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Sample records for carcinogenesis studies final

  1. Experimental radiation carcinogenesis is studies at NIRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental radiation carcinogenesis studies conducted during the past decade at NIRS are briefly reviewed. They include the following: 1) Age dependency of susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis. 2) Radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. 3) Mechanism of fractionated X-irradiation (FX) induced thymic lymphomas. 4) Significance of radiation-induced immunosuppression in radiation carcinogenesis in vivo. 5) Other ongoing studies. (author)

  2. Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported on studies at the molecular, biochemical, and immunological level of carcinogenesis induced in mice by viruses, radiation, or environmental chemicals alone or in combinations. Emphasis was placed on the identification and assessments of cocarcinogens and studies on their mechanisms of action. Data are included on mechanisms of carcinogenesis in the liver, thyroid, Harderian glands, skin, and lungs. The effects of the food additive butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), phenobarbitol, DDT, uv irradiation, the herbicide 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole(AT), the pituitary hormone prolactin, topically applied 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP), and benzo(a) pyrene(BaP) on tumor induction or enhancement were studied

  3. Studies of pancreatic carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Yu-bin; PANG Lin-lin; YU Lei; YANG Hai-fan; LIU Guang-da; LI Hai-jiao

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is the most common pancreatic neoplasm characterized by latentmorbidit, poor prognosis, high mortality rate and limited choice of treatment. Quite a lot studies focused on its pathogenesis, and showed molecular genetic alterations, which derived of genetic and environmental factors and played an important role in tumorigenesis. Recently, more and more findings laid particular emphasis on the changes of gene molecule and some were confirmed in vitro and in vivo. In this paper, we made a review and summarized the arked molecular changes and signalings of the four pathways to understand their functions in Pancreatic carcinoma. The most important changes concentrate on K-RAS, p16 INK4α, P53 and SMAD4 gene, secondly, the changes of pl4ARF, TGF-β, LKB1 /STK11, BRCA2 and growth factor Hedgehog and Notch path way and Telomere also play a important role in pancreatic carcinoma. The vast majority (83%) of pancreatic carcinomas had a distinctive genetic fingerprint, comprising activation of the K-ras oncogene and inactivation of the p 16 gene, generally also accompanied by alterations in the p53 gene (in 76 % of the tumors). The activation of K-ras appears nearly to be a prerequisite for the development of pancreatic carcinoma. Also, the binary alteration of K-ras and p16 is an extremely uncommon combination among other human tumor types. This particular genetic imprint of pancreatic carcinomas could have diagnostic utility in the evaluation of patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma of unknown primary origin. The evaluation of genetic alterations as they naturally occur in humantumors allows the formulation of hypotheses concerning the biological processes that involve human tumongenesis. A central tenet of tumori genesis, that positive selection is exerted upon those tumor cells that alterrate-limiting regulatory pathways, implies that mutation of one gene abrogates the need for inactivation of another gene in the same tumor suppressive pathway. It

  4. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  5. Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section contains summaries of research in the following areas: use of liver for mechanistic studies of multistage hepatocarcinogenesis and for screening of environmental contaminants for tumor initiating and promoting activity; molecular properties of rat liver ornithine aminotransferase; regulation of gene expression in rat liver; methods of tumor detection; mechanisms of radiation and viral oncogenesis; biphenyl metabolism by rat liver microsomes; and studies on aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity

  6. Comfrey (Symphytum officinale. L. and Experimental Hepatic Carcinogenesis: A Short-Term Carcinogenesis Model Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Pereira Lavieri Gomes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Comfrey or Symphytum officinale (L. (Boraginaceae is a very popular plant used for therapeutic purposes. Since the 1980s, its effects have been studied in long-term carcinogenesis studies, in which Comfrey extract is administered at high doses during several months and the neoplastic hepatic lesions are evaluated. However, the literature on this topic is very poor considering the studies performed under short-term carcinogenesis protocols, such as the ‘resistant hepatocyte model’ (RHM. In these studies, it is possible to observe easily the phenomena related to the early phases of tumor development, since pre-neoplastic lesions (PNLs rise in about 1–2 months of chemical induction. Herein, the effects of chronic oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey ethanolic extract were evaluated in a RHM. Wistar rats were sequentially treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine (ip and 2-acetilaminofluorene (po, and submitted to hepatectomy to induce carcinogenesis promotion. Macroscopic/microscopic quantitative analysis of PNL was performed. Non-parametric statistical tests (Mann–Whitney and χ2 were used, and the level of significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Comfrey treatment reduced the number of pre-neoplastic macroscopic lesions up to 1 mm (P ≤ 0.05, the percentage of oval cells (P = 0.0001 and mitotic figures (P = 0.007, as well as the number of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA positive cells (P = 0.0001 and acidophilic pre-neoplastic nodules (P = 0.05. On the other hand, the percentage of cells presenting megalocytosis (P = 0.0001 and vacuolar degeneration (P = 0.0001 was increased. Scores of fibrosis, glycogen stores and the number of nucleolus organizing regions were not altered. The study indicated that oral treatment of rats with 10% Comfrey alcoholic extract reduced cell proliferation in this model.

  7. STUDIES INTO THE MECHANISMS OF POTASSIUM BROMATE INDUCED THYROID CARCINOGENESIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies into the Mechanisms of Potassium Bromate Induced Thyroid Carcinogenesis. Potassium bromate (KBrO3) occurs in finished drinking water as a by-product of the ozonation disinfection process and has been found to induce thyroid follicular cell tumors in the rat after ...

  8. Studies on the multistage nature of radiation carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.; Ley, R.D.; Grube, D.; Staffeldt, E.

    1980-01-01

    With low dose levels of ionizing or ultraviolet radiation, the number of initiation events exceeds the number of tumors that grow to a detectable size. Ionizing radiation, which is a complete carcinogen, appears to be a more effective initiator than an enhancer or promoter. However, the initiation and promotion aspects of ionizing radiation have been studied in very few organ systems. In the case of UVR, with or without photosensitizers such as psoralens, the requirement of a relatively large number of exposures for carcinogenesis suggests that the expression of the initiated cells as frank tumors requires a number of events spread out over the time of the development of the tumor. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation are, perhaps, underutilized as tools for probing the mechanism of both initiation and promotion.

  9. Carcinogenesis by internal radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation carcinogenesis is based on the same molecular mechanisms, while spatial and temporal dose distribution in target cells is differed between internal and external radiation exposures. Animal models on dose-carcinogenic response relationships are required to complement an uncertainties in human epidemiological studies and finally to estimate human risk of internal exposures to radionuclides. Several dose response models for experimental carcinogenesis by internally administered radionuclides in laboratory animals were reviewed and discussed in this paper. (J.P.N.)

  10. Use of human epidermal cells in the study of carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the importance of human cells, particularly human epithelial cells, in cancer research, we have studied certain phases or events of carcinogenesis using human epidermal cells in primary culture. (1) We found that human epidermal cells are capable of metabolizing benzo[a]pyrene. Large inter-individual variations are found in the basal and induced arylhydrocarbon-hydroxylase activities. (2) UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis was demonstrated in human epidermal cells on autoradiographs. We also found that DNA repair is defective in epidermal cells isolated from xeroderma pigmentosum by a new explant-outgrowth culture. (3) Human epidermal cells are unique in that there is a large number of binding sites to phorbol esters compared with mouse epidermal cells, but there is no down-regulation. Further, human epidermal cells show essentially negative responses to tumor promoters, i.e., no stimulation of DNA synthesis, sugar uptake, and no induction of ornithine decarboxylase activity. (4) Human epidermal cells contain 1.5 x 10(5) binding sites per cell for epidermal growth factor (EGF), whereas squamous cell carcinomas of skin and oral cavity have larger amounts of EGF receptors in the order of 10(6) per cell. (5) Based on the above results, we attempted to transform human epidermal cells by the treatment with chemical carcinogens, but until now no transformation was obtained. 16 references

  11. Death receptors and ligands in cervical carcinogenesis : an immunohistochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reesink-Peters, N; Hougardy, B M T; van den Heuvel, F A J; Ten Hoor, K A; Hollema, H; Boezen, H M; de Vries, E G E; de Jong, S; van der Zee, A G J

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Increasing imbalance between proliferation and apoptosis is important in cervical carcinogenesis. The death ligands FasL and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induce apoptosis by binding to their cognate cell-surface death receptors Fas or death receptor (DR)

  12. Preclinical Cancer Chemoprevention Studies Using Animal Model of Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuji Tanaka

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is involved in all stages of carcinogenesis. Inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease is a longstanding inflammatory disease of intestine with increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC. Several molecular events involved in chronic inflammatory process are reported to contribute to multi-step carcinogenesis of CRC in the inflamed colon. They include over-production of free radicals, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, up-regulation of inflammatory enzymes in arachidonic acid biosynthesis pathway, up-regulation of certain cytokines, and intestinal immune system dysfunction. In this article, firstly I briefly introduce our experimental animal models where colorectal neoplasms rapidly develop in the inflamed colorectum. Secondary, data on preclinical cancer chemoprevention studies of inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis by morin, bezafibrate, and valproic acid, using this novel inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis model is described.

  13. Preclinical Cancer Chemoprevention Studies Using Animal Model of Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammation is involved in all stages of carcinogenesis. Inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease is a longstanding inflammatory disease of intestine with increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Several molecular events involved in chronic inflammatory process are reported to contribute to multi-step carcinogenesis of CRC in the inflamed colon. They include over-production of free radicals, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, up-regulation of inflammatory enzymes in arachidonic acid biosynthesis pathway, up-regulation of certain cytokines, and intestinal immune system dysfunction. In this article, firstly I briefly introduce our experimental animal models where colorectal neoplasms rapidly develop in the inflamed colorectum. Secondary, data on preclinical cancer chemoprevention studies of inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis by morin, bezafibrate, and valproic acid, using this novel inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis model is described

  14. Preclinical Cancer Chemoprevention Studies Using Animal Model of Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Takuji [Cytopatholgy Division, Tohkai Cytopathology Institute, Cancer Research and Prevention (TCI-CaRP), 5-1-2 Minami-uzura, Gifu 500-8285 (Japan); Department of Tumor Pathology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan)

    2012-07-16

    Inflammation is involved in all stages of carcinogenesis. Inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease is a longstanding inflammatory disease of intestine with increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). Several molecular events involved in chronic inflammatory process are reported to contribute to multi-step carcinogenesis of CRC in the inflamed colon. They include over-production of free radicals, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, up-regulation of inflammatory enzymes in arachidonic acid biosynthesis pathway, up-regulation of certain cytokines, and intestinal immune system dysfunction. In this article, firstly I briefly introduce our experimental animal models where colorectal neoplasms rapidly develop in the inflamed colorectum. Secondary, data on preclinical cancer chemoprevention studies of inflammation-associated colon carcinogenesis by morin, bezafibrate, and valproic acid, using this novel inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis model is described.

  15. Recent advances in the study of HPV-associated carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liyan; Jin; Zhi-Xiang; Xu

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses(HPVs) cause virtually all cervical cancers, the second leading cause of death by cancer among women, as well as other anogenital cancers and a subset of head and neck cancers. Approximately half of women, who develop cervical cancer die from it. Despite the optimism that has accompanied the introduction of prophylactic vaccines to prevent some HPV infections, the relatively modest uptake of the vaccine, especially in the developing world, and the very high fraction of men and women who are already infected, means that HPV-associated disease will remain as a significant public health problem for decades. In this review, we summarize some recent findings on HPV-associated carcinogenesis, such as mi RNAs in HPV-associated cancers, implication of stem cells in the biology and therapy of HPV-positive cancers, HPV vaccines, targeted therapy of cervical cancer, and drug treatment for HPV-induced intraepithelial neoplasias.

  16. Unique database study linking gingival inflammation and smoking in carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söder, Birgitta; Andersson, Leif C; Meurman, Jukka H; Söder, Per-Östen

    2015-02-01

    We investigated statistical association between gingival inflammation and cancer in a group of patients followed up for 26 years with the hypothesis that gingival inflammation affects carcinogenesis. Altogether, 1676 30- to 40-year-old subjects from Stockholm were clinically examined in 1985. In 2011, we compared the baseline oral examination and follow-up data with cancer diagnoses sourced from the Swedish national hospital register databases. Of 1676 individuals, 89 (55 women, 34 men) had got cancer by the year 2011. Women were found to be at higher risk for cancer than men. Smoking (expressed in pack-years) had been more prevalent in the cancer group than in those with no cancer diagnosis. Gingival index, marker of gingival inflammation, was higher in the cancer group than in subjects with no cancer. There were no significant differences between the groups regarding age, education, dental plaque and calculus index scores, or in the number of missing teeth. In multiple logistic regression analysis with cancer as the dependent variable and several independent variables, pack-years of smoking appeared to be a principal independent predictor with odds ratio (OR) 1.32 while gingival inflammation showed OR 1.29. Hence, our present findings showed that together with smoking, gingival inflammation indeed associated with the incidence of cancer in this cohort. PMID:25533098

  17. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in man is considered. The discussion is restricted to dose-incidence data in humans, particularly to certain of those epidemiological studies of human populations that are used most frequently for risk estimation for low-dose radiation carcinogenesis in man. Emphasis is placed solely on those surveys concerned with nuclear explosions and medical exposures

  18. Use of medaka as a tool in studies of radiation effects and chemical carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medaka, Oryzias latipes, a small freshwater oviparous fish, is common in Japan and found in some parts of Asia. Adult fish are 3.0-3.5 cm long and weigh 0.5-0.7 g. The small fish have been used extensively in this laboratory for analysis of radiation effects and for study of chemical carcinogenesis. These fish are relatively easy to rear and their reproductive biology is well known. Recently, inbred strains of the fish have been established by full sister-brother mating. In this report, we will review experimental results using medaka in studies of : 1) radiation effects on spermatogenesis, and 2) induction of hepatic tumors by MAM acetate, we will also review use of medaka in related studies of radiation effects and chemical carcinogenesis. (author)

  19. Differentiation and carcinogenesis: an integrated multilevel study of mechanisms from molecules to man. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study sought to identify and characterize mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) in vitro, to identify the in vivo equivalent of the in vitro MPCs, and to determine the relationship between the presence or response of these cells both in vitro and eventually in vivo to altered proliferative capacity (in vitro cellular senescence, in vivo organismal aging) and altered susceptibility to carcinogenesis (frequency of in vitro neoplastic transformation and age-related frequency of in vivo cancer incidence). 16 refs

  20. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-05-01

    The current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in man is considered. The discussion is restricted to dose-incidence data in humans, particularly to certain of those epidemiological studies of human populations that are used most frequently for risk estimation for low-dose radiation carcinogenesis in man. Emphasis is placed solely on those surveys concerned with nuclear explosions and medical exposures. (ACR)

  1. Chemical carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A. Oliveira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of chemical compounds benefits society in a number of ways. Pesticides, for instance, enable foodstuffs to be produced in sufficient quantities to satisfy the needs of millions of people, a condition that has led to an increase in levels of life expectancy. Yet, at times, these benefits are offset by certain disadvantages, notably the toxic side effects of the chemical compounds used. Exposure to these compounds can have varying effects, ranging from instant death to a gradual process of chemical carcinogenesis. There are three stages involved in chemical carcinogenesis. These are defined as initiation, promotion and progression. Each of these stages is characterised by morphological and biochemical modifications and result from genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. These genetic modifications include: mutations in genes that control cell proliferation, cell death and DNA repair - i.e. mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressing genes. The epigenetic factors, also considered as being non-genetic in character, can also contribute to carcinogenesis via epigenetic mechanisms which silence gene expression. The control of responses to carcinogenesis through the application of several chemical, biochemical and biological techniques facilitates the identification of those basic mechanisms involved in neoplasic development. Experimental assays with laboratory animals, epidemiological studies and quick tests enable the identification of carcinogenic compounds, the dissection of many aspects of carcinogenesis, and the establishment of effective strategies to prevent the cancer which results from exposure to chemicals.A sociedade obtém numerosos benefícios da utilização de compostos químicos. A aplicação dos pesticidas, por exemplo, permitiu obter alimento em quantidade suficiente para satisfazer as necessidades alimentares de milhões de pessoas, condição relacionada com o aumento da esperança de vida. Os benefícios estão, por

  2. Cadmium carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium is a heavy metal of considerable environmental and occupational concern. Cadmium compounds are classified as human carcinogens by several regulatory agencies. The most convincing data that cadmium is carcinogenic in humans comes from studies indicating occupational cadmium exposure is associated with lung cancer. Cadmium exposure has also been linked to human prostate and renal cancer, although this linkage is weaker than for lung cancer. Other target sites of cadmium carcinogenesis in humans, such as liver, pancreas and stomach, are considered equivocal. In animals, cadmium effectively induces cancers at multiple sites and by various routes. Cadmium inhalation in rats induces pulmonary adenocarcinomas, in accord with its role in human lung cancer. Cadmium can induce tumors and/or preneoplastic lesions within the rat prostate after ingestion or injection. At relatively high doses, cadmium induces benign testicular tumors in rats, but these appear to be due to early toxic lesions and loss of testicular function, rather than from a specific carcinogenic effect of cadmium. Like many other metals, cadmium salts will induce mesenchymal tumors at the site of subcutaneous (s.c.) or intramuscular (i.m.) injections, but the human relevance of these is dubious. Other targets of cadmium in rodents include the liver, adrenal, pancreas, pituitary, and hematopoietic system. With the exception of testicular tumors in rodents, the mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis are poorly defined. Cadmium can cause any number of molecular lesions that would be relevant to oncogenesis in various cellular model systems. Most studies indicate cadmium is poorly mutagenic and probably acts through indirect or epigenetic mechanisms, potentially including aberrant activation of oncogenes and suppression of apoptosis

  3. Experimental studies on lung carcinogenesis and their relationship to future research on radiation-induced lung cancer in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of experimental systems for studying human lung carcinogenesis lies in the ease of studying components of a total problem. As an example, the main thrust of attack on possible synergistic interactions between radiation, cigarette smoke, and other irritants must be by means of research on animals. Because animals can be serially sacrificed, a systematic search can be made for progressive lung changes, thereby improving our understanding of carcinogenesis. The mechanisms of radiation-induced carcinogenesis have not yet been delineated, but modern concepts of molecular and cellular biology and of radiation dosimetry are being increasingly applied to both in vivo and in vitro exposure to determine the mechanisms of radiation-induced carcinogenesis, to elucidate human data, and to aid in extrapolating experimental animal data to human exposures. In addition, biologically based mathematical models of carcinogenesis are being developed to describe the nature of the events leading to malignancy; they are also an essential part of a rational approach to quantitative cancer risk assessment. This paper summarizes recent experimental and modeling data on radon-induced lung cancer and includes the confounding effects of cigarette-smoke exposures. The applicability of these data to understanding human exposures is emphasized, and areas of future research on human radiation-induced carcinogenesis are discussed. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Experimental Animal Models of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis for Prevention Studies and Their Relevance to Human Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Mami, E-mail: mtakahas@ncc.go.jp; Hori, Mika; Mutoh, Michihiro [Division of Cancer Development System, Carcinogenesis Research Group, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Keiji [Graduate School of Nutritional and Environmental Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Yada 52-1, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Nakagama, Hitoshi [Division of Cancer Development System, Carcinogenesis Research Group, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2011-02-09

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5′ CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention.

  5. Experimental Animal Models of Pancreatic Carcinogenesis for Prevention Studies and Their Relevance to Human Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is difficult to cure, so its prevention is very important. For this purpose, animal model studies are necessary to develop effective methods. Injection of N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) into Syrian golden hamsters is known to induce pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas, the histology of which is similar to human tumors. Moreover, K-ras activation by point mutations and p16 inactivation by aberrant methylation of 5′ CpG islands or by homozygous deletions have been frequently observed in common in both the hamster and humans. Thus, this chemical carcinogenesis model has an advantage of histopathological and genetic similarity to human pancreatic cancer, and it is useful to study promotive and suppressive factors. Syrian golden hamsters are in a hyperlipidemic state even under normal dietary conditions, and a ligand of peroxizome proliferator-activated receptor gamma was found to improve the hyperlipidemia and suppress pancreatic carcinogenesis. Chronic inflammation is a known important risk factor, and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 also have protective effects against pancreatic cancer development. Anti-inflammatory and anti-hyperlipidemic agents can thus be considered candidate chemopreventive agents deserving more attention

  6. Nanocytological field carcinogenesis detection to mitigate overdiagnosis of prostate cancer: a proof of concept study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant K Roy

    Full Text Available To determine whether nano-architectural interrogation of prostate field carcinogenesis can be used to predict prognosis in patients with early stage (Gleason 6 prostate cancer (PCa, which is mostly indolent but frequently unnecessarily treated.We previously developed partial wave spectroscopic microscopy (PWS that enables quantification of the nanoscale intracellular architecture (20-200 nm length scale with remarkable accuracy. We adapted this technique to assess prostate needle core biopsies in a case control study from men with Gleason 6 disease who either progressed (n = 20 or remained indolent (n = 18 over a ~3 year follow up. We measured the parameter disorder strength (Ld characterizing the spatial heterogeneity of the nanoscale cellular structure and nuclear morphology from the microscopically normal mucosa ~150 histologically normal epithelial cells.There was a profound increase in nano-architectural disorder between progressors and non-progressors. Indeed, the Ld from future progressors was dramatically increased when compared to future non-progressors (1±0.065 versus 1.30±0.0614, respectively p = 0.002. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC was 0.79, yielding a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 72% for discriminating between progressors and non-progressors. This was not confounded by demographic factors (age, smoking status, race, obesity, thus supporting the robustness of the approach.We demonstrate, for the first time, that nano-architectural alterations occur in prostate cancer field carcinogenesis and can be exploited to predict prognosis of early stage PCa. This approach has promise in addressing the clinically vexing dilemma of management of Gleason 6 PCa and may provide a paradigm for dealing with the larger issue of cancer overdiagnosis.

  7. Gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ismail Gomceli; Baris Demiriz; Mesut Tez

    2012-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths.Despite complete resection of gastric cancer and lymph node dissection,as well as improvements in chemotherapy and radiotherapy,there are still 700 000 gastric cancer-related deaths per year worldwide and more than 80% of patients with advanced gastric cancer die of the disease or recurrent disease within 1 year after diagnosis.None of the treatment modalities we have been applying today can influence the overall survival rates:at present,the overall 5-year relative survival rate for gastric cancer is about 28%.Cellular metaplasia due to chronic inflammation,injury and repair are the most documented processes for neoplasia.It appears that chronic inflammation stimulates tumor development and plays a critical role in initiating,sustaining and advancing tumor growth.It is also evident that not all inflammation is tumorigenic.Additional mutations can be acquired,and this leads to the cancer cell gaining a further growth advantage and acquiring a more malignant phenotype.Intestinalization of gastric units,which is called "intestinal metaplasia";phenotypic antralization of fundic units,which is called "spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia"; and the development directly from the stem/progenitor cell zone are three pathways that have been described for gastric carcinogenesis.Also,an important factor for the development of gastrointestinal cancers is peritumoral stroma.However,the initiating cellular event in gastric metaplasia is still controversial.Understanding gastric carcinogenesis and its precursor lesions has been under intense investigation,and our paper attempts to high-light recent progress in this field of cancer research.

  8. Oxidants, antioxidants and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Gibanananda; Husain, Syed Akhtar

    2002-11-01

    Reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs), such as superoxide anions (O2*-) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radical (*OH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) are directly or indirectly involved in multistage process of carcinogenesis. They are mainly involved in DNA damage leading sometimes to mutations in tumour suppressor genes. They also act as initiator and/or promotor in carcinogenesis. Some of them are mutagenic in mammalian systems. O2*-, H2O2 and *OH are reported to be involved in higher frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and chromosome breaks and gaps (CBGs). MDA, a bi-product of lipid peroxidation (LPO), is said to be involved in DNA adduct formations, which are believed to be responsible for carcinogenesis. NO, on the other hand, plays a duel role in cancer. At high concentration it kills tumour cells, but at low concentration it promotes tumour growth and metastasis. It causes DNA single and double strand breaks. The metabolites of NO such as peroxynitrite (OONO-) is a potent mutagen that can induce transversion mutations. NO can stimulate O2*-/H2O2/*OH-induced LPO. These deleterious actions of oxidants can be countered by antioxidant defence system in humans. There are first line defense antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT). SOD converts O2*- to H2O2, which is further converted to H2O with the help of GPx and CAT. SOD inhibits *OH production. SOD also act as antipoliferative agent, anticarcinogens, and inhibitor at initiation and promotion/transformation stage in carcinogenesis. GPx is another antioxidative enzyme which catalyses to convert H2O2, to H2O. The most potent enzyme is CAT. GPx and CAT are important in the inactivation of many environmental mutagens. CAT is also found to reduce the SCE levels and chromosomal aberrations. Antioxidative vitamins such as vitamin A, E, and C have a number of biological activities such as immune stimulation, inhibition of

  9. Study to evaluate molecular mechanics behind synergistic chemo-preventive effects of curcumin and resveratrol during lung carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshoo Malhotra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The combination approach is the future of the war against cancer and the present study evaluated molecular mechanics behind the synergistic effects of curcumin and resveratrol during lung carcinogenesis. METHODS: The mice were segregated into five groups which included normal control, Benzo[a]pyrene[BP] treated, BP+curcumin treated, BP+resveratrol treated and BP+curcumin+resveratrol treated. RESULTS: The morphological analyses of tumor nodules confirmed lung carcinogenesis in mice after 22 weeks of single intra-peritoneal[i.p] injection of BP at a dose of 100 mg/Kg body weight. The BP treatment resulted in a significant increase in the protein expressions of p53 in the BP treated mice. Also, a significant increase in the protein expression of phosphorylated p53[ser15] confirmed p53 hyper-phosphorylation in BP treated mice. On the other hand, enzyme activities of caspase 3 and caspase 9 were noticed to be significantly decreased following BP treatment. Further, radiorespirometric studies showed a significant increase in the 14C-glucose turnover as well as 14C-glucose uptake in the lung slices of BP treated mice. Moreover, a significant rise in the cell proliferation was confirmed indirectly by enhanced uptake of 3H-thymidine in the lung slices of BP treated mice. Interestingly, combined treatment of curcumin and resveratrol to BP treated animals resulted in a significant decrease in p53 hyper-phosphorylation, 14C glucose uptakes/turnover and 3H-thymidine uptake in the BP treated mice. However, the enzyme activities of caspase 3 and caspase 9 showed a significant increase upon treatment with curcumin and resveratrol. CONCLUSION: The study, therefore, concludes that molecular mechanics behind chemo-preventive synergism involved modulation of p53 hyper-phosphorylation, regulation of caspases and cellular metabolism enzymes.

  10. Epigenetic alterations in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    In-Seon CHOI; Tsung-Teh WU

    2005-01-01

    Gastric cancer is believed to result in part from the accumulation of multiple genetic alterations leading to oncogene overexpression and tumor suppressor loss. Epigenetic alterations as a distinct and crucial mechanism to silence a variety of methylated tissue-specific and imprinted genes, have been extensively studied in gastric carcinoma and play important roles in gastric carcinogenesis. This review will briefly discuss the basic aspects of DNA methylation and CpG island methylation, in particular the epigenetic alterations of certain critical genes implicated in gastric carcinogenesis and its relevance of clinical implications.

  11. Mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium (Cd), a heavy metal of considerable occupational and environmental concern, has been classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The carcinogenic potential of Cd as well as the mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis following exposure to Cd has been studied using in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal models. Exposure of cells to Cd results in their transformation. Administration of Cd in animals results in tumors of multiple organs/tissues. Also, a causal relationship has been noticed between exposure to Cd and the incidence of lung cancer in human. It has been demonstrated that Cd induces cancer by multiple mechanisms and the most important among them are aberrant gene expression, inhibition of DNA damage repair, induction of oxidative stress, and inhibition of apoptosis. The available evidence indicates that, perhaps, oxidative stress plays a central role in Cd carcinogenesis because of its involvement in Cd-induced aberrant gene expression, inhibition of DNA damage repair, and apoptosis.

  12. Endothelins and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olender, Jacek; Nowakowska-Zajdel, Ewa; Walkiewicz, Katarzyna; Muc-Wierzgoń, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Endothelins are a family of four endogenous peptides (ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, ET-4) secreted primarily in an inactive form by the endothelium. They are activated with the participation of converting enzyme. Numerous studies have described their pleiotropic biological activity. These peptides are involved, inter alia, in the regulation of processes such as cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis and apoptosis. Their important role in the regulation of blood pressure, tissue perfusion (especially in the central nervous system), and myocardial systolic function is also known. Moreover, changes in transcriptional activity of endothelin and its receptors may be involved, with the participation of a number of signaling pathways, in carcinogenesis, and the pathogenesis of numerous diseases (heart, kidney, lung and skin disorders, especially with the component of fibrosis). Their role has been documented in the development of breast, prostatic, colorectal, ovarian, lung, kidney, and endometrial cancer, and in melanoma. In this article we present a brief description of the endothelin group and the participation of them and their receptors in carcinogenesis. We also try to show their role as prognostic and predictive factors in human malignant tumors. The article also refers to clinical trials on the use of preparations of endothelin receptor antagonists in the design of molecular therapeutic strategies in human malignancies. PMID:27594562

  13. Contribution to the study of markers in lungs carcinogenesis and analysis of factors predicting the benefit of chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A better definition of early bio markers in lung carcinogenesis should enhance the development of molecular means to perform screening, diagnostic, and chemo-prevention of patients at high risk of lung cancer. We studied epigenetic deregulation of multiple promoters (p16(INK4a), HOX A9, MAGE A 1 et MAGE B2) in sputum samples from smokers at high risk and from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (N.S.C.L.C.). This molecular test, based on easily accessible sample,s can be modulated according to the aims of the investigator (e.g. screening or confirmation of diagnosis). Secondly, we have studied two candidate proteins as predictive markers of the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with resected lung cancer. The multivariate analysis shows that tumor expression of the catalytic sub-unit of telomerase is not able to predict survival in patients included in the lAL T study' of adjuvant chemotherapy. However, tumor expression of the DNA repair protein ERCC1 identifies a sub-group of patients (ERCC1 negative) whose chances of survival are increased by 35% by means of cisplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Further, tumor ERCC1 expression has a positive prognostic value in the non-treated control group. The need for a deeper understanding in cancerology of the physiological role of the ERCC1 endonuclease is discussed in this thesis. (author)

  14. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of p-Nitrophenol (CAS No. 100-02-7) in Swiss Webster Mice (Dermal Studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    p-Nitrophenol is used in the production of acetaminophen, methyl and ethyl parathion insecticides, fungicides, and dyestuffs. Toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of p-nitrophenol (greater than 97% pure) were conducted by dermal application to male and female Swiss-Webster mice for 18 months. Dermal application was selected as the route of chemical administration because of possible skin absorption from p-nitrophenol-treated leather footwear. Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in Salmonella typhimurium, Chinese hamster ovary cells, and Drosophila melanogaster. 18-MONTH STUDIES: Groups of 60 Swiss-Webster mice of each sex received p-nitrophenol in acetone applied to the interscapular skin. Doses of 0, 40, 80, or 160 mg/kg p-nitrophenol were administered to mice 3 days per week for 78 weeks. At the end of the study, survival rates of mice receiving 0, 40, 80, or 160 mg/kg p-nitrophenol were 29/60, 17/60, 26/60, and 24/60 for males and 35/60, 26/60, 33/60, and 27/60 for females. Deaths after 60 weeks were caused by generalized amyloidosis and secondary kidney failure. The severity of amyloidosis was similar among dosed and control animals. At the end of the study, the final mean body weights of the dosed groups of each sex were similar to those of the controls. No biologically significant lesions were observed that were related to the dermal administration of p-nitrophenol. GENETIC TOXICOLOGY: p-Nitrophenol was not mutagenic in Salmonella typhimurium (strains TA100, TA1535, TA1537, and TA98) with or without exogenous metabolic (S9) activation, or in germ cells of male Drosophila melanogaster administered p-nitrophenol in feed or by injection. In Chinese hamster ovary cells, no induction of sister chromatid exchanges was observed with or without S9, but a significant increase in chromosomal aberrations occurred in trials conducted with S9. CONCLUSIONS: Under the conditions of these 18-month dermal studies there was no evidence of carcinogenic activity in male

  15. Nanoscale intracellular mass-density alteration as a signature of the effect of alcohol on early carcinogenesis: A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study

    CERN Document Server

    Ghimire, Hemendra M; Sahay, Peeyush; Almabadi, Huda; Tripathi, Vibha; Skalli, Omar; Rao, R K; Pradhan, Prabhakar

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol consumption interferes with the functioning of multiple organ systems, causing changes in the chemistry, physiology and pathology of tissues and cellular organelles. Although epigenetic modifications underlie the development of cancer, exposure to carcinogenic chemicals, such as alcohol, can also contribute to disease development. However, the effects of chronic alcoholism on normal or pre-carcinogenic cells/tissues in different organelles are not well understood. Therefore, we herein study the effect of alcohol consumption on colonic nucleus using control and azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) treated carcinogenic mice. Previous studies showed that progression of carcinogenesis is associated with increase in the degree of intranuclear nanoscale structural disorder. In the present work, we quantify the degree of nanostructural disorder as a measure of carcinogenesis. To accomplish this, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging of respective colonic epithelial cell nuclei are use...

  16. Experimental pancreatic carcinogenesis. II. Lifetime carcinogenesis studies in the outbred Syrian golden hamster with N-nitroso-bis(2-hydroxypropyl)amine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, M; Harris, C; Squire, R; Wenk, M; Mollelo, C; Springer, S

    1978-03-01

    A high incidence of pancreatic duct neoplasms was induced in outbred male Syrian golden hamsters following weekly sc injection of N-nitroso-bis(2-hydroxypropyl)amine for life. The first such tumors appeared as early as 16 experimental weeks; the maximum incidence reached 100% by the termination of the study. Tumors in the respiratory tracts and angiosarcomas of the livers of the hamsters were also observed in high frequency. Latency of the induced neoplasms was significantly decreased by the substitution of distilled water for olive oil as the vehicle for the carcinogen. PMID:625072

  17. Studies on the mechanisms of action of modifiers of skin carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaga, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    Skin tumors can be induced by the sequential application of a subthreshold dose of a carcinogen (initiaton phase), followed by repetitive treatment with a weak or noncarcinogenic tumor promoter. There is a very good dose-response relationship between the induction of the number of papillomas per mouse at early times (10 to 20 weeks) by either tumor initiators and promoters and the final carcinoma incidence after a longer latency (20 to 50 weeks) in SENCAR mice. This system not only can be used to determine the tumor initiating and promoting activities of a compound but if the agent is given repeatedly by itself one can also determine if it is a complete carcinogen, i.e., if it has both tumor initiating and promoting activity. There is a good correlation between the tumor-initiating activities of PAH and their abilities to bind covalently to DNA. In addition, various inhibitors of PAH tumor initiation show a strong correlation with their abilities to inhibit the binding of the PAH to DNA and their anti-tumor initiating activities. There is also a good correlation between the promoting abilities of phorbil esters to promote tumors and their abilities to induce ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), cell proliferation and dark basal keratinocytes. However, when other nonpromoting hyperplastic agents are used only dark cell induction correlates. Certain polyamines and prostaglandins can enhance phorbol ester tumor promotion. Anti-inflammatory steroids, retinoids and protease inhibitors are potent inhibitors of tumor promotion. They inhibit tumor promotion by either inhibiting the 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)induced cell proliferation, ODC and/or dark basal keratinocytes. Certain weak promoters such as mezerein which mimics TPA in many biochemical and morphological effects are potent second step promoters in a two-stage promotion regimen.

  18. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Trichloroethylene (CAS No. 79-01-6) in Four Strains of Rats (ACI, August, Marshall, Osborne-Mendel) (Gavage Studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    Trichloroethylene is an industrial solvent used primarily for vapor degreasing and cold cleaning. It was selected for study because of its industrial use and for potential for human exposure. (An estimated 3.5 million workers are exposed to trichloroethylene.) In an earlier study trichloroethylene (stabilized with epichlorohydrin and 1,2-epoxybutane) administered by gavage caused hepatocellular carcinomas in male and female B6C3F1 mice. Trichloroethylene administration did not increase the incidence of tumors in male or female Osborne-Mendel rats. However, the survival of dosed rats was reduced, thereby compromising the sensitivity of the study to detect a carcinogenic effect. The studies described in this report were conducted to compare the sensitivities of four strains of rats (ACI, August, Marshall, and Osborne-Mendel) to diisopropylamine-stabilized trichloroethylene. The results of the present studies demonstrate that long-term administration of trichloroethylene produces nephrotoxicity in four strains of rats and that the susceptibilities of these strains to the nephrotoxic effects of the chemical are similar. Because of chemically induced toxicity, reduced survival, and incomplete documentation of the experimental data, the studies are considered inadequate for either comparing or assessing trichloroethylene-induced carcinogenesis in these strains of rats. Toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of trichloroethylene (more than 99% pure, stabilized with 8 ppm diisopropylamine) were conducted by administering the chemical in corn oil gavage at doses of 0, 500, or 1,000 mg/kg per day, 5 day per week, for 103 weeks to groups of 50 male and 50 female ACI, August, Marshall, and Osborne-Mendel rats. The doses were selected on the basis of results from 13-week gavage studies in which groups of 10 male and 10 female ACI, August, and Marshall rats received daily doses or trichloroethylene (male: 125-2,000 mg/kg; female: 63-1,000 mg/kg). Doses for Osborne-Mendel rats

  19. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, an appropriate in vitro model to study heavy metals induced carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youn-Hee; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2015-09-15

    Occupational and environmental exposure to arsenic (III) and chromium VI (Cr(VI)) have been confirmed to cause lung cancer. Mechanisms of these metals carcinogenesis are still under investigation. Selection of cell lines to be used is essential for the studies. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells are the cells to be utilized by most of scientists. However, due to p53 missense mutation (CCG→TCG) at codon 47 and the codon 72 polymorphism (CGC→CCC) in BEAS-2B cells, its usage has frequently been questioned. The present study has examined activity and expression of 53 and its downstream target protein p21 upon acute or chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic and Cr(VI). The results show that short-term exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) was able to activate both p53 and p21. Chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to these two metals caused malignant cell transformation and tumorigenesis. In arsenic-transformed BEAS-2B cells reductions in p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 were observed, while the total p53 protein level remained the same compared to those in passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were decreased in arsenic-transformed cells. Cr(VI)-transformed cells exhibit elevated p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation at Ser15, but reduced phosphorylation at Ser392 and total p53 protein level compared to passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were elevated in Cr(VI)-transformed cells. These results demonstrate that p53 is able to respond to exposure of arsenic or Cr(VI), suggesting that BEAS-2B cells are an appropriate in vitro model to investigate arsenic or Cr(VI) induced lung cancer. PMID:26091798

  20. [Hpv cofactors in cervical carcinogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Alvaro P; Tulio, Siumara; Cruz, Olívia Russo

    2002-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) plays a central rule in uterine cervix carcinogenesis. Other factors direct or indirectly influence the installation of this mechanism in cervical squamous epithelium. Investigations regarding mechanisms of interaction of these factors with viral elements are found in the literature of the last 20 years. The present review article discusses possible co-factors of HPV in the genesis of the squamous carcinoma of uterine cervix, taking into account only the factors whose association with the virus or cervical cancer has been documented by experimental studies, and not based just on clinical or epidemiological data. Among the approached parameters are immunological factors (local and humoral immune response), the association with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, genetic factors as protein p53 polymorphism, tabagism and the use of oral contraceptives. All these factors interact in variable intensity with oncoproteins and other HPV elements, increasing and facilitating the virus action in host cells, leading to the development of immortalization and carcinogenesis. PMID:12185639

  1. SKHIN/Sprd, a new genetically defined inbred hairless mouse strain for UV-induced skin carcinogenesis studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Carlos; Parker-Thornburg, Jan; Mikulec, Carol; Kusewitt, Donna F; Fischer, Susan M; Digiovanni, John; Conti, Claudio J; Benavides, Fernando

    2012-03-01

    Strains of mice vary in their susceptibility to ultra-violet (UV) radiation-induced skin tumors. Some strains of hairless mice (homozygous for the spontaneous Hr(hr) mutation) are particularly susceptible to these tumors. The skin tumors that develop in hairless mice resemble, both at the morphologic and molecular levels, UV-induced squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and their precursors in human. The most commonly employed hairless mice belong to the SKH1 stock. However, these mice are outbred and their genetic background is not characterized, which makes them a poor model for genetic studies. We have developed a new inbred strain from outbred SKH1 mice that we named SKHIN/Sprd (now at generation F31). In order to characterize the genetic background of this new strain, we genotyped a cohort of mice at F30 with 92 microsatellites and 140 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) evenly distributed throughout the mouse genome. We also exposed SKHIN/Sprd mice to chronic UV irradiation and showed that they are as susceptible to UV-induced skin carcinogenesis as outbred SKH1 mice. In addition, we proved that, albeit with low efficiency, inbred SKHIN/Sprd mice are suitable for transgenic production by classical pronuclear microinjection. This new inbred strain will be useful for the development of transgenic and congenic strains on a hairless inbred background as well as the establishment of syngeneic tumor cell lines. These new tools can potentially help elucidate a number of features of the cutaneous response to UV irradiation in humans, including the effect of genetic background and modifier genes.

  2. Pilot Study of CYP2B6 Genetic Variation to Explore the Contribution of Nitrosamine Activation to Lung Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel F. Tyndale

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We explored the contribution of nitrosamine metabolism to lung cancer in a pilot investigation of genetic variation in CYP2B6, a high-affinity enzymatic activator of tobacco-specific nitrosamines with a negligible role in nicotine metabolism. Previously we found that variation in CYP2A6 and CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 combined to increase lung cancer risk in a case-control study in European American ever-smokers (n = 860. However, these genes are involved in the pharmacology of both nicotine, through which they alter smoking behaviours, and carcinogenic nitrosamines. Herein, we separated participants by CYP2B6 genotype into a high- vs. low-risk group (*1/*1 + *1/*6 vs. *6/*6. Odds ratios estimated through logistic regression modeling were 1.25 (95% CI 0.68–2.30, 1.27 (95% CI 0.89–1.79 and 1.56 (95% CI 1.04–2.31 for CYP2B6, CYP2A6 and CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4, respectively, with negligible differences when all genes were evaluated concurrently. Modeling the combined impact of high-risk genotypes yielded odds ratios that rose from 2.05 (95% CI 0.39–10.9 to 2.43 (95% CI 0.47–12.7 to 3.94 (95% CI 0.72–21.5 for those with 1, 2 and 3 vs. 0 high-risk genotypes, respectively. Findings from this pilot point to genetic variation in CYP2B6 as a lung cancer risk factor supporting a role for nitrosamine metabolic activation in the molecular mechanism of lung carcinogenesis

  3. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present review provides an understanding of our current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation in man, and surveys the epidemiological studies of human populations exposed to nuclear explosions and medical radiation. Discussion centers on the contributions of quantitative epidemiology to present knowledge, the reliability of the dose-incidence data, and those relevant epidemiological studies that provide the most useful information for risk estimation of cancer-induction in man. Reference is made to dose-incidence relationships from laboratory animal experiments where they may obtain for problems and difficulties in extrapolation from data obtained at high doses to low doses, and from animal data to the human situation. The paper describes the methods of application of such epidemiological data for estimation of excess risk of radiation-induced cancer in exposed human populations, and discusses the strengths and limitations of epidemiology in guiding radiation protection philosophy and public health policy

  4. Epidemiological studies on radiation carcinogenesis in human populations following acute exposure: nuclear explosions and medical radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-08-01

    The present review provides an understanding of our current knowledge of the carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation in man, and surveys the epidemiological studies of human populations exposed to nuclear explosions and medical radiation. Discussion centers on the contributions of quantitative epidemiology to present knowledge, the reliability of the dose-incidence data, and those relevant epidemiological studies that provide the most useful information for risk estimation of cancer-induction in man. Reference is made to dose-incidence relationships from laboratory animal experiments where they may obtain for problems and difficulties in extrapolation from data obtained at high doses to low doses, and from animal data to the human situation. The paper describes the methods of application of such epidemiological data for estimation of excess risk of radiation-induced cancer in exposed human populations, and discusses the strengths and limitations of epidemiology in guiding radiation protection philosophy and public health policy.

  5. Minireview: Animal studies on the role of 50/60-Hertz magnetic fields in carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loescher, W.; Mevissen, M. (School of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover (Germany))

    1994-01-01

    A number of epidemiological studies have suggested that exposure to 50/60-Hz magnetic fields (MF) from power lines and electrical equipment may be associated with a modestly increased incidence of various type of cancer. Laboratory studies have indicated that nonionizing radiation has no mutagenic effect, i.e. does not initiate cancer. Thus, if 50/60-Hz MF are truly associated with an increased risk of cancer, then these fields must act as a promoter or co-promoter of cancer in cells that have already been initiated. This paper reviews the evidence produced by animal studies. As shown in this review, the available animal data on 50/60-Hz MF exposures seem to indicate that intermediate MF exposure exerts co-promoting effects in different tumor models, particularly cocarcinogenesis models of breast cancer while chronic (up to life-time) exposure may exert promoting effects on [open quotes]spontaneous[close quotes] development of certain tumors. The tumor promoting or co-promoting effects of 50/60-Hz MF exposure found in several animal studies could relate to actions of MF on gene expression, immune surveillance, and Ca[sup 2+] homeostasis as demonstrated by in vitro experiments in cell cultures. However, the most plausible evidence of an in vivo effect of MF exposure which could be related to tumor promotion is reduction of circulating levels of melatonin, i.e. a hormone which is inhibitory to the growth of a wide range of cancers, particularly breast cancer. Animal studies have shown that 50-Hz MF exposure at fluxes as low as 0.3-1 [mu]Tesla significantly reduces nocturnal melatonin levels in plasma. While decrease of melatonin levels alone could explain tumor promoting or copromoting effects of MF exposure, recent data indicate that MF exposure also impairs the effects of melatonin at the cellular level. The oncostatic effect of melatonin on proliferation of a human breast cancer cell line was antagonized by 60-Hz MF exposure at a flux density of 1 [mu]Tesla.

  6. Arsenic-induced enhancement of ultraviolet radiation carcinogenesis in mouse skin: a dose-response study.

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, Fredric J.; Uddin, Ahmed N.; Wu, Feng; Nádas, Arthur; Rossman, Toby G.

    2004-01-01

    The present study was designed to establish the form of the dose-response relationship for dietary sodium arsenite as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in a mouse skin model. Hairless mice (strain Skh1) were fed sodium arsenite continuously in drinking water starting at 21 days of age at concentrations of 0.0, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0, and 10 mg/L. At 42 days of age, solar spectrum UVR exposures were applied three times weekly to the dorsal skin at 1.0 kJ/m2 per exposure until the experi...

  7. Differentiation and carcinogenesis: An integrated multilevel study of mechanisms from molecules to man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ts' o, P.O.P. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1989-08-01

    This research proposal consists of four scientific projects and one administrative core. Project I concerns the investigation of the mechanisms regulating normal cellular differentiation and the disruption of these regulatory mechanisms in neoplastic cells, using myogenic differentiation as a model system. Project II concerns three investigations: (1) effects of oxygen radicals and x-ray irradiation; (2) development of computerized microscopic imaging system; and (3) gene location and control of cellular gene expression. Project III concerns the two-dimensional DNA restriction fragment mapping for the E. coli genome (3 megabase in size) and yeast genome (12 megabase in size), as well as the development of a probe-free, global monitoring system for DNA rearrangement in E. coli and in yeast. Project IV provides these analogs for Projects I, II, and III for the purpose of controlling gene expression at both the mRNA level or directly at the DNA level with a sequence-specific triplex formation. All these projects work closely with each other in the study on the localization and organization of genes, damage to genes, and control of gene expression in a fully integrated approach.

  8. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, an appropriate in vitro model to study heavy metals induced carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Youn-hee; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Zhang, Zhuo, E-mail: zhuo.zhang@uky.edu

    2015-09-15

    Occupational and environmental exposure to arsenic (III) and chromium VI (Cr(VI)) have been confirmed to cause lung cancer. Mechanisms of these metals carcinogenesis are still under investigation. Selection of cell lines to be used is essential for the studies. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells are the cells to be utilized by most of scientists. However, due to p53 missense mutation (CCG → TCG) at codon 47 and the codon 72 polymorphism (CGC → CCC) in BEAS-2B cells, its usage has frequently been questioned. The present study has examined activity and expression of 53 and its downstream target protein p21 upon acute or chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic and Cr(VI). The results show that short-term exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) was able to activate both p53 and p21. Chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to these two metals caused malignant cell transformation and tumorigenesis. In arsenic-transformed BEAS-2B cells reductions in p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 were observed, while the total p53 protein level remained the same compared to those in passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were decreased in arsenic-transformed cells. Cr(VI)-transformed cells exhibit elevated p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation at Ser15, but reduced phosphorylation at Ser392 and total p53 protein level compared to passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were elevated in Cr(VI)-transformed cells. These results demonstrate that p53 is able to respond to exposure of arsenic or Cr(VI), suggesting that BEAS-2B cells are an appropriate in vitro model to investigate arsenic or Cr(VI) induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Short-term exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) activates p53 and p21. • Chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) causes cell transformation and tumorigenesis. • Arsenic-transformed cells exhibit

  9. Enhancement of Urinary Bladder Carcinogenesis by the Role of Chronic Bacterial Infection-induced Inflammation (Imunnohistochemical and Biochemical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabri MS*, Ashmawy AM**, Ibrahim MA*, Hosny RM

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bacterial infections traditionally have not been considered major causes of cancer. Recently, however, bacteria have been linked to cancer by two mechanisms: induction of chronic inflammation and production of carcinogenic bacterial metabolites. The most specific example of the inflammatory mechanism of carcinogenesis is Escherichia coli infection. E. coli has been epidemiologically linked to urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder by its propensity to cause lifelong inflammation. This inflammation is in turn thought to cause cancer by inducing cell proliferation and production of mutagenic free radicals and N-nitroso compounds.Material and methods: After each 3, 6 and 9 months of daily oral administration of dibutyl amine (DBA plus sodium nitrate (nitrosamine precursors in drinking water, curcuma in grinding diet and bladder injection with E. coli, rats were sacrificed. The excited bladder were dissected, processed and stained with H&E and anti-Ki67 immunohistochemical stains. This was followed by Elisa for caspse-3 and statistical analysis.Results: The current results indicated that E. coli infection in the bladder tissues increases the carcinogenic ability of nitrosamine precursors through caused marked alteration in the form hyperplastic, dysplastic and metaplastic urothelium. Also, there was a statistically significant increase in ki67 immunoreactivity in urothelium. However, a statistically significant decrease in the concentration of caspase-3 in bladder tissue consequently caused the process of carcinogenesis. All these changes were less marked after curcuma treatment when compared with the group that not treated with curcuma. Conclusion: Bacterial infection of the urinary bladder may play a major additive and possible role in bladder carcinogenesis. Rhizome of curcuma may have a protective action during induction of urinary bladder tumors.

  10. DNA methylation and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, A V; Kisseljova, N P

    2001-03-01

    In the world of easy things truth is opposed to lie; in the world of complicated things one profound truth is opposed to another not less profound than the first. Neils Bohr The hypothesis of the exclusively genetic origin of cancer ("cancer is a disease of genes, a tumor without any damage to the genome does not exist") dominated in the oncology until recently. A considerable amount of data confirming this hypothesis was accumulated during the last quarter of the last century. It was demonstrated that the accumulation of damage of specific genes lies at the origin of a tumor and its following progression. The damage gives rise to structural changes in the respective proteins and, consequently, to inappropriate mitogenic stimulation of cells (activation of oncogenes) or to the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes that inhibit cell division, or to the combination of both (in most cases). According to an alternative (epigenetic) hypothesis that was extremely unpopular until recently, a tumor is caused not by a gene damage, but by an inappropriate function of genes ("cancer is a disease of gene regulation and differentiation"). However, recent studies led to the convergence of these hypotheses that initially seemed to be contradictory. It was established that both factors--genetic and epigenetic--lie at the origin of carcinogenesis. The relative contribution of each varies significantly in different human tumors. Suppressor genes and genes of repair are inactivated in tumors due to their damage or methylation of their promoters (in the latter case an "epimutation", an epigenetic equivalent of a mutation, occurs, producing the same functional consequences). It is becoming evident that not only the mutagens, but various factors influencing cell metabolism, notably methylation, should be considered as carcinogens.

  11. 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide induced experimental oral carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanojia, Deepak; Vaidya, Milind M

    2006-08-01

    Human oral cancer is the sixth largest group of malignancies worldwide and single largest group of malignancies in the Indian subcontinent. Seventy percent of premalignant cancers appear from premalignant lesions. Only 8-10% of these lesions finally turn into malignancy. The appearance of these premalignant lesions is one distinct feature of human oral cancer. At present there is dearth of biomarkers to identify which of these lesions will turn into malignancy. Regional lymph node metastasis and locoregional recurrence are the major factors responsible for the limited survival of patients with oral cancer. Paucity of early diagnostic and prognostic markers is one of the contributory factors for higher mortality rates. Cancer is a multistep process and because of constrain in availability of human tissues from multiple stages of oral carcinogenesis including normal tissues, animal models are being widely used, aiming for the development of diagnostic and prognostic markers. A number of chemical carcinogens like coal tar, 20 methyl cholanthrene (20MC), 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA) and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) have been used in experimental oral carcinogenesis. However, 4NQO is the preferred carcinogen apart from DMBA in the development of experimental oral carcinogenesis. 4NQO is a water soluble carcinogen, which induces tumors predominantly in the oral cavity. It produces all the stages of oral carcinogenesis and several lines of evidences suggest that similar histological as well as molecular changes are observed in the human system. In the present review an attempt has been made to collate the information available on mechanisms of action of 4NQO, studies carried out for the development of biomarkers and chemopreventives agents using 4NQO animal models. PMID:16448841

  12. Hormones and endometrial carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Areege; Tempest, Nicola; Parkes, Christina; Alnafakh, Rafah; Makrydima, Sofia; Adishesh, Meera; Hapangama, Dharani K

    2016-02-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the commonest gynaecological cancer in the Western World with an alarmingly increasing incidence related to longevity and obesity. Ovarian hormones regulate normal human endometrial cell proliferation, regeneration and function therefore are implicated in endometrial carcinogenesis directly or via influencing other hormones and metabolic pathways. Although the role of unopposed oestrogen in the pathogenesis of EC has received considerable attention, the emerging role of other hormones in this process, such as androgens and gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) is less well recognised. This review aims to consolidate the current knowledge of the involvement of the three main endogenous ovarian hormones (oestrogens, progesterone and androgens) as well as the other hormones in endometrial carcinogenesis, to identify important avenues for future research. PMID:26966933

  13. Biomarkers for pancreatic carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hustinx, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. Most pancreatic cancers (approximately 85%) are diagnosed at a late, incurable stage. The poor prognosis and late presentation of pancreatic cancer patients underscore the importance of early detection, which is the sine qua non for the fight against pancreatic cancer. It is hoped for the future that the understanding of genetic alterations will lead to the rapid discovery of an effective biomarker of pancreatic carcinogenesis. In this thesis we vis...

  14. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Pentachloroanisole (CAS No. 1825-21-4) in F344 Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Feed Studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    Pentachloroanisole is a chlorinated aromatic compound which is widely distributed at low levels in the environment and in food products. Formation of pentachloroanisole in the environment may result from the degradation of structurally related, commercially important, ubiquitous chlorinated aromatic compounds such as pentachlorophenol and pentachloronitrobenzene which are known rodent toxins or carcinogens. Toxicology and carcinogenesis studies were conducted by administering pentachloroanisole (>99% pure) in corn oil by gavage to groups of male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice for 16 days, 13 weeks, or 2 years. Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in Salmonella typhimurium strains, mouse lymphoma cells, and Chinese hamster ovary cells. 16-DAY STUDIES IN RATS: Groups of five male and five female F344/N rats were administered pentachloroanisole in corn oil by gavage once per day, 5 days per week, for 16 days at doses of 0, 100, 125, 150, 175, or 200 mg/kg body weight. Deaths occurred during days 2 and 3 in rats receiving doses of 125 mg/kg or greater; these deaths were considered directly related to pentachloroanisole administration. No biologically significant changes in mean body weight gains or final body weights were noted in the 100 mg/kg groups of rats. Because of the high early mortality rate, valid comparisons of body weight differences in other dose groups could not be made. Inactivity was noted in all dose groups. Rats administered doses of 125 mg/kg or greater also exhibited dyspnea. 16-DAY STUDIES IN MICE: Groups of five male and five female B6C3F1 mice were administered pentachloroanisole in corn oil by gavage once per day, 5 days per week, for 16 days at doses of 0, 100, 175, 250, 325, or 400 mg/kg. Deaths occurred during days 2 and 3 in mice receiving doses of 175 mg/kg or greater; these deaths were considered directly related to chemical administration. No biologically significant changes in mean body weight gains or final body weights

  15. Liver Development, Regeneration, and Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet W. C. Kung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of putative liver stem cells has brought closer the previously separate fields of liver development, regeneration, and carcinogenesis. Significant overlaps in the regulation of these processes are now being described. For example, studies in embryonic liver development have already provided the basis for directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells into hepatocyte-like cells. As a result, the understanding of the cell biology of proliferation and differentiation in the liver has been improved. This knowledge can be used to improve the function of hepatocyte-like cells for drug testing, bioartificial livers, and transplantation. In parallel, the mechanisms regulating cancer cell biology are now clearer, providing fertile soil for novel therapeutic approaches. Recognition of the relationships between development, regeneration, and carcinogenesis, and the increasing evidence for the role of stem cells in all of these areas, has sparked fresh enthusiasm in understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms and has led to new targeted therapies for liver cirrhosis and primary liver cancers.

  16. Study of the mechanism of carcinogenesis by carcinogens which are negative in the Ames test. Progress report, April 1-September 1, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    Carcinogens ethionine, thioacetamide, and actinomycin D, all of which are negative in the Ames test and all of which raise the progesterone level in the chicken, were tested to determine their physiological role in carcinogenesis. The optimization of the carcinogenesis model also included evaluation of the chicken as the biological indicator of physiological changes relative to the above compounds. (PCS)

  17. Environmental and chemical carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wogan, Gerald N; Hecht, Stephen S; Felton, James S; Conney, Allan H; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2004-12-01

    People are continuously exposed exogenously to varying amounts of chemicals that have been shown to have carcinogenic or mutagenic properties in experimental systems. Exposure can occur exogenously when these agents are present in food, air or water, and also endogenously when they are products of metabolism or pathophysiologic states such as inflammation. It has been estimated that exposure to environmental chemical carcinogens may contribute significantly to the causation of a sizable fraction, perhaps a majority, of human cancers, when exposures are related to "life-style" factors such as diet, tobacco use, etc. This chapter summarizes several aspects of environmental chemical carcinogenesis that have been extensively studied and illustrates the power of mechanistic investigation combined with molecular epidemiologic approaches in establishing causative linkages between environmental exposures and increased cancer risks. A causative relationship between exposure to aflatoxin, a strongly carcinogenic mold-produced contaminant of dietary staples in Asia and Africa, and elevated risk for primary liver cancer has been demonstrated through the application of well-validated biomarkers in molecular epidemiology. These studies have also identified a striking synergistic interaction between aflatoxin and hepatitis B virus infection in elevating liver cancer risk. Use of tobacco products provides a clear example of cancer causation by a life-style factor involving carcinogen exposure. Tobacco carcinogens and their DNA adducts are central to cancer induction by tobacco products, and the contribution of specific tobacco carcinogens (e.g. PAH and NNK) to tobacco-induced lung cancer, can be evaluated by a weight of evidence approach. Factors considered include presence in tobacco products, carcinogenicity in laboratory animals, human uptake, metabolism and adduct formation, possible role in causing molecular changes in oncogenes or suppressor genes, and other relevant data

  18. Experimental radiation carcinogenesis: what have we learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author reviews the need for animal experiments in development of a biological model for radioinduced carcinogenesis. He concludes they are vital for: (1) study of mechanisms; (2) establishment of generalizations; (3) elucidation of dose-response and time-dose relationships; and (4) determination of dose-distributions and their results, particularly for radionuclides

  19. Impaired glucose metabolism treatment and carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    MATYSZEWSKI, ARTUR; Czarnecka, Anna; Kawecki, Maciej; KORZEŃ, PIOTR; SAFIR, ILAN J.; Kukwa, Wojciech; SZCZYLIK, CEZARY

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism disorders increase the risk of carcinogenesis. Diabetes mellitus alters numerous physiological processes that may encourage cancer growth. However, treating impaired glucose homeostasis may actually promote neoplasia; maintaining proper glucose plasma concentrations reduces metabolic stresses, however, certain medications may themselves result in oncogenic effects. A number of previous studies have demonstrated that metformin reduces the cancer risk. However, the use o...

  20. Molecular mechanisms in radiation carcinogenesis: introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular studies of radiation carcinogenesis are discussed in relation to theories for extrapolating from cellular and animal models to man. Skin cancer is emphasized because of sunlight-induced photochemical damage to DNA. It is emphasized that cellular and animal models are needed as well as molecular theories for quantitative evaluation of hazardous environmental agents. (U.S.)

  1. Preliminary study Malaa. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factors of importance for a possible localization of a deep nuclear waste repository at Malaa in northern Sweden are mapped in this study. The geologic structures in the area have been reviewed, mostly from already existing knowledge. Existing infrastructure and necessary improvements are discussed, as well as land use and environment, employment and other social effects. 47 refs, 41 figs, 8 tabs

  2. Final report on case studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungberg, Daniel; McKelvey, Maureen; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2012-01-01

    Case study as a research design means investigating a single or multiple instance(s) or setting(s) (i.e. a case) and its entire context to explain a phenomenon and its processes. This is achieved through detailed understanding, usually comprised of multiple sources of information. In this way, ca...

  3. Cost Benefit Studies. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Arthur; Marson, Arthur A.

    This document applies Dr. Mehar Aurora's method for conducting cost benefit studies to the Food Manufacturing Technology-Dairy and the Food Manufacturing Technology-Canning and Freezing programs offered by the Moraine Park Technical Institute. Costs to individual students enrolled in the programs include tuition, fees, housing, travel, books,…

  4. Dickinson geothermal study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fossum, G.O.; Harris, K.L.; Hassett, D.J.; Mathsen, D.V.; Owens, T.C.

    1982-06-01

    The Inyan Kara Formation provides an abundant source of warm (54 to 71/sup 0/C) but salty (7400 mg/l combined Na and Cl ions) water for much of southwestern North Dakota. The city of Dickinson, ND, overlies this aquifer at 1676 to 1768 meters. This study investigates the potential of usng this hydrothermal resource as an energy source for a district heating system in a new undeveloped addition to Dickinson. In addition, the use of a reverse osmosis system to desalinate the water is considered along with other water treatment processes necessary to allow use of this water in the existing city water supply. The results of the study indicate the economic requirements to make this concept feasible and outline the consideration to carry the project into the design phase.

  5. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models.

  6. Selenium in human mammary carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overvad, Kim; Grøn, P.; Langhoff, Otto;

    1991-01-01

    In a case-referent study on the possible role of selenium in human mammary carcinogenesis, serum selenium was found to be 79 +/- 12 micrograms/l in 66 cases and 81 +/- 12 micrograms/l in 93 referents. An internal trend in serum selenium was observed among cases (TNM stage I 81 +/- 11 micrograms....../l and TNM stage II 76 +/- 13 micrograms selenium/l), indicating disease-mediated changes. The evaluation of selenium as a risk indicator in human breast cancer was therefore restricted to TNM stage I patients (n = 36). Multiple logistic regression analyses including variables associated with selenium...... levels revealed no association between selenium levels and breast cancer risk....

  7. Stem cells and colorectal carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoian, M; Stoica, V; Radulian, G

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer represents an important cause of mortality and morbidity. Unfortunately, the physiopathology is still under study. There are theories about carcinogenesis and it is known that not only a single factor is responsible for the development of a tumor, but several conditions. Stem cells are a promising target for the treatment of colorectal cancer, along with the environment that has an important role. It has been postulated that mutations within the adult colonic stem cells may induce neoplastic changes. This theory is based on the observation that within a colon cancer, less than 1% of the neoplastic cells have the ability to regenerate the tumor and therefore they are responsible for recurrence. It is important to know that a new way of treatment needs to be found, since these cells are resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  8. Oxidative Stress and HPV Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico De Marco

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Extensive experimental work has conclusively demonstrated that infection with certain types of human papillomaviruses, the so-called high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV, represent a most powerful human carcinogen. However, neoplastic growth is a rare and inappropriate outcome in the natural history of HPV, and a number of other events have to concur in order to induce the viral infection into the (very rare neoplastic transformation. From this perspective, a number of putative viral, host, and environmental co-factors have been proposed as potential candidates. Among them oxidative stress (OS is an interesting candidate, yet comparatively underexplored. OS is a constant threat to aerobic organisms being generated during mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, as well as during inflammation, infections, ionizing irradiation, UV exposure, mechanical and chemical stresses. Epithelial tissues, the elective target for HPV infection, are heavily exposed to all named sources of OS. Two different types of cooperative mechanisms are presumed to occur between OS and HPV: I The OS genotoxic activity and the HPV-induced genomic instability concur independently to the generation of the molecular damage necessary for the emergence of neoplastic clones. This first mode is merely a particular form of co-carcinogenesis; and II OS specifically interacts with one or more molecular stages of neoplastic initiation and/or progression induced by the HPV infection. This manuscript was designed to summarize available data on this latter hypothesis. Experimental data and indirect evidences on promoting the activity of OS in viral infection and viral integration will be reviewed. The anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenetic role of NO (nitric oxide and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase will be discussed together with the OS/HPV cooperation in inducing cancer metabolism adaptation. Unexplored/underexplored aspects of the OS interplay with the HPV-driven carcinogenesis

  9. Breast carcinogenesis: risk of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The risk of radiation carcinogenesis in the opposite breast is a major concern for physicians and breast cancer patients who choose to preserve the involved breast through conservation treatment, i.e., conservation survey and radiation therapy. In analyzing the carcinogenic effect of irradiation on the breast, the radiobiologic risks assumed from the studies must be evaluated first in order to determine the accuracy of the epidemiologic data and radiation dosage. It is generally assumed from the carcinogenic studies that radiation is carcinogenic at any dose rate. However, it is well-known that low dose rates are less effective at producing cancer in animal species than high dose rates. However, in most epidemiologic studies no apparent account is taken of dose rate. Also, there are technical differences between the irradiation received by individuals involved in most epidemiologic studies and the therapeutic irradiation received by breast cancer patients. All of these factors make it difficult, if not impossible, to directly correlate the irradiation risk ascertained from the studies and modern radiotherapy. This paper examines what risk exists and how great it is

  10. Genetic alterations in carcinogenesis and chemoprevention.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosin, M P

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory and clinical studies suggest that genetic change is intrinsically involved in the development of cancer and that this change occurs in humans throughout carcinogenesis, in both early and late stages. Therefore, the quantification of the level of genetic change in human epithelial tissues may serve as a marker for cancer risk. The micronucleus test has been used to quantify the level of site-specific chromosomal breakage occurring in epithelial tissues of individuals at elevated ris...

  11. Modifying effects of Soybean and Nigella Sativa against Experimental Hepato-carcinogenesis induced By Nitrosamine Precursor in Rats Histopathological and electron microscopically study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanaa F. Waer, **Abdel Baset EL Asser, ***Hamdy A. Ibrahim

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer has become an important topic in medicine since it is a major cause of death in the developing countries and it is now only secondary to that of myocardial infraction. Nitrosamines precursors are known to be carcinogenic to humans, in various organs at relatively low levels of exposure. It induces benign and malignant tumors especially liver tumors following its administration by various routes, including ingestion and inhalation. Humans may be exposed to Nitrosamines through the ingestion of food that contains it, such as cured meat products, and smoked fish. Other exposures to Nitrosamines may be from drinking contaminated water and from breathing cigarette smoke and contaminated ambient air. Individual are most likely to be exposed to Nitrosamines in occupational settings such as in the rubber, tannery, fish processing, dyes, and surfactant industries. The prevalence of liver tumors throughout the world makes in imperative to seek chemo preventive agents. Vegetables, natural products of plant origin and numerous non-nutritive dietary constituents have been shown to play a salutary role in cancer chemoprevention. The present study aims to evaluate the chemo preventive efficacy of soy bean and Nigella sativa on hepato-carcinogenesis induced by dibuty1 nitrosamine (DEN. It could be observed that both soy bean and Nigella sativa have a good effect of amelioration against liver hepatoma induced by nitrosamine. Soy bean more or less showed more prerogative effect than Nigella 9 and 12 months after administration.

  12. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyo; Jun; Ahn; Dong; Soo; Lee

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to theoccurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cag A and vac A are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  13. Inhibition of carcinogenesis by retinoids. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nettesheim, P.

    1979-01-01

    Progress made in recent years in the search for retinoids with anticarcinogenic activity is reviewed. There are many studies to be found in the literature which show no substantial effect of retinoids on carcinogenesis or tumor growth. Some of these negative findings may be related to the carcinogen dose used, the type of retinoid used, the dose, dose schedule or mode of administration of the retinoid. Others may indicate that the particular type of tumor or tumor system is, indeed, refractory to retinoids in general or to those retinoids that were tested. A great gap still exists in our knowledge concerning the pharmake-kinetics of most retinoids their availability to various normal and cancerous tissues, and the role and existence of transport and binding proteins. There are studies which indicate that under certain conditions, particularly conditions of topical application, some retinoids may even enhance carcinogenesis. It seems, however, indisputable by now that some retinoids are effective inhibitors of carcinogenesis in some organ systems and can even inhibit the growth of some established tumors. While the mechanisms of these inhibitory effects are presently not understood, it does seem clear that they are not mediated via the cytotoxic mechanisms typical of chemotherapeutic agents. The hope that retinoids might become an effective tool to halt the progression of some neoplastic diseases, seems to be justified.

  14. Radiation-induced mammary carcinogenesis in rodent models. What's different from chemical carcinogenesis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation is one of a few well-characterized etiologic factors of human breast cancer. Laboratory rodents serve as useful experimental models for investigating dose responses and mechanisms of cancer development. Using these models, a lot of information has been accumulated about mammary gland cancer, which can be induced by both chemical carcinogens and radiation. In this review, we first list some experimental rodent models of breast cancer induction. We then focus on several topics that are important in understanding the mechanisms and risk modification of breast cancer development, and compare radiation and chemical carcinogenesis models. We will focus on the pathology and natural history of cancer development in these models, genetic changes observed in induced cancers, indirect effects of carcinogens, and finally risk modification by reproductive factors and age at exposure to the carcinogens. In addition, we summarize the knowledge available on mammary stem/progenitor cells as a potential target of carcinogens. Comparison of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis models on these topics indicates certain similarities, but it also indicates clear differences in several important aspects, such as genetic alterations of induced cancers and modification of susceptibility by age and reproductive factors. Identification of the target cell type and relevant translational research for human risk management may be among the important issues that are addressed by radiation carcinogenesis models. (author)

  15. Neglected role of hookah and opium in gastric carcinogenesis : A cohort study on risk factors and attributable fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadjadi, Alireza; Derakhshan, Mohammad H.; Yazdanbod, Abbas; Boreiri, Majid; Parsaeian, Mahbubeh; Babaei, Masoud; Alimohammadian, Masoomeh; Samadi, Fatemeh; Etemadi, Arash; Pourfarzi, Farhad; Ahmadi, Emad; Delavari, Alireza; Islami, Farhad; Farzadfar, Farshad; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Nikmanesh, Arash; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2014-01-01

    A recent study showed an association between hookah/opium use and gastric cancer but no study has investigated the relationship with gastric precancerous lesions. We examined the association between hookah/opium and gastric precancerous lesions and subsequent gastric cancer. In a population-based co

  16. Radiation carcinogenesis: radioprotectors and photosensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines 1) some of the salient features of radiation carcinogenesis that are pertinent to the questions of how the carcinogenic effects might be influenced, 2) the effects of radioprotectors on ionizing radiation-induced cancer, and 3) the effect of photosensitizers on UVR-induced skin cancer

  17. Radiation carcinogenesis: radioprotectors and photosensitizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper outlines 1) some of the salient features of radiation carcinogenesis that are pertinent to the questions of how the carcinogenic effects might be influenced, 2) the effects of radioprotectors on ionizing radiation-induced cancer, and 3) the effect of photosensitizers on UVR-induced skin cancer.

  18. Review of low dose-rate epidemiological studies and biological mechanisms of dose-rate effects on radiation induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection system adopts the linear non-threshold model with using dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF). The dose-rate range where DDREF is applied is below 100 mGy per hour, and it is regarded that there are no dose-rate effects at very low dose rate, less than of the order of 10 mGy per year, even from the biological risk evaluation model based on cellular and molecular level mechanisms for maintenance of genetic integrity. Among low dose-rate epidemiological studies, studies of residents in high natural background areas showed no increase of cancer risks at less than about 10 mGy per year. On the other hand, some studies include a study of the Techa River cohort suggested the increase of cancer risks to the similar degree of Atomic bomb survivor data. The difference of those results was supposed due to the difference of dose rate. In 2014, International Commission on Radiological Protection opened a draft report on stem cell biology for public consultations. The report proposed a hypothesis based on the new idea of stem cell competition as a tissue level quality control mechanism, and suggested that it could explain the dose-rate effects around a few milligray per year. To verify this hypothesis, it would be needed to clarify the existence and the lowest dose of radiation-induced stem cell competition, and to elucidate the rate of stem cell turnover and radiation effects on it. As for the turnover, replenishment of damaged stem cells would be the important biological process. It would be meaningful to collect the information to show the difference of dose rates where the competition and the replenishment would be the predominant processes. (author)

  19. Brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) skin carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunton, T E

    2000-06-01

    Alternative models using fish species have been tested in liver toxicity and carcinogenesis bioassays. Similar models have not been developed for skin. The brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) has shown potential as a model for skin carcinogenesis studies due to its sensitivity to environmental chemical pollutants. The present study is an initial morphologic and biochemical characterization of the normal and neoplastic brown bullhead skin to assess its suitability as a model of skin carcinogenesis. Brown bullhead were removed from Back River in the Chesapeake Bay region, an area historically polluted with heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Histology, histochemistry, and electron microscopy were used to stage the morphologic development and progression of neoplasia in skin. The distribution of keratin, a family of structural proteins with altered expression in mammalian tumorigenesis, was analyzed with one and two dimensional gel electrophoresis and nitrocellulose blots of extracts from normal skin. Keratin expression in skin and other organs was also assessed with immunohistochemistry using AE1, AE3, and PCK 26 antibodies, and the proliferation index in skin and neoplasms with PCNA antibody. Skin lesions appeared to progress from hyperplasia through carcinoma, and the proliferation index was increased in papilloma. Also in papilloma, intercellular interdigitations appeared increased and desmosomes decreased which may in future studies correlate with changes in expression of other molecular markers of neoplastic progression. Both Type I and Type II keratin subfamilies were detected in skin using gel electrophoresis with the complimentary keratin blot-binding assay. For further development of the brown bullhead model, future studies can compare and relate these baseline data to alterations in expression of keratin and other markers in fish neoplasms and to molecular events which occur in man. PMID:10930121

  20. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Tris(2-chloroethyl) Phosphate (CAS No. 115-96-8) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Gavage Studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    Tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TRCP), a flame-retardant plasticizer used in plastics, polymeric foams, and synthetic fibers, was studied as part of the National Toxicology Program's class study of trisalkyl phosphate flame retardants. Toxicology and carcinogenesis studies were conducted by administering TRCP (approximately 98% pure) in corn oil by gavage to groups of F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice of each sex for 16 days, 16 weeks, or 2 years. Genetic toxicology studies were performed in Salmonella typhimurium and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. 16-Day Studies: There were no chemical-related deaths, differences in final mean body weight, or histopathological lesions in rats receiving 22 to 350 mg/kg TRCP or in mice receiving 44 to 700 mg/kg TRCP for 12 doses over 16 days. Serum cholinesterase activity in female rats receiving 175 or 350 mg/kg TRCP was reduced slightly (80% of control levels), but enzyme activity in dosed male rats and in mice was similar to that in controls. 16-Week Studies: Rats received 22 to 350 mg/kg TRCP for 16 weeks (female) or 18 weeks (male). Several male and female rats in the 175 or 350 mg/kg dose groups died from chemical toxicity. Final mean body weights of female rats receiving 350 mg/kg were 20% greater than those of controls; final mean body weights of the remaining groups of dosed female rats and dosed male rats were similar. Chemical-related neuronal necrosis occurred in the hippocampus and thalamus of female rats and, to a lesser extent, of male rats. Serum cholinesterase activity was reduced in females receiving 175 or 350 mg/kg TRCP. There were no chemical-related deaths, differences in final mean body weight, or differences in cholinesterase activity in mice receiving 44 to 700 mg/kg TRCP for 16 weeks. Tubule epithelial cells with enlarged nuclei (cytomegaly and karyomegaly) were observed in the kidneys of high-dose (700 mg/kg) male and female mice. 2-Year Studies: The 2-year studies in rats were conducted by administering 0

  1. Mechanisms of carcinogenesis prevention by flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Belitsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of anticancerogenic effects of flavanoids and isocyanates from the plants widely consumed in the midland belt of Russia were reviewed. Data of studies both in vitro and in vivo were analyzed. Special attention was paid to inhibition of targets responsible for carcinogen metabolic activation, carcinogenesis promotion and tumor progression as well as neoangiogenesis. Besides that the antioxidant properties of flavonoids and their effects on cell cycle regulation, apoptosis initiation and cell mobility were considered.

  2. Oxidative stress in prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udensi, Udensi K; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic hyperplasia (PH) is a common urologic disease that affects mostly elderly men. PH can be classified as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or prostate cancer (PCa) based on its severity. Oxidative stress (OS) is known to influence the activities of inflammatory mediators and other cellular processes involved in the initiation, promotion and progression of human neoplasms including prostate cancer. Scientific evidence also suggests that micronutrient supplementation may restore the antioxidant status and hence improve the clinical outcomes for patients with BPH and PCa. This review highlights the recent studies on prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis, and examines the role of OS on the molecular pathology of prostate cancer progression and treatment. PMID:27609145

  3. Thyroid cancer. Reevaluation of an experimental model for radiogenic endocrine carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of experimental studies of radiogenic thyroid cancer is appraised, and some older data are reinterpreted in the light of more recent findings. Problems of thyroid dosimetry, particularly the dosimetry of internal radioiodides, are discussed. The steps in radiation carcinogenesis during the acute phase, the latent phase, and the phase of tumor growth are discussed in terms of thyroid epithelial cell population changes. The roles of three cell populations (undamaged or completely repaired epithelial cells, oncogenically initiated cells, and terminally damaged but functionally competent cells) in neoplasia are described. Finally, the implications for man of these experimental results and conclusions are discussed. 89 refs., 4 figs

  4. Experimental, statistical, and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared to domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette-smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research program that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models), and the relationship of radon to smoking and other copollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. 20 refs., 1 fig

  5. Experimental, statistical and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared with domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research programme that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models) and the relationship of radon to smoking and other co-pollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. (author)

  6. Transgenerational teratogenesis and carcinogenesis by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper thoroughly reviews studies on transgenerational teratogenesis and carcinogenesis induced by radiation and summarizes currently available data from animal studies. The discussions focus on the incidence of tumors, malformations, and mutations in the offspring after parental exposure to radiation, as well as estimated relative risks of congenital malformations and stillbirths in the offspring after parental X-ray exposure. The data suggest that different types of tumors are induced in offspring, because of strain differences in the experimental animals. The results of epidemiological studies in human populations, such as the children of atomic bomb survivors, conflict with the findings in animal studies. The author points to the following reasons for the differences between the results in animals and humans: differences in radiation doses, timing of exposure, and genetic predisposition, etc. While pointing out issues that need to be investigated further, the author indicates that clear strain differences exist in types of tumors induced and in tumor incidences in the offspring of animals that were irradiated before the offspring were conceived, and that genetic predisposition is therefore important in transgenerational carcinogenesis. (K.H.)

  7. Dietary fat and carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woutersen, R.A.; Appel, M.J.; Garderen-Hoetmer, A. van; Wijnands, M.V.W.

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic investigations have suggested a relationship between dietary fat intake and various types of cancer incidences. Furthermore, epidemiologic studies as well as studies with animal models have demonstrated that not only the amount but also the type of fat consumed is important. At present

  8. Repository shafts relocation study: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to reconfigure the sub-surface layout so as to move the shaft pillar out of the area of the probable maximum flood (PMF). The reconfiguration consisted of two major changes in the layout. First, two emplacement entries at the south end of the repository were moved into an area west of the shaft pillar. Secondly, the width of the shaft pillar was reduced from 1800 ft to 1200 ft. This change was based on more detailed scoping studies than had been conducted during SCP-CD. Finite element analysis and calculation of shaft pillar size by empirical methods, data evaluation from operating evaporite mines, thermomechanical analysis, and review of damaged mine shafts all went into this scoping study. It was assumed that there are tolerable vertical and horizontal displacements to shaft linings and surface facilities and that these structures can be designed and constructed to withstand these deformations. In a preliminary revised underground layout, the exploratory shafts (ESs) were 369 ft west of the locations identified in the Draft Environmental Assessment (DEA). However, there was a desire to keep them in the DEA, hence the final Environmental Assessment (EA, DOE, 1986), locations. This was accomplished by moving shaft A and its connecting entries 625 ft to the east and making certain other modifications to the layout. This change would require excavating an additional 40,000 tons of salt and a 1.2 month extension of pre-emplacement development activity. 12 ref., 19 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Oral Carcinogenesis and Oral Cancer Chemoprevention: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuji Tanaka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. The development of oral cancer is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are possible to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will yield important advances for detecting high-risk patients, monitoring preventive interventions, and assessing cancer risk and pharmacogenomics. In addition, novel chemopreventive agents based on molecular mechanisms and targets against oral cancers will be derived from studies using appropriate animal carcinogenesis models. New approaches, such as molecular-targeted agents and agent combinations in high-risk oral individuals, are undoubtedly needed to reduce the devastating worldwide consequences of oral malignancy.

  10. Modeling Multiple Causes of Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, T D

    1999-01-24

    An array of epidemiological results and databases on test animal indicate that risk of cancer and atherosclerosis can be up- or down-regulated by diet through a range of 200%. Other factors contribute incrementally and include the natural terrestrial environment and various human activities that jointly produce complex exposures to endotoxin-producing microorganisms, ionizing radiations, and chemicals. Ordinary personal habits and simple physical irritants have been demonstrated to affect the immune response and risk of disease. There tends to be poor statistical correlation of long-term risk with single agent exposures incurred throughout working careers. However, Agency recommendations for control of hazardous exposures to humans has been substance-specific instead of contextually realistic even though there is consistent evidence for common mechanisms of toxicological and carcinogenic action. That behavior seems to be best explained by molecular stresses from cellular oxygen metabolism and phagocytosis of antigenic invasion as well as breakdown of normal metabolic compounds associated with homeostatic- and injury-related renewal of cells. There is continually mounting evidence that marrow stroma, comprised largely of monocyte-macrophages and fibroblasts, is important to phagocytic and cytokinetic response, but the complex action of the immune process is difficult to infer from first-principle logic or biomarkers of toxic injury. The many diverse database studies all seem to implicate two important processes, i.e., the univalent reduction of molecular oxygen and breakdown of aginuine, an amino acid, by hydrolysis or digestion of protein which is attendant to normal antigen-antibody action. This behavior indicates that protection guidelines and risk coefficients should be context dependent to include reference considerations of the composite action of parameters that mediate oxygen metabolism. A logic of this type permits the realistic common-scale modeling of

  11. Effect of luteolin on glycoproteins metabolism in 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine induced experimental colon carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Vaiyapuri

    2008-12-01

    carcinogenesis. Thus, the present study indicates that luteolin has protected the cell surface and maintained the structural integrity of the cell membranes during DMH induced colon carcinogenesis. Keywords: Colon cancer, 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine, luteolin, glycoproteins Received: 23 January 2009 / Received in revised form: 17 February 2009, Accepted: 28 February 2009, Published online: 3 March 2009

  12. Additional EIPC Study Analysis. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, Stanton W [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gotham, Douglas J. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Luciani, Ralph L. [Navigant Consultant Inc., Suwanee, GA (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 14 topics was developed for further analysis. This paper brings together the earlier interim reports of the first 13 topics plus one additional topic into a single final report.

  13. Radiation-Ethionine Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents data on the possible co-carcinogenic effects of radiation and ethionine on the induction of liver tumours in female white rats, and data on the liver enzyme, tryptophan pyrrolase. Rats were divided into the following groups of approximately 100 animals each: two control groups; two groups given whole-body X-ray (200 and 400 rads); two groups given ethionine; and two groups given radiation-plus-ethionine. Ethionine was placed in the diet at a concentration of 0.25 per cent by weight. The radiation groups were exposed two weeks before being placed on the ethionine diet. Ten rats from each group were sacrified at 6-week intervals. After 54 weeks a total of 57 tumours had been observed in the rats receiving radiation-plus-ethionine, while only 17 liver tumours were found in the rats which received ethionine only. Of the rats receiving ethionine and 400 R, 38 developed liver tumours while 19 tumours were seen in rats given ethionine and 200 R. No liver tumours were found in control rats or in rats given radiation only. Statistical evaluation of.the data showed that radiation did not accelerate the rate of development of liver tumours but acted by decreasing the latent period of tumour appearance. Also, the latent period was shorter in the rats receiving 400 R plus ethionine than in those receiving 200 R and ethionine. The tryptophan pyrrolase studies indicated that the levels in the liver were not altered at any time during the study once the animals were placed on ethionine. The hepatomas had low basal enzyme levels and almost no inducible enzyme, while adjacent liver tissue had normal enzyme levels and responded to hydrocortisone. induction. (author)

  14. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Coumarin (CAS No. 91-64-5) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Gavage Studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Coumarin is the basic structure of numerous naturally occurring compounds with important and diverse physiological activities. More than a thousand coumarin derivatives have been described, varying from simple coumarins containing alkyl and hydroxyl side chains to complex coumarins with benzoyl, furanoyl, pyranoyl, or alkylphosphorothionyl substituents. Coumarin and 3,4-dihydrocoumarin were nominated by the Food and Drug Administration and the National Cancer Institute for study because of the widespread use of coumarin in perfumes, cosmetics, and other products as a fragrance, continued interest in coumarin compounds as flavor-enhancing agents for foods, and the interest in structure-activity relationships of this important group of compounds. Coumarin is believed to be metabolized to a 3,4-epoxide intermediate, which may be responsible for its toxic effects, while 3,4-dihydrocoumarin, which lacks the 3,4-double bond, is not considered likely to form an epoxide intermediate. Toxicity and carcinogenicity studies were conducted by administering coumarin (97% pure) in corn oil by gavage to groups of male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice for 16 days, 13 weeks, and 2 years. Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in Salmonella typhimurium, cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, Drosophila melanogaster, and B6C3F1 mice. 16-DAY STUDY IN RATS: Groups of five male and five female rats received coumarin in corn oil by gavage at doses of 0, 25, 50, 100, 200, or 400 mg per kg body weight, 5 days a week for a total of 12 doses in a 16-day period. All female rats and four male rats receiving 400 mg/kg died. The mean body weight gains and final mean body weights of surviving dosed male and female rats were similar to those of the controls. There were no clinical signs of organ-specific toxicity, and there was no evidence of impaired blood coagulation from measurements of capillary clotting time or prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin time. 16-DAY STUDY IN MICE

  15. Pipeline bottoming cycle study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of applying bottoming cycles to the prime movers that drive the compressors of natural gas pipelines was studied. These bottoming cycles convert some of the waste heat from the exhaust gas of the prime movers into shaft power and conserve gas. Three typical compressor station sites were selected, each on a different pipeline. Although the prime movers were different, they were similar enough in exhaust gas flow rate and temperature that a single bottoming cycle system could be designed, with some modifications, for all three sites. Preliminary design included selection of the bottoming cycle working fluid, optimization of the cycle, and design of the components, such as turbine, vapor generator and condensers. Installation drawings were made and hardware and installation costs were estimated. The results of the economic assessment of retrofitting bottoming cycle systems on the three selected sites indicated that profitability was strongly dependent upon the site-specific installation costs, how the energy was used and the yearly utilization of the apparatus. The study indicated that the bottoming cycles are a competitive investment alternative for certain applications for the pipeline industry. Bottoming cycles are technically feasible. It was concluded that proper design and operating practices would reduce the environmental and safety hazards to acceptable levels. The amount of gas that could be saved through the year 2000 by the adoption of bottoming cycles for two different supply projections was estimated as from 0.296 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a low supply projection to 0.734 trillion ft/sup 3/ for a high supply projection. The potential market for bottoming cycle equipment for the two supply projections varied from 170 to 500 units of varying size. Finally, a demonstration program plan was developed.

  16. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Tetrafluoroethylene (CAS No. 116-14-3) in F344 Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Inhalation Studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Tetrafluoroethylene is used in the production of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon(R)) and other polymers. Tetrafluoroethylene was nominated by the National Cancer Institute for toxicity and carcinogenicity studies based on the potential for human exposure to the chemical due to the large production volume and on the lack of adequate data for tetrafluoroethylene in the literature. Male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed to tetrafluoroethylene (98% to 99% pure) by whole body inhalation exposure for 16 days, 13 weeks, or 2 years. Genetic toxicity studies were conducted in mouse peripheral blood erythrocytes. 16-DAY STUDY IN RATS: Groups of five male and five female F344/N rats were exposed to 0, 312, 625, 1,250, 2,500, or 5,000 ppm tetrafluoroethylene by inhalation for 6 hours per day, 5 days per week for a total of 12 exposures during a 16-day period. All rats survived to the end of the study. The final mean body weights and body weight gains of males and females exposed to 5,000 ppm were significantly less than those of the controls. The mean body weight gain of females exposed to 2,500 ppm was also significantly less than that of the controls. There were no exposure-related clinical findings in male or female rats. There were no significant differences in hematology parameters that were considered to be related to tetrafluoroethylene exposure. Absolute and relative kidney weights of all exposed groups of males were significantly greater than those of the controls, as were those of females in the 2,500 and 5,000 ppm groups. The absolute kidney weight of females exposed to 1,250 ppm was also significantly greater than that of the controls. The relative liver weights of all exposed groups of males and the absolute liver weights of males in the 625 and 2,500 ppm groups were significantly greater than those of the controls. Increased incidences of renal tubule degeneration occurred in males and females exposed to 625 ppm or greater; this lesion was

  17. Molecular mechanism of cholangiocarcinoma carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maemura, Kosei; Natsugoe, Shoji; Takao, Sonshin

    2014-10-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a highly malignant cancer of the biliary tract with a poor prognosis, which often arises from conditions causing long-term inflammation, injury, and reparative biliary epithelial cell proliferation. Several conditions are known to be major risk factors for cancer in the biliary tract or gallbladder, including primary sclerosing cholangitis, liver fluke infection, pancreaticobiliary maljunction, and chemical exposure in proof-printing workers. Abnormalities in various signaling cascades, molecules, and genetic mutations are involved in the pathogenesis of CCA. CCA is characterized by a series of highly recurrent mutations in genes, including KRAS, BRF, TP53, Smad, and p16(INK4a) . Cytokines that are affected by inflammatory environmental conditions, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), play an important role in cancer pathogenesis. Prominent signaling pathways important in carcinogenesis include TGF-β/Smad, IL-6/STAT-3, PI3K/AKT, Wnt, RAF/MEK/MAPK, and Notch. Additionally, some microRNAs regulate targets in critical pathways of CCA development and progression. This review article provides the understanding of the genetic and epigenetic mechanism(s) of carcinogenesis in CCA, which leads to the development of new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of this devastating cancer. PMID:24895231

  18. The glutathione biotransformation system and colon carcinogenesis in human

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grubben, M.J.A.L.; Nagengast, F.M.; Katan, M.B.; Peters, W.H.M.

    2001-01-01

    Evidence for a protective role of the glutathione biotransformation system in carcinogenesis is growing. However, most data on this system in relation to colorectal cancer originate from animal studies. Here we review the human data. In humans, a significant association was found between glutathione

  19. Carcinogenesis related to intense pulsed light and UV exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedelund, L; Lerche, C; Wulf, H C;

    2006-01-01

    This study examines whether intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment has a carcinogenic potential itself or may influence ultraviolet (UV)-induced carcinogenesis. Secondly, it evaluates whether UV exposure may influence IPL-induced side effects. Hairless, lightly pigmented mice (n=144) received three...

  20. Hypoxia and cell cycle deregulation in endometrial carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horrée, N.

    2007-01-01

    Because uterine endometrial carcinoma is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract and 1 of every 5 patients dies of this disease, understanding the mechanisms of carcinogenesis and progression of endometrial carcinoma is important. In general, this thesis can be summarized as a study o

  1. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Salicylazosulfapyridine (CAS No. 599-79-1) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Gavage Studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Salicylazosulfapyridine is widely used for the treatment of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. It has been beneficial in the treatment of psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis, and it has been used in veterinary medicine for the treatment of granulomatous colitis. Salicylazosulfapyridine was nominated for toxicity and carcinogenicity testing by the National Cancer Institute on the basis of its widespread use in humans and because it is a representative chemical from a class of aryl sulfonamides. Salicylazosulfapyridine is a suspect carcinogen because reductive cleavage of the azo linkage yields a p-amino aryl sulfonamide (sulfapyridine), and a related p-amino aryl sulfonamide (sulfamethoxazole) has been shown to produce thyroid neoplasms in rats. Toxicology and carcinogenicity studies were conducted in F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice. Rats and mice were administered salicylazosulfapyridine (96% to 98% pure) in corn oil by gavage for 16 days, 13 weeks, or 2 years. The gavage route of administration was selected for these studies because it approximates the typical route of human exposure to the chemical. Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in vitro in Salmonella typhimurium and cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells and in vivo in rat and mouse bone marrow and mouse peripheral blood cells. 16-DAY STUDY IN RATS: Groups of five male and five female rats were administered 0, 675, 1,350, or 2,700 mg salicylazosulfapyridine/kg body weight in corn oil by gavage for 16 days excluding weekends. All rats survived to the end of the study. With the exception of the 675 mg/kg male group, the final mean body weights of all dosed groups of males and females were significantly lower than those of controls. Mean body weight gains of all dosed groups were less than those of controls. Clinical findings included ruffled fur and distended abdomens in male and female rats receiving 2,700 mg/kg. Hypothyroidism, evidenced by decreased serum triiodothyronine and thyroxine concentrations

  2. Studies on the repair of double strand break of DNA and cellular carcinogenesis, and consideration on the concept of extinction of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the relationship between the repair of double strand break (DSB) of DNA and cellular carcinogenesis mainly on author's investigations, and his recent thought aiming at the extinction of nuclear power. The molecular repairing system is explained about DNA DSB induced by radiation and chemicals. When DSB occurs, nucleosome consisting from 4 core-histones participates to link the broken ends and then repair mechanisms of homologous recombination (HRR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) begin to work. The latter is dominant in mammalians. Thus the genetic defect in these systems of DSB response and repair is a course of disorders such as ataxia telangiectasia (AT) (DSB sensor defect), genetic breast cancer (HRR defect), and radiosensitive-severe combined immunodeficiency (RS-SCID) (NHEJ defect), all of which result in cancer formation. NHEJ repair is known to be error-prone. Against multi-step carcinogenesis where accumulated gene mutations lead to the cancer formation, the author thinks chromosomal instability is one of important carcinogenic causes: the instability can be a trigger of producing cancer stem cells because the cells can be yielded from mouse embryonic stem cells where DSB is shown to participate in the process. Low dose radiation produces a small amount of DSB, to which the repair response is less sensitive at G2/M checkpoint, ultimately leading to genomic instability. Considering effects of the low dose radiation exposure above, and of the internal exposure to 3H-thymidine beta ray in cells, of indoor Rn participating 16% of lung cancer incidence (Canadian epidemiological data) and so on, together with moral and social responsibility of scientist and technologist, the author says to have attained to the concept of the ''Extinction of Nuclear Power''. (T.T)

  3. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Nitromethane (CAS No. 75-52-5) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Inhalation Studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Nitromethane is used as a rocket and engine fuel; as a synthesis intermediate for agricultural fumigants, biocides, and other products; as a solvent; and as an explosive in mining, oil-well drilling, and seismic exploration. It has been detected in air, in surface and drinking water, and in cigarette smoke. Nitromethane was studied because of the potential for widespread human exposure and because it is structurally related to the carcinogens 2-nitropropane and tetranitromethane. Male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice received nitromethane (purity 98% or greater) by inhalation for 16 days, 13 weeks, or 2 years. Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in Salmonella typhimurium, cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, and peripheral blood erythrocytes of mice. 16-DAY STUDY IN RATS: Groups of five male and five female rats were exposed to 0, 94, 188, 375, 750, or 1,500 ppm nitromethane by inhalation, 6 hours per day, 5 days per week, for 16 days. All rats survived until the end of the study. The mean body weight gain of male rats in the 1,500 ppm group was slightly but significantly less than that of the controls; the final mean body weights and mean body weight gains of exposed females were similar to those of the controls. Clinical findings in all male and female rats in the 1,500 ppm groups included increased preening, rapid breathing, hyperactivity early in the study, and hypoactivity and loss of coordination in the hindlimbs near the end of the study. The relative liver weights of all exposed groups of male rats and the absolute and relative liver weights of females exposed to 375 ppm or greater were significantly greater than those of the controls. Minimal to mild degeneration of the olfactory epithelium was observed in the nose of males and females exposed to 375 ppm or greater. Sciatic nerve degeneration was present in all male and female rats exposed to 375 ppm or greater; rats exposed to 750 or 1,500 ppm also had reduced myelin around sciatic axons. 16

  4. Role of retinoic receptors in lung carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renyi-Vamos Ferenc

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several in vitro and in vivo studies have examined the positive and negative effects of retinoids (vitamin A analogs in premalignant and malignant lesions. Retinoids have been used as chemopreventive and anticancer agents because of their pleiotropic regulator function in cell differentiation, growth, proliferation and apoptosis through interaction with two types of nuclear receptors: retinoic acid receptors and retinoid X receptors. Recent investigations have gradually elucidated the function of retinoids and their signaling pathways and may explain the failure of earlier chemopreventive studies. In this review we have compiled basic and recent knowledge regarding the role of retinoid receptors in lung carcinogenesis. Sensitive and appropriate biological tools are necessary for screening the risk population and monitoring the efficacy of chemoprevention. Investigation of retinoid receptors is important and may contribute to the establishment of new strategies in chemoprevention for high-risk patients and in the treatment of lung cancer.

  5. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Two Pentachlorophenol Technical-Grade Mixtures (CAS No. 87-86-5) in B6C3F1 Mice (Feed Studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    pure pentachlorophenol for 26-27 weeks. Common control groups of 10 male and 10 female mice were fed control diets. Additional groups of male mice were examined for behavioral, histopathologic, clinical pathology, biochemical, and immunologic effects. All mice exposed at the highest dose of technical-grade pentachlorophenol died, as did 2/10 male mice exposed at the highest dose of DP-2. No deaths were observed in mice exposed to EC-7 or pure pentachlorophenol. Markedly lower final body weights were observed in the high dose groups only (all grades of pentachlorophenol). No chemical-relatedclinical signs were observed at sublethal doses. No major behavioral changes were observed after 5 weeks' exposure, but increased motor activity and heightened startle responses were present at the end of the study in female mice exposed to all four grades of pentachlorophenol. All grades of pentachlorophenol caused increases in serum enzymes associated with liver injury. All grades of pentachlorophenol also resulted in a dose-related induction of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase and an increase in cytochrome P450. However, the technical grade was a more powerful inducer than the other grades of pentachlorophenol. Pure pentachlorophenol had no effect on humoral or cell-mediated immunity. However, DP-2 and particularly technical-grade pentachlorophenol depressed humoral immune function. A dose-related increase in liver weight was observed in mice exposed to all grades of pentachlorophenol. A dose-related increase in spleen weight was observed in male mice exposed to all grades of pentachlorophenol; a decrease in spleen weight was observed in female mice exposed to all grades of pentachlorophenol except pure. After 6 months' exposure, histopathologic examination consistently revealed effects in the liver and urinary bladder. The liver lesions were present at all doses with all four grades of pentachlorophenol but were less severe at comparable doses in the mice exposed to pure

  6. Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Furfuryl Alcohol (CAS No. 98-00-0) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Inhalation Studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-02-01

    Furfuryl alcohol-based resins are used as binding agents in foundry sand and as corrosion inhibitors in mortar, grout, and cement. Because of their heat resistance, furan resins are used in the manufacture of fiberglass-reinforced plastic equipment. Furfuryl alcohol was selected for evaluation because of the absence of data on its carcinogenic potential and its large production volume, widespread use in manufacturing, and ubiquitous presence in consumer goods. Male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed to furfuryl alcohol (greater than 98% pure) by inhalation for 16 days, 14 weeks, or 2 years. Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in Salmonella typhimurium, cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, and mouse bone marrow cells. 16-DAY STUDY IN RATS: Groups of five male and five female rats were exposed to concentrations of 0, 16, 31, 63, 125, or 250 ppm furfuryl alcohol by inhalation, 6 hours per day, 5 days per week for 16 days. All male and female rats exposed to 250 ppm died by day 2 of the study, and one male rat exposed to 125 ppm died on day 5. Final mean body weights of male and female rats exposed to 125 ppm were significantly less than those of the chamber control groups. Male rats exposed to 31, 63, or 125 ppm and female rats exposed to 125 ppm gained less weight than the chamber control groups. Clinical findings included dyspnea, hypoactivity, and nasal and ocular discharge in males and females exposed to 63, 125, or 250 ppm. All exposed animals developed lesions in the nasal respiratory epithelium and olfactory epithelium, and the severities of these lesions generally increased with increasing exposure concentration. 16-DAY STUDY IN MICE: Groups of five male and five female mice were exposed to concentrations of 0, 16, 31, 63, 125, or 250 ppm furfuryl alcohol by inhalation, 6 hours per day, 5 days per week for 16 days. All male and female mice exposed to 250 ppm died by day 4 of the study, and one female mouse exposed to 125 ppm died on day

  7. Genomic instability and colon carcinogenesis: from the perspective of genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinthalapally V Rao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is the second most lethal cancer; approximately 600,000 people die of it annually in the world. Colon carcinogenesis generally follows a slow and stepwise process of accumulation of mutations under the influence of environmental and epigenetic factors. To adopt a personalized (tailored cancer therapy approach and to improve current strategies for prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and therapy overall, advanced understanding of molecular events associated with colon carcinogenesis is necessary. A contemporary approach that combines genetics, epigenomics and signaling pathways has revealed many genetic/genomic alterations associated with colon cancer progression and their relationships to a genomic instability phenotype prevalent in colon cancer. In this review, we describe the relationship between gene mutations associated with colon carcinogenesis and a genomic instability phenotype, and we discuss possible clinical applications of genomic instability studies. Colon carcinogenesis is associated with frequent mutations in several pathways that include phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC, p53 (TP53, F-box and WD repeat domain containing 7 (FBXW7, transforming growth factor (TGF-beta, chromosome cohesion and KRAS. These genes frequently mutated in pathways affecting colon cancer were designated colon cancer (CAN genes. Aberrations in major colon CAN genes have a causal relationship to genomic instability. Conversely, genomic instability itself plays a role in colon carcinogenesis in experimental settings, as demonstrated in transgenic mouse models with high genomic instability. Thus, there is a feedback-type relationship between CAN gene mutations and genomic instability. These genetic/genomic studies have led to emerging efforts to apply the knowledge to colon cancer prognosis and to targeted therapy.

  8. Growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor system and carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguszewski, Cesar Luiz; Boguszewski, Margaret Cristina da Silva; Kopchick, John J

    2016-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. In terms of cell cycle regulation, the GH-IGF system induces signalling pathways for cell growth that compete with other signalling systems that result in cell death; thus the final effect of these opposed forces is critical for normal and abnormal cell growth. The association of the GH-IGF system with carcinogenesis has long been hypothesised, mainly based on in vitro studies and the use of a variety of animal models of human cancer, and also on epidemiological and clinical evidence in humans. While ample experimental evidence supports a role of the GH-IGF system in tumour promotion and progression, with several of its components being currently tested as central targets for cancer therapy, the strength of evidence from patients with acromegaly, GH deficiency, or treated with GH is much weaker. In this review, we will attempt to consolidate this data. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (4): 414-426). PMID:27387246

  9. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene) (CAS No. 127-18-4) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Inhalation Studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    Tetrachloroethylene is used primarily as a dry cleaning agent, an industrial solvent for fats, oils, tars, rubber, and gums, and a metal degreasing agent. Tetrachloroethylene had antihelminthic uses, particularly for hookworms (1.6-8 g/60 kg), and was formerly used in combination with some grain protectants and fumigants. Toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of tetrachloroethylene (99.9% pure) were conducted by inhalation exposure of groups of 50 male and 50 female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice 6 hours per day, 5 days per week, for 103 weeks. The exposure concentrations used (0, 200, or 400 ppm for rats and 0, 100, or 200 ppm for mice) were selected on the basis of results from 13-week inhalation studies in which groups of 10 rats and 10 mice of each sex were exposed to tetrachloroethylene at 100-1,600 ppm for 6 hours per day, 5 days per week. During the 13-week studies, 1,600 ppm tetrachloroethylene was lethal to 20%-70% of the rats and mice and reduced the final body weights of survivors. In rats, tetrachloroethylene at 200-800 ppm caused minimal to mild hepatic congestion. In dosed male and female mice, minimal to mild hepatic leukocytic infiltration, centrilobular necrosis, bile stasis (400-1,600 ppm), and mitotic alteration (200-1,600 ppm) were produced. Tetrachloroethylene exposure also caused minimal renal tubular cell karyomegaly in mice at concentrations as low as 200 ppm. During the 2-year studies, exposure to tetrachloroethylene did not consistently affect body weight gains in either rats or mice. Exposure at 400 ppm tetrachloroethylene reduced the survival of male rats (control, 23/50; low dose, 20/50; high dose, 12/50). This reduced survival may have been related to an increased incidence of mononuclear cell leukemia. Tetrachloroethylene at both exposure concentrations reduced the survival of male mice (46/50; 25/50; 32/50), whereas exposure at 200 ppm reduced female mouse survival (36/50; 31/50; 19/50). Early deaths in mice may have been related to the

  10. Technology transfer pilot study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four specific technologies based on the Initial Fusion Program were targeted for this initial study. The areas chosen were the CO2 laser, high pressure from cleaning, video multiplexer, and plans-optics polishing. The study concluded that both Government and Industry are willing and anxious to promote and to reap the benefits of technology transfer. Recommendations were made in the areas of patent policy, documentation procedures in the transfer process, awareness training, and expansion of the scope of the study. 18 refs

  11. 90% Compliance Pilot Studies Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    In early 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced an opportunity for states to participate in energy code compliance evaluation pilot studies. DOE worked with five Regional Energy Efficiency Organizations (REEOs, formerly referred to as Energy Efficiency Partnerships, or EEPs) to fund pilot studies covering nine states. This report details conclusions stated in individual state reports, as well as conclusions drawn by DOE based on their oversight of the pilot studies, and based on discussions held with the REEOs and representatives from the pilot study states and their contractors.

  12. Canister storage building trade study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swenson, C.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the impact of several technical issues related to the usage of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) to safely stage and store N-Reactor spent fuel currently located at K-Basin 100KW and 100KE. Each technical issue formed the basis for an individual trade study used to develop the ROM cost and schedule estimates. The study used concept 2D from the Fluor prepared ``Staging and Storage Facility (SSF) Feasibility Report`` as the basis for development of the individual trade studies.

  13. Canister storage building trade study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to evaluate the impact of several technical issues related to the usage of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) to safely stage and store N-Reactor spent fuel currently located at K-Basin 100KW and 100KE. Each technical issue formed the basis for an individual trade study used to develop the ROM cost and schedule estimates. The study used concept 2D from the Fluor prepared ''Staging and Storage Facility (SSF) Feasibility Report'' as the basis for development of the individual trade studies

  14. Studies in genetic discrimination. Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    We have screened 1006 respondents in a study of genetic discrimination. Analysis of these responses has produced evidence of the range of institutions engaged in genetic discrimination and demonstrates the impact of this discrimination on the respondents to the study. We have found that both ignorance and policy underlie genetic discrimination and that anti-discrimination laws are being violated.

  15. Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Final performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samet, J.; Gilliland, F.D.

    1998-08-13

    This project incorporates two related research projects directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first project involved a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second project was a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives including facilitating the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases, developing methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and assessing the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collected multiple biological specimens. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether blood collection, induced sputum, bronchial brushing, washings, and mucosal biopsies from participants at two of the hospitals could be included efficiently. A questionnaire was developed for the extended study and all protocols for specimen collection and tissue handling were completed. Resource utilization is in progress at ITRI and the methods have been developed to study molecular and cellular changes in exfoliated cells contained in sputum as well as susceptibility factors.

  16. Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Final performance report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project incorporates two related research projects directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first project involved a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second project was a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives including facilitating the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases, developing methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and assessing the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collected multiple biological specimens. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether blood collection, induced sputum, bronchial brushing, washings, and mucosal biopsies from participants at two of the hospitals could be included efficiently. A questionnaire was developed for the extended study and all protocols for specimen collection and tissue handling were completed. Resource utilization is in progress at ITRI and the methods have been developed to study molecular and cellular changes in exfoliated cells contained in sputum as well as susceptibility factors

  17. Gasohol: economic feasibility study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, M. L.; Hammaker, G. S.; Buzenberg, R. J.; Wagner, J. P.

    1978-07-01

    This report was prepared by Development Planning and Research Associates, Inc. under a contract with the Energy Research and Development Center of the University of Nebraska in cooperation with the Agricultural Products Industrial Utilization Committee and the State of Nebraska. Funding for this study was provided to the Energy Research and Development Center by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Old West Regional Commission. The primary objective of the study was to: determine the fiscal and market conditions under which the production of gasohol would be profitable for private producers. For purposes of this study, gasohol is a motor fuel consisting of 10 percent agriculturally-derived anhydrous ethanol and 90 percent unleaded gasoline. The study assumes that gasohol can be a fuel substitute for gasoline; indeed, the cost of gasoline will significantly influence that for gasohol. Gasoline prices are determined by factors external to ethanol; thus, the economic feasibility study of gasohol is in large part an economic feasibility study of fuel-grade ethanol production. More specifically, the study examined the following: the technical aspects of distributing, marketing, and using gasohol; the costs of the distribution and marketing of ethanol and gasohol; the energy balance of ethanol production; the cost of producing ethanol; the factors influencing ehtanol plant size and location; and the conditions that would make ethanol economicaly feasible for private producers.

  18. Deep Disposal. Preliminary Study Storuman. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the first study of a potential site for a swedish repository for high-level radioactive waste, based on already existing information. The study was performed in close contact with local political and administrative representatives, and produced about 30 technical reports. The present report gives a review of the findings, and discusses the positive and negative effects of a localization to Storuman. Overall, it is concluded that there is a good potential for building the repository at Storuman, but that further studies of the rock down to a depth of 500 m are needed. Similar studies at other sites will however first be made, before any decisions on a more detailed examination. 84 refs, 32 figs

  19. Statistical modeling and extrapolation of carcinogenesis data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathematical models of carcinogenesis are reviewed, including pharmacokinetic models for metabolic activation of carcinogenic substances. Maximum likelihood procedures for fitting these models to epidemiological data are discussed, including situations where the time to tumor occurrence is unobservable. The plausibility of different possible shapes of the dose response curve at low doses is examined, and a robust method for linear extrapolation to low doses is proposed and applied to epidemiological data on radiation carcinogenesis

  20. Understanding Carcinogenesis for Fighting Oral Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Takuji Tanaka; Rikako Ishigamori

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. Oral cancer development is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are able to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will give us important advances for...

  1. 2006 Final Transmission Proposal: Revenue Requirements Study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of the Revenue Requirement Study (Study) is to establish the level of revenues needed from rates for Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) transmission and ancillary services to recover, in accordance with sound business principles, costs associated with the transmission of electric power over the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). The FCRTS is part of the larger Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) which also includes the hydroelectric, multipurpose facilities constructed and operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation in the Pacific Northwest. The FCRPS costs that are not included in the FCRTS costs are funded and repaid through BPA power rates. The transmission revenue requirements herein include: recovery of the Federal investment in transmission and transmission-related assets; the operations and maintenance (O&M) and other annual expenses associated with the provision of transmission and ancillary services; the cost of generation inputs for ancillary services and other between business-line services necessary for the transmission of power; and all other transmission-related costs incurred by the Administrator. The cost evaluation period for this rate proposal includes Fiscal Years (FYs) 2005-2007, the period extending from the last year for which historical information is available through the proposed rate test period. The Study includes the transmission revenue requirements for the rate test period, FYs 2006-2007 (Rate Period) and the results of transmission repayment studies. This Study outlines the policies, forecasts, assumptions, and calculations used to determine BPA's transmission revenue requirements. Legal requirements are summarized in Chapter 5 of this Study. The Revenue Requirement Study Documentation (Documentation), TR-06-FS-BPA-01A, contains key technical assumptions and calculations, the results of the transmission repayment studies, and a further

  2. Forecast Master Program case studies: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engle, R.; Granger, C.; Ramanathan, R. (ed.)

    1987-04-01

    This report presents a number of case studies using the computer software package FORECAST MASTER (FM). The series studied and forecast are, aggregate monthly California Electricity Sales, system energy demand data from Ontario Hydro, peak demand data for the residential and commercial customers of Georgia Power Company, Massachusetts Electric commercial sales, Narragansett Electric commercial sales, average and peak demand using Georgia Power Company data. A variety of methods have been studied by each of the contributing authors; trend line fitting, exponential smoothing, Box-Jenkins univariate forecasting, vector autoregression, state space modeling, dynamic econometric models including time-varying parameters and general order serial correlation corrections. Thus both the data sets and the modeling/forecasting methodologies are varied. A number of conclusions emerge from these case studies: FM provides a powerful set of tools to aid a utility forecaster, a great deal of caution should be exercised in pre-processing the data; it can have unintended side effects, diagnostic tests are very useful in econometric models, the Akaike Information Criterion is a useful measure for selecting the best state space model, and state space and econometric approaches both need equal amounts of care in model analysis and presentation.

  3. Laser fusion system design study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following studies were completed: (1) The synthesis of a pointing/control system compatible with existing and advanced laser opto-mechanical configurations. (2) Attainment of the required pointing angle, longitudinal focus, and differential pathlength accuracies. (3) Maximum modularization of the sensor and gimbal assemblies to provide the required accuracies at minimum cost. Detailed information is given on each. (MOW)

  4. External wave-launcher study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rationale for liquid dielectrically-loaded external wave-guide launchers is discussed. The arguments are strongly indicative that a liquid dielectric-filled waveguide system could be a practical technique for launching ICRH power into a fusion reactor. A detailed summary of the work performed in the study is presented

  5. Geothermal reservoir insurance study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-09

    The principal goal of this study was to provide analysis of and recommendations on the need for and feasibility of a geothermal reservoir insurance program. Five major tasks are reported: perception of risk by major market sectors, status of private sector insurance programs, analysis of reservoir risks, alternative government roles, and recommendations.

  6. ETHOS: Education Through Organ Study. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, Seth F.

    This document describes the Education Through Organ Study Program (ETHOS) designed to counteract disaffected students' falling academic achievement, absenteeism and truancy, and negative attitudes toward education and the school. The program attempted to assure success in acquiring musical skill by providing portable desk reed organs, programmed…

  7. Final version dry cask storage study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was prepared in response to Section 5064 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 (the Amendments Act--Public Law 100-203), which directs the Secretary of Energy to conduct a study of the use of dry-cask-storage technology for storing spent fuel at the sites of civilian nuclear reactors until a geologic repository is available. In conducting this study, whose results are being reported to the Congress, the Secretary was to consider such factors as costs, effects on human health and the environment, and the extent to which the Nuclear Waste Fund can and should be used to provide funds for at-reactor storage. In addition, the Secretary was to consult with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), include NRC comments in the report, and solicit the views of State and local governments and the public. The study performed in response to these requirements was based largely on data published by the DOE or the NRC or included in documents issued by the DOE. Among the DOE documents are the 1987 MRS proposal to the Congress and a subsequent report, prepared to supply the Congress with additional information on the MRS facility. Because in evaluating dry storage at reactor sites it is necessary to take into account other options for meeting storage needs, this study covered all forms of at-reactor storage. 107 refs., 15 figs., 10 tabs

  8. Advanced Multiple Processor Configuration Study. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clymer, S. J.

    This summary of a study on multiple processor configurations includes the objectives, background, approach, and results of research undertaken to provide the Air Force with a generalized model of computer processor combinations for use in the evaluation of proposed flight training simulator computational designs. An analysis of a real-time flight…

  9. Nova Scotia wind integration study : final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An independent study was commissioned by the Nova Scotia Department of Energy to identify and assess the impacts of integrating large scale wind power generation into Nova Scotia's electric power system. The purpose of the study was to help Nova Scotia's efforts towards building its renewable energy supply, in order to secure a local energy resource and to protect the environment. This report provided an overview of Nova Scotia's electric power sector, including organizations involved; existing generation system; existing transmission system; renewable energy standards; Nova Scotia Power integrated resource plan; and 2007 renewable energy request for proposals. The major assumptions for the study that were discussed included system parameters; system capacity reserve requirements; expansion plans to 2020; and allocation of new wind generation by zone. Wind resource data and system dispatch modeling were also presented and transmission system modeling was outlined. This included a discussion of steady state reliability requirements; inputs to the load flow model; load flow study and contingency analysis; intra-province transmission congestion; and potential impacts on system security. The report also presented an approach to impact analysis and mitigation such as the impact on greenhouse gas and other air emissions and the impact of wind energy prices on system costs. It was concluded that one of the most important factors in evaluation of the economic impact of wind power integration is the forecasted fuel prices for the thermal units. If the fuel prices had varied significantly from the forecasted values, the study economic impact results could have been quite different. 55 tabs., 64 figs., 1 appendix

  10. Physical protection equipment study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the work performed by MITRE for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The major products of this effort are a Catalog of Physical Protection Equipment, a Guide for Evaluation of Physical Protection Equipment, a book of Reference Materials, and a set of guidelines for use in the development of a methodology for measuring levels of security system effectiveness. A summary of recommendations resulting from this study is also presented

  11. Renewable Energy Feasibility Study Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooney, Tim [Antares Group Inc.

    2013-10-30

    The Gila River Indian Community (GRIC or the Community) contracted the ANTARES Group, Inc. (“ANTARES”) to assess the feasibility of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations. A solar energy project could provide a number of benefits to the Community in terms of potential future energy savings, increased employment, environmental benefits from renewable energy generation and usage, and increased energy self-sufficiency. The study addresses a number of facets of a solar project’s overall feasibility, including:  Technical appropriateness;  Solar resource characteristics and expected system performance;  Levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) economic assessment. The Gila River Indian Community (GRIC or the Community) contracted the ANTARES Group, Inc. (“ANTARES”) to prepare a biomass resource assessment study and evaluate the feasibility of a bioenergy project on Community land. A biomass project could provide a number of benefits to the Community in terms of increased employment, environmental benefits from renewable energy generation and usage, and increased energy self-sufficiency. The study addresses a number of facets of a biomass project’s overall feasibility, including:  Resource analysis and costs;  Identification of potential bioenergy projects;  Technical and economic (levelized cost of energy) modeling for selected project configuration.

  12. Millimeter wave study program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this program was to study the various approaches to building an amplifier to produce 100 kW or more cw power at 120 GHz to decide on an optimum approach, and to perform design calculations. The study has led to the conclusion that a cyclotron resonance amplifier (gyrotron) is the optimum approach for 100 kW and that this type of interaction offers the best possibilities for going to still higher power levels. This report includes discussion in depth of all the topics and approaches considered in the study. Sections 2 and 3 deal with output waveguide and window designs. The fourth section discusses linear-beam amplifiers. The fifth section considers periodic-beam (other than cyclotron resonance) devices. Cyclotron resonance devices are considered in detail. Arguments are given leading to the choice of the gyrotron as the optimum approach in section 7. Design calculations for a 100 kW gyrotron amplifier are given based on the background and theory presented in section 6

  13. Renewable Energy Feasibility Study Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rooney, Tim [Antares Group Inc.

    2013-10-30

    The Gila River Indian Community (GRIC or the Community) contracted the ANTARES Group, Inc. (“ANTARES”) to assess the feasibility of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations. A solar energy project could provide a number of benefits to the Community in terms of potential future energy savings, increased employment, environmental benefits from renewable energy generation and usage, and increased energy self-sufficiency. The study addresses a number of facets of a solar project’s overall feasibility, including: Technical appropriateness; Solar resource characteristics and expected system performance; Levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) economic assessment. The Gila River Indian Community (GRIC or the Community) contracted the ANTARES Group, Inc. (“ANTARES”) to prepare a biomass resource assessment study and evaluate the feasibility of a bioenergy project on Community land. A biomass project could provide a number of benefits to the Community in terms of increased employment, environmental benefits from renewable energy generation and usage, and increased energy self-sufficiency. The study addresses a number of facets of a biomass project’s overall feasibility, including: Resource analysis and costs; Identification of potential bioenergy projects; Technical and economic (levelized cost of energy) modeling for selected project configuration.

  14. Canadian consumer battery baseline study : final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provided information about the estimated number of consumer and household batteries sold, re-used, stored, recycled, and disposed each year in Canada. The report discussed the ways in which different batteries posed risks to human health and the environment, and legislative trends were also reviewed. Data used in the report were obtained from a literature review as well as through a series of interviews. The study showed that alkaline batteries are the most common primary batteries used by Canadians, followed by zinc carbon batteries. However, lithium primary batteries are gaining in popularity, and silver oxide and zinc air button cell batteries are also used in applications requiring a flat voltage and high energy. Secondary batteries used in laptop computers, and cell phones are often made of nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal-hydroxide, and lithium ion. Small sealed lead batteries are also commonly used in emergency lighting and alarm systems. Annual consumption statistics for all types of batteries were provided. Results of the study showed that the primary battery market is expected to decline. Total units of secondary batteries are expected to increase to 38.6 million units by 2010. The report also used a spreadsheet model to estimate the flow of consumer batteries through the Canadian waste management system. An estimated 347 million consumer batteries were discarded in 2004. By 2010, it is expected that an estimated 494 million units will be discarded by consumers. The study also considered issues related to lead, cadmium, mercury, and nickel disposal and the potential for groundwater contamination. It was concluded that neither Canada nor its provinces or territories have initiated legislative or producer responsibility programs targeting primary or secondary consumer batteries. 79 refs., 37 tabs., 1 fig

  15. Geochemistry studies in Eastern Kentucky. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negus-de Wys, J.

    1981-04-01

    Presented here are the results of inorganic geochemical studies on well cuttings from fourteen wells in the Big Sandy Gas Field. Both x-ray fluorescence and x-ray diffraction were used in analysis. Resultant mineralic data and elemental data were mapped by computer and by hand for five intervals of Ohio Shale and for the Berea/Bedford sequence. Comparisons of the geochemistry trend maps were made with lithology, structure, thermal maturation, gas open flow, and paleoenvironment. Techniques used included visual map comparison, computer map comparison programs utilizing correlation coefficients based on grid derived data sets, cluster analysis, x-y plots, and r/sup 2/ (coefficient of determination). A limited number of regional maps are included. It is concluded that inorganic geochemical analysis can be useful in: (1) suggesting paleoenvironmental trends; (2) establishing depositional trends; (3) enhancing exploration in terms of setting limits and pinpointing potential areas for hydrocarbon recovery; and (4) identification of likely locations for large gas fields when used with other geological studies. Elemental data analysis is the most accurate, and can be done quickly and inexpensively. It is concluded that the Big Sandy gas field area is a unique stratigraphic-structural gas trap, in which sedimentary factors, depositional basin features, plant evolution and occurrence, and structural elements all played important roles. Combinations of certain of these ingredients in different amounts may exist in other parts of the basin, and thus, suggest areas for hydrocarbon accumulation and potential recovery.

  16. A study protocol to investigate the relationship between dietary fibre intake and fermentation, colon cell turnover, global protein acetylation and early carcinogenesis: the FACT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croucher Lisa J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of studies, notably EPIC, have shown a descrease in colorectal cancer risk associated with increased fibre consumption. Whilst the underlying mechanisms are likely to be multifactorial, production of the short-chain fatty-acid butyrate fro butyratye is frequently cited as a major potential contributor to the effect. Butyrate inhibits histone deacetylases, which work on a wide range of proteins over and above histones. We therefore hypothesized that alterations in the acetylated proteome may be associated with a cancer risk phenotype in the colorectal mucosa, and that such alterations are candidate biomarkers for effectiveness of fibre interventions in cancer prevention. Methods an design There are two principal arms to this study: (i a cross-sectional study (FACT OBS of 90 subjects recruited from gastroenterology clinics and; (ii an intervention trial in 40 subjects with an 8 week high fibre intervention. In both studies the principal goal is to investigate a link between fibre intake, SCFA production and global protein acetylation. The primary measure is level of faecal butyrate, which it is hoped will be elevated by moving subjects to a high fibre diet. Fibre intakes will be estimated in the cross-sectional group using the EPIC Food Frequency Questionnaire. Subsidiary measures of the effect of butyrate on colon mucosal function and pre-cancerous phenotype will include measures of apoptosis, apoptotic regulators cell cycle and cell division. Discussion This study will provide a new level of mechanistic data on alterations in the functional proteome in response to the colon microenvironment which may underwrite the observed cancer preventive effect of fibre. The study may yield novel candidate biomarkers of fibre fermentation and colon mucosal function. Trial Registration Trial Registration Number: ISRCTN90852168

  17. A study protocol to investigate the relationship between dietary fibre intake and fermentation, colon cell turnover, global protein acetylation and early carcinogenesis: the FACT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of studies, notably EPIC, have shown a descrease in colorectal cancer risk associated with increased fibre consumption. Whilst the underlying mechanisms are likely to be multifactorial, production of the short-chain fatty-acid butyrate fro butyratye is frequently cited as a major potential contributor to the effect. Butyrate inhibits histone deacetylases, which work on a wide range of proteins over and above histones. We therefore hypothesized that alterations in the acetylated proteome may be associated with a cancer risk phenotype in the colorectal mucosa, and that such alterations are candidate biomarkers for effectiveness of fibre interventions in cancer prevention. There are two principal arms to this study: (i) a cross-sectional study (FACT OBS) of 90 subjects recruited from gastroenterology clinics and; (ii) an intervention trial in 40 subjects with an 8 week high fibre intervention. In both studies the principal goal is to investigate a link between fibre intake, SCFA production and global protein acetylation. The primary measure is level of faecal butyrate, which it is hoped will be elevated by moving subjects to a high fibre diet. Fibre intakes will be estimated in the cross-sectional group using the EPIC Food Frequency Questionnaire. Subsidiary measures of the effect of butyrate on colon mucosal function and pre-cancerous phenotype will include measures of apoptosis, apoptotic regulators cell cycle and cell division. This study will provide a new level of mechanistic data on alterations in the functional proteome in response to the colon microenvironment which may underwrite the observed cancer preventive effect of fibre. The study may yield novel candidate biomarkers of fibre fermentation and colon mucosal function. Trial Registration Number: ISRCTN90852168

  18. Final Summary: Genre Theory in Information Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This chapter offers a re-description of knowledge organization in light of genre and activity theory. Knowledge organization needs a new description in order to account for those activities and practices constituting and causing concrete knowledge organization activity. Genre and activity...... theory is put forward as a framework for situating such a re-description. Findings By means of genre and activity theory, the chapters argues that understanding the genre and activity systems, in which every form of knowledge organization is embedded, makes us capable of seeing how knowledge organization......, as a genre, both can be a tool and an object in genred human activities. Originality/value In contrast to much research into knowledge organization, this chapter does not emphasize techniques, standards, or rules to be the sole object of study. Instead, an emphasis is put on the genre and activity systems...

  19. Adsorption isotherm special study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-05-01

    The study was designed to identify methods to determine adsorption applicable to Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites, and to determine how changes in aquifer conditions affect metal adsorption, resulting retardation factors, and estimated contaminant migration rates. EPA and ASTM procedures were used to estimate sediment sorption of U, As, and Mo under varying groundwater geochemical conditions. Aquifer matrix materials from three distinct locations at the DOE UMTRA Project site in Rifle, CO, were used as the adsorbents under different pH conditions; these conditions stimulated geochemical environments under the tailings, near the tailings, and downgradient from the tailings. Grain size, total surface area, bulk and clay mineralogy, and petrography of the sediments were characterized. U and Mo yielded linear isotherms, while As had nonlinear ones. U and Mo were adsorbed strongly on sediments acidified to levels similar to tailings leachate. Changes in pH had much less effect on As adsorption. Mo was adsorbed very little at pH 7-7.3, U was weakly sorbed, and As was moderately sorbed. Velocities were estimated for metal transport at different pHs. Results show that the aquifer materials must be characterized to estimate metal transport velocities in aquifers and to develop groundwater restoration strategies for the UMTRA project.

  20. New Particle Formation Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, JN; McMurry, PH [University of Minnesota

    2015-01-01

    The scientific foci of the New Particle Formation Study were the formation and evolution of atmospheric aerosols and the impacts of newly formed particles on cloud processes. Specifically, we planned to: (1) to identify the species and mechanisms responsible for the initial steps of new particle formation, i.e., the formation of thermodynamically stable clusters; (2) investigate the role of acid-base chemistry in new particle growth through measurements of ammonia and amines as well as organic and inorganic acids in both atmospheric nanoparticles and the gas phase; (3) investigate the contribution of other surface area or volume-controlled processes to nanoparticle formation and growth; (4) create a comprehensive dataset related to new particle formation and growth that can be used as input for our own thermodynamic models as well as the modeling efforts by our Department of Energy (DOE) Aerosol Life Cycle working group collaborators; (5) characterize the increase of the number and activity of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) due to particle formation and growth; (6) determine the regional extent of new particle formation to address the role that atmospheric transport plays in determining the impacts, if any, of new particle formation on cloud number and properties.

  1. Pinellas Plant feasibility study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    The Pinellas Plant was built in 1956 to manufacture neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. In September 1990, the Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services (HRS) entered into an agreement with DOE to independently examine environmental monitoring data from the plant and health data from Pinellas County to determine if an epidemiological study is technically feasible to measure possible off-site health effects from ionizing radiation. Through normal plant operations, some radioactive materials have been released to the environment. Eighty percent of the total plant releases of 107,707 curies occurred in the early years of plant operation (1957--1960). The primary materials released were tritium gas, tritium oxide and krypton-85. Environmental monitoring for radioactive releases from the plant has been done regularly since 1975. The US Public Health Service Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in assisting HRS, has determined that sufficient radiological data exist by which a dose reconstruction can be done. A dose reconstruction can provide an estimate of how much radiological exposure someone living in the vicinity of the Pinellas Plant may have suffered from environmental releases.

  2. Technical study gas storage. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study will answer the following questions: (a) For what uses was the storage facility designed and for what use is it currently applied? Provide an overview of the technical data per gas storage facility: for instance, what is its capacity, volume, start-up time, etc.; (b) How often has this facility been used during the past 10 years? With what purpose was the facility brought into operation at the time? How much gas was supplied at the time from the storage facility?; (c) Given the characteristics and the use of the storage facility during the past 10 years and projected gas consumption in the future, how will the storage facility be used in the future?; (d) Are there other uses for which the gas storage facility can be deployed, or can a single facility be deployed for numerous uses? What are the technical possibilities in such cases? Questions (a) and (b) are answered separately for every storage facility. Questions (c) and (d) in a single chapter each (Chapter 2 and 3). An overview of the relevant storage data relating to current use, use in the last 10 years and use in future is given in the Annex

  3. Pinellas Plant feasibility study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pinellas Plant was built in 1956 to manufacture neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. In September 1990, the Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services (HRS) entered into an agreement with DOE to independently examine environmental monitoring data from the plant and health data from Pinellas County to determine if an epidemiological study is technically feasible to measure possible off-site health effects from ionizing radiation. Through normal plant operations, some radioactive materials have been released to the environment. Eighty percent of the total plant releases of 107,707 curies occurred in the early years of plant operation (1957--1960). The primary materials released were tritium gas, tritium oxide and krypton-85. Environmental monitoring for radioactive releases from the plant has been done regularly since 1975. The US Public Health Service Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in assisting HRS, has determined that sufficient radiological data exist by which a dose reconstruction can be done. A dose reconstruction can provide an estimate of how much radiological exposure someone living in the vicinity of the Pinellas Plant may have suffered from environmental releases

  4. Study of The Final Customer Loyalty Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Fandos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available For any business is important to maintain a loyal customer base to help they to survive over time. This situation is accentuated even to the extent that increases competition and increases uncertainty. At present these are two features that are really developed. Because of the deep crisis in which we are, and other elements such as globalization and the development of new technologies and communication systems, we are faced with a scenario of intense competition and uncertainty manifest. It is therefore more necessary than ever to know in depth how to get customers to be faithful, and develop true loyalty strategies.In this paper, we present the sequential approach to the formation of consumer loyalty in order to deepen understanding of the concept. It is supplemented by studying the combined effect of switching costs as an element that promotes the continuity of the relationship. The results shows that the consumer takes a more cognitive process information in their initial assessments of the service and therefore in the early stages of loyalty. As advances in consumer behavior process becomes more direct and mechanic, so we can say that the customer-company bond is stronger.

  5. Microbial field pilot study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  6. P-Nitrobenzoic acid alpha2u nephropathy in 13-week studies is not associated with renal carcinogenesis in 2-year feed studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, K D; Dunnick, J; Horton, J; Greenwell, A; Eldridge, S R; Elwell, M; Sills, R C

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the renal toxicity and carcinogenicity of p-nitrobenzoic acid in F344 rats. Dose levels in 13-week and 2-year studies ranged from 630-10,000 ppm and 1,250-5,000 ppm, respectively. At 13 weeks, renal lesions included minimal to mild hyaline droplet accumulation in male rats and karyomegaly in male and female rats. At 2 years, renal lesions included proximal tubule epithelial cell hyperplasia in male rats and oncocytic hyperplasia in high-dose male and female rats, and a decreased severity of nephropathy in males and females. The hvaline droplets in renal tubular epithelial cells of male rats at 13 weeks were morphologically similar to those described in alpha2u-globulin nephropathy. Using immunohistochemical methods, alpha2u-globulin accumulation was associated with the hyaline droplets. In addition, at 13 weeks, cell proliferation as detected by PCNA immunohistochemistry was significantly increased in males exposed to 5,000 and 10,000 ppm when compared to controls. Cytotoxicity associated with alpha2U-globulin nephropathy such as single-cell necrosis of the P2 segment epithelium or accumulation of granular casts in the outer medulla did not occur in the 13-week study. In addition, chronic treatment related nephrotoxic lesions attributed to accumulation of alpha2u-globulin such as linear foci of mineralization within the renal papilla, hyperplasia of the renal pelvis urothelium and kidney tumors were not observed. Although there was histologic evidence of alpha2u-globulin accumulation in male rats at 13 weeks, the minimal severity of nephropathy suggests that the degree of cytotoxicity was below the threshold, which would contribute to the development of renal tumors at 2 years.

  7. Final Report on Pilot Studies / Final Report on Classroom Research with STEM and TESL Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biel, Carmen; Wake, Jo Dugstad; Hesse, Friedrich;

    This Deliverable is the final report on pilot studies within the NEXT-TELL project (D6.7) and furthermore comprises the Deliverable on Classroom Research with STEM and TESL Assessment (D2.9) in order to avoid redundancies between those two Deliverables.......This Deliverable is the final report on pilot studies within the NEXT-TELL project (D6.7) and furthermore comprises the Deliverable on Classroom Research with STEM and TESL Assessment (D2.9) in order to avoid redundancies between those two Deliverables....

  8. Chemopreventive effect of Quercus infectoria against chemically induced renal toxicity and carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Rehman, Muneeb U.; Mir Tahir, Farrah Ali; Wajhul Qamar; Rehan Khan; Abdul Quaiyoom Khan; Abdul Lateef; Oday-O-Hamiza; Sarwat Sultana

    2012-01-01

    In this study we have shown that Quercus infectoria attenuates Fe- NTA induced renal oxidative stress, hyperproliferative response and renal carcinogenesis in rats. Fe-NTA promoted DEN (N-diethyl nitrosamine) initiated renal carcinogenesis by increasing the percentage incidence of tumors and induces early tumor markers viz. ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) level and PCNA expression. Fe- NTA (9 mg Fe/kg body weight, intraperitoneally) enhances renal Malondialdehyde, xanthine oxidase and hydrogen ...

  9. American ginseng attenuates azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate-induced colon carcinogenesis in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Chunhao; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Zhiyu; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Wu, Xiao-hui; Martin, Adiba; Du, Wei; He, Tong-Chuan; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death, and inflammatory bowel disease is a risk factor for this malignancy. We previously reported colon cancer chemoprevention potential using American ginseng (AG) in a xenograft mice model. However, the nude mouse model is not a gut-specific colon carcinogenesis animal model. Methods In this study, an experimental colitis and colitis-associated colorectal carcinogenesis mouse model, chemically induced by azoxymethane/dextran...

  10. Modelo de carcinogênese gástrica utilizando piloroplastia de Finney: estudo experimental em ratos Gastric carcinogenesis model using Finney pyloroplasty: experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane de Marco Ferreira Kaminski

    2011-12-01

    estudados. CONCLUSÃO: 1 A piloroplastia à Finney é modelo experimental adequado de carcinogênese gástrica; 2 ela induziu refluxo duodenogástrico; 3 o refluxo duodenogástrico atuou como carcinógeno para o estômago; 4 não houve relação entre o pH gástrico e o desenvolvimento de carcinoma; 5 o nitrito de sódio não atuou como carcinógeno para o estômago dos ratos.BACKGROUND: The duodenogastric reflux has been implicated as a potential carcinogen for the stomach and esophagus and is one of the factors that may explain the development of gastric stump cancer. Experimental models of carcinogenesis in the stomach stump or in the duodenogastric anastomosis are well defined. AIM: To develop an experimental model of gastric carcinogenesis through the Finney pyloroplasty, evaluate the influence of ingestion of sodium nitrite in this model, analyze the concentrations of bile acids and the pH of the stomach. METHODS: A hundred and ten Wistar rats were operated and divided into four groups: Group I (15 rats underwent laparotomy (Sham group; Group II (15 rats underwent laparotomy (Sham and ingestion of sodium nitrite in drinking water; Group III (40 rats submitted to the Finney pyloroplasty and Group IV (40 rats submitted to the Finney pyloroplasty and ingestion of sodium nitrite in drinking water. After 50 weeks of surgery, the rats were sacrificed and samples collected for analysis of gastric pH, dosing of bile acids and histological analysis. RESULTS: The immediate postoperative mortality was 9%, and during the experiment, 10 rats died. The control group (I did not show gastric lesions; the control group with sodium nitrite (II developed papillomas in the pre-stomach in 16.6%; the operated groups with pyloroplasty had adenomas in 10.3% in Group III and 14.2 % in Group IV, and adenocarcinoma in 55.1% in group III and 14.2% in Group IV. The implementation of glands into the submucosa and muscle in the area of anastomosis (mucosa deployment was not sufficient criterion for

  11. Mathematical Modeling of Carcinogenesis Based on Chromosome Aberration Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-bo Li

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The progression of human cancer is characterized by the accumulation of genetic instability. An increasing number of experimental genetic molecular techniques have been used to detect chromosome aberrations. Previous studies on chromosome abnormalities often focused on identifying the frequent loci of chromosome alterations, but rarely addressed the issue of interrelationship of chromosomal abnormalities. In the last few years, several mathematical models have been employed to construct models of carcinogenesis, in an attempt to identify the time order and cause-and-effect relationship of chromosome aberrations. The principles and applications of these models are reviewed and compared in this paper. Mathematical modeling of carcinogenesis can contribute to our understanding of the molecular genetics of tumor development, and identification of cancer related genes, thus leading to improved clinical practice of cancer.

  12. Epigenetic targets of arsenic: emphasis on epigenetic modifications during carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ram Vinod; Son, Young-Ok; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Lei; Hitron, John Andrew; Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; D, Rakesh; Kim, Donghern; Yin, Yuanqin; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation and histone modification promote opening and closure of chromatin structure, which affects gene expression without altering the DNA sequence. Epigenetic markers regulate the dynamic nature of chromatin structure at different levels: DNA, histone, noncoding RNAs, as well as the higher-order chromatin structure. Accumulating evidence strongly suggests that arsenic-induced carcinogenesis involves frequent changes in the epigenetic marker. However, progress in identifying arsenic-induced epigenetic changes has already been made using genome-wide approaches; the biological significance of these epigenetic changes remains unknown. Moreover, arsenic-induced changes in the chromatin state alter gene expression through the epigenetic mechanism. The current review provides a summary of recent literature regarding epigenetic changes caused by arsenic in carcinogenesis. We highlight the transgenerational studies needed to explicate the biological significance and toxicity of arsenic over a broad spectrum.

  13. Study of diffractively produced five-pion final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffractively produced five-pion final states are studied in the reaction π-d→3π-2π+d at 15 GeV/c and compared with predictions of the statistical dissociation model and multiperipheral models. (Auth.)

  14. Experimental Gastric Carcinogenesis in Cebus apella Nonhuman Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tanielly Cristina Raiol; Andrade Junior, Edilson Ferreira; Rezende, Alexandre Pingarilho; Carneiro Muniz, José Augusto Pereira; Lacreta Junior, Antonio Carlos Cunha; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Demachki, Samia; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We established two gastric carcinogenesis models in New-World nonhuman primates. In the first model, ACP03 gastric cancer cell line was inoculated in 18 animals. In the second model, we treated 6 animals with N-methyl-nitrosourea (MNU). Animals with gastric cancer were also treated with Canova immunomodulator. Clinical, hematologic, and biochemical, including C-reactive protein, folic acid, and homocysteine, analyses were performed in this study. MYC expression and copy number was also evaluated. We observed that all animals inoculated with ACP03 developed gastric cancer on the 9th day though on the 14th day presented total tumor remission. In the second model, all animals developed pre-neoplastic lesions and five died of drug intoxication before the development of cancer. The last surviving MNU-treated animal developed intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma observed by endoscopy on the 940th day. The level of C-reactive protein level and homocysteine concentration increased while the level of folic acid decreased with the presence of tumors in ACP03-inoculated animals and MNU treatment. ACP03 inoculation also led to anemia and leukocytosis. The hematologic and biochemical results corroborate those observed in patients with gastric cancer, supporting that our in vivo models are potentially useful to study this neoplasia. In cell line inoculated animals, we detected MYC immunoreactivity, mRNA overexpression, and amplification, as previously observed in vitro. In MNU-treated animals, mRNA expression and MYC copy number increased during the sequential steps of intestinal-type gastric carcinogenesis and immunoreactivity was only observed in intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer. Thus, MYC deregulation supports the gastric carcinogenesis process. Canova immunomodulator restored several hematologic measurements and therefore, can be applied during/after chemotherapy to increase the tolerability and

  15. Shikonin Suppresses Skin Carcinogenesis via Inhibiting Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Ren, Amy; Li, Teena; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Gu, Xin; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been shown to be up-regulated in human skin cancers. To test whether PKM2 may be a target for chemoprevention, shikonin, a natural product from the root of Lithospermum erythrorhizon and a specific inhibitor of PKM2, was used in a chemically-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis study. The results revealed that shikonin treatment suppressed skin tumor formation. Morphological examinations and immunohistochemical staining of the skin epidermal tissues suggested that shikonin inhibited cell proliferation without inducing apoptosis. Although shikonin alone suppressed PKM2 activity, it did not suppress tumor promoter-induced PKM2 activation in the skin epidermal tissues at the end of the skin carcinogenesis study. To reveal the potential chemopreventive mechanism of shikonin, an antibody microarray analysis was performed, and the results showed that the transcription factor ATF2 and its downstream target Cdk4 were up-regulated by chemical carcinogen treatment; whereas these up-regulations were suppressed by shikonin. In a promotable skin cell model, the nuclear levels of ATF2 were increased during tumor promotion, whereas this increase was inhibited by shikonin. Furthermore, knockdown of ATF2 decreased the expression levels of Cdk4 and Fra-1 (a key subunit of the activator protein 1. In summary, these results suggest that shikonin, rather than inhibiting PKM2 in vivo, suppresses the ATF2 pathway in skin carcinogenesis. PMID:25961580

  16. Shikonin Suppresses Skin Carcinogenesis via Inhibiting Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhang, Chunjing; Ren, Amy; Li, Teena; Jin, Rong; Li, Guohong; Gu, Xin; Shi, Runhua; Zhao, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    The M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) has been shown to be up-regulated in human skin cancers. To test whether PKM2 may be a target for chemoprevention, shikonin, a natural product from the root of Lithospermum erythrorhizon and a specific inhibitor of PKM2, was used in a chemically-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis study. The results revealed that shikonin treatment suppressed skin tumor formation. Morphological examinations and immunohistochemical staining of the skin epidermal tissues suggested that shikonin inhibited cell proliferation without inducing apoptosis. Although shikonin alone suppressed PKM2 activity, it did not suppress tumor promoter-induced PKM2 activation in the skin epidermal tissues at the end of the skin carcinogenesis study. To reveal the potential chemopreventive mechanism of shikonin, an antibody microarray analysis was performed, and the results showed that the transcription factor ATF2 and its downstream target Cdk4 were up-regulated by chemical carcinogen treatment; whereas these up-regulations were suppressed by shikonin. In a promotable skin cell model, the nuclear levels of ATF2 were increased during tumor promotion, whereas this increase was inhibited by shikonin. Furthermore, knockdown of ATF2 decreased the expression levels of Cdk4 and Fra-1 (a key subunit of the activator protein 1. In summary, these results suggest that shikonin, rather than inhibiting PKM2 in vivo, suppresses the ATF2 pathway in skin carcinogenesis.

  17. Heel spur radiotherapy and radiation carcinogenesis risk estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy is a nonsurgical alternative therapy of painful heel spur patients. Nonetheless, cancer induction is the most important somatic effect of ionizing radiation. This study was designed to evaluate the carcinogenesis risk factor in benign painful heel spur patients treated by radiotherapy. Between 1974 and 1999, a total of 20 patients received mean 8.16 Gy total irradiation dose in two fractions. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD100) were placed on multiple phantom sites in vivo within the irradiated volume to verify irradiation accuracy and carcinogenesis risk factor calculation. The 20 still-alive patients, who had a minimum 5-year and maximum 29-year follow-up (mean 11.9 years), have been evaluated by carcinogenic radiation risk factor on the basis of tissue weighting factors as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 60. Reasonable pain relief has been obtained in all 20 patients. The calculated mean carcinogenesis risk factor is 1.3% for radiation portals in the whole group, and no secondary cancer has been clinically observed. Radiotherapy is an effective treatment modality for relieving pain in calcaneal spur patients. The estimated secondary cancer risk factor for irradiation of this benign lesion is not as high as was feared. (author)

  18. Pulmonary carcinogenesis from plutonium-containing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induction of lung tumors by various types of radiation is of paramount concern to the nuclear industry. The data presented were obtained by exposing the pulmonary system of Syrian hamsters to particles of zirconium oxide containing various amounts of either plutonium-238 or -239 as the alpha radiation source. These particles were injected intravenously and lodged permanently in the capillary bed of the lung. When less than 20% of the lung tissue was irradiated, simulating the ''hot particle'' mode, tumors were not evident with lung burdens up to 500 nCi plutonium. More diffuse irradiation significantly increased the tumor incidence, with lung burdens of 50 to 150 nCi. When plutonium-laden microspheres were administered intratracheally, tumor production was considerably increased and the addition of 3 mg of iron oxide intratracheally further increased the incidence. Using the zirconium oxide matrix for the carrier of plutonium in aerosol particles produced tumor incidences of up to 50% in Syrian hamsters exposed by inhalation. Initial pulmonary (alveolar) burdens reached 100 nCi of plutonium. Similar inhalation studies using plutonium dioxide alone (no matrix) failed to produce any increase in lung tumorigenesis. The results are discussed in terms of possible mechanisms necessary for lung carcinogenesis. (H.K.)

  19. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenenbaum, P.G.

    1995-12-01

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research.

  20. Expanded studies of linear collider final focus systems at the Final Focus Test Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to meet their luminosity goals, linear colliders operating in the center-of-mass energy range from 3,50 to 1,500 GeV will need to deliver beams which are as small as a few Manometers tall, with x:y aspect ratios as large as 100. The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a prototype for the final focus demanded by these colliders: its purpose is to provide demagnification equivalent to those in the future linear collider, which corresponds to a focused spot size in the FFTB of 1.7 microns (horizontal) by 60 manometers (vertical). In order to achieve the desired spot sizes, the FFTB beam optics must be tuned to eliminate aberrations and other errors, and to ensure that the optics conform to the desired final conditions and the measured initial conditions of the beam. Using a combination of incoming-beam diagnostics. beam-based local diagnostics, and global tuning algorithms, the FFTB beam size has been reduced to a stable final size of 1.7 microns by 70 manometers. In addition, the chromatic properties of the FFTB have been studied using two techniques and found to be acceptable. Descriptions of the hardware and techniques used in these studies are presented, along with results and suggestions for future research

  1. Study on Cell Cycle Regulatory Mechanism in Rat Bladder Carcinogenesis Promoted by Terephthalic Acid%对苯二甲酸促进大鼠膀胱癌发生的细胞周期调节机制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石远; 唐建梅

    2011-01-01

    [ Objective ] To study the cell cycle regulatory mechanism in rat bladder carcinogenesis promoted by terephthalic acid (TPA). [ Methods ] A total of 50 male Wister rats were divided into test group (30 rats) and control group (20 rats), respectively intraperitoneally injected with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and citrate buffer twice a week for 4 weeks, and then basal diet containing 5%TPA were given to the test group and basal diet to the control group separately for the next 22 weeks. Major regulatory proteins in Gl cell cycle checkpoint including pl6INK4a, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4), cyclin Dl, and retinoblastoma protein (pRb) were determined during various stages of urinary bladder carcinogenesis by immunohistochemistry. [ Results ] In MNU-5% TPA treated group, the incidences of overexpression of Cdk4, cyclin Dl and pRb in papilloma were significantly higher than those in epithelial simple hyperplasia (P=0.023, .P<0.001 and P< 0.001, respectively) and in papillary or nodular (PN) hyperplasia (P=0.042, ^=0.012 and P=0.002, respectively). The incidence of absent expression of pl61NK4 in papilloma was much higher than that in epithelial simple hyperplasia {P=0.004) and in PN hyperplasia (P=0.02). [ Conclusion ] Our results clearly reveal that the disorder of pl6INK4-cyclin Dl/Cdk4-pRb pathway is associated with bladder carcinogenesis promoted by TPA-stone.%[目的]研究对苯二甲酸(terephthalic acid,TPA)促进膀胱癌发生的细胞周期调节机制.[方法]50只blister大鼠分为实验组(30只)及对照组(20只),每周两次分别腹腔注射甲基亚硝墓脲(MNU)和冰柠檬酸盐缓冲液,持续4周.在随后的22周,分别给大鼠饲以含5%TPA和0%TPA的饲料.利用免疫组织化学方法检查G1细胞周期关卡的主要调节蛋白包括抑癌基因p16(INK4a)蛋白(pl6(INK4a))、周期素依赖性蛋白激酶4(Cdk4)、细胞周期蛋白D1(cyclin Dl)和成视网膜细胞瘤蛋白(pRb)在大鼠膀胱癌发生各

  2. Diet, lifestyle, and molecular alterations that drive colorectal carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.

    2004-01-01

    Environmental factors have been repeatedly implicated in the etiology of colorectal cancer, and much is known about the molecular events involved in colorectal carcinogenesis. The relationships between environmental risk factors and the molecular alterations that drive colorectal carcinogenesis are

  3. NTP Carcinogenesis Bioassay of Propyl Gallate (CAS No. 121-79-9) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Feed Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Propyl gallate is a white to nearly white odorless powder having a slightly bitter taste. Solutions of propyl gallate turn dark in the presence of iron or iron salts. Propyl gallate has been used since 1948 as an antioxidant to stabilize cosmetics, food packaging materials, and foods containing fats. As an additive, it may be found in edible fats, oils, mayonnaise, shortening, baked goods, candy, dried meat, fresh pork sausage, and dried milk, and it is used in hair grooming products, pressure-sensitive adhesives, lubricating oil additives, and transforming oils. A NTP Carcinogenesis bioassay of propyl gallate was conducted by feeding diets containing 6,000 or 12,000 ppm propyl gallate to groups of 50 F344/N rats and 50 B6C3F1 mice of each sex for 103 weeks. Groups of 50 untreated rats and 50 untreated mice of each sex served as controls. Survival of rats and mice was not adversely affected by propyl gallate, but mean body weights of dosed rats and mice of each sex were lower than those of the controls. At 104 weeks, mean body weights of low-and high-dose rats were 4% and 8% lower than those of the controls for males and 11% and 19% lower than those of the controls for females. Similarly, mean body weights of low-and high-dose mice were 5% and 8% lower than those of the controls for males and 11% (both dose groups) lower than those of the controls for females. Thyroid follicular-cell adenomas or carcinomas (combined) occurred in male rats with a statistically significant (P<0.05) positive trend, but the incidences in the dosed groups were not statistically significant in direct comparisons with the control groups. Moreover, the incidence of high-dose male rats with follicular-cell tumors (3/50, 6%) was not statistically different from the historical control rate (14/584, 2.4%) for the laboratory that conducted this bioassay. Rare tumors (an astrocytoma or a glioma) were found in the brains of two low-dose female rats. The incidence of all brain tumors in the

  4. NTP Carcinogenesis Bioassay of Propyl Gallate (CAS No. 121-79-9) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Feed Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    Propyl gallate is a white to nearly white odorless powder having a slightly bitter taste. Solutions of propyl gallate turn dark in the presence of iron or iron salts. Propyl gallate has been used since 1948 as an antioxidant to stabilize cosmetics, food packaging materials, and foods containing fats. As an additive, it may be found in edible fats, oils, mayonnaise, shortening, baked goods, candy, dried meat, fresh pork sausage, and dried milk, and it is used in hair grooming products, pressure-sensitive adhesives, lubricating oil additives, and transforming oils. A NTP Carcinogenesis bioassay of propyl gallate was conducted by feeding diets containing 6,000 or 12,000 ppm propyl gallate to groups of 50 F344/N rats and 50 B6C3F1 mice of each sex for 103 weeks. Groups of 50 untreated rats and 50 untreated mice of each sex served as controls. Survival of rats and mice was not adversely affected by propyl gallate, but mean body weights of dosed rats and mice of each sex were lower than those of the controls. At 104 weeks, mean body weights of low-and high-dose rats were 4% and 8% lower than those of the controls for males and 11% and 19% lower than those of the controls for females. Similarly, mean body weights of low-and high-dose mice were 5% and 8% lower than those of the controls for males and 11% (both dose groups) lower than those of the controls for females. Thyroid follicular-cell adenomas or carcinomas (combined) occurred in male rats with a statistically significant (P<0.05) positive trend, but the incidences in the dosed groups were not statistically significant in direct comparisons with the control groups. Moreover, the incidence of high-dose male rats with follicular-cell tumors (3/50, 6%) was not statistically different from the historical control rate (14/584, 2.4%) for the laboratory that conducted this bioassay. Rare tumors (an astrocytoma or a glioma) were found in the brains of two low-dose female rats. The incidence of all brain tumors in the

  5. Molecular aspects of carcinogenesis in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexandros Koliopanos; Constantinos Avgerinos; Constantina Paraskeva; Zisis Touloumis; Dionisisa Kelgiorgi; Christos Dervenis

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer (PCa) is one of the most aggressive human solid tumors, with rapid growth and metastatic spread as well as resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, leading rapidly to virtually incurable disease. Over the last 20 years, however, signiifcant advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular biology of PCa, with a focus on the cytogenetic abnormalities in PCa cell growth and differentiation. DATA SOURCES: A MEDLINE search and manual cross-referencing were utilized to identify published data for PCa molecular biology studies between 1986 and 2008, with emphasis on genetic alterations and developmental oncology. RESULTS: Activation of oncogenes, deregulation of tumor suppressor and genome maintenance genes, upregulation of growth factors/growth factor receptor signaling cascade systems, and alterations in cytokine expression, have been reported to play important roles in the process of pancreatic carcinogenesis. Alterations in the K-ras proto-oncogene and the p16INK4a, p53, FHIT, and DPC4 tumor suppressor genes occur in a high percentage of tumors. Furthermore, a variety of growth factors are expressed at increased levels. In addition, PCa often exhibits alterations in growth inhibitory pathways and evades apoptosis through p53 mutations and aberrant expression of apoptosis-regulating genes, such as members of the Bcl family. Additional pathways in the development of an aggressive phenotype, local inifltration and metastasis are still under ongoing genetic research. The present paper reviews recent studies on the pathogenesis of PCa, and includes a brief reference to alterations reported for other types of pancreatic tumor. CONCLUSIONS: Advances in molecular genetics and biology have improved our perception of the pathogenesis of PCa. However, further studies are needed to better understand the fundamental changes that occur in PCa, thus leading to better diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  6. Implications of tyrosine phosphoproteomics in cervical carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeFord James

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide cervical cancer remains a leading cause of mortality from gynecologic malignancies. The link between cervical cancer and persistent infection with HPV has been established. At a molecular level little is known about the transition from the precancerous state to invasive cancer. To elucidate this process, cervical biopsies from human specimens were obtained from precancerous state to stage III disease. Methods Cervical biopsies were obtained from patients with a diagnosis of cervical cancer undergoing definitive surgery or staging operation. Biopsies were obtained from patients with precancerous lesions at the time of their excisional procedure. Control samples were obtained from patients undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions such as fibroids. Samples were subjected to proteomic profiling using two dimensional gel electrophoresis with subsequent trypsin digestion followed by MALDI-TOF protein identification. Candidate proteins were then further studied using western blotting, immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry. Results Annexin A1 and DNA-PKcs were found to be differentially expressed. Phosphorylated annexin A1 was up regulated in diseased states in comparison to control and its level was strongly detected in the serum of cervical cancer patients compared to controls. DNA-PKcs was noted to be hyperphosphorylated and fragmented in cancer when compared to controls. By immunohistochemistry annexin A1 was noted in the vascular environment in cancer and certain precancerous samples. Conclusion This study suggests a probable role for protein tyrosine phosphorylation in cervical carcinogenesis. Annexin A1 and DNA-PK cs may have synergistic effects with HPV infection. Precancerous lesions that may progress to cervical cancer may be differentiated from lesions that will not base on similar immunohistochemical profile to invasive squamous cell carcinoma.

  7. Plant systems/components modularization study. Final report. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-07-01

    The final results are summarized of a Plant Systems/Components Modularization Study based on Stone and Webster's Pressurized Water Reactor Reference Design. The program has been modified to include evaluation of the most promising areas for modular consideration based on the level of the Sundesert Project engineering design completion and the feasibility of their incorporation into the plant construction effort.

  8. Model validation studies of solar systems, Phase III. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, L.J.; Winn, C.B.

    1978-12-01

    Results obtained from a validation study of the TRNSYS, SIMSHAC, and SOLCOST solar system simulation and design are presented. Also included are comparisons between the FCHART and SOLCOST solar system design programs and some changes that were made to the SOLCOST program. Finally, results obtained from the analysis of several solar radiation models are presented. Separate abstracts were prepared for ten papers.

  9. Understanding Alterations in Cell Nano-architecture during Early Carcinogenesis using Optical Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damania, Dhwanil

    Carcinogenesis is a complex multi-step process which eventually results in a malignant phenotype that often progresses into a fatal metastatic stage. There are several molecular changes (e.g. DNA methylation, activation of proto-oncogenes, loss of tumor-suppressor genes, histone acetylation) that occur in cells prior to the microscopically detectable morphological alterations. Hence, it is intuitive that these molecular changes should impact various biochemical, biophysical and transport processes within the cell and therefore its nanoscale morphology. Furthermore, recent studies have established that apparently `normal' cells (i.e., away from the actual tumor location) undergo similar genetic/epigenetic changes as the actual cancer cells, giving rise to the phenomenon of field carcinogenesis. Unfortunately, traditional microscopy or histopathology cannot resolve structures below 300 nm due to diffraction-limited resolution. Hence, we developed a novel optical imaging technique, partial wave spectroscopic (PWS) microscopy or optical nanocytology which quantifies the nanoscale refractive-index fluctuations (i.e. mass-density variations such as chromatin compaction) in an optically measured biomarker, disorder strength (Ld). This dissertation proves the nanoscale sensitivity of PWS nanocytology and shows that increase in Ld parallels neoplastic potential of a cell by using standardized cell-lines and animal-models. Based on concept of field carcinogenesis, we employ PWS nanocytology in a multi-center clinical study on approximately 450 patients in four different cancer-types (colon, ovarian, thyroid and lung) and we illustrate that nanoscale disorder increase is a ubiquitous phenomenon across different organs. We further demonstrate the potential of PWS nanocytology in predicting risk for developing future neoplasia. Biologically, we prove that cytoskeletal organization in both nucleus and cytoplasm plays a crucial role in governing L d-differences. Moreover, we

  10. Systems study 'Alternative Entsorgung'. Final report. Technical annex 23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reprocessing is not sensible for a number of certain spent fuel elements. From this point of view, it is necessary to develop a concept which takes into account the final storage of vitrified fission products and also fuel elements which are not processed. The aim of the mixed fuel processing concept is to design a method of treatment, which provides externally identical final storage barrels for both ways of fuel disposal and which provides associated standardized handling equipment. The study shows a way which provides for the packing of processed spent fuel elements in moulds with the external dimensions of the HAW mould and which makes it possible to store these fuel element final storage moulds together with HAW moulds in boreholes. (orig./HP)

  11. Hanford 100-N Area Tracer Study Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides an engineering tracer study final report for the determination of contact time for the disinfection process at Group A Nontransient Noncommunity water treatment plant for the 100- N Water Plant (located on the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington). The purpose of this study is to determine the actual detention time within the plant clearwell, and the disinfection contact time at several clearwell effluent flow rates

  12. Heterogeneity in multistage carcinogenesis and mixture modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgenthaler Stephan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Carcinogenesis is commonly described as a multistage process, in which stem cells are transformed into cancer cells via a series of mutations. In this article, we consider extensions of the multistage carcinogenesis model by mixture modeling. This approach allows us to describe population heterogeneity in a biologically meaningful way. We focus on finite mixture models, for which we prove identifiability. These models are applied to human lung cancer data from several birth cohorts. Maximum likelihood estimation does not perform well in this application due to the heavy censoring in our data. We thus use analytic graduation instead. Very good fits are achieved for models that combine a small high risk group with a large group that is quasi immune.

  13. Lymphotoxin prevention of diethylnitrosamine carcinogenesis in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of intervention measures to control cancer would be facilitated by being able to monitor in vivo carcinogenesis by in vitro quantitation of early indices of neoplastic transformation to assess the in vivo effectiveness of preventive-therapeutic measures. Pregnant Syrian golden hamsters were used in an in vivo-in vitro transplacental model of carcinogenesis to determine the extent that in vivo administration of immunologic hormone preparations along with chemical carcinogen would prevent morphologic transformation assessed in vitro. Pregnant hamsters at 10-11 days of gestation were given injections ip of 3 mg diethylnitrosamine (DENA)/100 g body weight and were killed 2 days later when fetal cells were seeded for colony formation. The frequency of morphologically transformed colonies was assessed after 7 days of growth. Cloning efficiency and mean transformation frequency after DENA exposure were 3.6% and 1 X 10(-4) per cell seeded, respectively. The ip injection of an immunologic hormone preparation reduced the transformation frequency by 46%. The hormone preparation, containing 10,000 U of lymphotoxin but no detectable interferon, was the ultrafiltered lymphokines (greater than 10,000 mol wt) from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated hamster peritoneal leukocytes. The effect of lymphotoxin on cocarcinogenic exposure of fetal cells to DENA in vivo followed by X-irradiation in vitro was also determined. Cells exposed to 250 rad in vitro had a cloning efficiency of 0.5% and a transformation frequency of 0.4 X 10(-4) per cell seeded. After DENA injection and X-irradiation, the transformation frequency increased to 1 X 10(-4) and was inhibited 64% by lymphotoxin in vivo. Thus immunologic hormones (e.g., lymphotoxin) can prevent carcinogenesis in vivo. Furthermore, in vitro quantitation of transformation is a rapid means for evaluating therapeutic and autochthonous effector mechanisms for their ability to prevent or otherwise modulate carcinogenesis in vivo

  14. Oxidative stress in prostate hypertrophy and carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar M. Przybyszewski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Aging, significant impairment of the oxidation/reduction balance, infection, and inflammation are recognized risk factors of benign hyperplasia and prostate cancer. Chronic symptomatic and asymptomatic prostate inflammatory processes generate significantly elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and halogenated compounds. Prostate cancer patients showed significantly higher lipid peroxidation and lower antioxidant levels in peripheral blood than healthy controls, whereas patients with prostate hyperplasia did not show such symptoms. Oxidative/nitrosative/halogenative stress causes DNA modifications leading to genome instability that may initiate carcinogenesis; however, it was shown that oxidative damage alone is not sufficient to initiate this process. Peroxidation products induced by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species seem to take part in epigenetic mechanisms regulating genome activity. One of the most common changes occurring in more than 90�0of all analyzed prostate cancers is the silencing of GSTP1 gene activity. The gene encodes glutathione transferase, an enzyme participating in detoxification processes. Prostate hyperplasia is often accompanied by chronic inflammation and such a relationship was not observed in prostate cancer. The participation of infection and inflammation in the development of hyperplasia is unquestionable and these factors probably also take part in initiating the early stages of prostate carcinogenesis. Thus it seems that therapeutic strategies that prevent genome oxidative damage in situations involving oxidative/nitrosative/halogenative stress, i.e. use of antioxidants, plant steroids, antibiotics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, could help prevent carcinogenesis.

  15. Plausible Mechanisms of Cadmium Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadmium is a transition metal and an ubiquitous environmental and industrial pollutant. Laboratory animal studies and epidemiological studies have shown that exposure to cadmium is associated with various organ toxicities and carcinogenic effects. Several national and internation...

  16. Cimetidine and Clobenpropit Attenuate Inflammation-Associated Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Male ICR Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuji Tanaka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Histamine and histamine receptors (Hrhs have been identified as critical molecules during inflammation and carcinogenesis. This study was conducted to determine the effects of Hrh1-Hrh3 antagonists on inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis. Male ICR mice were treated with azoxymethane (AOM, 10 mg/kg bw, i.p. and 1.5% dextran sodium sulfate (DSS, drinking water for 7 days to induce colorectal carcinogenesis. The mice were then fed diets containing test chemical (500 ppm terfenadine, 500 ppm cimetidine or 10 ppm clobenpropit for 15 weeks. At week 18, feeding with the diets containing cimetidine (Hrh2 antagonist and clobenpropit (Hrh3 antagonist/inverse agonist significantly lowered the multiplicity of colonic adenocarcinoma. Terfenadine (Hrh1 antagonist did not affect AOM-DSS-induced colorectal carcinogenesis. Adenocarcinoma cells immunohistochemically expressed Hrh1, Hrh2, Hrh3 and Hrh4 with varied intensities. Because clobenpropit is also known to be a Hrh4 receptor agonist, Hrh2, Hrh3 and Hrh4 may be involved in inflammation-related colorectal carcinogenesis. Additional data, including the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inducible inflammatory enzymes in the colonic mucosa, are also presented.

  17. EXPRESSION OF GST-π GENE IN HUMAN ESOPHAGEAL CARCINOGENESIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Baojin; ZHANG Yunhan; WANG Yaohe; GAO Dongling; FU Shuli; WEN Xiaogang; ZHANG Sanshen; WANG Jiang

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the possible role of GSTπ in esophageal carcinogenesis. Methods: GST-πexpression at mRNA level was studied by in situ hybridization (ISH) and at protein level by immunohistochemistry (IHC). GST-π expression in normal epithelial cells (NC) of the esophagus,hyperplastic cells (HC), dysplastic cells (DC) from grade Ⅰ to Ⅲ, carcinoma in situ (CIS) and all the cells in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) were examined in the same esophageal cancer specimens (n=48) which provided a model reflecting the process of esophageal carcinogenesis. Results: The positive rate of IHC staining was 87. 5% for NC, 95.3% for HC, 55.9% for DC (grade Ⅰ: 73.9%, grade Ⅱ: 47.4%, grade Ⅲ: 41.2%),36.4% for CIS and 45.8% for SCC. The positive rate of GST-π mRNA expression was 81.2% for NC, 94.4% for HC, 61.9% for DC (grade Ⅰ: 76.5%, grade Ⅱ: 61.5%,grade Ⅲ: 41.7%), 44.4% for CIS and 83.3% for grade ⅠSCC, 30.0% for grade Ⅱ SCC and 0% for grade ⅢSCC. There was no statistically significant difference in GST-π expression at the mRNA and the protein level.Conclusion: There is a decreasing tendency of GST-πexpression from dysplasia to CIS and SCC. The decrease in GST-π expression is an early event in esophageal carcinogenesis.

  18. Mechanistic study on lung cancer mortality after radon exposure in the Wismut cohort supports important role of clonal expansion in lung carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaballa, I; Eidemüller, M

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer mortality after radon exposure in the Wismut cohort was analyzed using the two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE) model. A total of 2996 lung cancer deaths among the 58,695 male workers were observed during the follow-up period between 1946 and 2003. Adjustment to silica exposure was performed to find a more accurate estimation of the risk of radon exposure. An additional analysis with the descriptive excess relative risk (ERR) model was carried out for comparison. The TSCE model that best describes the data is nonlinear in the clonal expansion with radon exposure and has a saturation level at an exposure rate of [Formula: see text]. The excess relative risk decreases with age and shows an inverse exposure rate effect. In comparison with the ERR model, the TSCE model predicts a considerably larger risk for low exposures rates below [Formula: see text]. Comparison to other mechanistic studies of lung cancer after exposure to alpha particles using the TSCE model reveals an extraordinary consistency in the main features of the exposure response, given the diversity in the characteristics of the cohorts and the exposure across different studies. This suggests that a nonlinear response mechanism in the clonal expansion, with some level of saturation at large exposure rates, may be playing a crucial role in the development of lung cancer after alpha particle irradiation. PMID:27334643

  19. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of d-Limonene (CAS No. 5989-27-5) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Gavage Studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of d-limonene, a naturally occurring monoterpene found in many volatile oils, especially in citrus oils, were conducted because of its widespread use as a flavor and fragrance additive for food and household cleaning products and its increasing use as an industrial solvent. The d-limonene used in these studies was more than 99% pure and was administered in corn oil by gavage. Short-term studies were conducted in F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice to identify toxic effects and affected sites and to help establish doses for the 2-year studies. Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in Salmonella typhimurium, mouse L5178Y cells, and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The doses selected for the 16-day studies ranged from 413 to 6,600 mg/kg for both rats and mice; deaths and reduction in body weight gain occurred at the two highest doses. No compound-related clinical signs or histopathologic lesions were observed in any of the surviving dose groups. In the 13-week studies, doses of d-limonene ranged from 150 to 2,400 mg/kg for rats and from 125 to 2,000 mg/kg for mice. Deaths occurred in the high dose group of each species and sex. Greater than 10% reductions in body weight gain were observed in the two highest dose groups of male rats and male mice and the high dose female rats. Rough hair coats and decreased activity were observed at the two highest doses in both rats and mice. There were no chemical-related histopathologic lesions in female rats or in mice of either sex. A compound-related increased severity of nephropathy was observed in the kidney of male rats. This lesion was characterized by degeneration of epithelial cells in the convoluted tubules, granular casts in the outer stripe of the outer medulla, and epithelial regeneration. These lesions have been described as reasonably characteristic of the hyaline droplet nephropathy that is associated with an accumulation of liver-generated a2u-globulin in the cytoplasm of tubular

  20. Laser fusion study. Final report, volume I, study results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal of this study was to devise, evaluate, and conceptually design a complete, end-to-end, alignment system capable of handling 30 to 32 Shiva amplifier chains to specified accuracies in space and time. A secondary goal was to accomplish the primary goal with an acceptably low development and procurement cost and with an acceptably high day-after-day performance reliability. This report presents such a system: it is comprised of sensors, actuating mechanisms, controls, and displays that perform well within the current art-state. (U.S.)

  1. Clinical significance of gelsolin-like actin-capping protein expression in oral carcinogenesis: an immunohistochemical study of premalignant and malignant lesions of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelsolin-like actin-capping protein (CapG) is a ubiquitous gelsolin-family actin-modulating protein involved in cell signalling, receptor-mediated membrane ruffling, phagocytosis, and motility. CapG has generated great interest due to its oncogenic function in the control of cell migration or invasion in a variety of cancer cells. We previously applied proteomic methods to characterize differentially expressed proteins in oral squamous-cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells and detected significantly high expression levels of CapG in OSCC-derived cell lines compared to human normal oral keratinocytes. In the current study, to further determine the potential involvement of CapG in OSCC, we evaluated the status of CapG protein and mRNA expression in human oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) and primary OSCCs and correlated the results with clinicopathologic variables. Matched normal and tumour tissue sections of 79 human primary OSCCs and 28 OPLs were analyzed for CapG expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Correlations between CapG-immunohistochemical staining scores of OSCCs and clinicopathologic features were evaluated by Fisher's exact test. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to estimate CapG expression at the mRNA level. In IHC, substantial up-regulation of CapG protein was observed in primary OSCCs (52%) and OPLs (64%), whereas corresponding normal tissues showed consistently weak or absent immunoreactivity of CapG. qRT-PCR data were consistent with the protein expression status. Moreover, CapG expression was correlated with the TNM stage grading of OSCCs. Our finding of frequent dysregulated expression of CapG in premalignant and malignant lesions together with an association with an advanced clinical disease stage suggests that CapG could contribute to cancer development and progression and that CapG may have potential as a biomarker and a therapeutic target for OSCC

  2. A review of dietary factors and its influence on DNA methylation in colorectal carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasaradnam, R P; Commane, D M; Bradburn, D; Mathers, J C

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common cancer in non-smokers posing a significant health burden in the UK. Observational studies lend support to the impact of environmental factors especially diet on colorectal carcinogenesis. Significant advances have been made in understanding the biology of CRC carcinogenesis in particular epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation. DNA methylation is thought to occur at least as commonly as inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. In fact compared with other human cancers, promoter gene methylation occurs most commonly within the gastrointestinal tract. Emerging data suggest the direct influence of certain micronutrients for example folic acid, selenium as well as interaction with toxins such as alcohol on DNA methylation. Such interactions are likely to have a mechanistic impact on CRC carcinogenesis through the methylation pathway but also, may offer possible therapeutic potential as nutraceuticals.

  3. Multnomah County Hydrokinetic Feasibility Study: Final Feasibility Study Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spain, Stephen

    2012-03-15

    HDR has completed a study of the technical, regulatory, and economic feasibility of installing hydrokinetic turbines under the Morrison, Broadway, and Sellwood bridges. The primary objective of installing hydrokinetic turbines is a demonstration of in-stream hydrokinetic technologies for public education and outreach. Due to the low gradient of the Lower Willamette and the effects of the tide, velocities in the area in consideration are simply not high enough to economically support a commercial installation. While the velocities in the river may at times provide enough energy for a commercial turbine to reach capacity, the frequency and duration of high flow events which provide suitable velocities is not sufficient to support a commercial hydrokinetic installation. We have observed that over an 11 year period, daily average velocities in the Lower Willamette exceeded a nominal cut-in speed of 0.75 m/s only 20% of the time, leaving net zero power production for the remaining 80% of days. The Sellwood Bridge site was estimated to have the best hydrokinetic resource, with an estimated average annual production of about 9,000 kWh. The estimated production could range from 2,500 kWh to 15,000 kWh. Based on these energy estimates, the amount of revenue generated through either a power purchase agreement (PPA) or recovered through net metering is not sufficient to repay the project costs within the life of the turbine. The hydrokinetic resource at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges is slightly smaller than at the Sellwood Bridge. While the Broadway and Morrison Bridges have existing infrastructure that could be utilized, the project is not expected to generate enough revenue to repay the investment. Despite low velocities and energy production, the sites themselves are favorable for installation of a demonstration or experimental project. With high public interest in renewable energy, the possibility exists to develop a hydrokinetic test site which could provide

  4. 32nd European Study Group with Industry, Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    ESGI (European Study Group with Industry) is Europe's leading workshop for interaction between mathematicians and industry. These workshops have taken place in Great Britain for a number of years, going back to 1968 when Prof. Alan Tayler initiated the so-called Oxford Study Group with Industry....... The coordiantion of the study groups is now done by the European Consortium for Mathematics in Industry (ECMI).This is the final report for the first study group in Denmark, (and the first ESGI outside Great Britain). Six Danish companies brought problems to the Study Group, requiring a wide range of mathematical...... expertise.Danfoss wanted a an analysis and optimization of a scroll compressor.DANISCO wanted a model for the heat and moisture transport in sugar silos.Danish Maritime Institute wanted to optimize a dynamical position system in order to keep a wessel stationary on the surface of the ocean.Grundfos wanted...

  5. Polyphenols as inhibitors of carcinogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, C S; Lee, M. J.; Chen, L.; Yang, G.Y.

    1997-01-01

    Many polyphenolic compounds have demonstrated anticarcinogenic activities in animal models. These compounds include flavanone, flavonols, isoflavone, and catechins. In this article, tea catechins will be used as an example to illustrate current research in this area. Many laboratory studies have demonstrated the inhibition of tumorigenesis in animal models by different tea preparations. The animal models include tumorigenesis in the mouse lung, rat and mouse esophagi, mouse forestomach, mouse...

  6. An experimental study of fission neutron carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously investigated the dose-effect relationship for lung carcinomas in rats exposed to radon and daughters at doses ranging from 20 to 12,000 working-level months (WLM). For comparison of the carcinogenic effectiveness of neutrons, rats of the same strains were given doses from 0.01 to 8 Gy, and the dose-effect relationship was estimated for the same lung carcinomas. Other malignant and benign tumors from various organs were analyzed by using a classification similar to that used for man. The data obtained make it possible to relate frequency and time of observation to radiation dose for each type of cancer. The dose-effect relationship for the various types of radiation-induced cancers differs. The relative radiosensitivity of organs is therefore also apparently dose dependent. If effects from radon are taken as a reference, the carcinogenic effectiveness of neutrons in rats is higher than is reflected by the quality factor currently used for man. 7 refs., 8 tabs

  7. Radiation carcinogenesis and radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the publication of the latest recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, several new issues have arisen. The Commission arrives at its recommendations for dose limits using a theoretical or predictive method making use of the data on risks of cancer in populations who have been accidentally or iatrogenically exposed. The issues of importance in this method are discussed, particularly the concept of acceptable risk. An aternative method for setting dose limits, a pragmatic method, involves the study of the cancer incidence in radiation workers and a comparison with cancer incidence in other occupations and industries

  8. High-let radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent results for neutron radiation-induced tumors are presented to illustrate the complexities of the dose-response curves for high-LET radiation. It is suggested that in order to derive an appropriate model for dose-response curves for the induction of tumors by high-LET radiation it is necessary to take into account dose distribution, cell killing and the susceptibility of the tissue under study. Preliminary results for the induction of Harderian gland tumors in mice exposed to various heavy ion beams are presented. The results suggest that the effectiveness of the heavy ion beams increases with increasing LET. The slopes of the dose-response curves for the different high-LET radiations decrease between 20 and 40 rads and therefore comparisons of the relative effectiveness should be made from data obtained at doses below about 20 to 30 rads

  9. A Review of Molecular Events of Cadmium-Induced Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luevano, Joe; Damodaran, Chendil

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic, heavy industrial metal that poses serious environmental health hazards to both humans and wildlife. Lately, Cd and Cd containing compounds have been classified as known human carcinogens and epidemiological data show causal associations with prostate, breast and lung cancer. The molecular mechanisms involved in Cd-induced carcinogenesis are poorly understood and are only now beginning to be elucidated. The effects of chronic exposure to Cd have recently become of great interest due to the development of malignancies in Cd-induced tumorigenesis in animal. Briefly, various in vitro studies demonstrate that Cd can act as a mitogen, stimulate cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis and DNA repair, and induce carcinogenesis in several mammalian tissues and organs. Thus, the various mechanisms involved in chronic Cd exposure and malignant transformations warrant further investigation. In this review, we will focus on recent evidence of various leading general and tissue specific molecular mechanisms that follow chronic exposure to Cd in prostate, breast and lung transformed malignancies. In addition, this review considers less defined mechanisms such as epigenetic modification and autophagy, which are thought to play a role in the development of Cd-induced malignant transformation. PMID:25272057

  10. [THE ROLE OF ESTROGENS IN THE CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG CANCER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikova, E; Uchikov, A; Dimitrakova, E; Uchikov, P

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from lung cancer has dramatically increased in women as compared to men over the past few years. Historically, smoking has been considered the major risk factor for lung cancer regardless of gender. Several recent lines of evidence implicate gender differences in the observed differences in prevalence and histologic type which cannot be explained based on the carcinogenic action of nicotine. Several recent studies underscore the importance of reproductive and hormonal factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer Lung cancer morbidity and mortality in Bulgaria was 16.2/100000 women and 14.6/ 100000 women, resp. Lung cancer morbidity in Europe was 39/100000 women. Lung cancer is extremely sensitive to estrogens. The latter act directly or as effect modifiers for the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. Further research examining the relationship between serum estrogen levels and the estrogen receptor expression in normal and tumor lung tissue samples can help elucidate the importance of reproductive and hormonal (exogenous and endogenous) factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer.

  11. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neagu, Monica; Caruntu, Constantin; Constantin, Carolina; Boda, Daniel; Zurac, Sabina; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M

    2016-05-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands‑on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro‑inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro‑inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  12. [THE ROLE OF ESTROGENS IN THE CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG CANCER].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikova, E; Uchikov, A; Dimitrakova, E; Uchikov, P

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from lung cancer has dramatically increased in women as compared to men over the past few years. Historically, smoking has been considered the major risk factor for lung cancer regardless of gender. Several recent lines of evidence implicate gender differences in the observed differences in prevalence and histologic type which cannot be explained based on the carcinogenic action of nicotine. Several recent studies underscore the importance of reproductive and hormonal factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer Lung cancer morbidity and mortality in Bulgaria was 16.2/100000 women and 14.6/ 100000 women, resp. Lung cancer morbidity in Europe was 39/100000 women. Lung cancer is extremely sensitive to estrogens. The latter act directly or as effect modifiers for the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. Further research examining the relationship between serum estrogen levels and the estrogen receptor expression in normal and tumor lung tissue samples can help elucidate the importance of reproductive and hormonal (exogenous and endogenous) factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer. PMID:27509656

  13. The Combination of Three Natural Compounds Effectively Prevented Lung Carcinogenesis by Optimal Wound Healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linxin Liu

    Full Text Available The tumor stroma has been described as "normal wound healing gone awry". We explored whether the restoration of a wound healing-like microenvironment may facilitate tumor healing. Firstly, we screened three natural compounds (shikonin, notoginsenoside R1 and aconitine from wound healing agents and evaluated the efficacies of wound healing microenvironment for limiting single agent-elicited carcinogenesis and two-stage carcinogenesis. The results showed that three compounds used alone could promote wound healing but had unfavorable efficacy to exert wound healing, and that the combination of three compounds made up treatment disadvantage of a single compound in wound healing and led to optimal wound healing. Although individual treatment with these agents may prevent cancer, they were not effective for the treatment of established tumors. However, combination treatment with these three compounds almost completely prevented urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis and reduced tumor burden. Different from previous studies, we found that urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis was associated with lung injury independent of pulmonary inflammation. LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation did not increase lung carcinogenesis, whereas decreased pulmonary inflammation by macrophage depletion promoted lung carcinogenesis. In addition, urethane damaged wound healing in skin excision wound model, reversed lung carcinogenic efficacy by the combination of three compounds was consistent with skin wound healing. Further, the combination of these three agents reduced the number of lung cancer stem cells (CSCs by inducing cell differentiation, restoration of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC and blockade of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Our results suggest that restoration of a wound healing microenvironment represents an effective strategy for cancer prevention.

  14. Chronic exposure to combined carcinogens enhances breast cell carcinogenesis with mesenchymal and stem-like cell properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenora Ann Pluchino

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer affecting women in North America and Europe. More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to small quantities of multiple carcinogens. To understand how multiple carcinogens act together to induce cellular carcinogenesis, we studied the activity of environmental carcinogens 4-(methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P, and dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP using our breast cell carcinogenesis model. Our study revealed, for the first time, that combined NNK and B[a]P enhanced breast cell carcinogenesis chronically induced by PhIP in both non-cancerous and cancerous breast cells. Co-exposure was more potent than sequential exposure to combined NNK and B[a]P followed by PhIP in inducing carcinogenesis. Initiation of carcinogenesis was measured by transient endpoints induced in a single exposure, while progression of carcinogenesis was measured by acquisition of constitutive endpoints in cumulative exposures. Transient endpoints included DNA damage, Ras-Erk-Nox pathway activation, reactive oxygen species elevation, and increased cellular proliferation. Constitutive endpoints included various cancer-associated properties and signaling modulators, as well as enrichment of cancer stem-like cell population and activation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition program. Using transient and constitutive endpoints as targets, we detected that a combination of the green tea catechins ECG and EGCG, at non-cytotoxic levels, was more effective than individual agents in intervention of cellular carcinogenesis induced by combined NNK, B[a]P, and PhIP. Thus, use of combined ECG and EGCG should be seriously considered for early intervention of breast cell carcinogenesis associated with long-term exposure to environmental and dietary carcinogens.

  15. Xeroderma pigmentosum, DNA repair and carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are reviewed: Symptoms of xeroderma pigmentosum; xeroderma pigmentosum as a defect in the biochemistry of repair of radiation damage; major classes of DNA damage and repair mechanisms; excision repair in relation to biochemical steps and the XP defect; sensitivity of xeroderma pigmentosum cells; host-cell reactivation of UV-damaged viruses; excision of pyrimidine dimers from human cells; formation and sealing of single strand breaks during dimer excision; insertion of new bases to repair DNA; and DNA repair, carcinogens, and carcinogenesis

  16. Ripeness sensor development. Final report of a Phase 2 study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroshine, R.

    1995-08-01

    This is a final report for the Phase II study entitled ``Ripeness Sensor Development.`` The overall objective of the study was the development of a prototype device capable of testing whole fruits for sugar content. Although ripeness and sugar content are not synonymous, they are closely related. Furthermore, the consumer`s acceptance of or preference for fruits is strongly influenced by sugar content. Therefore, the device was called a ripeness sensor. The principle behind the measurement is proton magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H-MR). For several decades, chemists, pharmacists and other scientists have been using {sup 1}H-MR to investigate chemical structure and composition. More recently, the technique has been used in laboratories of the food industry for quality control. This effort represents one of the first attempts to adapt {sup 1}H-MR to use in a commercial facility. 28 refs., 36 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Aberrant DNA methylation in cervical carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Juan Yang

    2013-01-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk types of human papillomavirus(HPV) is known to cause cervical cancer; however,additional genetic and epigenetic alterations are required for progression from precancerous disease to invasive cancer.DNA methylation is an early and frequent molecular alteration in cervical carcinogenesis.In this review,we summarize DNA methylation within the HPV genome and human genome and identify its clinical implications.Methylation of the HPV long control region (LCR) and L1 gene is common during cervical carcinogenesis and increases with the severity of the cervical neoplasm.The L1 gene of HPV16 and HPV18 is consistently hypermethylated in invasive cervical cancers and can potentially be used as a clinical marker of cancer progression.Moreover,promoters of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) involved in many cellular pathways are methylated in cervical precursors and invasive cancers.Some are associated with squamous cell carcinomas,and others are associated with adenocarcinomas.Identification of methylated TSGs in Pap smear could be an adjuvant test in cervical cancer screening for triage of women with high-risk HPV,atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance,or low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL).However,consistent panels must be validated for this approach to be translated to the clinic.Furthermore,reversion of methylated TSGs using demethylating drugs may be an alternative anticancer treatment,but demethylating drugs without toxic carcinogenic and mutagenic properties must be identified and validated.

  18. p21 Ablation in Liver Enhances DNA Damage, Cholestasis, and Carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehedego, H.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Hu, W.; Doler, C.; Haybaeck, J.; Gassler, N.; Muller, M.R.; Liedtke, C.; Trautwein, C.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mouse studies suggest that the NF-¿B pathway regulator NEMO (also known as IKK¿) controls chronic inflammation and carcinogenesis in the liver. However, the molecular mechanisms explaining the function of NEMO are not well defined. Here, we report that overexpression of the cell-cycle regula

  19. Effects of dietary fat on virus-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in guinea fowl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirev, T.; Woutersen, R.A.; Kril, A.

    2002-01-01

    The present study was performed to assess the effects of diets supplemented with low (5%) and high (20%) corn oil on a Pts 56 retrovirus-induced model of pancreatic carcinogenesis in guinea fowl. The early microscopic lesions appear after 3 mo after virus treatment and progress over time. Eight to 1

  20. Anatomy studies for an artificial heart. Final summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the interval from February of 1972 through December of 1977, studies were conducted relating to the anatomical feasibility of implanting a total artificial heart system. These studies included both the calf as an experimental animal as well as the ultimate human recipient of the artificial heart system. Studies with the calf included definition of the thoracic anatomy relative to the size, shape, and vascular connections for implanting the blood pump. To test the animal's tolerance to an implanted engine system, mockups of the thermal converter were implanted chronically in various locations within the calf. No problems developed in retroperitoneal or intraperitoneal implants ranging from 8 to 15 months. A study to determine accelerations experienced by an abdominally implanted thermal converter was performed in calves. Under the most severe conditions, accelerations of a maximum of 34 Gs were experienced. The largest effort was devoted to defining the human anatomy relative to implanting an artificial heart in the thorax. From a number of data sources, including cadavers as well as living patients, a quantitative, statistical analysis of the size and shape of the male thorax was obtained. Finally, an in vivo study of a functional intrathoracic compliance bag in a calf demonstrated the feasibility of this method

  1. Waste package/repository impact study: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-09-01

    The Waste Package/Repository Impact Study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using the current reference salt waste package in the salt repository conceptual design. All elements of the repository that may impact waste package parameters, i.e., (size, weight, heat load) were evaluated. The repository elements considered included waste hoist feasibility, transporter and emplacement machine feasibility, subsurface entry dimensions, feasibility of emplacement configuration, and temperature limits. The evaluations are discussed in detail with supplemental technical data included in Appendices to this report, as appropriate. Results and conclusions of the evaluations are discussed in light of the acceptability of the current reference waste package as the basis for salt conceptual design. Finally, recommendations are made relative to the salt project position on the application of the reference waste package as a basis for future design activities. 31 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Waste package/repository impact study: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Package/Repository Impact Study was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of using the current reference salt waste package in the salt repository conceptual design. All elements of the repository that may impact waste package parameters, i.e., (size, weight, heat load) were evaluated. The repository elements considered included waste hoist feasibility, transporter and emplacement machine feasibility, subsurface entry dimensions, feasibility of emplacement configuration, and temperature limits. The evaluations are discussed in detail with supplemental technical data included in Appendices to this report, as appropriate. Results and conclusions of the evaluations are discussed in light of the acceptability of the current reference waste package as the basis for salt conceptual design. Finally, recommendations are made relative to the salt project position on the application of the reference waste package as a basis for future design activities. 31 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs

  3. Differential timing of oxidative DNA damage and telomere shortening in hepatitis C and B virus-related liver carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piciocchi, Marika; Cardin, Romilda; Cillo, Umberto; Vitale, Alessandro; Cappon, Andrea; Mescoli, Claudia; Guido, Maria; Rugge, Massimo; Burra, Patrizia; Floreani, Annarosa; Farinati, Fabio

    2016-02-01

    In viral hepatitis, inflammation is correlated with chronic oxidative stress, one of the biological events leading to DNA damage and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. Aim of this study was to investigate the complex molecular network linking oxidative damage to telomere length and telomerase activity and regulation in hepatitis C and B virus-related liver carcinogenesis. We investigated 142 patients: 21 with HCC (in both tumor and peritumor tissues) and 121 with chronic viral hepatitis in different stages. We evaluated 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), marker of oxidative DNA damage, OGG1 gene polymorphism, telomere length, telomerase activity, TERT promoter methylation, and mitochondrial TERT localization. In hepatitis C-related damage, 8-OHdG levels increased since the early disease stages, whereas hepatitis B-related liver disease was characterized by a later and sharper 8-OHdG accumulation (P = 0.005). In C virus-infected patients, telomeres were shorter (P = 0.03), whereas telomerase activity was higher in tumors than that in the less advanced stages of disease in both groups (P = 0.0001, P = 0.05), with an earlier increase in hepatitis C. Similarly, TERT promoter methylation was higher in tumor and peritumor tissues in both groups (P = 0.02, P = 0.0001). Finally, TERT was localized in mitochondria in tumor and peritumor samples, with 8-OHdG levels significantly lower in mitochondrial than those in genomic DNA (P = 0.0003). These data describe a pathway in which oxidative DNA damage accumulates in correspondence with telomere shortening, telomerase activation, and TERT promoter methylation with a different time course in hepatitis B and C virus-related liver carcinogenesis. Finally, TERT localizes in mitochondria in HCC, where it lacks a canonical function. PMID:26408804

  4. Translesion Synthesis Polymerases in the Prevention and Promotion of Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Jay Stallons

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A critical step in the transformation of cells to the malignant state of cancer is the induction of mutations in the DNA of cells damaged by genotoxic agents. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS is the process by which cells copy DNA containing unrepaired damage that blocks progression of the replication fork. The DNA polymerases that catalyze TLS in mammals have been the topic of intense investigation over the last decade. DNA polymerase η (Pol η is best understood and is active in error-free bypass of UV-induced DNA damage. The other TLS polymerases (Pol ι, Pol κ, REV1, and Pol ζ have been studied extensively in vitro, but their in vivo role is only now being investigated using knockout mouse models of carcinogenesis. This paper will focus on the studies of mice and humans with altered expression of TLS polymerases and the effects on cancer induced by environmental agents.

  5. System study of alternative waste management techniques: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the important results achieved in conjunction with the Research and Development Priority ''Alternative Waste Management Techniques'' sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology from 1981 to 1984. The subject of these studies was solely ''direct disposal'' of spent fuel elements. For this purpose a reference concept was selected from a variety of possible processes and engineered in detailed form by firms in the nuclear industry. Those who worked on the engineering concepts consider this waste management method technically feasible. Several disposal casks have been fabricated. The basic licensability of direct disposal can be evaluated on the basis of the documentation developed by the companies. The direct disposal method was compared with the ''integrated waste management concept'' using reference fuel cycles with respect to the following criteria: radiological safety and nuclear material safeguards and, in addition, economic and energy-policy aspects. It was found that with respect to radiological safety, including the long-term safety of the final repository, there are no significant differences between the two fuel cycles with and without reprocessing. With respect to the nuclear material safeguards of a final repository containing spent fuel elements, there are still a number of unanswered questions. From an economic standpoint, direct disposal will be more economical in the foreseeable future than integrated waste management. Quantification of the effects of one or the other waste management method on the national economy is not necessarily possible. Reprocessing is supported primarily by technological and energy-policy considerations. On the basis of the results, the conclusion is reached that reprocessing should be pursued further, but that at the same time direct disposal should be developed to the point of practical maturity

  6. Prevention of mammary carcinogenesis by short-term estrogen and progestin treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Women who have undergone a full-term pregnancy before the age of 20 have one-half the risk of developing breast cancer compared with women who have never gone through a full-term pregnancy. This protective effect is observed universally among women of all ethnic groups. Parity in rats and mice also protects them against chemically induced mammary carcinogenesis. Seven-week-old virgin Lewis rats were given N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. Two weeks later the rats were treated with natural or synthetic estrogens and progestins for 7–21 days by subcutaneous implantation of silastic capsules. In our current experiment, we demonstrate that short-term sustained exposure to natural or synthetic estrogens along with progestins is effective in preventing mammary carcinogenesis in rats. Treatment with 30 mg estriol plus 30 mg progesterone for 3 weeks significantly reduced the incidence of mammary cancer. Short-term exposure to ethynyl estradiol plus megesterol acetate or norethindrone was effective in decreasing the incidence of mammary cancers. Tamoxifen plus progesterone treatment for 3 weeks was able to confer only a transient protection from mammary carcinogenesis, while 2-methoxy estradiol plus progesterone was effective in conferring protection against mammary cancers. The data obtained in the present study demonstrate that, in nulliparous rats, long-term protection against mammary carcinogenesis can be achieved by short-term treatments with natural or synthetic estrogen and progesterone combinations

  7. Nucleophosmin in the pathogenesis of arsenic-related bladder carcinogenesis revealed by quantitative proteomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of arsenic (As)-associated carcinogenesis, we performed proteomic analysis on E7 immortalized human uroepithelial cells after treatment with As in vitro. Quantitative proteomics was performed using stable isotope dimethyl labeling coupled with two-dimensional liquid chromatography peptide separation and mass spectrometry (MS)/MS analysis. Among 285 proteins, a total of 26 proteins were upregulated (ratio > 2.0) and 18 proteins were downregulated (ratio < 0.65) by As treatment, which are related to nucleotide binding, lipid metabolism, protein folding, protein biosynthesis, transcription, DNA repair, cell cycle control, and signal transduction. This study reports the potential significance of nucleophosmin (NPM) in the As-related bladder carcinogenesis. NPM was universally expressed in all of uroepithelial cell lines examined, implying that NPM may play a role in human bladder carcinogenesis. Upregulation of NPM tends to be dose- and time-dependent after As treatment. Expression of NPM was associated with cell proliferation, migration and anti-apoptosis. On the contrary, soy isoflavones inhibited the expression of NPM in vitro. The results suggest that NPM may play a role in the As-related bladder carcinogenesis, and soybean-based foods may have potential in the suppression of As/NPM-related tumorigenesis.

  8. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of alpha-Methyldopa Sesquihydrate (CAS No. 41372-08-1) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Feed Studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    a-Methyldopa sesquihydrate is used in the treatment of hypertension; over 20 million prescriptions are written annually for a -methyldopa or a-methyldopa sesquihydrate in the United States. a-Methyldopa sesquihydrate (USP grade, greater than 99% pure) was selected for study because of widespread human exposure and the lack of carcinogenicity studies on this compound. Fourteen-day, 13-week, and 2-year studies were conducted in F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice. The chemical was administered in feed because human exposure is primarily by the oral route. Short-term studies were performed in bacteria and mammalian cells to evaluate the potential for genetic damage. Fourteen-Day and Thirteen-Week Studies: In the 14-day studies, the chemical was administered at dietary concentrations of 0 and 6,250-100,000 ppm. All rats receiving 100,000 ppm and 2/5 female rats receiving 50,000 ppm died. All mice lived until the end of the studies. Final mean body weights of dosed male rats were 14%-43% lower than that of controls, and those of dosed female rats were 9%-24% lower. Feed consumption by dosed male and female rats was reduced. Final mean body weights of dosed mice were generally within 10% of those of controls; feed consumption by dosed groups was lower than that by controls during the first week of the studies. In the 13-week studies, the chemical was administered at dietary concentrations of 0 and 3,100-50,000 ppm. Deaths occurred in 4/10 male rats, 7/10 female rats, and 2/10 female mice at 50,000 ppm and in 1/10 female rats at 25,000 ppm. Final mean body weights of dosed rats were 6%-46% lower than those of controls. Feed consumption by dosed rat groups was lower than that by controls. Final mean body weights of male mice at 25,000 and 50,000 ppm and female mice at 50,000 ppm were reduced 12%-19%. Feed consumption by dosed and control mice was comparable. Rats and mice receiving 25,000 and 50,000 ppm exhibited clinical signs of toxicity including lethargy, hyperexcitability

  9. Study of $\\pi^{-}$p Interactions with Neutral Final States

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is a study of the production of neutral particles or states decaying into photons in the reaction @p|- + p @A M|0 + n at SPS energies. \\\\ \\\\ Special attention is paid to the measurement of the production of heavy particles with hidden quantum numbers and of possible new heavy spinless states decaying into two photons. \\\\ \\\\ The large four-momentum transfer behaviour of binary processes involving known neutral mesons and the production of new meson resonances with high mass and spin will also be studied. Complex multiparticle final states will be analysed as a by-product.\\\\ \\\\ The central unit of the experimental set-up is a 4000 cell Cerenkov hodoscope spectrometer (GAMS) which allows the measurement of the momentum vector of each $\\gamma$ in a multigamma event. \\\\ \\\\ The longitudinal position of the interaction point in the liquid hydrogen target is measured by the Cerenkov light intensity. \\\\ \\\\ A guard system, made of scintillation counters and lead-glass Cerenkov counters, is used to trigg...

  10. Mushroom Ganoderma lucidum prevents colitis-associated carcinogenesis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Sliva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies suggest that mushroom intake is inversely correlated with gastric, gastrointestinal and breast cancers. We have recently demonstrated anticancer and anti-inflammatory activity of triterpene extract isolated from mushroom Ganoderma lucidum (GLT. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether GLT prevents colitis-associated carcinogenesis in mice. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Colon carcinogenesis was induced by the food-borne carcinogen (2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazol[4,5-b]pyridine [PhIP] and inflammation (dextran sodium sulfate [DSS] in mice. Mice were treated with 0, 100, 300 and 500 mg GLT/kg of body weight 3 times per week for 4 months. Cell proliferation, expression of cyclin D1 and COX-2 and macrophage infiltration was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The effect of GLT on XRE/AhR, PXR and rPXR was evaluated by the reporter gene assays. Expression of metabolizing enzymes CYP1A2, CYP3A1 and CYP3A4 in colon tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry. GLT treatment significantly suppressed focal hyperplasia, aberrant crypt foci (ACF formation and tumor formation in mice exposed to PhIP/DSS. The anti-proliferative effects of GLT were further confirmed by the decreased staining with Ki-67 in colon tissues. PhIP/DSS-induced colon inflammation was demonstrated by the significant shortening of the large intestine and macrophage infiltrations, whereas GLT treatment prevented the shortening of colon lengths, and reduced infiltration of macrophages in colon tissue. GLT treatment also significantly down-regulated PhIP/DSS-dependent expression of cyclin D1, COX-2, CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in colon tissue. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that GLT could be considered as an alternative dietary approach for the prevention of colitis-associated cancer.

  11. Induction of human breast cell carcinogenesis by triclocarban and intervention by curcumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Triclocarban exposure induces breast epithelial cell carcinogenesis. •Triclocarban induces the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, and DNA damage. •Physiological doses of triclocarban induce cellular carcinogenesis. •Non-cytotoxic curcumin blocks triclocarban-induced carcinogenesis and pathways. -- Abstract: More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to environmental carcinogens and co-carcinogens. To identify co-carcinogens with abilities to induce cellular pre-malignancy, we studied the activity of triclocarban (TCC), an antimicrobial agent commonly used in household and personal care products. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, that chronic exposure to TCC at physiologically-achievable nanomolar concentrations resulted in progressive carcinogenesis of human breast cells from non-cancerous to pre-malignant. Pre-malignant carcinogenesis was measured by increasingly-acquired cancer-associated properties of reduced dependence on growth factors, anchorage-independent growth and increased cell proliferation, without acquisition of cellular tumorigenicity. Long-term TCC exposure also induced constitutive activation of the Erk–Nox pathway and increases of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells. A single TCC exposure induced transient induction of the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, increased cell proliferation, and DNA damage in not only non-cancerous breast cells but also breast cancer cells. Using these constitutively- and transiently-induced changes as endpoints, we revealed that non-cytotoxic curcumin was effective in intervention of TCC-induced cellular pre-malignancy. Our results lead us to suggest that the co-carcinogenic potential of TCC should be seriously considered in epidemiological studies to reveal the significance of TCC in the development of sporadic breast cancer. Using TCC-induced transient and constitutive endpoints as targets will likely help identify non-cytotoxic preventive

  12. Induction of human breast cell carcinogenesis by triclocarban and intervention by curcumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sood, Shilpa; Choudhary, Shambhunath; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert, E-mail: hcrwang@utk.edu

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Triclocarban exposure induces breast epithelial cell carcinogenesis. •Triclocarban induces the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, and DNA damage. •Physiological doses of triclocarban induce cellular carcinogenesis. •Non-cytotoxic curcumin blocks triclocarban-induced carcinogenesis and pathways. -- Abstract: More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to environmental carcinogens and co-carcinogens. To identify co-carcinogens with abilities to induce cellular pre-malignancy, we studied the activity of triclocarban (TCC), an antimicrobial agent commonly used in household and personal care products. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, that chronic exposure to TCC at physiologically-achievable nanomolar concentrations resulted in progressive carcinogenesis of human breast cells from non-cancerous to pre-malignant. Pre-malignant carcinogenesis was measured by increasingly-acquired cancer-associated properties of reduced dependence on growth factors, anchorage-independent growth and increased cell proliferation, without acquisition of cellular tumorigenicity. Long-term TCC exposure also induced constitutive activation of the Erk–Nox pathway and increases of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells. A single TCC exposure induced transient induction of the Erk–Nox pathway, ROS elevation, increased cell proliferation, and DNA damage in not only non-cancerous breast cells but also breast cancer cells. Using these constitutively- and transiently-induced changes as endpoints, we revealed that non-cytotoxic curcumin was effective in intervention of TCC-induced cellular pre-malignancy. Our results lead us to suggest that the co-carcinogenic potential of TCC should be seriously considered in epidemiological studies to reveal the significance of TCC in the development of sporadic breast cancer. Using TCC-induced transient and constitutive endpoints as targets will likely help identify non-cytotoxic preventive

  13. Finalization of the feasibility study for Rocky Mountain arsenal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental remediation program at the Army's premier cleanup site, Rocky Mountain Arsenal, is fast approaching the climax of the study phase and will be moving into the cleanup phase. Selecting the cleanup approach for this extremely complex site involves addressing a number of precedent-setting issues. The Remedial Investigation (RI) for this 27-sq. mile former Army chemical munitions and commercial pesticide manufacturing facility, completed in January 1992, included the collection of over 50,000 samples from soil, surface water, groundwater, structures, air and plants and animals. Samples were analyzed for over 60 specific chemical analytes and screened for hundreds of others. The RI found a number of contaminated groundwater plumes, hundreds of contaminated structures, high concentrations of contaminants in soils in former disposal basins and manufacturing areas and buried munitions. Some of the major contaminants targeted for remediation include benzene, chloroform, tetrachloroethylene, dibromochloropropane, diisopropylmethyl phosphonate, aldrin, adieldrin, isodrin, chlordane, lead, arsenic and mercury. The Feasibility Study (FS) has reviewed potential remediation alternatives. The first phase of the FS, the Development and Screening of Alternatives (DSA) presented a range of alternatives. An equally complex and parallel study, the Integrated Endangerment Assessment, is in final stages. The goal of the second phase of the FS, the Detailed Analysis of Alternatives (DAA), is to analyze the soils, water and structures alternatives retained in the DSA in greater technical detail. The Army's draft version of the DAA, released in the Fall of 1993, has proposed a wide range of alternatives to remediate 27 different contamination groups and is included in the presentation

  14. Role of bile acids in carcinogenesis of pancreatic cancer: An old topic with new perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hui-Yi; Chen, Yang-Chao

    2016-09-01

    The role of bile acids in colorectal cancer has been well documented, but their role in pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this review, we examined the risk factors of pancreatic cancer. We found that bile acids are associated with most of these factors. Alcohol intake, smoking, and a high-fat diet all lead to high secretion of bile acids, and bile acid metabolic dysfunction is a causal factor of gallstones. An increase in secretion of bile acids, in addition to a long common channel, may result in bile acid reflux into the pancreatic duct and to the epithelial cells or acinar cells, from which pancreatic adenocarcinoma is derived. The final pathophysiological process is pancreatitis, which promotes dedifferentiation of acinar cells into progenitor duct-like cells. Interestingly, bile acids act as regulatory molecules in metabolism, affecting adipose tissue distribution, insulin sensitivity and triglyceride metabolism. As a result, bile acids are associated with three risk factors of pancreatic cancer: obesity, diabetes and hypertriglyceridemia. In the second part of this review, we summarize several studies showing that bile acids act as cancer promoters in gastrointestinal cancer. However, more question are raised than have been solved, and further oncological and physiological experiments are needed to confirm the role of bile acids in pancreatic cancer carcinogenesis. PMID:27672269

  15. Final technical report on studies of plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gives an overview of the scientific results obtained under the DOE grant, and references the journal articles which give more complete descriptions of the various topics. Recently, the research has been focused on 2-dimensional vortices and turbulence: experiments using a new camera-diagnosed electron plasma apparatus have given surprising results which both clarify and challenge theories. Here, the crossfield E x B flow of the electron plasma is directly analogous to the 2-d flow of an ideal fluid such as water, and may also give insight into more complicated poloidal flows exhibited in toroidal plasmas. The shear-flow instabilities, turbulence, and vortices can be accurately observed, and the free relaxation of this turbulence has been characterized. The physical processes underlying the complicated turbulent evolution can also be studied in more controlled near-linear regimes. The original experimental focus of this program was on radial particle transport from applied external field asymmetries. Here, this research program clearly identified the importance of the collective response of the plasma, giving smaller fields from shielding, or enhanced fields from resonant modes. Experiments and theory work have also elucidated the flow of a plasma along the magnetic field. Finally, some theory was pursued for direct application to fusion plasmas, and to gravitating gas clouds in astrophysics. This program was highly successful in clarifying basic plasma transport processes

  16. Study of Final States in Deep Inelastic Muon Scattering

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to study the different possible final states in deep inelastic muon scattering from hydrogen in connection with the detection of the scattered muon in a forward spectrometer (Experiment NA2).\\\\ \\\\ A vertex detector will be used which extends the hadron detection capabilities into the backward hemisphere of the centre-of-mass system. Particle momenta can be measured down to 200 MeV/c in a vertex magnet, which contains a streamer chamber (SC Particle identification will be done in a series of wide angle Cerenkov counters (C^0,C^1,CA) and at low momenta in time-of-flight counter hodoscopes (F1-F4). An 8-plane module of MWPC chambers (PV) will be used in conjunction with the streamer chamber and the drift chambers WV1, WV2 and WV3. \\\\ \\\\ The vertex magnet is a C magnet with circular pole tips of 2 m diameter and 1 m gap width. The central magnetic field will be 1.5 T. The streamer chamber (2m x 1.2m x 0.72m) will contain a 1 m liquid H^2 target.\\\\ \\\\ As a natural extension of the for...

  17. Final technical report on studies of plasma transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Neil, T.M.; Driscoll, C.F.; Malmberg, J.H.

    1997-04-01

    This document gives an overview of the scientific results obtained under the DOE grant, and references the journal articles which give more complete descriptions of the various topics. Recently, the research has been focused on 2-dimensional vortices and turbulence: experiments using a new camera-diagnosed electron plasma apparatus have given surprising results which both clarify and challenge theories. Here, the crossfield E x B flow of the electron plasma is directly analogous to the 2-d flow of an ideal fluid such as water, and may also give insight into more complicated poloidal flows exhibited in toroidal plasmas. The shear-flow instabilities, turbulence, and vortices can be accurately observed, and the free relaxation of this turbulence has been characterized. The physical processes underlying the complicated turbulent evolution can also be studied in more controlled near-linear regimes. The original experimental focus of this program was on radial particle transport from applied external field asymmetries. Here, this research program clearly identified the importance of the collective response of the plasma, giving smaller fields from shielding, or enhanced fields from resonant modes. Experiments and theory work have also elucidated the flow of a plasma along the magnetic field. Finally, some theory was pursued for direct application to fusion plasmas, and to gravitating gas clouds in astrophysics. This program was highly successful in clarifying basic plasma transport processes.

  18. The molecular mechanisms of hazardous metals for carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenJK; LeiYX

    2002-01-01

    The available experimental and epidemiological data have shown that nickel (Ni) and cadmium (Dd) and their compounds are carcinogenic to experimental animals and human.These two metals have been classified as human carcinogens bythe International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).However,Their underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown.The objective of this research was to investigate the molecular mechanisms responsible for Ni and Cd carcinogenesis through epidemiological study in human exposure,transformation expreiments in human epithelial cells (16HBE) and BALB/c-3T3 cell lines in vitro,DNA damage detections (comet,DNA-protein crosslinks) as well as telomerase activity and apoptosis assay,and analysis of oncogens,tumor suppressor genes and their mutation (including genomic instability,k-ras,p15,p16,p53,FHIT) in transformed cell lines or tumor cells/tissue.Furthermore,we also detected and analyses the methylation,related novel genes and encoded protein in Cd transformed cells.The results and conclusion are as follows:(1)There is significant relationship between some hazardous metals and lung cancer (OR=8.76),especially for nickel(OR=11.25).(2)Ni and Cd and their compounds could induce malignant transformation in mammalian cell lines and human epithelial cells,and induce tumorigenesis in nude mice.(3)There is obvious DNA damage during cell transformation and tumorigenesis induced by Ni.(4) Significant genomic instability has been shown during cell transformation and tumorigenesis induced by Ni.(5)Detection of k-ras,p15,p16 genes in point mutation have demonstrated no changes during cell transformation and tumorigenesis induced by hazardous medals,suggesting that gene mutation is not the main way to metal carcinogenesis.(6)There are some aberrant DNA methylation in Cdtransformed cell lines.(7)We found two novel Cd-responsive proto-oncogenes and their encoded proteins in Cd-transformed cell lines.

  19. Study of B Meson Decays to ppbarh Final States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hryn' ova, Tetiana B.; /SLAC

    2006-03-22

    B mesons are unique among well-established non-quarkonium mesons in their ability to decay into baryons. Baryonic B decays offer a wide range of interesting areas of study: they can be used to test our theoretical understanding of rare decay processes involving baryons, search for direct CP violation and study low-energy QCD. This thesis presents measurements of branching fractions and a study of the decay dynamics of the charmless three-body decays of B meson into p{bar p}h final states, where h = {pi}{sup +}, K{sup +}, K{sub S}{sup 0}, K*{sup 0} or K*{sup +}. With a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events collected with the BaBar detector, we report the first observation of the B {yields} p{bar p}K*{sup 0} decay, and provide improved measurements of branching fractions of the other modes. The distribution of the three final-state particles is of particular interest since it provides dynamical information on the possible presence of exotic intermediate states such as the hypothetical pentaquark states {Theta}*{sup ++} and {Theta}{sup +}in the m{sub pK{sup +}} and m{sub pK{sub S}{sup 0}} spectra, respectively, or glueball states (such as the tensor glueball f{sub J}(2220)) in the m{sub p{bar p}} spectrum. No evidence for exotic states is found and upper limits on the branching fractions are set. An enhancement at low p{bar p} mass is observed in all the B {yields} p{bar p}h modes, and its shape is compared between the decay modes and with the shape of the time-like proton form factor. A Dalitz plot asymmetry in B {yields} p{bar p}K{sup +} mode suggests dominance of the penguin amplitude in this decay and disfavors the possibility that the low mass p{bar p} enhancement originates from the presence of a resonance below threshold (such as the recently seen baryonium candidate at 1835 MeV/c{sup 2}). We also identify decays of the type B {yields} X{sub c{bar c}}h {yields} p{bar p}h, where h = K{sup +}, K{sub S}{sup 0}, K*{sup 0} or K*{sup +}, and X

  20. Pulsed Neutron Scattering Studies of Strongly Fluctuating solids, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin Broholm

    2006-06-22

    The conventional description of a solid is based on a static atomic structure with small amplitude so-called harmonic fluctuations about it. This is a final technical report for a project that has explored materials where fluctuations are sufficiently strong to severely challenge this approach and lead to unexpected and potentially useful materials properties. Fluctuations are enhanced when a large number of configurations share the same energy. We used pulsed spallation source neutron scattering to obtain detailed microscopic information about structure and fluctuations in such materials. The results enhance our understanding of strongly fluctuating solids and their potential for technical applications. Because new materials require new experimental techniques, the project has also developed new techniques for probing strongly fluctuating solids. Examples of material that were studied are ZrW2O8 with large amplitude molecular motion that leads to negative thermal expansion, NiGa2S4 where competing interactions lead to an anomalous short range ordered magnet, Pr1- xBixRu2O7 where a partially filled electron shell (Pr) in a weakly disordered environment produces anomalous metallic properties, and TbMnO3 where competing interactions lead to a magneto-electric phase. The experiments on TbMnO3 exemplify the relationship between research funded by this project and future applications. Magneto-electric materials may produce a magnetic field when an electric field is applied or vise versa. Our experiments have clarified the reason why electric and magnetic polarization is coupled in TbMnO3. While this knowledge does not render TbMnO3 useful for applications it will focus the search for a practical room temperature magneto-electric for applications.

  1. Oxidative stress and inflammation in liver carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Olaya

    2007-02-01

    series of transcription factors. Moreover, in addition to direct production of ROS by these pathogens, liver infiltration by activated phagocytic cells provides an additional source of ROS production that promotes oxidative stress via interleukin or NO production that can damage proteins, lipids and DNA.

    Nuclear MSI was demonstrated first in familial hereditary colorectal cancer (HNPCC and then in sporadic cancers, primarily digestive tract cancers such as colorectal, gastric and pancreatic cancers.In HCC, although nuclear MSI has been shown in some studies (15,18, there is as yet no direct evidence of alteration of the MMR genes and the biological and the clinicopathological significance of the lowlevel MSI seen in HCC is unclear. MSI has also been shown to occur in inflammatory tissues such as chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis as well as in ulcerative colitis, chronic pancreatitis and in non digestive inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

    Recently, the role of mitochondria in carcinogenesis has been under numerous investigation, in part because their prominent role in apoptosis, ROS production and other aspects of tumour biology. The mitochondrial genome is particularly susceptible to mutations because of the high level of ROS generation in this organelle, coupled with a relatively low level of DNA repair. Somatic mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA have been shown in HCC as was also observed MSI. These findings suggest a potential role for mitochondrial genome instability in the early steps of tumorigenesis.

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury can occur in several situations and is a major cause of cell damage during surgery. Cells and tissues subjected to hypoxia by prolonged ischemia become acidic

  2. Estimation of the effects of smoking and DNA repair capacity on coefficients of a carcinogenesis model for lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Li; Kimmel, Marek; Foy, Millennia; Spitz, Margaret; Wei, Qingyi; Gorlova, Olga

    2009-01-01

    Numerous prospective and retrospective studies have clearly demonstrated a dose-related increased lung cancer risk associated with cigarette smoking, with evidence also for a genetic component to risk. In this study, using the two-stage clonal expansion stochastic model framework, for the first time we investigated the roles of both genetic susceptibility and smoking history in the initiation, clonal expansion, and malignant transformation processes in lung carcinogenesis, integrating information collected by a case–control study and a large-scale prospective cohort study. Our results show that individuals with suboptimal DNA repair capacity have enhanced transition rates of key events in carcinogenesis. PMID:19123470

  3. Oral Carcinogenesis and Oral Cancer Chemoprevention: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Takahiro Tanaka; Mayu Tanaka; Takuji Tanaka

    2011-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the major global threats to public health. The development of oral cancer is a tobacco-related multistep and multifocal process involving field cancerization and carcinogenesis. The rationale for molecular-targeted prevention of oral cancer is promising. Biomarkers of genomic instability, including aneuploidy and allelic imbalance, are possible to measure the cancer risk of oral premalignancies. Understanding of the biology of oral carcinogenesis will yield important adv...

  4. Molecular epidemiology of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of ionizing radiation in carcinogenesis is discussed. Every cell contains proto-oncogenes, which if damaged may lead to cell transformation. Every cell also contains tumor suppressor genes, which guard against transformation. Thus, transformation would seem to require a double injury to the DNA in a cell. Ionizing radiation is known to be a relatively weak mutagen, but a good clastogen (inducer of chromosome breaks, deletions and rearrangements). Ionizing radiation may therefore be a 'promoter' of cancer, i.e. a stimulant of the clonal expansion of transformed cells, if it kills enough cells to induce compensatory hyperplasia - i.e. rapid growth of cells. Ionizing radiation may be a 'progressor', if it deactivates tumor suppressor genes tending to suppress the growth of existing clones of transformed cells resulting from any of numerous causes. It may therefore be an oversimplification to say that radiation causes cancer; rather, it seems to be a weak initiator, an indirect promoter, and a late-stage progressor. 2 figs

  5. Multistage chemical carcinogenesis in mouse skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaga, T.J.; Fischer, S.M.; Weeks, C.E.; Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.

    1979-01-01

    Skin tumors in mice can be induced by the sequential application of a subthreshold dose of a carcinogen (initiation phase) followed by repetitive treatment with a noncarcinogenic tumor promoter. The initiation phase requires only a single application of either a direct acting carcinogen or a procarcinogen which has to be metabolized before being active and is essentially an irreversible step which probably involves a somatic cell mutation. There is a good correlation between the skin tumor initiating activites of several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their ability to bind covalently to epidermal DNA. Laboratory results suggest that bay region diol-epoxides are the ultimate carcinogenic form of PAH carcinogens. Potent inhibitors and stimulators of PAH tumor initiation appear to affect the level of the PAH diol-epoxide reacting with specific DNA bases. Reecent data suggests that the tumor promotion stage involves at least three important steps: (1) the induction of embryonic looking cells (dark cells) in adult epidermis; (2) an increased production of epidermal prostaglandins and polyamines; (3) sustained proliferation of dark cells. Retinoic acid specifically inhibits step two whereas the anti-inflammatory steriod fluocinolone acetonide is a potent inhibitor of steps one and three. The mechanism and the importance of a specific sequence for each step in chemical carcinogenesis in mouse skin are detailed.

  6. Hypoxia and Angiogenesis in Endometrioid Endometrial Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Horrée

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α plays an essential role in the adaptive response of cells to hypoxia, triggering biologic events associated with aggressive tumor behavior. Methods: Expression of HIF-1α and proteins in the HIF-1α pathway (Glut-1, CAIX, VEGF in paraffin-embedded specimens of normal (n = 17, premalignant (n = 17 and endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (n = 39 was explored by immunohistochemistry, in relation to microvessel density (MVD. Results: HIF-1α overexpression was absent in inactive endometrium but present in hyperplasia (61% and carcinoma (87%, with increasing expression in a perinecrotic fashion pointing to underlying hypoxia. No membranous expression of Glut-1 and CAIX was noticed in inactive endometrium, in contrast with expression in hyperplasia (Glut-1 0%, CAIX 61%, only focal and diffuse and carcinoma (Glut-1 94.6%, CAIX 92%, both mostly perinecrotically. Diffuse HIF-1α was accompanied by activation of downstream targets. VEGF was significantly higher expressed in hyperplasias and carcinomas compared to inactive endometrium. MVD was higher in hyperplasias and carcinomas than in normal endometrium (p < 0.001. Conclusion: HIF-1α and its downstream genes are increasingly expressed from normal through premalignant to endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the endometrium, paralleled by activation of its downstream genes and increased angiogenesis. This underlines the potential importance of hypoxia and its key regulator HIF-1α in endometrial carcinogenesis.

  7. Neutrophils Are Required for 3-Methylcholanthrene-Initiated, Butylated Hydroxytoluene-Promoted Lung Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Vikis, Haris G.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Franklin, Andrew; Stein, Lauren; Rymaszewski, Amy; Zhu, Jihong; Liu, Pengyuan; Tichelaar, Jay W.; Krupnick, Alexander S.; You, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Multiple studies have shown a link between chronic inflammation and lung tumorigenesis. Inbred mouse strains vary in their susceptibility to methylcholanthrene (MCA)-initiated butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-promoted lung carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated whether neutrophils play a role in strain dependent differences in susceptibility to lung tumor promotion. We observed a significant elevation in homeostatic levels of neutrophils in the lungs of tumor-susceptible BALB/cByJ...

  8. FINAL REPORT ON THE AQUATIC MERCURY ASSESSMENT STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halverson, N

    2008-09-30

    In February 2000, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 4 issued a proposed Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for total mercury in the middle and lower Savannah River. The initial TMDL, which would have imposed a 1 ng/l mercury limit for discharges to the middle/lower Savannah River, was revised to 2.8 ng/l in the final TMDL released in February 2001. The TMDL was intended to protect people from the consumption of contaminated fish, which is the major route of mercury exposure to humans. The most bioaccumulative form of mercury is methylmercury, which is produced in aquatic environments by the action of microorganisms on inorganic mercury. Because of the environmental and economic significance of the mercury discharge limits that would have been imposed by the TMDL, the Savannah River Site (SRS) initiated several studies concerning: (1) mercury in SRS discharges, SRS streams and the Savannah River, (2) mercury bioaccumulation factors for Savannah River fish, (3) the use of clams to monitor the influence of mercury from tributary streams on biota in the Savannah River, and (4) mercury in rainwater falling on the SRS. The results of these studies are presented in detail in this report. The first study documented the occurrence, distribution and variation of total and methylmercury at SRS industrial outfalls, principal SRS streams and the Savannah River where it forms the border with the SRS. All of the analyses were performed using the EPA Method 1630/31 ultra low-level and contaminant-free techniques for measuring total and methylmercury. Total mercury at National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) outfalls ranged from 0.31-604 ng/l with a mean of 8.71 ng/l. Mercury-contaminated groundwater was the source for outfalls with significantly elevated mercury concentrations. Total mercury in SRS streams ranged from 0.95-15.7 ng/l. Mean total mercury levels in the streams varied from 2.39 ng/l in Pen Branch to 5.26 ng/l in Tims Branch

  9. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of Lauric Acid Diethanolamine Condensate (CAS NO. 120-40-1) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Dermal Studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    Lauric acid diethanolamine condensate is widely used in cosmetics, shampoos, soaps, and related consumer products, to which there is extensive human exposure. Because of the lack of information about potential risks associated with long-term exposure, lauric acid diethanolamine condensate, coconut oil acid diethanolamine condensate, and oleic acid diethanolamine condensate were selected as representative of the class of diethanolamides for evaluation of prechronic toxicity and carcinogenic potential. Male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed to lauric acid diethanolamine condensate dermally for 14 weeks or 2 years. Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in Salmonella typhimurium, L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells, cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells, and mouse peripheral blood erythrocytes. 14-WEEK STUDY IN RATS: Groups of 10 male and 10 female rats were admin istered 0, 25, 50, 100, 200, or 400 mg lauric acid diethanolamine condensate/kg body weight in ethanol by dermal application for 14 weeks. All animals survived until study termination. Final mean body weights and body weight gains of males receiving 200 or 400 mg/kg were significantly less than those of the vehicle control group. Irritation of the skin at the site of application was observed in males receiving 100 mg/kg or greater and in females receiving 200 or 400 mg/kg. Kidney weights of females administered 200 or 400 mg/kg were significantly greater than those of the vehicle control group. There were dose-dependent increases in the incidences of nonneoplastic lesions of the skin at the site of application, including epidermal and sebaceous gland hyperplasia, chronic inflammation, parakeratosis, and ulcer. 14-WEEK STUDY IN MICE: Groups of 10 male and 10 female mice were admin istered 0, 50, 100, 200, 400, or 800 mg lauric acid diethanolamine condensate/kg body weight in ethanol by dermal application for 14 weeks. All animals survived until the end of the study, and final mean body weights and

  10. Final Report for Studies in Elementary Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piilonen, Leo; Takeuchi, Tatsu; Minic, Djordje; Link, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    This is the final report of DOE Grant DE-FG05-92ER40709 awarded to the Virginia Tech high energy physics group. It covers the period February 1, 2010 through April 30, 2013. The high energy physics program at Virginia Tech supported by this grant is organized into three tasks: A for theory (Profs. Tatsu Takeuchi and Djordje Minic), B for heavy flavor physics with the Belle and Belle II experiments (Prof. Leo Piilonen), and N for neutrino physics (Profs. Jonathan Link and Piilonen).

  11. Expression of SRSF3 is Correlated with Carcinogenesis and Progression of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Peiqi, Liu; Zhaozhong, Guo; Yaotian, Yin; Jun, Jia; Jihua, Guo; Rong, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignancy of head and neck with high mortality rates. The mechanisms of initiation and development of OSCC remain largely unknown. Dysregulated alternative splicing of pre-mRNA has been associated with OSCC. Splicing factor SRSF3 is a proto-oncogene and overexpressed in multiple cancers. The aim of this study was to uncover the relationship between SRSF3 and carcinogenesis and progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Desig...

  12. Increased visceral fat mass and insulin signaling in colitis-related colon carcinogenesis model mice

    OpenAIRE

    Miyamoto, Shingo; Tanaka, Takuji; Murakami, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Leptin, a pleiotropic hormone regulating food intake and metabolism, plays an important role in the regulation of inflammation and immunity. We previously demonstrated that serum leptin levels are profoundly increased in mice which received azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) as tumor-initiator and -promoter, respectively, in a colon carcinogenesis model. In this study, we attempted to address underlying mechanism whereby leptin is up-regulated in this rodent model. Five-week-...

  13. Helicobacter pylori-infected animal models are extremely suitable for the investigation of gastric carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kodama, Masaaki; Murakami, Kazunari; Sato, Ryugo; Okimoto, Tadayoshi; Nishizono, Akira; Fujioka, Toshio

    2005-01-01

    Although various animal models have been developed to clarify gastric carcinogenesis, apparent mechanism of gastric cancer was not clarified in recent years. Since the recognition of the pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori), several animal models with H pylori infection have been developed to confirm the association between H pylori and gastric cancer. Nonhuman primate and rodent models were suitable for this study. Japanese monkey model revealed atrophic gastritis and p53 mutation...

  14. Polyamines as mediators of APC-dependent intestinal carcinogenesis and cancer chemoprevention

    OpenAIRE

    Rial, Nathaniel S; Meyskens, Frank L.; Gerner, Eugene W.

    2009-01-01

    Combination chemoprevention for cancer was proposed a quarter of a century ago, but has not been implemented in standard medical practice owing to limited efficacy and toxicity. Recent trials have targeted inflammation and polyamine biosynthesis, both of which are increased in carcinogenesis. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that DFMO (difluoromethylornithine), an irreversible inhibitor of ODC (ornithine decarboxylase) which is the first enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, combined with NS...

  15. Effect of ginger on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status in 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine induced experimental colon carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    V Manju; N Nalini

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of colon cancer has rapidly risen during the last decade. In this study we have evaluated the chemopreventive efficacy of ginger in 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine (DMH) induced colon carcinogenesis. Rats were given a weekly subcutaneous injection of DMH at a dose of 20mg/kg body weight for 15 weeks. Ginger (50mg/kg body weight/day) was given at the initiation and also at the post-initiation stages of carcinogenesis to DMH treated rats every day. The animals were sacrificed at the end o...

  16. Apoptotic cell death and its relationship to gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ferda Bir; Nese Calli-Demirkan; A Cevik Tufan; Metin Akbulut; N Lale Satiroglu-Tufan

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the apoptotic process of cells within the intestinal metaplasia areas co-localizing with chronic gastritis and gastric carcinomas and to analyze the involvement of proteins regulating apoptosis in the process of intestinal metaplasia related gastric carcinogenesis.METHODS: Forty-two gastric carcinoma and seventeen chronic gastritis cases were included in this study. All cases were examined for the existence of intestinal metaplasia. Ten cases randomly selected from each group were processed for TUNEL assay. TUNEL positive cells within the intestinal metaplasia areas, colocalizing either to gastric carcinoma or chronic gastritis,were counted and converted to apoptotic indices.In addition, p53, bcl-2 and bax expression patterns within these tissues were analyzed on the basis of immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: Twenty-eight of the cases were intestinal and 14 of the cases were diffuse type adenocarcinomas.64% (27/42) of the gastric carcinoma cases had intestinal metaplasia. Intestinal metaplasia co-localized more with intestinal type carcinomas compared with diffuse type carcinomas [75% (21/28) vs 42% (6/14),respectively; P≤0.05]. The mean apoptotic index in tumor cells was 0.70±0.08. The mean apoptotic index in intestinal metaplasias co-localizing to tumors was significantly higher than that of intestinal metaplasias co-localizing to chronic gastritis (0.70±0.03 vs 0.09±0.01, respectively; P≤0.05). P53 positivity was not observed in areas of intestinal metaplasia adjacent to tumors or chronic gastritis. Intestinal metaplasia areas adjacent to tumors showed lower cytoplasmic bcl-2 positivity compared to intestinal metaplasia areas adjacent to chronic gastritis [55.5% (15/27) vs 70.5%(12/17), respectively]. On the other hand, intestinal metaplasia areas adjacent to tumors showed significantly higher cytoplasmic bax positivity compared to intestinal metaplasia areas adjacent to chronic gastritis [44.4%(12/27) vs 11.7% (2/17), respectively; P≤0

  17. 65Zn kinetics as a biomarker of DMH induced colon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietary factors are considered crucial for the prevention of initiating events in the multistep progression of colon carcinoma. There is substantial evidence that zinc may play a pivotal role in host defense against several malignancies, including colon cancer. The present study was conducted to evaluate the kinetics of zinc utilization following experimental colon carcinogenesis in rat model. The rats were segregated into two groups viz., untreated control and DMH treated. Colon carcinogenesis was established through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30mg/Kg body weight) for 16 weeks. Whole body 65Zn kinetics followed two compartment kinetics, with Tb1 representing the initial fast component of the biological half-life and Tb2, the slower component. The present study revealed a significant depression in the Tb1 and Tb2 components of 65Zn in DMH treated rats. Further, DMH treatment caused a significant increase in the percent uptake values of 65Zn in the colon, small intestine, kidney and blood, whereas a significant decrease was observed in the liver. Subcellular distribution revealed a significant increase in 65Zn uptake in the mitochondrial and microsomal fractions following 16 weeks of DMH supplementation. The present study demonstrated a slow mobilization of zinc during promotion of experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis and provides a physiological basis for the role of zinc in colon tumorigenesis, a paradigm which may have clinical implications in the management of colon cancer. (author)

  18. Chemopreventive effect of Quercus infectoria against chemically induced renal toxicity and carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneeb U Rehman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we have shown that Quercus infectoria attenuates Fe- NTA induced renal oxidative stress, hyperproliferative response and renal carcinogenesis in rats. Fe-NTA promoted DEN (N-diethyl nitrosamine initiated renal carcinogenesis by increasing the percentage incidence of tumors and induces early tumor markers viz. ornithine decarboxylase (ODC level and PCNA expression. Fe- NTA (9 mg Fe/kg body weight, intraperitoneally enhances renal Malondialdehyde, xanthine oxidase and hydrogen peroxide generation with reduction in renal glutathione content, antioxidant enzymes, viz., glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, catalase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and phase-II metabolizing enzymes such as glutathione-S-transferase and quinone reductase. It also enhances blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine. Fe-NTA also lead to increase in levels of some inflammatory markers viz NO and MPO and some proinflammatory cytokines viz PGE-2 and TNF-1. The chemopreventive efficacy of Quercus infectoria was studied in terms of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities, LPO, redox status, serum toxicity markers, inflammatory and proinflammatory markers and cell proliferation in the kidney tissue. Oral administration of Quercus infectoria at doses of 75 and 150 mg/kg b wt effectively suppressed renal oxidative stress, inflammation and tumor incidence. Chemopreventive effects of Quercus infectoria were associated with up-regulation of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme activities and down regulation of serum toxicity markers. Present study supports Quercus infectoria as a potent chemopreventive agent and suppresses Fe-NTA-induced renal carcinogenesis and oxidative and inflammatory response in Wistar rat.

  19. Quantification of nanoscale density fluctuations by electron microscopy: probing cellular alterations in early carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Damania, Dhwanil; Joshi, Hrushikesh M.; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Subramanian, Hariharan; Roy, Hemant K.; Taflove, Allen; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Backman, Vadim

    2011-04-01

    Most cancers are curable if they are diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Recent studies suggest that nanoarchitectural changes occur within cells during early carcinogenesis and that such changes precede microscopically evident tissue alterations. It follows that the ability to comprehensively interrogate cell nanoarchitecture (e.g., macromolecular complexes, DNA, RNA, proteins and lipid membranes) could be critical to the diagnosis of early carcinogenesis. We present a study of the nanoscale mass-density fluctuations of biological tissues by quantifying their degree of disorder at the nanoscale. Transmission electron microscopy images of human tissues are used to construct corresponding effective disordered optical lattices. The properties of nanoscale disorder are then studied by statistical analysis of the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the spatially localized eigenfunctions of these optical lattices at the nanoscale. Our results show an increase in the disorder of human colonic epithelial cells in subjects harboring early stages of colon neoplasia. Furthermore, our findings strongly suggest that increased nanoscale disorder correlates with the degree of tumorigenicity. Therefore, the IPR technique provides a practicable tool for the detection of nanoarchitectural alterations in the earliest stages of carcinogenesis. Potential applications of the technique for early cancer screening and detection are also discussed. Originally submitted for the special focus issue on physical oncology.

  20. Defining the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis using mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia A Ignatenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetics and diet are both considered important risk determinants for colorectal cancer, a leading cause of death in the US and worldwide. Genetically engineered mouse (GEM models have made a significant contribution to the characterization of colorectal cancer risk factors. Reliable, reproducible, and clinically relevant animal models help in the identification of the molecular events associated with disease progression and in the development of effictive treatment strategies. This review is focused on the use of mouse models for studying the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis. We describe how the available mouse models of colon cancer such as the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min mice and knockout genetic models facilitate understanding of the role of polyamines in colon carcinogenesis and help in the development of a rational strategy for colon cancer chemoprevention.

  1. Chemomodulatory Potential of Flaxseed Oil Against DMBA/Croton Oil-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jyoti; Singh, Ritu; Goyal, P K

    2016-09-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of flaxseed oil to prevent chemically induced skin cancer in mice. Cancer was induced on 2-stage skin carcinogenesis model by single topical application of 7,12 dimethylbenz [a]anthracene (DMBA), as, initiator, and two weeks later it was promoted by croton oil treatment thrice a week on the dorsal surface of mice for 16 weeks. Flaxseed oil (FSO; 100µL/animal/d) was orally administered 1 week before and 1 week after DMBA application (Peri-initiation stage). The animals of the FSO-administered group showed a significant reduction in tumor incidence (76.67%), cumulative number of tumors (37), tumor yield (3.7), and tumor burden (4.81) when compared with the carcinogen-treated control animals. Biochemical parameters in skin and liver tissue such as LPO and phase I enzymes were significantly (P croton oil-induced skin carcinogenesis in mice. PMID:26437861

  2. Chemomodulatory Potential of Flaxseed Oil Against DMBA/Croton Oil-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jyoti; Singh, Ritu; Goyal, P K

    2016-09-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the potential of flaxseed oil to prevent chemically induced skin cancer in mice. Cancer was induced on 2-stage skin carcinogenesis model by single topical application of 7,12 dimethylbenz [a]anthracene (DMBA), as, initiator, and two weeks later it was promoted by croton oil treatment thrice a week on the dorsal surface of mice for 16 weeks. Flaxseed oil (FSO; 100µL/animal/d) was orally administered 1 week before and 1 week after DMBA application (Peri-initiation stage). The animals of the FSO-administered group showed a significant reduction in tumor incidence (76.67%), cumulative number of tumors (37), tumor yield (3.7), and tumor burden (4.81) when compared with the carcinogen-treated control animals. Biochemical parameters in skin and liver tissue such as LPO and phase I enzymes were significantly (P croton oil-induced skin carcinogenesis in mice.

  3. Histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases: molecular and clinical implications to gastrointestinal carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Jian Sun; Xiang Zhou; Ji-Hang Zheng; Ming-Dong Lu; Jian-Yun Nie; Xiang-Jiao Yang; Zhi-Qiang Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases are two groups of enzymes whose opposing activities govern the dynamic levels of reversible acetylation on specific lysine residues of histones and many other proteins.Gastrointestinal (GI) carcinogenesis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide.In addition to genetic and environmental factors,the role of epigenetic abnormalities such as aberrant histone acetylation has been recognized to be pivotal in regulating benign tumorigenesis and eventual malignant transformation.Here we provide an overview of histone acetylation,list the major groups of histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases,and cover in relatively more details the recent studies that suggest the links of these enzymes to GI carcinogenesis.As potential novel therapeutics for GI and other cancers,histone deacetylase inhibitors are also discussed.

  4. Studies of final state interactions via femtoscopy in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    Femtoscopy is a technique enabling measurements of the space-time characteristics of particle-emitting sources. However, the femtoscopic analysis is also sensitive to the interaction cross-section. In this paper we show the first preliminary measurements of $\\rm K^0_SK^{\\pm}$ correlation functions in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=5.02$ TeV. These correlations originate from the final-state interactions which proceed through the $a_0(980)$ resonance only and can be employed to constrain its parameters. A similar approach can be applied to baryon pairs to extract the unknown interaction cross-sections for some (anti-)baryon-(anti-)baryon pairs. We show baryon--baryon and baryon--anti-baryon correlation functions of protons and lambdas, as well as discuss shortly the fitting method.

  5. Supplement to final report for ''Theoretical studies in tokamaks''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a previous report we summarized the results obtained for Task I of Contract Number AC03-88ER53270 for the two-year period of performance of the work supported by the contract. That report constituted the final report for Task 1. Since then, the contract was extended and the funding for Task I was incremented with $35K of new funds. The purpose for incrementing the contract was to begin a collaboration with the PBX-M group at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in the area of ion Bernstein wave (IBW) effects in the PBX-M experiment. This report summarizes the initial results of that collaboration obtained under the incremental continuation funding. In the intervening period, experimental and theoretical program directions changed so that no further funds were committed to Task 1

  6. Influence of caloric intake on experimental carcinogenesis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritchevsky, D; Klurfeld, D M

    1986-01-01

    The effect of caloric intake on tumor growth has been recognized for over 70 years. Inhibition of tumor growth depends primarily on the extent of caloric restriction, but tumor type, animal strain, and dietary composition all exert some influence. Caloric restriction is most effective when maintained during both initiation and promotion, but if limited to one of these phases, restriction during promotion appears to be the more effective modality. The types of tumor that have been studied include spontaneous mammary and lung tumors as well as tumors induced by organ-specific carcinogens or irradiation with ultraviolet light. Numerous investigators have studied the effects of fat, and a diet low in calories but high in fat is generally significantly more effective in inhibiting carcinogenesis than is a diet high in calories but low in fat. Mice fed high fat, low calorie diets exhibited 48% fewer chemically induced skin tumors and 61% fewer tumors induced by ultraviolet irradiation than did mice fed low fat, high calorie diets. Mice fed a diet containing 2% fat exhibited a 66% incidence of skin tumors, whereas mice fed an isocaloric diet containing 61% fat showed a 78% incidence. Rats whose diet was restricted in calories by 40% exhibited no mammary tumors (coconut oil as primary dietary fat) or 75% fewer tumors (corn oil as dietary fat) compared to ad libitum-fed controls; they also exhibited 47% fewer colonic tumors. The mechanism by which caloric restriction exerts its tumor-inhibiting effects remains to be elucidated.

  7. The identification of Smad7 gene in lung carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhanKT; HuoYY

    2002-01-01

    Previous study showed that Smad7 inhibited the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 signal transfuction physiologically in vitro.This study was carried out to investigate this feedback inhibitory effect in the carcinogenesis of lung.Smad7 expression was measured at transription and translation level in immortalized and malignant transformed cell line.Without stimulation of TGF-β1,Smad7 abundance in the malignant transformed cells was higher than thatin immortalized cells.Stimulated with TGF-β1,Smad7 expression level was up-regulated evidently in immortalized cells,but there was not a significant change in malignant transformed cells.With the overexpression of Smad7 in cells,the proliferation of malignant transformed cells was enhanced much higher than that in immortalized cells.Meanwhile,the inhibitory effect of exogenous TGF-β1 on malignant transformed cells was weaker than that on immortalized cells.It is suggested Smad7 feedback inhibition in malignant transformation stage be a mechanism to promote cell proliferation.

  8. Inflammation-Related Carcinogenesis and Prevention in Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Using Rat Duodenoesophageal Reflux Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimura, Takashi, E-mail: tphuji@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Oyama, Katsunobu; Sasaki, Shozo; Nishijima, Koji; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Ohta, Tetsuo [Gastroenterologic Surgery, Kanazawa University Hospital, Kanazawa, Japan, 13-1 Takaramachi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa 920-8641 (Japan); Koichi, Miwa [Houju Memorial Hospital, Nomi, Japan, 11-71 Midorigaoka, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1226 (Japan); Takanori, Hattori [Division of Molecular and Diagnostic Pathology, Shiga University of Medical Science, Otsu, Japan, Seta Tsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga 520-2192 (Japan)

    2011-08-10

    Development from chronic inflammation to Barrett's adenocarcinoma is known as one of the inflammation-related carcinogenesis routes. Gastroesophageal reflux disease induces regurgitant esophagitis, and esophageal mucosa is usually regenerated by squamous epithelium, but sometimes and somewhere replaced with metaplastic columnar epithelium. Specialized columnar epithelium, so-called Barrett's epithelium (BE), is a risk factor for dysplasia and adenocarcinoma in esophagus. Several experiments using rodent model inducing duodenogastroesophageal reflux or duodenoesophageal reflux revealed that columnar epithelium, first emerging at the proliferative zone, progresses to dysplasia and finally adenocarcinoma, and exogenous carcinogen is not necessary for cancer development. It is demonstrated that duodenal juice rather than gastric juice is essential to develop esophageal adenocarcinoma in not only rodent experiments, but also clinical studies. Antireflux surgery and chemoprevention by proton pump inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, green tea, retinoic acid and thioproline showed preventive effects on the development of Barrett's adenocarcinoma in rodent models, but it remains controversial whether antireflux surgery could regress BE and prevent esophageal cancer in clinical observation. The Chemoprevention for Barrett's Esophagus Trial (CBET), a phase IIb, multicenter, randomized, double-masked study using celecoxib in patients with Barrett's dysplasia failed to prove to prevent progression of dysplasia to cancer. The AspECT (Aspirin Esomeprazole Chemoprevention Trial), a large multicenter phase III randomized trial to evaluate the effects of esomeprazole and/or aspirin on the rate of progression to high-grade dysplasia or adenocarcinoma in patients with BE is now ongoing.

  9. Monitoring pancreatic carcinogenesis by the molecular imaging of cathepsin E in vivo using confocal laser endomicroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    Full Text Available The monitoring of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC in high-risk populations is essential. Cathepsin E (CTSE is specifically and highly expressed in PDAC and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs, and its expression gradually increases along with disease progression. In this study, we first established an in situ 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA-induced rat model for PanINs and PDAC and then confirmed that tumorigenesis properties in this model were consistent with those of human PDAC in that CTSE expression gradually increased with tumor development using histology and immunohistochemistry. Then, using in vivo imaging of heterotopically implanted tumors generated from CTSE- overexpressing cells (PANC-1-CTSE in nude mice and in vitro imaging of PanINs and PDAC in DMBA-induced rats, the specificity of the synthesized CTSE-activatable probe was verified. Quantitative determination identified that the fluorescence signal ratio of pancreatic tumor to normal pancreas gradually increased in association with progressive pathological grades, with the exception of no significant difference between PanIN-II and PanIN-III grades. Finally, we monitored pancreatic carcinogenesis in vivo using confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE in combination with the CTSE-activatable probe. A prospective double-blind control study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of this method in diagnosing PDAC and PanINs of all grades (>82.7%. This allowed us to establish effective diagnostic criteria for CLE in PDAC and PanINs to facilitate the monitoring of PDAC in high-risk populations.

  10. AM(VI) PARTITIONING STUDIES: FY14 FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce J Mincher

    2014-10-01

    The use of higher oxidation states of americium in partitioning from the lanthanides is under continued investigation by the sigma team. This is based on the hypothesis that Am(VI) can be produced and remain stable in irradiated first cycle raffinate solution long enough to perform solvent extraction for separations. The stability of Am(VI) to autoreduction was measured using millimolar americium concentrations in a 1-cm cell with a Cary 6000 UV/Vis spectrophotometer for data acquisition. At millimolar americium concentrations, Am(VI) is stable enough against its own autoreduction for separations purposes. A second major accomplishment during FY14 was the hot test. Americium oxidation and extraction was performed using a centrifugal contactor-based test bed consisting of an extraction stage and two stripping stages. Sixty-three percent americium extraction was obtained in one extraction stage, in agreement with batch contacts. Promising electrochemical oxidation results have also been obtained, using terpyridine ligand derivatized electrodes for binding of Am(III). Approximately 50 % of the Am(III) was oxidized to Am(V) over the course of 1 hour. It is believed that this is the first demonstration of the electrolytic oxidation of americium in a non-complexing solution. Finally, an initial investigation of Am(VI) extraction using diethylhexylbutyramide (DEHBA) was performed.

  11. Study on the role of human papillomavirus in carcinogenesis of oral papillomas by in situ hybridization%口腔鳞状细胞乳头状瘤组织中 HPV DNA的原位杂交研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    布静秋; 庞劲凡; 步荣发; 吕雅莉; 陈乐真

    2001-01-01

    目的探讨人乳头瘤病毒(human papillomavirus, HPV)感染与口腔鳞状细胞乳头状瘤(squamous cell papilloma,SCP)的发生之间的关系。方法应用地高辛标记的HPV 6/11和HPV 16/18核酸探针分别在30例口腔SCP组织上进行原位杂交,检测口腔SCP组织中HPV DNA的特征。结果 HPV 6/11 DNA阳性16例(53%),HPV 16/18 DNA未检出,HPV 6/11 DNA阳性细胞多数分布在鳞状上皮的表层、中层和基底层。结论原位杂交方法可以检测口腔SCP组织中HPV DNA的存在并能准确组织定位,进一步支持HPV 6/11感染与口腔SCP的发生密切相关。%Objective To explore the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection on carcinogenesis of oral squmous cell papillomas(SCP). Methods By using digoxin labelled HPV 6/11 and HPV 16/18 probes, through hybridization in situ technique, the HPV DNA sequence in 30 cases of oral SCP were detected. ResultsAmong them, 16 cases (53.3%) were positive for HPV 6/11 DNA. None of cases of SCP were positive for HPV 16/18 DNA. Conclusion Our results show that the frequent finding of HPV 6/11 DNA in oral SCP had close association between oral papillomas and HPV 6/11 infection.

  12. Adiponectin deficiency enhances colorectal carcinogenesis and liver tumor formation induced by azoxymethane in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tamao Nishihara; Shinji Tamura; Norio Hayashi; Hiroyasu Iishi; Iichiro Shimornura; Miyako Baba; Morihiro Matsuda; Masahiro Inoue; Yasuko Nishizawa; Atsunori Fukuhara; Hiroshi Arald; Shinji Kihara; Tohru Funahashi

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the causal relationship between hypoadiponectinemia and colorectal carcinogenesis in in vivo experimental model, and to determine the con-tribution of adiponectin deficiency to colorectal cancer development and proliferation. METHODS: We examined the influence of adiponectin deficiency on colorectal carcinogenesis induced by the administration of azoxymethane (AOM) (7.5 mg/kg, in-traperitoneal injection once a week for 8 wk), by using adiponectin-knockout (KO) mice. RESULTS: At 53 wk after the first AOM treatment, KOmice developed larger and histologically more progres-sive colorectal tumors with greater frequency com-pared with wild-type (WT) mice, although the tumor incidence was not different between WT and KO mice. KO mice showed increased cell proliferation of colorec-tal tumor cells, which correlated with the expression levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the colorectal tumors. In addition, KO mice showed higher incidence and frequency of liver tumors after AOI treatment. Thirteen percent of WT mice developed liver tumors, and these WT mice had only a single tumor. In contrast, 50% of K.O mice developed liver tumors, and 58% of these KO mice had multiple tumors. CONCLUSION: Adiponectin deficiency enhances colorectal carcinogenesis and liver tumor formation induced by AOM in mice. This study strongly suggests that hypoadiponectinemia could be involved in the pathogenesis for colorectal cancer and liver tumor in human subjects.

  13. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis

  14. The level of claudin-7 is reduced as an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tveit Kjell M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compromised epithelial barriers are found in dysplastic tissue of the gastrointestinal tract. Claudins are transmembrane proteins important for tight junctions. Claudins regulate the paracellular transport and are crucial for maintaining a functional epithelial barrier. Down-regulation of the oncogenic serine protease, matriptase, induces leakiness in epithelial barriers both in vivo and in vitro. We found in an in-silico search tight co-regulation between matriptase and claudin-7 expression. We have previously shown that the matriptase expression level decreases during colorectal carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated whether claudin-7 expression is likewise decreased during colorectal carcinogenesis, thereby causing or contributing to the compromised epithelial leakiness of dysplastic tissue. Methods The mRNA level of claudin-7 (CLDN7 was determined in samples from 18 healthy individuals, 100 individuals with dysplasia and 121 colorectal cancer patients using quantitative real time RT-PCR. In addition, immunohistochemical stainings were performed on colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, to confirm the mRNA findings. Results A 2.7-fold reduction in the claudin-7 mRNA level was found when comparing the biopsies from healthy individuals with the biopsies of carcinomas (p claudin-7 mRNA levels were also detected in mild/moderate dysplasia (p Conclusions Our results show that the claudin-7 mRNA level is decreased already as an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis, probably contributing to the compromised epithelial barrier in adenomas.

  15. Anti-tumour promoting activity of diphenylmethyl selenocyanate against two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rajat Kumar; Bhattacharya, Sudin

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence collectively suggests that Se in different inorganic and organic forms provides a potential cancer chemopreventive agent, active against several types of cancer. It can exert preventive activity in all the three stages of cancer: initiation, promotion and progression. Literature reports revealed that organoselenocyanates have more potential as chemopreventive agents than inorganic forms due to their lower toxicity. In our previous report we showed chemopreventive efficacy of diphenylmethyl selenocyanate during the initiation and pre- plus post-initiation phases of skin and colon carcinogenesis process. The present study was undertaken to explore the anti-tumour promoting activity of diphenylmethyl selenocyanate in a 7,12-dimethylbenz (a) anthracene (DMBA)-croton oil two-stage skin carcinogenesis model. The results obtained showed significant (pliver and skin. Thus, the present data strongly suggest that diphenylmethyl selenocyanate also has the potential to act as anti-tumour promoter agent in a two-stage skin carcinogenesis mouse model, pointing to possible general efficacy. PMID:16101330

  16. Effect of Cu supplementation on genomic instability in chemically-induced mammary carcinogenesis in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobrowska Barbara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of dietary supplementation (copper or copper and resveratrol on the intensity of carcinogenesis and the frequency of microsatellite instability in a widely used model of mammary carcinogenesis induced in the rat by treatment with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA. Methods DNA was extracted from rat mammary cancers and normal tisues, amplified by PCR, using different polymorphic DNA markers and the reaction products were analyzed for microsatellite instability. Results It was found that irrespectively of the applied diet there was no inhibition of mammary carcinogenesis in the rats due to DMBA. Besides, in the groups supplemented with Cu (II or Cu (II and resveratrol the tumor formation was clearly accelerated. Unlike the animals that were fed with standard diet, the supplemented rats were characterized by the loss of heterozygosity of microsatellite D3Mgh9 in cancer tumors (by respectively 50 and 40%. When the animals received Cu (II and resveratrol supplemented diet the occurrence of genomic instability was additionally found in their livers in the case of microsatellite D1Mgh6 (which was stable in the animals without dietary supplementation. Conclusions Identification of the underlying mechanisms by which dietary factors affect genomic stability might prove useful in the treatment of mammary cancer as well as in the incorporation of dietary factors into mammary cancer prevention strategies.

  17. Causal role of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication therapy in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masanori Ito; Shinji Tanaka; Tomoari Kamada; Ken Haruma; Kazuaki Chayama

    2006-01-01

    Many epidemiological reports indicate that Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) infection plays an important role in gastric carcinogenesis. Several genetic and epigenetic alterations contribute to the initiation, promotion, and progression of the cancer cells in a multi-step manner.H pyloriis known to induce chronic inflammation in the gastric mucosa. Its products, including superoxides,participate in the DNA damage followed by initiation, and the inflammation-derived cytokines and growth factors contribute to the promotion of gastric carcinogenesis.By eradicating H pylori, gastric inflammation can be cured; the therapy diminishes the levels not only of inflammatory cell infiltration, but also atrophyl intestinal metaplasia in part. A randomized controlled trial revealed that the eradication therapy diminished the gastric cancer prevalence in cases without precancerous conditions. In addition, recent epidemiological studies from Japanese groups demonstrated that the development of gastric cancer, especially of the intestinal type, was decreased by successful eradication therapy, although these were designed in a nonrandomized manner. However, it should be mentioned that endoscopic detection is the only way to evaluate the degree of gastric carcinogenesis. We have reported that the endoscopic and histological morphologies could be modified by eradication therapy and it might contribute to the prevalence of gastric cancer development.Considering the biological nature of cancer cell proliferation, it is considered that a sufficiently long-term follow-up would be essential to discuss the anticancer effect of eradication therapy.

  18. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Hong, Kyung-Sook; Hong, Hua [Lab of Translational Medicine, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Hahm, Ki Baik, E-mail: hahmkb@gachon.ac.kr [Lab of Translational Medicine, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, 7-45 Songdo-dong, Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Gastroenterology, Gachon Graduate School of Medicine, Gil Hospital, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-25

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  19. Detouring the Undesired Route of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Baik Hahm

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and experimental evidence has emerged that a dysregulated inflammation is associated with most of the tumors, and many studies have begun to unravel the molecular pathways linking inflammation and cancer. As a typical example linking these associations, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection-associated atrophic gastritis has been recognized as precursor lesion of gastric cancer. The identification of transcription factors such as NF-κB and STAT3, and their gene products such as IL-8, COX-2, iNOS, cytokines, chemokines and their receptors, etc have laid the molecular foundation for our understanding of the decisive role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. In addition to the role as the initiator of cancer, inflammation contributes to survival and proliferation of malignant cells, tumor angiogenesis, and even metastasis. In this review, the fundamental mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis as well as the possibility of cancer prevention through suppressing H. pylori-induced inflammation are introduced. We infer that targeting inflammatory pathways have a potential role to detour the unpleasant journey to H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  20. Effect of Withania somnifera on DMBA induced carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, L; Kuttan, G

    2001-05-01

    Administration of an extract of Withania somnifera was found to reduce two stage skin carcinogenesis induced by DMBA (dimethyl benzanthracene) and croton oil. Withania somnifera was administered at a concentration of (20 mg/dose/animal i.p.) consecutively on 5 days prior to DMBA administration and continued twice weekly for 10 weeks. After the 180th day of carcinogen administration, all of the animals developed papilloma in the control group whereas only six out of 12 animals developed papilloma in the treated group. A total of 11 papillomas were found in the control group while only six developed them in the Withania somnifera treated group. Enzyme analysis of skin and liver showed significant enhancement in antioxidant enzymes such as GSH, GST, Glutathione peroxides and Catalases in Withania somnifera treated group when compared with the control. The elevated level of lipid peroxide in the control group was significantly inhibited by Withania somnifera administration. These studies indicate that Withania somnifera could reduce the papilloma induced alterations to the antioxidant defense systems. PMID:11297845

  1. Dysregulated hepatic bile acids collaboratively promote liver carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guoxiang; Wang, Xiaoning; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Chen, Wenlian; Yan, Jingyu; Zhang, Yunjing; Lei, Sha; Ge, Kun; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Liu, Jiajian; Su, Mingming; Liu, Ping; Jia, Wei

    2016-10-15

    Dysregulated bile acids (BAs) are closely associated with liver diseases and attributed to altered gut microbiota. Here, we show that the intrahepatic retention of hydrophobic BAs including deoxycholate (DCA), taurocholate (TCA), taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDCA), and taurolithocholate (TLCA) were substantially increased in a streptozotocin and high fat diet (HFD) induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-hepatocellular carcinoma (NASH-HCC) mouse model. Additionally chronic HFD-fed mice spontaneously developed liver tumors with significantly increased hepatic BA levels. Enhancing intestinal excretion of hydrophobic BAs in the NASH-HCC model mice by a 2% cholestyramine feeding significantly prevented HCC development. The gut microbiota alterations were closely correlated with altered BA levels in liver and feces. HFD-induced inflammation inhibited key BA transporters, resulting in sustained increases in intrahepatic BA concentrations. Our study also showed a significantly increased cell proliferation in BA treated normal human hepatic cell lines and a down-regulated expression of tumor suppressor gene CEBPα in TCDCA treated HepG2 cell line, suggesting that several hydrophobic BAs may collaboratively promote liver carcinogenesis. PMID:27273788

  2. Washoe Tribe Alternative Energy Feasibility Study Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and CA

    2014-10-01

    The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding to complete the Washoe Tribe Alternative Energy Feasibility Study project. The main goal of the project was to complete an alternative energy feasibility study. This study was completed to evaluate “the potential for development of a variety of renewable energy projects and to conduct an alternative energy feasibility study that determines which alternative energy resources have the greatest economic opportunity for the Tribe, while respecting cultural and environmental values” (Baker-Tilly, 2014). The study concluded that distributed generation solar projects are the best option for renewable energy development and asset ownership for the Washoe Tribe. Concentrating solar projects, utility scale wind projects, geothermal, and biomass resource projects were also evaluated during the study and it was determined that these alternatives would not be feasible at this time.

  3. Effects of long term feeding of raw soya bean flour on virus- induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in guinea fowl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirev, T.; Woutersen, R.A.; Kiril, A.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of a diet enriched with 25% raw soya bean flour (RSF) on the pancreas and on the avian retrovirus Pts 56-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in guinea fowl were studied. It has been shown that prolonged RSF feeding of new-hatched virus-infected and uninfected guinea fowl-poults induced enl

  4. Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) File Partition Study: Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Cynthia C.; Wanger, Judith

    A study to provide the National Center for Educational Communication (NCE) with information that could be useful in making the ERIC data base more relevant to the needs of educators and more efficiently usable by them is discussed. Specific purposes of this project were to use an empirical field-survey study as an armature around which to: (1)…

  5. Industrial Education Ventilation Study. Volume 1: Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley Associates, Edmonton (Alberta).

    A study assessed aspects of ventilation in industrial education facilities in selected junior and senior highs schools in Alberta (Canada). This report describes the purpose of the study and the four test methods used to acquire school specific information. Also discussed are (1) the results of the instructors' perception survey, the ventilation…

  6. Report of the Comprehensive Service Needs Study. [Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban Inst., Washington, DC.

    Presented is the report of the comprehensive service needs study for the severely handicapped as authorized by section 130 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Chapters focus on the following aspects of the study: definitions; the vocational rehabilitation (VR) system; estimates of the severely disabled population not in institutions; the most…

  7. Melanoma: Stem cells, sun exposure and hallmarks for carcinogenesis, molecular concepts and future clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyrgidis Athanassios

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background :The classification and prognostic assessment of melanoma is currently based on morphologic and histopathologic biomarkers. Availability of an increasing number of molecular biomarkers provides the potential for redefining diagnostic and prognostic categories and utilizing pharmacogenomics for the treatment of patients. The aim of the present review is to provide a basis that will allow the construction-or reconstruction-of future melanoma research. Methods: We critically review the common medical databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus and Cochrane CENTRAL for studies reporting on molecular biomarkers for melanoma. Results are discussed along the hallmarks proposed for malignant transformation by Hanahan and Weinberg. We further discuss the genetic basis of melanoma with regard to the possible stem cell origin of melanoma cells and the role of sunlight in melanoma carcinogenesis. Results: Melanocyte precursors undergo several genome changes -UV-induced or not- which could be either mutations or epigenetic. These changes provide stem cells with abilities to self-invoke growth signals, to suppress anti-growth signals, to avoid apoptosis, to replicate without limit, to invade, proliferate and sustain angiogenesis. Melanocyte stem cells are able to progressively collect these changes in their genome. These new potential functions, drive melanocyte precursors to the epidermis were they proliferate and might cause benign nevi. In the epidermis, they are still capable of acquiring new traits via changes to their genome. With time, such changes could add up to transform a melanocyte precursor to a malignant melanoma stem cell. Conclusions : Melanoma cannot be considered a "black box" for researchers anymore. Current trends in the diagnosis and prognosis of melanoma are to individualize treatment based on molecular biomarkers. Pharmacogenomics constitute a promising field with regard to melanoma patients′ treatment. Finally, development of novel

  8. Eastern Region Renewable Energy Planning Study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    For planning authorities to address renewable energy through development plan policies and in the development control process, it is important to have clear and reliable information on the resource potential within their area. A number of studies have been undertaken in England and Wales to assess the potential for the development and utilisation of renewable energy resources. The studies have addressed the practicalities of how and why a certain resource might be suitable for exploitation in a particular county or region, in conjunction with consideration of the specific planning and environmental issues which may arise. The Eastern Region Renewable Energy Planning Study (ERREPS) is one of the last of these studies to be commissioned and, together with a concurrent study of the Lancashire and Yorkshire area, will substantially complete study coverage of England and Wales. The study area comprises the counties of Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Norfolk and Suffolk. It generally coincides with the area covered by Eastern Electricity. The area covers the majority of the land north of the River Thames to The Wash. (author)

  9. Networking and Information Technology Workforce Study: Final Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — This report presents the results of a study of the global Networking and Information Technology NIT workforce undertaken for the Networking and Information...

  10. Final Report: Feasibility Study of Biomass in Snohomish County, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daryl Williams (Tulalip Tribes); Ray Clark (Clark Group)

    2005-01-31

    This report and its attachments summarizes the results of a unique tribal-farmer cooperative study to evaluate the feasibility of building one or more regional anaerobic digestion systems in Snohomish County, Washington.

  11. 2006 Final Transmission Proposal: Revenue Requirement Study Documentation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of the Revenue Requirement Study (Study) is to establish the level of revenues needed from rates for Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) transmission and ancillary services to recover, in accordance with sound business principles, costs associated with the transmission of electric power over the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). The FCRTS is part of the larger Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) which also includes the hydroelectric, multipurpose facilities constructed and operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation in the Pacific Northwest. The FCRPS costs that are not included in the FCRTS costs are funded and repaid through BPA power rates. The transmission revenue requirements herein include: recovery of the Federal investment in transmission and transmission-related assets; the operations and maintenance (O&M) and other annual expenses associated with the provision of transmission and ancillary services; the cost of generation inputs for ancillary services and other between business-line services necessary for the transmission of power; and all other transmission-related costs incurred by the Administrator. The cost evaluation period for this rate proposal includes Fiscal Years (FYs) 2005-2007, the period extending from the last year for which historical information is available through the proposed rate test period. The Study includes the transmission revenue requirements for the rate test period, FYs 2006-2007 (Rate Period) and the results of transmission repayment studies. This Study outlines the policies, forecasts, assumptions, and calculations used to determine BPA's transmission revenue requirements. Legal requirements are summarized in Chapter 5 of this Study. The Revenue Requirement Study Documentation (Documentation), TR-06-FS-BPA-01A, contains key technical assumptions and calculations, the results of the transmission repayment studies, and a further

  12. Nuclear asphalt content gauge study. Research report (Final)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research ascertains if the Troxler Model 3241 Gauge could accurately determine the asphalt content of bituminous-concrete mixtures by nuclear means. The study was divided into three phases. Phase I was conducted in the Central Laboratory where a series of controlled tests were performed for variables that may effect the gauge's asphalt-content determinations. Phase II evolved into a cooperative study between the Maryland State Highway Administration (SHA) and several bituminous concrete producers. Phase III was to report the findings of the study and make a recommendation on the overall practical application of the gauge. The results indicate that the gauge can accurately determine asphalt contents on normal surface and base bituminous mixtures

  13. Mirror Fusion Test Facility data compression study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    This report is organized as follows. Discussions are given of three of the most important data compression methods that have been developed and studied over the years: coding, transforms, and redundancy reduction. (A brief discussion of how to combine and synthesize these ideas, and others, into a system is given). Specific ideas for compressing MFTF diagnostics and control data are developed. Listings and instructions for using FORTRAN programs that were compiled on the Livermore MFTF computers during the course of the study are also given.

  14. Dark Energy Studies with LSST Image Simulations, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, John Russell [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2016-07-26

    This grant funded the development and dissemination of the Photon Simulator (PhoSim) for the purpose of studying dark energy at high precision with the upcoming Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) astronomical survey. The work was in collaboration with the LSST Dark Energy Science Collaboration (DESC). Several detailed physics improvements were made in the optics, atmosphere, and sensor, a number of validation studies were performed, and a significant number of usability features were implemented. Future work in DESC will use PhoSim as the image simulation tool for data challenges used by the analysis groups.

  15. Mirror Fusion Test Facility data compression study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is organized as follows. Discussions are given of three of the most important data compression methods that have been developed and studied over the years: coding, transforms, and redundancy reduction. (A brief discussion of how to combine and synthesize these ideas, and others, into a system is given). Specific ideas for compressing MFTF diagnostics and control data are developed. Listings and instructions for using FORTRAN programs that were compiled on the Livermore MFTF computers during the course of the study are also given

  16. 1976-77 Internal Revenue Service Comparison Study. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applied Management Sciences, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    Application forms for the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) program for 1976-1977 were compared to 1975 tax forms filed with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Comparisons were also made to data from a similar 1974-1975 study. Based on a sample of 212,263 applicants, findings include the following: during 1976-1977, 70.7 percent of all…

  17. 1979-80 Internal Revenue Service Comparison Study. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applied Management Sciences, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    Application forms for the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) program for 1979-1980 were compared to 1978 tax forms filed with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Comparisons were also made to data from similar 1974-1975 and 1976-1977 studies. Based on a sample of 407,596 applicants, findings include the following: between 1976-1977 and…

  18. Final Technical Report: Renewable Energy Feasibility Study and Resources Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivero, Mariah [BEC Environmental, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-02-28

    In March 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded White Pine County, Nevada, a grant to assess the feasibility of renewable resource-related economic development activities in the area. The grant project included a public outreach and training component and was to include a demonstration project; however, the demonstration project was not completed due to lack of identification of an entity willing to locate a project in White Pine County. White Pine County completed the assessment of renewable resources and a feasibility study on the potential for a renewable energy-focused economic sector within the County. The feasibility study concluded "all resources studied were present and in sufficient quantity and quality to warrant consideration for development" and there were varying degrees of potential economic impact based on the resource type and project size. The feasibility study and its components were to be used as tools to attract potential developers and other business ventures to the local market. White Pine County also marketed the County’s resources to the renewable energy business community in an effort to develop contracts for demonstration projects. The County also worked to develop partnerships with local educational institutions, including the White Pine County School District, conducted outreach and training for the local community.

  19. Psychological and Educational Studies with Spina Bifida Children. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diller, Leonard; And Others

    To measure school achievements in spina bifida children, to relate these measures to certain variables, to obtain information on educational problems, and to study facets of cognition and its changes with age, 77 spina bifida children and 53 amputees (all aged 5 to 15) were tested. Sixty non-disabled children were at times used for controls. The…

  20. Staging and storage facility feasibility study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to investigate the feasibility of adapting the design of the HWVP Canister Storage Building (CSB) to meet the needs of the WHC Spent Nuclear Fuel Project for Staging and Storage Facility (SSF), and to develop Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost and schedule estimates

  1. Lead and cadmium exposure study, Galena, Kansas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhara, R.J.; Stallings, F.L.; Feese, D.

    1996-01-01

    A total of 167 residents from Galena, Kansas, and 283 residents from the southern portions of Neosho and Goodman, Missouri, participated in the study. Residents from the southern portions of Neosho and Goodman, Missouri, area served as the comparison population. Biological, environmental, and questionnaire information collected from residents of the Galena, Kansas, was compared with similar information collected from residents of the comparison area.

  2. A STUDY OF MATHEMATICAL ABILITY INVOLVING DIGIT RELATIONSHIPS. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KNAPP, ROBERT H.

    ATTITUDES OF STUDENTS TOWARD ARABIC NUMBERALS AND THEIR ASSOCIATIONS WITH THE NUMBERS FROM 1 TO 9 WERE INVESTIGATED IN A SERIES OF FIVE STUDIES ON (1) NONQUANTITATIVE ASSOCIATIONS TO NUMERALS AS A FUNCTION OF AGE, ABILITY LEVEL, AND SEX AMONG AMERICAN CHILDREN, (2) COLOR ASSOCIATIONS WITH NUMERALS AMONG MALE COLLEGE STUDENTS, (3) PERSONALITY…

  3. Preliminary study Malaa. Final report; Foerstudie Malaa. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Factors of importance for a possible localization of a deep nuclear waste repository at Malaa in northern Sweden are mapped in this study. The geologic structures in the area have been reviewed, mostly from already existing knowledge. Existing infrastructure and necessary improvements are discussed, as well as land use and environment, employment and other social effects. 47 refs, 41 figs, 8 tabs.

  4. Staging and storage facility feasibility study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swenson, C.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This study was performed to investigate the feasibility of adapting the design of the HWVP Canister Storage Building (CSB) to meet the needs of the WHC Spent Nuclear Fuel Project for Staging and Storage Facility (SSF), and to develop Rough Order of Magnitude (ROM) cost and schedule estimates.

  5. Study of Zircaloy-4: steam oxidation reaction kinetics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biederman, R.R.; Sisson, R.D. Jr.; Jones, J.K.; Dobson, W.G.

    1978-04-01

    Experimental studies utilizing a ''Gleeble'' have been performed to evaluate the oxidation of reactor grade Zircaloy-4 tubing in steam throughout the 1200/sup 0/F (649/sup 0/C) to 1800/sup 0/F (982/sup 0/C) temperature range. Oxidation behavior in this temperature range was found to be substantially different from that predicted by either the Baker-Just equation or extrapolation of oxidation data from temperatures above 1800/sup 0/F (982/sup 0/C). Preoxidation of Zircaloy-4 below the ..cap alpha../..beta.. Zircaloy transformation was found to have a substantial effect on the rate of subsequent oxidation at temperatures above 1800/sup 0/F (982/sup 0/C) with this effect increasing as the preoxidation thickness increased. Furthermore, a preoxidation treatment prior to clad rupture has been observed to reduce the extent of swelling prior to clad rupture in internal pressurization studies. Evaluation of the load carrying ability of Zircaloy-4 for both as-received and 10 ..mu..m preoxidized cladding has been made under both internal pressurization and axial loading conditions. Results of these rupture studies agree well with reported data from several other research programs indicating that once the ..beta.. phase of Zircaloy-4 begins to form, the load carrying ability of the cladding is rapidly reduced. Microstructural analysis and alumina marker studies have been used to develop a more complete understanding of the oxidation reaction of Zircaloy-4 in steam. These studies in combination with the low activation energy for oxygen diffusion through the oxide phase obtained from oxidation kinetics, strongly suggest a pore or surface diffusion mechanism for the oxidation of Zircaloy-4 in steam.

  6. Photovoltaic module electrical termination design requirement study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosna, F.J. Jr.; Donlinger, J.

    1980-07-01

    Motorola Inc., in conjunction with ITT Cannon, has conducted a study to develop information to facilitate the selection of existing, commercial, electrical termination hardware for photovoltaic modules and arrays. Details of the study are presented in this volume. Module and array design parameters were investigated and recommendations were developed for use in surveying, evaluating, and comparing electrical termination hardware. Electrical termination selection criteria factors were developed and applied to nine generic termination types in each of the four application sectors. Remote, residential, intermediate and industrial. Existing terminations best suited for photovoltaic modules and arrays were identified. Cost information was developed to identify cost drivers and/or requirements which might lead to cost reductions. The general conclusion is that there is no single generic termination that is best suited for photovoltaic application, but that the appropriate termination is strongly dependent upon the module construction and its support structure as well as the specific application sector.

  7. Electronic time switch evaluation study. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurber, L.R.

    1983-03-01

    This report describes a study which tested and evaluated the feasibility of using electronic time switches to reduce the electrical energy consumption of Army buildings which may not be suited to other energy-saving techniques like the Energy Monitoring and Control System. The study emphasized heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system controls in office and community support buildings. Electronic time switches were installed in 12 buildings at Fort Carson, CO, and Fort Knox, KY. Test results showed savings of between 12 kWh and 99 kWh per day fo the electrical energy consumed in the test buildings. Payback periods ranged from 5 months to 3-1/2 years. This report also includes guidance on selecting and installing electronic time switches on HVAC system controls.

  8. VHTR engineering design study: intermediate heat exchanger program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-11-01

    The work reported is the result of a follow-on program to earlier Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) studies. The primary use of the VHTR is to provide heat for various industrial processes, such as hydrocarbon reforming and coal gasification. For many processes the use of an intermediate heat transfer barrier between the reactor coolant and the process is desirable; for some processes it is mandatory. Various intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) concepts for the VHTR were investigated with respect to safety, cost, and engineering design considerations. The reference processes chosen were steam-hydrocarbon reforming, with emphasis on the chemical heat pipe, and steam gasification of coal. The study investigates the critically important area of heat transfer between the reactor coolant, helium, and the various chemical processes.

  9. VHTR engineering design study: intermediate heat exchanger program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work reported is the result of a follow-on program to earlier Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) studies. The primary use of the VHTR is to provide heat for various industrial processes, such as hydrocarbon reforming and coal gasification. For many processes the use of an intermediate heat transfer barrier between the reactor coolant and the process is desirable; for some processes it is mandatory. Various intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) concepts for the VHTR were investigated with respect to safety, cost, and engineering design considerations. The reference processes chosen were steam-hydrocarbon reforming, with emphasis on the chemical heat pipe, and steam gasification of coal. The study investigates the critically important area of heat transfer between the reactor coolant, helium, and the various chemical processes

  10. DOE final report: Studies on the microbial formation of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, Ralph S.

    2001-04-01

    The microbial formation of methane is carried out by methanogens which are found wherever active anaerobic degradation of organic matter occurs. We developed a procedure for reliable culture of 'Methanococus jannaschii' which yields 8 g wet weight of cells per liter of medium. To initiate a study of proteomics, this organism was grown at two levels of hydrogen partial pressure, very low (650 Pa) and high (178 kPa). When cells were exposed to hydrogen excess conditions, they possessed very low or undetectable levels of four flagella-related polypeptides, whereas, when hydrogen became limiting, these proteins were synthesized. Thus, use of proteomics showed, for the first time, that this methanogen can regulate expression of proteins, and these experiments open the door for general studies of regulation in this hyperthermophile.

  11. Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study, 1991 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, David E.

    1991-05-01

    The population of Yakima River spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha) has been drastically reduced from historic levels reported to be as high as 250,000 adults (Smoker 1956). This reduction is the result of a series of problems including mainstem Columbia dams, dams within the Yakima itself, severely reduced flows due to irrigation diversions, outmigrant loss in irrigation canals, increased thermal and sediment loading, and overfishing. Despite these problems, the return of spring chinook to the Yakima River has continued at levels ranging from 854 to 9,442 adults since 1958. In October 1982, the Bonneville Power Administration contracted the Yakima Indian Nation to develop methods to increase production of spring chinook in the Yakima system. The Yakima Nation's current enhancement policy attempts to maintain the genetic integrity of the spring chinook stock native to the Yakima Basin. Relatively small numbers of hatchery fish have been released into the basin in past years. The goal of this study was to develop data that will be used to present management alternatives for Yakima River spring chinook. A major objective of this study is to determine the distribution, abundance and survival of wild Yakima River spring chinook. The second major objective of this study is to determine the relative effectiveness of different methods of hatchery supplementation. The last three major objectives of the study are to locate and define areas in the watershed that may be used for the rearing of spring chinook; to define strategies for enhancing natural production of spring chinook in the Yakima River; and to determine the physical and biological limitations on production within the system. 47 refs., 89 figs., 67 tabs.

  12. Yakima River Spring Chinook Enhancement Study Appendices, 1991 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, David E.

    1991-05-01

    This document consists of the appendices for annual report DOE/BP/39461--9 which is summarized as follows. The population of Yakima River spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha) has been drastically reduced from historic levels reported to be as high as 250,000 adults (Smoker 1956). This reduction is the result of a series of problems including mainstem Columbia dams, dams within the Yakima itself, severely reduced flows due to irrigation diversions, outmigrant loss in irrigation canals, increased thermal and sediment loading, and overfishing. Despite these problems, the return of spring chinook to the Yakima River has continued at levels ranging from 854 to 9,442 adults since 1958. In October 1982, the Bonneville Power Administration contracted the Yakima Indian Nation to develop methods to increase production of spring chinook in the Yakima system. The Yakima Nation's current enhancement policy attempts to maintain the genetic integrity of the spring chinook stock native to the Yakima Basin. Relatively small numbers of hatchery fish have been released into the basin in past years. The goal of this study was to develop data that will be used to present management alternatives for Yakima River spring chinook. A major objective of this study is to determine the distribution, abundance and survival of wild Yakima River spring chinook. The second major objective of this study is to determine the relative effectiveness of different methods of hatchery supplementation. The last three major objectives of the study are to locate and define areas in the watershed that may be used for the rearing of spring chinook; to define strategies for enhancing natural production of spring chinook in the Yakima River; and to determine the physical and biological limitations on production within the system.

  13. Aerosol analysis for the regional air pollution study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and operation of an aerosol sampling and analysis program implemented during the 1975 to 1977 St. Louis Regional Air Pollution Study is described. A network of ten samplers were operated at selected sites in the St. Louis area and the total mass and elemental composition of the collected particulates were determined. Sampling periods of 2 to 24 hours were employed. The samplers were capable of collecting aerosol particles in two distinct size ranges corresponding to fine ( 2.4 μm diameter) particles. This unique feature allowed the separation of the particulate samples into two distinct fractions with differing chemical origins and health effects. The analysis methods were also newly developed for use in the St. Louis RAPS study. Total particulate mass was measured by a beta-particle attenuation method in which a precision of +- 5 μm/cm2 could be obtained in a one minute measurement time. Elemental compositions of the samples were determined using an energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence method in which detectable limits of 5 ng/cm2 or less were routinely achieved for elements ranging in atomic number from Al to Pb. The advantages of these analytical methods over more conventional techniques arise from the ability to automate the measurements. During the course of the two year study, a total of more than 35,000 individual samples were processed and a total of 28 concentrations measured for each sample

  14. NTP Toxicology and Carcinogenesis of 1,2,3-Trichloropropane (CAS No. 96-18-4) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1 Mice (Gavage Studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane is a colorless liquid used as a paint and varnish remover, solvent, and degreasing agent, and as a crosslinking agent in the synthesis of polysulfides and hexafluoropropylene. 1,2,3-Trichloropropane may be found as an impurity in certain nematocides and soil fumigants and as a contaminant of drinking and ground water. Studies on the toxic and carcinogenic effects of 1,2,3-trichloropropane were initiated because of the close structural relationship of this chemical to other short-chain halogenated compounds that were demonstrated to be carcinogenic in experimental animals, and because of the potential for human exposure. Toxicology and carcinogenicity studies were conducted by administering 1,2,3-trichloropropane (greater than 99% pure) in corn oil by gavage to groups of F344/N rats and B6C3FI mice for 17 weeks and 2 years. Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in Salmonella typhimurium strains, mouse lymphoma cells, and Chinese hamster ovary cells. 17-Week Studies: Groups of 20 male and 20 female rats received 1,2,3-trichloropropane in corn oil by gavage at doses of 8, 16, 32, 63, 125, or 250 mg/kg body weight 5 days per week for up to 17 weeks; 30 male and 30 female rats received corn oil alone and served as controls. Animals were evaluated at 8 or 17 weeks. All rats in the 250 mg/kg groups died by week 5. One male and four female rats in the 125 mg/kg groups died during the study. The mean body weight gains and final mean body weights of males receiving 63 mg/kg and of males and females receiving 125 mg/kg were lower than those of the controls. Hematocrit values, hemoglobin concentrations, and erythrocyte counts decreased with dose in males and females. Serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, and sorbitol dehydrogenase activities were significantly increased in some female rats receiving 125 mg/kg. Serum pseudocholinesterase activity decreased with dose in females. Increases in kidney and liver weights were related

  15. NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE (NGGT) SYSTEMS STUDY; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Building upon the 1999 AD Little Study, an expanded market analysis was performed by GE Power Systems in 2001 to quantify the potential demand for an NGGT product. This analysis concluded that improvements to the US energy situation might be best served in the near/mid term (2002-2009) by a ''Technology-Focused'' program rather than a specific ''Product-Focused'' program. Within this new program focus, GEPS performed a parametric screening study of options in the three broad candidate categories of gas turbines: aero-derivative, heavy duty, and a potential hybrid combining components of the other two categories. GEPS's goal was to determine the best candidate systems that could achieve the DOE PRDA expectations and GEPS's internal design criteria in the period specified for initial product introduction, circa 2005. Performance feasibility studies were conducted on candidate systems selected in the screening task, and critical technology areas were identified where further development would be required to meet the program goals. DOE PRDA operating parameters were found to be achievable by 2005 through evolutionary technology. As a result, the study was re-directed toward technology enhancements for interim product introductions and advanced/revolutionary technology for potential NGGT product configurations. Candidate technologies were identified, both evolutionary and revolutionary, with a potential for possible development products via growth step improvements. Benefits were analyzed from two perspectives: (1) What would be the attributes of the top candidate system assuming the relevant technologies were developed and available for an NGGT market opportunity in 2009/2010; and (2) What would be the expected level of public benefit, assuming relevant technologies were incorporated into existing new and current field products as they became available. Candidate systems incorporating these technologies were assessed as to how they could serve multiple applications

  16. White phosphorus pits focused feasibility study final July 2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, B.; Martino, L.

    2007-08-21

    The White Phosphorus Burning Pits (WPP) Area of Concern (AOC) is a site of about 5.5 acres (2.2 ha) located in the J-Field Study Area, in the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland (Figure 1.1). Considerable information about the WPP exists as a result of efforts to characterize the hazards associated with J-Field. Contamination in the J-Field Study Area was first detected during an environmental survey of the APG Edgewood Area conducted in 1977 and 1978 (Nemeth et al. 1983) by the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA; predecessor to the U.S. Army Environmental Center). As part of a subsequent USATHAMA environmental survey, 11 wells were installed and sampled at J-Field (three of them at the WPP) (Nemeth 1989). Contamination was also detected in 1983 during a munitions disposal survey conducted by Princeton Aqua Science (1984). The Princeton Aqua Science investigation involved installing and sampling nine wells (four at the WPP) and collecting and analyzing surficial and deep composite soil samples (including samples from the WPP area). In 1986, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit (MD3-21-002-1355) requiring a post-wide RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) and a hydrogeologic assessment of J-Field. In 1987, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a two-phase hydrogeologic assessment in which data were collected to model groundwater flow at J-Field. Soil-gas investigations were conducted, several well clusters were installed (four at the WPP), a groundwater flow model was developed, and groundwater and surface water monitoring programs were established that continue today. The results of the USGS study were published by Hughes (1993).

  17. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) final report summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) has resulted in an overview of a first-generation tandem mirror reactor. The central cell fusion plasma is self-sustained by alpha heating (ignition), while electron-cyclotron resonance heating and negative ion beams maintain the electrostatic confining potentials in the end plugs. Plug injection power is reduced by the use of high-field choke coils and thermal barriers, concepts to be tested in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) and Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  18. The Industry Coupled Case Study Program final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stringfellow, J. [ed.

    1982-10-01

    The Industry Coupled Case Study Program was conceived as a short-term cooperative program between the Federal government and private industry. Federal funds were committed to stimulate geothermal exploration and development between 1977 and 1979, although some work under the program continues into 1982. Federal funding has been phased out and the remaining information developed during the program is being disseminated and reported. This report presents an overview of the program and documents the technical results and open-file data base resulting from the program.

  19. Beam Loss Studies for Rare Isotope Driver Linacs Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wangler, T P; Kurennoy, S S; Billen, J H; Crandall, K R; Qiang, J; Ryne, R D; Mustapha, B; Ostroumov, P; Zhao, Q; York, and R. C.

    2008-03-26

    The Fortran 90 RIAPMTQ/IMPACT code package is a pair of linked beam-dynamics simulation codes that have been developed for end-to-end computer simulations of multiple-charge-state heavy-ion linacs for future exotic-beam facilities. These codes have multiple charge-state capability, and include space-charge forces. The simulations can extend from the low-energy beam-transport line after an ECR ion source to the end of the linac. The work has been performed by a collaboration including LANL, LBNL, ANL, and MSU. The code RIAPMTQ simulates the linac front-end beam dynamics including the LEBT, RFQ, and MEBT. The code IMPACT simulates the beam dynamics of the main superconducting linac. The codes have been benchmarked for rms beam properties against previously existing codes at ANL and MSU. The codes allow high-statistics runs on parallel supercomputing platforms, particularly at NERSC at LBNL, for studies of beam losses. The codes also run on desktop PC computers for low-statistics work. The code package is described in more detail in a recent publication [1] in the Proceedings of PAC07 (2007 US Particle Accelerator Conference). In this report we describe the main activities for the FY07 beam-loss studies project using this code package.

  20. Coastal-inland solar radiation difference study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, W.D. Jr.; Vukovich, F.M.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the characteristics of solar insolation in the coastal zone and to determine the effect of the sea breeze circulation on the global insolation. In order to satisfy these objectives, a six station sampling network was established in the coastal plain of southeastern North Carolina, where previous evidence has indicated that the sea breeze circulation is almost a daily occurrence from late May through October. Three sites (Sloop Point, Onslow Beach, and Cape Fear Technical Institute (CFTI)) were located near the coast (coastal sites) to assess the insolation at the coast. A site (Clinton) was located in an area seldom affected by the sea breeze (about 100 km from the coast). Two additional sites, Wallace and Ellis Airport, located between the coastal sites and the control site, were to be used to assess the transient impact of the sea breeze upon the insolation. Pyranometers were located at each site to measure the global insolation. Direct normal insolation measured by a pyrheliometer and ultraviolet radiation measured by uv radiometers were observed at the Sloop Point and Clinton sites only. Data were collected during the calendar year 1978. The results of the study indicated that the global insolation had greater variability over the network during the summer season (June, July, and August). During the summer, there was a systematicdiurnal variation of the difference in global insolation between the inland and the coastal sites.

  1. Bioenergetic and physiological studies of hyperthermophilic archaea. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, R.M.

    1999-03-01

    This project focuses on physiological and bioenergetic characteristics of two representative hyperthermophilic archaea: Thermococcus litoralis (T{sub opt} 88 C) and Pyrococcus furiosus (T{sub opt} 98 C). Both are obligately anaerobic heterotrophs which grow in the presence or absence of reducible sulfur compounds. T. litoralis was studied in relation to information previously developed for P. furiosus: effect of sulfur reduction on bioenergetics, preferred fermentation patterns, tungsten requirement, etc. A defined medium was developed for T. litoralis consisting of amino acids, vitamins and nucleotides. This serves as the basis for continuous culture studies probing metabolic response to media changes. P. furiosus and T. litoralis have also been found to produce a polysaccharide in the presence of maltose and yeast extract. The composition and chemical structure of this polysaccharide was investigated as well as the metabolic motivation for its production. A novel and, perhaps, primitive intracellular proteolytic complex (previously designated as protease S66) in P. furiosus was isolated and the gene encoding the subunit of the complex was cloned, sequenced and the protease expressed in active form in Eschericia coli. Among other issues, the role of this complex in protein turnover and stress response was examined in the context of this organism in addition to comparing it to other complexes in eubacterial and eukaryotic cells. Biochemical characteristics of the protease have been measured in addition to examining other proteolytic species in P. furiosus.

  2. Radioactivity studies: Final report, June 1985-August 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We instigated studies of neptunium metabolism in two nonhuman primate species to derive dosimetric parameters necessary for accurate human radiation risk assessments. The metabolism of neptunium was studied in adult female baboons and tamarins following intravenous injection and intragastric intubation. Neptunium-237 and 239Np isotopes were prepared as citrate, nitrate, and bicarbonate complexs with valence states of +4, +5 and +6. Samples of blood, urine, feces and autopsy tissues were measured by both gamma-ray and alpha spectrometry techniques. Retention of injected neptunium was determined in vivo using whole and partial body gamma-scintillation spectroscopy. Immediately following intravenous injection, neptunium (+5 and +6) cleared rapidly from blood, deposited primarily in the skeleton (54 +- 5%) and liver (3 +- 1%), and was excreted predominately via urine (40 +- 3%). For the first year post injection, neptunium was retained with a composite biological half-time of 100 yrs in liver and 1.5 yrs in bone. In comparison, injected Np(+4) was retained in blood in higher concentrations and was eliminated initially via urine to a lesser extent (12%). Np(+4) was deposited primarily in the carcass (38 +- 4%) and liver (43 +- 4%). Differences in the chemical forms and radionuclide concentrations injected did not alter neptunium metabolic patterns. 78 refs., 20 figs., 30 tabs

  3. Plutonium disposition study phase 1b final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the results of the Westinghouse activities performed as part of the Plutonium Disposition Study Phase 1b. These activities, which took place from May 16, 1993 to September 15, 1993, build upon the work completed in Phase 1a, which concluded on May 15, 1993. In Phase 1a, three Plutonium Disposal Reactor (PDR) options were developed for the disposal of excess weapons grade plutonium from returned and dismantled nuclear weapons. This report documents the results of several tasks that were performed to further knowledge in specific areas leading up to Phase 2 of the PDR Study. The Westinghouse activities for Phase 1b are summarized as follows: (1) resolved technical issues concerning reactor physics including equilibrium cycle calculations, use of gadolinium, moderator temperature coefficient, and others as documented in Section 2.0; (2) analyzed large Westinghouse commercial plants for plutonium disposal; (3) reactor safety issues including the steam line break were resolved, and are included in Section 2.0; (4) several tasks related to the PDR Fuel Cycle were examined; (5) cost and deployment options were examined to determine optimal configuration for both plutonium disposal and tritium production; (6) response to questions from DOE and National Academy of Scientists (NAS) reviewers concerning the PDR Phase 1a report are included in Appendix A

  4. Refueling outage availability study. Phase 1 final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomasson, F.R.

    1977-11-01

    Babcock and Wilcox entered into a contract with the Department of Energy (formerly the Energy Research and Development Administration) for the performance of a refueling outage availability study with the cooperation of Duke Power Company and Arkansas Power and Light Company. The objective was to improve plant availability through reduction of refueling outage time. The conclusions of the study were drawn from data gathered during the 1976 Oconee 3 and 1977 Arkansas Unit One refueling outages. The onsite effort was one of observation and data recording, which included time-lapsed photography and video tape. The collected data were then evaluated and analyzed for potential improvements and to identify in detail where resources were consumed. The overall result was a listing of (1) specific recommendations for implementing improvements in the facilities, equipment, tools, procedures, and techniques for the participating utilities; (2) generic recommendations of immediate benefit to other applicable utilities; and (3) recommendations for further work in the succeeding phases of the DOE program. The results indicate that, by incorporating the recommendations and taking credit for the time savings, an ideal refueling outage length of 21 to 22 days for the nuclear steam system (NSS) could be realized. Additional benefits would be a reduction in man-Rem exposure and manpower requirements.

  5. Energy conserving site design case study: Shenandoah, Georgia. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    The case study examines the means by which energy conservation can be achieved at an aggregate community level by using proper planning and analytical techniques for a new town, Shenandoah, Georgia, located twenty-five miles southwest of Atlanta's Hartsfield International Airport. A potentially implementable energy conservation community plan is achieved by a study team examining the land use options, siting characteristics of each building type, alternate infrastructure plans, possible decentralized energy options, and central utility schemes to determine how community energy conservation can be achieved by use of pre-construction planning. The concept for the development of mixed land uses as a passively sited, energy conserving community is based on a plan (Level 1 Plan) that uses the natural site characteristics, maximizes on passive energy siting requirement, and allows flexibility for the changing needs of the developers. The Level 2 Plan is identical with Level 1 plan plus a series of decentraized systems that have been added to the residential units: the single-family detached, the apartments, and the townhouses. Level 3 Plan is similar to the Level 1 Plan except that higher density dwellings have been moved to areas adjacent to central site. The total energy savings for each plan relative to the conventional plan are indicated. (MCW)

  6. Nuclear reactor system study for NASA/JPL. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor shielding and safety studies and heat pipe development work undertaken for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory during the period March 1, 1981 to October 30, 1981 are described. Monte Carlo calculations of gamma and neutron shield configurations show that substantial weight penalties are incurred if exposures at 25 m to neutrons and gammas must be limited to 1012 nvt and 106 rad, instead of the 1013 nvt and 107 rad values used earlier. For a 1.6 MW/sub t/ reactor, the required shield weight increases from 400 to 815 kg. Water immersion criticality calculations have been extended to study the effect of water in fuel void spaces as well as in the core heat pipes. These show that the insertion into the core of eight blades of B4C with a mass totaling 2.5 kg will guarantee subcriticality. The design, fabrication procedure, and testing of a 4-m-long molybdenum/lithium heat pipe are described. It appears that an excess of oxygen in the wick prevented the attainment of expected performance capability

  7. Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

    2009-05-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its

  8. 100 GHz, 1 MW, CW gyrotron study program. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a study program to investigate the feasibility of various approaches in designing a 100 GHz, 1 MW CW gyrotron are presented. A summary is given of the possible configurations for a high average power, high frequency gyrotron, including an historical survey of experimental results which are relevant to the various approaches. A set of basic scaling considerations which enable qualitative comparisons between particular gyrotron interaction circuits is presented. These calculations are important in understanding the role of various electron beam and circuit parameters in achieving a viable gyrotron design. Following these scaling exercises, a series of design calculations is presented for a possible approach in achieving 100 GHz, 1 MW CW. These calculations include analyses of the electron gun and interaction circuit parts of the gyrotron, and a general analysis of other aspects of a high average power, high frequency gyrotron. Scalability of important aspects of the design to other frequencies is also discussed, as well as key technology issues

  9. Extraction studies. Final report, May 6, 1996--September 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-09

    During the first week of this effort, an Alpkem RFA-300 4-channel automated chemical analyzer was transferred to the basement of building 42 at TA-46 for the purpose of performing extraction studies. Initially, this instrumentation was applied to soil samples known to contain DNA. Using the SFA (Segmented Flow Analysis) technique, several fluidic systems were evaluated to perform on-line filtration of several varieties of soil obtained from Cheryl Kuske and Kaysie Banton (TA-43, Bldg. 1). Progress reports were issued monthly beginning May 15, 1996. Early in 1997 there was a shift from the conventional 2-phase system (aqueous + air) to a 3-phase system (oil + aqueous + air) to drastically reduce sample size and reagent consumption. Computer animation was recorded on videotape for presentations. The time remaining on the subcontract was devoted to setting up existing equipment to incorporate the 3rd phase (a special fluorocarbon oil obtained from DuPont).

  10. Hycom Pre - Feasibility study. Final report[Hydrogen communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacobazzi, A.; Mario, F di [ENEA, (Italy); Hasenauer, U. [Fraunhofer IS, (Germany); Joergensen, B.H.; Bromand Noergaard, P. [Risoe National Lab., (Denmark)

    2005-07-01

    The Quick-start Programme of the European Union Initiative for Growth identifies the hydrogen economy as one of the key areas for investment in the medium term (2004-2015). In this context the HyCOM (Hydrogen Communities) programme has been initiated. The main goal of this programme is the creation of a limited number of strategically sited stand-alone hydrogen communities producing hydrogen from various primary sources (mostly renewables) and using it for heat and electricity production and as fuel for vehicles. This report looks at the establishment of such hydrogen communities, analysing the main technical, economic, social, and environmental aspects as well as financial and regulatory barriers associated with the creation and operation of hydrogen communities. It also proposes a number of concepts for Hydrogen Communities and criteria with which a Hydrogen Community should be evaluated. The study is not in any way intended to be prescriptive. (ln)

  11. Laser fusion driven breeder design study. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the Laser Fusion Breeder Design Study are given. This information primarily relates to the conceptual design of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) breeder reactor (or fusion-fission hybrid) based upon the HYLIFE liquid metal wall protection concept developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The blanket design for this breeder is optimized to both reduce fissions and maximize the production of fissile fuel for subsequent use in conventional light water reactors (LWRs). When the suppressed fission blanket is compared with its fast fission counterparts, a minimal fission rate in the blanket results in a unique reactor safety advantage for this concept with respect to reduced radioactive inventory and reduced fission product decay afterheat in the event of a loss-of-coolant-accident

  12. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li2O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N2) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concepts are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li2O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue

  13. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li2O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N2) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li2O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue

  14. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concepts are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  15. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concepts are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  16. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt ( than about 7 x 10-8 events yr-1 . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain sit

  17. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li2O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N2) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li2O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concepts are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue

  18. Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-09-01

    The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

  19. Toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of methylphenidate hydrochloride (Cas No. 298-59-9) in F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice (feed studies). Technical report series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Toxicology and carcinogenicity studies were conducted by administration of methylphenidate hydrochloride in feed to groups of 70 F344/N rats of each sex at doses of 0, 100, 500, or 1,0000 ppm and to groups of 70 B6C3F1 mice of each sex at doses of 0, 50, 250, or 500 ppm. Under the conditions of these 2-year feed studies, there was no evidence of carcinogenic activity of methylphenidate hydrochloride in male or female F344/N rats receiving 100, 500, or 1,000 ppm. There was some evidence of carcinogenic activity in male and female B6C3F1 mice, based on the occurrence of hepatocellular neoplasms. Treatment of female rats with methylphenidate hydrochloride was associated with a decrease in the incidence of mammary gland fibroadenomas. Administration of methylphenidate hydrochloride to male and female mice resulted in increased incidence of eosinophilic foci in the liver.

  20. Treatability study Number PDC-1-O-T. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-22

    Los Alamos National Laboratory provided treatability study samples from four waste streams, designated Stream {number_sign}1, Stream {number_sign}3, Stream {number_sign}6, and Stream {number_sign}7. Stream {number_sign}1 consisted of one 55-gallon drum of personal protective equipment (PPE), rags, and neutralizing agent (bicarbonate) generated during the cleanup of a sodium dichromate solution spill. Stream {number_sign}3 was one 55-gallon drum of paper, rags, lab utensils, tools, and tape from the decontamination of a glovebox. The sample of Stream {number_sign}6 was packaged in three 30-gallon drums and a 100 ft{sup 3} wooden box. It consisted of plastic sheeting, PPE, and paper generated from the cleanup of mock explosive (barium nitrate) from depleted uranium parts. Stream {number_sign}7 was scrap metal (copper, stainless and carbon steel joined with silver solder) from the disassembly of gas manifolds. The objective of the treatability study is to determine: (1) whether the Perma-Fix stabilization/solidification process can treat the waste sample to meet Land Disposal Restrictions and the Waste Acceptance Criteria for LANL Technical Area 54, Area G, and (2) optimum loading and resulting weight and volume of finished waste form. The stabilized waste was mixed into grout that had been poured into a lined drum. After each original container of waste was processed, the liner was closed and a new liner was placed in the same drum on top of the previous closed liner. This allowed an overall reduction in waste volume but kept waste segregated to minimize the amount of rework in case analytical results indicated any batch did not meet treatment standards. Samples of treated waste from each waste stream were analyzed by Perma-Fix Analytical Services to get a preliminary approximation of TCLP metals. Splits of these samples were sent to American Environmental Network`s mixed waste analytical lab in Cary, NC for confirmation analysis. Results were all below applicable

  1. High temperature facility for atomic physics studies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a program designed to develop a laser heated plasma sample for atomic physics studies in the 30 to 100 eV range of electron temperature and the 3 x 1017 to 1018 cm-3 range in electron density are presented. The approach used was discussed in detail in Mathematical Sciences Northwest, Inc., (MSNW) Proposal 1660, that is, the laser breakdown mode of heating in a slow solenoid. An extensive rework of the plasma sample facility was done in order to use this mode of heating. Specifically, a new solenoid magnet was constructed to allow higher field operation and the plasma chamber was modified to allow the use of puff filling orifices and small bore tube liners. The vacuum system and focussing optics were changed to allow the use of an on-axis Cassagranian system capable of focussing the laser radiation to a nearly diffraction limited spot as is necessary when heating through a small aperture. The 10 liter CO2 laser optics were charged to an unstable oscillator configuration and additional windows were provided into the optical cavity for alignment purposes

  2. Anticipatory precrash restraint sensor feasibility study: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercel, S.W.; Dress, W.B.

    1995-08-01

    This report explores feasibility of an anticipatory precrash restraint sensor. The foundation principle is the anticipation mechanism found at a primitive level of biological intelligence and originally formalized by the mathematical biologist Robert Rosen. A system based on formal anticipatory principles should significantly outperform conventional technologies. It offers the prospect of high payoff in prevention of death and injury. Sensors and processes are available to provide a good, fast, and inexpensive description of the present dynamical state of the vehicle to the embedded system model in the anticipation engine. The experimental part of this study found that inexpensive radar in a real-world setting does return useful data on target dynamics. The data produced by a radar system can be converted to target dynamical information by good, fast and inexpensive signal-processing techniques. Not only is the anticipatory sensor feasible, but further development under the sponsorship of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is necessary and desirable. There are a number of possible lines of follow-on investigation. The level of effort and expected benefits of various alternatives are discussed.

  3. California Basin Studies (CaBS). Final contract report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorsline, D.S.

    1991-12-31

    The California Continental Borderland`s present configuration dates from about 4 to 5 X 10{sup 6} years Before Present (B.P.) and is the most recent of several configurations of the southern California margin that have evolved after the North America Plate over-rode the East Pacific Rise about 30 X 10{sup 6} years ago. The present morphology is a series of two to three northwest-southeast trending rows of depressions separated by banks and insular ridges. Two inner basins, Santa Monica and San Pedro, have been the site for the Department of Energy-funded California Basin Study (CaBS) Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins contain post-Miocene sediment thicknesses of about 2.5 and 1.5 km respectively. During the Holocene (past 10,000 years) about 10-12 m have accumulated. The sediment entered the basin by one or a combination of processes including particle infall (mainly as bioaggregates) from surface waters, from nepheloid plumes (surface, mid-depths and near-bottom), from turbidity currents, mass movements, and to a very minor degree direct precipitation. In Santa Monica Basin, during the last century, particle infall and nepheloid plume transport have been the most common processes. The former dominates in the central basin floor in water depths from 900 to 945 m. where a characteristic silt-clay with a typical mean diameter of about 0.006 mm, phi standard deviation.

  4. Revised CTUIR Renewable Energy Feasibility Study Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Cox; Thomas Bailor; Theodore Repasky; Lisa Breckenridge

    2005-10-31

    This preliminary assessment of renewable energy resources on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (UIR) has been performed by CTUIR Department of Science and Engineering (DOSE). This analysis focused primarily identifying renewable resources that may be applied on or near the Umatilla Indian Reservation. In addition preliminary technical and economic feasibility of developing renewable energy resources have been prepared and initial land use planning issues identified. Renewable energies examined in the course of the investigation included solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, wind, bioethanol, bio-diesel and bio-pellet fuel. All renewable energy options studied were found to have some potential for the CTUIR. These renewable energy options are environmentally friendly, sustainable, and compliment many of the policy goals of the CTUIR. This report seeks to provide an overall review of renewable energy technologies and applications. It tries to identify existing projects near to the CTUIR and the efforts of the federal government, state government and the private sector in the renewable energy arena. It seeks to provide an understanding of the CTUIR as an energy entity. This report intends to provide general information to assist tribal leadership in making decisions related to energy, specifically renewable energy deve lopment.

  5. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Tate [Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) Study was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in Barrow, AK. The carbonaceous component was characterized via measurement of the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the particulate matter, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) particulate matter fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the BBCSI used standard Tisch hi-vol motors which have a known lifetime of ~1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance and it is suggested that the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers for future deployment in the Arctic. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric particulate matter samples from Barrow, AK from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the organic and black carbon concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer.

  6. Studies of Transport Properties of Fractures: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen R. Brown

    2006-06-30

    We proposed to study several key factors controlling the character and evolution of fracture system permeability and transport processes. We suggest that due to surface roughness and the consequent channeling in single fractures and in fracture intersections, the tendency of a fracture system to plug up, remain permeable, or for permeability to increase due to chemical dissolution/precipitation conditions will depend strongly on the instantaneous flow channel geometry. This geometry will change as chemical interaction occurs, thus changing the permeability through time. To test this hypothesis and advance further understanding toward a predictive capability, we endeavored to physically model and analyze several configurations of flow and transport of inert and chemically active fluids through channels in single fractures and through fracture intersections. This was an integrated program utilizing quantitative observations of fractures and veins in drill core, quantitative and visual observations of flow and chemical dissolution and precipitation within replicas of real rough-walled fractures and fracture intersections, and numerical modeling via lattice Boltzmann methods.

  7. Mini-Brayton economic RTG study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-01-01

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the applicability of a radioisotope heated Mini-Brayton power system to the 1973 USAF/AEC requirements established for the SURVSATCOM Mission. The principal requiremenets of the power system, are: 400 We power level; maximum weight 205 lbs.; $1.2 to 2.0 million per unit cost; and 5y mission duration. A radioisotope heat source that meets the ACE Nuclear Safety Criteria is presented. The major aspects of the Reference Design MB-ERTG are summarized. The Reference Design, utilizes a flexible Brayton rotating unit (BRU), a /sup 244/Cm heat source with ceramic clad fuel cylinders and an aluminum radiator. The flexible BRU has a variable power output capability, from 400 We to 3000 We, and is an important factor in the formulation of a cost effective development plan. The system weight is 186 lb and unit cost, including the /sup 244/Cm fuel, acceptance testing and delivery is $748,000. The total development cost for the 5-yr program is estimated at $16.4M with an additional $6.5M required for /sup 244/Cm heat source development support, /sup 244/Cm fuel, heat source fabrication and capital equipment expenditures. (LCL)

  8. Deletion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor inhibits murine oral carcinogenesis: Potential role for chronic pro-inflammatory immune mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oghumu, Steve; Knobloch, Thomas J; Terrazas, Cesar; Varikuti, Sanjay; Ahn-Jarvis, Jennifer; Bollinger, Claire E; Iwenofu, Hans; Weghorst, Christopher M; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2016-09-15

    Oral cancer kills about 1 person every hour each day in the United States and is the sixth most prevalent cancer worldwide. The pro-inflammatory cytokine 'macrophage migration inhibitory factor' (MIF) has been shown to be expressed in oral cancer patients, yet its precise role in oral carcinogenesis is not clear. In this study, we examined the impact of global Mif deletion on the cellular and molecular process occurring during oral carcinogenesis using a well-established mouse model of oral cancer with the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). C57BL/6 Wild-type (WT) and Mif knock-out mice were administered with 4NQO in drinking water for 16 weeks, then regular drinking water for 8 weeks. Mif knock-out mice displayed fewer oral tumor incidence and multiplicity, accompanied by a significant reduction in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines Il-1β, Tnf-α, chemokines Cxcl1, Cxcl6 and Ccl3 and other molecular biomarkers of oral carcinogenesis Mmp1 and Ptgs2. Further, systemic accumulation of myeloid-derived tumor promoting immune cells was inhibited in Mif knock-out mice. Our results demonstrate that genetic Mif deletion reduces the incidence and severity of oral carcinogenesis, by inhibiting the expression of chronic pro-inflammatory immune mediators. Thus, targeting MIF is a promising strategy for the prevention or therapy of oral cancer. PMID:27164411

  9. Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

    1998-12-01

    This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is

  10. Master plan study - District heating Sillamaee municipality. Estonia. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main deficiencies of the district heating system in Sillamae (Estonia) were identified as being inefficiency of the heat and power production plant, which has a very low capacity, lack of means for consumers to control their energy consumption due to the existing constant flow system, pollution from heat and power production based on oil shale, water and heat losses from the network and unclear agreements between the Silmet factory and Sillamae municipality. The available capital for funding is limited. It was investigated where in the system investments would have the greatest effect. A scenario where heat is supplied from individual gas-fired boilers was calculated. A financially viable scenario would be to change from cogeneration of heat and power (CHP) based on oil shale to either individual natural gas supply or peat-fueled heat production. The Sillamae municipality and the Estonian government should agree on a solution for Sillamae. There will be a cash flow problem if the project is implemented. This can be partly solved by introducing a longer loan period. it is expected that there will be no substantial changes in the consumers' heat demand in the 'do nothing'scenario, and in other scenarios ca. 520 Tj/p.a. from the Solmet factory, 530 Tj/p.a. from the town and 260 Tj/p.a. as heat losses, totaling 1310 Tj/p.a.. In another scenario - the introduction of natural gas - the town's heat demand will be 530 Tj/p.a. and there will be no heat losses. More detailed studies of environmental impacts should be undertaken

  11. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Tate

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact campaign was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site in Barrow, Alaska. The carbonaceous component was characterized by measuring the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the PM, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine PM fractions (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) PM fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) study used standard Tisch “hi-vol” motors that have a known lifetime of approximately 1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance, and it is suggested that, for future deployment in the Arctic, the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric PM samples from Barrow, Alaska, from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the OC and BC concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer. However, the annual OC concentrations had a very different seasonal pattern with the highest concentrations during the summer, lowest concentrations during the fall, and increased concentrations during the winter and spring (Figure 1).

  12. The bussola study. Final results, conclusions and proposals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Luiz da Silva Brasileiro

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the use of thrombolytic and acetylsalicylic acid therapies in acute myocardial infarct patients as well as the availability of technical and human resources for the care of these patients in the emergency units of the city of Rio de Janeiro. Additional objectives were the evaluation of the use of primary angioplasty and the level of acceptance of SBC /RJ as an entity responsible for programs of continued medical education. METHODS: Interviews with physicians at 46 emergency units in the city of Rio de Janeiro. RESULTS: Of the 46 emergency units inspected, a policy of encouragement to use thrombolytic therapy was only prescribed in 6.5%. In 1/3 of the public wards no thrombolytic agents were available, and in none of them was access to primary angioplasty regularly available; 45.9% did not offer the minimal conditions required for the handling of cases of acute myocardial infarction; 60% of the physicians on-call (at both public and private emergency units, appeared not to know the importance of the use of acetylsalicylic acid in acute myocardial infarct patients; all physicians interviewed would participate in programs of continued medical education organized by the SBC/RJ. CONCLUSION: The study suggests there was: 1 the low probability of the use of thrombolytic therapy in the majority of the emergency units in of the city of Rio de Janeiro due to the inadequate policy of waiting for the transfer of the patient to coronary or intensive care unit; 2 a low awareness to the importance of early use of acetylsalic acid in acute myocardial infarct; 3 half of the emergency units of the public net do not have the minimal conditions required for the handling of cases of acute myocardial infarction; 4 a high level of credibility exists that would enable the SBC/RJ to set up programs for continued medical education to change the mentality regarding the use of thrombolytic therapy and of acetylsalicylic acid.

  13. Toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of Ginkgo biloba extract (CAS No. 90045-36-6) in F344/N rats and B6C3F1/N mice (Gavage studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Ginkgo biloba extract has been used primarily as a medicinal agent in the treatment or prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular dysfunction. Ginkgo biloba extract was nominated for study by the National Cancer Institute because of its widespread use as an herbal supplement to promote mental function and the limited availability of toxicity and carcinogenicity data. Furthermore, one of the major ingredients in Ginkgo biloba extract, quercetin, is a known mutagen. The Ginkgo biloba extract used in the current studies was procured from a supplier known to provide material to United States companies and contained 31.2% flavonol glycosides, 15.4% terpene lactones (6.94% bilo-balide, 3.74% ginkgolide A, 1.62% ginkgolide B, 3.06% ginkgolide C), and 10.45 ppm ginkgolic acid. Male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1/N mice were administered Ginkgo biloba extract in corn oil by gavage for 3 months or 2 years. Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, and mouse peripheral blood erythrocytes. 3-MONTH STUDY IN RATS: Groups of 10 male and 10 female rats were administered 0, 62.5, 125, 250, 500, or 1,000 mg Ginkgo biloba extract/kg body weight in corn oil by gavage, 5 days per week for 14 weeks. Additional groups of 10 male and 10 female rats (clinical pathology study) were administered the same doses, 5 days per week for 23 days. All rats survived to the end of the study. Mean body weights of all dosed groups were similar to those of the vehicle control groups. Liver weights of all dosed groups of males and females were significantly greater than those of the vehicle control groups. The incidences of hepatocyte hypertrophy in all dosed groups of males and in 500 and 1,000 mg/kg females were significantly greater than those in the vehicle control groups; there was a dose-related increase in severity of this lesion in males. Hepatocyte fatty change occurred in all dosed males. The incidences of thyroid gland follicular cell

  14. Possible Involvement of Pancreatic Fatty Infiltration in Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Hori

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is difficult to diagnose in its early stage and is one of the most lethal human cancers. Thus, it is important to clarify its major risk factors, predictive factors and etiology. Here, we focus on fatty infiltration of the pancreas and suggest that it could be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Fatty infiltration of the pancreas is observed as ectopic adipocytes infiltrating the pancreatic tissue and is positively correlated with obesity and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, which are risk factors for pancreatic cancer. However, whether fatty infiltration is a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer has not been established. Recent clinical studies show there is a positive correlation between fatty infiltration of the pancreas and pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas. Animal experimental studies also show an association between fatty infiltration of the pancreas and pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas development. Syrian golden hamsters, which are sensitive to chemical carcinogens in the pancreas, develop fatty infiltration of the pancreas with age. The combination of a high-fat diet and a chemical carcinogen that induces a K-ras mutation increases the severity of fatty infiltration of the pancreas. Thus, fatty infiltration of the pancreas is suggested to promote pancreatic carcinogenesis via a K-ras activating mutation. It is assumed that increased expression of adipokines and of inflammatory and proliferation-associated factors elicited by fatty infiltration of the pancreas may contribute to pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas development. Accumulating evidence suggests that in addition to suppression of Ras activation, methods to modulate fatty infiltration in the pancreas can be considered as a strategy for preventing pancreatic cancer.

  15. Copper and resveratrol attenuates serum catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and element values in rats with DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrajnowska, Dorota; Bobrowska-Korczak, Barbara; Tokarz, Andrzej; Bialek, Slawomir; Jezierska, Ewelina; Makowska, Justyna

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a hypothesis was assessed whether or not the intoxication with copper and supplementation with copper plus resveratrol would result in changes in the activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase and moreover if the characteristic changes would appear in concentrations of copper, iron, calcium, magnesium, and zinc in the serum of rats with chemically induced carcinogenesis. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into study groups which, apart from the standard diet, were treated with copper (42.6 mg Cu/kg food as CuSO4·5H2O) or copper plus resveratrol (0.2 mg/kg body) via gavage for a period from 40 days until 20 weeks of age. In cancer groups, the rats were treated with a dose of 80 mg/body weight of 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA) given in rapeseed oil at 50 and 80 days of age to induce mammary carcinogenesis. The control groups included the rats kept in the same conditions and fed with the same diet as the animals from the study groups, but not DMBA-treated. The activity of catalase significantly decreased in groups of rats with mammary carcinogenesis that were supplemented with copper (p copper plus resveratrol (p cancer groups of nonsupplemented rats, the increase of glutathione peroxidase activity was observed. The process of carcinogenesis and the applied supplementation significantly altered the concentrations of trace elements in serum, in particular as concerns iron and copper. The mean serum iron levels in rats with breast cancer were significantly lower than those in the control groups (p copper levels significantly decreased in the groups of rats with mammary carcinogenesis that were supplemented with copper or copper plus resveratrol in comparison with the control groups that received the same diets (p copper and zinc/iron ratios in blood may be used as one of the prognostic factors in breast cancer research.

  16. Carcinogenesis ofnasopharyngeal carcinoma:an alternate hypothetical mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sharon Shuxian Poh; Melvin Lee Kiang Chua; Joseph TS Wee

    2016-01-01

    Current proposed mechanisms implicate both early and latent Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection in the carcinogenic cascade, whereas epidemiological studies have always associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) with early child-hood EBV infection and with chronic ear, nose, and sinus conditions. Moreover, most patients with NPC present with IgA antibody titers to EBV capsid antigen (VCA-IgA), which can precede actual tumor presentation by several years. If early childhood EBV infection indeed constitutes a key event in NPC carcinogenesis, one would have to explain the inability to detect the virus in normal nasopharyngeal epithelium of patients at a high risk for EBV infection. It is perhaps possible that EBV resides within the salivary glands, instead of the epithelium, during latency. This claim is indirectly supported by observations that the East Asian phenotype shares the characteristics of an increased sus-ceptibility to NPC and immature salivary gland morphogenesis, the latter of which is inlfuenced by the association of salivary gland morphogenesis with an evolutionary variant of the human ectodysplasin receptor gene (EDAR), EDARV370A. Whether the immature salivary gland represents a more favorable nidus for EBV is uncertain, but in patients with infectious mononucleosis, EBV has been isolated in this anatomical organ. The presence of EBV-induced lymphoepitheliomas in the salivary glands and lungs further addresses the possibility of submucosal spread of the virus. Adding to the fact that the fossa of Rosen Müller contains a transformative zone active only in the ifrst decade of life, one might be tempted to speculate the possibility of an alternative carcinogenic cascade for NPC that is perhaps not dissimilar to the model of human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

  17. Role of gastrin-peptides in Barrett's and colorectal carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eduardo Chueca; Angel Lanas; Elena Piazuelo

    2012-01-01

    Gastrin is the main hormone responsible for the stimulation of gastric acid secretion; in addition,gastrin and its derivatives exert proliferative and antiapoptotic effects on several cell types.Gastrin synthesis and secretion are increased in certain situations,for example,when proton pump inhibitors are used.The impact of sustained hypergastrinemia is currently being investigated.In vitro experiments and animal models have shown that prolonged hypergastrinemia may be related with higher cancer rates; although,this relationship is less clear in human beings.Higher gastrin levels have been shown to cause hyperplasia of several cell types; yet,the risk for developing cancer seems to be the same in normo-and hypergastrinemic patients.Some tumors also produce their own gastrin,which can act in an autocrine manner promoting tumor growth.Certain cancers are extremely dependent on gastrin to proliferate.Initial research focused only on the effects of amidated gastrins,but there has been an interest in intermediates of gastrin in the last few decades.These intermediates aren't biologically inactive;in fact,they may exert greater effects on proliferation and apoptosis than the completely processed forms.In certain gastrin overproduction states,they are the most abundant gastrin peptides secreted.The purpose of this review is to examine the gastrin biosynthesis process and to summarize the results from different studies evaluating the production,levels,and effects of the main forms of gastrin in different overexpression states and their possible relationship with Barrett's and colorectal carcinogenesis.

  18. Progressive telomere shortening and telomerase reactivation during hepatocellular carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, N; Horikawa, I; Nishimoto, A; Ohmura, H; Ito, H; Hirohashi, S; Shay, J W; Oshimura, M

    1997-01-01

    Telomeres shorten progressively with age in normal somatic cells in culture and in vivo. The maintenance of telomere length is assumed to be an obligatory step in the progression and immortalization of most human tumor cells. To understand the role of telomere dynamics in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we examined the length of terminal restriction fragment (TRF), as an indicator for telomere length, in HCC and surrounding tissues with chronic active hepatitis (CAH) or liver cirrhosis (LC). The study was performed in 12 hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody-positive, 12 hepatitis B virus (HBV) antigen-positive tissues, and 4 tissue samples from virus-negative patients with HCC. The peak TRFs in all 3 types of HCC were significantly shorter than those of the surrounding tissues (i.e., LC or CAH). TRFs examined in one patient with atypical adenomatous hyperplasia (AAH) also was shortened. Thus, progressive TRF shortening occurs from normal to CAH to LC to HCC(AAH). Telomerase, an enzyme that adds repeated telomere sequences onto the chromosome ends and stabilizes telomere length in immortal cells, also was examined in tissues and detected in high levels almost exclusively in HCCs. Interestingly, the intensity of telomerase activity in the AAH case was similar to that of HCC. In addition, the telomerase activity of biopsy samples with a fine 21-gauge needle also was examined in 10 HCCs, 2 adenomatous hyperplasias (AHs), 2 LCs, and 2 CAHs. We found strong telomerase activity in all the HCCs and surprisingly in the 2 cases that were pathologically diagnosed as AH. Thus, the findings strongly suggest that persistent cell proliferation or rapid cell turnover through damage of hepatic cells result in a process of multistep hepatocellular carcinogenesis. Thus, progressive shortening of telomeres and the activation of telomerase may be a useful marker for the early detection of malignant progression in liver disease. PMID:9062581

  19. Master plan study - District heating Sillamaee municipality. Estonia. Final report. Appendices for chapter 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The appendices to the final report on the master plan study on district heating in the municipality in Estonia, chapter nine, gives data related to general economic assumptions for financial and economic calculations, fuel consumption, financing, prices, fuel consumption. (ARW)

  20. Molecular oncology focus - Is carcinogenesis a 'mitochondriopathy'?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ścińska Anna

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mitochondria are sub-cellular organelles that produce adenosine triphosphate (ATP through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. As suggested over 70 years ago by Otto Warburg and recently confirmed with molecular techniques, alterations in respiratory activity and in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA appear to be common features of malignant cells. Somatic mtDNA mutations have been reported in many types of cancer cells, and some reports document the prevalence of inherited mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms in cancer patients. Nevertheless, a careful reanalysis of methodological criteria and methodology applied in those reports has shown that numerous papers can't be used as relevant sources of data for systematic review, meta-analysis, or finally for establishment of clinically applicable markers. In this review technical and conceptual errors commonly occurring in the literature are summarized. In the first place we discuss, why many of the published papers cannot be used as a valid and clinically useful sources of evidence in the biomedical and healthcare contexts. The reasons for introduction of noise in data and in consequence - bias for the interpretation of the role of mitochondrial DNA in the complex process of tumorigenesis are listed. In the second part of the text practical aspects of mtDNA research and requirements necessary to fulfill in order to use mtDNA analysis in clinics are shown. Stringent methodological criteria of a case-controlled experiment in molecular medicine are indicated. In the third part we suggest, what lessons can be learned for the future and propose guidelines for mtDNA analysis in oncology. Finally we conclude that, although several conceptual and methodological difficulties hinder the research on mitochondrial patho-physiology in cancer cells, this area of molecular medicine should be considered of high importance for future clinical practice.

  1. High Dietary Salt Intake Exacerbates Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Gaddy, Jennifer A.; Jana N Radin; Loh, John T.; Feng ZHANG; Washington, M. Kay; Peek, Richard M.; Algood, Holly M. Scott; Cover, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach with Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, and H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis is dependent on the actions of a bacterial oncoprotein known as CagA. Epidemiological studies have shown that high dietary salt intake is also a risk factor for gastric cancer. To investigate the effects of a high-salt diet, we infected Mongolian gerbils with a wild-type (WT) cagA+ H. pylori strain or an isogenic cagA mutant strain and main...

  2. Identification problem for stochastic models with application to carcinogenesis, cancer detection and radiation biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Hanin

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A general framework for solving identification problem for a broad class of deterministic and stochastic models is discussed. This methodology allows for a unified approach to studying identifiability of various stochastic models arising in biology and medicine including models of spontaneous and induced Carcinogenesis, tumor progression and detection, and randomized hit and target models of irradiated cell survival. A variety of known results on parameter identification for stochastic models is reviewed and several new results are presented with an emphasis on rigorous mathematical development.

  3. Human RecQL4 helicase plays critical roles in prostate carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Yanrong; Meador, Jarah A; Calaf, Gloria M;

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-associated deaths among men in the western countries. Here, we report that human RecQL4 helicase, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of a subset of cancer-prone Rothmund-Thomson syndrome, is highly elevated in metastatic prostate cancer c...... for prostate cancer promotion. Observation of a direct interaction of retinoblastoma (Rb) and E2F1 proteins with RecQL4 promoter suggests that Rb-E2F1 pathway may regulate RecQL4 expression. Collectively, our study shows that RecQL4 is an essential factor for prostate carcinogenesis....

  4. Environmental pollution and DNA methylation: carcinogenesis, clinical significance, and practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Environmental pollution is one of the main causes of human cancer. Exposures to environmental carcinogens result in genetic and epigenetic alterations which induce cell transformation. Epigenetic changes caused by environmental pollution play important roles in the development and progression of environmental pollution-related cancers. Studies on DNA methylation are among the earliest and most conducted epigenetic research linked to cancer. In this review, the roles of DNA methylation in carcinogenesis and their significance in clinical medicine were summarized, and the effects of environmental pollutants, particularly air pollutants, on DNA methylation were introduced. Furthermore, prospective applications of DNA methylation to environmental pollution detection and cancer prevention were discussed.

  5. Inflammation-driven carcinogenesis is mediated through STING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeonghyun; Xia, Tianli; Konno, Hiroyasu; Konno, Keiko; Ruiz, Phillip; Barber, Glen N.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stimulation of innate immune pathways by microbial agents or damaged tissue is known to promote inflammation-driven tumorigenesis by mechanisms that are not well understood. Here we demonstrate that mutagenic 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA), cisplatin and etoposide induce nuclear DNA leakage into the cytosol that intrinsically activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING)-dependent cytokine production. Inflammatory cytokine levels are subsequently augmented in a STING-dependent extrinsic manner by infiltrating phagocytes purging dying cells. Consequently, STING−/− mice, or wild-type mice adoptively transferred with STING−/− bone marrow, are almost completely resistant to DMBA-induced skin carcinogenesis compared with their wild-type counterparts. Our data establish a role for STING in the control of cancer, shed significant insight into the causes of inflammation-driven carcinogenesis and may provide a basis for therapeutic strategies to help prevent malignant disease. PMID:25300616

  6. The Role of Ubiquitine Proteasome Pathway in Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Ceren Sumer Turanligil

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin works as a marker protein which targets misfolded or injured proteins to cellular degradation. It brings the abnormal proteins to a subcellular organelle named proteasome and it maintains the degradation of proteins in limited lenghts of peptides by leaving the process withuout being changed. Mistakes in ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis in various steps of carcinogenesis is known. In this review, we dealed with the effects of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP on carcinogenesis via intercellular signaling molecules like Ras, transcription factors like NF-kB, cytokines like TNF-alfa Tumor necrosis factor, protooncogenes like p53 and MDM2(murine double minute 2, components of cell cycle and DNA repair proteins like BRCA1. We also focused on the relationship of UPP on antigen presentation which is active in immune response and its place in the aetiology of colon cancer to provide a specific example. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2010; 19(1.000: 36-55

  7. Using cell replication data in mathematical modeling in carcinogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Portier, C.J.; Kopp-Schneider, A; Sherman, C D

    1993-01-01

    Risk estimation involves the application of quantitative models of dose versus response to carcinogenicity data. Recent advances in biology, computing, and mathematics have led to the application of mathematically complicated, mechanistically based models of carcinogenesis to the estimation of risks. This paper focuses on two aspects of this application, distinguishing between models using available data and the development of new models to keep pace with research developments.

  8. A Review of Molecular Events of Cadmium-Induced Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Luevano, Joe; Damodaran, Chendil

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic, heavy industrial metal that poses serious environmental health hazards to both humans and wildlife. Lately, Cd and Cd containing compounds have been classified as known human carcinogens and epidemiological data show causal associations with prostate, breast and lung cancer. The molecular mechanisms involved in Cd-induced carcinogenesis are poorly understood and are only now beginning to be elucidated. The effects of chronic exposure to Cd have recently become of grea...

  9. Midkine translocated to nucleoli and involved in carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Cheng Dai

    2009-01-01

    Midkine (MK) is a heparin-binding growth factor with its gene first identified in embryonal carcinoma cells at early stages of retinoic acid-induced differentiation.MK is frequently and highly expressed in a variety of human carcinomas. Furthermore, the blood MK level is frequently elevated with advance of human carcinomas, decreased after surgical removal of the tumors. Thus, it is expected to become a promising marker for evaluating the progress of carcinomas.There is mounting evidence that MK plays a significant role in carcinogenesis-related activities, such as proliferation, migration, anti-apoptosis, mitogenesis,transforming, and angiogenesis. In addition, siRNA and anti-sense oligonucleotides for MK have yielded great effects in anti-tumor activities. Therefore, MK appears to be a potential candidate molecular target of therapy for human carcinomas. In this paper, we review MK targeting at nucleoli in different tumor cells and its role in carcinogenesis to deepen our understanding of the mechanism of MK involved in carcinogenesis.

  10. Differences in proximal (cardia) versus distal (antral) gastric carcinogenesis via retinoblastoma pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Gulmann; Helen Hegarty; Antoinette Grace; Mary Leader; Stephen Patchett; Elaine Kay

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Disruption of cell cycle regulation is a critical event in carcinogenesis, and alteration of the retinoblastoma (pRb)tumour suppressor pathway is frequent. The aim of this study was to compare alterations in this pathway in proximal and distal gastric carcinogenesis in an effort to explain the observed striking epidemiological differences.METHODS: Immunohistochemistry was performed to investigate expression of p16 and pRb in the following groups of both proximal (cardia) and distal (antral) tissue samples: (a) biopsies showing normal mucosa, (b) biopsies showing intestinal metaplasia and, (c) gastric cancer resection specimens including uninvolved mucosa and tumour.RESULTS: In the antrum there were highly significant trends for increased p16 expression with concomitant (and in the group of carcinomas inversely proportional)decreased pRb expression from normal mucosa to intestinal metaplasia to uninvolved mucosa (from cancer resections)to carcinoma. In the cardia, there were no differences in p16 expression between the various types of tissue samples whereas pRb expression was higher in normal mucosa compared with intestinal metaplasia and tissue from cancer resections.CONCLUSION: Alterations in the pRb pathway appear to play a more significant role in distal gastric carcinogenesis.Tt may be an early event in the former location since the trend towards p16 overexpression with concomitant pRb underexpression was seen as early as between normal mucosa and intestinal metaplasia. Importantly, the marked differences in expression of pRb and p16 between the cardia and antrum strongly support the hypothesis that tumours of the two locations are genetically different which may account for some of the observed epidemiological differences.

  11. The level of claudin-7 is reduced as an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compromised epithelial barriers are found in dysplastic tissue of the gastrointestinal tract. Claudins are transmembrane proteins important for tight junctions. Claudins regulate the paracellular transport and are crucial for maintaining a functional epithelial barrier. Down-regulation of the oncogenic serine protease, matriptase, induces leakiness in epithelial barriers both in vivo and in vitro. We found in an in-silico search tight co-regulation between matriptase and claudin-7 expression. We have previously shown that the matriptase expression level decreases during colorectal carcinogenesis. In the present study we investigated whether claudin-7 expression is likewise decreased during colorectal carcinogenesis, thereby causing or contributing to the compromised epithelial leakiness of dysplastic tissue. The mRNA level of claudin-7 (CLDN7) was determined in samples from 18 healthy individuals, 100 individuals with dysplasia and 121 colorectal cancer patients using quantitative real time RT-PCR. In addition, immunohistochemical stainings were performed on colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, to confirm the mRNA findings. A 2.7-fold reduction in the claudin-7 mRNA level was found when comparing the biopsies from healthy individuals with the biopsies of carcinomas (p < 0.001). Reductions in the claudin-7 mRNA levels were also detected in mild/moderate dysplasia (p < 0.001), severe dysplasia (p < 0.01) and carcinomas (p < 0.01), compared to a control sample from the same individual. The decrease at mRNA level was confirmed at the protein level by immunohistochemical stainings. Our results show that the claudin-7 mRNA level is decreased already as an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis, probably contributing to the compromised epithelial barrier in adenomas

  12. Suppression of colitis-related mouse colon carcinogenesis by a COX-2 inhibitor and PPAR ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugie Shigeyuki

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is generally assumed that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD-related carcinogenesis occurs as a result of chronic inflammation. We previously developed a novel colitis-related mouse colon carcinogenesis model initiated with azoxymethane (AOM and followed by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS. In the present study we investigated whether a cyclooxygenase (COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide and ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs, troglitazone (a PPARγ ligand and bezafibrate (a PPARα ligand inhibit colitis-related colon carcinogenesis using our model to evaluate the efficacy of these drugs in prevention of IBD-related colon carcinogenesis. Methods Female CD-1 (ICR mice were given a single intraperitoneal administration of AOM (10 mg/kg body weight and followed by one-week oral exposure of 2% (w/v DSS in drinking water, and then maintained on the basal diets mixed with or without nimesulide (0.04%, w/w, troglitazone (0.05%, w/w, and bezafibrate (0.05%, w/w for 14 weeks. The inhibitory effects of dietary administration of these compounds were determined by histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses. Results Feeding with nimesulide and troglitazone significantly inhibited both the incidence and multiplicity of colonic adenocarcinoma induced by AOM/DSS in mice. Bezafibrate feeding significantly reduced the incidence of colonic adenocarcinoma, but did not significantly lower the multiplicity. Feeding with nimesulide and troglitazone decreased the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA-labeling index and expression of β-catenin, COX-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and nitrotyrosine. The treatments increased the apoptosis index in the colonic adenocarcinoma. Feeding with bezafibrate also affected these parameters except for β-catenin expression in the colonic malignancy. Conclusion Dietary administration of nimesulide, troglitazone and bezafibrate effectively suppressed the development of colonic

  13. Progression of diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatic carcinogenesis in carnitine-depleted rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Salim S Al-Rejaie; Abdulaziz M Aleisa; Abdulaziz A Al-Yahya; Saleh A Bakheet; Abdulmalik Alsheikh; Amal G Fatani; Othman A Al-Shabanah; Mohamed M Sayed-Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    carcinogenesis while D-carnitine-mildronate aggravated DENA-induced hepatic damage.CONCLUSION: Data from this study suggest for the first time that: (1) carnitine deficiency is a risk factor and should be viewed as a mechanism in DENAinduced hepatic carcinogenesis; (2) oxidative stress plays an important role but is not the only cause of DENA-induced hepatic carcinogenesis; and (3) long-term L-carnitine supplementation prevents the development of DENA-induced liver cancer.

  14. Downregulation of keratin 76 expression during oral carcinogenesis of human, hamster and mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikant Ambatipudi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Keratins are structural marker proteins with tissue specific expression; however, recent reports indicate their involvement in cancer progression. Previous study from our lab revealed deregulation of many genes related to structural molecular integrity including KRT76. Here we evaluate the role of KRT76 downregulation in oral precancer and cancer development. METHODS: We evaluated KRT76 expression by qRT-PCR in normal and tumor tissues of the oral cavity. We also analyzed K76 expression by immunohistochemistry in normal, oral precancerous lesion (OPL, oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and in hamster model of oral carcinogenesis. Further, functional implication of KRT76 loss was confirmed using KRT76-knockout (KO mice. RESULTS: We observed a strong association of reduced K76 expression with increased risk of OPL and OSCC development. The buccal epithelium of DMBA treated hamsters showed a similar trend. Oral cavity of KRT76-KO mice showed preneoplastic changes in the gingivobuccal epithelium while no pathological changes were observed in KRT76 negative tissues such as tongue. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrates loss of KRT76 in oral carcinogenesis. The KRT76-KO mice data underlines the potential of KRT76 being an early event although this loss is not sufficient to drive the development of oral cancers. Thus, future studies to investigate the contributing role of KRT76 in light of other tumor driving events are warranted.

  15. The Orthopaedic Training Study, Phase II 1968-1972. Final Report Supplement, Part A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Carl J.; And Others

    This document, as a supplement to the final report of the Orthopaedic Training Study, contains the documents considered to be important in providing the background for the study. The materials are organized into four major areas: initial correspondence, instrumentation, special reports, and psychomotor skills. See also HE 003 275 and HE 003 276.…

  16. Chemical and radiation carcinogenesis. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma radiation, as a quantitative perturbation reference, has been related to oxygen toxicity as the unavoidable background risk due to living in an oxygen atmosphere. The basic mechanisms shared by gamma irradiation and oxygen toxicity have been studied. The response to these two perturbations has been characterized at the molecular level through DNA chemistry and monoclonal antibodies, and by cellular biological responses. The investigation of cellular responses is being extended to the molecular level through a study of alteration of gene arrangement and gene expression. Concentration has been on the study of the involvement of the evolutionally conserved repetitive DNA sequences shared by hamster and man. Such sequences were found and some have been isolated in plasmids. Two cellular systems were chosen for investigation, the embryonic/adult mesenchymal system and the hematopoietic tissues system. Concentration has been on the isolation, properties, and response to perturbation of the progenitor cells and the stem cell populations

  17. On the role of final-state interactions in Dalitz plot studies

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, Bastian; Schneider, Sebastian P

    2011-01-01

    The study of Dalitz plots of heavy-meson decays to multi-hadron final states has received intensified interest by the possibility to gain access to precision investigations of CP violation. A thorough understanding of the hadronic final-state interactions is a prerequisite to achieve a highly sensitive, model-independent study of such Dalitz plots. We illustrate some of the theoretical tools, predominantly taken from dispersion theory, available for these and related purposes, and discuss the low-energy decays omega, phi --> 3pi in some more detail.

  18. Helicobacter pylori-infected animal models are extremely suitable for the investigation of gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masaaki Kodama; Kazunari Murakami; Ryugo Sato; Tadayoshi Okimoto; Akira Nishizono; Toshio Fujioka

    2005-01-01

    Although various animal models have been developed to clarify gastric carcinogenesis, apparent mechanism of gastric cancer was not clarified in recent years. Since the recognition of the pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori (Hpylori), several animal models with Hpylori infection have been developed to confirm the association between Hpylori and gastric cancer. Nonhuman primate and rodent models were suitable for this study. Japanese monkey model revealed atrophic gastritis and p53mutation after long-term infection of Hpylori. Mongolian gerbil model showed the development of gastric carcinoma with H pylori infection alone, as well as with combination of chemical carcinogens, such as N-methylN-nitrosourea and N-methyl-N-nitro-N'-nitrosoguanidine.The histopathological changes of these animal models after Hpylori inoculation are closely similar to those in human beings with Hpylori infection. Eradication therapy attenuated the development of gastric cancer in Hpyloriinfected Mongolian gerbil. Although several features of animal models differ from those seen in human beings,these experimental models provide a starting point for further studies to clarify the mechanism of gastric carcinogenesis as a result of Hpylori infection and assist the planning of eradication therapy to prevent gastric carcinoma.

  19. Luteolin supplementation adjacent to aspirin treatment reduced dimethylhydrazine-induced experimental colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Neamt H A; Said, Usama Z; El-Waseef, Ahmed M; Ahmed, Esraa S A

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that aspirin is used in colon cancer treatment. However, long-term of Aspirin usage is limited to gastric and renal toxicity. Luteolin (LUT) has cancer prevention and anti-inflammatory effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of LUT supplementation and Aspirin treatment in dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced carcinogenesis in rats. DMH (20 mg/kg BW/week) treated rats received gavages with Aspirin (50 mg/kg BW/week) and LUT (0.2 mg/kg BW/day) for 15 weeks. DMH injections induce colon polyps and renal bleeding, significantly increasing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), oxidative stress, and kidney function tests and reducing antioxidant markers. Either Aspirin or LUT gavages alone or combined produce a significant decrease in colon polyp number and size, significantly decreasing CEA, COX-2, and oxidative stress and increasing antioxidant markers. In conclusion, the supplementations of LUT adjacent to Aspirin in the treatment of DMH-induced carcinogenesis in rats reflect a better effect than the use of Aspirin alone. PMID:25342594

  20. Investigating evolutionary perspective of carcinogenesis with single-cell transcriptome analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Zhang; Cheng Zhang; Zhongjun Li; Jiangjian Zhong; Leslie P. Weiner; Jiang F. Zhong

    2013-01-01

    We developed phase-switch microfluidic devices for molecular profiling of a large number of single cells. Whole genome microarrays and RNA-sequencing are commonly used to determine the expression levels of genes in cell lysates (a physical mix of millions of cells) for inferring gene functions. However, cellular heterogeneity becomes an inherent noise in the measurement of gene expression. The unique molecular characteristics of individual cells, as well as the temporal and quantitative information of gene expression in cells, are lost when averaged among all cells in cell lysates. Our single-cell technology overcomes this limitation and enables us to obtain a large number of single-cell transcriptomes from a population of cells. A collection of single-cell molecular profiles allows us to study carcinogenesis from an evolutionary perspective by treating cancer as a diverse population of cells with abnormal molecular characteristics. Because a cancer cellpopulation contains cells at various stages of development toward drug resistance, clustering similar single-cell molecular profiles could reveal how drug-resistant sub-clones evolve during cancer treatment. Here, we discuss how single-celltranscriptome analysis technology could enable the study of carcinogenesis from an evolutionary perspective and the development of drug-resistance in leukemia. The single-cell transcriptome analysis reported here could have a direct and significant impact on current cancer treatments and future personalized cancer therapies.

  1. Galectins in cancer: carcinogenesis, diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Ali Hasan; Alalawi, Zainab; Mirandola, Leonardo; Rakhshanda, Rahman; Dahlbeck, Scott; Nguyen, Diane; Jenkins, Marjorie; Grizzi, Fabio; Cobos, Everardo; Figueroa, Jose A; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio

    2014-09-01

    A major breakthrough in the field of medical oncology has been the discovery of galectins and their role in cancer development, progression and metastasis. In this review article we have condensed the results of a number of studies published over the past decade in an effort to shed some light on the unique role played by the galectin family of proteins in neoplasia, and how this knowledge may alter the approach to cancer diagnosis as well as therapy in the future. In this review we have also emphasized the potential use of galectin inhibitors or modulators in the treatment of cancer and how this novel treatment modality may affect patient outcomes in the future. Based on current pre-clinical models we believe the use of galectin inhibitors/modulators will play a significant role in cancer treatment in the future. Early clinical studies are underway to evaluate the utility of these promising agents in cancer patients. PMID:25405163

  2. Animal Models of Colitis-Associated Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasa Kanneganti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a group of chronic inflammatory disorders that affect individuals throughout life. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of IBD are largely unknown, studies with animal models of colitis indicate that dysregulation of host/microbial interactions are requisite for the development of IBD. Patients with long-standing IBD have an increased risk for developing colitis-associated cancer (CAC, especially 10 years after the initial diagnosis of colitis, although the absolute number of CAC cases is relatively small. The cancer risk seems to be not directly related to disease activity, but is related to disease duration/extent, complication of primary sclerosing cholangitis, and family history of colon cancer. In particular, high levels and continuous production of inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, by colonic epithelial cells (CECs and immune cells in lamina propria may be strongly associated with the pathogenesis of CAC. In this article, we have summarized animal models of CAC and have reviewed the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlining the development of carcinogenic changes in CECs secondary to the chronic inflammatory conditions in the intestine. It may provide us some clues in developing a new class of therapeutic agents for the treatment of IBD and CAC in the near future.

  3. Mechanisms linking excess adiposity and carcinogenesis promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I. Pérez-Hernández

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity constitutes one of the most important metabolic diseases being associated to insulin resistance development and increased cardiovascular risk. Association between obesity and cancer has also been well-established for several tumor types, such as breast cancer in postmenopausal women, colorectal and prostate cancer. Cancer is the first death cause in developed countries and the second one in developing countries, with high incidence rates around the world. Furthermore, it has been estimated that 15-20% of all cancer deaths may be attributable to obesity. Tumor growth is regulated by interactions between tumor cells and their tissue microenvironment. In this sense, obesity may lead to cancer development through dysfunctional adipose tissue and altered signaling pathways. In this review, three main pathways relating obesity and cancer development are examined: i inflammatory changes leading to macrophage polarization and altered adipokine profile; ii insulin resistance development; and iii adipose tissue hypoxia. Since obesity and cancer present a high prevalence, the association between these conditions is of great public health significance and studies showing mechanisms by which obesity lead to cancer development and progression are needed to improve prevention and management of these diseases.

  4. Hepatoma-derived growth factor/nucleolin axis as a novel oncogenic pathway in liver carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, San-Cher; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Kung, Mei-Lang; Chu, Tian-Huei; Yi, Li-Na; Huang, Shih-Tsung; Chan, Hoi-Hung; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Liu, Li-Feng; Wu, Han-Chung; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chang, Min-Chi; Tai, Ming-Hong

    2015-06-30

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) overexpression is involved in liver fibrosis and carcinogenesis. However, the receptor(s) and signaling for HDGF remain unclear. By using affinity chromatography and proteomic techniques, nucleolin (NCL) was identified and validated as a HDGF-interacting membrane protein in hepatoma cells. Exogenous HDGF elicited the membrane NCL accumulation within 0.5 hour by protein stabilization and transcriptional NCL upregulation within 24 hours. Blockade of surface NCL by antibodies neutralization potently suppressed HDGF uptake and HDGF-stimulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling in hepatoma cells. By using rescectd hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, immunohistochemical analysis revealed NCL overexpression was correlated with tumour grades, vascular invasion, serum alpha-fetoprotein levels and the poor survival in HCC patients. Multivariate analysis showed NCL was an independent prognostic factor for survival outcome of HCC patients after surgery. To delineate the role of NCL in liver carcinogenesis, ectopic NCL overexpression promoted the oncogenic behaviours and induced PI3K/Akt activation in hepatoma cells. Conversely, NCL knockdown by RNA interference attenuated the oncogenic behaviours and PI3K/Akt signaling, which could be partially rescued by exogenous HDGF supply. In summary, this study provides the first evidence that surface NCL transmits the oncogenic signaling of HDGF and facilitates a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:25938538

  5. A20 restricts wnt signaling in intestinal epithelial cells and suppresses colon carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Shao

    Full Text Available Colon carcinogenesis consists of a multistep process during which a series of genetic and epigenetic adaptations occur that lead to malignant transformation. Here, we have studied the role of A20 (also known as TNFAIP3, a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that restricts NFκB and cell death signaling, in intestinal homeostasis and tumorigenesis. We have found that A20 expression is consistently reduced in human colonic adenomas than in normal colonic tissues. To further investigate A20's potential roles in regulating colon carcinogenesis, we have generated mice lacking A20 specifically in intestinal epithelial cells and interbred these with mice harboring a mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC(min. While A20(FL/FL villin-Cre mice exhibit uninflamed intestines without polyps, A20(FL/FL villin-Cre APC(min/+ mice contain far greater numbers and larger colonic polyps than control APC(min mice. We find that A20 binds to the β-catenin destruction complex and restricts canonical wnt signaling by supporting ubiquitination and degradation of β-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, acute deletion of A20 from intestinal epithelial cells in vivo leads to enhanced expression of the β-catenin dependent genes cyclinD1 and c-myc, known promoters of colon cancer. Taken together, these findings demonstrate new roles for A20 in restricting β-catenin signaling and preventing colon tumorigenesis.

  6. Preventive Effects of Fermented Brown Rice and Rice Bran against Prostate Carcinogenesis in TRAP Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuno, Toshiya; Nagano, Aya; Mori, Yukiko; Kato, Hiroyuki; Nagayasu, Yuko; Naiki-Ito, Aya; Suzuki, Shugo; Mori, Hideki; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Fermented brown rice and rice bran with Aspergillus oryzae (FBRA) is considered to have the potential to prevent chemically-induced carcinogenesis in multiple organs of rodents. In the present study, we evaluated the possible chemopreventive effects of FBRA against prostate tumorigenesis. Six-week-old male rats of the transgenic rat for adenocarcinoma of prostate (TRAP) strain were fed diets containing 5% or 10% FBRA for 15 weeks. Animals were sacrificed at 21 weeks of age, and the ventral and lateral prostate were removed for histopathological evaluation and immunoblot analyses. FBRA decreased the incidence of adenocarcinoma in the lateral prostate and suppressed the progression of prostate carcinogenesis. Treatment with FBRA induced apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation in histologically high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasias. Phospho-AMP-activated kinase α (Thr172) was up-regulated in the prostate of rats fed the diet supplemented with FBRA. These results indicate that FBRA controls tumor growth by activating pathways responsive to energy deprivation and suggest that FBRA has translational potential for the prevention of human prostate cancer. PMID:27409632

  7. [In vitro and in vivo effects of mango pulp (Mangifera indica cv. Azucar) in colon carcinogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales-Bernal, Andrea; Amparo Urango, Luz; Rojano, Benjamín; Maldonado, Maria Elena

    2014-03-01

    Mango pulp contains ascorbic acid, carotenoids, polyphenols, terpenoids and fiber which are healthy and could protect against colon cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative and preventive capacity of an aqueous extract of Mangifera indica cv. Azúcar on a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (SW480) and in a rodent model of colorectal cancer, respectively. The content of total phenolics, flavonoids and carotenoids were also analyzed in the extract. SW480 cell growth was inhibited in a dose and time dependent manner by 22.3% after a 72h exposure to the extract (200 µg/ mL). Colon carcinogenesis was initiated in Balb/c mice by two intra-peritoneal injections of azoxymethane (AOM) at the third and fourth week of giving mango in drinking water (0.3%, 0.6%, 1.25%). After 10 weeks of treatment, in the colon of mice receiving 0.3% mango, aberrant crypt foci formation was inhibited more than 60% (p=0,05) and the inhibition was dose-dependent when compared with controls receiving water. These results show that mango pulp, a natural food, non toxic, part of human being diet, contains bioactive compounds able to reduce growth of tumor cells and to prevent the appearance of precancerous lesions in colon during carcinogenesis initiation. PMID:25796713

  8. Aggravation of serum Hepatocyte Growth Factor levels during hepato carcinogenesis in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has an essential role during liver development and it plays an important role in the regeneration and repair of injured tissues and acting as a mitogen, motogen and morphogens for a variety of epithelial cells. The role of HGF in carcinogenesis is in straggle and so, the present study aimed to through light through the level of HGF during different steps of carcinogenesis. Forty male rats were given diethylnitrosamine (DEN) in drinking water (100 mg/l) for up to 16 weeks. Eight rats were sacrificed at 8, 12 and 16 weeks. Besides, 8 hepatoma bearing rats were exposed to a single dose gamma irradiation (3 Gy) were sacrificed after 2 weeks from exposure (2 rats died, 36 hrs post irradiation) and 8 hepatoma bearing rats were sacrificed after 4 weeks from receiving a combined antioxidant (N-acetylcysteine and Lmethionine). Serum HGF was assayed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Serum HGF level in DEN treated rats and in exposed hepatoma bearing rats was significantly higher than in control rats whereas, serum HGF level after treatment with N acetylcysteine and L-methionine for 4 weeks was significantly decreased than DEN treated rats and concluded that serum HGF may play a role during promotion and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and during treatment

  9. Overexpression of Csk-binding protein contributes to renal cell carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X; Lu, X; Man, X; Zhou, W; Jiang, L Q; Knyazev, P; Lei, L; Huang, Q; Ullrich, A; Zhang, Z; Chen, Z

    2009-09-17

    C-terminal Src kinase (Csk)-binding protein (Cbp) is a transmembrane adaptor protein that localizes exclusively in lipid rafts, where it regulates Src family kinase (SFK) activities through recruitment of Csk. Although SFKs are well known for their involvement in cancer, the function of Cbp in carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. In this study, we reported overexpression of Cbp in more than 70% of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) specimens and in the majority of tested RCC cell lines. Depletion of Cbp in RCC cells by RNA interference led to remarkable inhibition of cell proliferation, migration, anchorage-independent growth as well as tumorigenicity in nude mice. Strikingly, silencing of Cbp negatively affected the sustaining of Erk1/2 activation but not c-Src activation induced by serum. Besides, the RhoA activity in RCC cells was remarkably impaired when Cbp was knocked down. Overexpression of wild-type Cbp, but not its mutant Cbp/DeltaCP lacking C-terminal PDZ-binding motif, significantly enhanced RhoA activation and cell migration of RCC cells. These results provided new insights into the function of Cbp in modulating RhoA activation, by which Cbp might contribute to renal cell carcinogenesis. PMID:19581936

  10. NO-Donating NSAIDs, PPARδ, and Cancer: Does PPARδ Contribute to Colon Carcinogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo G. Mackenzie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemopreventive NO-donating NSAIDs (NO-NSAIDs; NSAIDs with an NO-releasing moiety modulate PPARδ and offer the opportunity to revisit the controversial role of PPARδ in carcinogenesis (several papers report that PPARδ either promotes or inhibits cancer. This review summarizes the pharmacology of NO-NSAIDs, PPARδ cancer biology, and the relationship between the two. In particular, a study of the chemopreventive effect of two isomers of NO-aspirin on intestinal neoplasia in Min mice showed that, compared to wild-type controls, PPARδ is overexpressed in the intestinal mucosa of Min mice; PPARδ responds to m- and p-NO-ASA proportionally to their antitumor effect (p- >m-. This effect is accompanied by the induction of epithelial cell death, which correlates with the antineoplastic effect of NO-aspirin; and NO-aspirin's effect on PPARδ is specific (no changes in PPARα or PPARγ. Although these data support the notion that PPARδ promotes intestinal carcinogenesis and its inhibition could be therapeutically useful, more work is needed before a firm conclusion is reached.

  11. Preventive Effects of Fermented Brown Rice and Rice Bran against Prostate Carcinogenesis in TRAP Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiya Kuno

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fermented brown rice and rice bran with Aspergillus oryzae (FBRA is considered to have the potential to prevent chemically-induced carcinogenesis in multiple organs of rodents. In the present study, we evaluated the possible chemopreventive effects of FBRA against prostate tumorigenesis. Six-week-old male rats of the transgenic rat for adenocarcinoma of prostate (TRAP strain were fed diets containing 5% or 10% FBRA for 15 weeks. Animals were sacrificed at 21 weeks of age, and the ventral and lateral prostate were removed for histopathological evaluation and immunoblot analyses. FBRA decreased the incidence of adenocarcinoma in the lateral prostate and suppressed the progression of prostate carcinogenesis. Treatment with FBRA induced apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation in histologically high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasias. Phospho-AMP-activated kinase α (Thr172 was up-regulated in the prostate of rats fed the diet supplemented with FBRA. These results indicate that FBRA controls tumor growth by activating pathways responsive to energy deprivation and suggest that FBRA has translational potential for the prevention of human prostate cancer.

  12. Synchrotron Studies of Quantum Emergence in Non-Low Dimensional Materials Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James W. Allen

    2011-08-26

    This document is the final report of research performed under U.S. DOE Award Number DE-FG02-07ER46379, entitled Synchrotron Studies of Quantum Emergence in Non-Low Dimensional Materials. It covers the full period of the award, from June 1, 2007 through May 31, 2011.

  13. The Impact of CETA on Institutional Vocational Education. Case Studies and Final Report, 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert; Rozansky, Rosa D.

    This final report summarizes the findings of the National League of Cities and U.S. Conference of Mayors concerning CETA funded programs. It also examines three case studies in Chicago; Erie, Pennsylvania; and the Virginia Peninsula. The report discusses the need for cooperation between CETA and the vocational education system. Characteristics of…

  14. Master plan study - District heating Sillamaee municipality. Estonia. Final report. Appendices for chapter 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The appendices to the final report on the master plan study on the cogenerating district heating system in the municipality of Sillamae (Estonia) gives technical and costs data on existing conditions and on possible new facilities. The data relates to energy output, the energy budget, heat load duration curves, and to suggestions for improvement. (ARW)

  15. The Orthopaedic Training Study, Phase II 1968-1972. Final Report Supplement, Psychomotor Skills, Part B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Carl J.; And Others

    This document, as a supplement to the final report of the Orthopaedic Training Study, presents a discussion of the rationale behind the implementation of a laboratory course in psychomotor skills development for medical students. Medical educators examined resident training in terms of 3 components of cognitive elements of learning: cognitive,…

  16. Mouse Genetic Models Reveal Surprising Functions of IκB Kinase Alpha in Skin Development and Skin Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Xiaojun [The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Park, Eunmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Fischer, Susan M. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78967 (United States); Hu, Yinling, E-mail: huy2@mail.nih.gov [Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Gene knockout studies unexpectedly reveal a pivotal role for IκB kinase alpha (IKKα) in mouse embryonic skin development. Skin carcinogenesis experiments show that Ikkα heterozygous mice are highly susceptible to chemical carcinogen or ultraviolet B light (UVB) induced benign and malignant skin tumors in comparison to wild-type mice. IKKα deletion mediated by keratin 5 (K5).Cre or K15.Cre in keratinocytes induces epidermal hyperplasia and spontaneous skin squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in Ikkα floxed mice. On the other hand, transgenic mice overexpressing IKKα in the epidermis, under the control of a truncated loricrin promoter or K5 promoter, develop normal skin and show no defects in the formation of the epidermis and other epithelial organs, and the transgenic IKKα represses chemical carcinogen or UVB induced skin carcinogenesis. Moreover, IKKα deletion mediated by a mutation, which generates a stop codon in the Ikkα gene, has been reported in a human autosomal recessive lethal syndrome. Downregulated IKKα and Ikkα mutations and deletions are found in human skin SCCs. The collective evidence not only highlights the importance of IKKα in skin development, maintaining skin homeostasis, and preventing skin carcinogenesis, but also demonstrates that mouse models are extremely valuable tools for revealing the mechanisms underlying these biological events, leading our studies from bench side to bedside.

  17. Strawberry Phytochemicals Inhibit Azoxymethane/Dextran Sodium Sulfate-Induced Colorectal Carcinogenesis in Crj: CD-1 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Shi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Human and experimental colon carcinogenesis are enhanced by a pro-inflammatory microenvironment. Pharmacologically driven chemopreventive agents and dietary variables are hypothesized to have future roles in the prevention of colon cancer by targeting these processes. The current study was designed to determine the ability of dietary lyophilized strawberries to inhibit inflammation-promoted colon carcinogenesis in a preclinical animal model. Mice were given a single i.p. injection of azoxymethane (10 mg kg−1 body weight. One week after injection, mice were administered 2% (w/v dextran sodium sulfate in drinking water for seven days and then an experimental diet containing chemically characterized lyophilized strawberries for the duration of the bioassay. Mice fed control diet, or experimental diet containing 2.5%, 5.0% or 10.0% strawberries displayed tumor incidence of 100%, 64%, 75% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.05. The mechanistic studies demonstrate that strawberries reduced expression of proinflammatory mediators, suppressed nitrosative stress and decreased phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and nuclear factor kappa B. In conclusion, strawberries target proinflammatory mediators and oncogenic signaling for the preventive efficacies against colon carcinogenesis in mice. This works supports future development of fully characterized and precisely controlled functional foods for testing in human clinical trials for this disease.

  18. Statistical properties of a two-stage model of carcinogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Portier, C J

    1987-01-01

    Some of the statistical properties of a simple two-stage model of carcinogenesis are explored. The implications of additive treatment effects versus independent treatment effects on the shape of the dose-response curve are considered. Response that is low-dose linear results in the cases where the mutation rates are affected by dose or in the cases where treatment changes the birth rate/death rate of initiated cells in an additive fashion. Independent treatment effects lead to non-low-dose li...

  19. : beta-carotene, alpha-linolenate and carcinogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Maillard, Virginie; Hoinard, Claude; Arab, Khelifa; Jourdan, Marie-Lise; Bougnoux, Philippe; Chajès, Véronique

    2006-01-01

    To investigate whether dietary alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) content alters the effect of beta-carotene on mammary carcinogenesis, we conducted a chemically induced mammary tumorigenesis experiment in rats randomly assigned to four nutritional groups (15 rats per group) varying in beta-carotene supplementation and ALA content. Two oil formula-enriched diets (15 %) were used: one with 6 g ALA/kg diet in an essential fatty acids (EFA) ratio of linoleic acid:ALA of 5:1 w/w (EFA 5 diet), the other w...

  20. Apc-Mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD Rats Are Susceptible to 4-NQO-Induced Tongue Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuji Tanaka

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite widening interest in the possible association between infection/ inflammation and cancer development, knowledge of this issue in relation to oral cancer remains inadequate. This study aimed to determine the susceptibility of Apc-mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD rats, which are vulnerable to developing inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis, to 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO-induced tongue carcinogenesis in order to clarify the role of inflammation in oral cancer. KAD (20 males and 22 females and F344/NS1c (22 males and 23 females rats received drinking water with or without 4-NQO (20 ppm for eight weeks. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of the tongue were performed at week 20. Additionally, the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue mucosa was determined at week 8. Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC developed in the KAD and F344/NS1c rats that received 4-NQO. Regardless of gender, the incidence and multiplicity of tongue SCC were greater in the KAD rats than in the F344/NS1c rats. In addition, the multiplicity of tongue SCC in the female KAD rats was significantly greater than that observed in the male KAD (p < 0.01 and female F344/NS1c rats (p < 0.05. The levels of inflammation and the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue in the 4-NQO-treated female KAD rats were the highest among the rats given 4-NQO. These results show that KAD rats, particularly females, are susceptible to 4-NQO-induced tongue carcinogenesis, suggesting the utility of models employing KAD rats for investigating the pathobiology of oral (tongue carcinogenesis associated with inflammation.

  1. Apc-Mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) Rats Are Susceptible to 4-NQO-Induced Tongue Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Takuji, E-mail: tmntt08@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Pathology (DDP) & Research Center of Diagnostic Pathology (RC-DiP), Gifu Municipal Hospital, 7-1 Kashima-Cho, Gifu 500-8513 (Japan); Department of Tumor Pathology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Shimizu, Masahito; Kochi, Takahiro; Shirakami, Yohei [Department of Internal Medicine/Gastroenterology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Mori, Takayuki [Department of Pharmacy, Ogaki Municipal Hospital, 4-86 Minaminokawa-cho, Ogaki 503-8502 (Japan); Watanabe, Naoki [Department of Diagnostic Pathology (DDP) & Research Center of Diagnostic Pathology (RC-DiP), Gifu Municipal Hospital, 7-1 Kashima-Cho, Gifu 500-8513 (Japan); Naiki, Takafumi [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Gifu Municipal Hospital, 7-1 Kashima-cho, Gifu 500-8513 (Japan); Moriwaki, Hisataka [Department of Internal Medicine/Gastroenterology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Yoshimi, Kazuto; Serikawa, Tadao; Kuramoto, Takashi [The Institute of Laboratory Animals, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Yoshidakonoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2014-07-21

    Despite widening interest in the possible association between infection/inflammation and cancer development, knowledge of this issue in relation to oral cancer remains inadequate. This study aimed to determine the susceptibility of Apc-mutant Kyoto Apc Delta (KAD) rats, which are vulnerable to developing inflammation-associated colorectal carcinogenesis, to 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO)-induced tongue carcinogenesis in order to clarify the role of inflammation in oral cancer. KAD (20 males and 22 females) and F344/NS1c (22 males and 23 females) rats received drinking water with or without 4-NQO (20 ppm) for eight weeks. Histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of the tongue were performed at week 20. Additionally, the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue mucosa was determined at week 8. Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) developed in the KAD and F344/NS1c rats that received 4-NQO. Regardless of gender, the incidence and multiplicity of tongue SCC were greater in the KAD rats than in the F344/NS1c rats. In addition, the multiplicity of tongue SCC in the female KAD rats was significantly greater than that observed in the male KAD (p < 0.01) and female F344/NS1c rats (p < 0.05). The levels of inflammation and the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the tongue in the 4-NQO-treated female KAD rats were the highest among the rats given 4-NQO. These results show that KAD rats, particularly females, are susceptible to 4-NQO-induced tongue carcinogenesis, suggesting the utility of models employing KAD rats for investigating the pathobiology of oral (tongue) carcinogenesis associated with inflammation.

  2. Level of stress in final year MBBS students at Rural Medical College: a cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Shelke Umesh S, Kunkulol Rahul R, Narwane Sandeep P

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Stress, defined as an imbalance between environmental conditions necessary for survival and the ability of individuals to adapt to those conditions, have a high prevalence in MBBS students. A variety of stressors play a significant role in developing stress. Objective:To study the level of stress and stressors responsible in Final MBBS students of Rural Medical College, Loni. Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study was carried out in 100 students (50 of either sex) willing ...

  3. Differences in the Rate of in Situ Mammary Gland Development and Other Developmental Endpoints in Three Strains of Female Rat Commonly Used in Mammary Carcinogenesis Studies: Implications for Timing of Carcinogen Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanko, Jason P; Kissling, Grace E; Chappell, Vesna A; Fenton, Suzanne E

    2016-10-01

    The potential of chemicals to alter susceptibility to mammary tumor formation is often assessed using a carcinogen-induced study design in various rat strains. The rate of mammary gland (MG) development must be considered so that the timing of carcinogen administration is impactful. In this study, in situ MG development was assessed in females of the Harlan Sprague-Dawley (Hsd:SD), Charles River Sprague-Dawley (Crl:SD), and Charles River Long-Evans (Crl:LE) rat strains at postnatal days 25, 33, and 45. Development was evaluated by physical assessment of growth parameters, developmental scoring, and quantitative morphometric analysis. Although body weight (BW) was consistently lower and day of vaginal opening (VO) occurred latest in female Hsd:SD rats, they exhibited accelerated pre- and peripubertal MG development compared to other strains. Glands of Crl:SD and Crl:LE rats exhibited significantly more terminal end buds (TEBs) and TEB/mm than Hsd:SD rats around the time of VO. These data suggest a considerable difference in the rate of MG development across commonly used strains, which is independent of BW and timing of VO. In mammary tumor induction studies employing these strains, administration of the carcinogen should be timed appropriately, based on strain, to specifically target the peak of TEB occurrence. PMID:27613105

  4. Distinct response of the hepatic transcriptome to Aflatoxin B1 induced hepatocellular carcinogenesis and resistance in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiejun; He, Jiangtu; Lin, Jing; Sun, Xin; Sun, Fenyong; Ou, Chao; Jiang, Cizhong

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxin is a natural potent carcinogen and a major cause of liver cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms of hepatocellular carcinogenesis remain largely unexplored. In this study, we profiled global gene expression in liver tissues of rats that developed hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) administration and those that were AFB1-resistant, as well as rats without AFB1 exposure as a control. AFB1 exposure resulted in extensive perturbation in gene expression with different functions in HCC and AFB1 resistance (AR) samples. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in HCC sample were enriched for cell proliferation, cell adhesion and vasculature development that largely contribute to carcinogenesis. Anti-apoptosis genes were up-regulated in HCC sample whereas apoptosis-induction genes were up-regulated in AR sample. AFB1 exposure also caused extensive alteration in expression level of lncRNAs. Among all the 4511 annotated lncRNAs, half of them were highly expressed only in HCC sample and up-regulated a group of protein-coding genes with cancer-related functions: apoptosis regulation, DNA repair, and cell cycle. Intriguingly, these genes were down-regulated by lncRNAs highly expressed in AR sample. Collectively, apoptosis is the critical biological process for carcinogenesis in response to AFB1 exposure through changes in expression level of both protein-coding and lncRNA genes. PMID:27545718

  5. Inhibitory effects of polysaccharides isolated from Phellinus gilvus on benzo(a)pyrene-induced forestomach carcinogenesis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jae-Sung Bae; Kwang-Ho Jang; Hyunee Yim; Seung-Chun Park; Hee-Kyung Jin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Although polysaccharides from Phellinus mushrooms are a well-known material with anti-tumor properties, there is no information about the effect of polysaccharides from Phellinus gilvus (PG) on tumor. The modulating effect of polysaccharides isolated from PG on the benzo(a)pyrene (BaP)-induced forestomach carcinogenesis in ICR female mice was investigated in this study.METHODS: A forestomach carcinogenesis model was established in 40 ICR female mice receiving oral administration of BaP for 4 wk. The mice were randomly assigned to 4 groups (10 each). The mice in each group were treated with sterile water or PG for 4 and 8 wk (SW4,PGW4, SW8, and PGW8 groups). Eight or 12 wk after the first dose of BaP, forestomachs were removed for histopathological and RT-PCR analysis.RESULTS: In histopathological changes and RT-PCR analysis, sterile water-treated mice showed significant hyperplasia of the gastric mucosa with a significantly increased expression of mutant p53 mRNA compared to mice treated with PG for 8 wk.CONCLUSION: Polysaccharides isolated from PG may inhibit BaP-induced forestomach carcinogenesis in mice bydown-regulating mutant p53 expression.

  6. Expression of survivin protein in human colorectal carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Jie Lin; Chang-Qing Zheng; Yu Jin; Ying Ma; Wei-Guo Jiang; Tie Ma

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To identify the role of survivin in colorectal carcinogenesis and the relationship between Survivin and histological differentiation grade of colorectal carcinoma.METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining of survivin by using the monoclonal antibody was performed by the standard streptavidin-peroxidase (SP) technique for the 188paraffin sections which included 30 normal colorectal mucosas, 41 adenomas with low grade dysplasia, 30adenomas with high grade dysplasia, and 87 colorectal carcinomas which were classified as high, middle and low differentiated subgroups which included 33, 28, 26 cases respectively.RESULTS: Expression of survivin was observed in the cytoplasm of adenoma with dysplasia and colorectal carcinoma cells. No immunoreactivity of survivin was seen in normal mucosas. The positive rate of survivin increased in the transition from normal mucosas to adenomas with low grade dysplasia to high grade dysplasia/carcinomas (0.0 %, 31.7 %, 56.7 % and 63.2% respectively). But the difference between high grade dyspiasia and carcinomas had no statistical significance. Positive rate was not related to histological differentiation grade of colorectal carcinoma.Moreover, there was no correlation between histological differentiation grade of colorectal carcinoma and immunoreactive intensity of survivin.CONCLUSION: The expression of survivin is the essential event in the early stage of colorectal carcinogenesis and plays an important role in the transition sequence and it is not related to histological differentiation grade of colorectal carcinoma. It thus may provide a new diagnostic and therapeutic target in colorectal cancer.

  7. Thrombospondin-1 in a Murine Model of Colorectal Carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenaida P Lopez-Dee

    Full Text Available Colorectal Cancer (CRC is one of the late complications observed in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. Carcinogenesis is promoted by persistent chronic inflammation occurring in IBD. Understanding the mechanisms involved is essential in order to ameliorate inflammation and prevent CRC. Thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1 is a multidomain glycoprotein with important roles in angiogenesis. The effects of TSP-1 in colonic tumor formation and growth were analyzed in a model of inflammation-induced carcinogenesis. WT and TSP-1 deficient mice (TSP-1-/- of the C57BL/6 strain received a single injection of azoxymethane (AOM and multiple cycles of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS to induce chronic inflammation-related cancers. Proliferation and angiogenesis were histologically analyzed in tumors. The intestinal transcriptome was also analyzed using a gene microarray approach. When the area containing tumors was compared with the entire colonic area of each mouse, the tumor burden was decreased in AOM/DSS-treated TSP-1-/- versus wild type (WT mice. However, these lesions displayed more angiogenesis and proliferation rates when compared with the WT tumors. AOM-DSS treatment of TSP-1-/- mice resulted in significant deregulation of genes involved in transcription, canonical Wnt signaling, transport, defense response, regulation of epithelial cell proliferation and metabolism. Microarray analyses of these tumors showed down-regulation of 18 microRNAs in TSP-1-/- tumors. These results contribute new insights on the controversial role of TSP-1 in cancer and offer a better understanding of the genetics and pathogenesis of CRC.

  8. Viral Carcinogenesis: Factors Inducing DNA Damage and Virus Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are the causative agents of 10%–15% of human cancers worldwide. The most common outcome for virus-induced reprogramming is genomic instability, including accumulation of mutations, aberrations and DNA damage. Although each virus has its own specific mechanism for promoting carcinogenesis, the majority of DNA oncogenic viruses encode oncogenes that transform infected cells, frequently by targeting p53 and pRB. In addition, integration of viral DNA into the human genome can also play an important role in promoting tumor development for several viruses, including HBV and HPV. Because viral integration requires the breakage of both the viral and the host DNA, the integration rate is believed to be linked to the levels of DNA damage. DNA damage can be caused by both endogenous and exogenous factors, including inflammation induced by either the virus itself or by co-infections with other agents, environmental agents and other factors. Typically, cancer develops years to decades following the initial infection. A better understanding of virus-mediated carcinogenesis, the networking of pathways involved in transformation and the relevant risk factors, particularly in those cases where tumorigenesis proceeds by way of virus integration, will help to suggest prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to reduce the risk of virus-mediated cancer.

  9. Modulation of dietary fat-enhanced colorectal carcinogenesis in N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-treated rats by a vegetables-fruit mixture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnkels, J.M.; Hollanders, V.H.M.; Woutersen, R.A.; Koeman, J.H.; Alink, G.M.

    1997-01-01

    The modulation of a vegetables-fruit mixture on N-methyl-N'-nitro-N- nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced colorectal carcinogenesis was studied in rats maintained on a low- or a high-fat diet. Far this purpose, 120 rats received a semisynthetic diet without (Groups A and C) or with a vegetables-fruit mix

  10. Effect of Anisomeles malabarica (L. R.Br. Methanolic extract on DMBA - induced HBP Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ranganathan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, the effect of Anisomeles malabarica (L. R.Br. whole plants extract has been studied on cellular redox status during hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis. The animals were randomized into experimental and control groups and divided into 8 groups of six animals each. In group 1, the right buccal pouches of hamsters were painted three times per week with a 0.5 percent solution of DMBA in liquid paraffin . Hamsters in groups 2 - 4 painted with DMBA as in group 1, received in addition, intragastric administration of Anisomeles malabarica methanolic extract of concentration 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight respectively three times a week on days alternate to DMBA. Animals in groups 5 through 7 were administered Anisomeles malabarica metabolic extract alone (125, 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight respectively. Group 8 animals received the same volume of water and served as controls. Administration of AMME to DMBA - painted hamsters reduced the incidence of SCC and mean tumour burden in addition to preneoplastic lesions. In the buccal pouch, AMME reversed the susceptibility to lipid peroxidation while simultaneously increasing GSH-dependent antioxidant enzyme activities, whereas in the liver and erythrocytes, the extent of lipid peroxidation was reduced with elevation of antioxidants. Thus, modified oxidant status together with antioxidant adequacy in the target organ as well as in the liver and erythrocytes induced by AMME may significantly reduce cell proliferation and block tumour development in the HBP. The results of the present study are consistent with the free radical scavenging properties of AMME reported in literature. AMME has been shown to prevent the increase in lipid peroxidation and protect against oxidative DNA damage by improving antioxidant defences. Among the doses used in the present study, the medium dose and higher dose of AMME (250 mg/kg bw and 500 mg/kg bw were found to be more effective in inhibiting

  11. The role of immediate and final goals in action planning: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdandzić, Jasminka; Grol, Meike J; van Schie, Hein T; Verhagen, Lennart; Toni, Ivan; Bekkering, Harold

    2007-08-15

    To interact effectively with our environment, we need to specify the intended outcomes (goals) of our actions. In this process, immediate goals and final goals can be regarded as different levels within a hierarchically organized system for action planning: immediate goals and movement details are selected to accomplish more remote goals. Behavioral studies support this notion of different levels of action planning, but the neurophysiological basis remains unclear. Using fMRI, we examined the neural correlates of preparing object manipulations based on either the desired end-state (the final goal) or the initial movement towards a target (the immediate goal). Subjects had to insert an object (consisting of a large and a small cube) into one of two corresponding large and small slots. The subjects were cued on either which slot to fill (Final Goal trials) or which object part to grasp (Immediate Goal trials). These actions required similar movements, but different planning. During Final Goal trials, there was differential preparatory activity along the superior frontal gyrus (bilaterally) and in left inferior parietal cortex. Immediate Goal trials evoked differential activity in occipito-parietal and occipito-temporal cortex. These findings support the notion that actions can be planned at different levels. We show that different fronto-parietal circuits plan the same action, by a relative emphasis on either selecting a sequence of movements to achieve a desired end-state, or selecting movements spatially compatible with given object properties.

  12. Evolution of Tumor Metabolism might Reflect Carcinogenesis as a Reverse Evolution process (Dismantling of Multicellularity)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfarouk, Khalid O., E-mail: Alfarouk@Hala-alfarouk.org [Department of Evolution of Tumor Metabolism and Pharmacology, Hala Alfarouk Cancer Center, Khartoum 11123 (Sudan); Shayoub, Mohammed E.A. [Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Khartoum, Khartoum 11111 (Sudan); Muddathir, Abdel Khalig [Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Khartoum, Khartoum 11111 (Sudan); Elhassan, Gamal O. [General Directorate of Pharmacy, Federal Ministry of Health, Khartoum 11111 (Sudan); Bashir, Adil H.H. [Department of Evolution of Tumor Metabolism and Pharmacology, Hala Alfarouk Cancer Center, Khartoum 11123 (Sudan); Al Jawda Medical Hospital, Khartoum 11111 (Sudan)

    2011-07-22

    Carcinogenesis occurs through a series of steps from normal into benign and finally malignant phenotype. This cancer evolutionary trajectory has been accompanied by similar metabolic transformation from normal metabolism into Pasteur and/or Crabtree-Effects into Warburg-Effect and finally Cannibalism and/or Lactate-Symbiosis. Due to lactate production as an end-product of glycolysis, tumor colonies acquire new phenotypes that rely on lactate as energetic fuel. Presence of Warburg-Effect indicates that some tumor cells undergo partial (if not complete) de-endosymbiosis and so cancer cells have been become unicellular microorganism (anti-Dollo's Law) specially when they evolve to develop cannibalism as way of metabolism while oxidative types of cells that rely on lactate, as their energetic fuel, might represent extra-endosymbiosis. Thus, at the end, the cancer colony could be considered as integrated metabolic ecosystem. Proper understanding of tumor metabolism will contribute to discover potential anticancer agents besides conventional chemotherapy.

  13. Evolution of Tumor Metabolism might Reflect Carcinogenesis as a Reverse Evolution process (Dismantling of Multicellularity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil H.H. Bashir

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis occurs through a series of steps from normal into benign and finally malignant phenotype. This cancer evolutionary trajectory has been accompanied by similar metabolic transformation from normal metabolism into Pasteur and/or Crabtree-Effects into Warburg-Effect and finally Cannibalism and/or Lactate-Symbiosis. Due to lactate production as an end-product of glycolysis, tumor colonies acquire new phenotypes that rely on lactate as energetic fuel. Presence of Warburg-Effect indicates that some tumor cells undergo partial (if not complete de-endosymbiosis and so cancer cells have been become unicellular microorganism (anti-Dollo’s Law specially when they evolve to develop cannibalism as way of metabolism while oxidative types of cells that rely on lactate, as their energetic fuel, might represent extra-endosymbiosis. Thus, at the end, the cancer colony could be considered as integrated metabolic ecosystem. Proper understanding of tumor metabolism will contribute to discover potential anticancer agents besides conventional chemotherapy.

  14. Using Nonlinear Stochastic Evolutionary Game Strategy to Model an Evolutionary Biological Network of Organ Carcinogenesis Under a Natural Selection Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Tsai, Kun-Wei; Li, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Molecular biologists have long recognized carcinogenesis as an evolutionary process that involves natural selection. Cancer is driven by the somatic evolution of cell lineages. In this study, the evolution of somatic cancer cell lineages during carcinogenesis was modeled as an equilibrium point (ie, phenotype of attractor) shifting, the process of a nonlinear stochastic evolutionary biological network. This process is subject to intrinsic random fluctuations because of somatic genetic and epigenetic variations, as well as extrinsic disturbances because of carcinogens and stressors. In order to maintain the normal function (ie, phenotype) of an evolutionary biological network subjected to random intrinsic fluctuations and extrinsic disturbances, a network robustness scheme that incorporates natural selection needs to be developed. This can be accomplished by selecting certain genetic and epigenetic variations to modify the network structure to attenuate intrinsic fluctuations efficiently and to resist extrinsic disturbances in order to maintain the phenotype of the evolutionary biological network at an equilibrium point (attractor). However, during carcinogenesis, the remaining (or neutral) genetic and epigenetic variations accumulate, and the extrinsic disturbances become too large to maintain the normal phenotype at the desired equilibrium point for the nonlinear evolutionary biological network. Thus, the network is shifted to a cancer phenotype at a new equilibrium point that begins a new evolutionary process. In this study, the natural selection scheme of an evolutionary biological network of carcinogenesis was derived from a robust negative feedback scheme based on the nonlinear stochastic Nash game strategy. The evolvability and phenotypic robustness criteria of the evolutionary cancer network were also estimated by solving a Hamilton-Jacobi inequality - constrained optimization problem. The simulation revealed that the phenotypic shift of the lung cancer

  15. Shuttle Ground Operations Efficiencies/Technologies (SGOE/T) study. Volume 3: Final presentation material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, A. L.; Hart, M. T.; Lowry, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Charts used in the Final Phase 1 Oral Briefing at Kennedy Space Center on April 6, 1987, and to the Space Transportation Architecture Study (SPAS) Interim Program Review (IPS-5) held at MSFC on April 8, 1987, are contained. Topics discussed include: identification of existing or new technologies to reduce cost; management approaches; recommendations for research or development of specific technology for future use; and identification of new management techniques.

  16. Data base of climatic change simulations for the impact studies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data used for the study of the climatic change impact on the environment and the society come from climate models and are affected by uncertainties. It is necessary to quantify the resulting errors in the models. The data base provides a comparison of simulations of climatic change in France. The final report presents the project methodology. Three projects using the distributed simulations are also presented. (A.L.B.)

  17. SIMS study on statistics and environmental factors in health. Final technical report to Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This final technical report to DOE consists of five individual technical reports and one working paper by members of the SIMS Study at Stanford. Research topics include testing goodness-of-fit for the distribution of errors in regression models, mathematical models of cancer and their use in risk assessment, pollutant standards index (Psi), osteosarcomas among beagles exposed to 239Plutonium, air pollution and respiratory disease, and models of human exposure to air pollution. Individual summaries of the six reports are indexed separately

  18. Alcohol interlock implementation in the European Union : feasibility study. Final report of the European research project

    OpenAIRE

    Bax, C. (ed.) Kärki, O. Evers, C. Bernhoft, I.M. & Mathijssen, R.

    2002-01-01

    A Breath Alcohol Ignition Interlock Device (BAIID) is a breath testing device connected to the ignition system of a motor vehicle. It prevents an operator from starting the vehicle if the breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) exceeds a predetermined threshold or fail level. From November 2000 until September 2001, a consortium of European road safety research institutes conducted a feasibility study regarding the implementation of BAIIDs in EU drink-driving policies. This is the final report of...

  19. The role of final-state interactions in Dalitz plot studies

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, Bastian

    2011-01-01

    Dalitz plot studies for multi-hadron decays of heavy mesons are expected to become very important tools for precision investigations of CP violation. A thorough understanding of the hadronic final-state interactions is a prerequisite to achieve a highly sensitive, model-independent study of CP-violating phases in such processes. We illustrate the theoretical tools available, as well as still to be developed, from low-to-medium-energy hadron physics for this purpose, and the goals of the informal "Les Nabis" network studying these and related problems.

  20. Age-dependent change in biological characteristics of stem cells in radiation-induced mammary carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Yoshiya; Nishimura, Mayumi; Kakinuma, Shizuko; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Chiba (Japan); Yasukawa-Barnes, Jane; Gould, Michael N.; Clifton, Kelly H. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Department of Human Oncology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2003-07-01

    If you ask what types of cells are the targets for carcinogenesis, a popular answer would be that cancer arises from stem cells. Stem cells are cells that are capable of both self-renewal and generation of differentiated progenies. If the hypothesis of 'cancer as stem cell disease' is correct, the risk of carcinogenesis should be a function of the number of stem cells and their responsiveness of carcinogen-induced damage. In the present study, we addressed the feasibility of this hypothesis using the rat mammary carcinogenesis model. One of the important conclusions emerging from studies on atomic bomb survivors concerns age-related changes in the susceptibility to breast cancer. The relative risk of breast cancer is very high among women exposed to ionizing radiation before or during puberty, and it decreases thereafter. Little information is available, however, on age-related changes in the radiobiological nature of mammary stem cells. We examined age-associated changes in the number of mammary stem-like cells (clonogens) and their susceptibility to radiation in terms of cell death and carcinogenic initiation frequency. The results were as follows. (1) During the prepubertal period, the total number of mammary clonogens per rat increased exponentially with a population doubling time of {approx}4 days. After puberty, the doubling time lengthened to {approx}30 days. The total number of clonogens in abdominal and inguinal mammary glands was {approx}200 in 2-week-old rats, while it was {approx}5600 in 8-week-old rats. (2) The survival curves of clonogenic cells after irradiation indicated that radiation sensitivity of the cells before and during puberty was much higher than after puberty. (3) The initiation frequency of the clonogens from prepubertal rats after 5 Gy irradiation was four times higher than that of the clonogens from post-pubertal rats. These results suggest that changes in the number of stem cells and their radiobiological characteristics

  1. Studies of beauty baryon decays to $D^0 ph^-$ and $\\Lambda_c^+ h^-$ final states

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Adrover, Cosme; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Callot, Olivier; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carranza-Mejia, Hector; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coca, Cornelia; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bonis, Isabelle; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dogaru, Marius; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorosz, Piotr; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; van Eijk, Daan; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farry, Stephen; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garofoli, Justin; Garosi, Paola; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gordon, Hamish; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Hafkenscheid, Tom; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hartmann, Thomas; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hicks, Emma; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Huse, Torkjell; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Iakovenko, Viktor; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Wallaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Klaver, Suzanne; Kochebina, Olga; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanciotti, Elisa; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Li Gioi, Luigi; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guoming; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Ian; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luisier, Johan; Luo, Haofei; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Maratas, Jan; Marconi, Umberto; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Martynov, Aleksandr; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Maurice, Emilie; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Moran, Dermot; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Mountain, Raymond; Mous, Ivan; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Muresan, Raluca; Muryn, Bogdan; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Nomerotski, Andrey; Novoselov, Alexey; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pavel-Nicorescu, Carmen; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Polok, Grzegorz; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Powell, Andrew; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redford, Sophie; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Alexander; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Roberts, Douglas; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Sabatino, Giovanni; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sapunov, Matvey; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Senderowska, Katarzyna; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Oksana; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teodorescu, Eliza; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Webber, Adam Dane; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiechczynski, Jaroslaw; Wiedner, Dirk; Wiggers, Leo; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Decays of beauty baryons to the $D^0 p h^-$ and $\\Lambda_c^+ h^-$ final states (where $h$ indicates a pion or a kaon) are studied using a data sample of $pp$ collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb detector. The Cabibbo-suppressed decays $\\Lambda_b^0\\to D^0 p K^-$ and $\\Lambda_b^0\\to \\Lambda_c^+ K^-$ are observed and their branching fractions are measured with respect to the decays $\\Lambda_b^0\\to D^0 p \\pi^-$ and $\\Lambda_b^0\\to \\Lambda_c^+ \\pi^-$. In addition, the first observation is reported of the decay of the neutral beauty-strange baryon $\\Xi_b^0$ to the $D^0 p K^-$ final state, and a measurement of the $\\Xi_b^0$ mass is performed. Evidence of the $\\Xi_b^0\\to \\Lambda_c^+ K^-$ decay is also reported.

  2. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha expression increases during colorectal carcinogenesis and tumor progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) is involved in processes promoting carcinogenesis of many tumors. However, its role in the development of colorectal cancer is unknown. To investigate the significance of HIF-1α during colorectal carcinogenesis and progression we examined its expression in precursor lesions constituting the conventional and serrated pathways, as well as in non-metastatic and metastatic adenocarcinomas. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot is used to analyse HIF-1α expression in normal colonic mucosa, hyperplastic polyps (HPP), sessile serrated adenomas (SSA), low-grade (TA-LGD) and high-grade (TA-HGD) traditional adenomas as well as in non-metastatic and metastatic colorectal adenocarcinomas. Eight colorectal carcinoma cell lines are tested for their HIF-1α inducibility after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation using western blot and immunocytochemistry. In normal mucosa, HPP and TA-LGD HIF-1α was not expressed. In contast, perinuclear protein accumulation and nuclear expression of HIF-1α were shown in half of the examined SSA and TA-HGD. In all investigated colorectal carcinomas a significant nuclear HIF-1α overexpression compared to the premalignant lesions was observed but a significant correlation with the metastatic status was not found. Nuclear HIF-1α expression was strongly accumulated in perinecrotic regions. In these cases HIF-1α activation was seen in viable cohesive tumor epithelia surrounding necrosis and in dissociated tumor cells, which subsequently die. Enhanced distribution of HIF-1α was also seen in periiflammatory regions. In additional in vitro studies, treatment of diverse colorectal carcinoma cell lines with the potent pro-inflammatory factor lipopolysaccharide (LPS) led to HIF-1α expression and nuclear translocation. We conclude that HIF-1α expression occurs in early stages of colorectal carcinogenesis and achieves a maximum in the invasive stage independent of the metastatic status. Perinecrotic

  3. Effects of Imbalance of Apoptosis and Proliferation on Large Bowel Carcinogenesis in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BaocunSun; ShiwuZhang; XiulanZhao; LanWang

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To observe the pattern of changes in the proliferation and apoptosis at different stages of large bowel carcinoma in mice, and to explore the effects of the imbalance of apoptosis and proliferation at different stages of large-intestine carcinogenesis.METHODS An experimental animal model for large intestine carcinogenesis of KUNMING-strain mice was used. The carcinomas were induced by subcuteneous injection of dimethylhydrazine (DMH) and the distribution and density changes of proliferating and apoptotic cells observed through multistages toward cancer formation. The animals were killed in groups at the 12th, 18th, 24th,and 32nd weeks of carcinoma induction. The apoptotic and proliferating cells were labeled separately using TUNEL and PCNA immunohistochemical staining methodsRF, RESULTS In the normal mouse mucosa, all the apoptotic cells were situated in the superficial layers, however, the proliferating cells were situated in the basement layers, and the amount of both were small. In the early stage of carcinoma induction, the proliferation and the apoptotic cells slightly increased in amount, but there were no obvious changes in their ratio. In the medium stage, the densities of both distinctly increased, but there were no obvious changes in the ratio. In the late stage, the densities of the proliferating and the apoptotic cells in the non-carcinoma mucosa were higher than those at other stages. The proliferating cells in the dysplastic mucosa increased progressively with the increasing degree of the lesions. Although the apoptotic cells increased, their changes did not occur with the degree of the lesions. Their ratio showed a decreasing tendency with the degree of the lesions.CONCLUSIONS (①The presence of an imbalance between cell proliferation and apoptosis was confirmed in the course of large intestine carcinogenesis in a mouse model. ②In the early stage of carcinoma induction both proliferation and apoptosis were at a low level; in the medium

  4. Dose-dependent effects of UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis in hairless p53 knockout mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to (solar) UVB radiation gives rise to mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene that appear to contribute to the earliest steps in the molecular cascade towards human and murine skin cancer. To examine in more detail the role of p53, we studied UVB-induced carcinogenesis in hairless p53 knock-out mice. The early onset of lymphomas as well as early wasting of mice interfered with the development of skin tumors in p53 null-mice. The induction of skin tumors in the hairless p53+/- mice was accomplished by daily exposure to two different UV-doses of approximately 450 J/m2 and 900 J/m2 from F40 lamps corresponding to a fraction of about 0.4 and 0.8 of the minimal edemal dose. Marked differences in skin carcinogenesis were observed between the p53+/- mice and their wild type littermates. Firstly, at 900 J/m2, tumors developed significantly faster in the heterozygotes than in wild types, whereas at 450 J/m2 there was hardly any difference, suggesting that only at higher damage levels loss of one functional p53 allele is important. Secondly, a large portion (25%) of skin tumors in the heterozygotes were of a more malignant, poorly differentiated variety of squamous cell carcinomas, i.e. spindle cell carcinomas, a tumor type that was rarely observed in daily UV exposed wild type hairless mice. Thirdly, the p53 mutation spectrum in skin tumors in heterozygotes is quite different from that in wild types. Together these results support the notion that a point mutation in the p53 gene impacts skin carcinogenesis quite differently than allelic loss: the former is generally selected for in early stages of skin tumors in wild type mice, whereas the latter enhances tumor development only at high exposure levels (where apoptosis becomes more prevalent) and appears to increase progression (to a higher grade of malignancy) of skin tumors

  5. Significance of CpG methylation for solar UV-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehata, Hironobu; Ono, Tetsuya

    2007-01-01

    Mutations detected in the p53 gene in human nonmelanoma skin cancers show a highly UV-specific mutation pattern, a dominance of C --> T base substitutions at dipyrimidine sites plus frequent CC --> TT tandem substitutions, indicating a major involvement of solar UV in the skin carcinogenesis. These mutations also have another important characteristic of frequent occurrences at CpG dinucleotide sites, some of which actually show prominent hotspots in the p53 gene. Although mammalian solar UV-induced mutation spectra were studied intensively in the aprt gene using rodent cultured cells and the UV-specific mutation pattern was confirmed, the second characteristic of the p53 mutations in human skin cancers had not been reproduced. However, studies with transgenic mouse systems developed thereafter for mutation research, which harbor methyl CpG-abundant transgenes as mutation markers, yielded complete reproductions of the situation of the human skin cancer mutations in terms of both the UV-specific pattern and the frequent occurrence at CpG sites. In this review, we evaluate the significance of the CpG methylation for solar UV mutagenesis in the mammalian genome, which would lead to skin carcinogenesis. We propose that the UV-specific mutations at methylated CpG sites, C --> T transitions at methyl CpG-associated dipyrimidine sites, are a solar UV-specific mutation signature, and have estimated the wavelength range effective for the solar-UV-specific mutation as 310-340 nm. We also recommend the use of methyl CpG-enriched sequences as mutational targets for studies on solar-UV genotoxicity for human, rather than conventional mammalian mutational marker genes such as the aprt and hprt genes.

  6. Anticarcinogenesis effect of Gynura procumbens (Lour Merr on tongue carcinogenesis in 4NQO-induced rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Agustina

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In Indonesia Gynura procumbens (Lour Merr leaves have been long used as various cancers medication. Many in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated anticarcinogenesis of ethanol extract of Gynura procumbens leaves. The aim of this study was to investigate the anticarcinogenesis of the ethanol extract of Gynura procumbens leaves on 4 nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO-induced rat tongue carcinogenesis. Fifty six 4 week old male Sprague Dawley rats were used in this study and divided into 7 groups. Group 1, 2 and 3 were lingually induced by 4NQO for 8 weeks. In groups 2 and 3 the extract was given simultaneously with or after 4NQO induction finished, each for 10 weeks and 26 weeks, respectively. Groups 4, 5 and 6 were induced by 4NQO for 16 weeks. However, in groups 5 and 6 the extract was given as well simultaneously with or after the 4NQO induction, each for 18 weeks, respectively. Group 7 served as the as untreated control group. The results from microscopical assessment showed that tongue squamous cell carcinomas (SCC developed in 100% (3/3 of group 1. However, only 33.3% (2/6 and 25% (2/8 of rats in groups 2 and 3, respectively demonstrated tongue SCC. Among groups 4, 5 and 6, no significant difference of tongue SCC incidence was observed. From these results it is apparent that the ethanol extract of Gynura procumbens leaves could inhibit the progression of 4NQOinduced rat tongue carcinogenesis in the initiation phase.

  7. Oxidative DNA base modifications as factors in carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactive oxygen species can cause extensive DNA modifications including modified bases. Some of the DNA base damage has been found to possess premutagenic properties. Therefore, if not repaired, it can contribute to carcinogenesis. We have found elevated amounts of modified bases in cancerous and precancerous tissues as compared with normal tissues. Most of the agents used in anticancer therapy are paradoxically responsible for induction of secondary malignancies and some of them may generate free radicals. The results of our experiments provide evidence that exposure of cancer patients to therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation and anticancer drugs cause base modifications in genomic DNA of lymphocytes. Some of these base damages could lead to mutagenesis in critical genes and ultimately to secondary cancers such as leukemias. This may point to an important role of oxidative base damage in cancer initiation. Alternatively, the increased level of the modified base products may contribute to genetic instability and metastatic potential of tumor cells. (author)

  8. Multi-step pancreatic carcinogenesis and its clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakorafas, G H; Tsiotou, A G

    1999-12-01

    The poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer relates mainly to its delayed diagnosis. It has been repeatedly shown that earlier diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is associated with a better outcome. Molecular diagnostic methods (mainly detection of K-ras mutations in pure pancreatic or duodenal juice, on specimens obtained by percutaneous fine-needle aspirations or in stool specimens) can achieve earlier diagnosis in selected subgroups of patients, such as patients with chronic pancreatitis (especially hereditary), adults with recent onset of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and patients with some inherited disorders that predispose to the development of pancreatic cancer. There is increasing evidence that pancreatic carcinogenesis is a multi-step phenomenon. Screening procedures for precursor lesions in these selected subgroups of patients may reduce the incidence and mortality from pancreatic cancer.

  9. Carcinogenesis of gallbladder mucosa with occult pancreatobiliary reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characteristics of gallbladder cancer (GC) with occult pancreatobiliary reflux (OPBR) were retrospectively examined with images by US (ultrasonography), endoscopic US (EUS), ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) and multi-row CT, and with pathological specimens of the mucosa to consider its carcinogenesis. Subjects were 51-77 years old, 7 female patients with GC in whom OPBR was suggested mainly by mucosal hypertrophy in those images. Pathological observation was performed on specimens stained by HE and Ki-67 (for detecting cell proliferation). Imaging and pathological findings of the mucosa in the present GC were found analogous to known characteristics of GC with abnormal pancreatbiliary confluence, suggesting a similar carcinogenetic process to each other, where biliary phospholipids (PL) were degraded to toxic lyso-PL and free fatty acids. The subject with OPBR could thus be classified in the high risk group. More cases in number were thought necessary to define the surgical treatment, its timing and procedure in GC. (R.T.)

  10. Mucin-Type O-Glycosylation in Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique O. Duarte

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucin-type O-glycosylation plays a crucial role in several physiological and pathological processes of the gastric tissue. Modifications in enzymes responsible for key glycosylation steps and the consequent abnormal biosynthesis and expression of their glycan products constitute well-established molecular hallmarks of disease state. This review addresses the major role played by mucins and associated O-glycan structures in Helicobacter pylori adhesion to the gastric mucosa and the subsequent establishment of a chronic infection, with concomitant drastic alterations of the gastric epithelium glycophenotype. Furthermore, alterations of mucin expression pattern and glycan signatures occurring in preneoplastic lesions and in gastric carcinoma are also described, as well as their impact throughout the gastric carcinogenesis cascade and in cancer progression. Altogether, mucin-type O-glycosylation alterations may represent promising biomarkers with potential screening and prognostic applications, as well as predictors of cancer patients’ response to therapy.

  11. Mucin-Type O-Glycosylation in Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Henrique O; Freitas, Daniela; Gomes, Catarina; Gomes, Joana; Magalhães, Ana; Reis, Celso A

    2016-01-01

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation plays a crucial role in several physiological and pathological processes of the gastric tissue. Modifications in enzymes responsible for key glycosylation steps and the consequent abnormal biosynthesis and expression of their glycan products constitute well-established molecular hallmarks of disease state. This review addresses the major role played by mucins and associated O-glycan structures in Helicobacter pylori adhesion to the gastric mucosa and the subsequent establishment of a chronic infection, with concomitant drastic alterations of the gastric epithelium glycophenotype. Furthermore, alterations of mucin expression pattern and glycan signatures occurring in preneoplastic lesions and in gastric carcinoma are also described, as well as their impact throughout the gastric carcinogenesis cascade and in cancer progression. Altogether, mucin-type O-glycosylation alterations may represent promising biomarkers with potential screening and prognostic applications, as well as predictors of cancer patients' response to therapy. PMID:27409642

  12. Pathogenesis and biomarkers of carcinogenesis in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Sigrun; Gudjonsson, Thorkell; Nielsen, Ole Haagen;

    2011-01-01

    One of the most serious complications of ulcerative colitis is the development of colorectal cancer. Screening patients with ulcerative colitis by standard histological examination of random intestinal biopsy samples might be inefficient as a method of cancer surveillance. This Review focuses...... on the current understanding of the pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis-associated colorectal cancer and how this knowledge can be transferred into patient management to assist clinicians and pathologists in identifying patients with ulcerative colitis who have an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Inflammation....... Although progress has been made in the understanding of inflammation-driven carcinogenesis, markers based on these findings possess insufficient sensitivity or specificity to be usable as reliable biomarkers for risk of colorectal cancer development in patients with ulcerative colitis. However, screening...

  13. Maine firewood study. Final report, 1 November 1978-15 January 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, E.W.

    1980-06-01

    The barriers and incentives to fuelwood use were examined with particular emphasis on woodburners, woodlot owners and firewood dealers. A draft guide for woodlot owners managing for firewood production was prepared, along with a handbook for fuelwood dealers. Cost-benefit studies were completed for three fuelwood businesses in addition to an analysis of firewood marketing systems. The analysis revealed marginal though distinct opportunity for profit during the first year of a firewood venture. Landowner attitudes were also studied and programmatic suggestions offered to improve the effectiveness of existing services. Finally, legislative barriers to increased wood energy use were targetted and remedies proposed.

  14. Studies of hadronic B decays to final states containing open charm mesons at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Martín Sánchez, A

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is a general purpose forward spectrometer operating at the Large Hadron Collider, optimized for the study of B and D hadrons. LHCb recorded 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity during 2011 data taking, collecting unprecedented large samples of B decays to final states involving charmed mesons. These decays offer several complementary measurements of CP violation and CKM matrix parameters, and serve as a laboratory for testing effective theories of hadron decays. We present a selection of new world leading results in these types of decays, including first observations of new modes, world best branching ratio measurements and studies of resonant substructures.

  15. Synergistic effect of radiation on colon carcinogenesis induced by methylazoxymethanol acetate in ACI/N rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Takuji; Morishita, Yukio; Kawamori, Toshihiko; Suzui, Masumi; Kojima, Toshihiro; Sugie, Shigeyuki; Mori, Hideki (Gifu Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1993-10-01

    The effect on colon and liver carcinogenicity in rats of a single X-irradiation exposure given either before or after methylazoxymethanol (MAM) acetate was studied in ACI/N rats of both sexes. A single dose of X-irradiation (3 Gy) was administered either 3 months before or after three weekly s.c. injection of MAM acetate (25 mg/kg body weight). At 365 days after the start, the incidence and multiplicity of MAM acetate-induced intestinal tumors were enhanced by X-irradiation either prior to or after the MAM acetate treatment. In addition, X-irradiation before MAM acetate increased the incidence of hepatocellular foci in either sex. In females, X-irradiation either before or after MAM acetate exposure decreased intestinal tumorigenesis. These findings suggest an apparent synergism of these agents in intestinal carcinogenesis of male rats. (author).

  16. Caryocar brasiliense camb protects against genomic and oxidative damage in urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.B.R. Colombo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant effects of Caryocar brasiliense Camb, commonly known as the pequi fruit, have not been evaluated to determine their protective effects against oxidative damage in lung carcinogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the role of pequi fruit against urethane-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress in forty 8-12 week old male BALB/C mice. An in vivo comet assay was performed to assess DNA damage in lung tissues and changes in lipid peroxidation and redox cycle antioxidants were monitored for oxidative stress. Prior supplementation with pequi oil or its extract (15 µL, 60 days significantly reduced urethane-induced oxidative stress. A protective effect against DNA damage was associated with the modulation of lipid peroxidation and low protein and gene expression of nitric oxide synthase. These findings suggest that the intake of pequi fruit might protect against in vivo genotoxicity and oxidative stress.

  17. Acquisition of Genetic Aberrations by Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) during Inflammation-Associated Carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic abnormalities such as nucleotide alterations and chromosomal disorders that accumulate in various tumor-related genes have an important role in cancer development. The precise mechanism of the acquisition of genetic aberrations, however, remains unclear. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a nucleotide editing enzyme, is essential for the diversification of antibody production. AID is expressed only in activated B lymphocytes under physiologic conditions and induces somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in immunoglobulin genes. Inflammation leads to aberrant AID expression in various gastrointestinal organs and increased AID expression contributes to cancer development by inducing genetic alterations in epithelial cells. Studies of how AID induces genetic disorders are expected to elucidate the mechanism of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis

  18. Acquisition of Genetic Aberrations by Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) during Inflammation-Associated Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takai, Atsushi; Marusawa, Hiroyuki, E-mail: maru@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Chiba, Tsutomu [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Shogoin-Kawahara-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2011-06-22

    Genetic abnormalities such as nucleotide alterations and chromosomal disorders that accumulate in various tumor-related genes have an important role in cancer development. The precise mechanism of the acquisition of genetic aberrations, however, remains unclear. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a nucleotide editing enzyme, is essential for the diversification of antibody production. AID is expressed only in activated B lymphocytes under physiologic conditions and induces somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in immunoglobulin genes. Inflammation leads to aberrant AID expression in various gastrointestinal organs and increased AID expression contributes to cancer development by inducing genetic alterations in epithelial cells. Studies of how AID induces genetic disorders are expected to elucidate the mechanism of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis.

  19. Acquisition of Genetic Aberrations by Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID during Inflammation-Associated Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Chiba

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic abnormalities such as nucleotide alterations and chromosomal disorders that accumulate in various tumor-related genes have an important role in cancer development. The precise mechanism of the acquisition of genetic aberrations, however, remains unclear. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, a nucleotide editing enzyme, is essential for the diversification of antibody production. AID is expressed only in activated B lymphocytes under physiologic conditions and induces somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in immunoglobulin genes. Inflammation leads to aberrant AID expression in various gastrointestinal organs and increased AID expression contributes to cancer development by inducing genetic alterations in epithelial cells. Studies of how AID induces genetic disorders are expected to elucidate the mechanism of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis.

  20. Role of oxidative stress in cadmium toxicity and carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic metal, targeting the lung, liver, kidney, and testes following acute intoxication, and causing nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, osteotoxicity and tumors after prolonged exposures. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are often implicated in Cd toxicology. This minireview focused on direct evidence for the generation of free radicals in intact animals following acute Cd overload and discussed the association of ROS in chronic Cd toxicity and carcinogenesis. Cd-generated superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals in vivo have been detected by the electron spin resonance spectra, which are often accompanied by activation of redox sensitive transcription factors (e.g., NF-κB, AP-1 and Nrf2) and alteration of ROS-related gene expression. It is generally agreed upon that oxidative stress plays important roles in acute Cd poisoning. However, following long-term Cd exposure at environmentally-relevant low levels, direct evidence for oxidative stress is often obscure. Alterations in ROS-related gene expression during chronic exposures are also less significant compared to acute Cd poisoning. This is probably due to induced adaptation mechanisms (e.g., metallothionein and glutathione) following chronic Cd exposures, which in turn diminish Cd-induced oxidative stress. In chronic Cd-transformed cells, less ROS signals are detected with fluorescence probes. Acquired apoptotic tolerance renders damaged cells to proliferate with inherent oxidative DNA lesions, potentially leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, ROS are generated following acute Cd overload and play important roles in tissue damage. Adaptation to chronic Cd exposure reduces ROS production, but acquired Cd tolerance with aberrant gene expression plays important roles in chronic Cd toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  1. Clinical observed performance evaluation: a prospective study in final year students of surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Markey, G C

    2010-06-24

    We report a prospective study of clinical observed performance evaluation (COPE) for 197 medical students in the pre-qualification year of clinical education. Psychometric quality was the main endpoint. Students were assessed in groups of 5 in 40-min patient encounters, with each student the focus of evaluation for 8 min. Each student had a series of assessments in a 25-week teaching programme. Over time, several clinicians from a pool of 16 surgical consultants and registrars evaluated each student by direct observation. A structured rating form was used for assessment data. Variance component analysis (VCA), internal consistency and inter-rater agreement were used to estimate reliability. The predictive and convergent validity of COPE in relation to summative OSCE, long case, and overall final examination was estimated. Median number of COPE assessments per student was 7. Generalisability of a mean score over 7 COPE assessments was 0.66, equal to that of an 8 x 7.5 min station final OSCE. Internal consistency was 0.88-0.97 and inter-rater agreement 0.82. Significant correlations were observed with OSCE performance (R = 0.55 disattenuated) and long case (R = 0.47 disattenuated). Convergent validity was 0.81 by VCA. Overall final examination performance was linearly related to mean COPE score with standard error 3.7%. COPE permitted efficient serial assessment of a large cohort of final year students in a real world setting. Its psychometric quality compared well with conventional assessments and with other direct observation instruments as reported in the literature. Effect on learning, and translation to clinical care, are directions for future research.

  2. ADVANCED BIOMASS REBURNING FOR HIGH EFFICIENCY NOx CONTROL AND BIOMASS REBURNING - MODELING/ENGINEERING STUDIES JOINT FINAL REPORT; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents results of studies under a Phase II SBIR program funded by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, and a closely coordinated project sponsored by the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL, formerly FETC). The overall Phase II objective of the SBIR project is to experimentally optimize the biomass reburning technologies and conduct engineering design studies needed for process demonstration at full scale. The DOE project addresses supporting issues for the process design including modeling activities, economic studies of biomass handling, and experimental evaluation of slagging and fouling. The performance of biomass has been examined in a 300 kW (1 x 10(sup 6) Btu/hr) Boiler Simulator Facility under different experimental conditions. Fuels under investigation include furniture waste, willow wood and walnut shells. Tests showed that furniture pellets and walnut shells provided similar NO(sub x) control as that of natural gas in basic reburning at low heat inputs. Maximum NO(sub x) reduction achieved with walnut shell and furniture pellets was 65% and 58% respectively. Willow wood provided a maximum NO(sub x) reduction of 50% and was no better than natural gas at any condition tested. The efficiency of biomass increases when N-agent is injected into reburning and/or burnout zones, or along with OFA (Advanced Reburning). Co-injection of Na(sub 2)CO(sub 3) with N-agent further increases efficiency of NO(sub x) reduction. Maximum NO(sub x) reduction achieved with furniture pellets and willow wood in Advanced Reburning was 83% and 78% respectively. All combustion experiments of the Phase II project have been completed. All objectives of the experimental tasks were successfully met. The kinetic model of biomass reburning has been developed. Model agrees with experimental data for a wide range of initial conditions and thus correctly represents main features of the reburning process. Modeling suggests that the most important factors that provide

  3. Radiation carcinogenesis. Comprehensive final report, 16 May 1979-31 December 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This abstract covers three main areas of investigation: mesothelioma induction by asbestos, radiation tumorigenesis and transplantable tumors. Canadian and Rhodesian asbestos fibers have been administered under anesthesia to rats by intratracheal, intrapleural and intraperitoneal injection. Additional groups were given 3-methylcholanthrene or x-radiation along with asbestos. A large series of mice also treated as above have displayed mesotheliomas. In addition, glass fiber injections and feeding of asbestos were done and have produced negative results to date. The carcinogenic effect of whole-body radiation on hemi-irradiated parabiont partners exposed to a single 1000 R dose of x-ray was evidenced by a significant increase in the incidence of malignant tumors in only six tissues: skin, supporting soft tissue, kidney, bone, pancreatic islets and ovary. In the male adrenal medulla and in the female breast genetic and parabiotic hormonal factors were judged to exert a significant effect. The occurrence of incisional (anastomotic) sarcomas in significant numbers in hemi-irradiated and parabiont control pairs suggests the operation of mechanical factors complicating the healing process, only slightly enhanced by radiation. One of the very valuable but unanticipated developments of the rat radiation program was the isolation of two transplantable endocrine tumors with strong hormonal potentials: an insulinoma of the pancreas and a pheochromocytoma of the adrenal medulla

  4. THE STUDY OF PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHER CANDIDATES’ OPINIONS TOWARDS MIDTERM AND FINAL EXAMINATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kaan DEMİR

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study views of primary school teacher candidates on midterm and final examinations have been investigated. The research was conducted on senior students studying in Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Faculty of Education Primary School Teaching Programme. Out of a population of 244 students 179 were selected to constitute the sample. In the study a scale developed by the researcher has been used. Results of the study indicated that the primary school teacher candidates were administered mostly written exams, that they preferred to take multiple choice exams, that they deemed an exam period of 45-60 minutes appropriate, that the exams were directed to measure the memorization ability, that they had begun to prepare for the exams a few days prior to the exam dates, that they considered the questions to have been mostly comprehensible, that they thought that the exam instructions had been usually adequate.

  5. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Final Proposal : Wholesale Power Rate Development Study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-07-01

    The Wholesale Power Rate Development Study (WPRDS) serves two primary purposes. It synthesizes information supplied by the other final studies that comprise the BPA rate proposal and shows the actual calculations for BPA's power rates. In addition, the WPRDS is the primary source for certain information used in establishing the power rates. Information developed in the WPRDS includes rate design (including seasonal and diurnal shapes for energy rates, demand, and load variance rates), the risk mitigation tools (Cost Recovery Adjustment Clause (CRAC), along with the [N]ational Marine Fisheries Service [F]ederal Columbia River Power System [B]iological Opinion (NFB) Adjustment, the Emergency NFB Surcharge, and Dividend Distribution Clause (DDC)), development of the Slice rate, and all discounts and other adjustments that are included in the rate schedules and the General Rate Schedule Provisions. The WPRDS also includes the description of the methodology for the Cost of Service Analysis (COSA), and the various rate design steps necessary to establish BPA's power rates. The WPRDS also shows the calculations for inter-business line revenues and expenses, the revenue forecast and, finally, includes a description of all of the rate schedules. The actual rate schedules are shown in ''Administrator's Final Record of Decision (ROD), Appendix A: 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules and General Rate Schedule Provisions, WP-07-A-02''. The WPRDS also includes the Partial Resolution of Issues, shown in Attachment 1 of the ROD. The Partial Resolution of Issues affected many of the features described in this study. These are noted where appropriate.

  6. Raman spectroscopy detects biomolecular changes associated with nanoencapsulated hesperetin treatment in experimental oral carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurushankar, K.; Gohulkumar, M.; Kumar, Piyush; Krishna, C. Murali; Krishnakumar, N.

    2016-03-01

    Recently it has been shown that Raman spectroscopy possesses great potential in the investigation of biomolecular changes of tumor tissues with therapeutic drug response in a non-invasive and label-free manner. The present study is designed to investigate the antitumor effect of hespertin-loaded nanoparticles (HETNPs) relative to the efficacy of native hesperetin (HET) in modifying the biomolecular changes during 7,12-dimethyl benz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced oral carcinogenesis using a Raman spectroscopic technique. Significant differences in the intensity and shape of the Raman spectra between the control and the experimental tissues at 1800-500 cm-1 were observed. Tumor tissues are characterized by an increase in the relative amount of proteins, nucleic acids, tryptophan and phenylalanine and a decrease in the percentage of lipids when compared to the control tissues. Further, oral administration of HET and its nanoparticulates restored the status of the lipids and significantly decreased the levels of protein and nucleic acid content. Treatment with HETNPs showed a more potent antitumor effect than treatment with native HET, which resulted in an overall reduction in the intensity of several biochemical Raman bands in DMBA-induced oral carcinogenesis being observed. Principal component and linear discriminant analysis (PC-LDA), together with leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) on Raman spectra yielded diagnostic sensitivities of 100%, 80%, 91.6% and 65% and specificities of 100%, 65%, 60% and 55% for classification of control versus DMBA, DMBA versus DMBA  +  HET, DMBA versus DMBA  +  HETNPs and DMBA  +  HET versus DMBA  +  HETNPs treated tissue groups, respectively. These results further demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy associated with multivariate statistical algorithms could be a valuable tool for developing a comprehensive understanding of the process of biomolecular changes, and could reveal the signatures of the

  7. Expression of some tumor associated factors in human carcinogenesis and development of gastric carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Dong Zhao; Xue-Mei Hu; Dian-Jing Sun; Qun Zhang; Yu-Hao Zhang; Wei Meng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of IGF-1/IGF-1R and gastrin/ CCK-BR on carcinogenesis and development of human gastric carcinoma and to explore its mechanism and provide a credible theoretical foundation for early diagnosis and molecular therapy of gastric carcinoma. METHODS: mRNA expression levels of IGF-1/IGF-1R and gastrin/CCK-BR were assessed by RT-PCR method in gastric cancer tissues, adjacent mucosa, and tumor-free tissues from 56 patients with gastric carcinoma and normal gastric mucosae from 56 healthy controls. Tissue specimens were obtained by biopsy and confirmed by histological evaluation.RESULTS: The mRNA levels of IGF-1/IGF-1R were increased in gastric cancer tissues compared with normal tissues from healthy controls and successively increased in tumor-free tissues, adjacent mucosa, and gastric cancer tissues. The mRNA levels of gastrin/CCK-BR were increased in gastric cancer tissues compared with normal tissues from healthy controls. There was a significant difference between gastric cancer tissues and adjacent mucosa and tumor-free tissues, but the mRNA levels of gastrin were not significantly increased in adjacent mucosa and gastric cancer tissues compared with tumorfree tissues. The mRNA levels of CCK-BR were increased in gastric cancer tissues and adjacent mucosa compared with tumor-free tissues, but not significantly increased in adjacent mucosa and gastric cancer tissues compared with gastric cancer tissues. CONCLUSION: Overexpression of IGF-1/IGF-1R and gastrin/CCK-BR promotes the disorderly proliferation of gastric mucosa epithelia and it is of great significance in the carcinogenesis and development of gastric carcinoma.

  8. Defects in cytochrome c oxidase expression induce a metabolic shift to glycolysis and carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawei W. Dong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial metabolic dysfunction is often seen in cancers. This paper shows that the defect in a mitochondrial electron transport component, the cytochrome c oxidase (CcO, leads to increased glycolysis and carcinogenesis. Using whole genome microarray expression analysis we show that genetic silencing of the CcO subunit Cox4i1 in mouse C2C12 myoblasts resulted in metabolic shift to glycolysis, activated a retrograde stress signaling, and induced carcinogenesis. In the knockdown cells, the expression of Cox4i1 was less than 5% of the control and the expression of the irreversible glycolytic enzymes (Hk1, Pfkm and Pkm increased two folds, facilitating metabolic shift to glycolysis. The expression of Ca2+ sensitive Calcineurin (Ppp3ca and the expression of PI3-kinase (Pik3r4 and Pik3cb increased by two folds. This Ca2+/Calcineurin/PI3K retrograde stress signaling induced the up-regulation of many nuclear genes involved in tumor progression. Overall, we found 1047 genes with 2-folds expression change (with p-value less than 0.01 between the knockdown and the control, among which were 35 up-regulated genes in pathways in cancer (enrichment p-value less than 10−5. Functional analysis revealed that the up-regulated genes in pathways in cancer were dominated by genes in signal transduction, regulation of transcription and PI3K signaling pathway. These results suggest that a defect in CcO complex initiates a retrograde signaling which can induce tumor progression. Physiological studies of these cells and esophageal tumors from human patients support these results. GEO accession number = GSE68525.

  9. Aberrant promoter methylation and expression of UTF1 during cervical carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Guenin

    Full Text Available Promoter methylation profiles are proposed as potential prognosis and/or diagnosis biomarkers in cervical cancer. Up to now, little is known about the promoter methylation profile and expression pattern of stem cell (SC markers during tumor development. In this study, we were interested to identify SC genes methylation profiles during cervical carcinogenesis. A genome-wide promoter methylation screening revealed a strong hypermethylation of Undifferentiated cell Transcription Factor 1 (UTF1 promoter in cervical cancer in comparison with normal ectocervix. By direct bisulfite pyrosequencing of DNA isolated from liquid-based cytological samples, we showed that UTF1 promoter methylation increases with lesion severity, the highest level of methylation being found in carcinoma. This hypermethylation was associated with increased UTF1 mRNA and protein expression. By using quantitative RT-PCR and Western Blot, we showed that both UTF1 mRNA and protein are present in epithelial cancer cell lines, even in the absence of its two main described regulators Oct4A and Sox2. Moreover, by immunofluorescence, we confirmed the nuclear localisation of UTF1 in cell lines. Surprisingly, direct bisulfite pyrosequencing revealed that the inhibition of DNA methyltransferase by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine was associated with decreased UTF1 gene methylation and expression in two cervical cancer cell lines of the four tested. These findings strongly suggest that UTF1 promoter methylation profile might be a useful biomarker for cervical cancer diagnosis and raise the questions of its role during epithelial carcinogenesis and of the mechanisms regulating its expression.

  10. Chemopreventive effect of sinapic acid on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced experimental rat colon carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, C; Muthukumaran, J; Nalini, N

    2014-12-01

    Sinapic acid (SA) is a naturally occurring phenolic acid found in various herbal plants which is attributed with numerous pharmacological properties. This study was aimed to investigate the chemopreventive effect of SA on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. Rats were treated with DMH injections (20 mg kg(-1) bodyweight (b.w.) subcutaneously once a week for the first 4 consecutive weeks and SA (20, 40 and 80 mg kg(-1) b.w.) post orally for 16 weeks. At the end of the 16-week experimental period, all the rats were killed, and the tissues were evaluated biochemically. Our results reveal that DMH alone treatment decreased the levels/activities of lipid peroxidation by-products such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, conjugated dienes and antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione in the intestine and colonic tissues which were reversed on supplementation with SA. Moreover, the activities of drug-metabolizing enzymes of phase I (cytochrome P450 and P4502E1) were enhanced and those of phase II (glutathione-S-transferase, DT-diaphorase and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase) were diminished in the liver and colonic mucosa of DMH alone-treated rats and were reversed on supplementation with SA. All the above changes were supported by the histopathological observations of the rat liver and colon. These findings suggest that SA at the dose of 40 mg kg(-1) b.w. was the most effective dose against DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis, and thus, SA could be used as a potential chemopreventive agent. PMID:24532707

  11. Role of microsatellites instability in carcinogenesis of postcricoid carcinoma on top of plummer-vinson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Badawy Shahat; Ahmad, Mohamed Abdel-Kader; Sayed, Ramadan Hashem; Habib, Tito Naeem

    2010-10-01

    To develop a molecular pattern that might help in understanding carcinogenesis of postcricoid carcinoma (PCC) on top of Plummer-Vinson syndrome (PVS) in a prospective controlled study. Twenty-four patients with PVS were diagnosed and followed up over a 4 year period, during which eight of them showed malignant change to PCC. Twenty volunteers free of neoplastic diseases were included as a control group. In the two groups, DNA extraction from mononuclear peripheral blood cells, and analysis of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI) using six paired simple tandem repeats (STRs) primers were done. The molecular weight of each STRs locus was scored and statistical correlations were performed. LOH occurred in 55.6 and 72.9% of PVS and PCC cases compared to 25% of control group. At loci D17S695, D9S753 and D9S171, LOH occurred in 54.2, 66.7, and 70.8% of PVS cases; and in 62.5% of PCC cases for each locus compared to 15, 25 and 45% of control cases. D3S1286 and CFS1-R displayed the highest frequency of LOH in PCC (100% for each) while recorded in 58.3 and 33.3% in PVS compared to 30 and 0% in control cases. Certain genetic events tend to occur as early and late events in malignant change of PVS to PCC. Detection of these events may help in understanding carcinogenesis and in early detection of malignancy. CFS1-R is the most informative marker of tumor progression.

  12. Increased visceral fat mass and insulin signaling in colitis-related colon carcinogenesis model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Shingo; Tanaka, Takuji; Murakami, Akira

    2010-01-27

    Leptin, a pleiotropic hormone regulating food intake and metabolism, plays an important role in the regulation of inflammation and immunity. We previously demonstrated that serum leptin levels are profoundly increased in mice which received azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) as tumor-initiator and -promoter, respectively, in a colon carcinogenesis model. In this study, we attempted to address underlying mechanism whereby leptin is up-regulated in this rodent model. Five-week-old male ICR mice were given a single intraperitoneal injection of AOM (week 0), followed by 1% DSS in drinking water for 7 days. Thereafter, the weights of visceral fats and the serum concentration of leptin were determined at week 20. Of interest, the relative epididymal fat pad and mesenteric fat weights, together with serum leptin levels in the AOM and/or DSS-treated mice were markedly increased compared to that in untreated mice. In addition, leptin protein production in epididymal fat pad with AOM/DSS-treated mice was 4.7-fold higher than that of control. Further, insulin signaling molecules, such as protein kinase B (Akt), S6, mitogen-activate protein kinase/extracellular signaling-regulated kinase 1/2, and extracellular signaling-regulated kinase 1/2, were concomitantly activated in epididymal fat of AOM/DSS-treated mice. This treatment also increased the serum insulin and IGF-1 levels. Taken together, our results suggest that higher levels of serum insulin and IGF-1 promote the insulin signaling in epididymal fat and thereby increasing serum leptin, which may play an crucial role in, not only obesity-related, but also -independent colon carcinogenesis. PMID:19931517

  13. Histopathological and in vivo evidence of regucalcin as a protective molecule in mammary gland carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Ricardo; Vaz, Cátia V.; Maia, Cláudio J. [CICS-UBI, Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal); Gomes, Madalena [IPATIMUP, Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, Porto (Portugal); Gama, Adelina [Department of Veterinary Sciences, Animal and Veterinary Science Research Center (CECAV), University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro (UTAD) (Portugal); Alves, Gilberto; Santos, Cecília R. [CICS-UBI, Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal); Schmitt, Fernando [IPATIMUP, Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology, University of Porto, Porto (Portugal); Medical Faculty, University of Porto, Porto (Portugal); Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Pathology, University Health Network, Toronto (Canada); Socorro, Sílvia, E-mail: ssocorro@fcsaude.ubi.pt [CICS-UBI, Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal)

    2015-01-15

    Regucalcin (RGN) is a calcium-binding protein, which has been shown to be underexpressed in cancer cases. This study aimed to determine the association of RGN expression with clinicopathological parameters of human breast cancer. In addition, the role of RGN in malignancy of mammary gland using transgenic rats overexpressing the protein (Tg-RGN) was investigated. Wild-type (Wt) and Tg-RGN rats were treated with 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene (DMBA). Carcinogen-induced tumors were histologically classified and the Ki67 proliferation index was estimated. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that RGN immunoreactivity was negatively correlated with the histological grade of breast infiltrating ductal carcinoma suggesting that progression of breast cancer is associated with loss of RGN. Tg-RGN rats displayed lower incidence of carcinogen-induced mammary gland tumors, as well as lower incidence of invasive forms. Moreover, higher proliferation was observed in non-invasive tumors of Wt animals comparatively with Tg-RGN. Overexpression of RGN was associated with diminished expression of cell-cycle inhibitors and increased expression of apoptosis inducers. Augmented activity of apoptosis effector caspase-3 was found in the mammary gland of Tg-RGN. RGN overexpression protected from carcinogen-induced mammary gland tumor development and was linked with reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis. These findings indicated the protective role of RGN in the carcinogenesis of mammary gland. - Highlights: • RGN immunoreactivity was negatively correlated with breast cancer differentiation. • Transgenic overexpression of RGN diminished incidence of carcinogen-induced tumors. • Transgenic overexpression of RGN restricted proliferation and fostered apoptosis. • RGN has a protective role in the carcinogenesis of mammary gland.

  14. Methylation-mediated transcriptional repression of microRNAs during cervical carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilting, Saskia M.; Verlaat, Wina; Jaspers, Annelieke; Makazaji, Nour A.; Agami, Reuven; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Snijders, Peter J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Deregulated expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is common and biologically relevant in cervical carcinogenesis and appears only partly related to chromosomal changes. We recently identified 32 miRNAs showing decreased expression in high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and carcinomas not associated with a chromosomal loss, 6 of which were located within a CpG island. This study aimed to investigate to what extent these miRNAs are subject to DNA methylation-mediated transcriptional repression in cervical carcinogenesis.   Methylation-specific PCR (MSP) analysis on a cell line panel representing different stages of human papillomavirus (HPV) induced transformation revealed an increase in methylation of hsa-miR-149, -203 and -375 with progression to malignancy, whereas expression of these miRNAs was restored upon treatment with a demethylating agent. All three miRNAs showed significantly increased levels of methylation in cervical carcinomas, whereas methylation levels of hsa-miR-203 and -375 were also significantly increased in high-grade CIN. A pilot analysis showed that increased hsa-miR-203 methylation was also detectable in HPV-positive cervical scrapes of women with high-grade CIN compared with controls. Similar to recent findings on hsa-miR-375, ectopic expression of hsa-miR-203 in cervical cancer cells decreased both the proliferation rate and anchorage independent growth. We found evidence for methylation-mediated transcriptional repression of hsa-miR-149, -203 and -375 in cervical cancer. Methylation of the latter two was already apparent in precancerous lesions and represent functionally relevant events in HPV-mediated transformation. Increased hsa-miR-203 methylation was detectable in scrapes of women with high-grade CIN, indicating that methylated miRNAs may provide putative markers to assess the presence of (pre)cancerous lesions. PMID:23324622

  15. Dietary Chemoprevention of PhIP Induced Carcinogenesis in Male Fischer 344 Rats with Tomato and Broccoli

    OpenAIRE

    Kirstie Canene-Adams; Sfanos, Karen S; Chung-Tiang Liang; Srinivasan Yegnasubramanian; Nelson, William G.; Cory Brayton; Marzo, Angelo M. De

    2013-01-01

    The heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-B]pyridine (PhIP), found in meats cooked at high temperatures, has been implicated in epidemiological and rodent studies for causing breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. A previous animal study using a xenograft model has shown that whole tomato and broccoli, when eaten in combination, exhibit a marked effect on tumor reduction compared to when eaten alone. Our aim was to determine if PhIP-induced carcinogenesis can be prevente...

  16. Does doctors’ workload impact supervision and ward activities of final-year students? A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celebi Nora

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital doctors face constantly increasing workloads. Besides caring for patients, their duties also comprise the education of future colleagues. The aim of this study was to objectively investigate whether the workload arising from increased patient care interferes with student supervision and is associated with more non-medical activities of final-year medical students. Methods A total of 54 final-year students were asked to keep a diary of their daily activities over a three-week period at the beginning of their internship in Internal Medicine. Students categorized their activities – both medical and non-medical - according to whether they had: (1 only watched, (2 assisted the ward resident, (3 performed the activity themselves under supervision of the ward resident, or (4 performed the activity without supervision. The activities reported on a particular day were matched with a ward specific workload-index derived from the hospital information system, including the number of patients treated on the corresponding ward on that day, a correction factor according to the patient comorbidity complexity level (PCCL, and the number of admissions and discharges. Both students and ward residents were blinded to the study question. Results A total of 32 diaries (59 %, 442 recorded working days were handed back. Overall, the students reported 1.2 ± 1.3 supervised, 1.8 ±1.6 medical and 3.6 ± 1.7 non-medical activities per day. The more supervised activities were reported, the more the number of reported medical activities increased (p  Conclusions There was a significant association between ward doctors’ supervision of students and the number of medical activities performed by medical students. The workload had no significant effect on supervision or the number of medical or non-medical activities of final-year students.

  17. The Michigan regulatory incentives study for electric utilities. Phase 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, M.W.; Weaver, E.M. [Barakat and Chamberlin, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

    1991-06-17

    This is the final report of Phase I of the Michigan Regulatory Incentives Study for Electric Utilities, a three-phase review of Michigan`s regulatory system and its effects on resource selection by electric utilities. The goal of Phase I is to identify and analyze financial incentive mechanisms that encourage selection of resources in accord with the principles of integrated resource planning (IRP) or least-cost planning (LCP). Subsequent study phases will involve further analysis of options and possibly a collaborative formal effort to propose regulatory changes. The Phase I analysis proceeded in three steps: (1) identification and review of existing regulatory practices that affect utilities; selection of resources, particularly DSM; (2) preliminary analysis of ten financial mechanisms, and selection of three for further study; (3) detailed analysis of the three mechanisms, including consideration of how they could be implemented in Michigan and financial modeling of their likely impacts on utilities and ratepayers.

  18. Suitability of Haestholmen Loviisa for final disposal of spent fuel. Preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the amendment of the Nuclear Energy Act the spent nuclear fuel of Imatran Voima Oy (IVO) will be disposed of in Finland instead of returning it to Russia. After Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) and IVO had founded a joint company Posiva Oy the work IVO started in 1995 was brought together with the ongoing research programme for final disposal of spent fuel and extended to a feasibility study. The feasibility study was launched in the beginning of 1996. The geological evaluation was mainly based on the previous investigations at the island. For this study the complementary geological mapping has been carried out at the Haestholmen and on the surrounding area with a radius of 20 km. (49 refs.)

  19. Suitability of the Kannonkoski municipality for final disposal of spent fuel. Preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) studies the Finnish bedrock for the final disposal of the spent nuclear fuel from the Olkiluoto NPP. Detailed site investigations have since 1993 been concentrated on three areas, the Olkiluoto area i Eurajoki, Romuvaara in Kuhmo and Kivetty in Aeaenekoski. The Kivetty investigation area is situated on a large bedrock block that extends to the area of Aeaenekoski's western neighbour municipality, Kannonkoski. In 1993 the municipality of Kannonkoski and TVO agreed that TVO also studies the feasibility of siting the repository in Kannonkoski. In this pre-study consideration is given to both geologic and other prerequisite of siting the disposal facility, such as transport arrangements and infrastructure. The report also includes an estimate of the economic impact on Kannonkoski in case its area is chosen for the site of the disposal facility. (34 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.)

  20. Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off

  1. Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off

  2. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of tetrahydrofuran in mice and rats: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Stoney, K.H.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1988-08-01

    Tetrahydrofuran (THF), a four-carbon cyclic ether, is widely used as an industrial solvent. Although it has been used in large quantities for many years, few long-term toxicology studies, and no reproductive or developmental studies, have been conducted on THF. This study addresses the potential for THF to cause developmental toxicity in rodents by exposing Sprague-Dawley rats and Swiss (CD-1) mice to 0, 600, 1800, or 5000 ppm tetrahydrofuran (THF) vapors, 6 h/day, 7 dy/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.33 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6--17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6--19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as O dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded and live fetuses were examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 27 refs., 6 figs., 23 tabs.

  3. A qualitative study of final-year medical students' perspectives of general practitioners' competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Landström

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate final-year medical students' perspectives of general practitioners' competencies. A further aim of the study was to investigate which type of clinical problems is properly managed by GPs according to students. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study of 49 final year medical students from two programmes. Reflective writing statements were used to collect data. Qualitative content analysis was employed to analyse data. Results: Three themes were identified to explain the conditions of a general practitioner (GP. They are: 'prerequisites', 'patients´ problems' and 'competence and clinical judgment' which reflect the specific features of primary care, presentation of symptoms by patient and the way that GPs approach an actual encounter. Conclusions: The students valued the importance of unselected patient problems, straightforwardness in contact and care as the characteristics of a competent GP. They viewed patients with different approaches and related their observations to problems of fragmentation within this large area of medical care. This is a period in the training of students in which students' views of general practice are formed.

  4. Tumor-protective and tumor-promoting actions of dietary whey proteins in an N-methyl-N-nitrosourea model of rat mammary carcinogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Eason, Renea R.; Till, S. Renee; Frank, Julie A.; Badger, Thomas M.; Korourian, Sohelia; Simmen, Frank A.; Simmen, Rosalia C. M.

    2006-01-01

    Dietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers; Dietary modulation of carcinogenesis-related pathways. Dietary item or component studied: whey protein hydrolysate (WPH)Outcome studied: mammary tumor incidence; tumor suppressor BRCA1 gene expression; tumor differentiation marker kappa-casein gene expressionStudy type: female Sprague-Dawley rats Tissue/biological material/sample size: mammary glandsMode of exposure: dietaryImpact on outcome (including dose-response): lifetime exposure to WP...

  5. Fusion reactor physics and technology studies: Final report, December 1, 1985 to June 15, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work performed for ''Fusion Reactor Physics and Technology Studies'' was to participate with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and others in the design of the Minimars Tandem Mirror power reactor. This design activity was a collaborative effort with LLNL being responsible for the physics and program administration. The Fusion Technology Institute (FTI) of the University of Wisconsin was responsible for nuclear technology (central cell blanket/reflector/shield design, neutronics, activation, tritium issues, and end cell shielding), and the design of the central cell magnets. In addition, FTI provided assistance to LLNL on the plasma physics modeling of the plasma halo. An interim report on the Minimars design has been issued, and a final report covering all aspects of Minimars is in press. In addition, various reports and conference papers covering aspects of the design have been issued, and are listed in this report. A summary of the FTI contribution to the Minimars design study is presented

  6. Central magnetic cooling and refrigeration machines (chiller) and their assessment. A feasibility study - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egolf, P. W.; Gonin, C. [University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, HEIG-VD, Yverdon-les Bains (Switzerland); Kitanovski, A. [University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2010-03-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a feasibility study made concerning magnetic cooling and refrigeration machines. This report presents a comprehensive thermodynamic and economic analysis of applications of rotary magnetic chillers. The study deals with magnetic chillers based on permanent magnets and superconducting magnets, respectively. The numerical design of permanent magnet assemblies with different magnetic flux densities is discussed. The authors note that superconducting magnetic chillers are feasible only in large-scale applications with over 1 MW of cooling power. This report describes new ideas for magnetic refrigeration technologies, which go beyond the state of the art. They show potential for a substantial reduction of costs and further improvements in efficiency. Rotary magnetic liquid chillers with 'wavy' structures and using micro tubes are discussed, as are superconducting magnetic chillers and future magneto-caloric technologies.

  7. Modulation of Estrogen Chemical Carcinogenesis by Botanical Supplements used for Postmenopausal Women's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelten, Courtney S; Dietz, Birgit; Bolton, Judy L

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer risk has been associated with long-term estrogen exposure including traditional hormone therapy (HT, formally hormone replacement therapy). To avoid traditional HT and associated risks, women have been turning to botanical supplements such as black cohosh, red clover, licorice, hops, dong gui, and ginger to relieve menopausal symptoms despite a lack of efficacy evidence. The mechanisms of estrogen carcinogenesis involve both hormonal and chemical pathways. Botanical supplements could protect women from estrogen carcinogenesis by modulating key enzymatic steps [aromatase, P4501B1, P4501A1, catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging] in estradiol metabolism leading to estrogen carcinogenesis as outlined in Figure 1. This review summarizes the influence of popular botanical supplements used for women's health on these key steps in the estrogen chemical carcinogenesis pathway, and suggests that botanical supplements may have added chemopreventive benefits by modulating estrogen metabolism. PMID:24223609

  8. The role of B-vitamins - gene interactions in colorectal carcinogenesis: A molecular epidemiological approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donk, van den M.

    2005-01-01

    Folate deficiency can affect DNA methylation and DNA synthesis. Both factors may be operative in colorectal carcinogenesis. Many enzymes, like methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), thymidylate synthase (TS), methionine synthase (MTR), and serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT), are needed for

  9. Relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric carcinogenesis in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文新

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection and gastric carcinogenesis,and to investigate its mechanism.Methods Totally 333elderly patients with different degrees of gastric mucosal lesions in our hospital were selected.Patients were

  10. Effects of environmental stressors on histone modifications and their relevance to carcinogenesis: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dik, S.; Scheepers, P.T.J.; Godderis, L.

    2012-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a complex process involving both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The cellular molecular epigenetic machinery, including histone modifications, is associated with changes in gene expression induced by exposure to environmental agents. In this paper, we systematically reviewed pub

  11. Carcinogenesis and Inflammatory Effects of Plutonium-Nitrate Retention in an Exposed Nuclear Worker and Beagle Dogs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Christopher E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wang, Xihai [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Robinson, Robert J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Brooks, Antone L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lovaglio, Jamie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Patton, Kristin M. [Battelle Toxicology Northwest, Richland, WA (United States); McComish, Stacey [United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries, Washington State University, College of Pharmacy, Richland, WA (United States); Tolmachev, Sergei Y. [United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries, Washington State University, College of Pharmacy, Richland, WA (United States); Morgan, William F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The genetic and inflammatory response pathways elicited following plutonium exposure in archival lung tissue of an occupationally exposed human and experimentally exposed beagle dogs were investigated. These pathways include: tissue injury, apoptosis and gene expression modifications related to carcinogenesis and inflammation. In order to determine which pathways are involved, multiple lung samples from a plutonium exposed worker (Case 0269), a human control (Case 0385), and plutonium exposed beagle dogs were examined using histological staining and immunohistochemistry. Examinations were performed to identify target tissues at risk of radiation-induced fibrosis, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. Case 0269 showed interstitial fibrosis in peripheral and subpleural regions of the lung, but no pulmonary tumors. In contrast, the dogs with similar and higher doses showed pulmonary tumors primarily in brochiolo-alveolar, peripheral and subpleural alveolar regions. The TUNEL assay showed slight elevation of apoptosis in tracheal mucosa, tumor cells, and nuclear debris was present in the inflammatory regions of alveoli and lymph nodes of both the human and the dogs. The expression of apoptosis and a number of chemokine/cytokine genes was slightly but not significantly elevated in protein or gene levels compared to that of the control samples. In the beagles, mucous production was increased in the airway epithelial goblet cells and glands of trachea, and a number of chemokine/cytokine genes showed positive immunoreactivity. This analysis of archival tissue from an accidentally exposed worker and in a large animal model provides valuable information on the effects of long-term retention of plutonium in the respiratory tract and the histological evaluation study may impact mechanistic studies of radiation carcinogenesis.

  12. Carcinogenesis and Inflammatory Effects of Plutonium-Nitrate Retention in an Exposed Nuclear Worker and Beagle Dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genetic and inflammatory response pathways elicited following plutonium exposure in archival lung tissue of an occupationally exposed human and experimentally exposed beagle dogs were investigated. These pathways include: tissue injury, apoptosis and gene expression modifications related to carcinogenesis and inflammation. In order to determine which pathways are involved, multiple lung samples from a plutonium exposed worker (Case 0269), a human control (Case 0385), and plutonium exposed beagle dogs were examined using histological staining and immunohistochemistry. Examinations were performed to identify target tissues at risk of radiation-induced fibrosis, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. Case 0269 showed interstitial fibrosis in peripheral and subpleural regions of the lung, but no pulmonary tumors. In contrast, the dogs with similar and higher doses showed pulmonary tumors primarily in brochiolo-alveolar, peripheral and subpleural alveolar regions. The TUNEL assay showed slight elevation of apoptosis in tracheal mucosa, tumor cells, and nuclear debris was present in the inflammatory regions of alveoli and lymph nodes of both the human and the dogs. The expression of apoptosis and a number of chemokine/cytokine genes was slightly but not significantly elevated in protein or gene levels compared to that of the control samples. In the beagles, mucous production was increased in the airway epithelial goblet cells and glands of trachea, and a number of chemokine/cytokine genes showed positive immunoreactivity. This analysis of archival tissue from an accidentally exposed worker and in a large animal model provides valuable information on the effects of long-term retention of plutonium in the respiratory tract and the histological evaluation study may impact mechanistic studies of radiation carcinogenesis

  13. Copper and resveratrol attenuates serum catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and element values in rats with DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrajnowska, Dorota; Bobrowska-Korczak, Barbara; Tokarz, Andrzej; Bialek, Slawomir; Jezierska, Ewelina; Makowska, Justyna

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a hypothesis was assessed whether or not the intoxication with copper and supplementation with copper plus resveratrol would result in changes in the activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase and moreover if the characteristic changes would appear in concentrations of copper, iron, calcium, magnesium, and zinc in the serum of rats with chemically induced carcinogenesis. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into study groups which, apart from the standard diet, were treated with copper (42.6 mg Cu/kg food as CuSO4·5H2O) or copper plus resveratrol (0.2 mg/kg body) via gavage for a period from 40 days until 20 weeks of age. In cancer groups, the rats were treated with a dose of 80 mg/body weight of 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA) given in rapeseed oil at 50 and 80 days of age to induce mammary carcinogenesis. The control groups included the rats kept in the same conditions and fed with the same diet as the animals from the study groups, but not DMBA-treated. The activity of catalase significantly decreased in groups of rats with mammary carcinogenesis that were supplemented with copper (p iron and copper. The mean serum iron levels in rats with breast cancer were significantly lower than those in the control groups (p iron content and the zinc/copper and zinc/iron ratios in blood may be used as one of the prognostic factors in breast cancer research. PMID:24213724

  14. WMU Power Generation Study Task 2.0 Corn Cob Co-Combustion Study: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folkedahl, Bruce [Folkedahl Consulting, Inc., Willmar, MN (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Much attention has been focused on renewable energy use in large-scale utilities and very small scale distributed energy systems. However, there is little information available regarding renewable energy options for midscale municipal utilities. The Willmar Municipal Utilities Corn Cob-Coal Co-Combustion Project was initiated to investigate opportunities available for small to midscale municipal utilities to "go green". The overall goal of the Project was to understand the current t'enewable energy research and energy efficiency projects that are or have been implemented at both larger and smaller scale and determine the applicability to midscale municipal utilities. More specific objectives for Task 2.0 of this project were to determine the technical feasibility of co-combusting com cobs with coal in the existing WMU boiler, and to identify any regulatory issues that might need to be addressed if WMU were to obtain a significant portion of its heat from such co-combustion. This report addresses the issues as laid out in the study proposal. The study investigated the feasibility of and demonstrated the technical effectiveness of co-combusting corn cobs with coal in the Willmar Municipal Utilities stoker boiler steam generation power plant. The results of the WMU Co-Combustion Project will serve as a model for other midscale utilities who wish to use corn cobs to generate renewable electrical energy. As a result of the Co-Combustion Project, the WMU plans to upgrade their stoker boiler to accept whole corn cobs as well as other types of biomass, while still allowing the fuel delivery system to use 100% coal as needed. Benefits of co-combustion will include: energy security, reduced Hg and CO2 air emissions, improved ash chemistry, potential future carbon credit sales, an immediate positive effect on the local economy, and positive attention focused on the WMU and the City of Willmar. The first step in the study was to complete a feasibility analysis

  15. Studies of beauty baryon decays to D0ph- and Λc+h- final states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dogaru, M.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorosz, P.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garosi, P.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Hafkenscheid, T. W.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hicks, E.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Klaver, S.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marconi, U.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martins Tostes, D.; Martynov, A.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Maurice, E.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D. A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szilard, D.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.; LHCb Collaboration

    2014-02-01

    Decays of beauty baryons to the D0ph- and Λc+h- final states (where h indicates a pion or a kaon) are studied using a data sample of pp collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb-1, collected by the LHCb detector. The Cabibbo-suppressed decays Λb0→D0pK- and Λb0→Λc+K- are observed, and their branching fractions are measured with respect to the decays Λb0→D0pπ- and Λb0→Λc+π-. In addition, the first observation is reported of the decay of the neutral beauty-strange baryon Ξb0 to the D0pK- final state, and a measurement of the Ξb0 mass is performed. Evidence of the Ξb0→Λc+K- decay is also reported.

  16. Modifier-concept of colorectal carcinogenesis: Lipidomics as a technical tool in pathway analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nikolaus; Gassler; Christina; Klaus; Elke; Kaemmerer; Andrea; Reinartz

    2010-01-01

    In the modifier concept of intestinal carcinogenesis, lipids have been established as important variables and one focus is given to long-chain fatty acids. Increased consumption of long-chain fatty acids is in discussion to modify the development of colorectal carcinoma in humans. Saturated long-chain fatty acids, in particular, are assumed to promote carcinogenesis, whereas poly-unsaturated forms are likely to act in the opposite way. At present, the molecular mechanisms behind these effects are not well u...

  17. Lower Flathead System Fisheries Study, Executive Summary, Volume I, 1983-1987 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, David; DosSantos, Joseph M.

    1988-06-01

    This Executive Summary, Volume I, of the lower Flathead System Fisheries Study Final Report, was prepared to provide a study overview for persons who are not fisheries scientists. The contents provide an introduction to the study and its objectives, a short description of the study area, a discussion of the major findings and conclusions of the study, and the description of fisheries management alternatives available to managers of the lower Flathead system. Technical reports were prepared for those portions of the study dealing with the lower Flathead River and its tributaries, Volume II, and the South Bay of Flathead Lake, Volume III. The annual hydrographic regime of the Flathead system, consisting of upper rivers, lake and lower river, has been modified by the construction and operation of two major hydroelectric facilities, Hungry Horse Dam on the south fork Flathead River and Kerr Dam at the outlet of Flathead Lake. The modified hydrographic regime has resulted in significant impacts to kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) and several species of trout. Kerr Dam, closed in 1938, controls Flathead Lake levels between 878.7 m (2883 ft) and 881.8 m (2893 ft) and discharges into the lower Flathead River. Kerr Dam is a 63.4 m (208 ft) high concrete arch structure located 7.2 km (4.5 miles) downstream from the outlet of Flathead Lake. The facility is used by Montana Power Company primarily for system frequency load control with some use for low level base load. 77 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of n-hexane in rats: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.

    1987-12-01

    The straight chain hydrocarbon, n-hexane, is a volatile, ubiquitous solvent used in industrial, academic, and smaller commercial environments. The significant opportunity for women of child-bearing age to be exposed to this chemical prompted the undertaking of a study to assess the developmental toxicity of n-hexane in an animal model. Timed-pregnant (30 animals per group) and virgin (10 animals per group) Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 0 (filtered air), 200, 1000, and 5000 ppM n-hexane (99.9% purity) vapor in inhalation chambers for 20 h/day for a period of 14 consecutive days. Sperm-positive females were exposed for 6 to 19 days of gestation (dg) and virgins were exposed concurrently for 14 consecutive days. The day of sperm detection was designated as 0 dg for mated females. Adult female body weights were monitored prior to, throughout the exposure period, and at sacrifice. Uterine, placental, and fetal body weights were obtained for gravid females at sacrifice. Implants were enumerated and their status recorded as live fetus, early or late resorption, or dead. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 16 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of isoprene in mice and rats: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Stoney, K.H.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Isoprene, a reactive, branched diene, is used in large quantities in the manufacture of polyisoprene and as a copolymer in the synthesis of butyl rubber. The potential for isoprene to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in rodents, by exposing four groups each of Sprague-Dawley rats and Swiss (CD-1) mice to 0, 280, 1400, or 7000 ppM isoprene vapors, 6 h/day, 7 day/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.30 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 31 refs., 6 figs., 19 tabs.

  20. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of methyl ethyl ketone in mice: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Dill, J.A.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1989-02-01

    Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) is a widely used industrial solvent which results in considerable human exposure. In order to assess the potential for MEK to cause developmental toxicity in rodents, four groups of Swiss (CD-1) mice were exposed to 0, 400, 1000 or 3000 ppM MEK vapors, 7 h/day, 7 dy/wk. Ten virgin females and approx.30 plug-positive females per group were exposed concurrently for 10 consecutive days (6--15 dg for mated mice). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 18 dg. Uterine implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Exposure of pregnant mice to these concentrations of MEK did not result in apparent maternal toxicity, although there was a slight, treatment-correlated increase in liver to body weight ratios which was significant for the 3000-ppM group. Mild developmental toxicity was evident at 3000-ppM as a reduction in mean fetal body weight. This reduction was statistically significant for the males only, although the relative decrease in mean fetal body weight was the same for both sexes. 17 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of methyl ethyl ketone in mice: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) is a widely used industrial solvent which results in considerable human exposure. In order to assess the potential for MEK to cause developmental toxicity in rodents, four groups of Swiss (CD-1) mice were exposed to 0, 400, 1000 or 3000 ppM MEK vapors, 7 h/day, 7 dy/wk. Ten virgin females and ∼30 plug-positive females per group were exposed concurrently for 10 consecutive days (6--15 dg for mated mice). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 18 dg. Uterine implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Exposure of pregnant mice to these concentrations of MEK did not result in apparent maternal toxicity, although there was a slight, treatment-correlated increase in liver to body weight ratios which was significant for the 3000-ppM group. Mild developmental toxicity was evident at 3000-ppM as a reduction in mean fetal body weight. This reduction was statistically significant for the males only, although the relative decrease in mean fetal body weight was the same for both sexes. 17 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs

  2. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of acetone in mice and rats: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Stoney, K.H.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1988-11-01

    Acetone, an aliphatic ketone, is a ubiquitous industrial solvent and chemical intermediate; consequently, the opportunity for human exposure is high. The potential for acetone to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 440, 2200, or 11000 ppm, and in Swiss (CD-1) mice exposed to 0, 440, 2200, and 6600 ppm acetone vapors, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.32 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 46 refs., 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  3. Role of S100 Proteins in Colorectal Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Moravkova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The family of S100 proteins represents 25 relatively small (9–13 kD calcium binding proteins. These proteins possess a broad spectrum of important intracellular and extracellular functions. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men (after lung and prostate cancer and the second most frequent cancer in women (after breast cancer worldwide. S100 proteins are involved in the colorectal carcinogenesis through different mechanisms: they enable proliferation, invasion, and migration of the tumour cells; furthermore, S100 proteins increase angiogenesis and activate NF-κβ signaling pathway, which plays a key role in the molecular pathogenesis especially of colitis-associated carcinoma. The expression of S100 proteins in the cancerous tissue and serum levels of S100 proteins might be used as a precise diagnostic and prognostic marker in patients with suspected or already diagnosed colorectal neoplasia. Possibly, in the future, S100 proteins will be a therapeutic target for tailored anticancer therapy.

  4. Skin carcinogenesis in man and in experimental models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents an updated overview of the current state of the art in scientific, experimental and clinical investigations on the generation and the prevention of cancer of the skin. From the achievements presented, marked refinements in the assessment of the risk of cancer, by environmental and endogenous factors, including tumor virus, will be stimulated. They include the problem of the stratospheric 'ozone holes' above both poles of the earth causing much public concern as expressed by current headlines in the media and by the United Nations Environmental Program. Moreover, new ideas will merge for developing specific approaches to explore the mechanistic, i.e. ultimately the molecular-biological, causes of skin cancer and others. In addition, the experimental utilization of oncogens and of other techniques of molecular biology at all levels of the biology of tissues and cells, may open up entirely new facets in the research on skin cancer. Detailed knowledge of the mechanistic aspects of skin carcinogenesis may give important hints with respect to 'tailor-make' and utilize new anti-tumor agents in the therapy of skin cancer for the benefit of the cancer patient. (orig.). 67 figs., 44 tabs

  5. An UVB-carcinogenesis model with KSN nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Nikaido, Osamu [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Suzuki, Fumio; Hayakawa, Jun-ichiro; Hiai, Hiroshi

    1998-03-01

    We established and characterized a systematic ultraviolet light-induced carcinogenesis model using KSN nude mice. We prepared five groups of KSN mice and exposed them six times a week to five levels of daily ultraviolet B (UVB) doses; 1340, 670, 320, 160 and 0 J/m{sup 2}/day. In 670, 320 and 160 J/m{sup 2}/day, the latency period tended to become shorter in proportion to the daily doses and prevalence data fitted well to log-normal distribution. In the log-log plot of days till 50% prevalence versus daily dose, we saw a linear relationship for 1 mm tumor diameter. From this analysis, we determined that days necessary to reach 50% prevalence is in proportion to the -0.49 power of daily dose. The average number of tumors per survivor correlated with prevalence data. Direct measured rates of tumor growth were independent of daily UVB-dose. Therefore we speculated that UV-irradiation did not affect tumor growth after its appearance. Most UVB-induced tumors were squamous cell carcinoma, the rest were spindle cell carcinoma, papilloma and mixed type. We concluded that our experimental data with nude mice was in accordance with data with hairless mice in nature. (author)

  6. Cell cycle deregulation by methyl isocyanate: Implications in liver carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Hariom; Raghuram, Gorantla V; Jain, Deepika; Ahirwar, Alok K; Khan, Saba; Jain, Subodh K; Pathak, Neelam; Banerjee, Smita; Maudar, Kewal K; Mishra, Pradyumna K

    2014-03-01

    Liver is often exposed to plethora of chemical toxins. Owing to its profound physiological role and central function in metabolism and homeostasis, pertinent succession of cell cycle in liver epithelial cells is of prime importance to maintain cellular proliferation. Although recent evidence has displayed a strong association between exposures to methyl isocyanate (MIC), one of the most toxic isocyanates, and neoplastic transformation, molecular characterization of the longitudinal effects of MIC on cell cycle regulation has never been performed. Here, we sequentially delineated the status of different proteins arbitrating the deregulation of cell cycle in liver epithelial cells treated with MIC. Our data reaffirms the oncogenic capability of MIC with elevated DNA damage response proteins pATM and γ-H2AX, deregulation of DNA damage check point genes CHK1 and CHK2, altered expression of p53 and p21 proteins involved in cell cycle arrest with perturbation in GADD-45 expression in the treated cells. Further, alterations in cyclin A, cyclin E, CDK2 levels along with overexpression of mitotic spindle checkpoints proteins Aurora A/B, centrosomal pericentrin protein, chromosomal aberrations, and loss of Pot1a was observed. Thus, MIC impacts key proteins involved in cell cycle regulation to trigger genomic instability as a possible mechanism of developmental basis of liver carcinogenesis. PMID:22223508

  7. BRAFV600E: implications for carcinogenesis and molecular therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cantwell-Dorris, Emma R

    2012-02-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)\\/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is frequently mutated in human cancer. This pathway consists of a small GTP protein of the RAS family that is activated in response to extracellular signaling to recruit a member of the RAF kinase family to the cell membrane. Active RAF signals through MAP\\/ERK kinase to activate ERK and its downstream effectors to regulate a wide range of biological activities including cell differentiation, proliferation, senescence, and survival. Mutations in the v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogenes homolog B1 (BRAF) isoform of the RAF kinase or KRAS isoform of the RAS protein are found as activating mutations in approximately 30% of all human cancers. The BRAF pathway has become a target of interest for molecular therapy, with promising results emerging from clinical trials. Here, the role of the most common BRAF mutation BRAF(V600E) in human carcinogenesis is investigated through a review of the literature, with specific focus on its role in melanoma, colorectal, and thyroid cancers and its potential as a therapeutic target.

  8. Recent Concepts of Ovarian Carcinogenesis: Type I and Type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Koshiyama

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type I ovarian tumors, where precursor lesions in the ovary have clearly been described, include endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous, low grade serous, and transitional cell carcinomas, while type II tumors, where such lesions have not been described clearly and tumors may develop de novo from the tubal and/or ovarian surface epithelium, comprise high grade serous carcinomas, undifferentiated carcinomas, and carcinosarcomas. The carcinogenesis of endometrioid and clear cell carcinoma (CCC arising from endometriotic cysts is significantly influenced by the free iron concentration, which is associated with cancer development through the induction of persistent oxidative stress. A subset of mucinous carcinomas develop in association with ovarian teratomas; however, the majority of these tumors do not harbor any teratomatous component. Other theories of their origin include mucinous metaplasia of surface epithelial inclusions, endometriosis, and Brenner tumors. Low grade serous carcinomas are thought to evolve in a stepwise fashion from benign serous cystadenoma to a serous borderline tumor (SBT. With regard to high grade serous carcinoma, the serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs of the junction of the fallopian tube epithelium with the mesothelium of the tubal serosa, termed the “tubal peritoneal junction” (TPJ, undergo malignant transformation due to their location, and metastasize to the nearby ovary and surrounding pelvic peritoneum. Other theories of their origin include the ovarian hilum cells.

  9. A novel mouse model for colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine and dextran sulfate sodium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Guo Wang; Dong-Fei Wang; Bing-Jian Lv; Jian-Min Si

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To develop an efficient animal colitis-associated carcinogenesis model and to detect the expression of β-catenin and p53 in this new model.METHODS: Dysplasia and cancer were investigated in mice pretreated with a single intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/kg body mass of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine prior to three repetitive oral administrations of 30 g/L dextran sulfate sodium to give conditions similar to the clinically observed active and remission phases. Immunohistochemical staining of β-catenin and p53 was performed on paraffin-imbedded specimens of animals with cancer and/or dysplasia, those without dysplasia and the normal control animals.RESULTS: At wk 11, four early-invasive adenocarcinomas and 36 dysplasia were found in 10 (90.9%) of the 11 mice that underwent 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-pretreatment with 3 cycles of 30 g/L dextran sulfate sodium-exposure. Dysplasia and/or cancer occurred as flat lesions or as dysplasia-associated lesion or mass (DALM) as observed in humans. Colorectal carcinogenesis occurred primarily on the distal portion of the large intestine. No dysplasia and/or cancer lesion was observed in the control groups with 1,2-dimethylhydrazine pretreatment or 3 cycles of 30 g/L dextran sulfate sodium exposure alone. Immunohistochemical investigation revealed that β-catenin was translocated from cell membrane to cytoplasm and/or nucleus in 100% of cases with dysplasia and neoplasm, while normal membrane staining was observed in cases without dysplasia and the normal control animals. Nuclear expression of p53 was not detected in specimens.CONCLUSION: A single dose of procarcinogen followed by induction of chronic ulcerative colitis results in a high incidence of colorectal dysplasia and cancer. Abnormal expression of β-catenin occurs frequently in dysplasia and cancer. This novel mouse model may provide an excellent vehicle for studying colitis-related colon carcinogenesis.

  10. Interdisciplinary study of reservoir compartments and heterogeneity. Final report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kirk, C.

    1998-01-01

    A case study approach using Terry Sandstone production from the Hambert-Aristocrat Field, Weld County, Colorado was used to document the process of integration. One specific project goal is to demonstrate how a multidisciplinary approach can be used to detect reservoir compartmentalization and improve reserve estimates. The final project goal is to derive a general strategy for integration for independent operators. Teamwork is the norm for the petroleum industry where teams of geologists, geophysicists, and petroleum engineers work together to improve profits through a better understanding of reservoir size, compartmentalization, and orientation as well as reservoir flow characteristics. In this manner, integration of data narrows the uncertainty in reserve estimates and enhances reservoir management decisions. The process of integration has proven to be iterative. Integration has helped identify reservoir compartmentalization and reduce the uncertainty in the reserve estimates. This research report documents specific examples of integration and the economic benefits of integration.

  11. Alteration of gene expression during nasopharyngeal carcinogenesis revealed by oligonucleotide microarray after microdissection of tumor tissue and normal epithelia from nasopharynx

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhong-qi; TIAN Yong-quan; HU Yong-fang; LI Xiao-ling; MA Fu-rong; LI Gui-yuan

    2009-01-01

    Background Microarray and microdissection techniques were being used for many applications to study the carcinogenesis of some human tumors. But seldom studies had hitherto combined these two techniques to study carcinogenesis mechanism of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). To identify a set of genes involved in the carcinogenesis and development of NPC, we used the microdissected homogeneous NPC tissue cells and the pure normal epithelium pillar cells to construct the whole human genome expression profiles.Methods We preserved the tissue samples from nasopharynx of 18 patients (including 13 samples of NPC and 5 samples of normal or inflammatory mucous tissue samples from nasopharynx) in RNAlater Stabilization Reagent. The tissue samples were microdissected to harvest the homogeneous tissue cells, then total RNA was isolated from them. The sufficient antisense RNA (aRNA) was amplified from these total RNA. HG-U133.Plus.2.0 GeneChip was used to construct the human whole genome expression profiling of each sample. Differential patterns of expression of genes correlated with the carcinogenesis, classification and progression of NPC were identified with comparing the expression profiling data respectively in leave one out cross-validation analysis. Correlation between aRNA expression measured by the microarrays and semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (sqRT-PCR) were also ascertained, and found that hybridization results were validated in all of the 18 patients.Results Differential patterns of expression of 127 genes correlated with the carcinogenesis (A P value less than 0.001 with the 2-fold differentiated expression between case group and control group) of the NPG were filtered. The top most up-regulated and down-regulated 8 genes by the way of permutation test were also selected and listed in the paper. Expression of genes E2F6 and TSPAN-1 was identified using aRNA by sqRT-PCR and showed that there was significant difference between the

  12. Evaluation of techniques used to study vegetation and avifauna in National Petroleum Reserve of Alaska: 1976 NPRA final report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The report covers the evaluation of techniques used to study vegetation and avifauna in National Petroleum Reserve of Alaska. This is the 1976 NPRA final report....

  13. Study supporting the phasing out of environmentally harmful subsidies. Annexes to Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Withana, S.; Ten Brink, P.; Franckx, L.; Hirschnitz-Garbers, M.; Mayeres, I.; Oosterhuis, F.; Porsch, L.

    2012-10-15

    The need to reform ineffective or harmful public subsidies has long been recognised and has been a contentious point of discussion for several years. The EU has a long-standing commitment to removing or phasing out environmentally harmful subsidies (EHS). Most recently, the need to phase out EHS is reiterated in the 'Roadmap for a resource efficient Europe' which includes a milestone that 'by 2020 EHS will be phased out, with due regard to the impact on people in need'. Despite several commitments, progress has been slow and subsidies remain an issue in most EU countries. This study focuses specifically on EHS at the level of EU Member States; it identifies key types of EHS and examines cases of existing EHS across a range of environmental sectors and issues, including subsidies from non-action. The study also analyses examples of good practices in the reform of EHS in EU Member States and the lessons that can be learnt from these cases. Finally, based on this analysis, it develops practical recommendations on phasing out and reforming EHS to support the objectives of the Europe 2020 Strategy and the resource efficiency agenda. The study was carried out between January and October 2012 and is based on an analysis of literature and consultation with experts and policy makers. The sectoral cases studied are listed and discussed in this annex report: agriculture, climate and energy, fisheries, food, forestry, materials, transport, waste, and water.

  14. Systems study of fuels from grains and grasses. Phase I. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, W.; Allen, A.; Athey, R.; McElroy, A.; Davis, M.; Bennett, M.

    1978-02-24

    The program reported on herein consists of a first phase analysis of the potential for significant and economically viable contributions to U.S. energy needs from grasses and grains by the photosynthetic production of biomass. The study does not include other cultivated crops such as sugar cane, sugar beets, cotton, tobacco, vegetables, fruits, etc. The scope of the study encompasses grain crop residues, whole plant biomass from grain crops and nongrain crops on cropland, and whole plant biomass from grasses on pasture, rangeland, and federal range. The basic approach to the study involves first an assessment of current total biomass generation from the various grasses and grains on cropland, pasture, range, and federal range, and aggregating the production by combinations of crop residues and whole plant biomass; second, evaluation of possibilities for introduction of new crops and expanding production to marginal or presently idle land; third, development of proposed reasonable scenarios for actually harvesting biomass from selected combinations of crop residues, forages and hays, and new crops from land now in production, plus additional marginal or underutilized land brought into production; and finally, assessment on national and regional or local scales of the production that might be affected by reasonable scenarios. This latter effort includes analysis of tentative possibilities for reallocating priorities and needs with regard to production of grain for export or for livestock production. The overall program includes a case study analysis of production economics for a representative farm of about 1,000 acres (405 ha) located in Iowa.

  15. 核苷酸切除修复基因 XPF 无义突变与胃癌发生的相关性研究%Correlation Study of Nonsense Mutation of Xeroderma Pigmentosum Complementation Group F (XPF) Gene and Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏中华; 黄琴; 高军; 金艳凤; 刘敏

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨胃癌组织及胃癌细胞系中XPF C2169A无义突变与其发生的关系。方法对488例肿瘤患者外周血及64例胃癌组织进行基因组DNA的提取,应用Taqman MGB探针进行基因分型;应用免疫组化法检测XPF蛋白的情况。结果488例肿瘤患者外周血中C2169A无一发生突变,然而64例胃癌组织中发现32例(50%)发生突变,并导致XPF蛋白表达水平降低,羧基端失去194个氨基酸;XPF C2169A突变仅出现在癌组织中,而癌旁正常组织中没有突变;突变后表达的截断蛋白tXPF不能与ERCC1相互作用,迅速通过泛素化降解。结论胃癌中XPF C2169A主要是单等位基因突变,表明XPF是一个单倍型剂量不足修复基因,XPF C2169A突变可以作为胃癌早期诊断和治疗的靶点。%Objective To study the relation between C2169A nonsense mutation in XPF and Carcinogenesis in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines.Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples of 488 cancer patients and 64 gastric tumors.The genotype was mapped using a Taqman MGB probe.Expression of XPF was examined by immunohistochemistry.Re-sults The C2169A mutation was not detected in 488 samples of blood genomic DNA,yet was found in 32 of 64 gastric cancer tis-sue samples (50.0%) ,resulted in a 194 C-terminal amino acid loss in XPF protein and lower expression.The XPF C2169A was found in cancer tissues,but not in surrounding normal tissues.The truncated form of XPF ( tXPF) impaired interaction with ER-CC1,was rapidly degraded via ubiquitination.Conclusion In gastric cancer,the C2169A mutation is monoallelic,indicating that XPF is a haplo-insufficient DNA repair gene.The C2169A mutation might be regarded as a therapeutic target for early diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer.

  16. Chemo-preventive effect of Star anise in N-nitrosodiethylamine initiated and phenobarbital promoted hepato-carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Amit Singh; Bhatnagar, D

    2007-09-20

    The generation of free radicals is a cause of many pathological conditions like diabetes mellitus, cancer, stroke, etc. Free radicals cause damage to cellular DNA and initiate carcinogenesis. Free radicals also bring about proliferation of cells via cell signaling. An inverse relationship between the consumption of vegetable diets and the risk of cancer has been established. In the present study, Star anise (Illicium verum), which is a commonly used condiment in Indian cuisine, was assessed for its anti-carcinogenic potential in N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) initiated and phenobarbital (PB) promoted hepato-carcinogenesis. Rats were randomly selected for eight experimental groups. The carcinogenesis was induced by injecting the rats, with a single dose of NDEA (200mg/kg body weight) intraperitoneally as initiator, followed by promotion with PB (0.05%) in drinking water for 14 consecutive weeks. The treatment with NDEA increased liver weight, while Star anise (Star) treatment reduced the liver weight of rats. The treatment with Star throughout for 20 weeks or during the promotion stage (6-20 weeks) significantly reduced the nodule incidence and nodule multiplicity in the rats, while the treatment with Star at the initiation phase (first 4 weeks) only could not reduce these parameters. The treatment with Star for 20 consecutive weeks significantly reduced the nodule size and nodule volume. The treatment with Star throughout as well as at the promotion stage lowered the lipid peroxidation (LPO) in liver and erythrocytes, while the LPO was not lowered, when Star was administered during initiation stage only. The treatment with Star restored the liver and erythrocyte super-oxide dismutase (SOD) activities to normal in the carcinogenesis-induced rats. The liver catalase (CAT) activity increased in all the treated groups. The erythrocyte CAT activity increased in the rats treated with Star during initiation and promotion stage only. The liver glutathione (GSH) level

  17. Study for a simplified LCA methodology adapted to bio-products. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agricultural resources form a renewable stock of raw materials that can be used for various purposes: food supply, production of energy (including biofuels), bio-products and bio-based construction materials. The use of agricultural resources to produce bio-products is expanding in France and throughout the world, partly due to the presumed advantages of these products towards the environment. In this context, ADEME (the French Environment and Energy Management Agency) commissioned a study for the development of a methodological framework to evaluate the environmental impacts of bio-products. This study was also in charge of the identification of areas of improvement for the 'Bilan Produit', an environmental assessment tool developed by ADEME, in order to allow a future integration of bio-products. The first step of this study consisted of a comparative review of the existing bio-products' LCA (Life Cycle Assessment). This review underlined a deep heterogeneity among the methodologies used, as well as a lack of transparency in the results displayed. In a second step of the project, all the methodological issues in the evaluation of bio-products were studied, and recommendations for the resolution of each one of them have been proposed. These critical analyses are presented in individual fact-sheets, which detail the specific issues of each question, facts from the bibliographic review, the results of the tests conducted on three bio-products, and finally the methodological recommendations to answer the question. This project showed that some methodological recommendations had to be specified depending on the objective of the LCA: eco-design, environmental labeling or comparative LCA. The work conducted also identified some necessary improvements to the Bilan Produit tool, which come under four categories: addition of the missing inventories, integration of metadata regarding the inventories, consideration for the specific end-of-life scenarios of bio-products, and

  18. Emerging role of bacteria in oral carcinogenesis: a review with special reference to perio-pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Manosha; Al-Hebshi, Nezar Noor; Speicher, David J; Perera, Irosha; Johnson, Newell W

    2016-01-01

    Oral cancer, primarily oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), continues to be a major global health problem with high incidence and low survival rates. While the major risk factors for this malignancy, mostly lifestyle related, have been identified, around 15% of oral cancer cases remain unexplained. In light of evidence implicating bacteria in the aetiology of some cancer types, several epidemiological studies have been conducted in the last decade, employing methodologies ranging from traditional culture techniques to 16S rRNA metagenomics, to assess the possible role of bacteria in OSCC. While these studies have demonstrated differences in microbial composition between cancerous and healthy tissues, they have failed to agree on specific bacteria or patterns of oral microbial dysbiosis to implicate in OSCC. On the contrary, some oral taxa, particularly Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum, show strong oral carcinogenic potential in vitro and in animal studies. Bacteria are thought to contribute to oral carcinogenesis via inhibition of apoptosis, activation of cell proliferation, promotion of cellular invasion, induction of chronic inflammation, and production of carcinogens. This narrative review provides a critical analysis of and an update on the association between bacteria and oral carcinogenesis and the possible mechanisms underlying it. PMID:27677454

  19. Studies of elasticity, sound propagation and attenuation of acoustic modes in granular media: final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makse, Hernan A. [City College of New York, NY (United States). Levich Inst., Dept. of Physcis; Johnson, David L. [Schlumberger-Doll Research, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-09-03

    This is the final report describing the results of DOE Grant # DE-FG02-03ER15458 with original termination date of April 31, 2013, which has been extended to April 31, 2014. The goal of this project is to develop a theoretical and experimental understanding of sound propagation, elasticity and dissipation in granular materials. The topic is relevant for the efficient production of hydrocarbon and for identifying and characterizing the underground formation for storage of either CO2 or nuclear waste material. Furthermore, understanding the basic properties of acoustic propagation in granular media is of importance not only to the energy industry, but also to the pharmaceutical, chemical and agricultural industries. We employ a set of experimental, theoretical and computational tools to develop a study of acoustics and dissipation in granular media. These include the concept effective mass of granular media, normal modes analysis, statistical mechanics frameworks and numerical simulations based on Discrete Element Methods. Effective mass measurements allow us to study the mechanisms of the elastic response and attenuation of acoustic modes in granular media. We perform experiments and simulations under varying conditions, including humidity and vacuum, and different interparticle force-laws to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of damping and acoustic propagation in granular media. A theoretical statistical approach studies the necessary phase space of configurations in pressure, volume fraction to classify granular materials.

  20. Level of stress in final year MBBS students at Rural Medical College: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelke Umesh S, Kunkulol Rahul R, Narwane Sandeep P

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stress, defined as an imbalance between environmental conditions necessary for survival and the ability of individuals to adapt to those conditions, have a high prevalence in MBBS students. A variety of stressors play a significant role in developing stress. Objective:To study the level of stress and stressors responsible in Final MBBS students of Rural Medical College, Loni. Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study was carried out in 100 students (50 of either sex willing to participate in the study. They were subjected to fill the Medical Student Stressor Questionnaire, which consists of 40 questions for evaluating the stressors and severity of stress perceived by the subjects. Results: 71% subjects’ perceived moderate stress, while 13% and 16% perceived high and mild stress respectively. Academic stressor counted for moderate stress in 63% and high stress in 24 % of subjects, which was higher than other stressors. Conclusion: Academic stressors being the major stressor perceived, Strategies are required to decrease the burden of academic stress in the students.

  1. Final Report for the Arroyo Las Positas Maintenance Impact Study, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Hattem, M; Paterson, L

    2006-01-12

    In 2000, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Environmental Protection Department, in coordination with Plant Engineering (PE), began dredging sections of the Arroyo Las Positas (ALP) to alleviate concerns about flooding of sensitive facilities within the mainsite of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In order to reduce potential impacts on the federally threatened California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii), LLNL proposed to dredge sections of the ALP in a ''checkerboard pattern'', resulting in a mosaic of open water habitat and vegetated sections (Figure 1). The Arroyo Las Positas Management Plan (Plan) was coordinated with both state and federal agencies including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), California Department of Fish and Game (CDF&G), San Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Board (SFRWQCB), and the Army Corp of Engineers (ACOE). Water Discharge Requirements (WDRs) were issued for this project on December 30, 1999 (Order No. 99-086) by the SFRWQCB. Provision 19 of the WDRs outlined a five-year (2000 through 2004) Maintenance Impact Study (MIS) that LLNL began in coordination with dredging work that was conducted as part of the Arroyo Las Positas Management Plan. Provision 20 of these WDRs requires LLNL to submit a final report of the results of the Maintenance Impact Study for this project to the SFRWQCB. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the Maintenance Impact Study for Arroyo Las Positas and meet the requirements of Provision 20. A description of the annual monitoring included in this Maintenance Impact Study is included in the methods section of this report. Initially the Plan called for dredging the entire length of the Arroyo Las Positas (approximately 6,981 linear feet) over a 5-year period to minimize temporal impacts on the California red-legged frog. Dredging occurred in 2000 ({approx}1,300 ft.), 2001 ({approx}800 ft.), and 2002 ({approx}1,200 ft.), which

  2. Do Alterations in Mitochondrial DNA Play a Role in Breast Carcinogenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E. Rohan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A considerable body of evidence supports a role for oxidative stress in breast carcinogenesis. Due to their role in producing energy via oxidative phosphorylation, the mitochondria are a major source of production of reactive oxygen species, which may damage DNA. The mitochondrial genome may be particularly susceptible to oxidative damage leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. Genetic variants in mtDNA and nuclear DNA may also contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction. In this review, we address the role of alterations in mtDNA in the etiology of breast cancer. Several studies have shown a relatively high frequency of mtDNA mutations in breast tumor tissue in comparison with mutations in normal breast tissue. To date, several studies have examined the association of genetic variants in mtDNA and breast cancer risk. The G10398A mtDNA polymorphism has received the most attention and has been shown to be associated with increased risk in some studies. Other variants have generally been examined in only one or two studies. Genome-wide association studies may help identify new mtDNA variants which modify breast cancer risk. In addition to assessing the main effects of specific variants, gene-gene and gene-environment interactions are likely to explain a greater proportion of the variability in breast cancer risk.

  3. Final definition and preliminary design study for the initial atmospheric cloud physics laboratory, a Spacelab mission payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The following areas related to the final definition and preliminary design study of the initial atmospheric cloud physics laboratory (ACPL) were covered: (1) proposal organization, personnel, schedule, and project management, (2) proposed configurations, (3) study objectives, (4) ACPL experiment program listing and description, (5) mission/flight flexibility and modularity/commonality, (6) study plan, and (7) description of following tasks: requirement analysis and definition task flow, systems analysis and trade studies, subsystem analysis and trade studies, specifications and interface control documents, preliminary design task flow, work breakdown structure, programmatic analysis and planning, and project costs. Finally, an overview of the scientific requirements was presented.

  4. Perceived stress at transition to workplace: a qualitative interview study exploring final-year medical students’ needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moczko TR

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tobias R Moczko,1,2,* Till J Bugaj,1,* Wolfgang Herzog,1 Christoph Nikendei1 1Department for General Internal and Psychosomatic Medicine, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 2School of Medicine, Faculty of Health, Witten/Herdecke University, Witten, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Objectives: This study was designed to explore final-year medical students’ stressors and coping strategies at the transition to the clinical workplace. Methods: In this qualitative study, semi-standardized interviews with eight final-year medical students (five male, three female; aged 25.9±1.4 years were conducted during their internal medicine rotation. After verbatim transcription, a qualitative content analysis of students’ impressions of stress provoking and easing factors during final-year education was performed. Results: Students’ statements regarding burdens and dealing with stress were classified into four main categories: A perceived stressors and provoking factors, B stress-induced consequences, C personal and external resources for preventing and dealing with stress, and D final-year students’ suggestions for workplace improvement. Conclusion: Final-year medical students perceived different types of stress during their transition to medical wards, and reported both negative consequences and coping resources concerning perceived stress. As supervision, feedback, and coping strategies played an important role in the students’ perception of stress, final-year medical education curricula development should focus on these specifically. Keywords: undergraduate medical education, stress prevention, final-year medical education, workplace learning, qualitative research

  5. Perceptions Regarding Employment Prospects among Final Year Students as Determined by Field of Study, Gender and Race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillary Tomu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated university student perceptions regarding their employment prospects and the extent to which differences exist regarding perceptions of employment prospects among beneficiaries and non-beneficiaries of the South African government’s affirmative action policies. A quantitative research design was used in which self administered questionnaires were distributed to respondents. A purposive sampling procedure was utilised. The data was subjected to a number of statistical analyses including one way ANOVA and T-test of independent samples. Results indicated that final Accounting and Pharmacy students reported positive perceptions about their employment prospects than final year sociology students. As hypothesised, female final year students were significantly more confident than male final year students about employment prospects. Also, black final year students were found to be significantly more confident than their white final year counterparts (non-beneficiaries of employment policies about their employment prospects. It is concluded that differences regarding employment prospects among final year students can be accounted for by factors such as gender, field of study, race and whether or not one is a beneficiary of the SA government’s affirmative employment policies.

  6. The effect of probiotic microorganisms and bioactive compounds on chemically induced carcinogenesis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertkova, I; Hijova, E; Chmelarova, A; Mojzisova, G; Petrasova, D; Strojny, L; Bomba, A; Zitnan, R

    2010-01-01

    Diet interventions and natural bioactive supplements have now been extensively studied to reduce risks of colon cancer, which is one of the major public health problem throughout the world. The objective of our investigation was to study the effects of probiotic, prebiotic, nutritional plant extract, and plant oil on selected biochemical and immunological parameters in rats with colon cancer induced by N,N dimethylhydrazine (DMH). Male and female Wistar albino rats were were fed by a high-fat (HF) diet (10% fat in the diet) and were divided into 9 groups: Control group; PRO group - HF diet supplemented with probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum to provide 3 x 109 c.f.u. of strain/1 ml of medium; PRE group - HF diet supplemented with inulin enriched with oligofructose (2% of HF diet); HES group - HF diet supplemented with plant extract of Aesculus hippocastanum L. (1% of HF diet); OIL group - HF diet comprised Linioleum virginale (2% of HF diet); and combination of probiotic microorganisms and bioactive compounds in the groups - PRO-PRE, PRO-HES, PRO-OIL, PRE-OIL. Carcinogenesis was initiated with subcutaneous injection of DMH (20 mg/kg) two times at week interval and dietary treatments were continued for the six weeks. Application of probiotic microorganisms and bioactive compounds in all treated groups significantly decreased the activities of bacterial enzymes (p<0.001), the fecal bile acids concentration (p<0.01; p<0.001) and significantly increased serum TNFalpha level (p<0.001) in comparison to the control rats. The number of coliforms was reduced in PRO, PRO-PRE, PRO-OIL and PRE-OIL groups and significantly higher count of lactobacilli (p<0.05) was observed in PRO-PRE, PRO-OIL and PRE-OIL groups in compare with the controls. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that probiotic microorganisms and bioactive compounds could exert a preventive effect on colon carcinogenesis induced by DMH. PMID:20568896

  7. Role of infectious agents in the carcinogenesis of brain and head and neck cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alibek Kenneth

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review concentrates on tumours that are anatomically localised in head and neck regions. Brain cancers and head and neck cancers together account for more than 873,000 cases annually worldwide, with an increasing incidence each year. With poor survival rates at late stages, brain and head and neck cancers represent serious conditions. Carcinogenesis is a multi-step process and the role of infectious agents in this progression has not been fully identified. A major problem with such research is that the role of many infectious agents may be underestimated due to the lack of or inconsistency in experimental data obtained globally. In the case of brain cancer, no infection has been accepted as directly oncogenic, although a number of viruses and parasites are associated with the malignancy. Our analysis of the literature showed the presence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV in distinct types of brain tumour, namely glioblastoma multiforme (GBM and medulloblastoma. In particular, there are reports of viral protein in up to 100% of GBM specimens. Several epidemiological studies reported associations of brain cancer and toxoplasmosis seropositivity. In head and neck cancers, there is a distinct correlation between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. Considering that almost every undifferentiated NPC is EBV-positive, virus titer levels can be measured to screen high-risk populations. In addition there is an apparent association between human papilloma virus (HPV and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC; specifically, 26% of HNSCCs are positive for HPV. HPV type 16 was the most common type detected in HNSCCs (90% and its dominance is even greater than that reported in cervical carcinoma. Although there are many studies showing an association of infectious agents with cancer, with various levels of involvement and either a direct or indirect causative effect, there is a scarcity of articles covering the role of

  8. Safrole-DNA adducts in tissues from esophageal cancer patients: clues to areca-related esophageal carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jang-Ming; Liu, Tsung-Yung; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Tang, Hseau-Chung; Leh, Julie; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Hsu, Hsao-Hsun; Huang, Pei-Ming; Chen, Jin-Shing; Lee, Chun-Jean; Lee, Yung-Chie

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that areca quid chewing can be an independent risk factor for developing esophageal cancer. However, no studies are available to elucidate the mechanisms of how areca induces carcinogenesis in the esophagus. Since the areca nut in Taiwan contains a high concentration of safrole, a well-known carcinogenic agent, we analyzed safrole-DNA adducts by the 32P-postlabelling method in tissue specimens from esophageal cancer patients. In total, we evaluated 47 patients with esophageal cancer (16 areca chewers and 31 non-chewers) who underwent esophagectomy at the National Taiwan University Hospital between 1996 and 2002. Of the individuals with a history of habitual areca chewing (14 cigarette smokers and two non-smokers), one of the tumor tissue samples and five of the normal esophageal mucosa samples were positive for safrole-DNA adducts. All patients positive for safrole-DNA adducts were also cigarette smokers. Such adducts could not be found in patients who did not chew areca, irrespective of their habits of alcohol consumption or cigarette smoking (psafrole was also tested in vitro in three esophageal cell lines and four cultures of primary esophageal keratinocytes. In two of the esophageal keratinocyte cultures, adduct formation was increased by treatment with safrole after induction of cytochrome P450 by 3-methyl-cholanthrene. This paper provides the first observation of how areca induces esophageal carcinogenesis, i.e., through the genotoxicity of safrole, a component of the areca juice.

  9. Folic acid, polymorphism of methyl-group metabolism genes, and DNA methylation in relation to GI carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing Yuan; Xiao, Shu Dong

    2003-01-01

    DNA methylation is the main epigenetic modification after replication in humans. DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase (DNMT) catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to C5 of cytosine within CpG dinucleotide sequences in the genomic DNA of higher eukaryotes. There is considerable evidence that aberrant DNA methylation plays an integral role in carcinogenesis. Folic acid or folate is crucial for normal DNA synthesis and can regulate DNA methylation, and through this, it affects cellular SAM levels. Folate deficiency results in DNA hypomethylation. Epidemiological studies have indicated that folic acid protects against gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and methionine synthase (MS) are the enzymes involved in folate metabolism and are thought to influence DNA methylation. MTHFR is highly polymorphic, and the variant genotypes result in decreased MTHFR enzyme activity and lower plasma folate level. Two common MTHFR polymorphisms, 677CT (or 677TT) and A1298C, and an MS polymorphism, A-->G at 2756, have been identified. Most studies support an inverse association between folate status and the rate of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. During human GI carcinogenesis, MTHFR is highly polymorphic, and the variant genotypes result in decreased MTHFR enzyme activity and lower plasma folate level, as well as aberrant methylation.

  10. Common cancer in a wild animal: the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) as an emerging model for carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Helen M; Gulland, Frances M D; Hammond, John A; Colegrove, Kathleen M; Hall, Ailsa J

    2015-07-19

    Naturally occurring cancers in non-laboratory species have great potential in helping to decipher the often complex causes of neoplasia. Wild animal models could add substantially to our understanding of carcinogenesis, particularly of genetic and environmental interactions, but they are currently underutilized. Studying neoplasia in wild animals is difficult and especially challenging in marine mammals owing to their inaccessibility, lack of exposure history, and ethical, logistical and legal limits on experimentation. Despite this, California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) offer an opportunity to investigate risk factors for neoplasia development that have implications for terrestrial mammals and humans who share much of their environment and diet. A relatively accessible California sea lion population on the west coast of the USA has a high prevalence of urogenital carcinoma and is regularly sampled during veterinary care in wildlife rehabilitation centres. Collaborative studies have revealed that genotype, persistent organic pollutants and a herpesvirus are all associated with this cancer. This paper reviews research to date on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of urogenital carcinoma in this species, and presents the California sea lion as an important and currently underexploited wild animal model of carcinogenesis.

  11. Pro-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory potential of andrographolide during 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene induced hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Karthikeyan Sekar; Baskaran Nagarethinam; Arjun Kumar Singh; Manoharan Shanmugam

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Aim of the present study was to investigate the modulating effect of andrographolide on apoptotic and inflammatory markers during 7,12-dimethyl-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA) induced hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis. Methods: Oral tumors were developed in the buccal pouch of golden Syrian hamsters by painting with 0.5% DMBA in liquid paraffin three times a week for 14 weeks. The expression pattern of molecular markers were assayed using immunohistochemistry (p53, Bcl-2 and Bax), ELISA...

  12. Study of B-Meson Decays to Final States with a Single Charm Baryon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majewski, Stephanie A. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    2007-08-01

    A study of B-meson decays to final states with a single charm baryon is presented based on data recorded by the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Although the B meson is the lightest bottom-flavored meson, it is heavy enough to decay to a baryon made of three quarks and an antibaryon made of three antiquarks. By studying the baryonic weak decays of the B meson, we can investigate baryon production mechanisms in heavy meson decays. In particular, we measure the rates of the decays B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π- and $\\bar{B}$0 → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$. Comparing these rates, we confirm an observed trend in baryonic B decays that the decay with the lower energy release, B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π-, is favored over $\\bar{B}$0 → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$. The dynamics of the baryon-antibaryon (Λ+c$\\bar{p}$) system in the three-body decay also provide insight into baryon-antibaryon production mechanisms. The B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π- system is a laboratory for searches for excited #c baryon states; we observe the resonant decays B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ and B- → Σc(2800) 0$\\bar{p}$. This is the first observation of the decay B- → Σc(2800) 0$\\bar{p}$; however, the mass of the observed #c(2800)0 state is inconsistent with previous measurements. Finally, we examine the angular distribution of the B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ decays and measure the spin of the B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ baryon to be J = 1/2, as predicted by the quark model.

  13. Inhibitory effects of Zengshengping fractions on DMBA-induced buccal pouch carcinogenesis in hamsters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Xiao-bing; SUN Zheng; CHEN Xiao-xin; WU Hong-ru; ZHANG Xin-yan

    2012-01-01

    Background Zengshengping (ZSP) tablets had inhibitory effects on oral precancerous lesions by reducing the incidence of oral cancer.However,the severe liver toxicity caused by systemic administration of ZSP limits the long-term use of this anti-cancer drug.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tumor inhibitory effects due to the topical application of extracts from ZSP,a Chinese herbal drug,on 7,12-dimethlbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) induced oral tumors in hamsters.The study also investigated the anti-cancer mechanisms of the ZSP extracts on oral carcinogenesis.Methods DMBA (0.5%) was applied topically to the buccal pouches of Syrian golden hamsters (6-8 weeks old) three times per week for six weeks in order to induce the development of oral tumors.Different fractions of ZSP were either applied topically to the oral tumor lesions or fed orally at varying dosages to animals with oral tumors for 18 weeks.Tumor volume was measured by histopathological examination.Tumor cell proliferation was evaluated by counting BrdU labeled cells and by Western blotting for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) protein levels.The protein levels of apoptosis marker Caspase-3 and regulator Bcl-2 protein were also measured by Western blotting.Results Topical application of DMBA to the left pouch of hamsters induced oral tumor formation.Animals treated with DMBA showed a loss in body weight while animals treated with ZSP maintained normal body weights.Both the ZSP n-butanol fraction and water fraction significantly reduced tumor volume by 32.6% (P <0.01) and 22.9% (P <0.01)respectively.Topical application of ZSP also markedly decreased the BrdU-positive cell numbers in oral tumor lesions and reduced the expression level of MAPK.In addition,ZSP promoted tumor cell apoptosis by increasing Caspase-3 expression but decreasing Bcl-2 protein production.Conclusion The n-butanol and water fractions of ZSP are effective at inhibiting tumor cell proliferation and stimulating

  14. Human colon carcinogenesis is associated with increased interleukin-17-driven inflammatory responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Z

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Zhaohui Xie,1 Yine Qu,2 Yanli Leng,2 Wenxiu Sun,2 Siqi Ma,2 Jingbo Wei,2 Jiangong Hu,3 Xiaolan Zhang1 1Department of Gastroenterology, Second Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Histology and Embryology, Hebei United University School of Basic Medicine, Tangshan, Hebei, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Pathology, the Second Hospital of Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Inflammation is known to contribute to carcinogenesis in human colorectal cancer. Proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-17 (IL-17 or IL-17A has been shown to play a critical role in colon carcinogenesis in mouse models. However, few studies have investigated IL-17A in human colon tissues. In the present study, we assessed IL-17-driven inflammatory responses in 17 cases of human colon adenocarcinomas, 16 cases of human normal colon tissues adjacent to the resected colon adenocarcinomas, ten cases of human ulcerative colitis tissues from biopsies, and eight cases of human colon polyps diagnosed as benign adenomas. We found that human colon adenocarcinomas contained the highest levels of IL-17A cytokine, which was significantly higher than the IL-17A levels in the adenomas, ulcerative colitis, and normal colon tissues (P<0.01. The levels of IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA were also the highest in human colon adenocarcinomas, followed by adenomas and ulcerative colitis. The increased levels of IL-17A and IL-17RA were accompanied with increased IL-17-driven inflammatory responses, including activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK pathways, increase in expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP9, MMP7, MMP2, B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2, and cyclin D1, decrease in Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX expression, and increase in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and VEGF receptor (VEGFR expression that

  15. Protective role of fish oil (Maxepa on early events of rat mammary carcinogenesis by modulation of DNA-protein crosslinks, cell proliferation and p53 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Basabi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fish oil is known to protect from many types of cancers of the colon, liver, breast, prostate and lung 123. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the role of fish oil [Maxepa, supplemented at a dose of 0.5 ml is equivalent to 90 mg eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and 60 mg docosahexaenoic acid (DHA] on cell proliferation, expression of p53 tumor suppressor protein and DNA protein crosslinks (DPCs in a defined model of chemical rat mammary carcinogenesis. Mammary carcinogenesis was initiated by a single, intravenous (i.v. tail vein injection of 7,12 dimethylbenz(αanthracene (DMBA at a dose of 5 mg DMBA/2 ml corn oil/kg body weight in female Sprague-Dawley rats at 7 weeks of age. Fish oil supplementation was started daily, 2 weeks prior to DMBA injection and continued for 24 (31 weeks of animal age weeks and 35 (42 weeks of animal age weeks of post DMBA injection, for histopathological and immunohistochemical and for morphological studies, respectively. Results Our results indicate the chemopreventive effect of fish oil (Maxepa on DMBA-induced rat mammary carcinogenesis. Administration of fish oil further showed a prominent reduction of cell proliferation (24.34%, P = 0.001; DPCs (25%, P Conclusion Our study thus provides evidence for the anticarcinogenic effect of fish oil (Maxepa in limiting mammary preneoplasia in Sprague-Dawley rats.

  16. Probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus acidophilus suppresses DMH-induced procarcinogenic fecal enzymes and preneoplastic aberrant crypt foci in early colon carcinogenesis in Sprague Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Angela; Shukla, Geeta

    2013-01-01

    Diet makes an important contribution to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk implying risks for CRC are potentially reducible. Therefore, the probiotics have been suggested as the prophylactic measure in colon cancer. In this study, different probiotics were used to compare their protective potential against 1,2 dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH)-induced chemical colon carcinogenesis in Sprague Dawley rats. Animals belonging to different probiotic groups were fed orally with 1 × 10(9) lactobacilli daily for 1 week, and then a weekly injection of DMH was given intraperitoneally for 6 wks with daily administration of probiotic. Lactobacillus GG and L.acidophilus + DMH-treated animals had maximum percent reduction in ACF counts. A significant decrease (P colon morphology of animals belonging to various probiotic + DMH-treated rats compared with DMH-treated alone. The results indicated that probiotics, L.GG, and L.acidophilus can be used as the better prophylactic agents for experimental colon carcinogenesis. PMID:23368917

  17. Poor final visual outcome after traumatic hyphema: A retrospective study of associated factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayda Khalfan Al Ali

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the factors associated with a poor final visual outcome following a non-perforating traumatic hyphema. METHODS: The in-patient records of all traumatic hyphema patients admitted to the Department of Ophthalmology of the Hamad Medical Centre (HMC in Doha, Qatar, were retrospectively reviewed for a four-year period from January 2004 to March 2008. One hundred and seventeen patients who did not meet the exclusion criteria were divided into two groups based on their final visual outcome post-treatment. Group 1 (good outcome consisted of 100 patients with a visual acuity (VA of 6/18 or better and group 2 (worse outcome consisted of 17 patients with a VA of less than 6/18. The two groups were compared to determine the factors associated with a poor final visual outcome. RESULTS: Group 2 patients had an 82.3% incidence of complications after a traumatic hyphema compared with a 21% incidence in group 1. Of these complications, secondary glaucoma and rebleeding were significantly associated with a worse final visual outcome. Trauma from projectiles or blows did not differ significantly in their effect on the final visual outcome, although blow injuries had a greater impact on the final visual outcome. Posterior segment injuries were associated with a worse visual outcome. CONCLUSION: It was concluded that secondary glaucoma, rebleeding, and posterior segment injuries are factors associated with a poor final visual outcome.

  18. Tobacco Smoke: Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Stable Free Radicals in Mechanisms of Oxidative Damage, Carcinogenesis and Synergistic Effects with Other Respirable Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Fiotakis

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoke contains many toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic chemicals, as well as stable and unstable free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS in the particulate and the gas phase with the potential for biological oxidative damage. Epidemiological evidence established that smoking is one of the most important extrinsic factor of premature morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to investigate oxidative and carcinogenic mechanisms of tobacco and synergistic action with other respirable particles in the respiratory system of smokers. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR and spin- trapping techniques were used to study stable free radicals in the cigarette tar, and unstable superoxide anion (O2·- and hydroxyl (HO· radicals in the smoke Results showed that the semiquinone radical system has the potential for redox recycling and oxidative action. Further, results proved that aqueous cigarette tar (ACT solutions can generate adducts with DNA nucleobases, particularly the mutagenic 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (a biomarker for carcinogenesis.Also, we observed synergistic effects in the generation of HO·, through the Fenton reaction, with environmental respirable particles (asbestos fibres, coal dust, etc. and ambient particulate matter (PM, such as PM10, PM2.5 and diesel exhaust particles (DEP. The highest synergistic effects was observed with the asbestos fibres (freshly grounded, PM2.5 and DEP. Finally, we discuss results from our previous study of conventional cellulose acetate filters and “bio-filters” with hemoglobin impregnated activated carbon, which showed that these filters do not substantially alter the free radical content of smoke in the particulate and in the gaseous phase.

  19. Radiation carcinogenesis. Progress report V, 16 May 1977--15 May 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments are underway on the cocarcinogenic effects of asbestos and carcinogenic hydrocarbons using rats and mice as test objects. None of the protocols of these experiments have as yet been completed. The study of tumorigenesis in irradiated parabiont rats has been completed. Study of the benign tumors indicates that radiation is an effective neoplastic stimulus for only a limited number of organs and tissues, chiefly ovary, adrenal, mammary tissue, islands of Langerhans, and liver. In general the benign tumors did not seriously affect health, and in only a very few animals did they become malignant. The incidence of malignant tumors in the parabiont series has been tabulated and analyzed. Parabiosis alone appears to increase the incidence of leukemia and solid lymphoid tumors in NEDH rats. Our study of radiation tumorigenesis in the adrenal cortest in the mouse has been completed. The cortex is highly resistant to tumor induction by irradiation. Cortical tumorigenesis is strongly influenced by changes in pituitary and ovarian hormones. Proliferation of capsular ''A'' cells appears to be an important early factor in carcinogenesis. Hormonal imbalance continues to be an important factor in tumorigenesis in the parabiont pairs. If each of a pair of parabiont rats is irradiated sequentially at intervals, 30 days after a lethal dose of radiation is enough to permit the irradiated rat to support its partner through a like dose as effectively as would an unirradiated animal. The transplantable radiation-induced functioning pheochromocytoma and insulinoma of rats continue to be valuable research tools

  20. Doxycycline Promotes Carcinogenesis & Metastasis via Chronic Inflammatory Pathway: An In Vivo Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Nanda

    Full Text Available Doxycycline (DOX exhibits anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, and pro-apoptotic activity and is being tested in clinical trials as a chemotherapeutic agent for several cancers, including colon cancer.In the current study, the chemotherapeutic activity of doxycycline was tested in a rat model of colon carcinogenesis, induced by colon specific cancer promoter, 1,2, dimethylhydrazine (DMH as well as study the effect of DOX-alone on a separate group of rats.Doxycycline administration in DMH-treated rats (DMH-DOX unexpectedly increased tumor multiplicity, stimulated progression of colonic tumor growth from adenomas to carcinomas and revealed metastasis in small intestine as determined by macroscopic and histopathological analysis. DOX-alone treatment showed markedly enhanced chronic inflammation and reactive hyperplasia, which was dependent upon the dose of doxycycline administered. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis revealed evidence of inflammation and anti-apoptotic action of DOX by deregulation of various biomarkers.These results suggest that doxycycline caused chronic inflammation in colon, small intestine injury, enhanced the efficacy of DMH in tumor progression and provided a mechanistic link between doxycycline-induced chronic inflammation and tumorigenesis. Ongoing studies thus may need to focus on the molecular mechanisms of doxycycline action, which lead to its inflammatory and tumorigenic effects.