

    Carcinogen contaminations in the food chain, for example heavy metal ions, pesticides, acrylamide, and mycotoxins, have caused serious health problems. A major objective of food-safety research is the identification and prevention of exposure to these carcinogens, because of their impossible-to-reverse tumorigenic effects. However, carcinogen detection is difficult because of their trace-level presence in food. Thus, reliable and accurate separation and determination methods are essential to protect food safety and human health. This paper summarizes the state of the art in separation and determination methods for analyzing carcinogen contamination, especially the advances in biosensing methods. Furthermore, the application of promising technology including nanomaterials, imprinted polymers, and microdevices is detailed. Challenges and perspectives are also discussed. PMID:25694149

  10. 78 FR 57868 - Nominations to the Report on Carcinogens; Request for Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... RoC. 20 Substances Nominated to the RoC* Aloe vera whole leaf extract (Aloe barbadensis Miller) 2..., ongoing, or planned studies related to evaluating carcinogenicity; (3) scientific issues important...

  11. Occupational toxicants. Critical data evaluation for MAK values and classification of carcinogens. Vol. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    33 occupational toxicants are reviewed. Data are presented according to toxic effects in animals and man, mode of action, carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, reproductive and development toxicity, and MAK value. (MG)

  12. Biomarkers for assessing potential carcinogenic effects of chronic arsenic exposure in Inner Mongolia, CHINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic is ubiquitous in the environment. Chronic arsenic exposure via drinking water has been associated. with carcinogenic, cardiovascular, neurological and diabetic effects in humans and has been of great public health concern worldwide. In 2001, U.S. Environmental Protection ...

  13. Regulation of immune suppression induced by UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Exposure of the skin of mice and men to increasing doses of UV radiation causes erythema, blistering, accelerated photoageing, DNA lesions and photocarcinogenesis. Moderate exposure also suppresses T cell-mediated immune function, a defect which is a prerequisite for the promotion or outgrowth phase of the UV-initiated tumour, and which is accompanied by dysregulated cutaneous cytokine patterns. A major cutaneous photoreceptor for the immunosuppression is epidermal urocanic acid (UCA). Naturally occurring trans-UCA photoisomerises in the stratum corneum and epidermis to cis-UCA, in a direct reaction. Cis-UCA has been found to have local and systemic immunosuppressive properties. The action spectrum for the photoimmuno-suppression is maximal in the UVB (280 320nm) waveband. However longer wavelength UVA (320-400nm), which interacts with skin predominantly via oxidative reactions, is not immunosuppressive at environmental exposure doses, and unexpectedly can provide protection from UVB-immunosuppression. We find that UVA protective exposure prevents the major UVB-alterations to the cytokine array. In addition, UVA (but not UVB) exposure induces cutaneous haem oxygenase (HO) activity, an endogenous antioxidant enzyme. HO is known to be redox-regulated, and to be the major stress protein induced in cultured fibroblasts by UVA. We find that UVA-immune protection is dependent on the induced HO; that enhanced HO activity following UVA is cytokine-dependent; and that the induced HO acts by inhibiting the immunosuppressive potential of cis-UCA. Thus oxidant states resulting predominantly from UVA irradiation, while apparently immunologically innocuous, seem to actively upregulate this defensive HO response. These studies have therefore revealed interactions between different UV wavebands important for immune regulation both in the skin and systemically, which may have a critical bearing on the carcinogenic outcome in chronically exposed skin, and offer the

  14. An Analysis of the Role of Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamines in the Carcinogenicity of Tobacco Smoke

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Buddy G.; Borschke, August J.; Doolittle, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Cigarette smoke is a complex mixture consisting of more than 4500 chemicals, including several tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNA). TSNA typically form in tobacco during the post-harvest period, with some fraction being transferred into mainstream smoke when a cigarette is burned during use. The most studied of the TSNA is 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK). NNK has been shown to be carcinogenic in laboratory animals. Studies examining the carcinogenicity of NNK frequently ...

  15. Perturbation of Mitosis through Inhibition of Histone Acetyltransferases: The Key to Ochratoxin A Toxicity and Carcinogenicity?

    OpenAIRE

    Czakai, Kristin; Müller, Katja; Mosesso, Pasquale; Pepe, Gaetano; Schulze, Markus; Gohla, Antje; Patnaik, Debasis; Dekant, Wolfgang; Higgins, Jonathan M.G.; Mally, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most potent rodent renal carcinogens studied to date. Although controversial results regarding OTA genotoxicity have been published, it is now widely accepted that OTA is not a mutagenic, DNA-reactive carcinogen. Instead, increasing evidence from both in vivo and in vitro studies suggests that OTA may promote genomic instability and tumorigenesis through interference with cell division. The aim of the present study was to provide further support for disruption...

  16. Recent developments in the multistage modeling of cohort data for carcinogenic risk assessment.

    OpenAIRE

    Mazumdar, S; Redmond, C K; Costantino, J P; Patwardhan, R N; Zhou, S. Y.

    1991-01-01

    The modeling of cohort data based on the Armitage-Doll multistage model of the carcinogenic process has gained popular acceptance as a methodology for quantitative risk assessment for estimating the dose-related relationships between different occupational and environmental carcinogenic exposures and cancer mortality. The multistage model can be used for extrapolation to low doses relevant for setting environmental standards and also provides information regarding whether more than one stage ...

  17. Carcinogenic effects of the combined action of /sup 241/Am and. gamma. -radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippova, L.G.; Buldakov, L.A.; Nifatov, A.P. (Institut Biofiziki, Moscow (USSR))

    In experiments on Wistar rats a study was made of the carcinogenic effects of the combined exposure to /sup 241/Am administered intrapertioneally (6.7 to 229.4 kBq/kg body weight) and external ..gamma..-radiation (/sup 137/Cs, 175 cGy). The occurrence of osteosarcoma, leucosis, skin and mammary tumors increased in the exposed animals. The combined irradiation produced an additive carcinogenic effect.

  18. A review of the genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of aspartame: does it safe or not?

    OpenAIRE

    Yılmaz, Serkan; Uçar, Aslı

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to review genotoxicologic and carcinogenic profile of the artificial sweetener aspartame. Aspartame is a synthetic dipeptide, nearly 180–200 times sweeter than sucrose. It is the most widely used artificial sweetener especially in carbonated and powdered soft drinks, beverages, drugs and hygiene products. There is a discussion ongoing for many years whether aspartame posses genotoxic and carcinogenic risk for humans. This question led to many studies to specif...

  19. In vivo transgenic bioassays and assessment of the carcinogenic potential of pharmaceuticals.

    OpenAIRE

    Contrera, J F; DeGeorge, J J

    1998-01-01

    There is general agreement in the scientific community on the need to improve carcinogenicity testing and the assessment of human carcinogenic risk and to incorporate more information on mechanisms and modes of action into the risk assessment process. Advances in molecular biology have identified a growing number of genes such as protooncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are highly conserved across species and are associated with a wide variety of human and animal cancers. In vivo transg...

  20. Carcinogenic effects of the combined action of 241Am and γ-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In experiments on Wistar rats a study was made of the carcinogenic effects of the combined exposure to 241Am administered intrapertioneally (6.7 to 229.4 kBq/kg body weight) and external γ-radiation (137Cs, 175 cGy). The occurrence of osteosarcoma, leucosis, skin and mammary tumors increased in the exposed animals. The combined irradiation prodUced an additive carcinogenic effect

  1. Analysis of carcinogenicity testing for regulatory purposes in the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    MADIA FEDERICA; Worth, Andrew; Corvi, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    The approaches for evaluating the carcinogenic potential of substances, including whether carcinogenicity studies should be conducted, differ substantially across sectors. Despite variations in testing schemes, the two-year bioassay study in rodents represents the standard element across all sectors. The validity of the two-year bioassay though has been questioned in the last decade. Uncertainty is associated with the extrapolation of data from rodents to humans. Furthermore, these stud...

  2. Carcinogens in Israeli milk: a study in regulatory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westin, J B

    1993-01-01

    The potential danger to humans of exposure to chemicals shown to be carcinogenic in animals has become increasingly clear in the last 20 years. A gap still exists, however, between the appreciation of the risk by scientists and the willingness of public health authorities to reduce it. Three pesticides, shown repeatedly to produce over a dozen different types of cancer in rats and mice, were discovered in inordinately high concentrations in Israeli milk and dairy products. The three pesticides--alpha-BHC, gamma-BHC (lindane), and DDT--had been shown to be present for ten years or more at mean concentrations up to 100 times those found in U.S. dairy products--with resultant concentrations in breast milk being possibly 800 times greater than those in the United States--yet neither the Ministry of Health nor the Israel Cancer Association made any apparent moves either to warn the public or to rectify the situation. A small consumer organization, Consumer Shield, brought the issue into the open. Through public pressure, court action, and the threat of further legal redress--and despite repeated attacks in the media by the milk producers, the Ministry, and the Cancer Association--Consumer Shield forced the authorities to outlaw the use of alpha-BHC and lindane (DDT no longer being in general use). The ban resulted in a precipitous drop in the concentrations of these substances in Israeli milk. Recent epidemiological and laboratory findings suggest that the dramatic drop in breast cancer mortality rates subsequent to the pesticide ban could be a direct result of that ban. PMID:8375952

  3. Gene discovery for the carcinogenic human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasser Robin B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA – cancer of the bile ducts – is associated with chronic infection with the liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini. Despite being the only eukaryote that is designated as a 'class I carcinogen' by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, little is known about its genome. Results Approximately 5,000 randomly selected cDNAs from the adult stage of O. viverrini were characterized and accounted for 1,932 contigs, representing ~14% of the entire transcriptome, and, presently, the largest sequence dataset for any species of liver fluke. Twenty percent of contigs were assigned GO classifications. Abundantly represented protein families included those involved in physiological functions that are essential to parasitism, such as anaerobic respiration, reproduction, detoxification, surface maintenance and feeding. GO assignments were well conserved in relation to other parasitic flukes, however, some categories were over-represented in O. viverrini, such as structural and motor proteins. An assessment of evolutionary relationships showed that O. viverrini was more similar to other parasitic (Clonorchis sinensis and Schistosoma japonicum than to free-living (Schmidtea mediterranea flatworms, and 105 sequences had close homologues in both parasitic species but not in S. mediterranea. A total of 164 O. viverrini contigs contained ORFs with signal sequences, many of which were platyhelminth-specific. Examples of convergent evolution between host and parasite secreted/membrane proteins were identified as were homologues of vaccine antigens from other helminths. Finally, ORFs representing secreted proteins with known roles in tumorigenesis were identified, and these might play roles in the pathogenesis of O. viverrini-induced CCA. Conclusion This gene discovery effort for O. viverrini should expedite molecular studies of cholangiocarcinogenesis and accelerate research focused on developing new interventions

  4. An agent framework for dynamic agent retraining: Agent academy

    OpenAIRE

    Mitkas, P.; A. Symeonidis; Kechagias, D.; Athanasiadis, I.N.; Laleci, G.; KURT, G.; Kabak, Y.; Acar, A.; Dogac, A.

    2004-01-01

    Agent Academy (AA) aims to develop a multi-agent society that can train new agents for specific or general tasks, while constantly retraining existing agents in a recursive mode. The system is based on collecting information both from the environment and the behaviors of the acting agents and their related successes/failures to generate a body of data, stored in the Agent Use Repository, which is mined by the Data Miner module, in order to generate useful knowledge about the application domai...

  5. Carcinogenicity assessments of biotechnology-derived pharmaceuticals: a review of approved molecules and best practice recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahle, John L; Finch, Gregory L; Heidel, Shawn M; Hovland, David N; Ivens, Inge; Parker, Suezanne; Ponce, Rafael A; Sachs, Clifford; Steigerwalt, Ronald; Short, Brian; Todd, Marque D

    2010-06-01

    An important safety consideration for developing new therapeutics is assessing the potential that the therapy will increase the risk of cancer. For biotherapeutics, traditional two-year rodent bioassays are often not scientifically applicable or feasible. This paper is a collaborative effort of industry toxicologists to review past and current practice regarding carcinogenicity assessments of biotherapeutics and to provide recommendations. Publicly available information on eighty marketed protein biotherapeutics was reviewed. In this review, no assessments related to carcinogenicity or tumor growth promotion were identified for fifty-one of the eighty molecules. For the twenty-nine biotherapeutics in which assessments related to carcinogenicity were identified, various experimental approaches were employed. This review also discusses several key principles to aid in the assessment of carcinogenic potential, including (1) careful consideration of mechanism of action to identify theoretical risks, (2) careful investigation of existing data for indications of proliferative or immunosuppressive potential, and (3) characterization of any proliferative or immunosuppressive signals detected. Traditional two-year carcinogenicity assays should not be considered as the default method for assessing the carcinogenicity potential of biotherapeutics. If experimentation is considered warranted, it should be hypothesis driven and may include a variety of experimental models. Ultimately, it is important that preclinical data provide useful guidance in product labeling. PMID:20472697

  6. Effect of DNA type on response of DNA biosensor for carcinogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Nor Diyana bt. Md.; Heng, Lee Yook; Surif, Salmijah; Lazim, Azwani Mat

    2013-11-01

    Carcinogens are cancer causing chemicals that can bind to DNA and cause damage to the DNA. These chemicals are available everywhere including in water, air, soil and food. Therefore, a sensor that can detect the presence of these chemicals will be a very useful tool. Since carcinogens bind to DNA, DNA can be used as the biological element in a biosensor. This study has utilized different types of DNA in a biosensor for carcinogen detection. The DNAs include double stranded calf thymus DNA, single stranded calf thymus DNA and guanine rich single stranded DNA. The modified SPE was exposed to a carcinogen followed by interaction with methylene blue which acts as the electroactive indicator. The SPE was then analysed using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Optimization studies were conducted for MB concentration and accumulation time, DNA concentration, as well as effect of buffer concentration, buffer pH and ionic strength. The performance of the biosensor was tested on a group 1 carcinogen, formaldehyde. The results indicated that the usage of guanine rich single stranded DNA also gives higher response as carcinogens prefer to bind with guanine compared to other bases.

  7. A comprehensive review of the carcinogenic and anticarcinogenic potential of capsaicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bley, Keith; Boorman, Gary; Mohammad, Bashir; McKenzie, Donald; Babbar, Sunita

    2012-08-01

    Human exposure to capsaicin, the most abundant pungent chili pepper component, is ubiquitous. Evaluation of capsaicin's carcinogenic potential has produced variable results in in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity and carcinogenicity assays. The capsaicin tested in older studies was often from pepper plant extracts and included other capsaicinoids and diverse impurities. Recent studies utilizing high-purity capsaicin and standardized protocols provide evidence that the genotoxic and carcinogenic potential of capsaicin is quite low and that the purity of capsaicin is important. Several small epidemiological studies suggest a link between capsaicin consumption and stomach or gall bladder cancer, but contamination of capsaicin-containing foods with known carcinogens renders their interpretation problematic. The postulated ability of capsaicin metabolites to damage DNA and promote carcinogenesis remains unsupported. Anticancer activities of capsaicin have been widely reported, as it inhibits the activity of carcinogens and induces apoptosis in numerous cancer cell lines in vitro and explanted into rodents. Diverse mechanisms have been postulated for capsaicin's anticancer properties. One hypothesis is that inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes-particularly CYP2E1-retards carcinogen activation but is contradicted by the low potency of capsaicin for CYP inhibition. The potential for dietary capsaicin to act as a chemopreventative is now widely postulated. PMID:22563012

  8. DNA damage caused by UV- and near UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Much work with mutants deficient in DNA repair has been performed concerning UV-induced DNA damage under the condition where there is no artificial stimulation. In an attempt to infer the effects of solar wavelengths, the outcome of the work is discussed in terms of cellular radiation sensitivity, unscheduled DNA synthesis, and mutation induction, leading to the conclusion that some DNA damage occurs even by irradiation of the shorter wavelength light (270 - 315 nm) and is repaired by excision repair. It has been thought to date that pyrimidine dimer (PD) plays the most important role in UV-induced DNA damage, followed by (6 - 4) photoproducts. As for DNA damage induced by near UV irradiation, the yield of DNA single-strand breaks and of DNA-protein crosslinking, other than PD, is considered. The DNA-protein crosslinking has proved to be induced by irradiation at any wavelength of UV ranging from 260 to 425 nm. Near UV irradiation causes the inhibition of cell proliferation to take place. (Namekawa, K.)

  9. Transcriptionally active and inactive genes are similarly modified by chemical carcinogens or X-ray in normal human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical carcinogens and ionizing radiation induce DNA modifications and strand breaks in cells. This damage is reported to be affected by chromatin proteins or chromatin of a higher structure order. To compare the sensitivity of transcriptionally active and inactive genes on chromatin toward DNA-damaging agents, we treated normal human fibroblasts (WI-38) cells with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), X-ray, 4-hydroxyaminoquinoline 1-oxide or N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene, and high molecular weight DNA was isolated. After digestion with EcoRI to completion, the DNA was electrophoresed on an alkaline agarose gel, blotted on a nitrocellulose filter and hybridized with a transcriptionally active gene probe (human type I(α2) procollagen gene) or an inactive gene probe (human β-globin gene). The results show that both genes are similarly modified by these agents. Repair of DNA damage caused by MNNG also occurred similarly in collagen and β-globin genes after removal of MNNG. (Auth.)

  10. Exposure to Crystal Violet, Its Toxic, Genotoxic and Carcinogenic Effects on Environment and Its Degradation and Detoxification for Environmental Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Sujata; Bharagava, Ram Naresh

    2016-01-01

    Crystal Violet (CV), a triphenylmethane dye, has been extensively used in human and veterinary medicine as a biological stain, as a textile dye in textile processing industries and also used to provide a deep violet color to paints and printing ink. CV is also used as a mutagenic and bacteriostatic agent in medical solutions and antimicrobial agent to prevent the fungal growth in poultry feed. Inspite of its many uses, CV has been reported as a recalcitrant dye molecule that persists in environment for a long period and pose toxic effects in environment. It acts as a mitotic poison, potent carcinogen and a potent clastogene promoting tumor growth in some species of fish. Thus, CV is regarded as a biohazard substance. Although, there are several physico-chemical methods such as adsorption, coagulation and ion-pair extraction reported for the removal of CV, but these methods are insufficient for the complete removal of CV from industrial wastewaters and also produce large quantity of sludge containing secondary pollutants. However, biological methods are regarded as cost-effective and eco-friendly for the treatment of industrial wastewaters, but these methods also have certain limitations. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop such eco-friendly and cost-effective biological treatment methods, which can effectively remove the dye from industrial wastewaters for the safety of environment, as well as human and animal health. PMID:26613989

  11. Improved methods for adjusting the UV content of measurement instrument illumination for papermaking industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li

    2014-09-01

    Optical brightening agents (OBAs) or fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) are often used additives in paper and board products as they improve both whiteness and brightness of the products. When printed, OBAs can even contribute to colour tone reproduction. Fluorescent emissions of OBAs depend on the UV content of the illuminant (light source). Adequate adjustment (control or adjustment) of UV content of measurement apparatus (e.g. spectrophotometer) is essential for accurate colour measurement and printing colour reproduction. We proposed a method to adjust the UV content against assigned spectra rather than, as adopted in current ISO standards, against single assigned values. Demonstrations of applying this method to the CIE standard illuminants used in papermaking and graphic industries, D65, C and D50 have been given. Thanks to the well-established traceability of reference standards (IRs), the UV contents of a spectrophotometer corresponding to the standard CIE illuminants have been achieved.

  12. A UV-B-specific signaling component orchestrates plant UV protection

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Bobby A.; Cloix, Catherine; Jiang, Guang Huai; Kaiserli, Eirini; Herzyk, Pawel; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.; Jenkins, Gareth I.

    2005-01-01

    UV-B radiation in sunlight has diverse effects on humans, animals, plants, and microorganisms. UV-B can cause damage to molecules and cells, and consequently organisms need to protect against and repair UV damage to survive in sunlight. In plants, low nondamaging levels of UV-B stimulate transcription of genes involved in UV-protective responses. However, remarkably little is known about the underlying mechanisms of UV-B perception and signal transduction. Here we report that Arabidopsis UV R...

  13. A mechanism-mediated model for carcinogenicity: model content and prediction of the outcome of rodent carcinogenicity bioassays currently being conducted on 25 organic chemicals.

    OpenAIRE

    Purdy, R.

    1996-01-01

    A hierarchical model consisting of quantitative structure-activity relationships based mainly on chemical reactivity was developed to predict the carcinogenicity of organic chemicals to rodents. The model is comprised of quantitative structure-activity relationships, QSARs based on hypothesized mechanisms of action, metabolism, and partitioning. Predictors included octanol/water partition coefficient, molecular size, atomic partial charge, bond angle strain, atomic acceptor delocalizibility, ...

  14. Evaluation of human health risks posed by carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic multiple contaminants associated with consumption of fish from Taihu Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingxin; Wang, Xinxin; Yang, Dan; Lei, Bingli; Zhang, Xiaolan; Zhang, Xinyu

    2014-07-01

    The present study estimated the human daily intake and uptake of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and toxic trace elements [mercury (Hg), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), and arsenic (As)] due to consumption of fish from Taihu Lake, China, and the associated potential health risks posed by these contaminants. The health risks posed by the contaminants were assessed using a risk quotient of the fish consumption rate to the maximum allowable fish consumption rate considering the contaminants for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effect endpoints. The results showed that fish consumption would not pose non-cancer risks. However, some species would cause a cancer risk. Relative risks of the contaminants were calculated to investigate the contaminant which posed the highest risk to humans. As a result, in view of the contaminants for carcinogenic effects, As was the contaminant which posed the highest risk to humans. However, when non-carcinogenic effects of the contaminants were considered, Hg posed the highest risk. The risk caused by PBDEs was negligible. The results demonstrated that traditional contaminants, such as As, Hg, DDTs (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites), and PCBs, require more attention in Taihu Lake than the other target contaminants. PMID:24727049

  15. Comparison of the expression profiles induced by genotoxic and nongenotoxic carcinogens in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of recently developed gene expression techniques using microarrays in toxicological studies (toxicogenomics) facilitate the interpretation of a toxic compound's mode of action and may also allow the prediction of selected toxic effects based on gene expression changes. In order to test this hypothesis, we investigated whether carcinogens at doses known to induce liver tumors in the 2-year rat bioassay deregulate characteristic sets of genes in a short term in vivo study and whether these deregulated genes represent defined biological pathways. Male Wistar rats were dosed with the four nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens methapyrilene (MPy, 60 mg/kg/day), diethylstilbestrol (DES, 10 mg/kg/day), Wy-14643 (Wy, 60 mg/kg/day), and piperonylbutoxide (PBO, 1200 mg/kg/day). After 1, 3, 7, and 14 days, the livers were taken for histopathological evaluation and for analysis of the gene expression profiles on Affymetrix RGU34A arrays. The expression profile of the four nongenotoxic carcinogens were compared to the profiles of the four genotoxic carcinogens 2-nitrofluorene (2-NF), dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and aflatoxin B1 (AB1) from a similar study reported previously. By using statistical and clustering tools characteristically deregulated genes were extracted and functionally classified. Distinct cellular pathways were affected by the nongenotoxic carcinogens compared to the genotoxic carcinogens which at least partly correlated with the two-stage model of carcinogenesis. Characteristic to genotoxic carcinogens were a DNA damage response and the activation of proliferative and survival signaling. Nongenotoxic carcinogens showed responses to oxidative DNA or protein damage, as well as cell cycle progression and signs of regeneration. Many of the gene alterations found with the nongenotoxic carcinogens imply compound-specific mechanisms. Although neither a single gene nor a single pathway will be sufficient to

  16. Comparison of the expression profiles induced by genotoxic and nongenotoxic carcinogens in rat liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun [Bayer Healthcare AG, Department of Molecular and Genetic Toxicology, Aprather Weg 18a, 42096 Wuppertal (Germany)]. E-mail: heidrun.ellinger-ziegelbauer@bayerhealthcare.com; Stuart, Barry [Bayer Crop Science, Department of Toxicology, Stilwell, KS (United States); Wahle, Brad [Bayer Crop Science, Department of Toxicology, Stilwell, KS (United States); Bomann, Werner [Bayer Crop Science, Department of Toxicology, Stilwell, KS (United States); Ahr, Hans Juergen [Bayer Healthcare AG, Department of Molecular and Genetic Toxicology, Aprather Weg 18a, 42096 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2005-08-04

    Application of recently developed gene expression techniques using microarrays in toxicological studies (toxicogenomics) facilitate the interpretation of a toxic compound's mode of action and may also allow the prediction of selected toxic effects based on gene expression changes. In order to test this hypothesis, we investigated whether carcinogens at doses known to induce liver tumors in the 2-year rat bioassay deregulate characteristic sets of genes in a short term in vivo study and whether these deregulated genes represent defined biological pathways. Male Wistar rats were dosed with the four nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens methapyrilene (MPy, 60 mg/kg/day), diethylstilbestrol (DES, 10 mg/kg/day), Wy-14643 (Wy, 60 mg/kg/day), and piperonylbutoxide (PBO, 1200 mg/kg/day). After 1, 3, 7, and 14 days, the livers were taken for histopathological evaluation and for analysis of the gene expression profiles on Affymetrix RG{sub U}34A arrays. The expression profile of the four nongenotoxic carcinogens were compared to the profiles of the four genotoxic carcinogens 2-nitrofluorene (2-NF), dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and aflatoxin B1 (AB1) from a similar study reported previously. By using statistical and clustering tools characteristically deregulated genes were extracted and functionally classified. Distinct cellular pathways were affected by the nongenotoxic carcinogens compared to the genotoxic carcinogens which at least partly correlated with the two-stage model of carcinogenesis. Characteristic to genotoxic carcinogens were a DNA damage response and the activation of proliferative and survival signaling. Nongenotoxic carcinogens showed responses to oxidative DNA or protein damage, as well as cell cycle progression and signs of regeneration. Many of the gene alterations found with the nongenotoxic carcinogens imply compound-specific mechanisms. Although neither a single gene nor a single pathway will be

  17. Use of the modified Ames test as an indicator of the carcinogenicity of residual aromatic extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boogaard, P.; Hedelin, A.; Riley, A.; Rushton, E.; Vaissiere, M.; Minsavage, G.; Rohde, A.; Dalbey, W.

    2013-01-15

    Existing data demonstrate that residual aromatic extracts (RAEs) can be either carcinogenic or non-carcinogenic. CONCAWE had previously concluded that 'Although limited data available indicate that some RAEs are weakly carcinogenic, it is not possible to provide a general recommendation. Classify on a case-by-case basis' (CONCAWE 2005). Therefore CONCAWE's Health/Toxicology Subgroup (H/TSG) has developed a proposal for the use of the modified Ames test as a short-term predictive screening tool for decisions on the classification of RAEs for carcinogenicity. The relationship between RAE chemistry and carcinogenic potential is not as well understood as it is for some other categories of substances, e.g. Other Lubricant Base Oils (OLBO). However, a correlation has been found between the results of the skin carcinogenicity bioassay and the mutagenicity index (MI) obtained from the modified Ames test. Data supporting this correlation are summarised in this report. The H/TSG confirmed that the modified Ames test can be used as a predictive screening tool and that a cut-off value can be established to make a distinction between carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic products. RAEs with a MI > 0.4 demonstrated carcinogenic potential upon dermal application to mouse skin with chronic exposure. RAEs with a MI > 0.4 did not demonstrate a carcinogenic potential. To justify the use of the modified Ames test with RAEs, additional analysis of the repeatability of the test with RAEs was required. With this objective, CONCAWE sponsored a round robin study with different samples of RAEs from member companies, at three different laboratories. The repeatability demonstrated in the round robin study with RAEs support the proposed use of the modified Ames test. As part of the tools available for use by member companies, the H/TSG proposed a standard operating procedure (SOP) (included as an Appendix to this report) on the conduct of the modified Ames test with RAEs. The H

  18. Licochalcone A, a Polyphenol Present in Licorice, Suppresses UV-Induced COX-2 Expression by Targeting PI3K, MEK1, and B-Raf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nu Ry Song

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Licorice is a traditional botanical medicine, and has historically been commonly prescribed in Asia to treat various diseases. Glycyrrhizin (Gc, a triterpene compound, is the most abundant phytochemical constituent of licorice. However, high intake or long-term consumption of Gc has been associated with a number of side effects, including hypertension. However, the presence of alternative bioactive compounds in licorice with anti-carcinogenic effects has long been suspected. Licochalcone A (LicoA is a prominent member of the chalcone family and can be isolated from licorice root. To date, there have been no reported studies on the suppressive effect of LicoA against solar ultraviolet (sUV-induced cyclooxygenase (COX-2 expression and the potential molecular mechanisms involved. Here, we show that LicoA, a major chalcone compound of licorice, effectively inhibits sUV-induced COX-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 PGE2 generation through the inhibition of activator protein 1 AP-1 transcriptional activity, with an effect that is notably more potent than Gc. Western blotting analysis shows that LicoA suppresses sUV-induced phosphorylation of Akt/ mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2/p90 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (RSK in HaCaT cells. Moreover, LicoA directly suppresses the activity of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1, and B-Raf, but not Raf-1 in cell-free assays, indicating that PI3K, MEK1, and B-Raf are direct molecular targets of LicoA. We also found that LicoA binds to PI3K and B-Raf in an ATP-competitive manner, although LicoA does not appear to compete with ATP for binding with MEK1. Collectively, these results provide insight into the biological action of LicoA, which may have potential for development as a skin cancer chemopreventive agent.

  19. Excimer UV curing in printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is the aim of this study to investigate the potential of 308 run excimer UV curing in web and sheet fed offset printing and to discuss its present status. Using real-time FTIR-ATR and stationary or pulsed monochromatic (313 nm) irradiation chemical and physical factors affecting the curing speed of printing inks such as nature and concentration of photo-initiators, reactivity of the ink binding system, ink thickness and pigmentation, irradiance in the curing plane, oxygen concentration and nitrogen inerting, multiple pulse exposure, the photochemical dark reaction and temperature dependence were studied. The results were used to select optimum conditions for excimer UV curing in respect to ink reactivity, nitrogen inerting and UV exposure and to build an excimer UV curing unit consisting of two 50 W/cm 308 run excimer lamps, power supply, cooling and inerting unit. The excimer UV curing devices were tested under realistic conditions on a web offset press zirkon supra forte and a sheet fed press Heidelberg GTO 52. Maximum curing speeds of 300 m/min in web offset and 8000 sheets per hour in sheet fed offset were obtained

  20. Determination of Hexavalent Chromium (Cr(VI)) Concentrations via Ion Chromatography and UV-Vis Spectrophotometry in Samples Collected from Nacogdoches Wastewater Treatment Plant, East Texas (USA)

    OpenAIRE

    Onchoke, Kefa K.; Sasu, Salomey A.

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), a toxic environmental pollutant and carcinogen, was determined in samples collected from Nacogdoches Wastewater Treatment Plant (NWWTP) using ion chromatography and UV-visible spectrophotometry (IC, UV-Vis). On reaction with 1,5-diphenylcarbazide (DPC) Cr+6 forms a 1,5-diphenylcarbazide-Cr(VI) complex, which is then analyzed at 530 nm and 540 nm, respectively. Via ion chromatography Cr(VI) concentrations were in the range of 0.00190±0.0020 an...

  1. Preparation and Characterization of UV-Curable Cyclohexanone-Formaldehyde Resin and Its Cured Film Properties

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    UV-curable cyclohexanone-formaldehyde (UVCF) resin was prepared with cyclohexanone-formaldehyde (CF) resin, isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI), and pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) as base substance, bridging agent, and functional monomer, respectively. The structure of UVCF was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR), and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The viscosity and photopolymerization behavior of the UV-cu...

  2. The evolutionary response of plants to increased UV-B radiation: Field studies with Arabidopsis thaliana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of a species to any environmental change is determined by both phenotypic and evolutionary adjustments. To date, the majority of research concerning the response of terrestrial plants to increased UV-B radiation has focused on phenotypic adjustments. Recently we have initiated field studies aimed at assessing genetic variation for UV-B sensitivity within a natural population of Arabidopsis thaliana. This population consists of at least eight discrete genotypes that have been confirmed by RAPD analysis. We used an incomplete block design to assess the impact of UV-B (ambient and ambient + 6 kJ) and PAR (low and high) on these genotypes. The high UV-B treatment caused a significant reduction in fruit number and plant height while the high PAR treatment caused a significant increase in these variables. In addition, there was a marginally significant (p=0.1) UV-B x PAR x maternal line interaction for fruit number, indicating that genetic variation for UV-B sensitivity within this population depends on the PAR environment. The combination of high UV-B and high PAR caused a change in fruit number (relative to the ambient UV-B/high PAR treatment) ranging from an increase of 24% to a decrease of 47%. This range was much smaller in the low PAR treatment. These results indicate the potential for increased UV-B radiation to act as an agent of natural selection within this population

  3. Development of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models to predict the carcinogenic potency of chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determining the carcinogenicity and carcinogenic potency of new chemicals is both a labor-intensive and time-consuming process. In order to expedite the screening process, there is a need to identify alternative toxicity measures that may be used as surrogates for carcinogenic potency. Alternative toxicity measures for carcinogenic potency currently being used in the literature include lethal dose (dose that kills 50% of a study population [LD50]), lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level (LOAEL) and maximum tolerated dose (MTD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between tumor dose (TD50) and three alternative toxicity measures as an estimator of carcinogenic potency. A second aim of this study was to develop a Classification and Regression Tree (CART) between TD50 and estimated/experimental predictor variables to predict the carcinogenic potency of new chemicals. Rat TD50s of 590 structurally diverse chemicals were obtained from the Cancer Potency Database, and the three alternative toxicity measures considered in this study were estimated using TOPKAT, a toxicity estimation software. Though poor correlations were obtained between carcinogenic potency and the three alternative toxicity (both experimental and TOPKAT) measures for the CPDB chemicals, a CART developed using experimental data with no missing values as predictor variables provided reasonable estimates of TD50 for nine chemicals that were part of an external validation set. However, if experimental values for the three alternative measures, mutagenicity and logP are not available in the literature, then either the CART developed using missing experimental values or estimated values may be used for making a prediction

  4. UV completion without symmetry restoration

    CERN Document Server

    Endlich, Solomon; Penco, Riccardo

    2013-01-01

    We show that it is not possible to UV-complete certain low-energy effective theories with spontaneously broken space-time symmetries by embedding them into linear sigma models, that is, by adding "radial" modes and restoring the broken symmetries. When such a UV completion is not possible, one can still raise the cutoff up to arbitrarily higher energies by adding fields that transform non-linearly under the broken symmetries, that is, new Goldstone bosons. However, this (partial) UV completion does not necessarily restore any of the broken symmetries. We illustrate this point by considering a concrete example in which a combination of space-time and internal symmetries is broken down to a diagonal subgroup. Along the way, we clarify a recently proposed interpretation of inverse Higgs constraints as gauge-fixing conditions.

  5. Plasmon-enhanced UV photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Yuika, E-mail: yuika@ap.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Kawata, Satoshi [Department of Applied Physics, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kumamoto, Yasuaki [Nanophotonics Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Taguchi, Atsushi [Nanophotonics Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2014-02-10

    We report plasmonic nanoparticle enhanced photocatalysis on titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) in the deep-UV range. Aluminum (Al) nanoparticles fabricated on TiO{sub 2} film increases the reaction rate of photocatalysis by factors as high as 14 under UV irradiation in the range of 260–340 nm. The reaction efficiency has been determined by measuring the decolorization rate of methylene blue applied on the TiO{sub 2} substrate. The enhancement of photocatalysis shows particle size and excitation wavelength dependence, which can be explained by the surface plasmon resonance of Al nanoparticles.

  6. UV-hardening of coating materials on the basis of unsaturated polyesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UV-hardening of coated materials based on unsaturated polyester resins is successful in practice. Resins, modified by acrylic acid, are gaining importance for thin coating from paper coatings up to printing colours. A report is given on the binding classes which come into question as photo initiators and whose ways of reaction with UV-irradiation are so far known. The photopolymerizeable coating systems can be used from undercoats to coating varnishes and from thick layers (polishing varnishes) to thinnest layers (printing colours). The economical significance of the UV-process today is illustrated by statistics on the use of binding agents and coating materials. (orig./AK)

  7. Agent Chameleons: Virtual Agents Real Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    O'Hare, Gregory; Duffy, Brian; Schoen-Phelan, Bianca; Martin, Alan; Bradley, John

    2003-01-01

    Agent Chameleons provides virtual agents powered by real intelligence, delivering next generation autonomic entities that can seamlessly migrate, mutate and evolve on their journey between and within physical and digital information spaces.

  8. Influence of pre- and post-treatment with caffeine on UV-induced effects in Oedogonium gunnii Wittr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoospores and mature filaments of O.gunnii were treated with 0.05 and 0.25% of caffeine 2 hr prior and immediately after exposure to UV. While the caffeine treatment given 2 hr prior to UV-exposure lowered the percentage of chromosomal aberrations, the same concentrations of caffeine, when employed immediately after UV-exposure, resulted in an increased frequency of chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine appears to act as protective as well as potentiating agent in relation to UV-induced effects both with respect to survival of zoospores and chromosomal aberrations in mature filaments. (author)

  9. Opportunities for an alternative integrating testing strategy for carcinogen hazard assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doktorova, Tatyana Y; Pauwels, Marleen; Vinken, Mathieu; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Rogiers, Vera

    2012-02-01

    The 2-year rodent carcinogenicity bioassay evolved more than 40 years ago, and although it is complex, long lasting, expensive, and animal consuming, it is still the only generally accepted test for assessing the carcinogenicity of chemicals. Over time, different alternative approaches have been developed with the final goal to replace the bioassay. Unfortunately, at present, none of these strategies alone provides sufficient assurance of accurate prediction. In this review paper, we discuss the major advantages and pitfalls of the existing alternative methodologies to the carcinogenicity bioassay. Finally, based on the available scientific data in the public domain, we propose what we would like to call a "feasible integrated testing strategy" which incorporates some promising alternatives, providing at the same time information on the mechanism of action and the toxic nature of the compounds tested. It is, however, clear that the adoption of whatever "new" testing scheme should be considered with caution and its effectiveness should be experimentally demonstrated in advance by addressing a reasonable number of chemical carcinogens and non-carcinogens from a variety of structural and functional classes. PMID:22141324

  10. Partial lipectomy reduces dimethylhydrazine-induced carcinogenic initiation in the colon of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated whether visceral adipose tissue directly modulates the development of preneoplastic lesions in the colon of carcinogen-treated rats. Wistar rats (n = 64) were randomly assigned to 8 experimental groups in two experiments. In one experiment, 32 rats were exposed or not to either carcinogen treatment (dimethylhydrazine, DMH; 125 mg/kg) or high-fat diet (standard chow enriched with 14% lard) or both for 56 days. In a second experiment, 32 rats were exposed to a carcinogen or they underwent partial lipectomy or both for 30 days (partial lipectomy groups underwent ablation of mesenteric and parametrial fat pads, whereas sham groups did not; all rats were fed with standard chow). Colon was collected for histopathological analysis. After 56 experimental days a high-fat diet increased carcinogenic mutations in the colonic epithelia. Partial lipectomy reduced weight gain in carcinogen-exposed rats and decreased the de novo formation of mesenteric and parametrial fat pads. Partial lipectomy significantly inhibited the mutational process after 30 days: there were fewer colonic preneoplastic lesions and less proliferation, apoptosis, and inflammation. These data suggest that visceral adipose tissue promotes colon carcinogenesis and enhances the establishment and expansion of genetically mutated cells in colonic epithelia

  11. Quantitative structure carcinogenicity relationship for detecting structural alerts in nitroso-compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevention of environmentally induced cancers is a major health problem of which solutions depend on the rapid and accurate screening of potential chemical hazards. Lately, theoretical approaches such as the one proposed here - Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) - are increasingly used for assessing the risks of environmental chemicals, since they can markedly reduce costs, avoid animal testing, and speed up policy decisions. This paper reports a QSAR study based on the Topological Substructural Molecular Design (TOPS-MODE) approach, aiming at predicting the rodent carcinogenicity of a set of nitroso-compounds selected from the Carcinogenic Potency Data Base (CPDB). The set comprises nitrosoureas (14 chemicals), N-nitrosamines (18 chemicals) C-nitroso-compounds (1 chemical), nitrosourethane (1 chemical) and nitrosoguanidine (1 chemical), which have been bioassayed in male rat using gavage as the route of administration. Here we are especially concerned in gathering the role of both parameters on the carcinogenic activity of this family of compounds. First, the regression model was derived, upon removal of one identified nitrosamine outlier, and was able to account for more than 84% of the variance in the experimental activity. Second, the TOPS-MODE approach afforded the bond contributions - expressed as fragment contributions to the carcinogenic activity - that can be interpreted and provide tools for better understanding the mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Finally, and most importantly, we demonstrate the potentialities of this approach towards the recognition of structural alerts for carcinogenicity predictions

  12. Production of thymine glycols in DNA by radiation and chemical carcinogens as detected by a monoclonal antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Leadon, S A

    1987-01-01

    In order to understand the role in carcinogenesis of damage indirectly induced by chemical carcinogens, it is important to identify the primary DNA lesions. We have measured the formation and repair of one type of DNA modification, 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine (thymine glycol), following exposure of cultured human cells to the carcinogens N-hydroxy-2-naphthylamine or benzo(a)pyrene. The efficiency of production of thymine glycols in DNA by these carcinogens was compared to that by ionizing rad...

  13. UV-LED photopolymerised monoliths

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abele, S.; Nie, F.; Foret, František; Paull, B.; Macka, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 133, č. 7 (2008), s. 864-866. ISSN 0003-2654 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400310651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : photopolymerisation * UV- LED * polymethacrylate monolith Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.761, year: 2008

  14. [Skin tanning and light protection-theory, agents and analytic aspects. 1. Skin tanning and skin tanning agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matissek, R

    1984-10-01

    The different approaches to achieving skin tanning with emphasis on natural tanning, due to UV radiation of the sun or solaria, and artificial tanning through tannings agents are described. In contrast to the artificial tan the natural tan is a protection against UV radiation and is caused by pigmentation (melanin formation). The artificial tanning is based on a chemical reaction usually by means of dihydroxy acetone (melanoidin formation). Reaction mechanisms by both agents are reported. The determination of dihydroxy acetone in cosmetic tanning preparations by TLC, GC, HPLC, enzymatic tests and by a new method for capillary GC including sample preparation is described. When exceeding the natural protection mechanisms the skin should be protected by physico-chemical measures. The active principles in sunscreens are the UV filtering substances. UV filters permitted in the EG are listed. 2-Hydroxy benzophenone is used as an example to explain the mechanism of UV filtering substances. Analysis of UV filtering substances in cosmetic sunscreens by TLC, GC, HPLC is described as well as a fast and simple method for separation of lipophilic UV filters followed by capillary GC determination. PMID:6506884

  15. Skin protection against UV light by dietary antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, Elisabet

    2014-09-01

    There is considerable interest in the concept of additional endogenous photoprotection by dietary antioxidants. A number of efficient micronutrients are capable of contributing to the prevention of UV damage in humans. These compounds protect molecular targets by scavenging reactive oxygen species, including excited singlet oxygen and triplet state molecules, and also modulate stress-dependent signaling and/or suppress cellular and tissue responses like inflammation. Micronutrients present in the diet such as carotenoids, vitamins E and C, and polyphenols contribute to antioxidant defense and may also contribute to endogenous photoprotection. This review summarizes the literature concerning the use of dietary antioxidants as systemic photoprotective agents towards skin damage induced by UVA and UVB. Intervention studies in humans with carotenoid-rich diets have shown photoprotection. Interestingly, rather long treatment periods (a minimum of 10 weeks) were required to achieve this effect. Likewise, dietary carotenoids exert their protective antioxidant function in several in vitro and in vivo studies when present at sufficiently high concentration. A combination of vitamins E and C protects the skin against UV damage. It is suggested that daily consumption of dietary polyphenols may provide efficient protection against the harmful effects of solar UV radiation in humans. Furthermore, the use of these micronutrients in combination may provide an effective strategy for protecting human skin from damage by UV exposure. PMID:24964816

  16. UV-photoactivation technique for size and shape controlled synthesis and annealing of stable gold nanoparticles in micelle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhuri Mandal; Subrata Kundu; Sujit Kumar Ghosh; Tarasankar Pal

    2002-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes have been prepared by UV-photoactivation technique using the micelle TX-100 (poly(oxyethylene) iso-octylphenyl ether) as reducing agent, stabilizing agent as well as template which has been authenticated from the plasmon absorption band and TEM picture. The heating effect on those gold nanoparticles has also been studied.

  17. Modulation of carcinogen bioavailability by immunisation with benzo[a]pyrene-conjugate vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grova, Nathalie; Prodhomme, Emmanuel J F; Schellenberger, Mario T; Farinelle, Sophie; Muller, Claude P

    2009-06-24

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) conjugate vaccines based on ovalbumin, tetanus toxoid and diphtheria toxoid (DT) as carrier proteins were developed to investigate the effect of specific antibodies on the bioavailability of this ubiquitous carcinogen and its metabolites. After metabolic activation of this prototype carcinogen, B[a]P forms DNA adducts which initiate chemical carcinogenesis. B[a]P-DT conjugate induced the most robust immune response. The antibodies reacted not only with B[a]P but also with the proximate carcinogen 7,8-diol-B[a]P. Antibodies modulated the bioavailability of B[a]P and its metabolic activation in a dose-dependent manner by sequestration in the blood. Our results showed that this immune prophylactic strategy influences the pharmacokinetic of B[a]P and further studies to investigate their effects on chemical carcinogenesis are warranted. PMID:19406187

  18. Factors modifying sensitivity to carcinogens and the problem of threshold in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximum allowable concentrations of chemical carcinogens and dose rates of ionizing radiation have been under extensive study both experimentally and epidemiologically. The problem of the carcinogenic hazards of low-level radiation is a very difficult one: in epidemiological studies it is hard to take into account the many factors (e.g. diseases, diet, genetic peculiarities) that may affect sensitivity to radiation; in experimental studies it is hard to extrapolate with accuracy from one species to another or from the individual threshold to that of the whole population. Age, enzyme activity, sex, and DNA repair capability also modify sensitivity to radiation; when factors such as these are better understood it is expected that epidemiological studies will give a solution that allows estimation of the carcinogenic risk from low-level radiation and hence establishment of a threshold dose. (author)

  19. A review of the genotoxic and carcinogenic effects of aspartame: does it safe or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Serkan; Uçar, Aslı

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this article is to review genotoxicologic and carcinogenic profile of the artificial sweetener aspartame. Aspartame is a synthetic dipeptide, nearly 180-200 times sweeter than sucrose. It is the most widely used artificial sweetener especially in carbonated and powdered soft drinks, beverages, drugs and hygiene products. There is a discussion ongoing for many years whether aspartame posses genotoxic and carcinogenic risk for humans. This question led to many studies to specify the adverse effects of aspartame. Therefore, we aimed to review the oldest to latest works published in major indices to gather information within this article. With respect to published data, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of aspartame is still confusing. So, consumers should be aware of the potential side effects of aspartame before they consume it. PMID:24510317

  20. Cell-mediated mutagenesis and cell transformation of mammalian cells by chemical carcinogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a cell-mediated mutagenesis assay in which cells with the appropriate markers for mutagenesis are co-cultivated with either lethally irradiated rodent embryonic cells that can metabolize carcinogenic hydrocarbons or with primary rat liver cells that can metabolize chemicals carcinogenic to the liver. During co-cultivation, the reactive metabolites of the procarcinogen appear to be transmitted to the mutable cells and induce mutations in them. Assays of this type make it possible to demonstrate a relationship between carcinogenic potency of the chemicals and their ability to induce mutations in mammalian cells. In addition, by simultaneously comparing the frequencies of transformation and mutation induced in normal diploid hamster cells by benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and one of its metabolites, it is possible to estimate the genetic target size for cell transformation in vitro

  1. [Notion of threshold in mutagenesis: implications for mutagenic and carcinogenic risk assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzin, D

    2007-11-01

    During years, it has been widely admitted in the scientific community that there was no threshold in mutagenesis: a compound was or not a mutagen. The meaning of such a proposition was that a risk existed at all exposure level, because, at least theoretically, one molecule is sufficient to cause the formation of a DNA adduct which is able to induce a mutation. However, works carried out in the last few years have shown that in the case of some specific mechanisms of mutagenesis, a threshold could be demonstrated essentially in the case of compounds that do not react directly with DNA. Several types of thresholds exist, and the simple statistical threshold is not sufficient in terms of risk assessment. A biological threshold that is consistent with a mechanism of action of the mutagen should be established. Amongst these mechanisms, we can mention some mechanism with a demonstrated threshold: effects of aneugens, effects of topoisomerases inhibitors, effects of DNA polymerases inhibitors, effects of compounds with a different metabolism at high doses compared to low doses. On the contrary, for some mechanisms, the demonstration of the mechanism is suspected, but not totally demonstrated. It is the case of compounds which induce nucleotides pool imbalance or compounds which are DNA repair inhibitors. In some cases, when a redundancy exists in the repair of damages, like oxidative DNA damage, a threshold is suspected. Some authors even recently proposed the possibility of a threshold in the case of alkylating agents. The majority of mutagenic thresholds were demonstrated in vitro, however some mechanisms were demonstrated in vivo, for example in the case of micronucleus induction by hypo or hyperthermia in rodents bone marrow. The use of threshold in risk assessment requires the use of the most sensitive endpoint for example, non disjunction in the case of aneugens, confusing factors like apoptosis should be eliminated and species sensitivities should be taken into

  2. Carcinogenicity of consumption of red and processed meat: What about environmental contaminants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, José L; Nadal, Martí

    2016-02-01

    In October 26, 2015, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) issued a press release informing of the recent evaluation of the carcinogenicity of red and processed meat consumption. The consumption of red meat and processed meat was classified as "probably carcinogenic to humans", and as "carcinogenic to humans", respectively. The substances responsible of this potential carcinogenicity would be generated during meat processing, such as curing and smoking, or when meat is heated at high temperatures (N-nitroso-compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic aromatic amines). However, in its assessments, the IARC did not make any reference to the role that may pose some carcinogenic environmental pollutants, which are already present in raw or unprocessed meat. The potential role of a number of environmental chemical contaminants (toxic trace elements, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, polychlorinated diphenyl ethers, polychlorinated naphthalenes and perfluoroalkyl substances) on the carcinogenicity of consumption of meat and meat products is discussed in this paper. A case-study, Catalonia (Spain), is specifically assessed, while the influence of cooking on the concentrations of environmental pollutants is also reviewed. It is concluded that although certain cooking processes could modify the levels of chemical contaminants in food, the influence of cooking on the pollutant concentrations depends not only on the particular cooking process, but even more on their original contents in each specific food item. As most of these environmental pollutants are organic, cooking procedures that release or remove fat from the meat should tend to reduce the total concentrations of these contaminants in the cooked meat. PMID:26656511

  3. Embryonic turkey liver: activities of biotransformation enzymes and activation of DNA-reactive carcinogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrone, Carmen E.; Duan, Jian Dong; Jeffrey, Alan M.; Williams, Gary M. [New York Medical College, Department of Pathology, Valhalla (United States); Ahr, Hans-Juergen; Schmidt, Ulrich [Bayer AG, Institute of Toxicology, Wuppertal (Germany); Enzmann, Harald H. [Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices, Bonn (Germany)

    2004-10-01

    Avian embryos are a potential alternative model for chemical toxicity and carcinogenicity research. Because the toxic and carcinogenic effects of some chemicals depend on bioactivation, activities of biotransformation enzymes and formation of DNA adducts in embryonic turkey liver were examined. Biochemical analyses of 22-day in ovoturkey liver post-mitochondrial fractions revealed activities of the biotransformation enzymes 7-ethoxycoumarin de-ethylase (ECOD), 7-ethoxyresorufin de-ethylase (EROD), aldrin epoxidase (ALD), epoxide hydrolase (EH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and UDP-glucuronyltransferase (GLUT). Following the administration of phenobarbital (24 mg/egg) on day 21, enzyme activities of ECOD, EROD, ALD, EH and GLUT, but not of GST, were increased by two-fold or higher levels by day 22. In contrast, acute administration of 3-methylcholanthrene (5 mg/egg) induced only ECOD and EROD activities. Bioactivation of structurally diverse pro-carcinogens was also examined using {sup 32}P-postlabeling for DNA adducts. In ovoexposure of turkey embryos on day 20 of gestation to 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), 4,4'-methylenebis(2-chloroaniline) (MOCA), benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) resulted in the formation of DNA adducts in livers collected by day 21. Some of the DNA adducts had {sup 32}P-postlabeling chromatographic migration patterns similar to DNA adducts found in livers from Fischer F344 rats exposed to the same pro-carcinogens. We conclude that 21-day embryonic turkey liver is capable of chemical biotransformation and activation of genotoxic carcinogens to form DNA adducts. Thus, turkey embryos could be utilized to investigate potential chemical toxicity and carcinogenicity. (orig.)

  4. Carcinogen-induced DNA repair in nucleotide-permeable Escherichia coli cells. Induction of DNA repair by the carcinogens methyl and ethyl nitrosourea and methyl methanesulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielmann, H W; Vosberg, H P; Reygers, U

    1975-08-15

    Ether-permeabilized (nucleotide-permeable) cells of Escherichia coli show excision repair of their DNA after having been exposed to the carcinogens N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MeNOUr), N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (EtNOUr) and methyl methanesulfonate (MeSO2OMe) which are known to bind covalently to DNA. Defect mutations in genes uvrA, uvrB, uvrC, recA, recB, recC and rep did not inhibit this excision repair. Enzymic activities involved in this repair were identified by measuring size reduction of DNA, DNA degradation to acid-soluble nucleotides and repair polymerization. 1. In permeabilized cells methyl and ethyl nitrosourea induced endonucleolytic cleavage of endogenous DNA, as determined by size reduction of denatured DNA in neutral and alkaline sucrose gradients. An enzymic activity from E. coli K-12 cell extracts was purified (greater than 2000-fold) and was found to cleave preferentially methyl-nitrosourea-treated DNA and to convert the methylated supercoiled DNA duplex (RFI) of phage phiX 174 into the nicked circular form. 2. Degradation of alkylated cellular DNA to acid solubility was diminished in a mutant lacking the 5' leads to 3' exonucleolytic activity of DNA polymerase I but was not affected in a mutant which lacked the DNA polymerizing but retained the 5' leads 3' exonucleolytic activity of DNA polymerase I. 3. An easily measurable effect is carcinogen-induced repair polymerization, making it suitable for detection of covalent binding of carcinogens and potentially carcinogenic compounds. PMID:170107

  5. Exposure to chromium (VI) in the drinking water increases susceptibility to UV-induced skin tumors in hairless mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) is a well known-human carcinogen with exposures occurring in both occupational and environmental settings. Although lung carcinogenicity has been well documented for occupational exposure via inhalation, the carcinogenic hazard of drinking water exposure to Cr (VI) has yet to be established. We used a hairless mouse model to study the effects of K2CrO4 in the drinking water on ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced skin tumors. Hairless mice were unexposed or exposed to UVR alone (1.2 kJ/m2), K2CrO4 alone at 2.5 and 5.0 ppm, or the combination of UVR and K2CrO4 at 0.5, 2.5, and 5.0 ppm. Mice were observed on a weekly basis for the appearance of skin tumors larger than 2 mm. All the mice were euthanized on day 182. The skin tumors were excised and subsequently analyzed microscopically for malignancy by histopathology. There was a total absence of observable skin tumors in untreated mice and in mice exposed to chromate alone. However, there was a dose-dependent increase in the number of skin tumors greater than 2 mm in mice exposed to K2CrO4 and UV compared with mice exposed to UV alone. The increase in tumors larger than 2 mm was statistically significant (P 2CrO4 at the two highest K2CrO4 doses (2.5 and 5.0 ppm), and there was a statistically significant increase in the numbers of malignant tumors per mouse in the UVR plus K2CrO4 (5 ppm) group compared with UV alone. The data presented here indicate that K2CrO4 increases the number of UV-induced skin tumors in a dose-dependent manner, and these results support the concern that regulatory agencies have relative to the carcinogenic health hazards of widespread human exposure to Cr (VI) in drinking water

  6. Physics of Electrodeless UV Lamps and Applications of UV Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekic, Miodrag; Ruckman, Mark

    2004-12-01

    Electrodeless discharge microwave powered ultraviolet limps are a special class of high power incoherent UV sources, conceptualized forty years ago for industrial processing applications. Because of the nonimaging character of the applications, the need for measuring averaged properties of the lamps' exceeds the motivation to obtain detailed space-resolved discharge parameters. This writing discusses measurements of the average plasma temperature of a 5.8kW high pressure mercury bulb and a XeCl* excimer bulb driven by the microwaves of the same power. First method is based on the black body radiance fit to the self-absorbed 185nm and 254nm mercury lines. The second method is essentially Boltzmann plot method applied to the roto-vibrational levels of B1/2 - X1/2 XeCl* molecular transition with a maximum at 308nm. We also present a procedure for evaluation of effectiveness of different bulb spectra to the given UV curing chemistry system independent from the Beer-Lambert law. Conversely, the procedure can be used for the optimization of the chemistry to the chosen UV lamp radiance spectrum.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Silver/Clay/Chitosan Bionanocomposites by UV-Irradiation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansor B. Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Silver/Montmorillonite/Chitosan Bionanocomposites (Ag/MMT/Cts BNCs have been synthesized by UV-irradiation reduction method in the absence of any reducing agent or heat treatment which is used to antibacterial application and medical devices. Approach: MMT, Chitosan and AgNO3 were used as a solid support, stabilizer and silver precursor, respectively. The properties of Ag/MMT/Cts BNCs were studied as a function of UV-irradiation times. The crystalline structure, d-spacing of interlayer of MMT, the size distributions and surface plasmon resonance of synthesized silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs were characterized using Powder X-Ray Diffraction (PXRD, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM and UV-vis spectroscopy. The functional groups of prepared BNCs were also determined by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR. Results: The results obtained from UV-vis spectroscopy of synthesized Ag-NPs showed that the intensity of the maximum wavelength of the plasmon peaks were increased with the increasing in the UV-irradiation times. Results from UV-visible spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM microphotographs show that particles size of Ag-NPs decrease with the increase of UV-irradiation time. Conclusion: UV-irradiation disintegrated the Ag-NPs into smaller size until a relatively stable size and size distribution were achieved. Ag/MMT/Cts BNCs could be suitable to antimicrobial applications and medical devices.

  8. Effects of combined UV and chlorine treatment on chloroform formation from triclosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, Weiwei; Sun, Peizhe; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2016-05-01

    The co-exposure to UV irradiation and free chlorine may occur in certain drinking water and wastewater treatment systems. This study investigated the effects of simultaneous low pressure ultraviolet (LPUV) irradiation and free chlorination on the formation of chloroform from triclosan which is a commonly used antibacterial agent. Different treatment systems (i.e., combined UV/chlorine, UV alone, and chlorine alone) were applied to examine the degradation of triclosan and formation of chloroform. The fate of representative intermediates, including chlorinated triclosan, dechlorinated triclosan intermediates and 2,4-dichlorophenol, were tracked to deduce the effect of combined UV/chlorine on the transformation of chloroform formation precursors. The relation between intermediates degradation and chloroform formation was investigated in depth by conducting stepwise experiments with UV and chlorine in different sequences. Results indicate that the combined UV/chlorine notably enhanced the chloroform formation from triclosan. From the reaction mechanism perspective the combined UV/chlorine, where the direct photolysis may play an important role, could accelerate the decay of intermediates and facilitate the generation of productive chloroform precursors. The radicals had modest influence on the degradation of triclosan and intermediates and partly hindered the formation of chloroform. These results emphasize the necessity of considering disinfection by-products formation in the application of combined UV/chlorine technology during water treatment. PMID:26746417

  9. Distinct mechanisms of oxidative DNA damage induced by carcinogenic nickel subsulfide and nickel oxides.

    OpenAIRE

    Kawanishi, Shosuke; Oikawa, Shinji; Inoue, Sumiko; Nishino, Kohsuke

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. National Toxicology Program has shown clear evidence of carcinogenicity of nickel subsulfide (Ni(3)S(2)) and some evidence of carcinogenicity of NiO (green) in rats. In the present study, DNA damage in cultured cells and in lungs of rats induced by nickel compounds was investigated to clarify the mechanism of nickel carcinogenesis. In cultured HeLa cells, Ni(3)S(2) induced a significant increase in 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) formation, whereas NiO (black), NiO (green), and NiS...

  10. Chemoprevention with Acetylsalicylic Acid, Vitamin D and Calcium Reduces Risk of Carcinogen-induced Lung Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, J; Raskov, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim: Research has shown that chemoprevention may be effective against the development of lung cancer. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of oral chemoprevention in a mouse model of tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumor.......Background/Aim: Research has shown that chemoprevention may be effective against the development of lung cancer. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of oral chemoprevention in a mouse model of tobacco carcinogen-induced lung tumor....

  11. The Cigarette Smoke Carcinogen Benzo[a]pyrene Enhances Human Papillomavirus Synthesis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Alam, Samina; Conway, Michael J; Chen, Horng-Shen; Meyers, Craig

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that cigarette smoke carcinogens are cofactors which synergize with human papillomavirus (HPV) to increase the risk of cervical cancer progression. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a major carcinogen in cigarette smoke, is detected in the cervical mucus and may interact with HPV. Exposure of cervical cells to high concentrations of BaP resulted in a 10-fold increase in HPV type 31 (HPV31) viral titers, whereas treatment with low concentrations of BaP resulted in an increa...

  12. Tobacco Carcinogen NNK Transporter MRP2 Regulates CFTR Function in Lung Epithelia: Implications for Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chunying; Schuetz, John D.; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. About 85% of all lung cancers are linked to tobacco smoke, in which more than 50 lung carcinogens have been identified and one of the most abundant is 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)- 1-butanone (NNK). The human lung epithelium constitutes the first line of defense against tobacco specific carcinogens, in which apically-localized receptors, transporters, and ion channels in the airway may play a critical role in this n...

  13. Cytotoxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic properties of ultraviolet radiation : shining light on photolesions

    OpenAIRE

    Jans, Judith

    2003-01-01

    textabstractExposure to ultraviolet light (UV light) poses a serieus threat to human health. An altered life style (holidays in the sun, tanning devices) has led to increased exposure to UV light in the Western population. UV light damages the DNA, the carrier of genetic information, which can result in permanent alterations in the genome and, ultimately, cancer. The majority of the DNA lesions induced by UV light consists of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine-(6,4)-pyrimidon...

  14. Photodynamic cytotoxicity of mammalian cells exposed to sunlight-simulating near ultraviolet light in the presence of the carcinogen 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coal-derived carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), added to cultures of V79 Chinese Hamster, C3H mouse 10T1/2, and human HeLa cells enhanced photolethality induced by the sunlight-simulating emission from Westinghouse Sun Lamps (approximately 290-400 nm) but only in the presence of 02. Treatment of cells with DMBA after irradiation was without lethal effect; the endoperoxide of DMBA was ineffective both before as well as after irradiation, and DMBA incubation before far-UV exposure (254 nm) was protective. Cells rendered photosensitive by incubation with DMBA rapidly lost their sensitivity (in 0C) if incubation in a DMBA-free solution containing serum, but maintained their sensitivity at least for several hours if a serum-free solution was used. Although DMBA enhanced light-induced killing of cells in all phases of the cycle, those undergoing DNA syntheses were preferentially sensitized. The data supported photodynamic lethality due to one or both of the following: (1) the reaction with DNA of either DMBA radicals followed by oxidation, or DMBA-produced single oxygen; or (2) the peroxidation of lysosomal membranes followed by the release of hydrolases including DNAses. As a model system of the combined effects of a fossil-fuel derived polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and sunlight, the results with DMBA + near-UV are discussed in the context of altered cell properties (e.g. neoplastic transformation) in sublethally affected cells. (author)

  15. Ecotoxicity of carbamazepine and its UV photolysis transformation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donner, E.; Kosjek, T.; Qualmann, Signe;

    2013-01-01

    considerably more toxic than carbamazepine itself may be produced during UV-treatment of wastewater effluents and/or photo-induced degradation of carbamazepine in natural waters. This study highlights the need to consider mixture toxicity and the formation and persistence of toxicologically relevant......Carbamazepine, an anti-epileptic pharmaceutical agent commonly found in wastewater, is highly recalcitrant to standard wastewater treatment practices. This study investigated the mixture toxicity of carbamazepine transformation products formed during ultraviolet (UV) photolysis using three standard...... treatment period, together with concurrent increases in acridine and acridone concentrations. Ecotoxicity was shown to increase in parallel with carbamazepine degradation indicating that the mixture of degradation products formed was more toxic than the parent compound, and all three ecotoxicity endpoints...

  16. Low toxicity aromatic diamine curing agents for adhesives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorsey, G.F.

    1993-08-24

    Increasing severity of regulations for handling of hazardous materials has led to formulation of adhesives with considerably lowered toxicities for use at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Fundamental was the development of Asilamine aromatic diamines, a family of liquid aromatic diamines useful as substitutes for methylenedianiline (MDA), a widely used adhesives curing agent. The use of Asilamine has allowed us to continue operations without dealing with expensive measures for regulation of MDA as a carcinogen promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

  17. UV-induced DNA damage in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Bykov, Vladimir J.

    1999-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is considered to be the most harmful part of solar energy affecting man. The depletion of the ozone layer around the Earth increases the total exposure to UV-light. The incidence of skin cancer in man has been shown to be associated with exposure to solar radiation, especially to UV-light. UV is capable of initiating skin carcinogenesis through DNA damage, particularly by formation of DNA photoproducts. The major products formed by UV irradiation are di...

  18. Comparative effect of irradiation and metabolization of some chemical pollutants in animals based upon mutagenic/carcinogenic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons have long been implicated as mutagens and carcinogens. The compounds selected for this study, 3,4-benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and 3-methylcholanterene (MC), were considered the most representative substances of this chemical group. Of the tested metabolites of the first, only 1,2 and 9-hydroxy-BP and diasteromers diolepoxi (7,8,9,10-cis and trans) proved mutagens. BP and MC in mammalian cells produced DNA lesions in the form of single-strand breaks and inhibition of semiconservative synthesis. They did not inhibit rejoining of DNA single-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation. BP and MC are both mutagens only after metabolic activation, as shown in host-mediated assay and by in-vitro test. In order to establish an equivalence, the effect of three chemicals were investigated: an alkylating agent, BP and MC, the latter requiring metabolic activation. Under the given experimental conditions, 1 rad appeared as equivalent to 55 ng of IOB-82 (a cytostatic), 115 ng of BP and 178 ng of MC. This concept could prove of great importance for evaluating the risks arising from chemical and physical pollutants in man's environment

  19. Cremophor EL stimulates mitotic recombination in uvsH//uvsH diploid strain of Aspergillus nidulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleverson Busso

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Cremophor EL is a solubilizer and emulsifier agent used in the pharmaceutical and foodstuff industries. The solvent is the principal constituent of paclitaxel's clinical formulation vehicle. Since mitotic recombination plays a crucial role in multistep carcinogenesis, the study of the recombinagenic potential of chemical compounds is of the utmost importance. In our research genotoxicity of cremophor EL has been studied by using an uvsH//uvsH diploid strain of Aspergillus nidulans. Since it spends a great part of its cell cycle in the G2period, this fungus is a special screening system for the study of mitotic recombination induced by chemical substances. Homozygotization Indexes (HI for paba and bi markers from heterozygous B211//A837 diploid strain were determined for the evaluation of the recombinagenic effect of cremophor EL. It has been shown that cremophor EL induces increase in mitotic crossing-over events at nontoxic concentrations (0.05 and 0.075% v/v.Cremofor EL (CEL é um solubilizante e emulsificante amplamente utilizado nas indústrias farmacêuticas e de gêneros alimentícios. É o principal veículo empregado nas formulações clínicas do antineoplásico paclitaxel. Considerando-se que a recombinação mitótica desempenha importante função no processo de carcinogênese, o estudo de substâncias químicas com potencial recombinagênico assume importância crucial, no sentido de se detectar aquelas que eventualmente possam atuar como promotoras de neoplasias. A genotoxicidade do cremofor EL foi estudada no presente trabalho, utilizando-se uma linhagem diplóide uvsH//uvsH de Aspergillus nidulans. Neste fungo as células vegetativas comumente repousam no período G2 do ciclo celular, facilitando a ocorrência da recombinação mitótica. O efeito recombinagênico do CEL foi avaliado através da determinação dos Índices de Homozigotização para os marcadores nutricionais paba e bi do diplóide heterozigoto B211//A837. Os

  20. DIRECT-ACTING, DNA-DAMAGING AS (III)-METHYLATED SPECIES: IMPLICATIONS FOR A CARCINOGENIC MECHANISM OF ACTION OF ARSENICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direct-acting, DNA-damaging As (III)-methylated species: implications for a carcinogenic . mechanism of action of arsenicals Inorganic arsenic (iAs, arsenite and arsenate) has been thought to act as a carcinogen without reacting directly with DNA; neither iAs nor the As(...

  1. 75 FR 79320 - Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Regulation of Carcinogenic Compounds in Food-Producing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... human diet that represents no significant increase in the risk of cancer to people. The concentration... defined, adequately addresses concentrations of residues of carcinogenic concern in the total human diet... secondarily as corresponding to the concentration of residue of carcinogenic concern in the total human...

  2. Environmental exposure to carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons – the interpretation of cytogenetic analysis by FISH

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šrám, Radim; Beskid, Olena; Rössnerová, Andrea; Rössner st., Pavel; Lněničková, Zdena; Milcová, Alena; Solansky, I.; Binková, Blanka

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 172, - (2007), s. 12-20. ISSN 0378-4274 R&D Projects: GA MŽP SL/5/160/05 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : environmental pollution * carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons * cytogenetic analysis Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 2.826, year: 2007

  3. 29 CFR 1990.131 - Priority lists for regulating potential occupational carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... review or be the basis for any legal action. The Secretary may regulate a potential occupational... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Priority lists for regulating potential occupational... POTENTIAL OCCUPATIONAL CARCINOGENS Priority Setting § 1990.131 Priority lists for regulating...

  4. Carcinogens, Teratogens and Mutagens: Their Impact on Occupational Health, Particularly for Women in Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, J. E.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Pregnant women, especially those working in veterinary medicine, face occupational health/disease risks from mutagens, teratogens, and carcinogens. These hazards can be placed into three categories: physical, chemical, and biological. Each of these hazards is discussed with examples. (Author/JN)

  5. AN EVALUATION OF THE HUMAN CARCINOGENIC POTENTIAL OF ETHYLENE GLYCOL BUTYL ETHER: INTERIM FINAL POSITION PAPER

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to determine the merit of a petition to remove ethylene glycol ether (EGBE) from the Agency's Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) list, EPA has developed an interim final position paper, An Evaluation of the Human Carcinogenic Potential of Ethylene Glycol Butyl Ether, t...

  6. Evaluation of an information campaign about working safely with carcinogenic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, I.P.P.; Rijt, G.A.J. van der; Koppen, K.F.C.J. van; Gulden, J.W.J. van der

    1995-01-01

    An information campaign, organised in the Netherlands to foster safer working conditions for those who find themselves exposed to carcinogenic substances, has been evaluated. Posters, leaflets, and booklets had been distributed to those who are liable to run a risk while at work, managers as well as

  7. Human bronchus-mediated mutagenesis of mammalian cells by carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1978-01-01

    was found in Chinese hamster V-79 cells when they were cocultivated with bronchial explants in the presence of BzaP. The proximate carcinogenic form of BzaP, the 7,8-diol [(+/-)-r7,t8-dihyroxy-7,8-dihydrobenzo[a]pyrene], was 5-fold more potent as a promutagen than the parent compound. Neither BzaP nor...

  8. 40 CFR 799.9430 - TSCA combined chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Good Laboratory Practice Standards at 40 CFR part 792, subpart J, the following specific information.... The study must be conducted in compliance with 40 CFR Part 792—Good Laborary Practice Standards. (h...) Page, N.P. Chronic Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Guidelines. Journal of Environmental Pathology...

  9. Repair of DNA treated with lambda-irradiation and chemical carcinogens. Progress report, 1984-1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research progress is reported in the following areas: (1) DNA repair in HeLa cells; (2) a search for human transposable elements; (3) the effect of radiation and carcinogens on the activation of LTR sequences; and (4) studies on oncogenes of central nervous system tumors

  10. Environmental Carcinogen Releases and Lung Cancer Mortality in Rural-Urban Areas of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Juhua; Hendryx, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Environmental hazards are unevenly distributed across communities and populations; however, little is known about the distribution of environmental carcinogenic pollutants and lung cancer risk across populations defined by race, sex, and rural-urban setting. Methods: We used the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) database to conduct an…

  11. Color Managing for Papers Containing Optical Brightening Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millward, R. Scott

    The role of a color-managed inkjet proof is to predict and simulate the visual appearance of printed color. The proof-to-print visual match works well under different viewing conditions when the input ICC profile and the output ICC profile, built from characterization datasets, do not contain optical brightening agents (OBA). OBAs influence printed color when measured for characterization and viewed. These brightening agents absorb UV wavelengths in the illuminant and fluoresce in the blue wavelengths. As more and more OBAs are used in printing paper production, the role of color proofing becomes more difficult. The difference in the amount of the UV component of the measuring and viewing light sources cause a problem where the OBA effect, as measured, may not be the same amount of OBA effect that should be proofed under the viewing illuminant. There are two objectives in this research project. The first objective is to show how printed colors, under identical printing conditions on OBA and non-OBA substrates, look different than when they are proofed using current characterization for proofing practices. Both M0 (UV-included) and M2 (UV-cut) measurement data are collected from color patches with selected tonal values and input ICC profiles created from this data are used to proof the brightened reference print. The results show that the UV-cut characterization treatment produces a very poor proof to the reference, while the UV-included proof was ranked as a fairly high match. A third commercially available software designed to improve upon the UV-included treatment, the X-Rite Optical Brightened Compensation module, was also tested and found to be a good match to the reference as well. The second objective is to propose different ways the characterization data can be adjusted for the OBAs in a reference print on brightened paper, by accounting for the influence of UV in the measurement illuminant, and the influence of UV in the viewing illuminant. By means of

  12. Molecular responses of plants to solar UV-B and UV-A radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Morales Suárez, Luis Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Plant responses to solar ultraviolet radiation (UV, 280-400 nm) were assessed at different molecular levels using Betula pendula Roth (silver birch) and Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) as model species in outdoor experiments to assess the possibly interacting roles of the UV-B and UV-A wavebands in acclimation to sunlight. Solar UV-B (280-315 nm) and UV-A (315-400 nm) irradiance was attenuated with plastic films. Both solar UV-B and UV-A promoted the acclimation of silver birch and Arabido...

  13. Genotoxicity assessment of membrane concentrates of landfill leachate treated with Fenton reagent and UV-Fenton reagent using human hepatoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guifang; Lu, Gang; Yin, Pinghe; Zhao, Ling; Yu, Qiming Jimmy

    2016-04-15

    Membrane concentrates of landfill leachates contain organic and inorganic contaminants that could be highly toxic and carcinogenic. In this paper, the genotoxicity of membrane concentrates before and after Fenton and UV-Fenton reagent was assessed. The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity was determined by using the methods of methyltetrazolium (MTT), cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) and comet assay in human hepatoma cells. MTT assay showed a cytotoxicity of 75% after 24h of exposure to the highest tested concentration of untreated concentrates, and no cytotoxocity for UV-Fenton and Fenton treated concentrates. Both CBMN and comet assays showed increased levels of genotoxicity in cells exposed to untreated concentrates, compared to those occurred in cells exposed to UV-Fenton and Fenton reagent treated concentrates. There was no significant difference between negative control and UV-Fenton treated concentrates for micronucleus and comet assay parameters. UV-Fenton and Fenton treatment, especially the former, were effective methods for degradation of bisphenol A and nonylphenol in concentrates. These findings showed UV-Fenton and Fenton reaction were effective methods for treatment of such complex concentrates, UV-Fenton reagent provided toxicological safety of the treated effluent, and the genotoxicity assays were found to be feasible tools for assessment of toxicity risks of complex concentrates. PMID:26780702

  14. Simultaneous cellulose conversion and hydrogen production assisted by cellulose decomposition under UV-light photocatalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guan; Ni, Chengsheng; Huang, Xiubing; Welgamage, Aakash; Lawton, Linda A.; Robertson, Peter K. J.; Irvine, John T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Photocatalytic conversion of cellulose to sugars and carbon dioxide with simultaneous production of hydrogen assisted by cellulose decomposition under UV or solar light irradiation was achieved upon immobilization of cellulose onto a TiO2 photocatalyst. This approach enables production of hydrogen from water without using valuable sacrificial agents, and provides the possibility for recovering sugars as liquid fuels.

  15. Simultaneous cellulose conversion and hydrogen production assisted by cellulose decomposition under UV-light photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guan; Ni, Chengsheng; Huang, Xiubing; Welgamage, Aakash; Lawton, Linda A; Robertson, Peter K J; Irvine, John T S

    2016-01-28

    Photocatalytic conversion of cellulose to sugars and carbon dioxide with simultaneous production of hydrogen assisted by cellulose decomposition under UV or solar light irradiation was achieved upon immobilization of cellulose onto a TiO2 photocatalyst. This approach enables production of hydrogen from water without using valuable sacrificial agents, and provides the possibility for recovering sugars as liquid fuels. PMID:26661296

  16. Salicylic acid inhibits UV- and Cis-Pt-induced human immunodeficiency virus expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have shown that exposure of HeLa cells stably transfected with a human immunodeficiency virus-long terminal repeat-chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (HIV-LTR-CAT) construct to UV light-induced expression from the HIV LTR. By culturing the cells with salicylic acid we demonstrated dose-dependent repression of this induced HIV expression. Repression was evident if salicylic acid was administered 2 h before, at the same time as, or up to 6 h after exposure to the DNA-damaging agent. The kinetics were similar for UV- and for cis-Pt-induced HIV expression, and induction was dependent on the UV dose or cis-Pt concentration added to the culture. These results suggest a role for the prostaglandins or the cyclooxygenase pathway or both in HIV induction mediated by DNA-damaging agents

  17. Carcinogen-induced DNA repair in nucleotide-permeable Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon exposure to the carcinogens N-acetoxy-N-2-acetylaminofluorene and 7-bromomethyl-benz[a]anthracene, which bind covalently to DNA, ether-permeabilized (nucleotide-permeable) Escherichia coli wild-type cells responded with DNA excision repair. This repair was missing in mutants carrying defects in genes uvrA, uvrB and uvrC, whereas it was present in uvrD and several rec mutants. Enzymic activities involved were identified by measuring repair polymerization and size reduction of denatured DNA. An easily measurable effect in E. coli wild-type cells was carcinogen-induced repair polymerization. When initiated by N-acetoxy-N-2-acetylaminofluorene or 7-bromomethyl-benz[a]anthracene, it depended upton an ATP-requiring step; CTP, GTP or UTP did not substitute for ATP. DNA repair synthesis was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate and quinacrine. In uvrA, uvrB and uvrC mutants no carcinogen-stimulated DNA synthesis could be detected, indicating that steps involved in pyrimidine dimer excision are also involved in chemorepair. In recA, recB and recC mutant cells, repair synthesis was stimulated by the carcinogens to a normal extent. This evidence excludes the ATP-dependent recB,C deoxyribonuclease and recA gene products as playing an important role in carcinogen-induced excision repair. polA1 cells showed drastically reduced levels of repair polymerization, indicating that DNA polymerase I is the main polymerizing enzyme. As determined by DNA size reduction in alkaline sucrose gradients, the arylalkylating carcinogens caused endonucleolytic cleavage of endogenous DNA in wild-type cells. This incision step was most effectively performed in the presence of ATP; UTP, CTP and GTP were only slightly effective. Incision was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate and quinacrine. When exposed to the arylalkylating carcinogens, uvrA, uvrB and uvrC mutant cells did not perform the incision step in the presence of ATP, suggesting the involvement of the respective gene products in the

  18. IR/UV and UV/UV double-resonance study of guaiacol and eugenol dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longarte, Asier; Redondo, Carolina; Fernández, José A.; Castaño, Fernando

    2005-04-01

    Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol) molecules are biologically active phenol derivatives with an intramolecular -OH⋯OCH3 hydrogen bond (H bond). Pulsed supersonic expansions of mixtures of either of the two molecules with He yield weakly bound homodimers as well as other higher-order complexes. A number of complementary and powerful laser spectroscopic techniques, including UV-UV and IR-UV double resonances, have been employed to interrogate the species formed in the expansion in order to get information on their structures and spectroscopic properties. The interpretation of the spectra of eugenol dimer is complex and required a previous investigation on a similar but simpler molecule both to gain insight into the possible structures and support the conclusions. Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) has been used for that purpose. The combination of the broad laser study combined with ab initio calculations at the Becke 3 Lee-Yang-Parr/6-31+G(d) level has provided the isomer structures, the potential-energy wells, and shed light on the inter- and intramolecular interactions involved. Guaiacol homodimer has been shown to have a single isomer whereas eugenol dimer has at least two. The comparison between the computed geometries of the dimers, their respective energies, and the vibrational normal modes permits the identification of the spectra.

  19. Developmental transcriptomic features of the carcinogenic liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Gi Yoo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Clonorchis sinensis is the causative agent of the life-threatening disease endemic to China, Korea, and Vietnam. It is estimated that about 15 million people are infected with this fluke. C. sinensis provokes inflammation, epithelial hyperplasia, and periductal fibrosis in bile ducts, and may cause cholangiocarcinoma in chronically infected individuals. Accumulation of a large amount of biological information about the adult stage of this liver fluke in recent years has advanced our understanding of the pathological interplay between this parasite and its hosts. However, no developmental gene expression profiles of C. sinensis have been published. In this study, we generated gene expression profiles of three developmental stages of C. sinensis by analyzing expressed sequence tags (ESTs. Complementary DNA libraries were constructed from the adult, metacercaria, and egg developmental stages of C. sinensis. A total of 52,745 ESTs were generated and assembled into 12,830 C. sinensis assembled EST sequences, and then these assemblies were further categorized into groups according to biological functions and developmental stages. Most of the genes that were differentially expressed in the different stages were consistent with the biological and physical features of the particular developmental stage; high energy metabolism, motility and reproduction genes were differentially expressed in adults, minimal metabolism and final host adaptation genes were differentially expressed in metacercariae, and embryonic genes were differentially expressed in eggs. The higher expression of glucose transporters, proteases, and antioxidant enzymes in the adults accounts for active uptake of nutrients and defense against host immune attacks. The types of ion channels present in C. sinensis are consistent with its parasitic nature and phylogenetic placement in the tree of life. We anticipate that the transcriptomic information on essential regulators of development

  20. Report on NCI symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. II. Cellular and animal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The point at which the common final pathway for induction of cancer by chemical carcinogens and ionizing radiation has not been identified. Although common molecular targets are suggested by recent findings about the role of oncogenes, the mechanism by which the deposition of radiation energy and the formation of adducts or other DNA lesions induced by chemicals affects the changes in the relevant targets may be quite different. The damage to DNA that plays no part in the transformation events, but that influences the stability of the genome, and therefore, the probability of subsequent changes that influence tumorigenesis may be more readily induced by some agents than others. Similarly, the degree of cytotoxic effects that disrupt tissue integrity and increase the probability of expression of initiated cells may be dependent on the type of carcinogen. Also, evidence was presented that repair of the initial lesions could be demonstrated after exposure to low-LET radiation but not after exposure to chemical carcinogens.

  1. Report on NCI symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. II. Cellular and animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The point at which the common final pathway for induction of cancer by chemical carcinogens and ionizing radiation has not been identified. Although common molecular targets are suggested by recent findings about the role of oncogenes, the mechanism by which the deposition of radiation energy and the formation of adducts or other DNA lesions induced by chemicals affects the changes in the relevant targets may be quite different. The damage to DNA that plays no part in the transformation events, but that influences the stability of the genome, and therefore, the probability of subsequent changes that influence tumorigenesis may be more readily induced by some agents than others. Similarly, the degree of cytotoxic effects that disrupt tissue integrity and increase the probability of expression of initiated cells may be dependent on the type of carcinogen. Also, evidence was presented that repair of the initial lesions could be demonstrated after exposure to low-LET radiation but not after exposure to chemical carcinogens

  2. Ochratoxin A induces rat renal carcinogenicity with limited induction of oxidative stress responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) has displayed nephrotoxicity and renal carcinogenicity in mammals, however, no clear mechanisms have been identified detailing the relationship between oxidative stress and these toxicities. This study was performed to clarify the relationship between oxidative stress and the renal carcinogenicity induced by OTA. Rats were treated with 70 or 210 μg/kg b.w. OTA for 4 or 13 weeks. In the rats administrated with OTA for 13 weeks, the kidney was damaged seriously. Cytoplasmic vacuolization was observed in the outer stripe of the outer medulla. Karyomegaly was prominent in the tubular epithelium. Kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1) was detected in the outer stripe of the outer medulla in both low- and high-dose groups. OTA increased the mRNA levels of clusterin in rat kidneys. Interestingly, OTA did not significantly alter the oxidative stress level in rat liver and kidney. Yet, some indications related to proliferation and carcinogenicity were observed. A dose-related increase in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was observed at 4 weeks in both liver and kidney, but at 13 weeks, only in the kidney. OTA down-regulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and up-regulated vimentin and lipocalin 2 in rat kidney at 13 weeks. The p53 gene was decreased in both liver and kidney at 13 weeks. These results suggest that OTA caused apparent kidney damage within 13 weeks but exerted limited effect on oxidative stress parameters. It implies that cell proliferation is the proposed mode of action for OTA-induced renal carcinogenicity. - Highlights: • We studied OTA toxicities in both the rat liver and kidney for 13 weeks. • OTA exerts limited effects on oxidative stress in the rat liver and kidney. • OTA induced renal carcinogenicity resulting from cell proliferation

  3. Ochratoxin A induces rat renal carcinogenicity with limited induction of oxidative stress responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Xiaozhe; Yu, Tao; Zhu, Liye; Gao, Jing [College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); He, Xiaoyun; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo [College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); The Supervision, Inspection and Testing Center of Genetically Modified Organisms, Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing 100083 (China); Xu, Wentao, E-mail: xuwentao@cau.edu.cn [College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); The Supervision, Inspection and Testing Center of Genetically Modified Organisms, Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-11-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) has displayed nephrotoxicity and renal carcinogenicity in mammals, however, no clear mechanisms have been identified detailing the relationship between oxidative stress and these toxicities. This study was performed to clarify the relationship between oxidative stress and the renal carcinogenicity induced by OTA. Rats were treated with 70 or 210 μg/kg b.w. OTA for 4 or 13 weeks. In the rats administrated with OTA for 13 weeks, the kidney was damaged seriously. Cytoplasmic vacuolization was observed in the outer stripe of the outer medulla. Karyomegaly was prominent in the tubular epithelium. Kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1) was detected in the outer stripe of the outer medulla in both low- and high-dose groups. OTA increased the mRNA levels of clusterin in rat kidneys. Interestingly, OTA did not significantly alter the oxidative stress level in rat liver and kidney. Yet, some indications related to proliferation and carcinogenicity were observed. A dose-related increase in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was observed at 4 weeks in both liver and kidney, but at 13 weeks, only in the kidney. OTA down-regulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and up-regulated vimentin and lipocalin 2 in rat kidney at 13 weeks. The p53 gene was decreased in both liver and kidney at 13 weeks. These results suggest that OTA caused apparent kidney damage within 13 weeks but exerted limited effect on oxidative stress parameters. It implies that cell proliferation is the proposed mode of action for OTA-induced renal carcinogenicity. - Highlights: • We studied OTA toxicities in both the rat liver and kidney for 13 weeks. • OTA exerts limited effects on oxidative stress in the rat liver and kidney. • OTA induced renal carcinogenicity resulting from cell proliferation.

  4. Effect of chemical mutagens and carcinogens on gene expression profiles in human TK6 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lode Godderis

    Full Text Available Characterization of toxicogenomic signatures of carcinogen exposure holds significant promise for mechanistic and predictive toxicology. In vitro transcriptomic studies allow the comparison of the response to chemicals with diverse mode of actions under controlled experimental conditions. We conducted an in vitro study in TK6 cells to characterize gene expression signatures of exposure to 15 genotoxic carcinogens frequently used in European industries. We also examined the dose-responsive changes in gene expression, and perturbation of biochemical pathways in response to these carcinogens. TK6 cells were exposed at 3 dose levels for 24 h with and without S9 human metabolic mix. Since S9 had an impact on gene expression (885 genes, we analyzed the gene expression data from cells cultures incubated with S9 and without S9 independently. The ribosome pathway was affected by all chemical-dose combinations. However in general, no similar gene expression was observed among carcinogens. Further, pathways, i.e. cell cycle, DNA repair mechanisms, RNA degradation, that were common within sets of chemical-dose combination were suggested by clustergram. Linear trends in dose-response of gene expression were observed for Trichloroethylene, Benz[a]anthracene, Epichlorohydrin, Benzene, and Hydroquinone. The significantly altered genes were involved in the regulation of (anti- apoptosis, maintenance of cell survival, tumor necrosis factor-related pathways and immune response, in agreement with several other studies. Similarly in S9+ cultures, Benz[a]pyrene, Styrene and Trichloroethylene each modified over 1000 genes at high concentrations. Our findings expand our understanding of the transcriptomic response to genotoxic carcinogens, revealing the alteration of diverse sets of genes and pathways involved in cellular homeostasis and cell cycle control.

  5. High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

    2012-05-14

    UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

  6. UV irradiation responses in Giardia intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsson, Elin; Svärd, Staffan G; Troell, Karin

    2015-07-01

    The response to ultraviolet light (UV) radiation, a natural stressor to the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis, was studied to deepen the understanding of how the surrounding environment affects the parasite during transmission. UV radiation at 10 mJ/cm(2) kills Giardia cysts effectively whereas trophozoites and encysting parasites can recover from UV treatment at 100 mJ/cm(2) and 50 mJ/cm(2) respectively. Staining for phosphorylated histone H2A showed that UV treatment induces double-stranded DNA breaks and flow cytometry analyses revealed that UV treatment of trophozoites induces DNA replication arrest. Active DNA replication coupled to DNA repair could be an explanation to why UV light does not kill trophozoites and encysting cells as efficiently as the non-replicating cysts. We also examined UV-induced gene expression responses in both trophozoites and cysts using RNA sequencing (RNA seq). UV radiation induces small overall changes in gene expression in Giardia but cysts show a stronger response than trophozoites. Heat shock proteins, kinesins and Nek kinases are up-regulated, whereas alpha-giardins and histones are down-regulated in UV treated trophozoites. Expression of variable surface proteins (VSPs) is changed in both trophozoites and cysts. Our data show that Giardia cysts have limited ability to repair UV-induced damage and this may have implications for drinking- and waste-water treatment when setting criteria for the use of UV disinfection to ensure safe water. PMID:25825252

  7. UV-induced Melanin Chemiexcitation: A New Mode of Melanoma Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brash, Douglas E

    2016-06-01

    Mutations in sunlight-induced melanoma arise from cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), DNA photoproducts usually created picoseconds after an ultraviolet (UV) photon is absorbed at thymine or cytosine. Surprisingly, we found that, in melanocytes, CPDs were generated for hours after UVA or UVB exposure. These "dark CPDs" constituted the majority of CPDs in cultured human and murine melanocytes and in mouse skin, and they were most prominent in skin containing pheomelanin, the melanin responsible for blonde and red hair. The mechanism was also a surprise. Dark cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) arise when ultraviolet (UV)-induced superoxide and nitric oxide combine to form peroxynitrite, one of the few biological molecules capable of exciting an electron. This process, termed "chemiexcitation," is the source of bioluminescence in lower organisms. Excitation occurred in fragments of melanin, creating a quantum triplet state that had the energy of a UV photon but which induced CPDs by radiationless energy transfer to DNA. UVA and peroxynitrite also solubilized melanin and permeabilized the nuclear membrane, allowing melanin to enter. Melanin is evidently carcinogenic as well as protective. Chemiexcitation may also trigger pathogenesis in internal tissues because the same chemistry should arise wherever superoxide and nitric oxide arise near cells that contain melanin. PMID:26951162

  8. A CCD-based system for the detection of DNA in electrophoresis gels by UV absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method and apparatus for the detection and quantification of large fragments of unlabelled nucleic acids in agarose gels is presented. The technique is based on ultraviolet (UV) absorption by nucleotides. A deuterium source illuminates individual sample lanes of an electrophoresis gel via an array of optical fibres. As DNA bands pass through the illuminated region of the gel the amount of UV light transmitted is reduced because of absorption by the DNA. During electrophoresis the regions of DNA are detected on-line using a UV-sensitive charge coupled device (CCD). As the absorption coefficient is proportional to the mass of DNA the technique is inherently quantitative. The mass of DNA in a region of the gel is approximately proportional to the integrated signal in the corresponding section of the CCD image. This system currently has a detection limit of less than 1.25 ng compared with 2-10 ng for the most popular conventional technique, ethidium bromide (EtBr) staining. In addition the DNA sample remains in its native state. The removal of the carcinogenic dye from the detection procedure greatly reduces associated biological hazards. (author)

  9. Novel Radiation Sources in Vacuum UV and Near UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Sheng; Ametepe, Joseph; Manos, Dennis

    2004-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light induced or enhanced chemical reactions have many advanced applications. This causes excimer lamps which deliver high power, large area UV radiations in demand. There have been extensive studies on rare gas or mixtures of rare gas halogen in different excimer lamps. But experimental data for high pressure KrI (iodine in krypton) spectra are scarce partially because the transitions B->X (191nm) and B->A (225nm) are usually very weak. We designed a new prototype of rf lamp for this study. This lamp has its electrodes outside the plasma for longer lamp lifetime. It is capable of studying most rf excited gas discharge and efficient enough for weak emissions like KrI. Detailed features of KrI spectrum from 160nm to 360nm were obtained. The wavelength and intensity variation of with pressure was modeled using a set of coupled kinetic equations. Molecular orbits of KrI were calculated in Gaussian 03. A semi-classical approach was used to study the line shape of the broad band emission and an explicit expression was obtain for KrI.

  10. Enhancement of SV40 transformation by treatment of C3H2K cells with uv light and caffeine. I. Combined effect of uv light and caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of cultured mouse cells, C3H2K, with uv light and/or caffeine enhanced the frequency of SV40-induced transformation. This enhancement depends upon the doses of uv and caffeine and the mode of combination of these agents. Irradiation of cells with increasing doses of uv just before infection resulted in approximately 2-fold enhancement of the transformation frequency up to a dose of 90 ergs/mm2 and 3.3-fold at 150 ergs/mm2. Addition of 1 mM caffeine to the medium for 4 days subsequent to infection brought about a 2-fold enhancement. When cells were irradiated and treated with 1 mM caffeine, the enhancement was approximately 4-fold up to a uv dose of 90 ergs/mm2 and 5.9-fold at 150 ergs/mm2. When 0.1 to 4 mM caffeine was added for 4 days postinfection, the absolute number of transformations increased, and an enhancement ratio of 1.3 to 6.8 resulted. After the addition of the same increasing doses of caffeine to uv-irradiated cells (75 ergs/mm2), the enhancement of transformation frequency was even higher ranging 2.0 to 13.3. The transformation frequencies thus obtained by the double treatment were always higher than those predicted if uv and caffeine acted additively. The transformation frequency was little affected by the addition of dibutyrylcyclic AMP and theophylline

  11. XI UV Laser Trigger System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brickeen, B.K.; Morelli, G.L.; Paiva, R.A.; Powell, C.A.; Sundvold, P.D.

    1999-01-26

    The X1 accelerator project at Sandia National Laboratory/New Mexico utilizes SF6 insulated, multi-stage, UV laser triggered gas switches. A 265 nm UV laser system was designed and built to generate eight simultaneous output pulses of 10 mJ each with a 13 nsec pulse width. A 1061 nm solid-state Nd:Cr:GSGG laser was frequency quadrupled using a two-stage doubling process. The 1061 nm fundamental laser energy was frequency doubled with a KTP crystal to 530 nm, achieving 65% conversion efficiency. The 530 nm output was frequency doubled with KD*P crystal to 265 nm, achieving conversion efficiency of 31%. The 265 nm beam pulse was split into eight parallel channels with a system of partially reflecting mirrors. Low timing jitter and stable energy output were achieved. The entire optical system was packaged into a rugged, o-ring sealed, aluminum structure 10''x19''x2.75''. The size of the electronics was 12''x8''x8''. Subsequent accelerator system requirements dictated a redesign of the triggering system for an output beam with less angular divergence. An unstable, crossed porro prism resonator was designed and incorporated into the system. The beam divergence of the redesigned system was successfully decreased to 0.97 mrad in the UV. The resulting frequency doubling efficiencies were 55% to 530 nm and 25% to 265 nm. The optical output remained at 10 mJ in each channel with an 11 nsec pulse width.

  12. Prediction of rodent carcinogenicity using the DEREK system for 30 chemicals currently being tested by the National Toxicology Program. The DEREK Collaborative Group.

    OpenAIRE

    Marchant, C A

    1996-01-01

    DEREK is a knowledge-based expert system for the qualitative prediction of toxicity. The DEREK system has been used to predict the carcinogenicity in rodents of the 30 chemicals in the second National Toxicology Program (NTP) carcinogenicity prediction exercise. Seven of the chemicals were predicted to be carcinogens. For 23 chemicals, there was no evidence in the DEREK knowledge base to suggest carcinogenic activity. Supplementary data from a variety of sources have been evaluated by human e...

  13. The Skin Microbiome: Is It Affected by UV-induced Immune Suppression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, VijayKumar; Byrne, Scott N.; Wolf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Human skin apart from functioning as a physical barricade to stop the entry of pathogens, also hosts innumerable commensal organisms. The skin cells and the immune system constantly interact with microbes, to maintain cutaneous homeostasis, despite the challenges offered by various environmental factors. A major environmental factor affecting the skin is ultraviolet radiation (UV-R) from sunlight. UV-R is well known to modulate the immune system, which can be both beneficial and deleterious. By targeting the cells and molecules within skin, UV-R can trigger the production and release of antimicrobial peptides, affect the innate immune system and ultimately suppress the adaptive cellular immune response. This can contribute to skin carcinogenesis and the promotion of infectious agents such as herpes simplex virus and possibly others. On the other hand, a UV-established immunosuppressive environment may protect against the induction of immunologically mediated skin diseases including some of photodermatoses such as polymorphic light eruption. In this article, we share our perspective about the possibility that UV-induced immune suppression may alter the landscape of the skin’s microbiome and its components. Alternatively, or in concert with this, direct UV-induced DNA and membrane damage to the microbiome may result in pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) that interfere with UV-induced immune suppression. PMID:27559331

  14. UV dosimeter based on polyamide woven fabric and nitro blue tetrazolium chloride as an active compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the preparation and features of a UV light dosimeter composed of nitro blue tetrazolium chloride (NBT) and polyamide woven fabric. This textile dosimeter is based on the conversion reaction of NBT into formazan, which was initially examined in aerated aqueous solutions through steady state UV irradiation. Irradiated solutions change their colour as a consequence of the formation of polydisperse NBT formazan particles. This was analysed in relation to the absorbed dose of UV light through UV-VIS spectrophotometry and dynamic laser light scattering measurements. When NBT substrate molecules are embedded in polyamide textile, UV irradiation leads to similar effects as in solution. However, the tinge intensity changes at much lower absorbed doses. The dependence of the tinge intensity on the absorbed dose was followed by measurements of the remission of light from the NBT-polyamide samples. Consequently, the calibration parameters were calculated such as the dose sensitivity, dose range, and quasi-linear dose range. An improvement of the NBT-polyamide samples by application of a colour levelling agent and improvement of their resistance to humidity is presented. Finally, the samples were used for estimation of absorbed UV energy distribution showing their capability as new dosimeters for in-plane high resolution radiation dose measurements. - Highlights: → Preparation of a textile dosimeter with nitro blue tetrazolium chloride is shown. → The dosimeter responds to UV light by a colour change. → 2D radiation dose measurements are possible. → PC scanners can be employed for measurements of the dosimeter.

  15. UV dosimeter based on polyamide woven fabric and nitro blue tetrazolium chloride as an active compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozicki, Marek, E-mail: mkozicki@mitr.p.lodz.pl [Institute of Architecture of Textiles, Technical University of Lodz, Zeromskiego 116, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); European Centre of Bio- and Nano-Technology (ECBNT), Technical University of Lodz, Zeromskiego 116, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Sasiadek, Elzbieta [Institute of Architecture of Textiles, Technical University of Lodz, Zeromskiego 116, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); European Centre of Bio- and Nano-Technology (ECBNT), Technical University of Lodz, Zeromskiego 116, 90-924 Lodz (Poland)

    2011-10-15

    This paper reports on the preparation and features of a UV light dosimeter composed of nitro blue tetrazolium chloride (NBT) and polyamide woven fabric. This textile dosimeter is based on the conversion reaction of NBT into formazan, which was initially examined in aerated aqueous solutions through steady state UV irradiation. Irradiated solutions change their colour as a consequence of the formation of polydisperse NBT formazan particles. This was analysed in relation to the absorbed dose of UV light through UV-VIS spectrophotometry and dynamic laser light scattering measurements. When NBT substrate molecules are embedded in polyamide textile, UV irradiation leads to similar effects as in solution. However, the tinge intensity changes at much lower absorbed doses. The dependence of the tinge intensity on the absorbed dose was followed by measurements of the remission of light from the NBT-polyamide samples. Consequently, the calibration parameters were calculated such as the dose sensitivity, dose range, and quasi-linear dose range. An improvement of the NBT-polyamide samples by application of a colour levelling agent and improvement of their resistance to humidity is presented. Finally, the samples were used for estimation of absorbed UV energy distribution showing their capability as new dosimeters for in-plane high resolution radiation dose measurements. - Highlights: > Preparation of a textile dosimeter with nitro blue tetrazolium chloride is shown. > The dosimeter responds to UV light by a colour change. > 2D radiation dose measurements are possible. > PC scanners can be employed for measurements of the dosimeter.

  16. Beneficial and adverse effects of chemopreventive agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Mu; Park, Kwang-Kyun

    2003-03-01

    The beneficial and adverse effects of some chemopreventive agents, such as Vitamins A, C, E, beta-carotene, indole-3-carbinol, capsaicin, garlic, and aloe are reviewed. Two large randomized trials with a lung cancer endpoint, the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Prevention Study and the Beta-Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET), suggested that antioxidants might be harmful in smokers. However, the results of the Linxian study and of the ATBC or the CARET studies were significantly different in this respect, and therefore, the relationship between antioxidant and carcinogenesis remains open to debate. Indole-3-carbinol has cancer promoting activities in the colon, thyroid, pancreas, and liver, whereas capsaicin alters the metabolism of chemical carcinogens and may promote carcinogenesis at high doses. Organosulfur compounds and selenium from garlic have no or a little enhancing effect on cancer promotion stage. Information upon chemopreventive mechanisms that inhibit carcinogenesis is imperfect, although the causes and natures of certain human cancers are known. Therefore, definitive preventive guidelines should be carefully offered for various types of tumors, which properly consider ethnic variations, and the efficacies and the safety of chemopreventive agents.

  17. Beneficial and adverse effects of chemopreventive agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beneficial and adverse effects of some chemopreventive agents, such as Vitamins A, C, E, beta-carotene, indole-3-carbinol, capsaicin, garlic, and aloe are reviewed. Two large randomized trials with a lung cancer endpoint, the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Prevention Study and the Beta-Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET), suggested that antioxidants might be harmful in smokers. However, the results of the Linxian study and of the ATBC or the CARET studies were significantly different in this respect, and therefore, the relationship between antioxidant and carcinogenesis remains open to debate. Indole-3-carbinol has cancer promoting activities in the colon, thyroid, pancreas, and liver, whereas capsaicin alters the metabolism of chemical carcinogens and may promote carcinogenesis at high doses. Organosulfur compounds and selenium from garlic have no or a little enhancing effect on cancer promotion stage. Information upon chemopreventive mechanisms that inhibit carcinogenesis is imperfect, although the causes and natures of certain human cancers are known. Therefore, definitive preventive guidelines should be carefully offered for various types of tumors, which properly consider ethnic variations, and the efficacies and the safety of chemopreventive agents

  18. UV-induced cutaneous photobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beissert, S; Granstein, R D

    1996-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) present in sunlight is a major environmental factor capable of affecting human health and well being. The organ primarily affected by UVR is the skin, which is composed of a variety of different cell types. Here, UVR is needed for production of active vitamin D as well as producing undesirable effects such as sunburn, premature cutaneous photoaging, and promoting skin cancer development. Depending on the radiation dose, UVR influences virtually every cutaneous cell type investigated differently. Since the end of the nineteenth century, sun exposure has been known to induce skin cancer, which is now the human malignancy with the most rapidly increasing incidence. In several experimental models, mid-range UVR has been demonstrated to be the major cause of UV-induced cutaneous tumors. The stratospheric ozone layer protecting the terrestrial surface from higher quantum energy solar radiation is being damaged by industrial activities resulting in the possibility of increased UVR exposure in the future. Investigations in the field of experimental dermatology have shown that within the skin an immunosurveillance system exists that may be able to detect incipient neoplasms and to elicit a host responses against it. This article reviews the literature on studies designed to investigate the effects of UVR on cutaneous cellular components, with special focus on the immune system within the skin and the development of UV-induced cancer. PMID:8994803

  19. UV lamp for photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An UV lamp and a differential pumping system which enables to couple the lamp to an ultra-high vacuum chamber (10-9 torr) without using windows, are described. The differential between the pressure inside the discharge chamber and the one in de UHV region, which is of 108-109, is achieved with two pumping states separated by pyrex capillaries having an internal diameter of 0.6 mm. In the first stage, a mechanical pump (10-3 torr) is used; in the second stage, a diffusor pump with a cryogenic trap (N2 liq - 10-7 torr) is employed. The lamp produces, when used with high purity He, narrow lines almost clear at 21.2 eV and 40.8 eV, depending on the discharge chamber pressure, thus eliminating the need of a monochromator. As a high voltage source (3 KV), a commercial unit with a good current control was used, ensuring UV beam stability - an essential characteristic for this lamp if it is employed for photoelectron excitation of crystalline samples. (C.L.B.)

  20. Photodegradation of the indoor organic pollutants by UV irradiation using TiO2 catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glajar, Ioana C.; Moldovan, Z.

    2009-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a major environmental concern, because of their carcinogenic and toxic effects on human health. The most frequent types of VOCs found in indoor air are, according to literature, Choloroform, p-dichlorbenzene, tetrachloroethylene, formaldehyde, NOx. Another VOCs found very often mentioned in the literature are ethanol and acetone or BTEX compounds. The investigated compounds used in this work for studding the photodegradation effect are toluene and cholorobenzene. In the present work were calculated the photodegradation rates of the compounds mentioned above using UV radiation and TiO2, as catalyst. The obtained results are discussed based on comparative values of removal quantities for few time intervals for different types of catalysts based on TiO2 aerogel.

  1. Investigation of the mechanisms by which UV irradiation activates the tyrosinase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Y

    2000-04-01

    within this 100-bp, totally abolished the stimulation of CAT activity in response to UV irradiation, thus suggesting a key role of this potential CRE motif in the UV response of the 100-bp promoter. Since the CRE motif binds transcription factors of CREB family, it is possible that CREB or a related protein, could be involved in UV-activation of tyrosinase gene expression. Microphthalmia (Mi), a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor which binds to a CANNTG E-motif, has recently been demonstrated to be important in tyrosinase and TRP-1 gene expression. The tyrosinase, TRP-1 and TRP-2 promoters share a CATGTG E-motif within a conserved 11 bp M-box. Mi is able to transactivate the human tyrosinase and TRP-1 gene promoter through the E-motif and cAMP elevating agents led to a rapid, but transient increase in Mi mRNA and protein levels in B16 melanoma cells. To investigate the possible role of Mi in UV-induced melanogenesis, the effects of UV irradiation on gene expression and protein phosphorylation of Mi were examined. UV irradiation caused a marked reduction of Mi mRNA. This suggested that Mi was unlikely to be involved in the stimulation of the tyrosinase gene expression by UV. When using a One-hybrid System to study activation of the Mi phosphorylation, however, UV irradiation caused a small increase in GAL4-Mi-dependent luciferase activity, indicating a phosphorylation of Mi by UV. The mechanisms under these effects need to be further investigated. (author)

  2. Investigation of the mechanisms by which UV irradiation activates the tyrosinase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    within this 100-bp, totally abolished the stimulation of CAT activity in response to UV irradiation, thus suggesting a key role of this potential CRE motif in the UV response of the 100-bp promoter. Since the CRE motif binds transcription factors of CREB family, it is possible that CREB or a related protein, could be involved in UV-activation of tyrosinase gene expression. Microphthalmia (Mi), a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor which binds to a CANNTG E-motif, has recently been demonstrated to be important in tyrosinase and TRP-1 gene expression. The tyrosinase, TRP-1 and TRP-2 promoters share a CATGTG E-motif within a conserved 11 bp M-box. Mi is able to transactivate the human tyrosinase and TRP-1 gene promoter through the E-motif and cAMP elevating agents led to a rapid, but transient increase in Mi mRNA and protein levels in B16 melanoma cells. To investigate the possible role of Mi in UV-induced melanogenesis, the effects of UV irradiation on gene expression and protein phosphorylation of Mi were examined. UV irradiation caused a marked reduction of Mi mRNA. This suggested that Mi was unlikely to be involved in the stimulation of the tyrosinase gene expression by UV. When using a One-hybrid System to study activation of the Mi phosphorylation, however, UV irradiation caused a small increase in GAL4-Mi-dependent luciferase activity, indicating a phosphorylation of Mi by UV. The mechanisms under these effects need to be further investigated. (author)

  3. AgentChess : An Agent Chess Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Fransson, Henric

    2003-01-01

    The game of chess has many times been discussed and used for test purpose by science departments of Artificial Intelligence (AI). Although the technique of agent and as well multi-agent systems is quite old, the use of these offspring of AI within chess is limited. This report describes the project performed applying the use of agents to a chess program. To measure the performance of the logic has tests between the developed program main parts been performed. Further tests against a tradition...

  4. Homeostatic response under carcinogen withdrawal, heme oxygenase 1 expression and cell cycle association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batlle Alcira

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic injury deregulates cellular homeostasis and induces a number of alterations leading to disruption of cellular processes such as cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis, driving to carcinogenesis. The stress protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 catalyzes heme degradation producing biliverdin, iron and CO. Induction of HO-1 has been suggested to be essential for a controlled cell growth. The aim of this work was to analyze the in vivo homeostatic response (HR triggered by the withdrawal of a potent carcinogen, p-dimethylaminoazobenzene (DAB, after preneoplastic lesions were observed. We analyzed HO-1 cellular localization and the expression of HO-1, Bcl-2 and cell cycle related proteins under these conditions comparing them to hepatocellular carcinoma (HC. Methods The intoxication protocol was designed based on previous studies demonstrating that preneoplastic lesions were evident after 89 days of chemical carcinogen administration. Male CF1 mice (n = 18 were used. HR group received DAB (0.5 % w/w in the diet for 78 days followed by 11 days of carcinogen deprivation. The HC group received the carcinogen and control animals the standard diet during 89 days. The expression of cell cycle related proteins, of Bcl-2 and of HO-1 were analyzed by western blot. The cellular localization and expression of HO-1 were detected by immnunohistochemistry. Results Increased expression of cyclin E/CDK2 was observed in HR, thus implicating cyclin E/CDK2 in the liver regenerative process. p21cip1/waf1 and Bcl-2 induction in HC was restituted to basal levels in HR. A similar response profile was found for HO-1 expression levels, showing a lower oxidative status in the carcinogen-deprived liver. The immunohistochemical studies revealed the presence of macrophages surrounding foci of necrosis and nodular lesions in HR indicative of an inflammatory response. Furthermore, regenerative cells displayed changes in type, size and intensity of HO-1

  5. Homeostatic response under carcinogen withdrawal, heme oxygenase 1 expression and cell cycle association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic injury deregulates cellular homeostasis and induces a number of alterations leading to disruption of cellular processes such as cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis, driving to carcinogenesis. The stress protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes heme degradation producing biliverdin, iron and CO. Induction of HO-1 has been suggested to be essential for a controlled cell growth. The aim of this work was to analyze the in vivo homeostatic response (HR) triggered by the withdrawal of a potent carcinogen, p-dimethylaminoazobenzene (DAB), after preneoplastic lesions were observed. We analyzed HO-1 cellular localization and the expression of HO-1, Bcl-2 and cell cycle related proteins under these conditions comparing them to hepatocellular carcinoma (HC). The intoxication protocol was designed based on previous studies demonstrating that preneoplastic lesions were evident after 89 days of chemical carcinogen administration. Male CF1 mice (n = 18) were used. HR group received DAB (0.5 % w/w) in the diet for 78 days followed by 11 days of carcinogen deprivation. The HC group received the carcinogen and control animals the standard diet during 89 days. The expression of cell cycle related proteins, of Bcl-2 and of HO-1 were analyzed by western blot. The cellular localization and expression of HO-1 were detected by immnunohistochemistry. Increased expression of cyclin E/CDK2 was observed in HR, thus implicating cyclin E/CDK2 in the liver regenerative process. p21cip1/waf1 and Bcl-2 induction in HC was restituted to basal levels in HR. A similar response profile was found for HO-1 expression levels, showing a lower oxidative status in the carcinogen-deprived liver. The immunohistochemical studies revealed the presence of macrophages surrounding foci of necrosis and nodular lesions in HR indicative of an inflammatory response. Furthermore, regenerative cells displayed changes in type, size and intensity of HO-1 immunostaining. These results demonstrate that the

  6. Agents in domestic environments

    OpenAIRE

    van Moergestel, Leo; Langerak, Wouter; Meerstra, Glenn; Nieuwenburg, Niels van; Pape, Franc; Telgen, Daniël; Puik, Erik; meyer, john-jules

    2013-01-01

    Athor supplied : "This paper describes an agent-based architecture for domotics. This architecture is based on requirements about expandability and hardware independence. The heart of the system is a multi-agent system. This system is distributed over several platforms to open the possibility to tie the agents directly to the actuators, sensors and devices involved. This way a level of abstraction is created and all intelligence of the system as a whole is related to the agents involved. A pr...

  7. Study of molecular mechanisms of UV-induced aggregation of crystallins and possibility of maintaining eye lens transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soustov, L. V.; Chelnokov, E. V.; Bityurin, N. M.; Kiselev, A. L.; Nemov, V. V.; Sergeev, Yu. V.; Ostrovsky, M. A.

    2006-03-01

    The effect of D-pantethine and L-carnosine on the rate of UV-induced (XeC1 laser λ = 308 nm) aggregation of a mixture of βL-crystallin and α-crystallin is studied. We also demonstrate that the suggested by us combination of short-chain peptides shows better protective properties with respect to UV-induced aggregation than known anti-cataract agents.

  8. Culturally Aware Agent Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Nakano, Yukiko; Koda, Tomoko;

    2012-01-01

    Agent based interaction in the form of Embodied Conversational Agents (ECAs) has matured over the last decade and agents have become more and more sophisticated in terms of their verbal and nonverbal behavior like facial expressions or gestures. Having such “natural” communication channels...

  9. Riot Control Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a person has been exposed to riot control agents. Long-term health effects of exposure to riot control agents Prolonged ... person is removed from exposure to riot control agents, long-term health effects are unlikely to occur. How you can ...

  10. Reasoning about emotional agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyer, J.-J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the role of emotions in artificial agent design, and the use of logic in reasoning about the emotional or affective states an agent can reside in. We do so by extending the KARO framework for reasoning about rational agents appropriately. In particular we formalize in this f

  11. Agents modeling agents in information economies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, J.M.; Durfee, E.H. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Our goal is to design and build agents that act intelligently when placed in an agent-based information economy, where agents buy and sell services (e.g. thesaurus, search, task planning services, etc.). The economy we are working in is the University of Michigan Digital Library (UMDL), a large scale multidisciplinary effort to build an infrastructure for the delivery of library services. In contrast with a typical economy, an information economy deals in goods and services that are often derived from unique sources (authors, analysts, etc.), so that many goods and services are not interchangeable. Also, the cost of replicating and transporting goods is usually negligible, and the quality of goods and services is difficult to measure objectively: even two sources with essentially the same information might appeal to different audiences. Thus, each agent has its own assessment of the quality of goods and services delivered.

  12. Blue and UV Semiconductor Lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite many technological difficulties the group III nitrides: GaN, AlN and InN and their alloys are primary candidates for electro-optical coherent light sources. In the recent years the research and technology of the nitride based continuous wave (CW) laser diodes (LDs) led to creation of blue-violet coherent light sources of power up to 200 mW. The progress has been attained by using various ways to attack the main obstacles in the technology of these devices such as insufficient size of high quality lattice matched substrates, low p-doping efficiency of Mg acceptor, poor contact to p-type semiconductor and low efficiency of radiative recombination. The two different approaches were used to overcome the substrate problem: hetero-epitaxy and homoepitaxy. Homoepitaxy used high pressure GaN high quality crystals. Heteroepitaxy used sapphire, SiC or GaAs substrates and very sophisticated techniques of reduction of the dislocation density. The low p-doping efficiency by using Mg acceptor is related to creation of Mg - H complexes due to hydrogen presence during the growth of laser diode quantum structures. In addition, Mg acceptor has low efficiency due to its high energy. High Mg concentrations can be obtained by using either MOCVD or ammonia source MBE growth. An alternative route is to use hydrogen-free plasma activated MBE (PA-MBE) method. The recent advances and the prospects of both approaches will be discussed. Solid AlGaInN solution offers a possibility to cover wide spectral range, starting from near UV to blue, green and red. Arsenide based laser diodes (LDs) are efficient coherent red light sources. Therefore, nitride based LDs are considered to be devices of choice for green, blue and UV spectral range. So far only blue and violet laser has been realized. The progress toward green and UV lasers is far less spectacular. The results in all these areas and future prospects will be discussed. (author)

  13. [Carcinogenic risk of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: classification and interpretation of the monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalani, Simona; Fostinelli, Jacopo; Apostoli, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread contaminants characterized by various chemical, physical and toxic properties. The characterization of occupational and environmental exposures and the use of suitable measurements protocols are very significant because their presence in mixtures and environmental persistency. In the past few years, the knowledge concerning carcinogenicity of PAHs have been reviewed, the mechanisms involved are the interaction of PAH's metabolites with DNA and oxidative damages. The main requirement for research concerns lack of knowledge on reference values and occupational exposure's assessment in particular PAHs sampling methods that can lead to combined measurements of vapor and aerosol mixtures. Aims of this study are to describe a possible occupational sources of PAHs providing also an update of mechanism involved in their carcinogenicity and risk calculation as is done in the TEF approach. The classifications provided by International Agencies and Institutions and the limit values adopted have been reviewed and taken into account. PMID:25369710

  14. Gravity-flow alkaline elution: a method to rapidly detect carcinogen-induced DNA strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid, sensitive and reliable gravity-flow alkaline elution assay was developed to detect DNA strand breaks in cultured Madin-Darby bovine kidney epithelial cells. Elution was completed within 2 h without the use of pumps. The system was validated by exposing the cells to X-irradiation (25-1500 R) which resulted in a significant dose dependent response (p less than 0.05) with excellent correlation (r-0.93). The assay reliably detected the DNA damage of seven genotoxic carcinogens. In general, the measured DNA damage was dose dependent and significantly different from control values for all genotoxic carcinogens tested. Six non-genotoxic compounds were tested and showed no detectable DNA damage

  15. Fibrogenic and carcinogenic characteristics of asbestos occurring in Mohmand Agency, northern Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study has been carried out to identify the fibrogenic and carcinogenic characteristics including the type, physical dimension, and the fiber dose over time-weighted averages (TWA) of asbestos fibers mined, milled and used in Mohamand Agency. Fifteen representative rock and air samples of respirable particulates matter (0.45-10 micro m) collected from various mines and milling units were analyzed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Polarized light Microscope (PLM) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The types of asbestos were classified as chrysotile, tremolite and anthophyllite. The concentration of asbestos fibers identified in respirable particulates (PM/sub 10. 7. 5. 3. 2. and 8 um long and indicate that the type of asbestos fibers released during mining and milling in Mohamand Agency is potentially carcinogenic. (author)

  16. Selective isolation of UV-sensitive Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of penicillin selection method after UV irradiation (λ=254 nm) increases by an order efficiency of mutant selection sensible to ulraviolet radiation (uvs mutants), phototrophic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides induced with nitrosomethylurea (NMM). Over 30% of uvs mutants produced by means of this method possessed increased sensitivity not only to short-wave (sUV, λ=254 nm) but also to long-wave (lUV, λ>280 nm) UV radiations. No correlation in the degree of sensitivity of uvs mutants to sUV and lUV irradiations is discovered. Mutants, which are high-sensitive to lethal effect of lUV, are separated

  17. Ciprofloxacin oxidation by UV-C activated peroxymonosulfate in wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdi-Ahmed, M.; Chiron, Serge

    2014-01-01

    This work aimed at demonstrating the advantages to use sulfate radical anion for eliminating ciprofloxacin residues from treated domestic wastewater by comparing three UV-254 nm based advanced oxidation processes: UV/persulfate (PDS), UV/peroxymonosulfate (PMS) and UV/H2O2. In distilled water, the order of efficiency was UV/PDS>UV/PMS>UV/H2O2 while in wastewater, the most efficient process was UV/PMS followed by UV/PDS and UV/H2O2 mainly because PMS decomposition into sulfate radical anion wa...

  18. Photoluminescence of trypsin after UV-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For study purposes of the primary effects of UV light the photoluminescence of trypsin was investigated before and after UV irradiation (lambda = 254 nm). The results were compared with the corresponding relations at equimolar mixtures of the constituent amino acids. The increase of the absorption in the region between 230 nm and 400 nm at UV irradiation of trypsin in aqueous solution is primarily attributed to the ionization of tyrosine. The fluorescence is strongly quenched mainly due to the ionized tyrosine residues. The results are discussed in connection with previous investigations on radical formation and inactivation of trypsin after UV irradiation. (orig.)

  19. Microlensing of Quasar UV Iron Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Guerras, E; Jimenez-Vicente, J; Kochanek, C S; Muñoz, J A; Falco, E; Motta, V

    2013-01-01

    We measure the differential microlensing of the UV Fe II and Fe III emission line blends between 14 quasar image pairs in 13 gravitational lenses. We find that the UV iron emission is strongly microlensed in 4 cases with amplitudes comparable to that of the continuum. Statistically modeling the magnifications we infer a typical size of r ~ 4*sqrt(M/Msun) light-days for the Fe line emitting regions which is comparable to the size of the region generating the UV continuum (5 ~ 8 light-days). This may indicate that a significant part of the UV Fe II and Fe III emission originates in the quasar accretion disk.

  20. The role of biomethylation in toxicity and carcinogenicity of arsenic: a research update.

    OpenAIRE

    Stýblo, Miroslav; Drobná, Zuzana; Jaspers, Ilona; Lin, Shan; Thomas, David J.

    2002-01-01

    Recent research of the metabolism and biological effects of arsenic has profoundly changed our understanding of the role of metabolism in modulation of toxicity and carcinogenicity of this metalloid. Historically, the enzymatic conversion of inorganic arsenic to mono- and dimethylated species has been considered a major mechanism for detoxification of inorganic arsenic. However, compelling experimental evidence obtained from several laboratories suggests that biomethylation, particularly the ...

  1. Oxidative damage by carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organic extracts from urban air particulate matter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hanzalová, Kateřina; Rössner ml., Pavel; Šrám, Radim

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 696, č. 2 (2010), s. 114-121. ISSN 1383-5718 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B08005; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/1B3/8/08 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons * oxidative damage in vitro * extractable organic matter Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 2.938, year: 2010

  2. Evaluation of toxicogenomics approaches for assessing the risk of nongenotoxic carcinogenicity in rat liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Eichner

    Full Text Available The current gold-standard method for cancer safety assessment of drugs is a rodent two-year bioassay, which is associated with significant costs and requires testing a high number of animals over lifetime. Due to the absence of a comprehensive set of short-term assays predicting carcinogenicity, new approaches are currently being evaluated. One promising approach is toxicogenomics, which by virtue of genome-wide molecular profiling after compound treatment can lead to an increased mechanistic understanding, and potentially allow for the prediction of a carcinogenic potential via mathematical modeling. The latter typically involves the extraction of informative genes from omics datasets, which can be used to construct generalizable models allowing for the early classification of compounds with unknown carcinogenic potential. Here we formally describe and compare two novel methodologies for the reproducible extraction of characteristic mRNA signatures, which were employed to capture specific gene expression changes observed for nongenotoxic carcinogens. While the first method integrates multiple gene rankings, generated by diverse algorithms applied to data from different subsamplings of the training compounds, the second approach employs a statistical ratio for the identification of informative genes. Both methods were evaluated on a dataset obtained from the toxicogenomics database TG-GATEs to predict the outcome of a two-year bioassay based on profiles from 14-day treatments. Additionally, we applied our methods to datasets from previous studies and showed that the derived prediction models are on average more accurate than those built from the original signatures. The selected genes were mostly related to p53 signaling and to specific changes in anabolic processes or energy metabolism, which are typically observed in tumor cells. Among the genes most frequently incorporated into prediction models were Phlda3, Cdkn1a, Akr7a3, Ccng1 and Abcb4.

  3. Biomarkers of carcinogen exposure and cancer risk in a coke plant.

    OpenAIRE

    Assennato, G; Ferri, G M; Tockman, M S; Poirier, M C; Schoket, B; Porro, A.; Corrado, V.; Strickland, P T

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the association between an indicator of carcinogen exposure (peripheral blood leukocyte DNA adducts of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) and an early indicator of neoplastic transformation (sputum epithelial cell membrane antigens binding by monoclonal antibodies against small cell lung cancer and against nonsmall cell lung cancer), a survey of 350 coke-oven workers and 100 unexposed workers was planned. This paper reports a pilot investigation on a subgroup of 23 coke-oven worker...

  4. Evaluation of the potential carcinogenic action of radiocalcium internal irradiation in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carcinogenic action of 45Ca on inducing hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) in Swiss albino mice has been statistically evaluated. HCC proved to be radiation-induced and not due to spontaneous origin. Also, the higher incidence of male hepatocarcinogenesis due to internal irradiation has been found to be significant. The precise possible mechanism regarding the higher male susceptibility to liver cancer has been discussed in the light of available literature. (author)

  5. Nicotine: Carcinogenicity and Effects on Response to Cancer Treatment – A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sanner, Tore; Tom K Grimsrud

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco use is considered the single most important man-made cause of cancer that can be avoided. The evidence that nicotine is involved in cancer development is reviewed and discussed in this paper. Both tobacco smoke and tobacco products for oral use contain a number of carcinogenic substances, such as polycyclic hydrocarbons and tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines (TSNA), which undoubtedly contribute to tobacco related cancer. Recent studies have shown that nicotine can affect several importan...

  6. Clinical and biochemical studies support smokeless tobacco’s carcinogenic potential in the human oral cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Mallery, Susan R.; Tong, Meng; Michaels, Gregory C.; Kiyani, Amber R.; Hecht, Stephen S

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, International Agency for Cancer Research presented compelling evidence that linked smokeless tobacco use to the development of human oral cancer. While these findings imply vigorous local carcinogen metabolism, little is known regarding levels and distribution of Phase I, II and drug egress enzymes in human oral mucosa. In the study presented here, we integrated clinical data, imaging and histopathologic analyses of an oral squamous cell carcinoma that arose at the site of smokeless ...

  7. Repair of DNA treated with γ-irradiation and chemical carcinogens. Progress report, 1980-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied in vitro DNA repair with the isolation and characterization of DNA glycosylases active in the removable of 3-methyladenine and the problem of repair of DNA in chromatin. The second area of focus has been on transposable elements and carcinogen action. The work on DNA adducts with β-propiolactone was done to define potential new substrates useful in a search for new glycosylases

  8. Carcinogens induce reversion of the mouse pink-eyed unstable mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Schiestl, Robert H.; Aubrecht, Jiri; Khogali, Fathia; Carls, Nicholas

    1997-01-01

    Deletions and other genome rearrangements are associated with carcinogenesis and inheritable diseases. The pink-eyed unstable (pun) mutation in the mouse is caused by duplication of a 70-kb internal fragment of the p gene. Spontaneous reversion events in homozygous pun/pun mice occur through deletion of a duplicated sequence. Reversion events in premelanocytes in the mouse embryo detected as black spots on the gray fur of the offspring were inducible by the carcinogen x-rays, ethyl methanesul...

  9. Urban air pollution by carcinogenic and genotoxic polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the former USSR.

    OpenAIRE

    Khesina AYa,

    1994-01-01

    The content of major carcinogenic and genotoxic polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in urban air, vehicle, and industrial emissions is assessed. A sensitive, specific, and selective method for PAH and nitro-PAH quantitation was developed on the basis of low-temperature luminescence-spectra of frozen polycrystalline solutions. Polyarene contents in urban air and urban industrial emissions, as well as vehicle exhausts, are compared to the Russian Ministry of Health standard of maximal permissible c...

  10. Studies on the Mutagenicity and Teratogenicity of Kuianchun and Its Potential Carcinogenicity Prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Jian-ping; ZHANG Li; CAO Sui-zhong; ZHOU Li-xia; ZHOU Xue-hui; LIU Zong-ping; WEI Chun-mei; MIAO Xiao-lin; WEI Zeng-quan

    2002-01-01

    Kuianchun is a newly synthesized antibacterial and growth-promoting drug. This paper selected a battery of three short-term tests, including Ames test, micronucleus test and sperm abnormality test, to detect the mutagenicity of Kuianchun. The carcinogenicity prediction and battery selection method (CPBS method) was used to determine the probability of carcinogenicity of Kuianchun based upon the results of shortterm tests mentioned above. In addition, traditional teratogenic test was selected to study teratogenicity of Kuianchun. In Ames test, Kuianchun showed mutagenic for Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 in the absence and presence of microsomal metabolic activation system (S9-mix). However, the mutagenicity was reduced by the addition of S9-mix. In micronucleus test, Kuianchun was administered intra-peritoneally to male mouse 30 hours and 6 hours before they were killed respectively. The result indicated that there was no significant difference on the number of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) in the mouse bone marrow induced by Kuianchun compared with the negative contrast (50% DMSO) (P > 0.05). In sperm abnormality test, Kuianchun was administered through a gastric incubation to male mouse as a suspension in 2% Tween-80. The dosage levels were 450, 750, 1000 and 1500mg/kg per day for 5 days. The result indicated that the percentage of abnormal sperms induced by Kuianchun was not significant compared with the negative contrast (P>0.05). In traditional teratogenic test, Kuianchun was given orally to pregnant mouse at 1/30,1/20 and 1/15 LDs0 during 6 - 15days of pregnancy period (the LD50 = 9000mg/kg). No toxicity was found either on mother and embryo in mouse, and teratogenic effects were also not observed at all tested dosages. The probability of carcinogenicity of Kuianchun is 23.8 % (θ = 0.238). The result demonstrated that Kuianchun is a non-carcinogen.

  11. Mechanism-Based Classification of PAH Mixtures to Predict Carcinogenic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, Susan C; Siddens, Lisbeth K; Krueger, Sharon K; Larkin, Andrew J; Löhr, Christiane V; Williams, David E; Baird, William M; Waters, Katrina M

    2015-07-01

    We have previously shown that relative potency factors and DNA adduct measurements are inadequate for predicting carcinogenicity of certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PAH mixtures, particularly those that function through alternate pathways or exhibit greater promotional activity compared to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). Therefore, we developed a pathway-based approach for classification of tumor outcome after dermal exposure to PAH/mixtures. FVB/N mice were exposed to dibenzo[def,p]chrysene (DBC), BaP, or environmental PAH mixtures (Mix 1-3) following a 2-stage initiation/promotion skin tumor protocol. Resulting tumor incidence could be categorized by carcinogenic potency as DBC > BaP = Mix2 = Mix3 > Mix1 = Control, based on statistical significance. Gene expression profiles measured in skin of mice collected 12 h post-initiation were compared with tumor outcome for identification of short-term bioactivity profiles. A Bayesian integration model was utilized to identify biological pathways predictive of PAH carcinogenic potential during initiation. Integration of probability matrices from four enriched pathways (P < .05) for DNA damage, apoptosis, response to chemical stimulus, and interferon gamma signaling resulted in the highest classification accuracy with leave-one-out cross validation. This pathway-driven approach was successfully utilized to distinguish early regulatory events during initiation prognostic for tumor outcome and provides proof-of-concept for using short-term initiation studies to classify carcinogenic potential of environmental PAH mixtures. These data further provide a 'source-to-outcome' model that could be used to predict PAH interactions during tumorigenesis and provide an example of how mode-of-action-based risk assessment could be employed for environmental PAH mixtures. PMID:25908611

  12. Quantitative assessment of exposure and risk for three carcinogenics in long-standing pollution sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project attempts a quantitative assessment of risks for three carcinogenics that are common in sites of long-standing pollution. Benzo(a)pyrene stands for the group of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, cadmium for heavy metals, and benzene for volatile aromatic compounds. The report discusses the general fundamentals of exposure and risk assessment. The exposure model is described in detail and applied to the three test substances. (orig./MG)

  13. Gene–environment interactions between DNA repair polymorphisms and exposure to the carcinogen vinyl chloride

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yongliang; Marion, Marie-Jeanne; Zipprich, Jennifer; Santella, Regina M.; Freyer, Greg; Brandt-Rauf, Paul W.

    2009-01-01

    We have recently suggested that polymorphisms in metabolism and repair pathways may play a role in modulating the effects of exposure to the carcinogen vinyl chloride in the production of biomarkers of its mutagenic damage. The aim of the present study was to extend these observations by examining gene–environment interactions between several common polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes XRCC1 and ERCC2/XPD and vinyl chloride exposure on the production of vinyl chloride-induced biomarkers of m...

  14. Carcinogenicity tests of N-nitroso derivatives of two drugs, phenmetrazine and methylphenidate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lijinsky, W.; Taylor, H.W.

    1976-01-01

    Two commonly used drugs that are derivatives of cyclic secondary amines, phenmetrazine and methylphenidate, were converted to their N-nitroso derivatives by reaction with nitrite in acid solution, and the products were tested by chronic administration to rats in doses comparable with those used to test the unsubstituted parent nitrosamines. No tumors were seen that could be attributed to these nitrosamines, and it is concluded that, under these conditions, neither compound is carcinogenic.

  15. Biomarkers of exposure to carcinogenic PAHs and their relationship with environmental factors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taioli, E.; Šrám, Radim; Binková, Blanka; Kalina, I.; Popov, T. A.; Garte, S.; Farmer, P. B.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 620, - (2007), s. 16-21. ISSN 0027-5107 Grant ostatní: EU(GB) 2000-00091 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : DNA adducts * air pollution * carcinogenic PAHs Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 4.159, year: 2007

  16. On use of the multistage dose-response model for assessing laboratory animal carcinogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Nitcheva, Daniella; Piegorsch, Walter W.; West, R. Webster

    2007-01-01

    We explore how well a statistical multistage model describes dose-response patterns in laboratory animal carcinogenicity experiments from a large database of quantal response data. The data are collected from the U.S. EPA’s publicly available IRIS data warehouse and examined statistically to determine how often higher-order values in the multistage predictor yield significant improvements in explanatory power over lower-order values. Our results suggest that the addition of a second-order par...

  17. Bioavailability and potential carcinogenicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from wood combustion particulate matter in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauggel-Lewandowski, Susanne; Heussner, Alexandra H; Steinberg, Pablo; Pieterse, Bart; van der Burg, Bart; Dietrich, Daniel R

    2013-11-25

    Due to increasing energy demand and limited fossil fuels, renewable energy sources have gained in importance. Particulate matter (PM) in general, but also PM from the combustion of wood is known to exert adverse health effects in human. These are often related to specific toxic compounds adsorbed to the PM surface, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), of which some are known human carcinogens. This study focused on the bioavailability of PAHs and on the tumor initiation potential of wood combustion PM, using the PAH CALUX® reporter gene assay and the BALB/c 3T3 cell transformation assay, respectively. For this, both cell assays were exposed to PM and their respective organic extracts from varying degrees of combustion. The PAH CALUX® experiments demonstrated a concentration-response relationship matching the PAHs detected in the samples. Contrary to expectations, PM samples from complete (CC) and incomplete combustion (IC) provided for a stronger and weaker response, respectively, suggesting that PAH were more readily bioavailable in PM from CC. These findings were corroborated via PAH spiking experiments indicating that IC PM contains organic components that strongly adsorb PAH thereby reducing their bioavailability. The results obtained with organic extracts in the cell transformation assay presented the highest potential for carcinogenicity in samples with high PAH contents, albeit PM from CC also demonstrated a carcinogenic potential. In conclusion, the in vitro assays employed emphasize that CC produces PM with low PAH content however with a general higher bioavailability and thus with a nearly similar carcinogenic potential than IC PM. PMID:23796820

  18. Zizyphus Spina-Christi Extract Protects Against Aflatoxin B1-Intitiated Hepatic Carcinogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Wahhab, Mosaad A; Omara, Enayat A.; Abdel-Galil, Mona M; Hassan, Nabila S.; Nada, Somaia A; Saeed, Ataa; ElSayed, Magdy M

    2007-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AF), a group of closely related, extremely toxic mycotoxins, produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus can occur as natural contaminants of foods and feeds. Aflatoxins have been shown to be hepatotoxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, and teratogenic to different animal species. Zizyphus spina-christi L. extract was investigated for its antifungal and antimicrobial activities. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the antioxidant activity of the methanol extract of Z. spina...

  19. A one-electron oxidation of carcinogenic nonaminoazo dye Sudan I by horseradish peroxidase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Semanská, M.; Dračínský, Martin; Martínek, V.; Hudeček, J.; Hodek, P.; Frei, E.; Stiborová, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 5 (2008), s. 712-716. ISSN 0172-780X Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0505; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/06/0329 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : carcinogen * Sudan I * peroxidase * NMR spectroscopy * mechanism of oxidation Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.359, year: 2008 http://node.nel.edu

  20. The role of the Akt/mTOR pathway in tobacco-carcinogen induced lung tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Memmott, Regan M.; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2009-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States, and 85–90% of lung cancer cases are associated with tobacco use. Tobacco components promote lung tumorigenesis through genotoxic effects, as well as through biochemical modulation of signaling pathways such as the Akt/mTOR pathway that regulate cell proliferation and survival. This review will describe cell surface receptors and other upstream components required for tobacco-carcinogen induced activation of Akt and...

  1. A Comparative Survey on Parameters Influencing on Hexavalent Chromium Measurement as an Occupational Carcinogen

    OpenAIRE

    A. Tirgar; F. Golbabaie; S.J. Shahtaheri; K. Nori; J. Hamedi; Ganjali, M.R.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction & Objective: Hexavalent chromium, Cr+6, is a very harmful pollutant and a relatively unstable compound that is present in many industries. It is a known human respiratory carcinogen and occupational exposure to this chemical is associated with different health hazards. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of four parameters including: type of sampling head, sampling height from the surface of electroplating solution, sampling duration, and sample storage duration...

  2. Studies on the biological effects of internal exposure of alpha emitters. Carcinogenicity test of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outlines of carcinogenicity tests in animals given with injected or inhaled plutonium (Pu) were described. Insoluble 239PuO2 particles were nasally inhaled in rats maintained for life. The dose response relationship between incidence of their lung tumor and absorbed radiation dose in the lung revealed that>1 Gy dose increased the incidence of malignant lung tumors, which differed from findings in the U.S. probably due to the difference between particle sizes. Further, a carcinogenic mechanism specific for alpha-ray was suggested based on tumor-related gene analysis. After soluble 239Pu (citrate salt) was injected in mice, significant reduction of lifetime and early tumor- or non-tumor-death were observed when the bone dose exceeded 3 Gy. Tumors were mostly osteosarcoma, lymphoma and other soft tissue solid cancers and were different from those induced by gamma-ray, X-ray and neutron irradiation. Studies on the strain difference, on the carcinogenic mechanism and alpha-ray induced mutation and transformation are in progress, which may lead to elucidation of the biological effects of internal exposure of alpha-emitters. (K.H.)

  3. An update on direct genotoxicity as a molecular mechanism of ochratoxin a carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Manderville, Richard A

    2012-02-20

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a naturally occurring chlorophenolic fungal toxin that contaminates a wide range of food products and poses a cancer threat to humans. The mechanism of action (MOA) for OTA renal carcinogenicity is a controversial issue. In 2005, direct genotoxicity (covalent DNA adduct formation) was proposed as a MOA for OTA-mediated carcinogenicity [ Manderville , R. A. ( 2005 ) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 18 , 1091 - 1097 ]. At that time, inconsistent results had been published on OTA genotoxicity/mutagenicity, and conclusive evidence for OTA-mediated DNA adduction had been lacking. In this update, published data from the past 6-7 years are presented that provide new hypotheses for the MOA of OTA-mediated carcinogenicity. While direct genotoxicity remains a controversial issue for OTA, new findings from the Umemura and Nohmi laboratories provide definitive results for the mutagenicity of OTA in the target tissue (outer medulla) of male rat kidney that rules out oxidative DNA damage. These findings, coupled with our own efforts that provide new structural evidence for DNA adduction by OTA, has strengthened the argument for involvement of direct genotoxicity in OTA-mediated renal carcinogenesis. This MOA should be taken into consideration for OTA human risk assessment. PMID:22054007

  4. Carcinogenic effects of MGP-7 and B(a)P on the Hamster Cheek Pouch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandon, J.L.; Conti, C.J.; Goldstein, L.S.; DiGiovanni, J.; Gimenez-Conti, I.B. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX (United States). Dept. of Carcinogenesis

    2009-10-15

    This study was performed to examine the carcinogenic effects of benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) and manufactured gas plant (MGP) residues on the hamster cheek pouch (HCP). Syrian hamsters were treated topically with a suspension of 2%, 10%, or 20% B(a)P or 50% or 100% MGP-7 (a mixture of residues from 7 MGP sites) in mineral oil for eight (short-term study) and sixteen, twenty, twenty-eight, and thirty-two weeks (long-term study). The short-term study showed that B(a)P induced p53 protein accumulation, indicative of genotoxic damage, as well as increased cell proliferation, hyperplasia, and inflammation, which is usually associated with promotional activity. In contrast, the MGP-7 presented only marginal p53 accumulation and induction of BrdU incorporation. In the long-term experiments, animals treated with 2% and 10% of B(a)P continued to show p53 protein accumulation as well as hyperplasia and increased cell proliferation and inflammation. By thirty weeks, all the animals treated with B(a)P had a 100% incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Animals treated with 50% and 100% MGP-7 showed only weak hyperplasia and a low proliferation rate and accumulation of p53 protein through thirty-two weeks. Benzo(a)pyrene was highly carcinogenic when used at adequate doses. Manufactured gas plant residue, however, was not carcinogenic in this model.

  5. Synthesis, structural characterization and anti-carcinogenic activity of new cyclotriphosphazenes containing dioxybiphenyl and chalcone groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görgülü, Ahmet Orhan; Koran, Kenan; Özen, Furkan; Tekin, Suat; Sandal, Süleyman

    2015-05-01

    2,2-Dichloro-4,4,6,6-bis[spiro(2‧,2″-dioxy-1‧,1″-biphenylyl]cyclotriphosphazene (2) was synthesized from hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene (HCCP) and 2,2‧-dihydroxybiphenyl. The mixed substituent chalcone/dioxybiphenyl cyclophosphazenes (2a-h) were obtained from the reactions of (2) with hydroxy chalcone compounds in K2CO3/acetone system. The chalcone-cyclophosphazene compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H, 13C, 31P NMR techniques. In vitro anti-carcinogenic activities of all compounds were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Anti-carcinogenic activity of the compounds (2a-h) against androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and independent (PC-3) human prostate cancer cell lines were investigated. Our results indicate that the chalcone-phosphazene compounds (2a-h) have anti-carcinogenic activity on PC-3 and LNCaP cell lines (p < 0.05). The effective dose of the compounds was determined as 100 μM.

  6. Chronic Dermal Toxicity of Epoxy Resins I. Skin Carcinogenic Potency and General Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, J.M.

    2001-01-16

    Epoxy resins are a diverse class of chemicals that differ in structure, physical properties, and, presumably, biological activity. The purpose of these experiments was to compare the chronic dermal toxicity and carcinogenicity of selected commercial epoxy resins and to determine the potential for positive synergistic carcinogenic interactions between different resins. This work is an extension and continuation of a Department of Energy sponsored program to evaluate epoxy resins for potential occupational health risks. The materials examined were chosen on the basis of their interest to the U.S. government. They are representative of the manufacturer's production at the time, and therefore the data are completely valid only for the specific production period. Results of the experimental exposures will be reported in two parts. This report describes the test materials, their chemical and physical characteristics and the experimental design. General (systemic) toxicity will be evaluated and the skin carcinogenicity of the materials compared. A subsequent report will provide morphological descriptions of skin and significant internal pathology induced by the various treatments.

  7. Human hair follicles, a convenient tissue for genetic studies on carcinogen metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basal levels of benzo(a)pyrene metabolism were measured in hair follicles of seven monozygotic twins, eight dizygotic twins and ten pairs of unrelated individuals. Organic soluble metabolites were separated by thin-layer chromatography, visualised by autoradiography and quantified by scanning of the films. Activity was expressed as pmol 7,8- and 9,10-dihydrodiol metabolites of benzo(a)pyrene per μg DNA per hour. Intra-twin differences in benzo(a)pyrene metabolism for monozygotic twins were smaller than for dizygotic twins and intra-pair differences for dizygotic twins were smaller than for pairs of unrelated individuals. The results clearly suggest that individual differences in benzo(a)pyrene metabolism in hair follicles are partly genetically determined. Thus, hair follicles my be used for investigations on the suggested relations between genetic predisposition to carcinogen-induced cancer and individual differences in carcinogen metabolism. The relevance of these findings to research into the induction of neoplasms by carcinogens in epithelial tissues is discussed. (author)

  8. DNA repair of UV photoproducts and mutagenesis in human mitochondrial DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The induction and repair of DNA photolesions and mutations in the mitochondrial (mt) DNA of human cells in culture were analysed after cell exposure to UV-C light. The level of induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) in mitochondrial and nuclear DNA was comparable, while a higher frequency of pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4 PP) was detected in mitochondrial than in nuclear DNA. Besides the known defect in CPD removal, mitochondria were shown to be deficient also in the excision of 6-4 PP. The effects of repair-defective conditions for the two major UV photolesions on mutagensis was assessed by analysing the frequency and spectrum of spontaneous and UV-induced mutations by restriction site mutation (RSM) method in a restriction endonuclease site, NciI (5'CCCGG3') located within the coding sequence of the mitochondrial gene for tRNA Leu. The spontaneous mutation frequency and spectrum at the NciI site of mitochondrial DNA was very similar to the RSM background mutation frequency (approximately 10-5) and type (predominantly GC > AT transitions at GL1) of the NciI site). Conversely, an approximately tenfold increase over background mutation frequency was recorded after cell exposure to 20 J/m2. In this case, the majority of mutations were C > T transitions preferentially located on the non-transcribed DNA strand at C1 and C2 of the NciI site. This mutation spectrum is expected by UV mutagenesis. This is the first evidence of induction of mutations in mitochondrial DNA by treatment of human cells with a carcinogen. (author)

  9. 78 FR 68849 - Draft Current Intelligence Bulletin “Update of NIOSH Carcinogen Classification and Target Risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    .... Place: Surface Transportation Board Hearing Room, Patriots Plaza One, 395 E Street SW., 1st Floor, Room... sufficient evidence from animal data'' meet the criteria for GHS Carcinogen Category 1B. Chemicals...

  10. NANOSTRUCTURED POROUS SILICON AND LUMINESCENT POLYSILOLES AS CHEMICAL SENSORS FOR CARCINOGENIC CHROMIUM(VI) AND ARSENIC(V)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chief goal is to develop new selective solid state sensors for carcinogenic and toxic chromium(VI) and arsenic(V) in water based on redox quenching of the luminescence from nanostructured porous silicon and polysiloles.

  11. Expression of UV-irradiated adenovirus in normal and UV-sensitive Chinese hamster ovary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutants UV-20, UV-24, and UV-41 are abnormally sensitive to UV and harbour various defects lin their ability to repair cellular DNA. This study has examined the expression of UV-irradiated AD2 in these cells. HCR of UV-irradiated Ad2, as measured by viral structural antigen (Vag) formation or progeny production, was found to be similar for the normal and the UV-sensitive CHO strains. UV-irradiation of Ad2 (1200 J/m/sup 2/) resulted in a delay of Vag expression of 18 hours in normal human fibroblasts, which is thought to reflect the time required for removal of UV-induced lesions from the DNA before viral DNA synthesis can proceed. However, a similar UV-irradiation of Ad2 did not result in a delay of Vag expression for infection of CHO cells, suggesting that UV-induced lesions in Ad2 DNA do not inhibit its replication in CHO cells. These results indicate a fundamental difference in the processing of UV-irradiated AD2-DNA in CHO as compared to human cells

  12. Heuristic optimization of a continuous flow point-of-use UV-LED disinfection reactor using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Richard M; Jasper, Micah N; Simmons, Otto D; Shatalov, Max; Ducoste, Joel J

    2015-10-15

    Alternative disinfection sources such as ultraviolet light (UV) are being pursued to inactivate pathogenic microorganisms such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia, while simultaneously reducing the risk of exposure to carcinogenic disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water. UV-LEDs offer a UV disinfecting source that do not contain mercury, have the potential for long lifetimes, are robust, and have a high degree of design flexibility. However, the increased flexibility in design options will add a substantial level of complexity when developing a UV-LED reactor, particularly with regards to reactor shape, size, spatial orientation of light, and germicidal emission wavelength. Anticipating that LEDs are the future of UV disinfection, new methods are needed for designing such reactors. In this research study, the evaluation of a new design paradigm using a point-of-use UV-LED disinfection reactor has been performed. ModeFrontier, a numerical optimization platform, was coupled with COMSOL Multi-physics, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package, to generate an optimized UV-LED continuous flow reactor. Three optimality conditions were considered: 1) single objective analysis minimizing input supply power while achieving at least (2.0) log10 inactivation of Escherichia coli ATCC 11229; and 2) two multi-objective analyses (one of which maximized the log10 inactivation of E. coli ATCC 11229 and minimized the supply power). All tests were completed at a flow rate of 109 mL/min and 92% UVT (measured at 254 nm). The numerical solution for the first objective was validated experimentally using biodosimetry. The optimal design predictions displayed good agreement with the experimental data and contained several non-intuitive features, particularly with the UV-LED spatial arrangement, where the lights were unevenly populated throughout the reactor. The optimal designs may not have been developed from experienced designers due to the increased degrees of

  13. A comparison of herpes simplex virus plaque development after viral treatment with anti-DNA or antilipid agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Coohill, T P; Babich, M; Taylor, W.D.; Snipes, W

    1980-01-01

    The plaque development of Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV) is slower for viruses treated with two anti-DNA agents: ultraviolet radiation (UV) or n-acetoxy-2-acetyl-aminofluorene. For HSV treated with three antimembrane agents--butylated hydroxytoluene, acridine plus near UV radiation, or ether--the plaque development time is the same as for untreated viruses. These differences hold even for viruses that survived treatment that lowered viability below the 1% level. Gamma ray inactivation of H...

  14. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) evaluation of the carcinogenicity of outdoor air pollution: focus on China

    OpenAIRE

    Dana Loomis; Wei Huang; Guosheng Chen

    2014-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified outdoor air pollution and the particulate matter (PM) in outdoor air pollution as carcinogenic to humans, as based on sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in humans and experimental animals and strong support by mechanistic studies. The data with important contributions to the evaluation are reviewed, highlighting the data with particular relevance to China, and implications of the evaluation with respect to China are dis...

  15. Prediction of rodent carcinogenicity of further 30 chemicals bioassayed by the U.S. National Toxicology Program.

    OpenAIRE

    Benigni, R; Andreoli, C; Zito, R

    1996-01-01

    Recently the U.S. National Toxicology Program (NTP) sponsored a comparative exercise in which different prediction approaches (both biologically and chemically based) were challenged for their predictive abilities of rodent carcinogenicity of a common set of chemicals. The exercise enjoyed remarkable scientific success and stimulated NTP to sponsor a second challenging round of tests, inviting participants to present predictions relative to the rodent carcinogenicity of a further 30 chemicals...

  16. Red meat intake, doneness, polymorphisms in genes that encode carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes and colorectal cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Cotterchio, Michelle; Boucher, Beatrice A.; Manno, Michael; Gallinger, Steven; Okey, Allan B; Harper, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer literature regarding the interaction between polymorphisms in carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes and red meat intake/doneness is inconsistent. A case-control study was conducted to evaluate the interaction between red meat consumption, doneness and polymorphisms in carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes. Colorectal cancer cases diagnosed 1997-2000, aged 20-74 years, were identified through the population-based Ontario Cancer Registry and recruited by the Ontario Family Colorectal Canc...

  17. Liver fatty acid-binding protein: specific mediator of the mitogenesis induced by two classes of carcinogenic peroxisome proliferators.

    OpenAIRE

    S H Khan; Sorof, S

    1994-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators (PP) are a diverse group of chemicals that induce dramatic increases in peroxisomes in rodent hepatocytes, followed by hypertrophy, hepatomegaly, alterations in lipid metabolism, mitogenesis, and finally hepatocarcinomas. Termed nongenotoxic carcinogens, they do not interact with DNA, are not mutagenic in bacterial assays, and fail to elicit many of the phenotypes associated with classic genotoxic carcinogens. We report here that the mitogenesis induced by the major P...

  18. The metabolic N-oxidation of carcinogenic arylamines in relation to nitrogen charge density and oxidation potential.

    OpenAIRE

    Kadlubar, F F; Fu, P P; Jung, H.; Shaikh, A U; Beland, F A

    1990-01-01

    The N-oxidation of carcinogenic arylamines to form N-hydroxy arylamines has long been regarded as a necessary metabolic step for conversion to proximate carcinogenic derivatives. In contrast, arylamine ring-oxidation has been generally considered to be an important detoxification mechanism. Both enzymatic reactions are carried out in the liver and usually involve the cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases. Studies on the metabolic oxidation of certain arylamines have indicated that the relative char...

  19. The participation of the Fanconi anemia pathway in the replication of UV-damage DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When cells are challenged with genotoxic agents, replicating cells must use damaged DNA as templates. In this way, active replication forks do not collapse and cell viability is protected. After UV irradiation a specialized DNA polymerase pol eta uses UV damaged DNA as template. Intriguingly, Pol eta lost in human cells does not steeply increase UV sensitivity. This suggests that compensatory mechanisms promote cell survival when pol eta is absent. We have found an increase and sustained FANCD2 ubiquitination and focal formation after UV irradiation when pol eta is lost. FANCD2 is a key marker of the activation of the FANCONI ANEMIA (FA) pathway. While there is limited information regarding a role of the FA pathway after UV irradiation, it is well established that FANCD2 ubiquitination is linked to the recruitment of homologous recombination (HR) specific markers to other lesions. We therefore thought that cell viability in the absence of pol eta might result from the activation of FANDC2-dependent HR at collapsed replication forks. We are currently analyzing markers of damage such as γH2AX phosphorylation, markers of HR such as Rad51, markers of double strand breaks accumulation such as 53BP1 and setting up viability assays. This information might allow us to predict if FANCD2 can trigger HR after UV and if this contributes to cell viability when pol eta is absent. (authors)

  20. PUMA promotes Bax translocation by competitive binding to Bcl-Xl during UV-induced apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingjie; Xing, Da; Wu, Yinyuan; Liu, Lei

    2008-02-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation can induce apoptosis through both the membrane death receptor and the intrinsic apoptotic signaling pathways as DNA-damaging agents. PUMA, a BH3-only Bcl-2 family protein, plays an essential role in DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Bax, also a Bcl-2 family member, translocates from the cytosol to the mitochondrial membrane during UV-induced apoptosis. However, the regulation of Bax activation induced by UV irradiation remains poorly understood. In this study, the FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) technique was used to study the interactions of Bax, Bcl-Xl, and PUMA in ASTC-a-1 cells. The results show that Bax translocated from the cytosol to the mitochondrial membrane at about 7 h after UV irradiation, and the translocation can not be blocked completely when overexpressed Bcl-xl. Moreover, The interaction of Bax and Bcl-Xl weakened markedly. In addition, Co-immunoprecipitation shows that PUMA released Bax by directly binding to Bcl-XL after UV irradiation in ASTC-a-1 cells. Taken together, these results indicated that PUMA can promote Bax translocation by binding to Bcl-Xl during UV-induced apoptosis.

  1. Andrographolide Sodium Bisulfate Prevents UV-Induced Skin Photoaging through Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janis Ya-Xian Zhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide sodium bisulfate (ASB, a water-soluble form made from andrographolide through sulfonating reaction, is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory drug; however, the antiphotoaging effect of ASB has still not been revealed. Oxidative stress and inflammation are known to be responsible for ultraviolet (UV irradiation induced skin damage and consequently premature aging. In this study, we aimed at examining the effect of ASB on UV-induced skin photoaging of mice by physiological and histological analysis of skin and examination of skin antioxidant enzymes and immunity analyses. Results showed that topical administration of ASB suppressed the UV-induced skin thickness, elasticity, wrinkles, and water content, while ASB, especially at dose of 3.6 mg/mouse, increased the skin collagen content by about 53.17%, decreased the epidermal thickness by about 41.38%, and prevented the UV-induced disruption of collagen fibers and elastic fibers. Furthermore, ASB decreased MDA level by about 40.21% and upregulated the activities of SOD and CAT and downregulated the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α in UV-irradiated mice. Our study confirmed the protective effect of ASB against UV-induced photoaging and initially indicated that this effect can be attributed to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in vivo, suggesting that ASB may be a potential antiphotoaging agent.

  2. Sensitivity of pathogenic and free-living Leptospira spp. to UV radiation and mitomycin C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The habitats for the two major Leptospira spp. differ. The main habitat of L. biflexa is soil and water, whereas L. interrogans primarily resides in the renal tubules of animals. We investigated whether these two species, along with L. illini (species incertae sedis), differ with respect to their sensitivity to UV radiation. The doses of UV resulting in 37, 10 and 1% survival were determined for representive serovars from each species. L. interrogans serovar pomona was 3.0 to 4.8 times more sensitive to UV than the other Leptospira species under the 37, 10, and 1% survival parameters. In comparison to other bacteria, L. interrogans serovar pomona is among the most sensitive to UV. In a qualitative UV sensitivity assay., L. interrogans serovars were found to be in general more sensitive than L. biflexa serovars. All three species were found to have a photoreactivation DNA repair mechanism. Since organisms that are resistant to UV are often resistant to the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C, we tested the relative sensitivity of several Leptospira serovars to this compound. With few exceptions, L. biflexa and L. illini serovars were considerably more resistant to mitomycin C than the L. interrogans serovars. The mitomycin C sensitivity assay could be a useful addition to current characterization tests used to differentiate the Leptospira species

  3. Effect of UV-C irradiation on growth, sporulation and pathogenicity of cochliobolus sativus isolates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 30 isolates of Cochliobolus sativus, the causal agent of common root rot disease; were collected from different regions of Syria. Seven of them were exposed to UV-C light for 40 or 60 h . at a dose rate of 2.52x10-3 W/cm2. A significant increases in the mycelium growth and sporulation were detected (p<0.001). Within the studied range of UV wave length, these two parameters were increased upon increasing the period of exposure to UV-C light. The pathogenicity of four isolates was evaluated after 60 h. of UV irradiation. The response to UV irradiation varied among these isolates, and resulted in an increase in their virulence level (as assessed by evaluating disease severity on sub-crown internodes). Five barley genotypes possessing different levels of resistance to C. sativus were studied. Arabi Abiad was the most susceptible cultivar whereas, Taka 76 line was moderately susceptible. It is concluded that it is possible to implement the positive effect of low doses of UV-C in stimulating the sporulation of fungi, which are difficult to sporulate on artificial media. (author)

  4. Sensitivity of pathogenic and free-living Leptospira spp. to UV radiation and mitomycin C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamm, L.V.; Charon, N.W.

    1988-03-01

    The habitats for the two major Leptospira spp. differ. The main habitat of L. biflexa is soil and water, whereas L. interrogans primarily resides in the renal tubules of animals. We investigated whether these two species, along with L. illini (species incertae sedis), differ with respect to their sensitivity to UV radiation. The doses of UV resulting in 37, 10 and 1% survival were determined for representive serovars from each species. L. interrogans serovar pomona was 3.0 to 4.8 times more sensitive to UV than the other Leptospira species under the 37, 10, and 1% survival parameters. In comparison to other bacteria, L. interrogans serovar pomona is among the most sensitive to UV. In a qualitative UV sensitivity assay., L. interrogans serovars were found to be in general more sensitive than L. biflexa serovars. All three species were found to have a photoreactivation DNA repair mechanism. Since organisms that are resistant to UV are often resistant to the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C, we tested the relative sensitivity of several Leptospira serovars to this compound. With few exceptions, L. biflexa and L. illini serovars were considerably more resistant to mitomycin C than the L. interrogans serovars. The mitomycin C sensitivity assay could be a useful addition to current characterization tests used to differentiate the Leptospira species.

  5. Andrographolide Sodium Bisulfate Prevents UV-Induced Skin Photoaging through Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Janis Ya-Xian; Wang, Xiu-Fen; Liu, Yu-Hong; Zhang, Zhen-Biao; Wang, Lan; Chen, Jian-Nan; Huang, Song; Zeng, Hui-Fang; Lai, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Andrographolide sodium bisulfate (ASB), a water-soluble form made from andrographolide through sulfonating reaction, is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory drug; however, the antiphotoaging effect of ASB has still not been revealed. Oxidative stress and inflammation are known to be responsible for ultraviolet (UV) irradiation induced skin damage and consequently premature aging. In this study, we aimed at examining the effect of ASB on UV-induced skin photoaging of mice by physiological and histological analysis of skin and examination of skin antioxidant enzymes and immunity analyses. Results showed that topical administration of ASB suppressed the UV-induced skin thickness, elasticity, wrinkles, and water content, while ASB, especially at dose of 3.6 mg/mouse, increased the skin collagen content by about 53.17%, decreased the epidermal thickness by about 41.38%, and prevented the UV-induced disruption of collagen fibers and elastic fibers. Furthermore, ASB decreased MDA level by about 40.21% and upregulated the activities of SOD and CAT and downregulated the production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α in UV-irradiated mice. Our study confirmed the protective effect of ASB against UV-induced photoaging and initially indicated that this effect can be attributed to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities in vivo, suggesting that ASB may be a potential antiphotoaging agent. PMID:26903706

  6. Direct UV-writing of waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færch, Kjartan Ullitz

    2003-01-01

    induced refractive index change of more than 10-2 have been obtained. New insight, with respect to understanding the UV induced index change obtained by direct UV writing, has been provided, through experiments conducted with such high-pressure loaded germanosilica samples. This include measurements of...

  7. The UV Properties of SDSS Selected Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Trammell, G B; Schneider, D P; Richards, G T; Hall, P B; Anderson, S F; Brinkmann, J; Trammell, George B.; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Hall, Patrick B.; Anderson, Scott F.

    2006-01-01

    We present an analysis of the broadband UV/optical properties of z<3.4 quasars matched in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) General Data Release 1 (GR1) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 3 (SDSS DR3). Of the 6371 DR3 quasars covered by 204 GR1 tiles, 5380 have near-UV detections, while 3034 have both near-UV and far-UV detections using a matching radius of 7". Most of the DR3 sample quasars are detected in the near-UV until z~1.7, with the near-UV detection fraction dropping to ~50% by z~2. Statistical tests performed on the distributions of non-detections indicate that the optically-selected quasars missed in the UV tend to be optically faint or at high redshift. The GALEX positions are shown to be consistent with the SDSS astrometry to within an rms scatter of 0.6-0.7" in each coordinate, and empirically determined photometric errors from multi-epoch GALEX observations significantly exceed the Poissonian errors quoted in the GR1 object catalogs. The UV-detected quasars are well separated ...

  8. Exposure to solar UV in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokela, K.; Leszczynski, K.; Visuri, R.; Ylianttila, L. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-12-31

    Exceptionally low total ozone, up to 40 % below the normal level, was measured over Northern Europe during winter and spring in 1992 and 1993. In 1993 the depletion persisted up to the end of May, resulting in a significant increase in biologically effective ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The increases were significantly smaller in 1992 and 1994 than in 1993. A special interest in Northern Europe is the effect of high reflection of UV from the snow. The period from the mid March to the mid May is critical in Northern Finland, because in that time the UV radiation is intense enough to cause significant biological effects, and the UV enhancing snow still covers the ground. Moreover, there is some evidence of increasing springtime depletions of ozone over Arctic regions. In this study the increase of UV exposure associated with the ozone depletions was examined with measurements and theoretical calculations. The measurements were carried out with spectroradiometrically calibrated Solar Light Model 500 and 501 UV radiometers which measure the erythemally effective UV doses and dose rates. The theoretical UV doses and dose rates were computed with the clear sky model of Green

  9. [Mechanisms of action for metallic elements and their species classified carcinogen R 45 and R 49 by EU].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostoli, P; Catalani, S

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we will deal with mechanism of carcinogenic action of metallic elements and their species (arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, nickel) identified by EU as carcinogen R 45 or R 49. The carcinogenic effect depended on the ability of to penetrate the cell and interacted with the target sites, therefore the state of oxidation, charging, the solubility, type of binding, stereochemistry and the ability to interact with other xenobiotics were crucial. The carcinogenic metallic elements classified R45 or R49 are essentially weak mutagen and do not form adducts with the DNA as initial step of their carcinogenicity In spite of the wide range of metallic elements physicochemical properties, some common general mechanisms of carcinogenesis emerge:from the induction of oxidative stress, to inhibition of DNA repair, from activation of mitogenic signalling, to epigenetic modification of gene expression. However, each species lead to specific molecular interactions and were subject to different bioavailability. It has been also strongly supported the hypothesis that the metallic elements may act as a co-carcinogen with other organic compounds, for example with PAH. PMID:19344091

  10. Detection of strand breaks in phiX 174 RFI and PM2 DNA reacted with ultimate and proximate carcinogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielmann, H W

    1977-10-01

    Supercoiled DNA duplexes of phages phiX 174 and PM2 were treated in aqueous solution at neutral pH with ultimate and proximate carcinogens. Subsequently, the carcinogen-treated phage DNAs were subjected to velocity sedimentation in neutral and alkaline sucrose to quantitative introduction of single strand breaks. Reaction of phage DNA with the ultimate carcinogens N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MeNOUr), N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (EtNOUr), 7-bromomethyl-benza[a]-anthracene, N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene [(Ac)2ONFln] and K-region oxides for short periods followed by sedimentation in neutral sucrose gradients led to very few breaks. Incubation with the proximate carcinogens N-hydroxy-2-acetylaminofluorene, 2-acetylaminofluorene, 7-methyl-, and 7,12-dimethyl-benza[a]anthracene did not result in breaks. However, when the phage DNAs were reacted with the ultimate carcinogens under the same conditions but subsequently alkali-denatured and sedimented in alkaline sucrose gradients, single strand breaks were readily introduced. Incubation with the proximate carcinogens followed by alkali denaturation and sedimentation in alkaline sucrose showed that only 7,12-dimethyl-benz[a]anthracene and, to a minor extent, 7-methyl-benz[]anthracene caused alkali-inducible breaks. The ability of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine to effect breakdown of superhelical phage DNA in alkali was found enhanced in the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine. PMID:145749

  11. Results of screening NCI/NTP nongenotoxic carcinogens and genotoxic noncarcinogens with the k sub e test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.L. (ed.); Bakale, G.; McCreary, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The interdependence of the electrophilic and carcinogenic properties of chemicals that was demonstrated two decades ago rekindled interest in the somatic mutation theory of carcinogenesis. Interest in this theory grew with the development of a reverse-mutation bacterial assay in the laboratory of B.N. Ames that permitted the mutagenic properties of the chemicals to be determined quickly and yielded results which indicated that carcinogens are mutagens.'' Subsequent validation studies of this bioassay, the Salmonella typhimurium/microsome or Ames test,'' by Ames' group and others provided additional support for the correlation between mutagenicity and carcinogenicity which led to the worldwide deployment of the Ames test in thousands of laboratories and to the development of more than 100 other short-term tests that continue to be used to identify potential carcinogens via various end-points of genotoxicity. This document discusses electrophilicity, mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity relationships as well as carcinogen-screening of chemicals. 28 refs., 4 tabs.

  12. Production of thymine glycols in DNA by radiation and chemical carcinogens as detected by a monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadon, S A

    1987-06-01

    In order to understand the role in carcinogenesis of damage indirectly induced by chemical carcinogens, it is important to identify the primary DNA lesions. We have measured the formation and repair of one type of DNA modification, 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine (thymine glycol), following exposure of cultured human cells to the carcinogens N-hydroxy-2-naphthylamine or benzo(a)pyrene. The efficiency of production of thymine glycols in DNA by these carcinogens was compared to that by ionizing radiation and ultraviolet light. Thymine glycols were detected using a monoclonal antibody against this product in a sensitive immunoassay. We found that thymine glycols were produced in DNA in a dose dependent manner after exposure to the carcinogens and that their production was reduced if either catalase or superoxide dismutase or both were present at the time of treatment. The efficiency of thymine glycol production following exposure to the chemical carcinogens was greater than that following equi-toxic doses of radiation. Thymine glycols were efficiently removed from the DNA of human cells following treatment with either the chemical carcinogens, ionizing radiation or ultraviolet light. PMID:3477281

  13. Combining QSAR Modeling and Text-Mining Techniques to Link Chemical Structures and Carcinogenic Modes of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamokos, George; Silins, Ilona

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing need for new reliable non-animal based methods to predict and test toxicity of chemicals. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), a computer-based method linking chemical structures with biological activities, is used in predictive toxicology. In this study, we tested the approach to combine QSAR data with literature profiles of carcinogenic modes of action automatically generated by a text-mining tool. The aim was to generate data patterns to identify associations between chemical structures and biological mechanisms related to carcinogenesis. Using these two methods, individually and combined, we evaluated 96 rat carcinogens of the hematopoietic system, liver, lung, and skin. We found that skin and lung rat carcinogens were mainly mutagenic, while the group of carcinogens affecting the hematopoietic system and the liver also included a large proportion of non-mutagens. The automatic literature analysis showed that mutagenicity was a frequently reported endpoint in the literature of these carcinogens, however, less common endpoints such as immunosuppression and hormonal receptor-mediated effects were also found in connection with some of the carcinogens, results of potential importance for certain target organs. The combined approach, using QSAR and text-mining techniques, could be useful for identifying more detailed information on biological mechanisms and the relation with chemical structures. The method can be particularly useful in increasing the understanding of structure and activity relationships for non-mutagens.

  14. Effects of dietary fish oil on the depletion of carcinogenic PAH-DNA adduct levels in the liver of B6C3F1 mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Dong Zhou

    Full Text Available Many carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and their metabolites can bind covalently to DNA. Carcinogen-DNA adducts may lead to mutations in critical genes, eventually leading to cancer. In this study we report that fish oil (FO blocks the formation of DNA adducts by detoxification of PAHs. B6C3F1 male mice were fed a FO or corn oil (CO diet for 30 days. The animals were then treated with seven carcinogenic PAHs including benzo(apyrene (BaP with one of two doses via a single intraperitoneal injection. Animals were terminated at 1, 3, or 7 d after treatment. The levels of DNA adducts were analyzed by the (32P-postlabeling assay. Our results showed that the levels of total hepatic DNA adducts were significantly decreased in FO groups compared to CO groups with an exception of low PAH dose at 3 d (P = 0.067. Total adduct levels in the high dose PAH groups were 41.36±6.48 (Mean±SEM and 78.72±8.03 in 10(9 nucleotides (P = 0.011, respectively, for the FO and CO groups at 7 d. Animals treated with the low dose (2.5 fold lower PAHs displayed similar trends. Total adduct levels were 12.21±2.33 in the FO group and 24.07±1.99 in the CO group, P = 0.008. BPDE-dG adduct values at 7 d after treatment of high dose PAHs were 32.34±1.94 (CO group and 21.82±3.37 (FO group in 10(9 nucleotides with P value being 0.035. Low dose groups showed similar trends for BPDE-dG adduct in the two diet groups. FO significantly enhanced gene expression of Cyp1a1 in both the high and low dose PAH groups. Gstt1 at low dose of PAHs showed high levels in FO compared to CO groups with P values being 0.014. Histological observations indicated that FO played a hepatoprotective role during the early stages. Our results suggest that FO has a potential to be developed as a cancer chemopreventive agent.

  15. Chemical crowd control agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Ritesh G; Hussain, Syed Ather; Rameez, Mansoor Ali Merchant; Kharoshah, Magdy A; Madadin, Mohammed; Anwar, Naureen; Senthilkumaran, Subramanian

    2016-03-01

    Chemical crowd control agents are also referred to as riot control agents and are mainly used by civil authorities and government agencies to curtail civil disobedience gatherings or processions by large crowds. Common riot control agents used to disperse large numbers of individuals into smaller, less destructive, and more easily controllable numbers include chloroacetophenone, chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile, dibenzoxazepine, diphenylaminearsine, and oleoresin capsicum. In this paper, we discuss the emergency medical care needed by sufferers of acute chemical agent contamination and raise important issues concerning toxicology, safety and health. PMID:26658556

  16. Decontamination Data - Blister Agents

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Decontamination efficacy data for blister agents on various building materials using various decontamination solutions This dataset is associated with the following...

  17. UV/Vis/NIR Spectroelectrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Andreas; Marken, Frank; Compton, Richard G.

    Voltammetric techniques used in electrochemistry monitor the flow of current as a function of potential, time, and mass transport. A huge variety of different experiments are possible, giving information about reaction energies, reaction intermediates, and the kinetics of a process [1-4]. However, additional data are often required and are accessible, in particular, via in situ spectroelectrochemical approaches. By coupling a spectroscopic technique such as UV/Vis/NIR spectroscopy [5, 6] to an electrochemical experiment, a wealth of complementary information as a function of the potential, time, and mass transport is available. In a recently published book dedicated to spectroelectrochemical techniques [7] the diversity of methods and new chemical information obtained is apparent. Both spectroscopic information about short-lived unstable intermediates and spectroscopic information disentangling the composition of complex mixtures of reactants can be obtained. Figure II.6.1 shows a schematic diagram for the case of a computer-controlled potentiostat system connected to a conventional electrochemical cell (working electrode WE, reference electrode RE, counter electrode CE) and simultaneously controlling the emitter and detector of a spectrometer. This kind of experimental arrangement allows the electrochemical and the spectroscopic data to be recorded simultaneously and, therefore, in contrast to the analysis of two independent data sets, direct correlation of data as a function of time and potential is possible.

  18. DNA lesions induced by UV A1 and B radiation in human cells: Comparative analyses in the overall genome and in the p53 tumor suppressor gene

    OpenAIRE

    Besaratinia, Ahmad; Synold, Timothy W.; Chen, Hsiu-Hua; Chang, Cheng; Xi, Bixin; Riggs, Arthur D.; Pfeifer, Gerd P.

    2005-01-01

    The UV components of sunlight (UVA and UVB) are implicated in the etiology of human skin cancer. The underlying mechanism of action for UVB carcinogenicity is well defined; however, the mechanistic involvement of UVA in carcinogenesis is not fully delineated. We investigated the genotoxicity of UVA1 versus UVB in the overall genome and in the p53 tumor suppressor gene in normal human skin fibroblasts. Immuno-dot blot analysis identified the cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine-dimer (CPD) as a dist...

  19. UV disinfection system for cabin air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soojung; Blatchley, Ernest R.

    2009-10-01

    The air of indoor cabin environments is susceptible to contamination by airborne microbial pathogens. A number of air treatment processes are available for inactivation or removal of airborne pathogens; included among these processes is ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The effectiveness of UV-based processes is known to be determined by the combined effects of UV dose delivery by the reactor and the UV dose-response behavior of the target microbe(s). To date, most UV system designs for air treatment have been based on empirical approaches, often involving crude representations of dose delivery and dose-response behavior. The objective of this research was to illustrate the development of a UV system for disinfection of cabin air based on well-defined methods of reactor and reaction characterization. UV dose-response behavior of a test microorganism was measured using a laboratory (bench-scale) system. Target microorganisms (bacterial spores) were first applied to membrane filters at sub-monolayer coverage. The filters were then transferred to a humidity chamber at fixed relative humidity (RH) and allowed to equilibrate with their surroundings. Microorganisms were then subjected to UV exposure under a collimated beam. The experiment was repeated at RH values ranging from 20% to 100%. UV dose-response behavior was observed to vary with RH. For example, at 100% RH, a UV dose of 20 mJ/cm 2 accomplished 99.7% (2.5 log10 U) of the Bacillus subtilis spore inactivation, whereas 99.94% (3.2 log10 U) inactivation was accomplished at this same UV dose under 20% RH conditions. To determine reactor behavior, UV dose-response behavior was combined with simulated results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and radiation intensity field models. This modeling approach allowed estimating the UV dose distribution delivered by the reactor. The advantage of this approach is that simulation of many reactor configurations can be done in a relatively short period of time. Moreover, by

  20. Predicting the hepatocarcinogenic potential of alkenylbenzene flavoring agents using toxicogenomics and machine learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Identification of carcinogenic activity is the primary goal of the 2-year bioassay. The expense of these studies limits the number of chemicals that can be studied and therefore chemicals need to be prioritized based on a variety of parameters. We have developed an ensemble of support vector machine classification models based on male F344 rat liver gene expression following 2, 14 or 90 days of exposure to a collection of hepatocarcinogens (aflatoxin B1, 1-amino-2,4-dibromoanthraquinone, N-nitrosodimethylamine, methyleugenol) and non-hepatocarcinogens (acetaminophen, ascorbic acid, tryptophan). Seven models were generated based on individual exposure durations (2, 14 or 90 days) or a combination of exposures (2 + 14, 2 + 90, 14 + 90 and 2 + 14 + 90 days). All sets of data, with the exception of one yielded models with 0% cross-validation error. Independent validation of the models was performed using expression data from the liver of rats exposed at 2 dose levels to a collection of alkenylbenzene flavoring agents. Depending on the model used and the exposure duration of the test data, independent validation error rates ranged from 47% to 10%. The variable with the most notable effect on independent validation accuracy was exposure duration of the alkenylbenzene test data. All models generally exhibited improved performance as the exposure duration of the alkenylbenzene data increased. The models differentiated between hepatocarcinogenic (estragole and safrole) and non-hepatocarcinogenic (anethole, eugenol and isoeugenol) alkenylbenzenes previously studied in a carcinogenicity bioassay. In the case of safrole the models correctly differentiated between carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic dose levels. The models predict that two alkenylbenzenes not previously assessed in a carcinogenicity bioassay, myristicin and isosafrole, would be weakly hepatocarcinogenic if studied at a dose level of 2 mmol/kg bw/day for 2 years in male F344 rats; therefore suggesting that these

  1. Biological effects of radiation and chemical agents with special regard to repair processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is reasonably certain that the introduction or increase of pollutants in the environment can augment mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. These effects are operationally definable, but the genetic organization and the underlying mechanisms of DNA repair, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis are so complex as to make the extrapolation of results from mutagenicity test data to carcinogenicity somewhat uncertain. The subject is reviewed. Recent discoveries in gene organization and expression include overlapping genes in bacteriophages, split genes, processing of RNA and splicing, translocation of genes in eukaryotes, inactivation of the X-chromosome in mammals, etc. Apart from the genetic regulation, plasmids, insertion sequences and mutators can additionally affect mutation frequency. Cancers due to gene mutations, viruses, chemicals and physical agents are known. However, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms involved. The value of mutagenicity test data is beyond question, but in view of the extraordinary complexities encountered our extrapolations will be more sound if the data have the underpinning of basic information. (author)

  2. Prediction of rodent carcinogenic potential of naturally occurring chemicals in the human diet using high-throughput QSAR predictive modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consistent with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Critical Path Initiative, predictive toxicology software programs employing quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models are currently under evaluation for regulatory risk assessment and scientific decision support for highly sensitive endpoints such as carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and reproductive toxicity. At the FDA's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Office of Food Additive Safety and the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research's Informatics and Computational Safety Analysis Staff (ICSAS), the use of computational SAR tools for both qualitative and quantitative risk assessment applications are being developed and evaluated. One tool of current interest is MDL-QSAR predictive discriminant analysis modeling of rodent carcinogenicity, which has been previously evaluated for pharmaceutical applications by the FDA ICSAS. The study described in this paper aims to evaluate the utility of this software to estimate the carcinogenic potential of small, organic, naturally occurring chemicals found in the human diet. In addition, a group of 19 known synthetic dietary constituents that were positive in rodent carcinogenicity studies served as a control group. In the test group of naturally occurring chemicals, 101 were found to be suitable for predictive modeling using this software's discriminant analysis modeling approach. Predictions performed on these compounds were compared to published experimental evidence of each compound's carcinogenic potential. Experimental evidence included relevant toxicological studies such as rodent cancer bioassays, rodent anti-carcinogenicity studies, genotoxic studies, and the presence of chemical structural alerts. Statistical indices of predictive performance were calculated to assess the utility of the predictive modeling method. Results revealed good predictive performance using this software's rodent carcinogenicity module of over 1200 chemicals

  3. UV-A emission from fluorescent energy-saving light bulbs alters local retinoic acid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann-Regen, Julian; Heuser, Isabella; Regen, Francesca

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide bans on incandescent light bulbs (ILBs) drive the use of compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs, which emit ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Potential health issues of these light sources have already been discussed, including speculation about the putative biological effects on light exposed tissues, yet the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesized photoisomerization of all-trans retinoic acid (at-RA), a highly light sensitive morphogen, into biologically less active isomers, as a mechanism mediating biological effects of CFLs. Local at-RA is anti-carcinogenic, entrains molecular rhythms and is crucial for skin homeostasis. Therefore, we quantified the impact of CFL irradiation on extra- and intracellular levels of RA isomers using an epidermal cell culture model. Moreover, a biologically relevant impact of CFL irradiation was assessed using highly at-RA-sensitive human neuroblastoma cells. Dose-dependent conversion of extra- and intracellular at-RA into the biologically less active 13-cis-isomer was significantly higher in CFL vs. ILB exposure and completely preventable by employing a UV-filter. Moreover, pre-irradiation of culture media by CFL attenuated at-RA-specific effects on cell viability in human at-RA-sensitive cells in a dose-dependent manner. These findings point towards a biological relevance of CFL-induced at-RA decomposition, providing a mechanism for CFL-mediated effects on environmental health. PMID:24135972

  4. Reactivation of DNA replication of the parvovirus MVM in UV preirradiated mouse cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parvovirus Minute-Virus-of-Mice (MVM) was used to probe the DNA replication activities expressed by mouse fibroblasts. This system allowed us to study quantitatively the effect of UV-induced DNA lesions on the progression of DNA replication in vivo. MVM was UV-irradiated prior to infection. Pyrimidine dimers induced in the viral genome account for the reduced level of intracellular viral DNA synthesis, assuming that most of these lesions block viral DNA replication in unirradiated cells. The inhibition of damaged MVM DNA synthesis is less severe if the host cells themselves are irradiated prior to virus infection. This stimulation of viral DNA replication in pretreated cells might account for the UV-enhanced viral reactivation phenomenon, i.e. the increased survival of nuclear-replicating viruses propagated in cells preexposed to various genotoxic agents

  5. UV curing silicon-containing epoxy resin and its glass cloth reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A UV-curable cationic silicon-containing epoxy resin formulation was developed. The gel conversion of the cured resin after 10-min UV irradiation reached 80% in the presence of 5% diaryliodonium salt photoinitiator and 5.5% polyol chain transfer agent by cationic ring-opening polymerization. The glass cloth-reinforced composites were fabricated with the silicon-containing epoxy resin using the wet lay-up technique and UV irradiation. The mechanical properties of the composites were evaluated. Compared with glass cloth reinforced bisphenol A epoxy resin matrix composites, the silicon-containing epoxy resin matrix composites possessed higher tensile strength and interlayer shear strength which was 158.5MPa and 9.9MPa respectively while other mechanical properties such as flexural property and tensile modulus were similar. (authors)

  6. The UV-irradiated mouse as a model for testing biological response modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to inducing primary cancers of the skin, ultraviolet (UV) radiation produces specific impairments in the immune system that contribute to the growth and pathogenesis of these skin cancers. The cellular basis for the immunological alterations induced in mice by UV radiation has been studied and characterized over the past ten years. It is now possible to make use of this system to study the activity and mode of action of biological response modifiers. The advantages of this system are that it employs primary hosts, which may respond quite differently from normal animals bearing a transplanted tumor, it closely parallels several specific situations relevant to human cancer, and it may be useful in establishing the mechanism of action of certain agents. Studies in which biological response modifiers have been used in conjunction with the UV carcinogenesis model are reviewed. (Auth.)

  7. Agent Development Toolkits

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Aarti; Sharma, A K

    2011-01-01

    Development of agents as well as their wide usage requires good underlying infrastructure. Literature indicates scarcity of agent development tools in initial years of research which limited the exploitation of this beneficial technology. However, today a wide variety of tools are available, for developing robust infrastructure. This technical note provides a deep overview of such tools and contrasts features provided by them.

  8. Radiographic scintiscanning agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technetium-based scintiscanning agent has been prepared comprising a water soluble sup(99m)Tc-methanehydroxydiphosphonate in combination with a reducing agent selected from stannous, ferrous, chromous and titanous salts. As an additional stabilizer salts and esters of gentisic or ascorbic acids have been used. (E.G.)

  9. Asimovian Adaptive Agents

    CERN Document Server

    Gordon, D F

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop agents that are adaptive and predictable and timely. At first blush, these three requirements seem contradictory. For example, adaptation risks introducing undesirable side effects, thereby making agents' behavior less predictable. Furthermore, although formal verification can assist in ensuring behavioral predictability, it is known to be time-consuming. Our solution to the challenge of satisfying all three requirements is the following. Agents have finite-state automaton plans, which are adapted online via evolutionary learning (perturbation) operators. To ensure that critical behavioral constraints are always satisfied, agents' plans are first formally verified. They are then reverified after every adaptation. If reverification concludes that constraints are violated, the plans are repaired. The main objective of this paper is to improve the efficiency of reverification after learning, so that agents have a sufficiently rapid response time. We present two solutions: ...

  10. How do agents represent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Alex

    Representation is inherent to the concept of an agent, but its importance in complex systems has not yet been widely recognised. In this paper I introduce Peirce's theory of signs, which facilitates a definition of representation in general. In summary, representation means that for some agent, a model is used to stand in for another entity in a way that shapes the behaviour of the agent with respect to that entity. Representation in general is then related to the theories of representation that have developed within different disciplines. I compare theories of representation from metaphysics, military theory and systems theory. Additional complications arise in explaining the special case of mental representations, which is the focus of cognitive science. I consider the dominant theory of cognition — that the brain is a representational device — as well as the sceptical anti-representational response. Finally, I argue that representation distinguishes agents from non-representational objects: agents are objects capable of representation.

  11. Hyperthermia and chemotherapy agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer dates back to the late 19th century, but the modern era of chemotherapy drugs was ushered in during the 1940's with the development of the polyfunctional alkylating agent. Since then, numerous classes of drugs have evolved and the combined use of antineoplastic agents with other treatment modalities such as radiation or heat, remains a large relatively unexplored area. This approach, combining local hyperthermia with chemotherapy agents affords a measure of targeting and selective toxicity not previously available for drugs. In this paper, the effects of adriamycin, bleomycin and cis-platinum are examined. The adjuvant use of heat may also reverse the resistance of hypoxic cells noted for some chemotherapy agents

  12. Direct mapping of the UV surface plasmons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Qiaoqiang; Zhou, Liangcheng; Dierolf, Volkmar; Bartoli, Filbert J

    2009-05-01

    Researchers employed various well-developed concepts from conventional optics in designing novel plasmonic devices, which allow us to construct a framework to describe the propagation, diffraction, and interference of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on a chip. Here we present what we believe to be the first direct mapping of the UV SPPs on an Al2O3/Al surface using a UV-compatible near-field scanning optical microscope system. UV SPP modes launched by one-dimensional slits or two-dimensional groove arrays and corresponding interference phenomenon were both observed, which may enrich the studies on subwavelength optics on a chip. PMID:19412260

  13. UV Bandpass Optical Filter for Microspectometers

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, J. H.; Emadi, A.R.; Wolffenbuttel, R.F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the design and modeling of a UV bandpass optical filter for microspectrometers. The materials used for fabricating the multilayer UV filter are: silicon dioxide (SiO2), titanium dioxide (TiO2) and yttrium oxide (Y2O3). The optical filter shows a bandpass response wavelength in the range 230-280 nm, with a transmittance higher than 80%. Such a device is extremely suitable for optical detection of biological molecules with optical absorption or/and fluorescence in the UV sp...

  14. HR 4453 - An anomalously bright UV source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polidan, R. S.; Oegerle, W. R.; Margon, B.

    1980-01-01

    Crawford et al. (1979) reported that HR 4453 has an anomalously large UV flux in the 1350-1600 A band. This paper reports results of the UV spectrophotometry of HR 4453 obtained with the Copernicus satellite. Portions of the spectrum from 1120 to 2660 A were scanned, but no stellar signal was detected in any wavelength interval. This result is consistent with both components of the binary being normal A2A stars. UV variability or a source other than HR 4453 must be invoked to explain the observations of Crawford et al.

  15. Metabolic dephenylation of the rubber antioxidant N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine to carcinogenic 2-naphthylamine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Tobias; Bolt, Hermann M; Schlüter, Gerhard; Koslitz, Stephan; Taeger, Dirk; Welge, Peter; Brüning, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    N-Phenyl-2-naphthylamine (P2NA) was widely used as oxidation inhibitor, particularly in rubber manufacturing. Technical-grade P2NA was contaminated with carcinogenic 2-naphthylamine (2NA), and bladder cancer risk in exposed workers was attributed to this impurity. Investigations in humans and mammalian species revealed that small amounts of 2NA are excreted into urine after exposure to P2NA. However, since 2NA per se is not carcinogenic and main downstream metabolites of 2NA have not been found in urine so far, it remained uncertain if 2NA derived from P2NA dephenylation is further activated to carcinogenic downstream metabolites. An experimental animal study was therefore designed to indicate if, and if yes to which extent, 2NA from P2NA dephenylation is accessible to the metabolic pathway that is held responsible for the carcinogenicity of 2NA. Groups of 5 male and female CD rats were dosed with P2NA (2-550 mg/kg b.w.) and 2NA (0.075-75 mg/kg b.w.); 2NA-haemoglobin adducts and urinary 2NA excretion were determined applying GC-MS/MS. 2NA haemoglobin adducts originated dose-dependently after 2NA and P2NA dosing. To induce identical adduct concentrations, an approximately 100-200-fold higher dose of P2NA was necessary compared to 2NA. Since haemoglobin adducts are formed by the same pathway (N-hydroxylation) as the ultimate carcinogens from 2NA, the comparison of adduct concentrations after 2NA and P2NA dosage permits a quantitative estimate of the carcinogenicity of P2NA. The results show that 2NA derived from dephenylation of P2NA enters the carcinogenic downstream pathway of 2NA in rats. Hence, the bladder cancer risk after human exposures to P2NA must be re-evaluated. PMID:23423714

  16. The function and significance of SELENBP1 downregulation in human bronchial epithelial carcinogenic process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu-Qing Zeng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Our quantitative proteomic study showed that selenium-binding protein 1 (SELENBP1 was progressively decreased in human bronchial epithelial carcinogenic process. However, there is little information on expression and function of SELENBP1 during human lung squamous cell cancer (LSCC carcinogenesis. METHODS: iTRAQ-tagging combined with 2D LC-MS/MS analysis was used to identify differentially expressed proteins in the human bronchial epithelial carcinogenic process. SELENBP1, member of selenoproteins family and progressively downregulated in this process, was selected to further study. Both Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to detect SELENBP1 expression in independent sets of tissues of bronchial epithelial carcinogenesis, and ability of SELENBP1 for discriminating NBE (normal bronchial epithelium from preneoplastic lesions from invasive LSCC was evaluated. The effects of SELENBP1 downregulation on the susceptibility of benzo(apyrene (B[a]P-induced human bronchial epithelial cell transformation were determined. RESULTS: 102 differentially expressed proteins were identified by quantitative proteomics, and SELENBP1 was found and confirmed being progressively decreased in the human bronchial epithelial carcinogenic process. The sensitivity and specificity of SELENBP1 were 80% and 79% in discriminating NBE from preneoplastic lesions, 79% and 82% in discriminating NBE from invasive LSCC, and 77% and 71% in discriminating preneoplastic lesions from invasive LSCC, respectively. Furthermore, knockdown of SELENBP1 in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE cells significantly increased the efficiency of B[a]P-induced cell transformation. CONCLUSIONS: The present data shows for the first time that decreased SELENBP1 is an early event in LSCC, increases B[a]P-induced human bronchial epithelial cell transformation, and might serve as a novel potential biomarker for early detection of LSCC.

  17. Carcinogenic potential of soils contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Xiamen metropolis, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chao; Zhang, Youchi; Reid, Brian J; Nunes, Luis M

    2012-12-01

    Xiamen is one of China's most rapidly developing metropolises. The objectives of the present study were: (1) to establish the levels and spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil across the Xiamen metropolis, (2) to evaluate the extent to which PAH concentrations were elevated in the high urbanization area (HUA) of the island and how these compared with those in the low urbanization area (LUA) of the mainland, and (3) to evaluate the PAH hazard based upon their Carcinogenic Potential (CP), defined as toxicity equivalence of ∑PAHs. Twenty two alternative relative carcinogenic potency schemes were used and compared. Results demonstrated PAH concentrations to be greatly elevated across the entire metropolis. Significantly, the most enriched compounds represented the greatest concern with respect to carcinogenicity. The CP of more than 25% of the industrial samples from the island surpassed the Canadian guidance threshold value (600 μg kg⁻¹) for an excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR) of 1 in 10⁻⁶. While soil samples from the remaining land uses on the island were all below this threshold, PAH levels in soil were nonetheless elevated (enrichment factors of between 4.1 ± 1.9 and 16.3 ± 12.4 in the HUA, and between 1.3 ± 0.7 and 10.8 ± 4.4 in the LUA). Results relating to agricultural locations on the island indicated 75% of the samples in HUA and 28% of the samples in LUA to be above the USEPA guidance value for BaP (15 μg kg⁻¹). Given the exceptionally high population density on the island there is a need for further research to evaluate multiple pathway PAH exposure risks. PMID:23092998

  18. Inhibition of DNA synthesis by chemical carcinogens in cultures of initiated and normal proliferating rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat hepatocytes in primary culture can be stimulated to replicate under the influence of rat serum and sparse plating conditions. Higher replication rates are induced by serum from two-thirds partially hepatectomized rats. The effects of carcinogens and noncarcinogens on the ability of hepatocytes to synthesize DNA were examined by measuring the incorporation of [3H]thymidine by liquid scintillation counting and autoradiography. Hepatocyte DNA synthesis was not decreased by ethanol or dimethyl sulfoxide at concentrations less than 0.5%. No effect was observed when 0.1 mM ketamine, Nembutal, hypoxanthine, sucrose, ascorbic acid, or benzo(e)pyrene was added to cultures of replicating hepatocytes. Estrogen, testosterone, tryptophan, and vitamin E inhibited DNA synthesis by approximately 50% at 0.1 mM, a concentration at which toxicity was noticeable. Several carcinogens requiring metabolic activation as well as the direct-acting carcinogen N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine interfered with DNA synthesis. Aflatoxin B1 inhibited DNA synthesis by 50% (ID50) at concentrations between 1 X 10(-8) and 1 X 10(-7) M. The ID50 for 2-acetylaminofluorene was between 1 X 10(-7) and 1 X 10(-6) M. Benzo(a)pyrene and 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene inhibited DNA synthesis 50% between 1 X 10(-5) and 1 X 10(-4) M. Diethylnitrosamine and dimethylnitrosamine (ID50 between 1 X 10(-4) and 5 X 10(-4) M) and 1- and 2-naphthylamine (ID50 between 1 X 10(-5) and 5 X 10(-4) M) caused inhibition of DNA synthesis at concentrations which overlapped with concentrations that caused measurable toxicity

  19. Studies of biological effects of fluoride stannous and UV short in Escherichia coli BH110

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira da C, R., E-mail: rogercosta1@hotmail.com [Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Goias, Campus Uruacu, Rua Formosa Qd 28 e 29, Loteamento Santana, 76400-000 Uruacu, Goias (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The amount of UV rays on the Earth's surface has increased due to depletion of the ozone layer, and this has worried society, since these radiation although not considered ionizing can cause damage to biological membrane and especially to DNA. The DNA has cell repair mechanisms that can work in lesions caused by electromagnetic radiation such as ultraviolet -short (UV C)and agents causing oxidative stress, such as tin salts. Among the repair mechanisms can highlight the adaptive repair, which consists of smaller doses to cells pre-exposure of an oxidizing agent, and when these cells are exposed to larger doses of the agent even if there is a reduction in mortality rate which leads to complete that repair mechanisms are activated in the pre-exposure reducing cell mortality. Several publications have shown the genotoxic effects of stannous salts such as stannous fluoride (SnF{sub 2}), which shows the importance of the study, since these salts are widely used in industry as components in toothpastes and mouthwashes. So we check whether pretreatment with UV C is able to induce adaptive response reducing the cytotoxic effects caused by exposure of the strains to SnF{sub 2}. We use a strain of Escherichia coli BH110 (BH110 E. coli) deficient in three genes (fpg, nfo and xth) involved in the excision repair bases. To verify the induction of adaptive response to strain BH110 was exposed to various doses of UV C and then treated with SnF{sub 2} a concentration of 110 u M. Our results showed that the LD10 of strain BH110 is 20 J/m{sup 2} and pre-treatment with UV C does not seem to induce adaptive repair in BH110 strains. (Author)

  20. Studies of biological effects of fluoride stannous and UV short in Escherichia coli BH110

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The amount of UV rays on the Earth's surface has increased due to depletion of the ozone layer, and this has worried society, since these radiation although not considered ionizing can cause damage to biological membrane and especially to DNA. The DNA has cell repair mechanisms that can work in lesions caused by electromagnetic radiation such as ultraviolet -short (UV C)and agents causing oxidative stress, such as tin salts. Among the repair mechanisms can highlight the adaptive repair, which consists of smaller doses to cells pre-exposure of an oxidizing agent, and when these cells are exposed to larger doses of the agent even if there is a reduction in mortality rate which leads to complete that repair mechanisms are activated in the pre-exposure reducing cell mortality. Several publications have shown the genotoxic effects of stannous salts such as stannous fluoride (SnF2), which shows the importance of the study, since these salts are widely used in industry as components in toothpastes and mouthwashes. So we check whether pretreatment with UV C is able to induce adaptive response reducing the cytotoxic effects caused by exposure of the strains to SnF2. We use a strain of Escherichia coli BH110 (BH110 E. coli) deficient in three genes (fpg, nfo and xth) involved in the excision repair bases. To verify the induction of adaptive response to strain BH110 was exposed to various doses of UV C and then treated with SnF2 a concentration of 110 u M. Our results showed that the LD10 of strain BH110 is 20 J/m2 and pre-treatment with UV C does not seem to induce adaptive repair in BH110 strains. (Author)