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Sample records for carboxypeptidase

  1. Carboxypeptidase activity in human mycoplasmas.

    OpenAIRE

    Shibata, K; Watanabe, T

    1986-01-01

    Mycoplasma salivarium produced citrulline, ammonia, and ATP from N-benzoylglycyl-L-arginine. The activity was inhibited by EDTA and was therefore concluded to be due to an arginine-specific carboxypeptidase. The activity was also found to exist in M. orale, M. buccale, M. faucium, and M. hominis.

  2. Detection and quantitation of glutamate carboxypeptidase II in human blood

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knedlík, Tomáš; Navrátil, Václav; Vik, V.; Pacík, D.; Šácha, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 7 (2014), s. 768-780 ISSN 0270-4137 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/12/0847 Grant - others:OPPC(CZ) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : serum marker * glutamate carboxypeptidase II * plasma glutamate carboxypeptidase * prostate cancer * prostate -specific membrane antigen Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.565, year: 2014

  3. Structure and activity of recombinant human glutamate carboxypeptidase II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bařinka, Cyril; Šácha, Pavel; Sklenář, Jan; Bezouška, Karel; Slusher, B. S.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 81, Suppl. 1 (2002), s. 25 ISSN 0022-3042. [Annual Meeting of the American Society for Neurochemistry /33./. 22.06.2002-27.06.2002, West Palm Beach] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : carboxypeptidase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  4. Cloning of cDNAs that encode human mast cell carboxypeptidase A, and comparison of the protein with mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase A and rat pancreatic carboxypeptidases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, D.S.; Gurley, D.S.; Stevens, R.L.; Austen, K.F.; Serafin, W.E.; Sugarbaker, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Human skin and lung mast cells and rodent peritoneal cells contain a carboxypeptidase in their secretory granules. The authors have screened human lung cDNA libraries with a mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase A (MC-CPA) cDNA probe to isolate a near-full-length cDNA that encodes human MC-CPA. The 5' end of the human MC-CPA transcript was defined by direct mRNA sequencing and by isolation and partial sequencing of the human MC-CPA gene. Human MC-CPA is predicted to be translated as a 417 amino acid preproenzyme which includes a 15 amino acid signal peptide and a 94-amino acid activation peptide. The mature human MC-CPA enzyme has a predicted size of 36.1 kDa, a net positive charge of 16 at neutral pH, and 86% amino acid sequence identity with mouse MC-CPA. DNA blot analyses showed that human MC-CPA mRNA is transcribed from a single locus in the human genome. Comparison of the human MC-CPA with mouse MC-CPA and with three rat pancreatic carboxypeptidases shows that these enzymes are encoded by distinct but homologous genes

  5. Chemically modified carboxypeptidase Y with increased amidase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breddam, K.

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of carboxypeptidase Y with 14 C-iodoacetamide caused a drastic reduction in the peptidase activity towards FA-Phe-Leu-OH while the esterase activity towards FA-Phe-OMe, the amidase activity towards FA-Phe-NH 2 and the peptidyl amino acid amide hydrolase activity towards FA-Phe-Gly-NH 2 were much less affected. The loss of peptidase activity could be correlated with the incorporation of a single equivalent of reagent and it was demonstrated that the site of reaction was a methionyl residue, thus forming a sulfonium derivative. Analogous methionyl modifications were performed: carboxypeptidase Y modified with phenacylbromide hydrolysed substrates with bulky leaving groups in the P position, i.e. -OEt, -OBzl, -Gly-NH 2 ,-Gly-OH, and -Leu-OH, at reduced rates while substrates with small groups in that position, i.e. -OMe and -NH 2 , were hydrolysed with increased rates. These results indicate that the methionyl residue modified by phenacylbromide is located in the S binding site of the enzyme. Similar results were obtained with carboxypeptidase Y modified with m-nitrophen- acylbromide and p-nitrophenacylbromide. The increase in amidase activity and decrease in peptidyl amino acid amide hydrolase activity of carboxypeptidase Y following modification with phenacylbromide, m-nitrophenacylbromide, and p-nitrophenacylbromide was exploited in deamidation of peptide amides. These modified enzymes deamidated peptide amides with the exception of those containing a C-terminal glycyl or seryl residue in yields of 80-100% which is significantly higher than with unmodified carboxypeptidase Y. (author)

  6. [Comparison of basic carboxypeptidases activity in male rats tissues at a single injection of haloperidol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravosudova, N A; Bykova, I O

    2014-01-01

    The influence of a single injection of haloperidol on basic carboxypeptidases (biologically active peptide processing enzymes) activity in rat tissues was studied. Acute exposure to haloperidol increased the activity of carboxypeptidases H (CP H) in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system and cerebellum and reduced such activity in testes. Multidirectional changes of PMSF-inhibited carboxypeptidases activity (PMSF-CP) were observed after a single haloperidol injection in all studied tissues except testes. It is suggested that changes of CP H and PMSF-CP activity might affect levels of regulatory peptides in the brain and blood and thus may be involved in general and side effects of haloperidol on the organism.

  7. Preparation, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of mutant carboxypeptidase T containing the primary specificity pocket of carboxypeptidase B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akparov, V. Kh.; Grishin, A. M.; Timofeev, V. I.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2010-01-01

    Recombinant G215S, A251G, T257A, D260G, T262D mutant carboxypeptidase T from Thermoactinomyces vulgaris containing mutations in the primary specificity pocket was prepared and crystallized. Single crystals with a size of up to 0.3 mm were grown and investigated by X-ray diffraction. Recombinant mutant carboxypeptidase T containing the primary specificity subsite compositionally identical to that of pancreatic carboxypeptidase B crystallizes in the same space group as the natural enzyme. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P6 3 22; the unit-cell parameters are a = b = 157.867 A, c = 104.304 A, α = β = 90 deg., γ = 120 deg. X-ray diffraction data suitable for determining the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution were collected from one crystal.

  8. A digestive prolyl carboxypeptidase in Tenebrio molitor larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goptar, Irina A; Shagin, Dmitry A; Shagina, Irina A; Mudrik, Elena S; Smirnova, Yulia A; Zhuzhikov, Dmitry P; Belozersky, Mikhail A; Dunaevsky, Yakov E; Oppert, Brenda; Filippova, Irina Yu; Elpidina, Elena N

    2013-06-01

    Prolyl carboxypeptidase (PRCP) is a lysosomal proline specific serine peptidase that also plays a vital role in the regulation of physiological processes in mammals. In this report, we isolate and characterize the first PRCP in an insect. PRCP was purified from the anterior midgut of larvae of a stored product pest, Tenebrio molitor, using a three-step chromatography strategy, and it was determined that the purified enzyme was a dimer. The cDNA of PRCP was cloned and sequenced, and the predicted protein was identical to the proteomic sequences of the purified enzyme. The substrate specificity and kinetic parameters of the enzyme were determined. The T. molitor PRCP participates in the hydrolysis of the insect's major dietary proteins, gliadins, and is the first PRCP to be ascribed a digestive function. Our collective data suggest that the evolutionary enrichment of the digestive peptidase complex in insects with an area of acidic to neutral pH in the midgut is a result of the incorporation of lysosomal peptidases, including PRCP. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Dissecting carboxypeptidase E: properties, functions and pathophysiological roles in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Ji

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Since discovery in 1982, carboxypeptidase E (CPE has been shown to be involved in the biosynthesis of a wide range of neuropeptides and peptide hormones in endocrine tissues, and in the nervous system. This protein is produced from pro-CPE and exists in soluble and membrane forms. Membrane CPE mediates the targeting of prohormones to the regulated secretory pathway, while soluble CPE acts as an exopeptidase and cleaves C-terminal basic residues from peptide intermediates to generate bioactive peptides. CPE also participates in protein internalization, vesicle transport and regulation of signaling pathways. Therefore, in two types of CPE mutant mice, Cpefat/Cpefat and Cpe knockout, loss of normal CPE leads to a lot of disorders, including diabetes, hyperproinsulinemia, low bone mineral density and deficits in learning and memory. In addition, the potential roles of CPE and ΔN-CPE, an N-terminal truncated form, in tumorigenesis and diagnosis were also addressed. Herein, we focus on dissecting the pathophysiological roles of CPE in the endocrine and nervous systems, and related diseases.

  10. Regulation of dopamine transporter activity by carboxypeptidase E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Heping

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dopamine transporter (DAT plays a critical role in terminating the action of dopamine by rapid reuptake into the presynaptic neuron. Previous studies have revealed that the DAT carboxyl terminus (DAT-CT can directly interact with other cellular proteins and regulate DAT function and trafficking. Results Here, we have identified that carboxypeptidase E (CPE, a prohormone processing exopeptidase and sorting receptor for the regulated secretory pathway, interacts with the DAT-CT and affects DAT function. Mammalian cell lines coexpressing CPE and DAT exhibited increased DAT-mediated dopamine uptake activity compared to cells expressing DAT alone. Moreover, coexpression of an interfering DAT-CT minigene inhibited the effects of CPE on DAT. Functional changes caused by CPE could be attributed to enhanced DAT expression and subsequent increase in DAT cell surface localization, due to decreased DAT degradation. In addition, CPE association could reduce the phosphorylation state of DAT on serine residues, potentially leading to reduced internalization, thus stabilizing plasmalemmal DAT localization. Conclusion Taken together, our results reveal a novel role for CPE in the regulation of DAT trafficking and DAT-mediated DA uptake, which may provide a novel target in the treatment of dopamine-governed diseases such as drug addiction and obesity.

  11. Biphasically Modulating the Activity of Carboxypeptidase G2 with Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanying Ma

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2 has been used for cancer prodrug therapy to realize the targeted release of active drugs, but there yet lacks a means to modulate the CPG2 activity. Here ultrasound was used to modulate the CPG2 activity. Methods: The activity of insonated CPG2 was determined, and then underlying biochemical (i.e., monomer, dimer and conformation and ultrasonic (i.e., heat and cavitation mechanisms were explored. Results: Ultrasound (1.0 MHz increased or decreased the enzymatic activity; the activity decreased as zero- or first-order kinetics, depending on the intensity. L1 (10 W/cm2 for 200 s improved the activity via increasing the specific activity. L2 or L3 (20 W/cm2 for 1200 or 3000 s decreased the activity via disassembling the dimer, degrading the monomer, inducing glycosylation, transforming conformation and decreasing the specific activity. An increase or a slight decrease of activity attributable to 10 W/cm2 was reversible, but the activity decrease due to 20 W/cm2 was irreversible. The enzymatic modulation was realized via cavitation. Conclusion: Ultrasound can biphasically modulate the CPG2 activity, and can be employed in the CPG2-prodrug therapy to adjust the release and moles of active drugs.

  12. Comparison of a spectrophotometric, a fluorometric, and a novel radiometric assay for carboxypeptidase E and other carboxypeptidase B-like enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fricker, L.D.; Devi, L. (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase E (CPE) is a carboxypeptidase B-like enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of numerous peptide hormones and neurotransmitters. A sensitive assay for CPE and other carboxypeptidase B-like enzymes has been developed using 125I-acetyl-Tyr-Ala-Arg (125I-AcYAR) as the substrate. This peptide is poorly soluble in ethyl acetate whereas the product of carboxypeptidase B-like enzymatic activity (125I-AcYA) can be quantitatively extracted with this solvent, allowing the rapid separation of product from substrate. This radiometric assay can detect less than 1 pg of either CPE or carboxypeptidase B. For CPE, the assay with 125I-AcYAR is approximately 1000 times more sensitive than a fluorescent assay using dansyl-Phe-Ala-Arg (dans-FAR), and 6000 times more sensitive than a spectrophotometric assay using hippuryl-Arg (hipp-R). CPE hydrolyzes the three substrates with Kcat values of 16 s-1 for AcYAR, 13 s-1 for dans-FAR, and 8.5 s-1 for hipp-R. The Km values for CPE with AcYAR (28 microM) and dans-FAR (34 microM) are similar, and are much lower than the Km with hipp-R (400 microM). Thus, the primary reason for the increased sensitivity of the 125I-AcYAR assay over the fluorescent assay is not a result of kinetic differences but is due to the detection limit of iodinated product (10(-15) mol), compared to the fluorescent product (5 x 10(-11) mol). Applications of this rapid and sensitive radiometric assay to detect CPE in cultured cells and in subcellular fractions of the pituitary are described.

  13. Comparison of a spectrophotometric, a fluorometric, and a novel radiometric assay for carboxypeptidase E and other carboxypeptidase B-like enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricker, L.D.; Devi, L.

    1990-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase E (CPE) is a carboxypeptidase B-like enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of numerous peptide hormones and neurotransmitters. A sensitive assay for CPE and other carboxypeptidase B-like enzymes has been developed using 125I-acetyl-Tyr-Ala-Arg (125I-AcYAR) as the substrate. This peptide is poorly soluble in ethyl acetate whereas the product of carboxypeptidase B-like enzymatic activity (125I-AcYA) can be quantitatively extracted with this solvent, allowing the rapid separation of product from substrate. This radiometric assay can detect less than 1 pg of either CPE or carboxypeptidase B. For CPE, the assay with 125I-AcYAR is approximately 1000 times more sensitive than a fluorescent assay using dansyl-Phe-Ala-Arg (dans-FAR), and 6000 times more sensitive than a spectrophotometric assay using hippuryl-Arg (hipp-R). CPE hydrolyzes the three substrates with Kcat values of 16 s-1 for AcYAR, 13 s-1 for dans-FAR, and 8.5 s-1 for hipp-R. The Km values for CPE with AcYAR (28 microM) and dans-FAR (34 microM) are similar, and are much lower than the Km with hipp-R (400 microM). Thus, the primary reason for the increased sensitivity of the 125I-AcYAR assay over the fluorescent assay is not a result of kinetic differences but is due to the detection limit of iodinated product (10(-15) mol), compared to the fluorescent product (5 x 10(-11) mol). Applications of this rapid and sensitive radiometric assay to detect CPE in cultured cells and in subcellular fractions of the pituitary are described

  14. Response of the digestive system of Helicoverpa zea to ingestion of potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor and characterization of an uninhibited carboxypepidase B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayes, A.; Rodrigues de la Vega, M.; Vendrell, J.; Aviles, F.X.; Jongsma, M.A.; Beekwilder, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase activity participates in the protein digestion process in the gut of lepidopteran insects, supplying free amino-acids to developing larvae. To study the role of different carboxypeptidases in lepidopteran protein digestion, the effect of potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (PCI) on

  15. Sensitive radiometric assay for enkephalin convertase and other carboxypeptidase B-like enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stack, G.; Fricker, L.D.; Snyder, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    A sensitive radiometric assay for carboxypeptidase B-like enzymes has been developed using enkephalin convertase, an enkephalin synthesizing carboxypeptidase. The assay is based on the differential solubility of 3 H-labeled substrate and product in chloroform. The substrates 3 H-benzoyl-Phe-Ala-Arg or 3 H-benzoyl-Phe-Leu-Arg are poorly soluble in chloroform due to the charged arginine. The products of carboxypeptidase B-like activity on these substrates, 3 H-benzoyl-Phe-Ala or 3 H-benzoyl Phe-Leu partition quantitatively into chloroform, allowing rapid separation of product from substrate. This assay is approximately 100 times more sensitive than a similar fluorometric assay utilizing dansyl-Phe-Ala-Arg as a substrate

  16. Sensitive radiometric assay for enkephalin convertase and other carboxypeptidase B-like enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stack, G.; Fricker, L.D.; Snyder, S.H.

    1984-01-09

    A sensitive radiometric assay for carboxypeptidase B-like enzymes has been developed using enkephalin convertase, an enkephalin synthesizing carboxypeptidase. The assay is based on the differential solubility of /sup 3/H-labeled substrate and product in chloroform. The substrates /sup 3/H-benzoyl-Phe-Ala-Arg or /sup 3/H-benzoyl-Phe-Leu-Arg are poorly soluble in chloroform due to the charged arginine. The products of carboxypeptidase B-like activity on these substrates, /sup 3/H-benzoyl-Phe-Ala or /sup 3/H-benzoyl Phe-Leu partition quantitatively into chloroform, allowing rapid separation of product from substrate. This assay is approximately 100 times more sensitive than a similar fluorometric assay utilizing dansyl-Phe-Ala-Arg as a substrate.

  17. An extraovarian protein accumulated in mosquito oocytes is a carboxypeptidase activated in embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenlong Cho; Deitsch, K.W.; Raikhel, A.S. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (United States))

    1991-12-01

    The authors report a phenomenon previously unknown for oviparous animals; in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes a serine carboxypeptidase is synthesized extraovarially and then internalized by oocytes. The cDNA encoding mosquito vitellogenic carboxypeptidase (VCP) was cloned and sequenced. The VCP cDNA hybridizes to a 1.5-kilobase mRNA present only in the fat body of vitellogenic females. The deduced amino acid sequence of VCP shares significant homology with members of the serine carboxypeptidase family. Binding assays using a serine protease inhibitor, ({sup 3}H)diisopropyl fluorophosphate, showed that VCP is activated in eggs at the onset of embryonic development. Activation of VCP is associated with the reduction in its size from 53 kDa (inactive proenzyme) to 48 kDa (active enzyme). The active, 48-kDa, form of VCP is maximally present at the middle of embryonic development and disappears by the end.

  18. Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II in Diagnosis and Treatment of Neurologic Disorders and Prostate Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bařinka, Cyril; Rojas, C.; Slusher, B.; Pomper, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 6 (2012), s. 856-870 ISSN 0929-8673 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Glutamate carboxypeptidase II * X-ray crystallography * prostate-specific membrane antigen Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.070, year: 2012

  19. Characterization of glutamate carboxypeptidase II knock-out mice generated by TALEN technology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vorlová, Barbora; Kašpárek, Petr; Šácha, Pavel; Sedláček, Radislav; Konvalinka, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2017), s. 44 ISSN 2336-7202. [Mezioborové setkání mladých biologů, biochemiků a chemiků /17./. 30.05.2017-01.06.2017, Milovy] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : glutamate carboxypeptidase II * TALEN technology Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  20. Mast cell derived carboxypeptidase A3 is decreased among patients with advanced coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, Łukasz; Siebert, Janusz; Koliński, Tomasz; Piekarska, Karolina; Reiwer-Gostomska, Magdalena; Targoński, Radosław; Trzonkowski, Piotr; Marek-Trzonkowska, Natalia

    2018-03-07

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) affects milions of people and can result in myocardial infarction (MI). Previously, mast cells (MC) have been extensively investigated in the context of hypersensitivity, however as regulators of the local inflammatory response they can potentially contribute to CAD and/or its progression. The aim of the study was to assess if serum concentration of MC proteases: carboxypeptidase A3, cathepsin G and chymase 1 is associated with the extension of CAD and MI. The 44 patients with angiographically confirmed CAD (23 subjects with non-ST segment elevation MI [NSTEMI] and 21 with stable CAD) were analyzed. Clinical data were obtained as well serum concentrations of carboxypeptidase A3, cathepsin G and chymase 1 were also measured. Patients with single vessel CAD had higher serum concentration of carboxypeptidase than those with more advanced CAD (3838.6 ± 1083.1 pg/mL vs. 2715.6 ± 442.5 pg/mL; p = 0.02). There were no significant differences in levels of any protease between patients with stable CAD and those with NSTEMI. Patients with hypertension had ≈2-fold lower serum levels of cathepsin G than normotensive individuals (4.6 ± 0.9 pg/mL vs. 9.4 ± 5.8 pg/mL; p = 0.001). Cathepsin G levels were also decreased in sera of the current smokers as compared with non-smokers (3.1 ± 1.2 ng/mL vs. 5.8 ± 1.2 ng/mL, p = 0.02). 1. Decreased serum level of carboxypeptidase is a hallmark of more advanced CAD. 2. Lower serum levels of carboxypeptidase A3 and catepsin G are associated with risk factors of blood vessel damage suggesting a protective role of these enzymes in CAD.

  1. Discovery of Orally Available Prodrugs of the Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) Inhibitor 2-Phosphonomethylpentanedioic Acid (2-PMPA)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majer, Pavel; Jančařík, Andrej; Krečmerová, Marcela; Tichý, Tomáš; Tenora, Lukáš; Wozniak, K.; Wu, Y.; Pommier, E.; Ferraris, D.; Rais, R.; Slusher, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 6 (2016), s. 2810-2819 ISSN 0022-2623 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : glutamate carboxypeptidase II * glutamate * 2-PMPA * prodrug Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 6.259, year: 2016

  2. Propeptide of carboxypeptidase Y provides a chaperone-like function as well as inhibition of the enzymatic activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Jakob R.; Sørensen, P

    1991-01-01

    The zymogen of the vacuolar carboxypeptidase Y from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was purified and characterized with respect to activation as well as refolding in vitro. The purified procarboxypeptidase Y has no detectable activity but can be efficiently activated by proteinase K from Tritirachium...... folding pathway. The relatively large number of charged amino acid residues and a high theoretical potential for alpha-helix formation in the carboxypeptidase Y propeptide suggest a structural similarity to a number of other propeptides and heat shock proteins....

  3. Requirement of the propeptide for in vivo formation of active yeast carboxypeptidase Y

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos, C; Winther, Jakob R.; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    1994-01-01

    Deletions have been constructed in the region encoding the 91-amino acid propeptide of the vacuolar enzyme carboxypeptidase Y of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in vivo effects of these mutations on the intracellular transport of the mutant proenzymes have been examined. Deletions did not include...... the vacuolar targeting signal, and none of the mutated forms of procarboxypeptidase Y was found to be secreted. All deletions, however, resulted in a decreased rate of transport of the truncated proenzymes from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus. Up to 29 residues close to the N terminus can...... be removed without completely eliminating transport of the mutated proenzymes to the vacuole. However, the C-terminal part of the propeptide contains elements which are essential, since two small deletions, of 9 and 15 residues, respectively, within this area resulted in loss of carboxypeptidase Y activity...

  4. Yeast carboxypeptidase Y vacuolar targeting signal is defined by four propeptide amino acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valls, L A; Winther, Jakob R.; Stevens, T H

    1990-01-01

    The amino-terminal propeptide of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) is necessary and sufficient for targeting this glycoprotein to the vacuole of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A 16 amino acid stretch of the propeptide was subjected to region-directed mutagenesis using randomized oligonucleotides. Mutations...... sort and deliver only the wild-type molecule to the vacuole. These results indicate that the PRC1 missorting mutations are cis-dominant, implying that the mutant forms of proCPY are secreted as a consequence of failing to interact with the sorting apparatus, rather than a general poisoning...

  5. Carborane-containing urea-based inhibitors of glutamate carboxypeptidase II: Synthesis and structural characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Youn, S.; Kim, K.I.; Ptáček, Jakub; Ok, K.; Nováková, Zora; Kim, Y.; Koo, J.; Bařinka, Cyril; Byun, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 22 (2015), s. 5232-5236 ISSN 0960-894X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP301/12/1513; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0045 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Carborane * Glutamate carboxypeptidase II * X-ray crystal structure Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 2.486, year: 2015

  6. Characterization of a digestive carboxypeptidase from the insect pest corn earworm (Helicoverpa armigera) with novel specificity towards C-terminal glutamate residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bown, David P; Gatehouse, John A

    2004-05-01

    Carboxypeptidases were purified from guts of larvae of corn earworm (Helicoverpa armigera), a lepidopteran crop pest, by affinity chromatography on immobilized potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor, and characterized by N-terminal sequencing. A larval gut cDNA library was screened using probes based on these protein sequences. cDNA HaCA42 encoded a carboxypeptidase with sequence similarity to enzymes of clan MC [Barrett, A. J., Rawlings, N. D. & Woessner, J. F. (1998) Handbook of Proteolytic Enzymes. Academic Press, London.], but with a novel predicted specificity towards C-terminal acidic residues. This carboxypeptidase was expressed as a recombinant proprotein in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The expressed protein could be activated by treatment with bovine trypsin; degradation of bound pro-region, rather than cleavage of pro-region from mature protein, was the rate-limiting step in activation. Activated HaCA42 carboxypeptidase hydrolysed a synthetic substrate for glutamate carboxypeptidases (FAEE, C-terminal Glu), but did not hydrolyse substrates for carboxypeptidase A or B (FAPP or FAAK, C-terminal Phe or Lys) or methotrexate, cleaved by clan MH glutamate carboxypeptidases. The enzyme was highly specific for C-terminal glutamate in peptide substrates, with slow hydrolysis of C-terminal aspartate also observed. Glutamate carboxypeptidase activity was present in larval gut extract from H. armigera. The HaCA42 protein is the first glutamate-specific metallocarboxypeptidase from clan MC to be identified and characterized. The genome of Drosophila melanogaster contains genes encoding enzymes with similar sequences and predicted specificity, and a cDNA encoding a similar enzyme has been isolated from gut tissue in tsetse fly. We suggest that digestive carboxypeptidases with sequence similarity to the classical mammalian enzymes, but with specificity towards C-terminal glutamate, are widely distributed in insects.

  7. AoS28D, a proline-Xaa carboxypeptidase secreted by Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamin, Karine; Eugster, Philippe J; Jousson, Olivier; Waridel, Patrice; Grouzmann, Eric; Monod, Michel

    2017-05-01

    Prolyl peptidases of the MEROPS S28 family are of particular interest because they are key enzymes in the digestion of proline-rich peptides. A BLAST analysis of the Aspergillus oryzae genome revealed sequences coding for four proteases of the S28 family. Three of these proteases, AoS28A, AoS28B, and AoS28C, were previously characterized as acidic prolyl endopeptidases. The fourth protease, AoS28D, showed high sequence divergence with other S28 proteases and belongs to a phylogenetically distinct cluster together with orthologous proteases from other Aspergillus species. The objective of the present paper was to characterize AoS28D protease in terms of substrate specificity and activity. AoS28D produced by gene overexpression in A. oryzae and in Pichia pastoris was a 70-kDa glycoprotein with a 10-kDa sugar moiety. In contrast with other S28 proteases, AoS28D did not hydrolyze internal Pro-Xaa bonds of several tested peptides. Similarly, to human lysosomal Pro-Xaa carboxypeptidase, AoS28D demonstrated selectivity for cleaving C-terminal Pro-Xaa bonds which are resistant to carboxypeptidases of the S10 family concomitantly secreted by A. oryzae. Therefore, AoS28D could act in synergy with these enzymes during sequential degradation of a peptide from its C-terminus.

  8. Pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activities in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid and hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary axes of rats with mammary gland cancer induced by N-methyl nitrosourea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, M P; Ramírez-Expósito, M J; Valenzuela, M T; García, M J; Mayas, M D; Arias de Saavedra, J M; Sánchez, R; Pérez, M C; Martínez-Martos, J M

    2005-02-01

    Pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase is an omega-peptidase that hydrolyses N-terminal pyroglutamyl residues from biologically active peptides such as gonadotropin-releasing and thyrotrophin-releasing hormones. We previously described a decrease in both rat and human pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activity with breast cancer, suggesting that gonadotropin-releasing hormone may be an important local intracrine, autocrine and/or paracrine hormonal factor in the pathogenesis of breast cancer while playing a role in the tumoral process. However, the other susceptible substrate of pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase, thyrotrophin-releasing hormone, may also be modified with breast cancer, supporting an association between breast cancer and thyroid disorders. The present work analyses soluble and membrane-bound pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activities in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid and hypothalamus-pituitary-ovary axes in N-methyl nitrosourea-induced breast cancer in rats. Our aim was to determine the possible relationship between gonadotropin-releasing hormone and thyrotrophin-releasing hormone regulation through pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activity. We propose that pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activity dysregulation at various local and systemic levels may participate in the initiation, promotion and progression of breast cancer induced in rat by N-methyl nitrosourea through the increase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone. Since pyrrolidon carboxypeptidase activity also acts on thyrotrophin-releasing hormone, the dysregulation of this enzyme's activity could indirectly affect hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis function, and thus potentially represent a link between the diseases of thyroid and breast cancer.

  9. Carboxypeptidase-D is elevated in prostate cancer and its anti-apoptotic activity is abolished by combined androgen and prolactin receptor targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lynn N; Merrimen, Jennifer; Bell, David G; Rendon, Ricardo; Goffin, Vincent; Too, Catherine K L

    2014-05-01

    Carboxypeptidase-D (CPD) cleaves C-terminal arginine for nitric oxide (NO) production. CPD and NO levels are upregulated by testosterone (T) and prolactin (PRL) to promote survival of prostate cancer (pCa) cells. This study evaluated CPD immunostaining and T/PRL regulation of CPD and NO levels in benign and malignant prostate tissues/cells to determine the role of CPD in pCa. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and tissue microarrays (TMA) were used to determine CPD immunostaining in prostate specimens. QPCR and immunoblotting were used to quantify CPD mRNA/protein expression in prostate cells. NO production was measured using 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate assay. CPD staining increased from 8.9 ± 3.8% (Mean ± SEM, n = 15) of benign epithelial cell area to 30.9 ± 2.9% (n = 30) of tumor cell area in one set of TMAs (P = 0.0008) and from 5.9 ± 0.9% (n = 45) of benign epithelial cell area to 18.8 ± 1.9% (n = 55) of tumor area in another (P prostate tissues (≥50 mm(2)) confirmed increased CPD staining, from 13.1 ± 2.9% in benign (n = 16) to 29.5 ± 4.4% in pCa (n = 31, P = 0.0095). T and/or PRL increased CPD expression in several pCa but not benign cell lines. T and PRL acted synergistically to increase NO production, which was abolished only when receptor antagonists flutamide and Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL were used together. CPD immunostaining and T/PRL-stimulated CPD expression were higher in pCa than benign tissues/cells. Elevated CPD increased NO production, which was abolished when both AR and PRLR were inhibited. Our study implicates a critical role for the T/PRL-stimulated CPD-Arg-NO pathway in pCa progression, and suggests that AR+PRLR inhibition is a more effective treatment for pCa. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The pro region required for folding of carboxypeptidase Y is a partially folded domain with little regular structural core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P; Winther, Jakob R.; Kaarsholm, N C

    1993-01-01

    The pro region of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) from yeast is necessary for the correct folding of the enzyme [Winther, J. R., & Sørensen P. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 88, 9330-9334]. Using fluorescence, circular dichroism, and heteronuclear NMR analyses, it is demonstrated that the isolated...

  11. Yeast carboxypeptidase Y requires glycosylation for efficient intracellular transport, but not for vacuolar sorting, in vivo stability, or activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Jakob R.; Stevens, T H; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    1991-01-01

    Functions of the carbohydrate side chains of the yeast vacuolar enzyme carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) were investigated by removal, through site-directed mutagenesis, of the sequences which act as signals for N-linked glycosylation. The mutant forms of the enzyme were analysed with respect to activity...

  12. High-resolution structure of the M14-type cytosolic carboxypeptidase from Burkholderia cenocepacia refined exploiting PDB-REDO strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimsa, Vadim; Eadsforth, Thomas C. [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Joosten, Robbie P. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-01

    The structure of a bacterial M14-family carboxypeptidase determined exploiting microfocus synchrotron radiation and highly automated refinement protocols reveals its potential to act as a polyglutamylase. A potential cytosolic metallocarboxypeptidase from Burkholderia cenocepacia has been crystallized and a synchrotron-radiation microfocus beamline allowed the acquisition of diffraction data to 1.9 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit comprises a tetramer containing over 1500 amino acids, and the high-throughput automated protocols embedded in PDB-REDO were coupled with model–map inspections in refinement. This approach has highlighted the value of such protocols for efficient analyses. The subunit is constructed from two domains. The N-terminal domain has previously only been observed in cytosolic carboxypeptidase (CCP) proteins. The C-terminal domain, which carries the Zn{sup 2+}-containing active site, serves to classify this protein as a member of the M14D subfamily of carboxypeptidases. Although eukaryotic CCPs possess deglutamylase activity and are implicated in processing modified tubulin, the function and substrates of the bacterial family members remain unknown. The B. cenocepacia protein did not display deglutamylase activity towards a furylacryloyl glutamate derivative, a potential substrate. Residues previously shown to coordinate the divalent cation and that contribute to peptide-bond cleavage in related enzymes such as bovine carboxypeptidase are conserved. The location of a conserved basic patch in the active site adjacent to the catalytic Zn{sup 2+}, where an acetate ion is identified, suggests recognition of the carboxy-terminus in a similar fashion to other carboxypeptidases. However, there are significant differences that indicate the recognition of substrates with different properties. Of note is the presence of a lysine in the S1′ recognition subsite that suggests specificity towards an acidic substrate.

  13. High-resolution structure of the M14-type cytosolic carboxypeptidase from Burkholderia cenocepacia refined exploiting PDB-REDO strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimsa, Vadim; Eadsforth, Thomas C.; Joosten, Robbie P.; Hunter, William N.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of a bacterial M14-family carboxypeptidase determined exploiting microfocus synchrotron radiation and highly automated refinement protocols reveals its potential to act as a polyglutamylase. A potential cytosolic metallocarboxypeptidase from Burkholderia cenocepacia has been crystallized and a synchrotron-radiation microfocus beamline allowed the acquisition of diffraction data to 1.9 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit comprises a tetramer containing over 1500 amino acids, and the high-throughput automated protocols embedded in PDB-REDO were coupled with model–map inspections in refinement. This approach has highlighted the value of such protocols for efficient analyses. The subunit is constructed from two domains. The N-terminal domain has previously only been observed in cytosolic carboxypeptidase (CCP) proteins. The C-terminal domain, which carries the Zn 2+ -containing active site, serves to classify this protein as a member of the M14D subfamily of carboxypeptidases. Although eukaryotic CCPs possess deglutamylase activity and are implicated in processing modified tubulin, the function and substrates of the bacterial family members remain unknown. The B. cenocepacia protein did not display deglutamylase activity towards a furylacryloyl glutamate derivative, a potential substrate. Residues previously shown to coordinate the divalent cation and that contribute to peptide-bond cleavage in related enzymes such as bovine carboxypeptidase are conserved. The location of a conserved basic patch in the active site adjacent to the catalytic Zn 2+ , where an acetate ion is identified, suggests recognition of the carboxy-terminus in a similar fashion to other carboxypeptidases. However, there are significant differences that indicate the recognition of substrates with different properties. Of note is the presence of a lysine in the S1′ recognition subsite that suggests specificity towards an acidic substrate

  14. Insight into the transition between the open and closed conformations of Thermus thermophilus carboxypeptidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okai, Masahiko; Yamamura, Akihiro; Hayakawa, Kou; Tsutsui, Shiho; Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Lee, Woo-Cheol; Nagata, Koji; Inoue, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru

    2017-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase cleaves the C-terminal amino acid residue from proteins and peptides. Here, we report the functional and structural characterizations of carboxypeptidase belonging to the M32 family from the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TthCP). TthCP exhibits a relatively broad specificity for both hydrophilic (neutral and basic) and hydrophobic (aliphatic and aromatic) residues at the C-terminus and shows optimal activity in the temperature range of 75–80 °C and in the pH range of 6.8–7.2. Enzyme activity was significantly enhanced by cobalt or cadmium and was moderately inhibited by Tris at 25 °C. We also determined the crystal structure of TthCP at 2.6 Å resolution. Two dimer types of TthCP are present in the crystal. One type consists of two subunits in different states, open and closed, with a C α RMSD value of 2.2 Å; the other type consists of two subunits in the same open state. This structure enables us to compare the open and closed states of an M32 carboxypeptidase. The TthCP subunit can be divided into two domains, L and S, which are separated by a substrate-binding groove. The L and S domains in the open state are almost identical to those in the closed state, with C α RMSD values of 0.84 and 0.53 Å, respectively, suggesting that the transition between the open and closed states proceeds with a large hinge-bending motion. The superimposition between the closed states of TthCP and BsuCP, another M32 family member, revealed that most putative substrate-binding residues in the grooves are oriented in the same direction. - Highlights: • The enzyme activity of TthCP was inhibited moderately by Tris molecule. • We solved the crystal structure of TthCP at 2.6 Å resolution. • The crystal structure of TthCP revealed both the open and closed conformations.

  15. Three-dimensional structure of recombinant carboxypeptidase T from Thermoactinomyces vulgaris without calcium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akparov, V. Kh.; Timofeev, V. I.; Kuranova, I. P.

    2011-07-01

    Crystals of recombinant carboxypeptidase T (CPT) from Thermoactinomyces vulgaris were grown in a capillary by the counterdiffusion method in the absence of calcium ions. The three-dimensional structure of CPT was solved at 1.69-Å resolution using the X-ray diffraction data collected from the crystals of the enzyme on the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility and was then refined to Rfact = 16.903% and Rfree = 18.165%. The coordinates of the refined model were deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB ID: 3QNV). A comparison of this structure with the structure of wild-type CPT containing bound calcium ions, which was determined earlier, revealed a number of conformational changes both in the calcium-binding sites and the enzyme active site. Based on the results of this comparison, the possible factors responsible for the difference in the catalytic activity of the two forms of the enzyme are considered.

  16. Acetylornithine deacetylase, succinyldiaminopimelate desuccinylase and carboxypeptidase G2 are evolutionarily related.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyen, A; Charlier, D; Charlier, J; Sakanyan, V; Mett, I; Glansdorff, N

    1992-07-01

    The nucleotide (nt) sequence of the Escherichia coli argE gene, encoding the acetylornithine deacetylase (AO) subunit, has been established and corresponds to a 43-kDa (M(r) 42,320) polypeptide. The enzyme has been purified to near homogeneity and it appears to be a dimer consisting of two 43-kDa subunits. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nt sequence was compared to that of the subunit of E. coli succinyldiaminopimelate desuccinylase (the dapE gene product involved in the diaminopimelate pathway for lysine biosynthesis), since both enzymes share functional and biochemical features. Significant similarity covering the entire sequence allows us to infer a common origin for both deacylases. This homology extends to the Pseudomonas sp. G2 carboxypeptidase (G2CP); this or a functionally related enzyme may be responsible for the minor AO activity found in organisms relying on ornithine acetyltransferase for ornithine biosynthesis.

  17. AmpH, a bifunctional DD-endopeptidase and DD-carboxypeptidase of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Leiza, Silvia M; de Pedro, Miguel A; Ayala, Juan A

    2011-12-01

    In Escherichia coli, low-molecular-mass penicillin-binding proteins (LMM PBPs) are important for correct cell morphogenesis. These enzymes display DD-carboxypeptidase and/or dd-endopeptidase activities associated with maturation and remodeling of peptidoglycan (PG). AmpH has been classified as an AmpH-type class C LMM PBP, a group closely related to AmpC β-lactamases. AmpH has been associated with PG recycling, although its enzymatic activity remained uncharacterized until now. Construction and purification of His-tagged AmpH from E. coli permitted a detailed study of its enzymatic properties. The N-terminal export signal of AmpH is processed, but the protein remains membrane associated. The PBP nature of AmpH was demonstrated by its ability to bind the β-lactams Bocillin FL (a fluorescent penicillin) and cefmetazole. In vitro assays with AmpH and specific muropeptides demonstrated that AmpH is a bifunctional DD-endopeptidase and DD-carboxypeptidase. Indeed, the enzyme cleaved the cross-linked dimers tetrapentapeptide (D45) and tetratetrapeptide (D44) with efficiencies (k(cat)/K(m)) of 1,200 M(-1) s(-1) and 670 M(-1) s(-1), respectively, and removed the terminal D-alanine from muropeptides with a C-terminal D-Ala-D-Ala dipeptide. Both DD-peptidase activities were inhibited by 40 μM cefmetazole. AmpH also displayed a weak β-lactamase activity for nitrocefin of 1.4 × 10(-3) nmol/μg protein/min, 1/1,000 the rate obtained for AmpC under the same conditions. AmpH was also active on purified sacculi, exhibiting the bifunctional character that was seen with pure muropeptides. The wide substrate spectrum of the DD-peptidase activities associated with AmpH supports a role for this protein in PG remodeling or recycling.

  18. Inhibition of neurotensin-stimulated mast cell secretion and carboxypeptidase A activity by the peptide inhibitor of carboxypeptidase A and neurotensin-receptor antagonist SR 48692.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L A; Cochrane, D E; Feldberg, R S; Carraway, R E

    1998-06-01

    Neurotensin (NT), a peptide found in brain and several peripheral tissues, is a potent stimulus for mast cell secretion and its actions are blocked by the specific NT receptor antagonist, SR 48692. Subsequent to stimulation, NT is rapidly degraded by mast cell carboxypeptidase A (CPA). In the experiments described here, we tested for the involvement of CPA activity in the activation of mast cell secretion by the peptide, NT. Mast cells were isolated from the peritoneal and pleural cavities of rats, purified over metrizamide gradients and incubated at 37 degrees C in Locke solution or Locke containing the appropriate inhibitors. For some experiments, media derived from mast cells stimulated by compound 48/80 were used as a source of mast cell CPA activity. Treatment of mast cells with the highly specific peptide inhibitor of CPA derived from potato (PCI) inhibited histamine release in response to NT and NT8-13 (the biologically active region of NT). This inhibition required some 20 min to develop and was only partially reversed by a 20-min wash period. PCI (10 microM) did not inhibit histamine release in response to NT1-12, bradykinin, compound 48/80, the calcium ionophore, A23187, or anti-IgE serum. PCI also inhibited mast cell CPA activity. SR 48692, a highly selective antagonist of the brain NT receptor and of NT-stimulated mast cell secretion, also inhibited mast cell CPA activity as well as bovine pancreatic CPA activity in a concentration-dependent manner. It is suggested that the mast cell binding site for NT and the active site for CPA may share similar characteristics. The results are discussed in terms of NT mechanism of action on the mast cell.

  19. Interaction of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) with membrane-bound carboxypeptidase M (CPM) - a new function of ACE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoou; Wiesner, Burkhard; Lorenz, Dorothea; Papsdorf, Gisela; Pankow, Kristin; Wang, Po; Dietrich, Nils; Siems, Wolf-Eberhard; Maul, Björn

    2008-12-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) demonstrates, besides its typical dipeptidyl-carboxypeptidase activity, several unusual functions. Here, we demonstrate with molecular, biochemical, and cellular techniques that the somatic wild-type murine ACE (mACE), stably transfected in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) or Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells, interacts with endogenous membranal co-localized carboxypeptidase M (CPM). CPM belongs to the group of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins. Here we report that ACE, completely independent of its known dipeptidase activities, has GPI-targeted properties. Our results indicate that the spatial proximity between mACE and the endogenous CPM enables an ACE-evoked release of CPM. These results are discussed with respect to the recently proposed GPI-ase activity and function of sperm-bound ACE.

  20. Development of a High-Throughput Fluorescence Polarization Assay to Identify Novel Ligands of Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alquicer, Glenda; Sedlák, David; Byun, Y.; Pavlíček, Jiří; Stathis, M.; Rojas, C.; Slusher, B.; Pomper, M.G.; Bartůněk, Petr; Bařinka, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 8 (2012), s. 1030-1040 ISSN 1087-0571 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10031; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : fluorescence polarization * glutamate carboxypeptidase II * high-throughput screening Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.207, year: 2012

  1. Prolyl carboxypeptidase in Agouti-related Peptide neurons modulates food intake and body weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Bruschetta

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Prolyl carboxypeptidase (PRCP plays a role in the regulation of energy metabolism by inactivating hypothalamic α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH levels. Although detected in the arcuate nucleus, limited PRCP expression has been observed in the arcuate POMC neurons, and its site of action in regulating metabolism is still ill-defined. Methods: We performed immunostaining to assess the localization of PRCP in arcuate Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related Peptide (NPY/AgRP neurons. Hypothalamic explants were then used to assess the intracellular localization of PRCP and its release at the synaptic levels. Finally, we generated a mouse model to assess the role of PRCP in NPY/AgRP neurons of the arcuate nucleus in the regulation of metabolism. Results: Here we show that PRCP is expressed in NPY/AgRP-expressing neurons of the arcuate nucleus. In hypothalamic explants, stimulation by ghrelin increased PRCP concentration in the medium and decreased PRCP content in synaptic extract, suggesting that PRCP is released at the synaptic level. In support of this, hypothalamic explants from mice with selective deletion of PRCP in AgRP neurons (PrcpAgRPKO showed reduced ghrelin-induced PRCP concentration in the medium compared to controls mice. Furthermore, male PrcpAgRPKO mice had decreased body weight and fat mass compared to controls. However, this phenotype was sex-specific as female PrcpAgRPKO mice show metabolic differences only when challenged by high fat diet feeding. The improved metabolism of PrcpAgRPKO mice was associated with reduced food intake and increased energy expenditure, locomotor activity, and hypothalamic α-MSH levels. Administration of SHU9119, a potent melanocortin receptor antagonist, selectively in the PVN of PrcpAgRPKO male mice increased food intake to a level similar to that of control mice. Conclusions: Altogether, our data indicate that PRCP is released at the synaptic levels and that PRCP in AgRP neurons contributes to

  2. The glutamate carboxypeptidase AMP1 mediates abscisic acid and abiotic stress responses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yiting; Wang, Zheng; Meng, Pei; Tian, Siqi; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Shuhua

    2013-07-01

    ALTERED MERISTEM PROGRAM1 (AMP1) encodes a glutamate carboxypeptidase that plays an important role in shoot apical meristem development and phytohormone homeostasis. We isolated a new mutant allele of AMP1, amp1-20, from a screen for abscisic acid (ABA) hypersensitive mutants and characterized the function of AMP1 in plant stress responses. amp1 mutants displayed ABA hypersensitivity, while overexpression of AMP1 caused ABA insensitivity. Moreover, endogenous ABA concentration was increased in amp1-20- and decreased in AMP1-overexpressing plants under stress conditions. Application of ABA reduced the AMP1 protein level in plants. Interestingly, amp1 mutants accumulated excess superoxide and displayed hypersensitivity to oxidative stress. The hypersensitivity of amp1 to ABA and oxidative stress was partially rescued by reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging agent. Furthermore, amp1 was tolerant to freezing and drought stress. The ABA hypersensitivity and freezing tolerance of amp1 was dependent on ABA signaling. Moreover, amp1 had elevated soluble sugar content and showed hypersensitivity to high concentrations of sugar. By contrast, the contents of amino acids were changed in amp1 mutant compared to the wild-type. This study suggests that AMP1 modulates ABA, oxidative and abotic stress responses, and is involved in carbon and amino acid metabolism in Arabidopsis. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Enkephalin dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase (enkephalinase) activity: selective radioassay, properties, and regional distribution in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llorens, C.; Malfroy, B.; Schwartz, J.C.; Gacel, G.; Roques, B.P.; Roy, J.; Morgat, J.L.; Javoy-Agid, F.; Agid, Y.

    1982-01-01

    The compound [ 3 H-Tyr 1 ,D-Ala 2 ,Leu-OH 5 ]enkephalin has been synthesised as a potentially selective substrate for enkephalin dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase (enkephalinase) activity in brain. Incubations in the presence of homogenates and particulate fractions from rodent and human brain result in the formation of [ 3 H]Tyr-D-Ala-Gly, which can be conveniently isolated by polystyrene bead column chromatography. The enzyme activity responsible for the hydrolysis of the Gly 3 -Phe 4 amide bond of this substrate displays close resemblance to that hydrolysing the natural enkephalins at the same level. In addition, enkephalinase activity characterised in postmortem human brain is closely similar to that in rodent brain, with regard to optimal pH and apparent affinities of various substrates and inhibitors, including the potent compound thiorphan. Enkephalinase activity is distributed in a highly heterogeneous fashion among regions of human brain, the highest levels being found in globus pallidus and pars reticulata of the substantia nigra. This distribution is poorly correlated with that of opiate receptor binding sites but displays some resemblance to that of reported Met 5 -enkephalin levels. (author)

  4. Mice lacking glutamate carboxypeptidase II develop normally, but are less susceptible to traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Xu, Siyi; Cui, Zhenwen; Zhang, Mingkun; Lin, Yingying; Cai, Lei; Wang, Zhugang; Luo, Xingguang; Zheng, Yan; Wang, Yong; Luo, Qizhong; Jiang, Jiyao; Neale, Joseph H; Zhong, Chunlong

    2015-07-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) is a transmembrane zinc metallopeptidase found mainly in the nervous system, prostate and small intestine. In the nervous system, glia-bound GCPII mediates the hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) into glutamate and N-acetylaspartate. Inhibition of GCPII has been shown to attenuate excitotoxicity associated with enhanced glutamate transmission under pathological conditions. However, different strains of mice lacking the GCPII gene are reported to exhibit striking phenotypic differences. In this study, a GCPII gene knockout (KO) strategy involved removing exons 3-5 of GCPII. This generated a new GCPII KO mice line with no overt differences in standard neurological behavior compared to their wild-type (WT) littermates. However, GCPII KO mice were significantly less susceptible to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). GCPII gene KO significantly lessened neuronal degeneration and astrocyte damage in the CA2 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus 24 h after moderate TBI. In addition, GCPII gene KO reduced TBI-induced deficits in long-term spatial learning/memory tested in the Morris water maze and motor balance tested via beam walking. Knockout of the GCPII gene is not embryonic lethal and affords histopathological protection with improved long-term behavioral outcomes after TBI, a result that further validates GCPII as a target for drug development consistent with results from studies using GCPII peptidase inhibitors. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. Mapping of Carboxypeptidase M in Normal Human Kidney and Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Catherine J.; Van Acker, Nathalie; De Schepper, Stefanie; De Bie, Martine; Andries, Luc; Fransen, Erik; Hendriks, Dirk; Kockx, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Although the kidney generally has been regarded as an excellent source of carboxypeptidase M (CPM), little is known about its renal-specific expression level and distribution. This study provides a detailed localization of CPM in healthy and diseased human kidneys. The results indicate a broad distribution of CPM along the renal tubular structures in the healthy kidney. CPM was identified at the parietal epithelium beneath the Bowman’s basement membrane and in glomerular mesangial cells. Capillaries, podocytes, and most interstitial cells were CPM negative. Tumor cells of renal cell carcinoma subtypes lose CPM expression upon dedifferentiation. Tissue microarray analysis demonstrated a correlation between low CPM expression and tumor cell type. CPM staining was intense on phagocytotic tumor-associated macrophages. Immunoreactive CPM was also detected in the tumor-associated vasculature. The absence of CPM in normal renal blood vessels points toward a role for CPM in angiogenesis. Coexistence of CPM and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was detected in papillary renal cell carcinoma. However, the different subcellular localization of CPM and EGFR argues against an interaction between these h proteins. The description of the distribution of CPM in human kidney forms the foundation for further study of the (patho)physiological activities of CPM in the kidney. PMID:23172796

  6. High expression of human carboxypeptidase M in Pichia pastoris: Purification and partial characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craveiro R.B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Carboxypeptidase M (CPM is an extracellular glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol-anchored membrane glycoprotein, which removes the C-terminal basic residues, lysine and arginine, from peptides and proteins at neutral pH. CPM plays an important role in the control of peptide hormones and growth factor activity on the cell surface. The present study was carried out to clone and express human CPM in the yeast Pichia pastoris in order to evaluate the importance of this enzyme in physiological and pathological processes. The cDNA for the enzyme was amplified from total placental RNA by RT-PCR and cloned in the vector pPIC9, which uses the methanol oxidase promoter and drives the expression of high levels of heterologous proteins in P. pastoris. The cpm gene, after cloning and transfection, was integrated into the yeast genome, which produced the active protein. The recombinant protein was secreted into the medium and the enzymatic activity was measured using the fluorescent substrate dansyl-Ala-Arg. The enzyme was purified by a two-step protocol including gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography, resulting in a 1753-fold purified active protein (16474 RFU mg protein-1 min-1. This purification protocol permitted us to obtain 410 mg of the purified protein per liter of fermentation medium. SDS-PAGE showed that recombinant CPM migrated as a single band with a molecular mass similar to that of native placental enzyme (62 kDa, suggesting that the expression of a glycosylated protein had occurred. These results demonstrate for the first time the establishment of a method using P. pastoris to express human CPM necessary to the development of specific antibodies and antagonists, and the analysis of the involvement of this peptidase in different physiological and pathological processes

  7. High expression of human carboxypeptidase M in Pichia pastoris: Purification and partial characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.B. Craveiro

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Carboxypeptidase M (CPM is an extracellular glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol-anchored membrane glycoprotein, which removes the C-terminal basic residues, lysine and arginine, from peptides and proteins at neutral pH. CPM plays an important role in the control of peptide hormones and growth factor activity on the cell surface. The present study was carried out to clone and express human CPM in the yeast Pichia pastoris in order to evaluate the importance of this enzyme in physiological and pathological processes. The cDNA for the enzyme was amplified from total placental RNA by RT-PCR and cloned in the vector pPIC9, which uses the methanol oxidase promoter and drives the expression of high levels of heterologous proteins in P. pastoris. The cpm gene, after cloning and transfection, was integrated into the yeast genome, which produced the active protein. The recombinant protein was secreted into the medium and the enzymatic activity was measured using the fluorescent substrate dansyl-Ala-Arg. The enzyme was purified by a two-step protocol including gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography, resulting in a 1753-fold purified active protein (16474 RFU mg protein-1 min-1. This purification protocol permitted us to obtain 410 mg of the purified protein per liter of fermentation medium. SDS-PAGE showed that recombinant CPM migrated as a single band with a molecular mass similar to that of native placental enzyme (62 kDa, suggesting that the expression of a glycosylated protein had occurred. These results demonstrate for the first time the establishment of a method using P. pastoris to express human CPM necessary to the development of specific antibodies and antagonists, and the analysis of the involvement of this peptidase in different physiological and pathological processes

  8. A high-affinity inhibitor of yeast carboxypeptidase Y is encoded by TFS1 and shows homology to a family of lipid binding proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, A W; Svendsen, I; Sørensen, S O

    1998-01-01

    signals for transport into the endoplasmic reticulum. Surprisingly, Ic is encoded by TFS1, which has previously been isolated as a high-copy suppressor of cdc25-1. CDC25 encodes the putative GTP exchange factor for Ras1p/Ras2p in yeast. In an attempt to rationalize this finding, we looked...... degree of specificity, showing a 200-fold higher Ki toward a carboxypeptidase from Candida albicans which is highly homologous to carboxypeptidase Y. The TFS1 gene product shows extensive similarity to a class of proteins termed "21-23-kDa lipid binding proteins", members of which are found in several...

  9. Multiple RNAs from the mouse carboxypeptidase M locus: functional RNAs or transcription noise?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castilho Beatriz A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major effort of the scientific community has been to obtain complete pictures of the genomes of many organisms. This has been accomplished mainly by annotation of structural and functional elements in the genome sequence, a process that has been centred in the gene concept and, as a consequence, biased toward protein coding sequences. Recently, the explosion of transcriptome data generated and the discovery of many functional non-protein coding RNAs have painted a more detailed and complex scenario for the genome. Here we analyzed the mouse carboxypeptidase M locus in this broader perspective in order to define the mouse CPM gene structure and evaluate the existence of other transcripts from the same genomic region. Results Bioinformatic analysis of nucleotide sequences that map to the mouse CPM locus suggests that, in addition to the mouse CPM mRNA, it expresses at least 33 different transcripts, many of which seem to be non-coding RNAs. We randomly chose to evaluate experimentally four of these extra transcripts. They are expressed in a tissue specific manner, indicating that they are not artefacts or transcriptional noise. Furthermore, one of these four extra transcripts shows expression patterns that differed considerably from the other ones and from the mouse CPM gene, suggesting that there may be more than one transcriptional unit in this locus. In addition, we have confirmed the mouse CPM gene RefSeq sequence by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE and directional cloning. Conclusion This study supports the recent view that the majority of the genome is transcribed and that many of the resulting transcripts seem to be non-coding RNAs from introns of genes or from independent transcriptional units. Although some of the information on the transcriptome of many organisms may actually be artefacts or transcriptional noise, we argue that it can be experimentally evaluated and used to find and define biological

  10. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against glutamate carboxypeptidase II, the diagnostic and potential therapeutic prostate cancer marker, via the method of surface plasmon resonance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tykvart, Jan; Šácha, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 279, SI suppl. 1 (2012), s. 90-90 ISSN 1742-464X. [IUBMB Congress /22./ and FEBS Congress /37./. 04.09.2012-09.09.2012, Seville] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : glutamate carboxypeptidase II Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  11. Nitrogen source and growth stage of Candida albicans influence expression level of vacuolar aspartic protease Apr1p and carboxypeptidase Cpy1p

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bauerová, Václava; Pichová, Iva; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 5 (2012), s. 678-681 ISSN 0008-4166 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC531; GA ČR GA310/09/1945 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Candida albicans * carboxypeptidase Y * nitrogen starvation * vacuole Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.199, year: 2012

  12. Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II: An Overview of Structural Studies and Their Importance for Structure-Based Drug Design and Deciphering the Reaction Mechanism of the Enzyme

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlíček, Jiří; Ptáček, Jakub; Bařinka, Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 9 (2012), s. 1300-1309 ISSN 0929-8673 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10031 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Glutamate carboxypeptidase II * prostate-specific membrane antigen * metallopeptidase * X-ray crystallography Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.070, year: 2012

  13. Peptide synthesis by enzymatic catalysis: new application to the total radiosynthesis of the tritiated leucine-enkephalin hormone, using Y carboxypeptidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellio, F.

    1986-01-01

    A new method of enzymatic labelling of peptide hormones is described. The enzyme used, a protease, Y carboxypeptidase is able, in some conditions, to catalyze the formation of peptide bounds. This property has been used for the synthesis of a pentapeptide, the tritiated leucine-enkephalin, with the incorporation of every radioactive amino acid. The specific radioactivity of the labelled molecule is 139 Ci/mmole and its biological properties (receptor binding and immunoreactivity) are identical with native leucine-enkephalin properties [fr

  14. Messenger RNAs from the Scutellum and Aleurone of Germinating Barley Encode (1-->3,1-->4)-beta-d-Glucanase, alpha-Amylase and Carboxypeptidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mundy, John; Brandt, Anders; Fincher, Geoffrey B

    1985-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies raised against barley (1-->3,1-->4)-beta-d-glucanase, alpha-amylase and carboxypeptidase were used to detect precursor polypeptides of these hydrolytic enzymes among the in vitro translation products of mRNA isolated from the scutellum and aleurone of germinating barley....... In the scutellum, mRNA encoding carboxypeptidase appeared to be relatively more abundant than that encoding alpha-amylase or (1-->3,1-->4)-beta-d-glucanase, while in the aleurone alpha-amylase and (1-->3,1-->4)-beta-d-glucanase mRNAs predominated. The apparent molecular weights of the precursors for (1......-->3,1-->4)-beta-d-glucanase, alpha-amylase, and carboxypeptidase were 33,000, 44,000, and 35,000, respectively. In each case these are slightly higher (1,500-5,000) than molecular weights of the mature enzymes. Molecular weights of precursors immunoprecipitated from aleurone and scutellum mRNA translation...

  15. A vacuolar carboxypeptidase mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is degraded by the ERAD pathway independently of its N-glycan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Masaya; Kawanabe, Mitsuyoshi; Hayashi, Yoko; Endo, Toshiya; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi

    2010-01-01

    Misfolded proteins produced in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are degraded by a mechanism, the ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Here we report establishment of the experimental system to analyze the ERAD in plant cells. Carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) is a vacuolar enzyme and its mutant CPY* is degraded by the ERAD in yeast. Since Arabidopsis thaliana has AtCPY, an ortholog of yeast CPY, we constructed and expressed fusion proteins consisting of AtCPY and GFP and of AtCPY*, which carries a mutation homologous to yeast CPY*, and GFP in A. thaliana cells. While AtCPY-GFP was efficiently transported to the vacuole, AtCPY*-GFP was retained in the ER to be degraded in proteasome- and Cdc48-dependent manners. We also found that AtCPY*-GFP was degraded by the ERAD in yeast cells, but that its single N-glycan did not function as a degradation signal in yeast or plant cells. Therefore, AtCPY*-GFP can be used as a marker protein to analyze the ERAD pathway, likely for nonglycosylated substrates, in plant cells.

  16. Cytoplasmic peptide:N-glycanase cleaves N-glycans on a carboxypeptidase Y mutant during ERAD in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosomi, Akira; Suzuki, Tadashi

    2015-04-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) is a pathway by which misfolded or improperly assembled proteins in the ER are directed to degradation. The cytoplasmic peptide:N-glycanase (PNGase) is a deglycosylating enzyme that cleaves N-glycans from misfolded glycoproteins during the ERAD process. The mutant form of yeast carboxypeptidase Y (CPY*) is an ERAD model substrate that has been extensively studied in yeast. While a delay in the degradation of CPY* in yeast cells lacking the cytoplasmic PNGase (Png1 in yeast) was evident, the in vivo action of PNGase on CPY* has not been detected. We constructed new ERAD substrates derived from CPY*, bearing epitope tags at both N- and C-termini and examined the degradation intermediates observed in yeast cells with compromised proteasome activity. The occurrence of the PNGase-mediated deglycosylation of intact CPY* and its degradation intermediates was evident. A major endoproteolytic reaction on CPY* appears to occur between amino acid 400 and 404. The findings reported herein clearly indicate that PNGase indeed releases N-glycans from CPY* during the ERAD process in vivo. This report implies that the PNGase-mediated deglycosylation during the ERAD process may occur more abundantly than currently envisaged. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. N-Glycosylation analysis of yeast Carboxypeptidase Y reveals the ultimate removal of phosphate from glycans at Asn368.

    Science.gov (United States)

    B S, Gnanesh Kumar; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2017-05-01

    Carboxypeptidase Y from Saccharomyces cerivisiae was characterized for its site specific N-glycosylation through mass spectrometry. The N-glycopeptides were derived using non specific proteases and are analysed directly on liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap mass spectrometer in tandem mode. The evaluation of glycan fragment ions and the Y 1 ions (peptide+HexNAc) +n revealed the glycan sequence and the corresponding site of attachment. We observed the microheterogeneity in N-glycans such as Man 11-15 GlcNAc 2 at Asn 13 , Man 8-12 GlcNAc 2 at Asn 87 , Man 9-14 GlcNAc 2 at Asn 168 and phosphorylated Man 12-17 GlcNAc 2 as well as Man 11-16 GlcNAc 2 at Asn 368 . The presence of N-glycans with Man <18 GlcNAc 2 indicated that in vacuoles the steady release of mannose/phospho mannose residues from glycans occurs initially at Asn 13 or Asn 168 followed by at Asn 368 . However, glycans at Asn 87 which comprises Man 8-12 residues as reported earlier remain intact suggesting its inaccessibility for a similar processing. This in turn indicates the interaction of the glycan at Asn 87 with the polypeptide chain implicating it in the folding of the protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A vacuolar carboxypeptidase mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is degraded by the ERAD pathway independently of its N-glycan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Masaya; Kawanabe, Mitsuyoshi; Hayashi, Yoko; Endo, Toshiya [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi, E-mail: shuh@biochem.chem.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2010-03-12

    Misfolded proteins produced in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are degraded by a mechanism, the ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Here we report establishment of the experimental system to analyze the ERAD in plant cells. Carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) is a vacuolar enzyme and its mutant CPY* is degraded by the ERAD in yeast. Since Arabidopsis thaliana has AtCPY, an ortholog of yeast CPY, we constructed and expressed fusion proteins consisting of AtCPY and GFP and of AtCPY*, which carries a mutation homologous to yeast CPY*, and GFP in A. thaliana cells. While AtCPY-GFP was efficiently transported to the vacuole, AtCPY*-GFP was retained in the ER to be degraded in proteasome- and Cdc48-dependent manners. We also found that AtCPY*-GFP was degraded by the ERAD in yeast cells, but that its single N-glycan did not function as a degradation signal in yeast or plant cells. Therefore, AtCPY*-GFP can be used as a marker protein to analyze the ERAD pathway, likely for nonglycosylated substrates, in plant cells.

  19. Three-dimensional structure of potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor in solution. A study using nuclear magnetic resonance, distance geometry, and restrained molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clore, G.M.; Gronenborn, A.M.; Nilges, M.; Ryan, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    The solution conformation of potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (CPI) has been investigated by 1 H NMR spectroscopy. The spectrum is assigned in a sequential manner by using two-dimensional NMR techniques to identify through-bond and through-space (<5 A) connectivities. A set of 309 approximate interproton distance restraints is derived from the two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectra and used as the basis of a three-dimensional structure determination by a combination of metric matrix distance geometry and restrained molecular dynamics calculations. A total of 11 converged distance geometry structures were computed and refined by using restrained molecular dynamics. The average atomic root mean square (rms) difference between the final 11 structures and the mean structure obtained by averaging their coordinates is 1.4 +/- 0.3 A for residues 2-39 and 0.9 +/- 0.2 A for residues 5-37. The corresponding values for all atoms are 1.9 +/- 0.3 and 1.4 +/- 0.2 A, respectively. The computed structures are very close to the X-ray structure of CPI in its complex with carboxypeptidase, and the backbone atomic rms difference between the mean of the computed structures and the X-ray structure is only 1.2 A. Nevertheless, there are some real differences present which are evidenced by significant deviations between the experimental upper interproton distance limits and the corresponding interproton distances derived from the X-ray structure. These principally occur in two regions, residues 18-20 and residues 28-30, the latter comprising part of the region of secondary contact between CPI and carboxypeptidase in the X-ray structure

  20. Mice, double deficient in lysosomal serine carboxypeptidases Scpep1 and Cathepsin A develop the hyperproliferative vesicular corneal dystrophy and hypertrophic skin thickenings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefang Pan

    Full Text Available Vasoactive and mitogenic peptide, endothelin-1 (ET-1 plays an important role in physiology of the ocular tissues by regulating the growth of corneal epithelial cells and maintaining the hemodynamics of intraocular fluids. We have previously established that ET-1 can be degraded in vivo by two lysosomal/secreted serine carboxypeptidases, Cathepsin A (CathA and Serine Carboxypeptidase 1 (Scpep1 and that gene-targeted CathAS190A /Scpep1-/- mice, deficient in CathA and Scpep1 have a prolonged half-life of circulating ET-1 associated with systemic hypertension. In the current work we report that starting from 6 months of age, ~43% of CathAS190A /Scpep1-/- mice developed corneal clouding that eventually caused vision impairment. Histological evaluation of these mice demonstrated a selective fibrotic thickening and vacuolization of the corneas, resembling human hyperproliferative vesicular corneal stromal dystrophy and coexisting with a peculiar thickening of the skin epidermis. Moreover, we found that cultured corneal epithelial cells, skin fibroblasts and vascular smooth muscle cells derived from CathA/Scpep1-deficient mice, demonstrated a significantly higher proliferative response to treatment with exogenous ET-1, as compared with cells from wild type mice. We also detected increased activation level of ERK1/2 and AKT kinases involved in cell proliferation in the ET-1-treated cultured cells from CathA/Scpep1 deficient mice. Together, results from our experimental model suggest that; in normal tissues the tandem of serine carboxypeptidases, Scpep1 and CathA likely constitutes an important part of the physiological mechanism responsible for the balanced elimination of heightened levels of ET-1 that otherwise would accumulate in tissues and consequently contribute to development of the hyper-proliferative corneal dystrophy and abnormal skin thickening.

  1. 11C-MCG: Synthesis, Uptake Selectivity, and Primate PET of a Probe for Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II (NAALADase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin G. Pomper

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Imaging of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCP II, also known as N-acetylated α-linked l-amino dipeptidase (NAALADase, may enable study of glutamatergic transmission, prostate cancer, and tumor neovasculature in vivo. Our goal was to develop a probe for GCP II for use with positron emission tomography (PET. Radiosynthesis of 11C–MeCys–C(O–Glu or 11C-(S-2-[3-((R-1-carboxy-2-methylsulfanyl-ethyl-ureido]-pentanedioic acid (11C-MCG, an asymmetric urea and potent (Ki = 1.9 nM inhibitor of GCP II, was performed by C-11 methylation of the free thiol. Biodistribution of 11C-MCG was assayed in mice, and quantitative PET was performed in a baboon. 11C-MCG was obtained in 16% radiochemical yield at the end of synthesis with specific radioactivities over 167 GBq/mmol (4000 Ci/mmol within 30 min after the end of bombardment. At 30 min postinjection, 11C-MCG showed 33.0 ± 5.1%, 0.4 ± 0.1%, and 1.1 ± 0.2% ID/g in mouse kidney (target tissue, muscle, and blood, respectively. Little radioactivity gained access to the brain. Blockade with unlabeled MCG or 2-(phosphonomethylpentanedioic acid (PMPA, another potent inhibitor of GCP II, provided sevenfold and threefold reductions, respectively, in binding to target tissue. For PET, distribution volumes (DVs were 1.38 then 0.87 pre- and postblocker (PMPA. Little metabolism of 11C-MCG occurred in the mouse or baboon. These results suggest that 11C-MCG may be useful for imaging GCP II in the periphery.

  2. Crystal structure of the complex of carboxypeptidase A with a strongly bound phosphonate in a new crystalline form: comparison with structures of other complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H; Lipscomb, W N

    1990-06-12

    O-[[(1R)-[[N-(Phenylmethoxycarbonyl)-L-alanyl]amino]ethyl] hydroxyphosphinyl]-L-3-phenyllacetate [ZAAP(O)F], an analogue of (benzyloxycarbonyl)-Ala-Ala-Phe or (benzyloxycarbonyl)-Ala-Ala-phenyllactate, binds to carboxypeptidase A with great affinity (Ki = 3 pM). Similar phosphonates have been shown to be transition-state analogues of the CPA-catalyzed hydrolysis [Hanson, J. E., Kaplan, A. P., & Bartlett, P. A. (1989) Biochemistry 28, 6294-6305]. In the present study, the structure of the complex of this phosphonate with carboxypeptidase A has been determined by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 2.0 A. The complex crystallizes in the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with cell dimensions a = 61.9 A, b = 67.2 A, and c = 76.2 A. The structure of the complex was solved by molecular replacement. Refinement of the structure against 20,776 unique reflections between 10.0 and 2.0 A yields a crystallographic residual of 0.193, including 140 water molecules. The two phosphinyl oxygens of the inhibitor bind to the active-site zinc at 2.2 A on the electrophilic (Arg-127) side and 3.1 A on the nucleophilic (Glu-270) side. Various features of the binding mode of this phosphonate inhibitor are consistent with the hypothesis that carboxypeptidase A catalyzed hydrolysis proceeds through a general-base mechanism in which the carbonyl carbon of the substrate is attacked by Zn-hydroxyl (or Zn-water). An unexpected feature of the bound inhibitor, the cis carbamoyl ester bond at the benzyloxycarbonyl linkage to alanine, allows the benzyloxycarbonyl phenyl ring of the inhibitor to interact favorably with Tyr-198. This complex structure is compared with previous structures of carboxypeptidase A, including the complexes with the potato inhibitor, a hydrated keto methylene substrate analogue, and a phosphonamidate inhibitor. Comparisons are also made with the complexes of thermolysin with some phosphonamidate inhibitors.

  3. Mouse glutamate carboxypeptidaseII (GCPII) has a similar enzyme activity and inhibition profile but a different tissue distribution to human GCPII

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knedlík, Tomáš; Vorlová, Barbora; Navrátil, Václav; Tykvart, Jan; Sedlák, František; Vaculín, Š.; Franěk, M.; Šácha, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 9 (2017), s. 1362-1378 ISSN 2211-5463 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-02938S; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : glutamate carboxypeptidase II * mouse animal model * neuronal disorders * prostate cancer * prostate-specific membrane antigen Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.143, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2211-5463.12276/full

  4. D-Arg0-Bradykinin-Arg-Arg, a Latent Vasoactive Bradykinin B2 Receptor Agonist Metabolically Activated by Carboxypeptidases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Bachelard

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported hypotensive and vasodilator effects from C-terminally extended bradykinin (BK sequences that behave as B2 receptor (B2R agonists activated by vascular or plasma peptidases. D-Arg0-BK-Arg-Arg (r-BK-RR is a novel prodrug peptide hypothetically activated by two catalytic cycles of Arg-carboxypeptidases (CPs to release the direct agonist D-Arg0-BK. N-terminally extending the BK sequence with D-Arg0 in the latter peptide was meant to block the second kinin inactivation pathway in importance, aminopeptidase P. The affinity of r-BK and r-BK-RR for recombinant B2R was assessed using a [3H]BK binding displacement assay. Their pharmacology was evaluated in human isolated umbilical vein, a contractile bioassay for the B2R, in a morphological assay involving the endocytosis of B2R-green fusion protein (GFP and in anesthetized rats instrumented to record hemodynamic responses to bolus intravenous injection of both peptides. r-BK exhibited an affinity equal to that of BK for the rat B2R, while r-BK-RR was 61-fold less potent. In the vein and the B2R-GFP internalization assay, r-BK was a direct agonist unaffected by the blockade of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE with enalaprilat, or Arg-CPs with Plummer’s inhibitor. However, the in vitro effects of r-BK-RR were reduced by these inhibitors, more so by enalaprilat. In anesthetized rats, r-BK and r-BK-RR were equipotent hypotensive agents and their effects were inhibited by icatibant (a B2R antagonist. The hypotensive effects of r-BK were potentiated by enalaprilat, but not influenced by the Arg-CPs inhibitor, which is consistent with a minor role of Arg-CPs in the metabolism of r-BK. However, in rats pretreated with both enalaprilat and Plummer’s inhibitor, the hypotensive responses and the duration of the hypotensive episode to r-BK were significantly potentiated. The hypotensive responses to r-BK-RR were not affected by enalaprilat, but were reduced by pre-treatment with the Arg

  5. Truncating Homozygous Mutation of Carboxypeptidase E (CPE in a Morbidly Obese Female with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Intellectual Disability and Hypogonadotrophic Hypogonadism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne I M Alsters

    Full Text Available Carboxypeptidase E is a peptide processing enzyme, involved in cleaving numerous peptide precursors, including neuropeptides and hormones involved in appetite control and glucose metabolism. Exome sequencing of a morbidly obese female from a consanguineous family revealed homozygosity for a truncating mutation of the CPE gene (c.76_98del; p.E26RfsX68. Analysis detected no CPE expression in whole blood-derived RNA from the proband, consistent with nonsense-mediated decay. The morbid obesity, intellectual disability, abnormal glucose homeostasis and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism seen in this individual recapitulates phenotypes in the previously described fat/fat and Cpe knockout mouse models, evidencing the importance of this peptide/hormone-processing enzyme in regulating body weight, metabolism, and brain and reproductive function in humans.

  6. Three-dimensional structure of porcine pancreatic carboxypeptidase B with an acetate ion and two zinc atoms in the active site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akparov, V. Kh., E-mail: valery@akparov.ru [State Research Institute for Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms (Russian Federation); Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: tostars@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation); Maghsoudi, N. N., E-mail: maghsudi@yahoo.com [Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Neuroscience Research Center (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kuranova, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Crystals of porcine pancreatic carboxypeptidase B (CPB) were grown by the capillary counter-diffusion method in the presence of polyethylene glycol and zinc acetate. The three-dimensional structure of CPB was determined at 1.40 Å resolution using the X-ray diffraction data set collected from the crystals of the enzyme at the SPring 8 synchrotron facility and was refined to R{sub fact} = 17.19%, R{sub free} = 19.78%. The structure contains five zinc atoms, two of which are present in the active site of the enzyme, and an acetate ion. The arrangement of an additional zinc atom in the active site and the acetate ion is different from that reported by Yoshimoto et al.

  7. Diversity in mRNA expression of the serine-type carboxypeptidase ocpG in Aspergillus oryzae through intron retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Ken; Kuboshima, Megumi; Morita, Hiroto; Maeda, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Ayako; Takeuchi, Michio; Yamagata, Youhei

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing is thought to be a means for diversification of products by mRNA modification. Although some intron retentions are predicted by transcriptome analysis in Aspergillus oryzae, its physiological significance remains unknown. We found that intron retention occurred occasionally in the serine-type carboxypeptidase gene, ocpG. Analysis under various culture conditions revealed that extracellular nitrogen conditions influence splicing patterns; this suggested that there might be a correlation between splicing efficiency and the necessity of OcpG activity for obtaining a nitrogen source. Since further analysis showed that splicing occurred independently in each intron, we constructed ocpG intron-exchanging strain by interchanging the positions of intron-1 and intron-2. The splicing pattern indicated the probability that ocpG intron retention was affected by the secondary structures of intronic mRNA.

  8. Integrated roles of BclA and DD-carboxypeptidase 1 in Bradyrhizobium differentiation within NCR-producing and NCR-lacking root nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrière, Quentin; Guefrachi, Ibtissem; Gully, Djamel; Lamouche, Florian; Pierre, Olivier; Fardoux, Joël; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Alunni, Benoît; Timchenko, Tatiana; Giraud, Eric; Mergaert, Peter

    2017-08-22

    Legumes harbor in their symbiotic nodule organs nitrogen fixing rhizobium bacteria called bacteroids. Some legumes produce Nodule-specific Cysteine-Rich (NCR) peptides in the nodule cells to control the intracellular bacterial population. NCR peptides have antimicrobial activity and drive bacteroids toward terminal differentiation. Other legumes do not produce NCR peptides and their bacteroids are not differentiated. Bradyrhizobia, infecting NCR-producing Aeschynomene plants, require the peptide uptake transporter BclA to cope with the NCR peptides as well as a specific peptidoglycan-modifying DD-carboxypeptidase, DD-CPase1. We show that Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens strain USDA110 forms undifferentiated bacteroids in NCR-lacking soybean nodules. Unexpectedly, in Aeschynomene afraspera nodules the nitrogen fixing USDA110 bacteroids are hardly differentiated despite the fact that this host produces NCR peptides, suggesting that USDA110 is insensitive to the host peptide effectors and that nitrogen fixation can be uncoupled from differentiation. In agreement with the absence of bacteroid differentiation, USDA110 does not require its bclA gene for nitrogen fixing symbiosis with these two host plants. Furthermore, we show that the BclA and DD-CPase1 act independently in the NCR-induced morphological differentiation of bacteroids. Our results suggest that BclA is required to protect the rhizobia against the NCR stress but not to induce the terminal differentiation pathway.

  9. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II and folate deficiencies result in reciprocal protection against cognitive and social deficits in mice: implications for neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaevitz, Laura R; Picker, Jonathan D; Rana, Jasmine; Kolodny, Nancy H; Shane, Barry; Berger-Sweeney, Joanne E; Coyle, Joseph T

    2012-06-01

    Interactions between genetic and environmental risk factors underlie a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia (SZ) and autism (AD). Due to the complexity and multitude of the genetic and environmental factors attributed to these disorders, recent research strategies focus on elucidating the common molecular pathways through which these multiple risk factors may function. In this study, we examine the combined effects of a haplo-insufficiency of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) and dietary folic acid deficiency. In addition to serving as a neuropeptidase, GCPII catalyzes the absorption of folate. GCPII and folate depletion interact within the one-carbon metabolic pathway and/or of modulate the glutamatergic system. Four groups of mice were tested: wild-type, GCPII hypomorphs, and wild-types and GCPII hypomorphs both fed a folate deficient diet. Due to sex differences in the prevalence of SZ and AD, both male and female mice were assessed on a number of behavioral tasks including locomotor activity, rotorod, social interaction, prepulse inhibition, and spatial memory. Wild-type mice of both sexes fed a folic acid deficient diet showed motor coordination impairments and cognitive deficits, while social interactions were decreased only in males. GCPII mutant mice of both sexes also exhibited reduced social propensities. In contrast, all folate-depleted GCPII hypomorphs performed similarly to untreated wild-type mice, suggesting that reduced GCPII expression and folate deficiency are mutually protective. Analyses of folate and neurometabolite levels associated with glutamatergic function suggest several potential mechanisms through which GCPII and folate may be interacting to create this protective effect. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A putative low-molecular-mass penicillin-binding protein (PBP) of Mycobacterium smegmatis exhibits prominent physiological characteristics of DD-carboxypeptidase and beta-lactamase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ankita; Kar, Debasish; Murugan, Rajagopal A; Mallick, Sathi; Dutta, Mouparna; Pandey, Satya Deo; Chowdhury, Chiranjit; Ghosh, Anindya S

    2015-05-01

    DD-carboxypeptidases (DD-CPases) are low-molecular-mass (LMM) penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) that are mainly involved in peptidoglycan remodelling, but little is known about the dd-CPases of mycobacteria. In this study, a putative DD-CPase of Mycobacterium smegmatis, MSMEG_2433 is characterized. The gene for the membrane-bound form of MSMEG_2433 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli in its active form, as revealed by its ability to bind to the Bocillin-FL (fluorescent penicillin). Interestingly, in vivo expression of MSMEG_2433 could restore the cell shape oddities of the septuple PBP mutant of E. coli, which was a prominent physiological characteristic of DD-CPases. Moreover, expression of MSMEG_2433 in trans elevated beta-lactam resistance in PBP deletion mutants (ΔdacAdacC) of E. coli, strengthening its physiology as a dd-CPase. To confirm the biochemical reason behind such physiological behaviours, a soluble form of MSMEG_2433 (sMSMEG_2433) was created, expressed and purified. In agreement with the observed physiological phenomena, sMSMEG_2433 exhibited DD-CPase activity against artificial and peptidoglycan-mimetic DD-CPase substrates. To our surprise, enzymic analyses of MSMEG_2433 revealed efficient deacylation for beta-lactam substrates at physiological pH, which is a unique characteristic of beta-lactamases. In addition to the MSMEG_2433 active site that favours dd-CPase activity, in silico analyses also predicted the presence of an omega-loop-like region in MSMEG_2433, which is an important determinant of its beta-lactamase activity. Based on the in vitro, in vivo and in silico studies, we conclude that MSMEG_2433 is a dual enzyme, possessing both DD-CPase and beta-lactamase activities. © 2015 The Authors.

  11. Transient kinetic studies of pH-dependent hydrolyses by exo-type carboxypeptidase P on a 27-MHz quartz crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Hiroyuki; Takano, Hiroki; Okahata, Yoshio

    2008-02-15

    pH-Dependent kinetic parameters (k(on), k(off), and k(cat)) of protein (myoglobin) hydrolyses catalyzed by exo-enzyme (carboxypeptidase P, CPP) were obtained by using a protein-immobilized quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) in acidic aqueous solutions. The formation of the enzyme-substrate (ES) complex (k(on)), the decay of the ES complex (k(off)), and the formation of the product (k(cat)) could be analyzed by transient kinetics as mass changes on the QCM plate. The Kd (k(off)/k(on)) value was different from the Michaelis constant Km calculated from (k(off) + k(cat))/k(on) due to k(cat) > k(off). The rate-determining step was the binding step (k(on), and the catalytic rate k(cat) was faster than other k(on) and k(off) values. In the range of pH 2.5-5.0, values of k(on) gradually increased with decreasing pH showing a maximum at pH 3.7, values of k(off) were independent of pH, and k(cat) increased gradually with decreasing pH. As a result, the apparent rate constant (k(cat)/Km) showed a maximum at pH 3.7 and gradually increased with decreasing pH. The optimum pH at 3.7 of k(on) is explained by the optimum binding ability of CPP to the COOH terminus of the substrate with hydrogen bonds. The increase of k(cat) at the lower pH correlated with the decrease of alpha-helix contents of the myoglobin substrate on the QCM.

  12. The refined 2.0 A X-ray crystal structure of the complex formed between bovine beta-trypsin and CMTI-I, a trypsin inhibitor from squash seeds (Cucurbita maxima). Topological similarity of the squash seed inhibitors with the carboxypeptidase A inhibitor from potatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, W; Greyling, H J; Huber, R; Otlewski, J; Wilusz, T

    1989-01-02

    The stoichiometric complex formed between bovine beta-trypsin and the Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor I (CMTI-I) was crystallized and its X-ray crystal structure determined using Patterson search techniques. Its structure has been crystallographically refined to a final R value of 0.152 (6.0-2.0 A). CMTI-I is of ellipsoidal shape; it lacks helices or beta-sheets, but consists of turns and connecting short polypeptide stretches. The disulfide pairing is CYS-3I-20I, Cys-10I-22I and Cys-16I-28I. According to the polypeptide fold and disulfide connectivity its structure resembles that of the carboxypeptidase A inhibitor from potatoes. Thirteen of the 29 inhibitor residues are in direct contact with trypsin; most of them are in the primary binding segment Val-2I (P4)-Glu-9I (P4') which contains the reactive site bond Arg-5I-Ile-6I and is in a conformation observed also for other serine proteinase inhibitors.

  13. Characterization of the porcine carboxypeptidase E cDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hreidarsdôttir, G.E.; Cirera, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete

    2007-01-01

    the sequence of the cDNA for the porcine CPE gene including all the coding region and the 3'-UTR region was generated. Comparisons with bovine, human, mouse, and rat CPE cDNA sequences showed that the coding regions of the gene are highly conserved both at the nucleotide and at the amino acid level. A very low...

  14. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II does not process amyloid-beta peptide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlák, František; Šácha, Pavel; Blechová, Miroslava; Březinová, Anna; Šafařík, Martin; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Konvalinka, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 7 (2013), s. 2626-2632 ISSN 0892-6638 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/12/0847 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : PSMA * Alzheimer's disease * disaggregation * exopeptidase * substrate specificity * depsipeptide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.480, year: 2013

  15. Expression of glutamate carboxypeptidase II in human brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šácha, Pavel; Zámečník, J.; Bařinka, C.; Hlouchová, Klára; Vícha, A.; Mlčochová, Petra; Hilgert, Ivan; Eckschlager, T.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 144, č. 4 (2007), s. 1361-1372 ISSN 0306-4522 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508; GA ČR GA301/03/0784 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : PSMA * metallopeptidase * immunohistochemistry Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.352, year: 2007

  16. Design of Highly Potent Urea-Based, Exosite-Binding Inhibitors Selective for Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tykvart, Jan; Schimer, Jiří; Jančařík, Andrej; Bařinková, Jitka; Navrátil, Václav; Starková, Jana; Šrámková, Karolína; Konvalinka, Jan; Majer, Pavel; Šácha, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 10 (2015), s. 4357-4363 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : GCPII selective inhibitors * GCPIII * GCPII Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.589, year: 2015

  17. Comparison of human glutamate carboxypeptidases II and III reveals their divergent substrate specificities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátil, Michal; Tykvart, Jan; Schimer, Jiří; Pachl, Petr; Navrátil, Václav; Rokob, T. A.; Hlouchová, Klára; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Konvalinka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 283, č. 13 (2016), s. 2528-2545 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31419S; GA MŠk LO1302; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : arene-binding site * GCPIII * prostate -specific membrane antigen * QM/MM calculations * beta-citryl-L-glutamate Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.902, year: 2016

  18. Structural characterization of P1 '-diversified urea-based inhibitors of glutamate carboxypeptidase II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlíček, Jiří; Ptáček, Jakub; Černý, Jiří; Byun, Y.; Škultétyová, Ĺubica; Pomper, M.G.; Lubkowski, J.; Bařinka, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 10 (2014), s. 2340-2345 ISSN 0960-894X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:EMBO(DE) 1978 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : GCPII * Prostate -specific membrane antigen * PSMA Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 2.420, year: 2014

  19. delta-Thiolactones as Prodrugs of Thiol-Based Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) Inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ferraris, D. V.; Majer, Pavel; Ni, C.; Slusher, C. E.; Rais, R.; Wu, Y.; Wozniak, K. M.; Alt, J.; Rojas, C.; Slusher, B. S.; Tsukamoto, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 1 (2014), s. 243-247 ISSN 0022-2623 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : pharmacokinetics * discovery * disorders * diagnosis * pain Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.447, year: 2014

  20. Design of composite inhibitors targeting glutamate carboxypeptidase II: the importance of effector functionalities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Zora; Černý, Jiří; Choy, C.J.; Nedrow, J.R.; Choi, J.K.; Lubkowski, J.; Berkman, C.E.; Bařinka, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 283, č. 1 (2016), s. 130-143 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP301/12/1513; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0045 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : molecular modeling * NAALADase * prostate-specific membrane antigen * X-ray crystallography Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.902, year: 2016

  1. Rational design of urea-based glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) inhibitors as versatile tools for specific drug targeting and delivery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tykvart, Jan; Schimer, Jiří; Bařinková, Jitka; Pachl, Petr; Poštová Slavětínská, Lenka; Majer, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan; Šácha, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 15 (2014), s. 4099-4108 ISSN 0968-0896 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:OPPK(CZ) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : GCPII * PSMA * structure-aided drug design * specific drug targeting Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.793, year: 2014

  2. Unprecedented Binding Mode of Hydroxamate-Based Inhibitors of Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II: Structural Characterization and Biological Activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Zora; Wozniak, K.; Jančařík, Andrej; Rais, R.; Wu, Y.; Pavlíček, Jiří; Ferraris, D.; Havlínová, Barbora; Ptáček, Jakub; Vávra, Jan; Hin, N.; Rojas, C.; Majer, Pavel; Slusher, B. S.; Tsukamoto, T.; Bařinka, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 10 (2016), s. 4539-4550 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA ČR GAP301/12/1513 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : LINKED ACIDIC DIPEPTIDASE * N-ACETYLASPARTYLGLUTAMATE NAAG * THIOL-BASED INHIBITORS Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry ; CC - Organic Chemistry (UOCHB-X) Impact factor: 6.259, year: 2016

  3. Two DD-carboxypeptidases from Mycobacterium smegmatis affect cell surface properties through regulation of peptidoglycan cross-linking and glycopeptidolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Satya Deo; Pal, Shilpa; Kumar N, Ganesh; Bansal, Ankita; Mallick, Sathi; Ghosh, Anindya S

    2018-05-07

    During the peptidoglycan (PG) maturation of mycobacteria, the glycan strands are interlinked by both 3-3 (between two meso-DAP) and 4-3 cross-links (between D-ala and meso-DAP), though there is a predominance (60-80%) of 3-3 cross-links. The DD-CPases act on pentapeptides to generate tetrapeptides that are used by LD-transpeptidases as substrates to form 3-3 cross-links. Therefore, DD-CPases play a crucial role in mycobacterial PG cross-link formation. However, the physiology of DD-CPases in mycobacteria is relatively unexplored. Here, we deleted two DD-CPase genes, msmeg_2433 , and msmeg_2432 , both individually and in combination, from Mycobacterium smegmatis mc 2 155. Though the single DD-CPase deletions had no significant impact on the mycobacterial physiology, many interesting functional alterations were observed in the double deletion mutant, viz. , a predominance in PG cross-link formation was shifted from 3-3 cross-links to 4-3, cell surface glycopeptidolipid (GPL) expression was reduced and susceptibility towards β-lactams and anti-tubercular agents was enhanced. Moreover, the existence of the double mutant within murine macrophages was better as compared to the parent. Interestingly, the complementation with any one of the DD-CPase genes could restore the wild-type phenotype. In a nutshell, we infer that the altered ratio of 4-3: 3-3 PG cross-links might have influenced the expression of surface GPLs, colony morphology, biofilm formation,, drug susceptibility and subsistence of the cells within macrophages. Importance The glycan strands in mycobacterial peptidoglycan (PG) are interlinked by both 3-3 and 4-3 cross-links. The DD-CPases generate tetrapeptides by acting on the pentapeptides, and LD-transpeptidases use tetrapeptides as substrates to form 3-3 cross-links. Here, we showed that simultaneous deletions of two DD-CPases alter the nature of PG cross-linking from 3-3 cross-links to 4-3 cross-links. The deletions subsequently decrease the expression of Glycopeptidolipids (a significant surface lipid present in many non-tuberculous mycobacteria including Mycobacterium smegmatis ) and affect other physiological parameters like cell morphology, growth rate, biofilm formation, antibiotic susceptibility and existence within murine macrophages. Thus, unraveling the physiology of DD-CPases might help us design anti-mycobacterial therapeutics in future. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Structural and biochemical characterization of the folyl-poly-gamma-L-glutamate hydrolyzing activity of human glutamate carboxypeptidase II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátil, Michal; Ptáček, Jakub; Šácha, Pavel; Starková, Jana; Lubkowski, J.; Bařinka, Cyril; Konvalinka, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 281, č. 14 (2014), s. 3228-3242 ISSN 1742-464X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/12/0847; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:OPPC(CZ) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:86652036 Keywords : arene-binding site * crystal structure * folate hydrolase 1 * H475Y(1561C -> T) * polymorphism * zinc metalloprotease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.001, year: 2014

  5. Yeast carboxypeptidase Y requires glycosylation for efficient intracellular transport, but not for vacuolar sorting, in vivo stability, or activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Jakob R.; Stevens, T H; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    1991-01-01

    the formation of asparagine-linked glycosylation, had a similar effect on the transport of CPY at 23 degrees C. However, the absence of N-linked carbohydrate in general had the more dramatic result of blocking the transport of CPY altogether at an increased temperature (37 degrees C). The unglycosylated mutant...

  6. The combined action of mast cell chymase, tryptase and carboxypeptidase A3 protects against melanoma colonization of the lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grujic, Mirjana; Paivandy, Aida; Gustafson, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Mast cell secretory granules are densely packed with various bioactive mediators including proteases of chymase, tryptase and CPA3 type. Previous studies have indicated that mast cells can affect the outcome of melanoma but the contribution of the mast cell granule proteases to such effects has......, suggesting that multiple mast cell protease deficiency might affect T cell or NKT cell populations. In line with this, we found that the Mcpt4/Mcpt6/Cpa3-deficiency was associated with a reduction in cells expressing CD1d, a MHC class 1-like molecule that is crucial for presenting antigen to invariant NKT (i......NKT) cells. Together, these findings indicate a protective role of mast cell-specific proteases in melanoma dissemination, and suggest that this effect involves a CXCL16/CD1d/NKT cell axis....

  7. Structure and Dynamics of the Metal Site of Cadmium-Substituted Carboxypeptidase A in Solution and Crystalline States and under Steady-State peptide Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, R.; Danielsen, E.; Hemmingsen, L.

    1997-01-01

    are consistent with an intact scissile peptide bond in the enzyme-substrate complex of Bz-Gly-L-Phe and Bz-Gly-Gly-L-Phe. A single nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) is observed for the crystalline state of the enzyme between pH 5.7 and pH 9.4. This NQI agrees with calculations based on the metal coordination...... geometry for cadmium in crystalline CPD derived from X-ray diffraction studies. A single broad distribution of NQIs is observed for CPD in sucrose solutions and 0.1 M NaCl at pH values below 6.5. This NQI (NQI-1') has parameters very close to those for the crystalline state. The enzyme metal site......, characterized by this NQI, is converted into two new enzyme metal sites over the pH range of 6.5-8.3. The metal coordination sphere of one of these has a NQI (NQI-1) with parameters similar to those at lower pH values (NQI-1') while the other NQI (NQI-2) is characterized by markedly different NQI parameters...

  8. Cathepsin C and plasma glutamate carboxypeptidase secreted from Fischer rat thyroid cells liberate thyroxin from the N-terminus of thyroglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suban, Dejan; Zajc, Tajana; Renko, Miha; Turk, Boris; Turk, Vito; Dolenc, Iztok

    2012-03-01

    The release of a thyroid hormone from thyroglobulin is controlled by a complex regulatory system. We focused on the extracellular action of two lysosomal enzymes, cathepsin C (catC, dipeptidyl peptidase I) and PGCP (lysosomal dipeptidase), on thyroglobulin, and their ability to liberate the hormone thyroxin. Cathepsin C, an exopeptidase, removes dipeptides from the N-terminus of substrates, and PGCP hydrolyses dipeptides to amino acids. In vitro experiments proved that cathepsin C removes up to 12 amino acids from the N-terminus of porcine thyroglobulin, including a dipeptide with thyroxin on position 5. The newly formed N-terminus, Arg-Pro-, was not hydrolysed further by cathepsin C. Cell culture experiments with FRTL-5 cell line showed localization of cathepsin C and PGCP and their secretion into the medium. Secretion of the active cathepsin C from FRTL-5 cells is stimulated by TSH, insulin, and/or somatostatin. The released enzymes liberate thyroxin from porcine thyroglobulin added to media. The hormone liberation can be reduced by synthetic inhibitors of cysteine proteinases and metalloproteinases. Additionally, we show that TSH, insulin, and/or somatostatin induce up-regulation of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1, the enzyme responsible for the initiation of biosynthesis of hybrid and complex N-glycosylation of proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Delayed elimination of high-dose methotrexate and use of carboxypeptidase G2 in pediatric patients during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svahn, Thommy; Mellgren, Karin; Harila-Saari, Arja

    2017-01-01

    concentration decreased by 75% when measured with immune-based methods, and by 100% when measured with high-performance liquid chromatography. The median time from the start of Mtx infusion to plasma levels ≤ 0.2 μM was 228 hr (range: 48-438). The maximum increase in plasma creatinine was 375% (range: 100...... negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were treated according to the Nordic Organization for Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (NOPHO) ALL 2008 protocol, including administration of six to eight high-dose (5 g/m2 /24 hr) Mtx (HDMtx) courses. The protocol includes recommendations for CPDG2......-1,310). Creatinine peaked after a median of 48 hr (range: 36-86). Mtx elimination time was shorter in patients with body surface area creatinine increase (209 vs. 258 hr; P = 0.034). All patients normalized their renal function...

  10. Efficient and versatile one-step affinity purification of in vivo biotinylated proteins: Expression, characterization and structure analysis of recombinant human glutamate carboxypeptidase II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tykvart, Jan; Šácha, Pavel; Bařinka, Cyril; Knedlík, Tomáš; Starková, Jana; Lubkowski, J.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 1 (2012), s. 106-115 ISSN 1046-5928 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508; GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : affinity purification * biotin acceptor peptide * recombinant protein expression * biotin -protein ligase (BirA) * co-localization * PSMA Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.429, year: 2012

  11. Discovery of a para-Acetoxy-benzyl Ester Prodrug of a Hydroxamate-Based Glutamate Carboxypeptidase II Inhibitor as Oral Therapy for Neuropathic Pain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rais, R.; Vávra, Jan; Tichý, Tomáš; Dash, R. P.; Gadiano, A. J.; Tenora, Lukáš; Monincová, Lenka; Bařinka, Cyril; Alt, J.; Zimmermann, S. C.; Slusher, C. E.; Wu, Y.; Wozniak, K.; Majer, Pavel; Tsukamoto, T.; Slusher, B. S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 18 (2017), s. 7799-7809 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015043; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:86652036 Keywords : linked acidic dipeptidase * peripheral mononeuropathy * biological activity Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry; CC - Organic Chemistry (BTO-N) OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry; Organic chemistry (BTO-N) Impact factor: 6.259, year: 2016

  12. Investigation of peptidyl synthase activity of the Y Carboxypeptidase: influence of the primary structure of the substrate C-terminal fragment and application to radio-marking (3H or 14C) of three neuro hypophysis hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, Loic

    1989-01-01

    As radio-marking of peptides of biological interest induced significant advances in the metabolism study, radio-immunology and molecular endocrinology, this research thesis reports investigation performed on hormonal peptides released by the post-hypophysis. The ultimate objective is to substitute in these hormones the C-terminal Gly-NH2 by its tritiated radioactive homologue to provide these peptides with a R.A.S equal to that of the tritiated Gly-NH2 in order to study reaction mechanisms and to generalize this method to a larger number of peptides

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ETEL-01-1421 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ETEL-01-1421 ref|XP_001392987.1| carboxypeptidase Y cpy from patent WO9609397-...A1-Aspergillus niger emb|CAK96655.1| carboxypeptidase Y cpy from patent WO9609397-A1-Aspergillus niger XP_001392987.1 0.10 34% ...

  14. Stabilization versus inhibition of TAFIa by competitive inhibitors in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, J.B.; Hughes, B.; James, I.; Haddock, P.; Kluft, C.; Bajzar, L.

    2003-01-01

    Two competitive inhibitors of TAFIa (activated thrombin-activable fibrinolysis inhibitor), 2-guanidinoethyl-mercaptosuccinic acid and potato tuber carboxypeptidase inhibitor, variably affect fibrinolysis of clotted human plasma. Depending on their concentration, the inhibitors shortened, prolonged,

  15. Enzymatic digestibility of peptides cross-linked by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dizdaroglu, M.; Gajewski, E.; Simic, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    Digestibility by proteolytic enzymes of peptides cross-linked by ionizing radiation was investigated. Small peptides of alanine and phenylalanine were chosen as model compounds and aminopeptidases and carboxypeptidases were used as proteolytic enzymes. Peptides exposed to γ-radiation in aqueous solution were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography before and after hydrolysis by aminopeptidase M, leucine aminopeptidase carboxypeptidase A and carboxypeptidase Y. The results obtained clearly demonstrate the different actions of these enzymes on cross-linked aliphatic and aromatic peptides. Peptide bonds of cross-linked dipeptides of alanine were completely resistant to enzymatic hydrolysis whereas the enzymes, except for carboxypeptidase Y, cleaved all peptide bonds of cross-linked peptides of phenylalanine. The actions of the enzymes on these particular compounds are discussed in detail. (author)

  16. Midgut Protease Activity During Larval Development of Anastrepha obliqua (Diptera: Tephritidae) Fed With Natural and Artificial Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Ciprian, José Pedro; Aceituno-Medina, Marysol; Guillen, Karina

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we examined the activity of two serine proteases (chymotrypsin and trypsin) and two metalloproteases (carboxypeptidases A and B) during larval development in Anastrepha obliqua fed natural (mango fruit) and artificial (formulation used in mass-rearing) diets. Proteolytic activity of chymotrypsin, trypsin, carboxypeptidase A, and carboxypeptidase B was detected in the midgut of different instars of A. obliqua and was strongly affected by the pH and diet type. The protein content of the natural and artificial diets was similar. Enzymatic activity was higher in the midgut of the larvae fed the natural diet than in larvae fed the artificial diet. The activity of the endopeptidases (chymotrypsin and trypsin) was lower than those of the exopeptidases (carboxypeptidases A and B). The pH of the midgut varied from acidic to neutral. The results indicate that in the midgut of the larvae reared on both types of diet, the level of carboxypeptidase activity was approximately 100-fold greater than the level of chymotrypsin activity and 10,000-fold greater than the level of trypsin. In conclusion, carboxypeptidase A and B are the main proteases involved in the digestion of proteins in the larvae of A. obliqua. The natural diet showed a high bioaccessibility. A clear tendency to express high activities of chymotrypsin and trypsin was observed by the third instar. Our research contributes to the planning and development of novel bioaccessibility assays to understand the nutrition processing of A. obliqua larvae under mass-rearing conditions for sterile insect technique.

  17. Exploring the "intensity fading" phenomenon in the study of noncovalent interactions by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanes, Oscar; Aviles, Francesc X; Roepstorff, Peter

    2007-01-01

    the intensity fading phenomenon, as well as a comparison with the strategy based on the direct detection of intact complexes by MALDI MS. For this purpose, the study is focused on two different protease-inhibitor complexes naturally occurring in solution, together with a heterogeneous mixture of nonbinding...... molecules derived from a biological extract, to examine the specificity of the approach, i.e., those of carboxypeptidase A (CPA) bound to potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (PCI) and of trypsin bound to bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). Our results show that the intensity fading phenomenon occurs...

  18. 76 FR 10378 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-24

    ... the indicated licensing contact at the Office of Technology Transfer, National Institutes of Health... Residues From Recombinant Proteins Description of Technology: Affinity tags are commonly used to facilitate... inventors have now cloned, expressed and purified bovine carboxypeptidase B (BoCPB), which is specific for...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK103605 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK103605 J033133H04 (P10619) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_HUMAN 6e-20 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK067493 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK067493 J013111L08 (P16675) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_MOUSE 2e-58 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK112076 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK112076 001-124-A08 (P10619) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) ...(Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protecti...ve protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_HUMAN 5e-49 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK066671 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK066671 J013072A16 (P16675) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_MOUSE 1e-58 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK121476 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK121476 J023149B05 (P16675) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_MOUSE 1e-30 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK101382 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK101382 J033036E19 (P16675) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_MOUSE 1e-57 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK109766 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109766 002-146-H10 (P10619) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) ...(Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protecti...ve protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_HUMAN 4e-22 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK069785 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069785 J023031H02 (P10619) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_HUMAN 2e-27 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK073936 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK073936 J033077J01 (P16675) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_MOUSE 9e-35 ...

  8. SwissProt search result: AK072954 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK072954 J023149K09 (P10619) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_HUMAN 3e-41 ...

  9. SwissProt search result: AK109766 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK109766 002-146-H10 (P16675) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) ...(Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protecti...ve protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_MOUSE 3e-23 ...

  10. SwissProt search result: AK073508 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK073508 J033044O22 (P16675) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_MOUSE 2e-29 ...

  11. SwissProt search result: AK059355 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK059355 001-026-D05 (P16675) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) ...(Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protecti...ve protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_MOUSE 1e-10 ...

  12. SwissProt search result: AK070825 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070825 J023064P05 (P10619) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_HUMAN 2e-20 ...

  13. SwissProt search result: AK104329 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104329 001-031-E12 (P16675) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) ...(Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protecti...ve protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_MOUSE 4e-48 ...

  14. SwissProt search result: AK107270 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK107270 002-125-H11 (P16675) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) ...(Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protecti...ve protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_MOUSE 5e-48 ...

  15. SwissProt search result: AK111801 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK111801 J013059J16 (P10619) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_HUMAN 2e-38 ...

  16. SwissProt search result: AK073508 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK073508 J033044O22 (P10619) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_HUMAN 8e-29 ...

  17. SwissProt search result: AK070195 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK070195 J023043E04 (P10619) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_HUMAN 5e-53 ...

  18. SwissProt search result: AK112076 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK112076 001-124-A08 (P16675) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) ...(Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protecti...ve protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_MOUSE 1e-51 ...

  19. SwissProt search result: AK104807 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104807 001-040-E08 (P10619) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) ...(Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protecti...ve protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_HUMAN 3e-41 ...

  20. SwissProt search result: AK067247 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK067247 J013098N22 (P16675) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_MOUSE 3e-54 ...

  1. SwissProt search result: AK061997 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK061997 001-043-C12 (P16675) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) ...(Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protecti...ve protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_MOUSE 2e-59 ...

  2. SwissProt search result: AK107218 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK107218 002-125-C12 (P10619) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) ...(Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protecti...ve protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_HUMAN 5e-37 ...

  3. SwissProt search result: AK068732 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK068732 J013159H01 (P16675) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_MOUSE 8e-63 ...

  4. SwissProt search result: AK106800 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK106800 002-116-B10 (P10619) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) ...(Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protecti...ve protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_HUMAN 2e-53 ...

  5. SwissProt search result: AK241380 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241380 J065155L15 (P16675) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_MOUSE 1e-39 ...

  6. SwissProt search result: AK069959 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK069959 J023038G19 (P16675) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_MOUSE 6e-48 ...

  7. SwissProt search result: AK064874 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK064874 J013000J10 (P10619) Lysosomal protective protein precursor (EC 3.4.16.5) (...Cathepsin A) (Carboxypeptidase C) (Protective protein for beta-galactosidase) [Contains: Lysosomal protectiv...e protein 32 kDa chain; Lysosomal protective protein 20 kDa chain] PPGB_HUMAN 6e-61 ...

  8. UniProt search blastx result: AK287750 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287750 J065155L15 Q8RUW5|SCP8_ARATH Serine carboxypeptidase-like 8 precursor (EC 3.4.16.-) (Sina...poylglucose--malate O-sinapoyltransferase) (EC 2.3.1.92) (SMT) (Protein SINAPOYLGLUCOSE ACCUMULATOR 1) - Arabidopsis thaliana (Mouse-ear cress) 1.00E-31 ...

  9. UniProt search blastx result: AK287750 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287750 J065155L15 Q8VZU3|SCP19_ARATH Serine carboxypeptidase-like 19 precursor (EC 3.4.16.-) (Sina...poylglucose--choline O-sinapoyltransferase) (EC 2.3.1.91) (SCT) (Protein SINAPOYLGLUCOSE AC

  10. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241380 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241380 J065155L15 At2g22990.2 68415.m02737 sinapoylglucose:malate sinapoyltransfe... PF00450: Serine carboxypeptidase; identical to cDNA sinapoylglucose:malate sinapoyltransferase (SNG1) GI:8699618 4e-25 ...

  11. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241380 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241380 J065155L15 At2g22990.4 68415.m02733 sinapoylglucose:malate sinapoyltransfe... PF00450: Serine carboxypeptidase; identical to cDNA sinapoylglucose:malate sinapoyltransferase (SNG1) GI:8699618 8e-30 ...

  12. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK287750 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK287750 J065155L15 At2g22990.5 68415.m02735 sinapoylglucose:malate sinapoyltransfe... PF00450: Serine carboxypeptidase; identical to cDNA sinapoylglucose:malate sinapoyltransferase (SNG1) GI:8699618 2e-32 ...

  13. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241380 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK241380 J065155L15 At2g22990.5 68415.m02735 sinapoylglucose:malate sinapoyltransfe... PF00450: Serine carboxypeptidase; identical to cDNA sinapoylglucose:malate sinapoyltransferase (SNG1) GI:8699618 2e-32 ...

  14. Gclust Server: 93939 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 93939 TET_49.m00260 Cluster Sequences Related Sequences(190) 978 D-alanyl-D-alanine... carboxypeptidase family protein chr_0_8254607_49; no annotation 1 1.00e-14 0.0 11.11 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 Show 93939 Cluster ID 93939

  15. 113Cd NMR as a Probe of the Active Sites of Metalloenzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armitage, Ian M.; Schoot Uiterkamp, Antonius J.M.; Chlebowski, Jan F.; Coleman, Joseph E.

    1978-01-01

    113Cd NMR has been used to study the active site metal ion(s) of the 113Cd(II) derivatives of four Zn(II) metalloenzymes, carboxypeptidase A, carbonic anhydrases, alkaline phosphatase, and superoxide dismutase. The resonances of the enzyme-bound 113Cd(II) ions are extremely sensitive to ligand

  16. Enhanced Brain Delivery of 2-(Phosphonomethyl)pentanedioic Acid Following Intranasal Administration of Its gamma-Substituted Ester Prodrugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nedelcovych, M.; Dash, R. P.; Tenora, Lukáš; Zimmermann, S. C.; Gadiano, A. J.; Garrett, C.; Alt, J.; Hollinger, K. R.; Pommier, E.; Jančařík, Andrej; Rojas, C.; Thomas, A. G.; Wu, Y.; Wozniak, K.; Majer, Pavel; Slusher, B. S.; Rais, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 10 (2017), s. 3248-3257 ISSN 1543-8384 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : 2-PMPA * glutamate carboxypeptidase II * neurological disease * intranasal * pharmacokinetics * prodrugs Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 4.440, year: 2016

  17. Mutational analysis of the vacuolar sorting signal of procarboxypeptidase Y in yeast shows a low requirement for sequence conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Voorst, F; Kielland-Brandt, Morten; Winther, Jakob R.

    1996-01-01

    The core of the vacuolar targeting signal of yeast carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) is recognized by the receptor Vps10p and consists of four contiguous amino acid residues, Gln24-Arg-Pro-Leu27, near the amino terminus of the propeptide (Valls, L.A., Winther, J. R., and Stevens, T. H. (1990) J. Cell Biol...

  18. pH-dependent processing of yeast procarboxypeptidase Y by proteinase A in vivo and in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, S O; van den Hazel, H B; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    1994-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase Y is a vacuolar enzyme from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It enters the vacuole as a zymogen, procarboxypeptidase Y, which is immediately processed in a reaction involving two endoproteases, proteinase A and proteinase B. We have investigated the in vitro activation of purified proca...

  19. Discovery of thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertina, R.M.; Tilburg, N.H. van; Haverkate, F.; Bouma, B.N.; Borne, P.A.K. von dem; Meijers, J.C.M.; Campbell, W.; Eaton, D.; Hendriks, D.F.; Willemse, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    CAS: blood clotting factor 11, 9013-55-2; thrombin, 9002-04-4; tissue plasminogen activator, 105913-11-9; protein C, 60202-16-6; Carboxypeptidase U, 3.4.17.20; Protein C; Tissue Plasminogen Activator, 3.4.21.68

  20. Multiple pathways for vacuolar sorting of yeast proteinase A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westphal, V; Marcusson, E G; Winther, Jakob R.

    1996-01-01

    The sorting of the yeast proteases proteinase A and carboxypeptidase Y to the vacuole is a saturable, receptor-mediated process. Information sufficient for vacuolar sorting of the normally secreted protein invertase has in fusion constructs previously been found to reside in the propeptide...

  1. Prostate-specific membrane antigen and its truncated form PSM'

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mlčochová, Petra; Bařinka, Cyril; Tykvart, Jan; Šácha, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 5 (2009), s. 471-479 ISSN 0270-4137 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : prostate specific membrane antigen * glutamate carboxypeptidase II * prostate cancer Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.081, year: 2009

  2. Exocrine pancreatic secretion is stimulated in piglets fed Fish oil compared with those fed Coconut Oil or Lard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedemann, Mette Skou; Pedersen, Asger Roer; Engberg, Ricarda M.

    2001-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the effect of feeding diets containing fat sources with different fatty acid composition (fish oil, coconut oil or lard, 10 g/100 g diet) on exocrine pancreatic secretion in piglets after weaning. A total of 16 barrows were weaned at 4 wk of age; 3 d later...... the coconut oil or lard diets. The output [U/(h. kg(0.75))] of lipase was higher in piglets fed fish oil than in piglets fed lard or coconut oil. The output of colipase was greater in piglets fed fish oil and coconut oil than in those fed lard. The dietary treatments did not affect the output of carboxylester...... hydrolase. The output of trypsin was significantly lower in piglets fed lard than in piglets fed fish oil or coconut oil diets and the output of carboxypeptidase B was greater in those fed the fish oil diet. Protein, chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidase A, elastase and amylase outputs did not differ among...

  3. A radiopharmaceutical for pancreatic exocrine functional diagnosis: 62Zn-EDDA metabolism in pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujibayashi, Y; Saji, H; Kawai, K; Unuma, Y; Miyata, S; Okuno, T; Hosotani, R; Inoue, K; Adachi, H; Horiuchi, K

    1986-01-01

    The metabolic pathway of radioactive 62Zn-EDDA (ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid), in the exocrine pancreas was studied with respect to that of endogenous Zn. In pancreatic duct cannulated dog, the secretion of intravenously injected exogenous 62Zn into pancreatic juice increased under the stimulation of CCK-PZ (pancreatic protein secretion stimulating hormone), which closely correlated to endogenous Zn. Moreover, in pancreatic juice, 62Zn as well as endogenous Zn was selectively bound to Zn-metalloenzymes, carboxypeptidase A and B. These results demonstrated the close correlation between the endogenous and the exogenously-administered Zn (62Zn-EDDA), as well as the high availability of 62Zn-EDDA as a marker of pancreatic function for the follow up of carboxypeptidase metabolism.

  4. The effect of nutrition on immunoreactive glucagon and its related forms occurring in the gut, pancreas and plasma of normal and pancreatectomised pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourie, A.J.

    1983-08-01

    This thesis deals with the short-term effects of feeding or starvation upon the distribution of molecular species of glucagon in the gastrointestinal tissues, pancreas and blood entering and leaving the liver and kidney of sham operated or pancreatectomised pigs. The glucagon was quantitated by radioammunoassay. Further characterization of the molecular species present was made using gel filtration chromatography, and also by enzymatic digestion of extracted samples with trypsin or trypsin followed by carboxypeptidase

  5. Isolation and amino acid sequence of corticotropin-releasing factor from pig hypothalami.

    OpenAIRE

    Patthy, M; Horvath, J; Mason-Garcia, M; Szoke, B; Schlesinger, D H; Schally, A V

    1985-01-01

    A polypeptide was isolated from acid extracts of porcine hypothalami on the basis of its high ability to stimulate the release of corticotropin from superfused rat pituitary cells. After an initial separation by gel filtration on Sephadex G-25, further purification was carried out by reversed-phase HPLC. The isolated material was homogeneous chromatographically and by N-terminal sequencing. Based on automated gas-phase sequencing of the intact and CNBr-cleaved peptide and on carboxypeptidase ...

  6. Novel Monoclonal Antibodies Recognizing Human Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) as Research and Theranostic Tools

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Zora; Foss, C. A.; Copeland, B. T.; Morath, V.; Baranová, Petra; Havlínová, Barbora; Skerra, A.; Pomper, M.G.; Bařinka, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 7 (2017), s. 749-764 ISSN 0270-4137 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP301/12/1513; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : monoclonal antibody * glutamate carboxypeptidase II * NAALADase Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition OBOR OECD: Endocrinology and metabolism (including diabetes, hormones) Impact factor: 3.820, year: 2016

  7. Tissue expression and enzymologic characterization of human prostate specific membrane antigen and its rat and pig orthologs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rovenská, Miroslava; Hlouchová, Klára; Šácha, Pavel; Mlčochová, Petra; Horák, Vratislav; Zámečník, J.; Bařinka, C.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 2 (2008), s. 171-182 ISSN 0270-4137 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508; GA ČR GA524/04/0102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : prostate specific membrane antigen * glutamate carboxypeptidase II * animal orthologs * prostate cancer * animal model Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.069, year: 2008

  8. Structure-Activity Relationship of F-18-Labeled Phosphoramidate Peptidomimetic Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA)-Targeted Inhibitor Analogues for PET Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dannoon, S.; Ganguly, T.; Cahaya, H.; Geruntho, J. J.; Galliher, M. S.; Beyer, S. K.; Choy, C.J.; Hopkins, M.R.; Regan, M.; Blecha, J.E.; Škultétyová, Ĺubica; Drake, Ch.R.; Jivan, S.; Bařinka, Cyril; Jones, E. F.; Berkman, C.E.; VanBrocklin, H.F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 12 (2016), s. 5684-5694 ISSN 0022-2623 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP301/12/1513; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : GLUTAMATE CARBOXYPEPTIDASE-II * REACTION-MECHANISM * FOLATE-HYDROLASE Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 6.259, year: 2016

  9. Selection and characterization of Anticalins targeting human prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bařinka, Cyril; Ptáček, Jakub; Richter, A.; Nováková, Zora; Morath, V.; Skerra, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 3 (2016), s. 105-115 ISSN 1741-0126 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP301/12/1513 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Anticalin * lipocalin * glutamate carboxypeptidase II * non-immunoglobulin scaffold Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.043, year: 2016

  10. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of a Novel Aminopeptidase from Human Intestine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tykvart, Jan; Bařinka, Cyril; Svoboda, Michal; Navrátil, Václav; Souček, Radko; Hubálek, Martin; Hradilek, Martin; Šácha, Pavel; Lubkowski, J.; Konvalinka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 290, č. 18 (2015), s. 11321-11336 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/12/0847; GA MŠk LO1302; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:86652036 Keywords : glutamate carboxypeptidase II * reaction mechanism * expression Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.258, year: 2015

  11. Rare allelic variants determine folate status in an unsupplemented European population

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlíková, Markéta; Sokolová, J.; Janošíková, B.; Melenovská, P.; Krupková, L.; Zvárová, Jana; Kožich, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 142, č. 8 (2012), s. 1403-1409 ISSN 0022-3166 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NS10036 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : glutamate-carboxypeptidase-ii * coronary-artery-disease * one-carbon metabolism * methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase * homocysteine concentrations * genetic-determinants * common mutation * serum folate * polymorphisms * prevalence Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 4.196, year: 2012

  12. Mapping to mouse chromosome 3 of the gene encoding latexin (Lxn) expressed in neocortical neurons in a region-specific manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Ming-hao; Uratani, Yoshihiko; Arimatsu, Yasuyoshi [Mitsubishi Kasei Institute of Life Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    Latexin was first found as a 29-kDa antigen expressed in a subset of neurons in infragranular layers of lateral, but not dorsal, neocortical areas in the rat using a monoclonal antibody PC3.1. It was found that the vast majority of latexin-expressing neurons in both layers V and VI within the lateral neocortex were generated concurrently at Embryonic Day 15, demonstrating a strict correlation between the molecular identity of neurons and the time of their generation. Since neurons expressing latexin are located in the restricted part of the neocortex, latexin has been used as a useful molecular marker to elucidate the mechanism underlying cortical regional specification. The latexin cDNA isolated from a cDNA library of the rat cerebral cortex encodes a protein composed of 223-amino-acid residues containing two potential Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase sites and one cGMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site. The absence of any signal peptide or potential transmembrane domain is consistent with the apparent cytosolic localization of latexin in the rat brain. The transcripts of latexin were expressed in not only neutral but also nonneural tissues (e.g., lung, spleen, kidney, heart, and digestive tracts). Recently, it has been demonstrated that latexin purified from the rat brain has inhibitory activity against carboxypeptidase A1, carboxypeptidase A2, and mast cell carboxypeptidase A, with less carboxypeptidase B-inhibiting activity. The amino acid sequence deduced from the rat latexin cDNA has no strict homology to any sequences so far known. Genomic Southern blot analysis using a cDNA probe of rat latexin suggested that the gene encoding latexin in the rat has homologues in other mammalian species and in the chicken, but not in the nematode, fly, or frog. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Qualitative changes in human γ-secretase underlie familial Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaruga, Maria; Veugelen, Sarah; Benurwar, Manasi; Lismont, Sam; Sepulveda-Falla, Diego; Lleo, Alberto; Ryan, Natalie S.; Lashley, Tammaryn; Fox, Nick C.; Murayama, Shigeo; Gijsen, Harrie

    2015-01-01

    Presenilin (PSEN) pathogenic mutations cause familial Alzheimer’s disease (AD [FAD]) in an autosomal-dominant manner. The extent to which the healthy and diseased alleles influence each other to cause neurodegeneration remains unclear. In this study, we assessed γ-secretase activity in brain samples from 15 nondemented subjects, 22 FAD patients harboring nine different mutations in PSEN1, and 11 sporadic AD (SAD) patients. FAD and control brain samples had similar overall γ-secretase activity levels, and therefore, loss of overall (endopeptidase) γ-secretase function cannot be an essential part of the pathogenic mechanism. In contrast, impaired carboxypeptidase-like activity (γ-secretase dysfunction) is a constant feature in all FAD brains. Significantly, we demonstrate that pharmacological activation of the carboxypeptidase-like γ-secretase activity with γ-secretase modulators alleviates the mutant PSEN pathogenic effects. Most SAD cases display normal endo- and carboxypeptidase-like γ-secretase activities. However and interestingly, a few SAD patient samples display γ-secretase dysfunction, suggesting that γ-secretase may play a role in some SAD cases. In conclusion, our study highlights qualitative shifts in amyloid-β (Aβ) profiles as the common denominator in FAD and supports a model in which the healthy allele contributes with normal Aβ products and the diseased allele generates longer aggregation-prone peptides that act as seeds inducing toxic amyloid conformations. PMID:26481686

  14. Sequence analysis of the aminoacylase-1 family. A new proposed signature for metalloexopeptidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagini, A; Puigserver, A

    2001-03-01

    The amino acid sequence analysis of the human and porcine aminoacylases-1, the carboxypeptidase S precursor from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the succinyl-diaminopimelate desuccinylase from Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae and Corynebacterium glutamicum, the acetylornithine deacetylase from Escherichia coli and Dictyostelium discoideum and the carboxypeptidase G(2) precursor from Pseudomonas strain, using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) and the Position-Specific Iterated BLAST (PSI-BLAST), allowed us to suggest that all these enzymes, which share common functional and biochemical features, belong to the same structural family. The three amino acid blocks which were found to be highly conserved, using the CLUSTAL W program, could be assigned to the catalytic active site, based on the general three-dimensional structure of the carboxypeptidase G(2) from the Pseudomonas strain precursor. Six additional proteins with the same signature have been retrieved after performing two successive PSI-BLAST iterations using the sequence of the conserved motif, namely Lactobacillus delbrueckii aminoacyl-histidine dipeptidase, Streptomyces griseus aminopeptidase, Saccharomyces cerevisiae aminopeptidase Y precursor, two Bacillus stearothermophilus N-carbamyl-L-amino acid amidohydrolases and Pseudomonas sp. hydantoin utilization protein C. The three conserved amino acid motifs corresponded to the following blocks: (i) [S, G, A]-H-x-D-x-V; (ii) G-x-x-D; and (iii) x-E-E. This new sequence signature is clearly different from that commonly reported in the literature for proteins belonging to the ArgE/DapE/CPG2/YscS family.

  15. FGF7 and cell density are required for final differentiation of pancreatic amylase-positive cells from human ES cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa-Shirasawa, Sakiko; Yoshie, Susumu; Yue, Fengming; Mogi, Akimi; Yokoyama, Tadayuki; Tomotsune, Daihachiro; Sasaki, Katsunori

    2013-12-01

    The major molecular signals of pancreatic exocrine development are largely unknown. We examine the role of fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF7) in the final induction of pancreatic amylase-containing exocrine cells from induced-pancreatic progenitor cells derived from human embryonic stem (hES) cells. Our protocol consisted in three steps: Step I, differentiation of definitive endoderm (DE) by activin A treatment of hES cell colonies; Step II, differentiation of pancreatic progenitor cells by re-plating of the cells of Step I onto 24-well plates at high density and stimulation with all-trans retinoic acid; Step III, differentiation of pancreatic exocrine cells with a combination of FGF7, glucagon-like peptide 1 and nicotinamide. The expression levels of pancreatic endodermal markers such as Foxa2, Sox17 and gut tube endoderm marker HNF1β were up-regulated in both Step I and II. Moreover, in Step III, the induced cells expressed pancreatic markers such as amylase, carboxypeptidase A and chymotrypsinogen B, which were similar to those in normal human pancreas. From day 8 in Step III, cells immunohistochemically positive for amylase and for carboxypeptidase A, a pancreatic exocrine cell product, were induced by FGF7. Pancreatic progenitor Pdx1-positive cells were localized in proximity to the amylase-positive cells. In the absence of FGF7, few amylase-positive cells were identified. Thus, our three-step culture protocol for human ES cells effectively induces the differentiation of amylase- and carboxypeptidase-A-containing pancreatic exocrine cells.

  16. Competition between folding and glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, B; Bruun, A W; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    1996-01-01

    Using carboxypeptidase Y in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, the in vivo relationship between protein folding and N-glycosylation was studied. Seven new sites for N-glycosylation were introduced at positions buried in the folded protein structure. The level of glycosylation of such new...... acceptor sites. In some cases, all the newly synthesized mutant protein was modified at the novel site while in others no modification took place. In the most interesting category of mutants, the level of glycosylation was dependent on the conditions for folding. This shows that folding and glycosylation...

  17. Comparative analysis of monoclonal antibodies against prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tykvart, Jan; Navrátil, Václav; Sedlák, František; Corey, E.; Colombatti, M.; Fracasso, G.; Koukolík, F.; Bařinka, Cyril; Šácha, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 16 (2014), s. 1674-1690 ISSN 0270-4137 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/12/0847; GA MŠk LO1302; GA ČR GAP301/12/1513; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:86652036 Keywords : glutamate carboxypeptidase II * prostate -specific membrane antigen * folate hydrolase * NAALADase * Western blot * immunohistochemistry * ELISA * flow cytometry * surface plasmon resonance Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.565, year: 2014

  18. TR146 cells grown on filters as a model of human buccal epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck Nielsen, H; Rømer Rassing, M; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2000-01-01

    cell culture model, and human and porcine buccal epithelium were compared. The esterase activity in the intact cell culture model and in the porcine buccal mucosa was compared. Further, the TR146 cell culture model was used to study the permeability rate and metabolism of leu-enkephalin. The activity...... of the three enzymes in the TR146 homogenate supernatants was in the same range as the activity in homogenate supernatants of human buccal epithelium. In the TR146 cell culture model, the activity of aminopeptidase (13.70+/-2.10 nmol/min per mg protein) was approx. four times the activity of carboxypeptidase...

  19. Purification and primary structure determination of human lysosomal dipeptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, Iztok; Mihelic, Marko

    2003-02-01

    The lysosomal metallopeptidase is an enzyme that acts preferentially on dipeptides with unsubstituted N- and C-termini. Its activity is highest in slightly acidic pH. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of lysosomal dipeptidase from human kidney. The isolated enzyme has the amino-terminal sequence DVAKAIINLAVY and is a homodimer with a molecular mass of 100 kDa. So far no amino acid sequence has been determined for this metallopeptidase. The complete primary structure as deduced from the nucleotide sequence revealed that the isolated dipeptidase is similar to blood plasma glutamate carboxypeptidase.

  20. The sxa2-dependent inactivation of the P-factor mating pheromone in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladds, G; Rasmussen, E M; Young, T

    1996-01-01

    Haploid cells of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe exist in one of two mating types, referred to as M and P. Conjugation occurs between cells of opposite mating type and is controlled by the reciprocal action of diffusible pheromones. Loss of function of the sxa2 gene in M cells causes...... hypersensitivity to the P-factor mating pheromone and a reduction in mating efficiency. Here we demonstrate the secretion of an sxa2-dependent carboxypeptidase that inactivates P-factor by removal of the C-terminal leucine residue....

  1. Comparación computacional de estructuras de proteínas. Aplicación al estudio de un inhibidor de carboxipeptidasa como agente antitumoral

    OpenAIRE

    Mas Benavente, José Manuel

    2001-01-01

    Consultable des del TDX Títol obtingut de la portada digitalitzada El objetivo general de esta tesis se enmarca en un proyecto más amplio de ingeniería de proteínas que trata de analizar y rediseñar la estructura, camino de plegamiento, función natural y aplicaciones biotecnológicas de una proteína, el PCI (Potato Carboxypeptidase Inhibitor). Las características estructurales de esta proteína, esencialmente sus puentes de azufre, nos invitaron a realizar un estudio general en proteínas ...

  2. Engineering a prostate-specific membrane antigen-activated tumor endothelial cell prodrug for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denmeade, Samuel R; Mhaka, Annastasiah M; Rosen, D Marc

    2012-01-01

    adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA) pump, whose proper function is required by all cell types for viability. To achieve targeted inhibition, we took advantage of the unique expression of the carboxypeptidase prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) by tumor endothelial cells within the microenvironment...... of solid tumors. We generated a prodrug, G202, consisting of a PSMA-specific peptide coupled to an analog of the potent SERCA pump inhibitor thapsigargin. G202 produced substantial tumor regression against a panel of human cancer xenografts in vivo at doses that were minimally toxic to the host...

  3. Isolation and characterization of PEP3, a gene required for vacuolar biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Preston, R A; Manolson, M F; Becherer, K; Weidenhammer, E; Kirkpatrick, D; Wright, R; Jones, E W

    1991-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae PEP3 gene was cloned from a wild-type genomic library by complementation of the carboxypeptidase Y deficiency in a pep3-12 strain. Subclone complementation results localized the PEP3 gene to a 3.8-kb DNA fragment. The DNA sequence of the fragment was determined; a 2,754-bp open reading frame predicts that the PEP3 gene product is a hydrophilic, 107-kDa protein that has no significant similarity to any known protein. The PEP3 predicted protein has a zinc finger (CX...

  4. Regulation of glycoprotein synthesis in yeast by mating pheromones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, W.

    1984-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, glycosylated proteins amount to less than 2% of the cell protein. Two intensively studied examples of yeast glycoproteins are the external cell wall - associated invertase and the vacuolar carboxypeptidase Y. Recently, it was shown that the mating pheromone, alpha factor, specifically and strongly inhibits the synthesis of N-glycosylated proteins in haploid a cells, whereas O-glycosylated proteins are not affected. In this paper, the pathways of glycoprotein biosynthesis are summarized briefly, and evidence is presented that mating pheomones have a regulatory function in glycoprotein synthesis

  5. Mast Cells Can Enhance Resistance to Snake and Honeybee Venoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Martin; Piliponsky, Adrian M.; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Lammel, Verena; Åbrink, Magnus; Pejler, Gunnar; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2006-07-01

    Snake or honeybee envenomation can cause substantial morbidity and mortality, and it has been proposed that the activation of mast cells by snake or insect venoms can contribute to these effects. We show, in contrast, that mast cells can significantly reduce snake-venom-induced pathology in mice, at least in part by releasing carboxypeptidase A and possibly other proteases, which can degrade venom components. Mast cells also significantly reduced the morbidity and mortality induced by honeybee venom. These findings identify a new biological function for mast cells in enhancing resistance to the morbidity and mortality induced by animal venoms.

  6. Proteolytic and Trypsin Inhibitor Activity in Germinating Jojoba Seeds (Simmondsia chinensis) 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samac, Deborah; Storey, Richard

    1981-01-01

    Changes in proteolytic activity (aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase, endopeptidase) were followed during germination (imbibition through seedling development) in extracts from cotyledons of jojoba seeds (Simmondsia chinensis). After imbibition, the cotyledons contained high levels of sulfhydryl aminopeptidase activity (APA) but low levels of serine carboxypeptidase activity (CPA). CPA increased with germination through the apparent loss of a CPA inhibitor substance in the seed. Curves showing changes in endopeptidase activity (EPA) assayed at pH 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 during germination were distinctly different. EPA at pH 4, 5, 6, and 7 showed characteristics of sulfhydryl enzymes while activity at pH 8 was probably due to a serine type enzyme. EPA at pH 6 was inhibited early in germination by one or more substances in the seed. Activities at pH 5 and later at pH 6 were the highest of all EPA throughout germination and increases in these activities were associated with a rapid loss of protein from the cotyledons of the developing seedling. Jojoba cotyledonary extracts were found to inhibit the enzymic activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, and pepsin but not the protease from Aspergillus saotoi. The heat-labile trypsin inhibitor substance(s) was found in commercially processed jojoba seed meal and the albumin fraction of seed proteins. Trypsin inhibitor activity decreased with germination. PMID:16662104

  7. Proteolytic and Trypsin Inhibitor Activity in Germinating Jojoba Seeds (Simmondsia chinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samac, D; Storey, R

    1981-12-01

    Changes in proteolytic activity (aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase, endopeptidase) were followed during germination (imbibition through seedling development) in extracts from cotyledons of jojoba seeds (Simmondsia chinensis). After imbibition, the cotyledons contained high levels of sulfhydryl aminopeptidase activity (APA) but low levels of serine carboxypeptidase activity (CPA). CPA increased with germination through the apparent loss of a CPA inhibitor substance in the seed. Curves showing changes in endopeptidase activity (EPA) assayed at pH 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 during germination were distinctly different. EPA at pH 4, 5, 6, and 7 showed characteristics of sulfhydryl enzymes while activity at pH 8 was probably due to a serine type enzyme. EPA at pH 6 was inhibited early in germination by one or more substances in the seed. Activities at pH 5 and later at pH 6 were the highest of all EPA throughout germination and increases in these activities were associated with a rapid loss of protein from the cotyledons of the developing seedling.Jojoba cotyledonary extracts were found to inhibit the enzymic activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, and pepsin but not the protease from Aspergillus saotoi. The heat-labile trypsin inhibitor substance(s) was found in commercially processed jojoba seed meal and the albumin fraction of seed proteins. Trypsin inhibitor activity decreased with germination.

  8. HYDROLYSIS OF CHEESEWHEY PROTEINSWITH TRYPSIN, CHYMOTRYPSINAND CARBOXYPEPTIDASEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. CUSTÓDIO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available

    This work presents a method for adding value to cheese whey residues by whey proteins hydrolysis, using trypsin, chymotrypsin and carboxypeptidase A as catalysts. Sweet cheese whey was dialyzed and filtered in kaolin. Lactose and protein contents were analyzed after each step. The activities of bovine pancreas trypsin and chymotrypsin were measured at different pHs and temperatures. The optimal pH for the hydrolysis of whey proteins was 9.0 for both enzymes. Optima temperatures were 60ºC for trypsin, and 50ºC for chymotrypsin. Trypsin exhibited typical Michaelis-Menten behavior, but chymotrypsin did not. Electrophoretic analysis showed that neither trypsin nor chymotrypsin alone hydrolyzed whey proteins in less than three hours. Hydrolysis rates of -lactalbumin by trypsin, and of bovine serum albumin by chymotrypsin were low. When these enzymes were combined, however, all protein fractions were attacked and rates of hydrolysis were enhanced by one order of magnitude. The addition of carboxypeptidase A to the others enzymes did not improve the process yield.

  9. Protease inhibitors and indoleamines selectively inhibit cholinesterases in the histopathologic structures of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C I; Guela, C; Mesulam, M M

    1993-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques express acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activity in Alzheimer disease. We previously reported that traditional acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as BW284C51, tacrine, and physostigmine were more potent inhibitors of the acetylcholinesterase in normal axons and cell bodies than of the acetylcholinesterase in plaques and tangles. We now report that the reverse pattern is seen with indoleamines (such as serotonin and its precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan), carboxypeptidase inhibitor, and the nonspecific protease inhibitor bacitracin. These substances are more potent inhibitors of the cholinesterases in plaques and tangles than of those in normal axons and cell bodies. These results show that the enzymatic properties of plaque and tangle-associated cholinesterases diverge from those of normal axons and cell bodies. The selective susceptibility to bacitracin and carboxypeptidase inhibitor indicates that the catalytic sites of plaque and tangle-bound cholinesterases are more closely associated with peptidase or protease-like properties than the catalytic sites of cholinesterases in normal axons and cell bodies. This shift in enzymatic affinity may lead to the abnormal protein processing that is thought to play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. The availability of pharmacological and dietary means for altering brain indoleamines raises therapeutic possibilities for inhibiting the abnormal cholinesterase activity associated with Alzheimer disease. Images PMID:8421706

  10. Identification and characterization of the novel reversible and selective cathepsin X inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonović, Urša Pečar; Mitrović, Ana; Knez, Damijan; Jakoš, Tanja; Pišlar, Anja; Brus, Boris; Doljak, Bojan; Stojan, Jure; Žakelj, Simon; Trontelj, Jurij; Gobec, Stanislav; Kos, Janko

    2017-09-13

    Cathepsin X is a cysteine peptidase involved in the progression of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Targeting this enzyme with selective inhibitors opens a new possibility for intervention in several therapeutic areas. In this study triazole-based reversible and selective inhibitors of cathepsin X have been identified. Their selectivity and binding is enhanced when the 2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxine moiety is present as the R 1 substituent. Of a series of selected triazole-benzodioxine derivatives, compound 22 is the most potent inhibitor of cathepsin X carboxypeptidase activity (K i  = 2.45 ± 0.05 μM) with at least 100-fold greater selectivity in comparison to cathepsin B or other related cysteine peptidases. Compound 22 is not cytotoxic to prostate cancer cells PC-3 or pheochromocytoma PC-12 cells at concentrations up to 10 μM. It significantly inhibits the migration of tumor cells and increases the outgrowth of neurites, both processes being under the control of cathepsin X carboxypeptidase activity. Compound 22 and other characterized triazole-based inhibitors thus possess a great potential for further development resulting in several in vivo applications.

  11. Elevated Systemic Levels of Eosinophil, Neutrophil, and Mast Cell Granular Proteins in Strongyloides Stercoralis Infection that Diminish following Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamanickam, Anuradha; Munisankar, Saravanan; Bhootra, Yukthi; Dolla, Chandra Kumar; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2018-01-01

    Infection with the helminth parasite Strongyloides stercoralis ( Ss ) is commonly clinically asymptomatic that is often accompanied by peripheral eosinophilia. Granulocytes are activated during helminth infection and can act as immune effector cells. Plasma levels of eosinophil and neutrophil granular proteins convey an indirect measure of granulocyte degranulation and are prominently augmented in numerous helminth-infected patients. In this study, we sought to examine the levels of eosinophil, neutrophil, and mast cell activation-associated granule proteins in asymptomatic Ss infection and to understand their kinetics following anthelmintic therapy. To this end, we measured the plasma levels of eosinophil cationic protein, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil major basic protein, neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase, neutrophil proteinase-3, mast cell tryptase, leukotriene C4, and mast cell carboxypeptidase-A3 in individuals with asymptomatic Ss infection or without Ss infection [uninfected (UN)]. We also estimated the levels of all of these analytes in infected individuals following definitive treatment of Ss infection. We demonstrated that those infected individuals have significantly enhanced plasma levels of eosinophil cationic protein, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin, eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil major basic protein, elastase, myeloperoxidase, mast cell tryptase, leukotriene C4, and carboxypeptidase-A3 compared to UN individuals. Following the treatment of Ss infection, each of these granulocyte-associated proteins drops significantly. Our data suggest that eosinophil, neutrophil, and mast cell activation may play a role in the response to Ss infection.

  12. Purification and characterization of cathepsin B from the skeletal muscles of agama stellio stellio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Jassabi, S.; Abu-Ghalyun, Y.

    1997-01-01

    1. Cathepsin b from the muscles of Jordanian lizard Agama stellio stellio was purified to homogeneity by a series of column chromatography on DEAE-sephadex, thio propyl sepharose and sephadex G-100 2. The molecular weight of cathepsin B isolated was to be 31800 dalton by using SDS-PAGE, and 33000 dalton by gel filtration, and its isoelectric point was measured to be 4.2 by isoelectric focusing. 3. Cathepsin B had ph optimum of 5.5, required a thiol-reducing reagent for activation and was inhibited by thiol-protease inhibitors. 4. The Km and K cat values for Z-Phe-Arg-Mca were determined to be 0.161mM and 238 S -1 . 5. Cathepsin B acted on oligopeptide substrates mainly as di peptidyl carboxypeptidase. (authors). 22 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs

  13. Unconventional Trafficking of Mammalian Phospholipase D3 to Lysosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Carolina Gonzalez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Variants in the phospholipase D3 (PLD3 gene have genetically been linked to late-onset Alzheimer's disease. We present a detailed biochemical analysis of PLD3 and reveal its endogenous localization in endosomes and lysosomes. PLD3 reaches lysosomes as a type II transmembrane protein via a (for mammalian cells uncommon intracellular biosynthetic route that depends on the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport machinery. PLD3 is sorted into intraluminal vesicles of multivesicular endosomes, and ESCRT-dependent sorting correlates with ubiquitination. In multivesicular endosomes, PLD3 is subjected to proteolytic cleavage, yielding a stable glycosylated luminal polypeptide and a rapidly degraded N-terminal membrane-bound fragment. This pathway closely resembles the delivery route of carboxypeptidase S to the yeast vacuole. Our experiments reveal a biosynthetic route of PLD3 involving proteolytic processing and ESCRT-dependent sorting for its delivery to lysosomes in mammalian cells.

  14. alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating-hormone precursors in the pig pituitary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M

    1986-01-01

    The occurrence of intermediates from the processing of ACTH-(1-39) [adrenocorticotropic hormone-(1-39)] to alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone was investigated in normal pig pituitaries by the use of sensitive and specific radioimmunoassays for ACTH-(1-13), ACTH-(1-14), ACTH-(1-13)-NH2 and ACTH-(1......) were detected in lower amounts in both the intermediate lobe and the anterior lobe. ACTH-(1-17), ACTH-(1-13) and their acetylated analogues could not be detected in the anterior lobe or the intermediate lobe. The results suggest that an endopeptidase initially cleaves ACTH-(1-39) at the Lys-16-Arg-17...... bond. ACTH-(1-16) is then processed by a pituitary carboxypeptidase to ACTH-(1-14) and ACTH-(17-39) by the aminopeptidase to ACTH-(18-39)....

  15. Glutamylation of the DNA sensor cGAS regulates its binding and synthase activity in antiviral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Pengyan; Ye, Buqing; Wang, Shuo; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Du, Ying; Xiong, Zhen; Tian, Yong; Fan, Zusen

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) senses cytosolic DNA during viral infection and catalyzes synthesis of the dinucleotide cGAMP, which activates the adaptor STING to initiate antiviral responses. Here we found that deficiency in the carboxypeptidase CCP5 or CCP6 led to susceptibility to DNA viruses. CCP5 and CCP6 were required for activation of the transcription factor IRF3 and interferons. Polyglutamylation of cGAS by the enzyme TTLL6 impeded its DNA-binding ability, whereas TTLL4-mediated monoglutamylation of cGAS blocked its synthase activity. Conversely, CCP6 removed the polyglutamylation of cGAS, whereas CCP5 hydrolyzed the monoglutamylation of cGAS, which together led to the activation of cGAS. Therefore, glutamylation and deglutamylation of cGAS tightly modulate immune responses to infection with DNA viruses.

  16. Active site mutations in yeast protein disulfide isomerase cause dithiothreitol sensitivity and a reduced rate of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, B; Tachibana, C; Winther, Jakob R.

    1997-01-01

    Aspects of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) function have been studied in yeast in vivo. PDI contains two thioredoxin-like domains, a and a', each of which contains an active-site CXXC motif. The relative importance of the two domains was analyzed by rendering each one inactive by mutation to SGAS....... Such mutations had no significant effect on growth. The domains however, were not equivalent since the rate of folding of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) in vivo was reduced by inactivation of the a domain but not the a' domain. To investigate the relevance of PDI redox potential, the G and H positions of each CGHC......-deleted strains overexpressing the yeast PDI homologue EUG1 are viable. Exchanging the wild-type Eug1p C(L/I)HS active site sequences for C(L/I)HC increased the growth rate significantly, however, further highlighting the importance of the oxidizing function for optimal growth....

  17. Total synthesis of fully tritiated Leu-enkephalin by enzymatic coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellio, F.; Lecocq, G.; Morgat, J.L.; Gueguen, P. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service de Biochimie)

    1990-09-01

    This paper describes the total enzymatic synthesis of Leu-enkephalin (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu) in which all residues were labelled with tritium. Carboxypeptidase Y from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the coupling enzyme. ({sup 3}H)-Tyr-NH{sub 2}, ({sup 3}H)-Gly-Oet, ({sup 3}H)-Phe-NH{sub 2} and ({sup 3}H)-Leu-NH{sub 2} were prepared with specific radioactivities ranging between 20 and 60 Ci/mmol (740 to 2220 GBq/mmol). Using a microscale procedure, we obtained a fully tritiated hormone having a specific radioactivity equal to 139 Ci/mmol (5143 GBq/mmol), in agreement with the summation of the specific radioactivities of constituting residue. The radioactive hormone had antigenic properties identical to those of native Leu-enkephalin. It also bound to rat brain opiate receptors like the parental hormone. (author).

  18. Aloe vera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, A.D.; Penneys, N.S.

    1988-04-01

    We review the scientific literature regarding the aloe vera plant and its products. Aloe vera is known to contain several pharmacologically active ingredients, including a carboxypeptidase that inactivates bradykinin in vitro, salicylates, and a substance(s) that inhibits thromboxane formation in vivo. Scientific studies exist that support an antibacterial and antifungal effect for substance(s) in aloe vera. Studies and case reports provide support for the use of aloe vera in the treatment of radiation ulcers and stasis ulcers in man and burn and frostbite injuries in animals. The evidence for a potential beneficial effect associated with the use of aloe vera is sufficient to warrant the design and implementation of well-controlled clinical trials. 27 references.

  19. Aloe vera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, A.D.; Penneys, N.S.

    1988-01-01

    We review the scientific literature regarding the aloe vera plant and its products. Aloe vera is known to contain several pharmacologically active ingredients, including a carboxypeptidase that inactivates bradykinin in vitro, salicylates, and a substance(s) that inhibits thromboxane formation in vivo. Scientific studies exist that support an antibacterial and antifungal effect for substance(s) in aloe vera. Studies and case reports provide support for the use of aloe vera in the treatment of radiation ulcers and stasis ulcers in man and burn and frostbite injuries in animals. The evidence for a potential beneficial effect associated with the use of aloe vera is sufficient to warrant the design and implementation of well-controlled clinical trials. 27 references

  20. Isolation and partial characterization of a second myotropic peptide from the hindgut of the cockroach, Leucophaea maderae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, G M; Cook, B J

    1983-01-01

    Proctolin and a second myotropic peptide were extracted from the hindgut of the cockroach Leucophaea maderae with methanol-water-acetic acid (90:9:1). The two peptides were easily separated by HPLC on a mu-Bondapak-phenyl column. Like proctolin, the second peptide was heat stable and was inactivated by the exopeptidases aminopeptidase M and carboxypeptidase Y. The response of the isolated hindgut to the new peptide was distinguishable from the response to proctolin by the following features: (a) a longer interval following application (1-4 min) to reach a maximum contraction, and (b) a much larger amplitude for single phasic contractions. Like proctolin, the new peptide could cause a protracted stimulation of the hindgut for more than 2 hr.

  1. Influence of pulsed electric field on enzymes, bacteria and volatile flavor compounds of unpasteurized sake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamasa, OKUMURA; Taro, YAEGASHI; Takahiro, FUJIWARA; Katsuyuki, TAKAHASHI; Koichi, TAKAKI; Tomo, KUDO

    2018-04-01

    A pulsed electric field (PEF) was applied to unpasteurized sake at constant temperatures, at which α-amylase was not inactivated. We adjusted the input energy to be identical for the temperatures by changing the number of PEF application, because the current significantly increased with the temperature, even the amplitude of the applied voltage was identical. As a result, the α-amylase was seemed to be inactivated by PEF application, not due to thermal effect. The glucoamylase was significantly inactivated by PEF. Moreover, the acid carboxypeptidase was inactivated by PEF at 4 °C but significantly activated at 25 °C. These results show that the sensitivity of enzyme to PEF application differs depending on the types of enzyme and treatment temperature. On the other hand, the colony number of bacteria was remarkably decreased, but the amount of the volatile flavor compounds was not decreased by PEF application.

  2. Engineering a prostate-specific membrane antigen-activated tumor endothelial cell prodrug for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denmeade, Samuel R; Mhaka, Annastasiah M; Rosen, D Marc; Brennen, W Nathaniel; Dalrymple, Susan; Dach, Ingrid; Olesen, Claus; Gurel, Bora; Demarzo, Angelo M; Wilding, George; Carducci, Michael A; Dionne, Craig A; Møller, Jesper V; Nissen, Poul; Christensen, S Brøgger; Isaacs, John T

    2012-06-27

    Heterogeneous expression of drug target proteins within tumor sites is a major mechanism of resistance to anticancer therapies. We describe a strategy to selectively inhibit, within tumor sites, the function of a critical intracellular protein, the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA) pump, whose proper function is required by all cell types for viability. To achieve targeted inhibition, we took advantage of the unique expression of the carboxypeptidase prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) by tumor endothelial cells within the microenvironment of solid tumors. We generated a prodrug, G202, consisting of a PSMA-specific peptide coupled to an analog of the potent SERCA pump inhibitor thapsigargin. G202 produced substantial tumor regression against a panel of human cancer xenografts in vivo at doses that were minimally toxic to the host. On the basis of these data, a phase 1 dose-escalation clinical trial has been initiated with G202 in patients with advanced cancer.

  3. Furin proteolytically processes the heparin-binding region of extracellular superoxide dismutase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowler, Russell P; Nicks, Mike; Olsen, Dorte Aa

    2002-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant enzyme that attenuates brain and lung injury from oxidative stress. A polybasic region in the carboxyl terminus distinguishes EC-SOD from other superoxide dismutases and determines EC-SOD's tissue half-life and affinity for heparin....... There are two types of EC-SOD that differ based on the presence or absence of this heparin-binding region. It has recently been shown that proteolytic removal of the heparin-binding region is an intracellular event (Enghild, J. J., Thogersen, I. B., Oury, T. D., Valnickova, Z., Hojrup, P., and Crapo, J. D...... of intracellular proteases implicate furin as a processing protease. In vitro experiments using furin and purified EC-SOD suggest that furin proteolytically cleaves EC-SOD in the middle of the polybasic region and then requires an additional carboxypeptidase to remove the remaining lysines and arginines...

  4. Serglycin proteoglycan is not implicated in localizing exocrine pancreas enzymes to zymogen granules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Carsten U; Cowland, Jack B; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Storage and release of proteins from granules forms the basis of cellular functions as diverse as cell mediated cytotoxicity, neuronal communication, activation of muscle fibres, and release of hormones or digestive enzymes from endocrine and exocrine glands, such as the pancreas. Serglycin...... is the major intracellular proteoglycan of haematopoietic cells. Serglycin is important for localization of proteins in granules of different haematopoietic cell types. Previous reports have indicated a role for serglycin in granule formation and localization of zymogens in granules of the exocrine pancreas...... in rat. We here present data showing that serglycin is not present at the protein level in human or murine pancreas. Furthermore, the amount and localization of three exocrine pancreas zymogens (amylase, trypsinogen, and carboxypeptidase A) is not affected by the absence of serglycin in a serglycin knock...

  5. NAAG Peptidase Inhibitors Act via mGluR3: Animal Models of Memory, Alzheimer's, and Ethanol Intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Rafal T; Janczura, Karolina J; Bzdega, Tomasz; Der, Elise K; Venzor, Faustino; O'Rourke, Brennen; Hark, Timothy J; Craddock, Kirsten E; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Moussa, Charbel; Neale, Joseph H

    2017-09-01

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) inactivates the peptide neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) following synaptic release. Inhibitors of GCPII increase extracellular NAAG levels and are efficacious in animal models of clinical disorders via NAAG activation of a group II metabotropic glutamate receptor. mGluR2 and mGluR3 knock-out (ko) mice were used to test the hypothesis that mGluR3 mediates the activity of GCPII inhibitors ZJ43 and 2-PMPA in animal models of memory and memory loss. Short- (1.5 h) and long- (24 h) term novel object recognition tests were used to assess memory. Treatment with ZJ43 or 2-PMPA prior to acquisition trials increased long-term memory in mGluR2, but not mGluR3, ko mice. Nine month-old triple transgenic Alzheimer's disease model mice exhibited impaired short-term novel object recognition memory that was rescued by treatment with a NAAG peptidase inhibitor. NAAG peptidase inhibitors and the group II mGluR agonist, LY354740, reversed the short-term memory deficit induced by acute ethanol administration in wild type mice. 2-PMPA also moderated the effect of ethanol on short-term memory in mGluR2 ko mice but failed to do so in mGluR3 ko mice. LY354740 and ZJ43 blocked ethanol-induced motor activation. Both GCPII inhibitors and LY354740 also significantly moderated the loss of motor coordination induced by 2.1 g/kg ethanol treatment. These data support the conclusion that inhibitors of glutamate carboxypeptidase II are efficacious in object recognition models of normal memory and memory deficits via an mGluR3 mediated process, actions that could have widespread clinical applications.

  6. Primary structures of three fragments of proglucagon from the pancreatic islets of the daddy Sculpin (Cottus scorpius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, J M; Falkmer, S; Thim, L

    1987-04-01

    Three peptides isolated from the Brockmann bodies of the daddy sculpin, a teleostean fish, have been identified as fragments of one or more proglucagons. The peptide L Q D A E D S S R F D A D D T L A G E A R E L S T P K represents the NH2 terminus of proglucagon (residues 1-27), H S E G T F S N D Y S K Y L E T R R A Q D F V Q W L K N S represents glucagon and H A D G T F T S D V S S Y L N D Q A I K D F V A K L K S G K V represents the glucagon-like peptide at the COOH terminus of the precursor. The fast-atom bombardment mass spectra of the three peptides were consistent with the proposed structures and demonstrated that further posttranslational modifications of the peptides had not taken place. Sculpin glucagon is identical to anglerfish glucagon II but sculpin proglucagon(1-27) and glucagon-like peptide show stronger homology to the corresponding regions of anglerfish proglucagon I than to proglucagon II. The structures of the peptides are suggestive of the action of trypsin-like and carboxypeptidase-B-like enzymes at the site of pairs of basic amino acid residues in proglucagon. The presence of a COOH-terminal lysyl group in proglucagon(1-27) may indicate, however, that the penultimate prolyl residue partially inhibits the action of the carboxypeptidase-B-like activity.

  7. ProSAAS-derived peptides are differentially processed and sorted in mouse brain and AtT-20 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H Wardman

    Full Text Available ProSAAS is the precursor for some of the most abundant peptides found in mouse brain and other tissues, including peptides named SAAS, PEN, and LEN. Both SAAS and LEN are found in big and little forms due to differential processing. Initial processing of proSAAS is mediated by furin (and/or furin-like enzymes and carboxypeptidase D, while the smaller forms are generated by secretory granule prohormone convertases and carboxypeptidase E. In mouse hypothalamus, PEN and big LEN colocalize with neuropeptide Y. In the present study, little LEN and SAAS were detected in mouse hypothalamus but not in cell bodies of neuropeptide Y-expressing neurons. PEN and big LEN show substantial colocalization in hypothalamus, but big LEN and little LEN do not. An antiserum to SAAS that detects both big and little forms of this peptide did not show substantial colocalization with PEN or big LEN. To further study this, the AtT-20 cells mouse pituitary corticotrophic cell line was transfected with rat proSAAS and the distribution of peptides examined. As found in mouse hypothalamus, only some of the proSAAS-derived peptides colocalized with each other in AtT-20 cells. The two sites within proSAAS that are known to be efficiently cleaved by furin were altered by site-directed mutagenesis to convert the P4 Arg into Lys; this change converts the sequences from furin consensus sites into prohormone convertase consensus sites. Upon expression of the mutated form of proSAAS in AtT-20 cells, there was significantly more colocalization of proSAAS-derived peptides PEN and SAAS. Taken together, these results indicate that proSAAS is initially cleaved in the Golgi or trans-Golgi network by furin and/or furin-like enzymes and the resulting fragments are sorted into distinct vesicles and further processed by additional enzymes into the mature peptides.

  8. Cross genome comparisons of serine proteases in Arabidopsis and rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowdhamini R

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine proteases are one of the largest groups of proteolytic enzymes found across all kingdoms of life and are associated with several essential physiological pathways. The availability of Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa genome sequences has permitted the identification and comparison of the repertoire of serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species. Results Despite the differences in genome sizes between Arabidopsis and rice, we identified a very similar number of serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species (206 and 222, respectively. Nearly 40% of the above sequences were identified as potential orthologues. Atypical members could be identified in the plant genomes for Deg, Clp, Lon, rhomboid proteases and species-specific members were observed for the highly populated subtilisin and serine carboxypeptidase families suggesting multiple lateral gene transfers. DegP proteases, prolyl oligopeptidases, Clp proteases and rhomboids share a significantly higher percentage orthology between the two genomes indicating substantial evolutionary divergence was set prior to speciation. Single domain architectures and paralogues for several putative subtilisins, serine carboxypeptidases and rhomboids suggest they may have been recruited for additional roles in secondary metabolism with spatial and temporal regulation. The analysis reveals some domain architectures unique to either or both of the plant species and some inactive proteases, like in rhomboids and Clp proteases, which could be involved in chaperone function. Conclusion The systematic analysis of the serine protease-like proteins in the two plant species has provided some insight into the possible functional associations of previously uncharacterised serine protease-like proteins. Further investigation of these aspects may prove beneficial in our understanding of similar processes in commercially significant crop plant species.

  9. Immunological cross-reactivity to multiple autoantigens in patients with liver kidney microsomal type 1 autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, K; Gregorio, G V; Mieli-Vergani, G; Vergani, D

    1998-11-01

    We describe two patients with liver kidney microsomal antibody type 1 (LKM1)-positive autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) with associated endocrinopathies. The first patient had insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM), and the second patient had Addison's disease and hypoparathyroidism, and is also positive for islet cell antibodies, without overt diabetes. To account for the existence of multiple endocrinopathy in these patients, we investigated whether there is sequence similarity between the target of LKM1 antibodies, cytochrome P4502D6 (CYP2D6), and other human proteins, and if so, whether this structural similarity produces a detectable cross-reactive immune response. Our database search identified two proteins, carboxypeptidase H, an autoantigen in insulin-dependent diabetes, and 21-hydroxylase, the major autoantigen in Addison's disease, that share sequence similarity to the second major LKM1 epitope on CYP2D6. We tested the reactivity of sera from these patients to the homologous regions of the three autoantigens using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cut-off for positivity was established by testing sera from 22 healthy children. To determine the significance of reactivity to the peptide homologues of the three autoantigens, we investigated 16 additional patients with LKM1 AIH and 20 children with chronic hepatitis B virus infection as pathological controls. We found that reactivity to the second major epitope of CYP2D6 is significantly associated with reactivity to the homologous regions of carboxypeptidase H (CPH) and 21-hydroxylase (21-OHase) in patients with LKM1 AIH, and that this simultaneous recognition is cross-reactive. We suggest that a cross-reactive immune response between homologous autoantigens may contribute to the development of multiple endocrinopathies in LKM1 AIH.

  10. Activated thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa) attenuates breast cancer cell metastatic behaviors through inhibition of plasminogen activation and extracellular proteolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazzi, Zainab A.; Lanoue, Danielle; El-Youssef, Mouhanned; Romagnuolo, Rocco; Tubman, Janice; Cavallo-Medved, Dora; Porter, Lisa A.; Boffa, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) is a plasma zymogen, which can be converted to activated TAFI (TAFIa) through proteolytic cleavage by thrombin, plasmin, and most effectively thrombin in complex with the endothelial cofactor thrombomodulin (TM). TAFIa is a carboxypeptidase that cleaves carboxyl terminal lysine and arginine residues from protein and peptide substrates, including plasminogen-binding sites on cell surface receptors. Carboxyl terminal lysine residues play a pivotal role in enhancing cell surface plasminogen activation to plasmin. Plasmin has many critical functions including cleaving components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which enhances invasion and migration of cancer cells. We therefore hypothesized that TAFIa could act to attenuate metastasis. To assess the role of TAFIa in breast cancer metastasis, in vitro migration and invasion assays, live cell proteolysis and cell proliferation using MDA-MB-231 and SUM149 cells were carried out in the presence of a TAFIa inhibitor, recombinant TAFI variants, or soluble TM. Inhibition of TAFIa with potato tuber carboxypeptidase inhibitor increased cell invasion, migration and proteolysis of both cell lines, whereas addition of TM resulted in a decrease in all these parameters. A stable variant of TAFIa, TAFIa-CIIYQ, showed enhanced inhibitory effects on cell invasion, migration and proteolysis. Furthermore, pericellular plasminogen activation was significantly decreased on the surface of MDA-MB-231 and SUM149 cells following treatment with various concentrations of TAFIa. Taken together, these results indicate a vital role for TAFIa in regulating pericellular plasminogen activation and ultimately ECM proteolysis in the breast cancer microenvironment. Enhancement of TAFI activation in this microenvironment may be a therapeutic strategy to inhibit invasion and prevent metastasis of breast cancer cells

  11. Effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS and peptidoglycan (PGN on human mast cell numbers, cytokine production, and protease composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yalin

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human mast cell (HuMC maturation occurs in tissues interfacing with the external environment, exposing both mast cell progenitors and mature mast cells, to bacteria and their products. It is unknown, however, whether long- or short-term exposure to bacteria-derived toll-like receptor (TLR ligands, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS or peptidoglycan (PGN, influences HuMC biology. Results Over 6 wks of culture, LPS had minimal effect on HuMC numbers but increased CD117, tryptase and chymase expression. PGN inhibited HuMC development. For mature mast cells, LPS in the presence of rhSCF (10 ng/ml increased CD117, tryptase, chymase and carboxypeptidase expression, primarily in CD117low HuMC. LPS decreased FcεRI expression and β-hexosaminidase release; but had no effect on LTC4 and PGD2 production. PGN reduced HuMC numbers; and CD117 and tryptase expression. IL-1β and IL-6 (in addition to IL-8 and IL-12 were detected in short-term culture supernatants of LPS treated cells, and reproduced the increases in CD117, tryptase, chymase, and carboxypeptidase expression observed in the presence of LPS. Comparative studies with mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells from wild type, but not TLR4 knockout mice, showed increases in mRNA of mouse mast cell chymases MMCP-1, MMCP-2 and MMCP-4. Conclusion PGN inhibits HuMC growth, while LPS exerts its primary effects on mature HuMC by altering cytokine production and protease composition, particularly at low concentrations of SCF. These data demonstrate the ability of bacterial products to alter HuMC mediator production, granular content, and number which may be particularly relevant at mucosal sites where HuMC are exposed to these products.

  12. The angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, captopril disrupts the motility activation of sperm from the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Sumiharu; Kawasaki, Saori; Kawasaki, Hideki; Kamei, Kaeko

    2017-11-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (also known as peptidyl dicarboxypeptidase A, ACE, and EC 3.4.15.1), which is found in a wide range of organisms, cleaves C-terminal dipeptides from relatively short oligopeptides. Mammalian ACE plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure. However, the precise physiological functions of insect ACE homologs have not been understood. As part of our effort to elucidate new physiological roles of insect ACE, we herein report a soluble ACE protein in male reproductive secretions from the silkmoth, Bombyx mori. Seminal vesicle sperm are quiescent in vitro, but vigorous motility is activated by treatment with either a glandula (g.) prostatica homogenate or trypsin in vitro. When seminal vesicle sperm were pre-incubated with captopril, a strong and specific inhibitor of mammalian ACE, and then stimulated to initiate motility by the addition of the g. prostatica homogenate or trypsin, the overall level of acquired motility was reduced in an inhibitor-concentration-dependent manner. In the course of this project, we detected ACE-related carboxypeptidase activity that was inhibited by captopril in both the vesicular (v.) seminalis of the noncopulative male reproductive tract and in the spermatophore that forms in the female bursa copulatrix at the time of mating, just as in an earlier report on the tomato moth, Lacanobia oleracea, which belongs to a different lepidopteran species (Ekbote et al., 2003a). Two distinct genes encoding ACE-like proteins were identified by analysis of B. mori cDNA, and were named BmAcer and BmAcer2, respectively [the former was previously reported by Quan et al. (2001) and the latter was first isolated in this paper]. RT-qPCR and Western blot analyses indicated that the BmAcer2 was predominantly produced in v. seminalis and transferred to the spermatophore during copulation, while the BmAcer was not detected in the adult male reproductive organs. A recombinant protein of BmAcer2 (devoid of a signal

  13. Non-ionic iodinated contrast media related immediate reactions: A mechanism study of 27 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Liqin; Guo, Xiangjie; Zhang, Haoyue; Jin, Qianqian; Zeng, Qiang; Tang, Xiaoxian; Gao, Cairong

    2017-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of non-ionic iodinated contrast media-related immediate reactions was evaluated in this study. Patients presenting at least grade II immediate reactions after non-ionic iodinated contrast media injection were enrolled. Basophil activation was evaluated by flow cytometry. The plasma concentration of human terminal complement complex SC5b-9, as well as concentrations of serum chymase, tryptase, human mast cell carboxypeptidase A3, human prostaglandin D2, and total IgE were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The basophil activation percentage was significantly higher in the study group than in the control group (17.94±21.06% vs 3.45±1.49%). The plasma concentration of human terminal complement complex SC5b-9 and concentrations of serum chymase, human mast cell carboxypeptidase A3, prostaglandin D2, tryptase, and total IgE were also significantly increased (236.99±318.21 vs 49.70±30.41ng/mL, 0.41±0.49 vs 0.09±0.06ng/mL, 1.17±0.67 vs 0.30±0.17ng/mL, 203.52±137.27 vs 102.28±48.72pg/mL, 3.81±0.22 vs 2.70±0.16ng/mL, 102.00±51.84 vs 19.97±2.75ng/mL, respectively). Both mast cells and basophils were activated in non-ionic iodinated contrast media to mediate immediate hypersensitivity, and mast cells may be involved. Different mechanisms, including IgE-dependent, complement-dependent, and direct membrane effects, contributed to mast cell and basophil activation. Individual patients may use a single or combined mechanism involving single or combined mast cells and basophils. Immediate reactions following non-ionic iodinated contrast media injection may be a mechanically heterogenous disease. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Quantitative variation in obesity-related traits and insulin precursors linked to the OB gene region on human chromosome 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duggirala, R.; Stern, M.P.; Reinhart, L.J. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Despite the evidence that human obesity has strong genetic determinants, efforts at identifying specific genes that influence human obesity have largely been unsuccessful. Using the sibship data obtained from 32 low-income Mexican American pedigrees ascertained on a type II diabetic proband and a multipoint variance-components method, we tested for linkage between various obesity-related traits plus associated metabolic traits and 15 markers on human chromosome 7. We found evidence for linkage between markers in the OB gene region and various traits, as follows: D7S514 and extremity skinfolds (LOD = 3.1), human carboxypeptidase A1 (HCPA1) and 32,33-split proinsulin level (LOD = 4.2), and HCPA1 and proinsulin level (LOD = 3.2). A putative susceptibility locus linked to the marker D7S514 explained 56% of the total phenotypic variation in extremity skinfolds. Variation at the HCPA1 locus explained 64% of phenotypic variation in proinsulin level and {approximately}73% of phenotypic variation in split proinsulin concentration, respectively. Weaker evidence for linkage to several other obesity-related traits (e.g., waist circumference, body-mass index, fat mass by bioimpedance, etc.) was observed for a genetic location, which is {approximately}15 cM telomeric to OB. In conclusion, our study reveals that the OB region plays a significant role in determining the phenotypic variation of both insulin precursors and obesity-related traits, at least in Mexican Americans. 66 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Modified human beta 2-microglobulin (desLys(58)) displays decreased affinity for the heavy chain of MHC class I and induces nitric oxide production and apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M; Harhaji, L; Lamberth, K

    2009-01-01

    Beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) is the light chain of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules, and is a prerequisite for the binding of peptides to the heavy chain and their presentation to CD8+ T cells. beta2m can be modified in vivo and in vitro by proteolytic cleavage...... by complement C1 and subsequent carboxypeptidase B-like activity--processes that lead to the generation of desLys(58) beta2m (dbeta2m). This work aims to study the effect of dbeta2m on peptide binding to MHC-I, the influence of dbeta2m on the binding of beta2m to the MHC-I heavy chain and the biological...... activity of dbeta2m. Both beta2m and dbeta2m are able to support the generation of MHC-I/peptide complexes at 18 degrees C, but complexes formed in the presence of dbeta2m destabilize at 37 degrees C. Moreover, a 250 times higher concentration of dbeta2m than of beta2m is needed to displace MHC...

  16. Dual Roles of FmtA in Staphylococcus aureus Cell Wall Biosynthesis and Autolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Aneela

    2012-01-01

    The fmtA gene is a member of the Staphylococcus aureus core cell wall stimulon. The FmtA protein interacts with β-lactams through formation of covalent species. Here, we show that FmtA has weak d-Ala-d-Ala-carboxypeptidase activity and is capable of covalently incorporating C14-Gly into cell walls. The fluorescence microscopy study showed that the protein is localized to the cell division septum. Furthermore, we show that wall teichoic acids interact specifically with FmtA and mediate recruitment of FmtA to the S. aureus cell wall. Subjection of S. aureus to FmtA concentrations of 0.1 μM or less induces autolysis and biofilm production. This effect requires the presence of wall teichoic acids. At FmtA concentrations greater than 0.2 μM, autolysis and biofilm formation in S. aureus are repressed and growth is enhanced. Our findings indicate dual roles of FmtA in S. aureus growth, whereby at low concentrations, FmtA may modulate the activity of the major autolysin (AtlA) of S. aureus and, at high concentrations, may participate in synthesis of cell wall peptidoglycan. These two roles of FmtA may reflect dual functions of FmtA in the absence and presence of cell wall stress, respectively. PMID:22564846

  17. Characterization of a high affinity cocaine binding site in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calligaro, D.; Eldefrawi, M.

    1986-01-01

    Binding of [ 3 H]cocaine to synaptic membranes from whole rat brain was reversible and saturable. Nonlinear regression analysis of binding isotherms indicated two binding affinities: one with k/sub d/ = 16 nM, B/sub max/ = 0.65 pmoles/mg protein and the other with K/sub d/ = 660 nM, B/sub max/ = 5.1 pmoles/mg protein. The high-affinity binding of [ 3 H]cocaine was sensitive to the actions of trypsin and chymotrypsin but not carboxypeptidase, and was eliminated by exposure of the membranes to 95 0 C for 5 min. Specific binding at 2 nM was higher at pH 8.8 than at pH 7.0. Binding of [ 3 H]cocaine (15 nM) was inhibited by increasing concentrations of Na + ions. Several cocaine analogues, neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors and local anesthetics displaced specific [ 3 H]cocaine binding at 2 nM with various potencies. The cocaine analogue (-)-norcocaine was the most potent (IC 50 = 10 nM), while the local anesthetic tetracaine was the least potent in inhibiting [ 3 H]cocaine binding. Several biogenic amine uptake inhibitors, including tricyclic antidepressants and phencyclidine, had IC 50 values below μM concentrations

  18. Subfamily-specific adaptations in the structures of two penicillin-binding proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniil M Prigozhin

    Full Text Available Beta-lactam antibiotics target penicillin-binding proteins including several enzyme classes essential for bacterial cell-wall homeostasis. To better understand the functional and inhibitor-binding specificities of penicillin-binding proteins from the pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we carried out structural and phylogenetic analysis of two predicted D,D-carboxypeptidases, Rv2911 and Rv3330. Optimization of Rv2911 for crystallization using directed evolution and the GFP folding reporter method yielded a soluble quadruple mutant. Structures of optimized Rv2911 bound to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and Rv3330 bound to meropenem show that, in contrast to the nonspecific inhibitor, meropenem forms an extended interaction with the enzyme along a conserved surface. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Rv2911 and Rv3330 belong to different clades that emerged in Actinobacteria and are not represented in model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Clade-specific adaptations allow these enzymes to fulfill distinct physiological roles despite strict conservation of core catalytic residues. The characteristic differences include potential protein-protein interaction surfaces and specificity-determining residues surrounding the catalytic site. Overall, these structural insights lay the groundwork to develop improved beta-lactam therapeutics for tuberculosis.

  19. Squash inhibitor family of serine proteinases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otlewski, J.; Krowarsch, D.

    1996-01-01

    Squash inhibitors of serine proteinases form an uniform family of small proteins. They are built of 27-33 amino-acid residues and cross-linked with three disulfide bridges. The reactive site peptide bond (P1-P1') is between residue 5 (Lys, Arg or Leu) and 6 (always Ile). High resolution X-ray structures are available for two squash inhibitors complexed with trypsin. NMR solution structures have also been determined for free inhibitors. The major structural motif is a distorted, triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet. A similar folding motif has been recently found in a number of proteins, including: conotoxins from fish-hunting snails, carboxypeptidase inhibitor from potato, kalata B1 polypeptide, and in some growth factors (e.g. nerve growth factor, transforming growth factor β2, platelet-derived growth factor). Squash inhibitors are highly stable and rigid proteins. They inhibit a number of serine proteinases: trypsin, plasmin, kallikrein, blood clotting factors: X a and XII a , cathepsin G. The inhibition spectrum can be much broadened if specific amino-acid substitutions are introduced, especially at residues which contact proteinase. Squash inhibitors inhibit proteinases via the standard mechanism. According to the mechanism, inhibitors are substrates which exhibit at neutral pH a high k cat /K m index for hydrolysis and resynthesis of the reactive site, and a low value of the hydrolysis constant. (author)

  20. Crystal Structure of Homo Sapiens PTD012 Reveals a Zinc-Containing Hydrolase Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manjasetty,B.; Bussow, K.; Fieber-ErdMan, M.; Roske, Y.; Gobam, J.; Scheich, C.; Gotz, F.; Niesen, F.; Heinemann, U.

    2006-01-01

    The human protein PTD012 is the longer product of an alternatively spliced gene and was described to be localized in the nucleus. The X-ray structure analysis at 1.7 Angstroms resolution of PTD012 through SAD phasing reveals a monomeric protein and a novel fold. The shorter splice form was also studied and appears to be unfolded and non-functional. The structure of PTD012 displays an {alpha}{beta}{beta}{alpha} four-layer topology. A metal ion residing between the central {beta}-sheets is partially coordinated by three histidine residues. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis identifies the PTD012-bound ion as Zn{sup 2+}. Tetrahedral coordination of the ion is completed by the carboxylate oxygen atom of an acetate molecule taken up from the crystallization buffer. The binding of Zn{sup 2+} to PTD012 is reminiscent of zinc-containing enzymes such as carboxypeptidase, carbonic anhydrase, and {beta}-lactamase. Biochemical assays failed to demonstrate any of these enzyme activities in PTD012. However, PTD012 exhibits ester hydrolase activity on the substrate p-nitrophenyl acetate.

  1. CPB1 of Aedes aegypti Interacts with DENV2 E Protein and Regulates Intracellular Viral Accumulation and Release from Midgut Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Wai Tham

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti is a principal vector responsible for the transmission of dengue viruses (DENV. To date, vector control remains the key option for dengue disease management. To develop new vector control strategies, a more comprehensive understanding of the biological interactions between DENV and Ae. aegypti is required. In this study, a cDNA library derived from the midgut of female adult Ae. aegypti was used in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H screenings against DENV2 envelope (E protein. Among the many interacting proteins identified, carboxypeptidase B1 (CPB1 was selected, and its biological interaction with E protein in Ae. aegypti primary midgut cells was further validated. Our double immunofluorescent assay showed that CPB1-E interaction occurred in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER of the Ae. aegypti primary midgut cells. Overexpression of CPB1 in mosquito cells resulted in intracellular DENV2 genomic RNA or virus particle accumulation, with a lower amount of virus release. Therefore, we postulated that in Ae. aegypti midgut cells, CPB1 binds to the E protein deposited on the ER intraluminal membranes and inhibits DENV2 RNA encapsulation, thus inhibiting budding from the ER, and may interfere with immature virus transportation to the trans-Golgi network.

  2. Transcriptomic insight into pathogenicity-associated factors of Conidiobolus obscurus, an obligate aphid-pathogenic fungus belonging to Entomopthoromycota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianghong; Zhou, Xiang; Guo, Kai; Zhang, Xinqi; Lin, Haiping; Montalva, Cristian

    2018-01-16

    Conidiobolus obscurus is a widespread fungal entomopathogen with aphid biocontrol potential. This study focused on a de novo transcriptomic analysis of C. obscurus. A number of pathogenicity-associated factors were annotated for the first time from the assembled 17 231 fungal unigenes, including those encoding subtilisin-like proteolytic enzymes (Pr1s), trypsin-like proteases, metalloproteases, carboxypeptidases and endochitinases. Many of these genes were transcriptionally up-regulated by at least twofold in mycotized cadavers compared with the in vitro fungal cultures. The resultant transcriptomic database was validated by the transcript levels of three selected pathogenicity-related genes quantified from different in vivo and in vitro material in real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The involvement of multiple Pr1 proteases in the first stage of fungal infection was also suggested. Interestingly, a unique cytolytic (Cyt)-like δ-endotoxin gene was highly expressed in both mycotized cadavers and fungal cultures, and was more or less distinct from its homologues in bacteria and other fungi. Our findings provide the first global insight into various pathogenicity-related genes in this obligate aphid pathogen and may help to develop novel biocontrol strategy against aphid pests. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. [Culture of pancreatic progenitor cells in hanging drop and on floating filter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Feng-xia; Chen, Fang; Chi, Ying; Yang, Shao-guang; Lu, Shi-hong; Han, Zhong-chao

    2013-06-01

    To construct a method to culture pancreatic progenitor cells in hanging drop and on floating filter,and to examine if pancreatic progenitor cells can differentiate into mature endocrine cells with this method. Murine embryos at day 12.5 were isolated and digested into single cells,which were then cultured in hanging drop for 24h and formed spheres.Spheres were cultured on the filter for 6 days,which floated in the dish containing medium.During culture,the expressions of pancreas duodenum homeobox-1(PDX-1)and neurogenin3(Ngn3)were determined.The expressions of endocrine and exocrine markers,insulin,glucagon,and carboxypeptidase(CPA)were determined on day 7 by immunohistochemistry.Insulin secretion of spheres stimulated by glucose was detected by ELISA.The changes of pancreatic marker expressions during culture were monitored by real-time polymerase chain reaction(PCR). One day after the culture,there were still a large amount of PDX-1 positive cells in pancreatic spheres,and these cells proliferated.On day 3,high expression of Ngn3 was detected,and the Ngn3-positive cells did not proliferate.On day 7,The expressions of endocrine and exocrine markers in the differentiated pancreatic progenitor cells were detected,which were consistent with that in vivo.Insulin was secreted by spheres upon the stimulation of glucose. In hanging drop and on floating filter,pancreatic progenitor cells can differentiate into mature endocrine cells.

  4. Responses of wild watermelon to drought stress: accumulation of an ArgE homologue and citrulline in leaves during water deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, S; Miyake, C; Kohchi, T; Fujii, S; Uchida, M; Yokota, A

    2000-07-01

    Wild watermelon from the Botswana desert had an ability to survive under severe drought conditions by maintaining its water status (water content and water potential). In the analysis by two-dimensional electrophoresis of leaf proteins, seven spots were newly induced after watering stopped. One with the molecular mass of 40 kilodaltons of the spots was accumulated abundantly. The cDNA encoding for the protein was cloned based on its amino-terminal sequence and the amino acid sequence deduced from the determined nucleotide sequences of the cDNA exhibited homology to the enzymes belong to the ArgE/DapE/Acy1/Cpg2/YscS protein family (including acetylornithine deacetylase, carboxypeptidase and aminoacylase-1). This suggests that the protein is involved in the release of free amino acid by hydrolyzing a peptidic bond. As the drought stress progressed, citrulline became one of the major components in the total free amino acids. Eight days after withholding watering, although the lower leaves wilted significantly, the upper leaves still maintained their water status and the content of citrulline reached about 50% in the total free amino acids. The accumulation of citrulline during the drought stress in wild watermelon is an unique phenomenon in C3-plants. These results suggest that the drought tolerance of wild watermelon is related to (1) the maintenance of the water status and (2) a metabolic change to accumulate citrulline.

  5. Transcriptome Analysis of the Carmine Spider Mite, Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Boisduval, 1867 (Acari: Tetranychidae, and Its Response to β-Sitosterol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunya Bu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetranychus cinnabarinus (Acari: Tetranychidae is a worldwide polyphagous agricultural pest that has the title of resistance champion among arthropods. We reported previously the identification of the acaricidal compound β-sitosterol from Mentha piperita and Inula japonica. However, the acaricidal mechanism of β-sitosterol is unclear. Due to the limited genetic research carried out, we de novo assembled the transcriptome of T. cinnabarinus using Illumina sequencing and conducted a differential expression analysis of control and β-sitosterol-treated mites. In total, we obtained >5.4 G high-quality bases for each sample with unprecedented sequencing depth and assembled them into 22,941 unigenes. We identified 617 xenobiotic metabolism-related genes involved in detoxification, binding, and transporting of xenobiotics. A highly expanded xenobiotic metabolic system was found in mites. T. cinnabarinus detoxification genes—including carboxyl/cholinesterase and ABC transporter class C—were upregulated after β-sitosterol treatment. Defense-related proteins, such as Toll-like receptor, legumain, and serine proteases, were also activated. Furthermore, other important genes—such as the chloride channel protein, cytochrome b, carboxypeptidase, peritrophic membrane chitin binding protein, and calphostin—may also play important roles in mites’ response to β-sitosterol. Our results demonstrate that high-throughput-omics tool facilitates identification of xenobiotic metabolism-related genes and illustration of the acaricidal mechanisms of β-sitosterol.

  6. Cre-mediated cell ablation contests mast cell contribution in models of antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Weiser, Anne; Tietz, Annette; Stassen, Michael; Harris, Nicola; Kopf, Manfred; Radermacher, Peter; Möller, Peter; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane; Fehling, Hans Jörg; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2011-11-23

    Immunological functions of mast cells remain poorly understood. Studies in Kit mutant mice suggest key roles for mast cells in certain antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. However, Kit mutations affect multiple cell types of both immune and nonimmune origin. Here, we show that targeted insertion of Cre-recombinase into the mast cell carboxypeptidase A3 locus deleted mast cells in connective and mucosal tissues by a genotoxic Trp53-dependent mechanism. Cre-mediated mast cell eradication (Cre-Master) mice had, with the exception of a lack of mast cells and reduced basophils, a normal immune system. Cre-Master mice were refractory to IgE-mediated anaphylaxis, and this defect was rescued by mast cell reconstitution. This mast cell-deficient strain was fully susceptible to antibody-induced autoimmune arthritis and to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Differences comparing Kit mutant mast cell deficiency models to selectively mast cell-deficient mice call for a systematic re-evaluation of immunological functions of mast cells beyond allergy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular mechanism of mast cell–mediated innate defense against endothelin and snake venom sarafotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Lars A.; Schlenner, Susan M.; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Wunderlin, Markus; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer

    2007-01-01

    Mast cells are protective against snake venom sarafotoxins that belong to the endothelin (ET) peptide family. The molecular mechanism underlying this recently recognized innate defense pathway is unknown, but secretory granule proteases have been invoked. To specifically disrupt a single protease function without affecting expression of other proteases, we have generated a mouse mutant selectively lacking mast cell carboxypeptidase A (Mc-cpa) activity. Using this mutant, we have now identified Mc-cpa as the essential protective mast cell enzyme. Mass spectrometry of peptide substrates after cleavage by normal or mutant mast cells showed that removal of a single amino acid, the C-terminal tryptophan, from ET and sarafotoxin by Mc-cpa is the principle molecular mechanism underlying this very rapid mast cell response. Mast cell proteases can also cleave ET and sarafotoxin internally, but such “nicking” is not protective because intramolecular disulfide bridges maintain peptide function. We conclude that mast cells attack ET and sarafotoxin exactly at the structure required for toxicity, and hence sarafotoxins could not “evade” Mc-cpa's substrate specificity without loss of toxicity. PMID:17923505

  8. Mast cells limit extracellular levels of IL-13 via a serglycin proteoglycan-serine protease axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waern, Ida; Karlsson, Iulia; Thorpe, Michael; Schlenner, Susan M; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Åbrink, Magnus; Hellman, Lars; Pejler, Gunnar; Wernersson, Sara

    2012-12-01

    Mast cell (MC) granules contain large amounts of proteases of the chymase, tryptase and carboxypeptidase A (MC-CPA) type that are stored in complex with serglycin,a proteoglycan with heparin side chains. Hence, serglycinprotease complexes are released upon MC degranulation and may influence local inflammation. Here we explored the possibility that a serglycin-protease axis may regulate levels of IL-13, a cytokine involved in allergic asthma. Indeed, we found that wild-type MCs efficiently degraded exogenous or endogenously produced IL-13 upon degranulation,whereas serglycin −/− MCs completely lacked this ability.Moreover, MC-mediated IL-13 degradation was blocked both by a serine protease inhibitor and by a heparin antagonist,which suggests that IL-13 degradation is catalyzed by serglycin-dependent serine proteases and that optimal IL-13 degradation is dependent on both the serglycin and the protease component of the serglycin-protease complex.Moreover, IL-13 degradation was abrogated in MC-CPA −/−MC cultures, but was normal in cultures of MCs with an inactivating mutation of MC-CPA, which suggests that the IL-13-degrading serine proteases rely on MC-CPA protein.Together, our data implicate a serglycin-serine protease axis in the regulation of extracellular levels of IL-13. Reduction of IL-13 levels through this mechanism possibly can provide a protective function in the context of allergic inflammation.

  9. Mast cell chymase reduces the toxicity of Gila monster venom, scorpion venom, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahoshi, Mitsuteru; Song, Chang Ho; Piliponsky, Adrian M.; Metz, Martin; Guzzetta, Andrew; Åbrink, Magnus; Schlenner, Susan M.; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Pejler, Gunnar; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Mast cell degranulation is important in the pathogenesis of anaphylaxis and allergic disorders. Many animal venoms contain components that can induce mast cell degranulation, and this has been thought to contribute to the pathology and mortality caused by envenomation. However, we recently reported evidence that mast cells can enhance the resistance of mice to the venoms of certain snakes and that mouse mast cell–derived carboxypeptidase A3 (CPA3) can contribute to this effect. Here, we investigated whether mast cells can enhance resistance to the venom of the Gila monster, a toxic component of that venom (helodermin), and the structurally similar mammalian peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). Using 2 types of mast cell–deficient mice, as well as mice selectively lacking CPA3 activity or the chymase mouse mast cell protease-4 (MCPT4), we found that mast cells and MCPT4, which can degrade helodermin, can enhance host resistance to the toxicity of Gila monster venom. Mast cells and MCPT4 also can limit the toxicity associated with high concentrations of VIP and can reduce the morbidity and mortality induced by venoms from 2 species of scorpions. Our findings support the notion that mast cells can enhance innate defense by degradation of diverse animal toxins and that release of MCPT4, in addition to CPA3, can contribute to this mast cell function. PMID:21926462

  10. Transition-state characterization: a new approach combining inhibitor analogues and variation in enzyme structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M A; Kaplan, A P; Rutter, W J; Bartlett, P A

    1992-02-04

    A new strategy of potentially broad application for probing transition-state (TS) analogy in enzymatic systems is described in this paper. The degree to which a series of phosphonate inhibitors act as TS analogues of rat carboxypeptidase A1 has been determined for the wild-type enzyme, for the R127K, R127M, and R127A mutants, and for the R127A mutant in the presence of 0.5 M guanidine hydrochloride. The impact that the mutations have on the inverse second-order rate constants (Km/kcat) for substrate hydrolysis is mirrored by the effect on the inhibition constants (Ki) for the corresponding phosphonate inhibitors. These results demonstrate that the phosphonate moiety mimics some of the electronic as well as the geometric characteristics of the TS. A similar but distinctly separate correlation is observed for tripeptide analogues in comparison to analogues of the dipeptide Cbz-Gly-Phe, reflecting an anomalous mode of binding for the latter system. The selective rate increases and corresponding enhancement in inhibitor binding observed on addition of 0.5 M guanidine hydrochloride to the R127A mutant indicate that the exogenous cation can assume the role played by Arg-127 in stabilizing the TS and in providing substrate selectivity at the P2 position.

  11. Baculoviral expression and characterization of human recombinant PGCP in the form of an active mature dimer and an inactive precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajc, Tajana; Suban, Dejan; Rajković, Jelena; Dolenc, Iztok

    2011-02-01

    The human-blood plasma glutamate carboxypeptidase (PGCP) is a proteinase that acts on the unsubstituted N- and C-termini of dipeptides. It has been suggested that this PGCP is involved in the release of thyroxine. Furthermore, research has suggested that its activity is up-regulated in hepatitis-C-virus-infected patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study expressed human PGCP in the baculovirus expression system was produced by a Sf9 insect cell line with aim to prepare sufficient amounts of active recombinant enzyme for a subsequent biological characterization. Recombinant PGCP was expressed and secreted into the medium in the form of an inactive proenzyme. It was gradually converted into an active form in the medium after three days, with the highest expression of the active form on day six. The protein was sequentially purified by a combination of various liquid chromatographies, such as hydroxyapatite, ion exchange, and gel chromatography, and as final step with affinity chromatography on Phe-Leu-Sepharose. The human PGCP was purified as an active enzyme in the dimer form and as inactive precursor protein. The dipeptidase activity was confirmed by measuring the hydrolysis of the Ser-Met dipeptide at a slightly acidic pH. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Bi-allelic Alterations in AEBP1 Lead to Defective Collagen Assembly and Connective Tissue Structure Resulting in a Variant of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    KAUST Repository

    Blackburn, Patrick R.; Xu, Zhi; Tumelty, Kathleen E.; Zhao, Rose W.; Monis, William J.; Harris, Kimberly G.; Gass, Jennifer M.; Cousin, Margot A.; Boczek, Nicole J.; Mitkov, Mario V.; Cappel, Mark A.; Francomano, Clair A.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Klee, Eric W.; Faqeih, Eissa; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.; Layne, Matthew D.; McDonnell, Nazli B.; Atwal, Paldeep S.

    2018-01-01

    AEBP1 encodes the aortic carboxypeptidase-like protein (ACLP) that associates with collagens in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and has several roles in development, tissue repair, and fibrosis. ACLP is expressed in bone, the vasculature, and dermal tissues and is involved in fibroblast proliferation and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into collagen-producing cells. Aebp1 mice have abnormal, delayed wound repair correlating with defects in fibroblast proliferation. In this study, we describe four individuals from three unrelated families that presented with a unique constellation of clinical findings including joint laxity, redundant and hyperextensible skin, poor wound healing with abnormal scarring, osteoporosis, and other features reminiscent of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). Analysis of skin biopsies revealed decreased dermal collagen with abnormal collagen fibrils that were ragged in appearance. Exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous variants in AEBP1 (c.1470delC [p.Asn490_Met495delins(40)] and c.1743C>A [p.Cys581]) in the first individual, a homozygous variant (c.1320_1326del [p.Arg440Serfs3]) in the second individual, and a homozygous splice site variant (c.1630+1G>A) in two siblings from the third family. We show that ACLP enhances collagen polymerization and binds to several fibrillar collagens via its discoidin domain. These studies support the conclusion that biallelic pathogenic variants in AEBP1 are the cause of this autosomal-recessive EDS subtype.

  13. Morphologic, Phylogenetic and Chemical Characterization of a Brackish Colonial Picocyanobacterium (Coelosphaeriaceae with Bioactive Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Häggqvist

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite their cosmopolitan distribution, knowledge on cyanobacteria in the family Coelosphaeriaceae is limited. In this study, a single species culture of a coelosphaeran cyanobacterium isolated from a brackish rock pool in the Baltic Sea was established. The strain was characterized by morphological features, partial 16S rRNA sequence and nonribosomal oligopeptide profile. The bioactivity of fractionated extracts against several serine proteases, as well as protein-serine/threonine phosphatases was studied. Phylogenetic analyses of the strain suggested a close relationship with Snowella litoralis, but its morphology resembled Woronichinia compacta. The controversial morphologic and phylogenetic results demonstrated remaining uncertainties regarding species division in this cyanobacteria family. Chemical analyses of the strain indicated production of nonribosomal oligopeptides. In fractionated extracts, masses and ion fragmentation spectra of seven possible anabaenopeptins were identified. Additionally, fragmentation spectra of cyanopeptolin-like peptides were collected in several of the fractions. The nonribosomal oligopeptide profile adds another potential identification criterion in future inter- and intraspecies comparisons of coelosphaeran cyanobacteria. The fractionated extracts showed significant activity against carboxypeptidase A and trypsin. Inhibition of these important metabolic enzymes might have impacts at the ecosystem level in aquatic habitats with high cyanobacteria densities.

  14. Enzymatic activity of proteases and its isoenzymes in fermentation process in cultivars of cocoa (Theobroma cacao L. produced in southern Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Santos SOUSA

    Full Text Available Abstract The fermentation of cocoa seeds envolves microbial processes and the action of enzymes. To identify the possible differences in the cocoa fermentation process, with regards to proteolysis, this study has the objective of determining protease activity (under predetermined conditions and its isoenzymes in two cocoa cultivars (PH-16 and HRT-1188 in different cocoa fermentation times, in addition to establishing the microbial load (molds and yeasts and aerobic mesophilic. Protease and its isoenzymes were extracted and partially purified and the enzymatic activities determined by spectrophotometry. The results showed that the proteases activity was higher at 66h of fermentation for both cultivars. When the isoenzymes activity was evaluated, the results demonstrated similar activity behavior for both cultivars, with regards to the isoenzymes aminopeptidase and carboxypeptidase, although the behavior of the endoprotease isoenzyme activity proved to be a little different for TSH-1188 cultivar. Concerning microbiological analyses, the results indicate that the period after molds and yeast counting reduction is consistent with the period of protease activity increase.

  15. Deletion of exons 9 and 10 of the Presenilin 1 gene in a patient with Early-onset Alzheimer Disease generates longer amyloid seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guennec, Kilan; Veugelen, Sarah; Quenez, Olivier; Szaruga, Maria; Rousseau, Stéphane; Nicolas, Gaël; Wallon, David; Fluchere, Frédérique; Frébourg, Thierry; De Strooper, Bart; Campion, Dominique; Chávez-Gutiérrez, Lucía; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne

    2017-08-01

    Presenilin 1 (PSEN1) mutations are the main cause of autosomal dominant Early-onset Alzheimer Disease (EOAD). Among them, deletions of exon 9 have been reported to be associated with a phenotype of spastic paraparesis. Using exome data from a large sample of 522 EOAD cases and 584 controls to search for genomic copy-number variations (CNVs), we report here a novel partial, in-frame deletion of PSEN1, removing both exons 9 and 10. The patient presented with memory impairment associated with spastic paraparesis, both starting from the age of 56years. He presented a positive family history of EOAD. We performed functional analysis to elucidate the impact of this novel deletion on PSEN1 activity as part of the γ-secretase complex. The deletion does not affect the assembly of a mature protease complex but has an extreme impact on its global endopeptidase activity. The mutant carboxypeptidase-like activity is also strongly impaired and the deleterious mutant effect leads to an incomplete digestion of long Aβ peptides and enhances the production of Aβ43, which has been shown to be potently amyloidogenic and neurotoxic in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Genome Sequence of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis: Functional Annotation and Extended Analysis of Gene Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Fernando; Vidal, Ramon Oliveira; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Mondego, Jorge Maurício Costa; Costa, Gustavo Gilson Lacerda; Herai, Roberto Hirochi; Würtele, Martin; de Carvalho, Lucas Miguel; e Ferreira, Renata Carmona; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Barbiéri, Clara Lucia; Mieczkowski, Piotr; da Silveira, José Franco; Briones, Marcelo Ribeiro da Silva; Pereira, Gonçalo Amarante Guimarães; Bahia, Diana

    2013-01-01

    We present the sequencing and annotation of the Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis genome, an etiological agent of human cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Amazon region of Brazil. L. (L.) amazonensis shares features with Leishmania (L.) mexicana but also exhibits unique characteristics regarding geographical distribution and clinical manifestations of cutaneous lesions (e.g. borderline disseminated cutaneous leishmaniasis). Predicted genes were scored for orthologous gene families and conserved domains in comparison with other human pathogenic Leishmania spp. Carboxypeptidase, aminotransferase, and 3′-nucleotidase genes and ATPase, thioredoxin, and chaperone-related domains were represented more abundantly in L. (L.) amazonensis and L. (L.) mexicana species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these two species share groups of amastin surface proteins unique to the genus that could be related to specific features of disease outcomes and host cell interactions. Additionally, we describe a hypothetical hybrid interactome of potentially secreted L. (L.) amazonensis proteins and host proteins under the assumption that parasite factors mimic their mammalian counterparts. The model predicts an interaction between an L. (L.) amazonensis heat-shock protein and mammalian Toll-like receptor 9, which is implicated in important immune responses such as cytokine and nitric oxide production. The analysis presented here represents valuable information for future studies of leishmaniasis pathogenicity and treatment. PMID:23857904

  17. In Escherichia coli, MreB and FtsZ direct the synthesis of lateral cell wall via independent pathways that require PBP 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Archana; Young, Kevin D

    2009-06-01

    In Escherichia coli, the cytoplasmic proteins MreB and FtsZ play crucial roles in ensuring that new muropeptide subunits are inserted into the cell wall in a spatially correct way during elongation and division. In particular, to retain a constant diameter and overall shape, new material must be inserted into the wall uniformly around the cell's perimeter. Current thinking is that MreB accomplishes this feat through intermediary proteins that tether peptidoglycan synthases to the outer face of the inner membrane. We tested this idea in E. coli by using a DD-carboxypeptidase mutant that accumulates pentapeptides in its peptidoglycan, allowing us to visualize new muropeptide incorporation. Surprisingly, inhibiting MreB with the antibiotic A22 did not result in uneven insertion of new wall, although the cells bulged and lost their rod shapes. Instead, uneven (clustered) incorporation occurred only if MreB and FtsZ were inactivated simultaneously, providing the first evidence in E. coli that FtsZ can direct murein incorporation into the lateral cell wall independently of MreB. Inhibiting penicillin binding protein 2 (PBP 2) alone produced the same clustered phenotype, implying that MreB and FtsZ tether peptidoglycan synthases via a common mechanism that includes PBP 2. However, cell shape was determined only by the presence or absence of MreB and not by the even distribution of new wall material as directed by FtsZ.

  18. Aminopeptidase Activity from Germinated Jojoba Cotyledons 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Russell; Storey, Richard

    1985-01-01

    One major and two minor aminopeptidase activities from germinated jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) cotyledon extracts were separated by ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatofocusing. None of the activities were inhibited by 1,10 phenanthroline. The major aminopeptidase, purified 260-fold, showed a pH optimum of 6.9 with leucine-p-nitroanilide as substrate, a molecular weight estimated at 14,200 by electrophoretic analysis, and an isoelectric point of 4.5 according to the chromatofocusing pattern. Activity was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, slightly stimulated by 1,10 phenanthroline and 2-mercaptoethanol, and not influenced by Mg2+ or diethyl pyrocarbonate. Inhibition by p-chloromercuribenzoate was prevented by the presence of cysteine in the assay. Leucine-p-nitroanilide and leucine-β-naphthylamide were the most rapidly hydrolyzed of 11 carboxy-terminal end blocked synthetic substrates tested. No activity on endopeptidase or carboxypeptidase specific substrates was detected. The major aminopeptidase showed activity on a saline soluble, jojoba seed protein preparation and we suggest a possible physiological role for the enzyme in the concerted degradation of globulin reserve proteins during cotyledon senescence. PMID:16664465

  19. Aminopeptidase activity from germinated jojoba cotyledons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R; Storey, R

    1985-11-01

    One major and two minor aminopeptidase activities from germinated jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) cotyledon extracts were separated by ammonium sulfate precipitation and chromatofocusing. None of the activities were inhibited by 1,10 phenanthroline.The major aminopeptidase, purified 260-fold, showed a pH optimum of 6.9 with leucine-p-nitroanilide as substrate, a molecular weight estimated at 14,200 by electrophoretic analysis, and an isoelectric point of 4.5 according to the chromatofocusing pattern. Activity was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzoate, slightly stimulated by 1,10 phenanthroline and 2-mercaptoethanol, and not influenced by Mg(2+) or diethyl pyrocarbonate. Inhibition by p-chloromercuribenzoate was prevented by the presence of cysteine in the assay. Leucine-p-nitroanilide and leucine-beta-naphthylamide were the most rapidly hydrolyzed of 11 carboxy-terminal end blocked synthetic substrates tested. No activity on endopeptidase or carboxypeptidase specific substrates was detected. The major aminopeptidase showed activity on a saline soluble, jojoba seed protein preparation and we suggest a possible physiological role for the enzyme in the concerted degradation of globulin reserve proteins during cotyledon senescence.

  20. High and Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Induce Different Secretome Profiles in a Human Skin Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Matzke, Melissa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Hu, Zeping; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.

    2014-03-18

    It is postulated that secreted soluble factors are important contributors of bystander effect and adaptive responses observed in low dose ionizing radiation. Using multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based proteomics, we quantified the changes of skin tissue secretome – the proteins secreted from a full thickness, reconstituted 3-dimensional skin tissue model 48 hr after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. Overall, 135 proteins showed statistical significant difference between the sham (0 cGy) and any of the irradiated groups (3, 10 or 200 cGy) on the basis of Dunnett adjusted t-test; among these, 97 proteins showed a trend of downregulation and 9 proteins showed a trend of upregulation with increasing radiation dose. In addition, there were 21 and 8 proteins observed to have irregular trends with the 10 cGy irradiated group either having the highest or the lowest level among all three radiated doses. Moreover, two proteins, carboxypeptidase E and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 were sensitive to ionizing radiation, but relatively independent of radiation dose. Conversely, proteasome activator complex subunit 2 protein appeared to be sensitive to the dose of radiation, as rapid upregulation of this protein was observed when radiation doses were increased from 3, to 10 or 200 cGy. These results suggest that different mechanisms of action exist at the secretome level for low and high doses of ionizing radiation.

  1. [Diagnostic Significance of BAT in Anaphylaxis to Non-ionic Contrast Media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao-yue; Xu, Su-jun; Tang, Xiao-xian; Niu, Ji-jun; Guo, Xiang-jie; Gao, Cai-rong

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the diagnostic significance of basophil activation test (BAT) in anaphylaxis to non-ionic contrast media through testing the content of CD63, mast cell-carboxypeptidase A3 (MC-CPA3), and terminal complement complex SC5b-9 of the individuals by testing their levels in the normal immune group and the anaphylaxis groups to β-lactam drugs and non -ionic contrast media. The CD63 expression of basophilic granulocyte in blood was detected by flow cytometry. The levels of MC-CPA3 in blood serum and SC5b-9 in blood plasma were detected by ELISA. The CD63 expression of basophilic granulocyte in blood, the levels of MC-CPA3 and SC5b-9 of anaphylaxis to non-ionic contrast media and β-lactam drugs were significantly higher than that in normal immune group (P contrast media. BAT can be used to diagnose the anaphylaxis to non-ionic contrast media.

  2. Species-specific markers for the differential diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli and polymorphisms detection in Trypanosoma rangeli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Keila Adriana Magalhães; Fajardo, Emanuella Francisco; Baptista, Rodrigo P; Macedo, Andrea Mara; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Ramírez, Luis Eduardo; Pedrosa, André Luiz

    2014-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli are kinetoplastid parasites which are able to infect humans in Central and South America. Misdiagnosis between these trypanosomes can be avoided by targeting barcoding sequences or genes of each organism. This work aims to analyze the feasibility of using species-specific markers for identification of intraspecific polymorphisms and as target for diagnostic methods by PCR. Accordingly, primers which are able to specifically detect T. cruzi or T. rangeli genomic DNA were characterized. The use of intergenic regions, generally divergent in the trypanosomatids, and the serine carboxypeptidase gene were successful. Using T. rangeli genomic sequences for the identification of group-specific polymorphisms and a polymorphic AT(n) dinucleotide repeat permitted the classification of the strains into two groups, which are entirely coincident with T. rangeli main lineages, KP1 (+) and KP1 (-), previously determined by kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) characterization. The sequences analyzed totalize 622 bp (382 bp represent a hypothetical protein sequence, and 240 bp represent an anonymous sequence), and of these, 581 (93.3%) are conserved sites and 41 bp (6.7%) are polymorphic, with 9 transitions (21.9%), 2 transversions (4.9%), and 30 (73.2%) insertion/deletion events. Taken together, the species-specific markers analyzed may be useful for the development of new strategies for the accurate diagnosis of infections. Furthermore, the identification of T. rangeli polymorphisms has a direct impact in the understanding of the population structure of this parasite.

  3. Isolation and characterization of an antifungal protein from Bacillus licheniformis HS10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhixin; Wang, Yunpeng; Zheng, Li; Yang, Xiaona; Liu, Hongxia; Guo, Jianhua

    2014-11-07

    Bacillus licheniformis HS10 is a good biocontrol agent against Pseudoperonospora cubensis which caused cucumber downy disease. To identify and characterize the antifungal proteins produced by B.licheniformis HS10, the proteins from HS10 were isolated by using 30-60% ammonium sulfate precipitation, and purified with column chromatography on DEAE Sepharose Fast Flow, RESOURCE Q and Sephadex G-75. And the SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS analysis results demonstrated that the antifungal protein was a monomer with molecular weight of about 55 kDa, identified as carboxypeptidase. Our experiments also showed that the antifungal protein from B. licheniformis HS10 had significantly inhibition on eight different kinds of plant pathogenic fungi, and it was stable with good biological activity at as high as 100°C for 30 min and in pH value ranged from 6 to 10. The biological activity was negatively affected by protease K and 10mM metal cations except Ca(2+). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Binding activity of patterned concanavalin A studied by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebed, Kateryna; Pyka-Fosciak, Grazyna; Raczkowska, Joanna; Lekka, Malgorzata; Styczen, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The mode of protein immobilization plays a crucial role in the preparation of protein microarrays used for a wide spectrum of applications in analytical biochemistry. The microcontact printing technique was used to form a protein pattern using concanavalin A (Con A) since Con A belongs to a group of proteins widely used in analytical assays due to their selectivity as regards different kinds of carbohydrates. Atomic force microscopy was used to image surface topography, delivering information about the quality of the protein pattern. The force spectroscopy mode was used to verify the functional activity of deposited proteins via determination of the forces of interaction between Con A and carboxypeptidase Y bearing carbohydrate structure recognized by Con A. The calculated binding force between Con A and CaY was 105 ± 2 pN and it was compared with that measured for Con A deposited directly from the protein solution. The similarity of the value obtained for the interaction force was independent of the mode of protein deposition, thereby verifying that the microcontact printing technique did not influence the carbohydrate binding activity of Con A. The correlation between the surface topography of patterned samples and adhesion maps obtained showed the possible use of AFM for studying the chemical properties of different regions of the micropatterns produced

  5. The Protein Composition of the Digestive Fluid from the Venus Flytrap Sheds Light on Prey Digestion Mechanisms*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Waltraud X.; Sanggaard, Kristian W.; Kreuzer, Ines; Knudsen, Anders D.; Bemm, Felix; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Bräutigam, Andrea; Thomsen, Line R.; Schliesky, Simon; Dyrlund, Thomas F.; Escalante-Perez, Maria; Becker, Dirk; Schultz, Jörg; Karring, Henrik; Weber, Andreas; Højrup, Peter; Hedrich, Rainer; Enghild, Jan J.

    2012-01-01

    The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) is one of the most well-known carnivorous plants because of its unique ability to capture small animals, usually insects or spiders, through a unique snap-trapping mechanism. The animals are subsequently killed and digested so that the plants can assimilate nutrients, as they grow in mineral-deficient soils. We deep sequenced the cDNA from Dionaea traps to obtain transcript libraries, which were used in the mass spectrometry-based identification of the proteins secreted during digestion. The identified proteins consisted of peroxidases, nucleases, phosphatases, phospholipases, a glucanase, chitinases, and proteolytic enzymes, including four cysteine proteases, two aspartic proteases, and a serine carboxypeptidase. The majority of the most abundant proteins were categorized as pathogenesis-related proteins, suggesting that the plant's digestive system evolved from defense-related processes. This in-depth characterization of a highly specialized secreted fluid from a carnivorous plant provides new information about the plant's prey digestion mechanism and the evolutionary processes driving its defense pathways and nutrient acquisition. PMID:22891002

  6. Proteolytic activities in yeast after UV irradiation. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwencke, J.; Moustacchi, E.

    1982-01-01

    Specific proteolytic activities are known to be induced in Escherichia coli following irradiation. Consequently it seemed of interest to investigate whether variations in proteinase activities occur in yeast. Among the five most well known proteinases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have found that proteinase B activity increases up to three times in wild-type RAD + yeast cells after a dose of 50 Jm -2 of 254 nm ultraviolet light (40% survival). Carboxypeptidase Y and aminopeptidase I (leucin aminopeptidase) activities were only moderately increased. Proteinase A activity was only slightly enhanced, while aminopeptidase II (lysin aminopeptidase) was unaffected in both RAD + strains studied. The observed post UV-increase in proteinase B activity was inhibited by cycloheximide and was dose dependent. Increases in proteinase B levels were independent of the activation method used to destroy the proteinase B-inhibitor complex present in the crude yeast extracts. A standard method for comparison of the postirradiation levels among different proteinases, strains and methods of activation is presented. (orig.)

  7. Medicinal leech therapy-an overall perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sig, Ali K; Guney, Mustafa; Uskudar Guclu, Aylin; Ozmen, Erkan

    2017-12-01

    Complementary medicine methods have a long history, but modern medicine has just recently focused on their possible modes of action. Medicinal leech therapy (MLT) or hirudotherapy, an old technique, has been studied by many researchers for possible effects on various diseases such as inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, and after different surgeries. Hirudo medicinalis has widest therapeutic usage among the leeches, but worldwide, many different species were tested and studied. Leeches secrete more than 20 identified bioactive substances such as antistasin, eglins, guamerin, hirudin, saratin, bdellins, complement, and carboxypeptidase inhibitors. They have analgesic, anti-inflammatory, platelet inhibitory, anticoagulant, and thrombin regulatory functions, as well as extracellular matrix degradative and antimicrobial effects, but with further studies, the spectrum of effects may widen. The technique is cheap, effective, easy to apply, and its modes of action have been elucidated for certain diseases. In conclusion, for treatment of some diseases, MLT is not an alternative, but is a complementary and/or integrative choice. MLT is a part of multidisciplinary treatments, and secretes various bioactive substances. These substances vary among species and different species should be evaluated for both treatment capability and their particular secreted molecules. There is huge potential for novel substances and these could be future therapeutics.

  8. Buffalo Cheese Whey Proteins, Identification of a 24 kDa Protein and Characterization of Their Hydrolysates: In Vitro Gastrointestinal Digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassan, Juliana C; Goulart, Antonio J; Nasser, Ana L M; Bezerra, Thaís M S; Garrido, Saulo S; Rustiguel, Cynthia B; Guimarães, Luis H S; Monti, Rubens

    2015-01-01

    Milk whey proteins are well known for their high biological value and versatile functional properties, characteristics that allow its wide use in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this work, a 24 kDa protein from buffalo cheese whey was analyzed by mass spectrometry and presented homology with Bos taurus beta-lactoglobulin. In addition, the proteins present in buffalo cheese whey were hydrolyzed with pepsin and with different combinations of trypsin, chymotrypsin and carboxypeptidase-A. When the TNBS method was used the obtained hydrolysates presented DH of 55 and 62% for H1 and H2, respectively. Otherwise for the OPA method the DH was 27 and 43% for H1 and H2, respectively. The total antioxidant activities of the H1 and H2 samples with and without previous enzymatic hydrolysis, determined by DPPH using diphenyl-p-picrylhydrazyl radical, was 4.9 and 12 mM of Trolox equivalents (TE) for H2 and H2Dint, respectively. The increased concentrations for H1 and H2 samples were approximately 99% and 75%, respectively. The in vitro gastrointestinal digestion efficiency for the samples that were first hydrolyzed was higher compared with samples not submitted to previous hydrolysis. After in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, several amino acids were released in higher concentrations, and most of which were essential amino acids. These results suggest that buffalo cheese whey is a better source of bioavailable amino acids than bovine cheese whey.

  9. Isolation and structure elucidation of neuropeptides of the AKH/RPCH family in long-horned grasshoppers (Ensifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gäde, G

    1992-11-01

    An identical neuropeptide was isolated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography from the corpora cardiaca of the king cricket, Libanasidus vittatus, and the two armoured ground crickets, Heterodes namaqua and Acanthoproctus cervinus. The crude gland extracts had adipokinetic activity in migratory locusts, hypertrehalosaemic activity in American cockroaches and a slight hypertrehalosaemic, but no adipokinetic, effect in armoured ground crickets. The primary structure of this neuropeptide was determined by pulsed-liquid phase sequencing employing Edman chemistry after enzymically deblocking the N-terminal 5-oxopyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid residue. The C-terminus was also blocked, as indicated by the lack of digestion by carboxypeptidase A. The peptide was assigned the structure [symbol: see text]Glu-Leu-Asn-Phe-Ser-Thr-Gly-TrpNH2, previously designated Scg-AKH-II. The corpora cardiaca of the cricket Gryllodes sigillatus contained a neuropeptide which differed in retention time from the one isolated from the king and armoured ground crickets. The structure was assigned as [symbol: see text]Glu-Val-Asn-Phe-Ser-Thr-Gly-TrpNH2, previously designated Grb-AKH. This octapeptide caused hyperlipaemia in its donor species. The presence of the same peptide, Scg-AKH-II, in the two primitive infraorders of Ensifera, and the different peptide, Grb-AKH, in the most advanced infraorder of Ensifera, supports the evolutionary trends assigned formerly from morphological and physiological evidence.

  10. Destructin-1 is a collagen-degrading endopeptidase secreted by Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the causative agent of white-nose syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Anthony J; Knudsen, Giselle M; Beekman, Chapman; Perry, Jenna A; Johnson, Alexander D; DeRisi, Joseph L; Craik, Charles S; Bennett, Richard J

    2015-06-16

    Pseudogymnoascus destructans is the causative agent of white-nose syndrome, a disease that has caused the deaths of millions of bats in North America. This psychrophilic fungus proliferates at low temperatures and targets hibernating bats, resulting in their premature arousal from stupor with catastrophic consequences. Despite the impact of white-nose syndrome, little is known about the fungus itself or how it infects its mammalian host. P. destructans is not amenable to genetic manipulation, and therefore understanding the proteins involved in infection requires alternative approaches. Here, we identify hydrolytic enzymes secreted by P. destructans, and use a novel and unbiased substrate profiling technique to define active peptidases. These experiments revealed that endopeptidases are the major proteolytic activities secreted by P. destructans, and that collagen, the major structural protein in mammals, is actively degraded by the secretome. A serine endopeptidase, hereby-named Destructin-1, was subsequently identified, and a recombinant form overexpressed and purified. Biochemical analysis of Destructin-1 showed that it mediated collagen degradation, and a potent inhibitor of peptidase activity was identified. Treatment of P. destructans-conditioned media with this antagonist blocked collagen degradation and facilitated the detection of additional secreted proteolytic activities, including aminopeptidases and carboxypeptidases. These results provide molecular insights into the secretome of P. destructans, and identify serine endopeptidases that have the clear potential to facilitate tissue invasion and pathogenesis in the mammalian host.

  11. Thermophilic archaeal enzymes and applications in biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlechild, Jennifer A

    2011-01-01

    Thermophilic enzymes have advantages for their use in commercial applications and particularly for the production of chiral compounds to produce optically pure pharmaceuticals. They can be used as biocatalysts in the application of 'green chemistry'. The thermophilic archaea contain enzymes that have already been used in commercial applications such as the L-aminoacylase from Thermococcus litoralis for the resolution of amino acids and amino acid analogues. This enzyme differs from bacterial L-aminoacylases and has similarities to carboxypeptidases from other archaeal species. An amidase/γ-lactamase from Sulfolobus solfataricus has been used for the production of optically pure γ-lactam, the building block for antiviral carbocyclic nucleotides. This enzyme has similarities to the bacterial signature amidase family. An alcohol dehydrogenase from Aeropyrum pernix has been used for the production of optically pure alcohols and is related to the zinc-containing eukaryotic alcohol dehydrogenases. A transaminase and a dehalogenase from Sulfolobus species have also been studied. The archaeal transaminase is found in a pathway for serine synthesis which is found only in eukaryotes and not in bacteria. It can be used for the asymmetric synthesis of homochiral amines of high enantioselective purity. The L-2-haloacid dehalogenase has applications both in biocatalysis and in bioremediation. All of these enzymes have increased thermostability over their mesophilic counterparts.

  12. Inflammation, Adenoma and Cancer: Objective Classification of Colon Biopsy Specimens with Gene Expression Signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsolya Galamb

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression analysis of colon biopsies using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays can contribute to the understanding of local pathophysiological alterations and to functional classification of adenoma (15 samples, colorectal carcinomas (CRC (15 and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD (14. Total RNA was extracted, amplified and biotinylated from frozen colonic biopsies. Genome-wide gene expression profile was evaluated by HGU133plus2 microarrays and verified by RT-PCR. We applied two independent methods for data normalization and used PAM for feature selection. Leave one-out stepwise discriminant analysis was performed. Top validated genes included collagenIVα1, lipocalin-2, calumenin, aquaporin-8 genes in CRC; CD44, met proto-oncogene, chemokine ligand-12, ADAM-like decysin-1 and ATP-binding casette-A8 genes in adenoma; and lipocalin-2, ubiquitin D and IFITM2 genes in IBD. Best differentiating markers between Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease were cyclin-G2; tripartite motif-containing-31; TNFR shedding aminopeptidase regulator-1 and AMICA. The discriminant analysis was able to classify the samples in overall 96.2% using 7 discriminatory genes (indoleamine-pyrrole-2,3-dioxygenase, ectodermal-neural cortex, TIMP3, fucosyltransferase-8, collectin sub-family member 12, carboxypeptidase D, and transglutaminase-2. Using routine biopsy samples we successfully performed whole genomic microarray analysis to identify discriminative signatures. Our results provide further insight into the pathophysiological background of colonic diseases. The results set up data warehouse which can be mined further.

  13. Metabolism of enkephalin in stomach wall of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunnett, N.W.; Walsh, J.H.; Debas, H.T. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Peptidases degrade neuropeptides and thereby limit the duration and extent of their influence. This investigation examined the importance of peptidases in the degradation of the neuropeptide enkephalin in the stomach wall of the rat. Metabolism of (Leu5)- and (D-Ala2)(Leu5)enkephalin by gastric membranes was examined in vitro. Degradation of (Tyr1-3H)(Leu5)enkephalin was studied in the gastric submucosa of anesthetized and conscious rats in vivo by using a catheter to deliver peptide to tissues and implanted dialysis fibers to collect the metabolites. Specific inhibitors were used to assess the contribution of particular enzymes. (Leu5)- and (Tyr1-3H)(Leu5)enkephalin were metabolized by membranes and in the stomach wall by hydrolysis of the Tyr1-Gly2 bond. Degradation was inhibited by the aminopeptidase inhibitor amastatin (10(-5) M in vitro, 10 nmol in vivo). Inhibitors of endopeptidase-24.11 (phosphoramidon) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (captopril) did not inhibit degradation. Metabolism of the aminopeptidase-resistant analogue (D-Ala2)(Leu5)enkephalin by membranes was unaffected by amastatin and weakly inhibited by phosphoramidon affected by amastatin and weakly inhibited by phosphoramidon and captopril. A carboxypeptidase removed the COOH-terminal leucine residue and made a substantial contribution to degradation of both peptides by gastric membranes.

  14. The structure of Plasmodium vivax phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein suggests a functional motif containing a left-handed helix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakaki, Tracy; Neely, Helen; Boni, Erica; Mueller, Natasha; Buckner, Frederick S.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Lauricella, Angela; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of a phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein from P. vivax, a homolog of Raf-kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP), has been solved to a resolution of 1.3 Å. The inferred interaction surface near the anion-binding site is found to include a distinctive left-handed α-helix. The structure of a putative Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) homolog from the eukaryotic parasite Plasmodium vivax has been studied to a resolution of 1.3 Å using multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction at the Se K edge. This protozoan protein is topologically similar to previously studied members of the phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) sequence family, but exhibits a distinctive left-handed α-helical region at one side of the canonical phospholipid-binding site. Re-examination of previously determined PEBP structures suggests that the P. vivax protein and yeast carboxypeptidase Y inhibitor may represent a structurally distinct subfamily of the diverse PEBP-sequence family

  15. Bi-allelic Alterations in AEBP1 Lead to Defective Collagen Assembly and Connective Tissue Structure Resulting in a Variant of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    KAUST Repository

    Blackburn, Patrick R.

    2018-03-29

    AEBP1 encodes the aortic carboxypeptidase-like protein (ACLP) that associates with collagens in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and has several roles in development, tissue repair, and fibrosis. ACLP is expressed in bone, the vasculature, and dermal tissues and is involved in fibroblast proliferation and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into collagen-producing cells. Aebp1 mice have abnormal, delayed wound repair correlating with defects in fibroblast proliferation. In this study, we describe four individuals from three unrelated families that presented with a unique constellation of clinical findings including joint laxity, redundant and hyperextensible skin, poor wound healing with abnormal scarring, osteoporosis, and other features reminiscent of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). Analysis of skin biopsies revealed decreased dermal collagen with abnormal collagen fibrils that were ragged in appearance. Exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous variants in AEBP1 (c.1470delC [p.Asn490_Met495delins(40)] and c.1743C>A [p.Cys581]) in the first individual, a homozygous variant (c.1320_1326del [p.Arg440Serfs3]) in the second individual, and a homozygous splice site variant (c.1630+1G>A) in two siblings from the third family. We show that ACLP enhances collagen polymerization and binds to several fibrillar collagens via its discoidin domain. These studies support the conclusion that biallelic pathogenic variants in AEBP1 are the cause of this autosomal-recessive EDS subtype.

  16. Structure of a Novel N-acetyl-L-citrulline Deacetylase from Xanthomonas campestris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi,D.; Yu, X.; Roth, L.; Tuchman, M.; Allewell, N.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of a novel acetylcitrulline deacetylase from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris has been solved by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) using crystals grown from selenomethionine-substituted protein and refined at 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. The asymmetric unit of the crystal contains one monomer consisting of two domains, a catalytic domain and a dimerization domain. The catalytic domain is able to bind a single Co(II) ion at the active site with no change in confirmation. the dimerization domain forms an interface between two monomers related by a crystallographic two-fold symmetry axis. The interface is maintained by hydrophobic interactions between helices and hydrogen bonding between two {beta} strands that form a continuous {beta} sheet across the dimer interface. Because the dimers are also related by two-fold crystallographic axes, they pack together across the crystal via the dimerization domain, suggesting that higher order oligomers may form in solution. The polypeptide fold of the monomer is similar to the fold of Pseudomonas sp. carboxypeptidase G2 and Neisseria meningitidis succinyl diaminopimelate desuccinylase. Structural comparison among these enzymes allowed modeling of substrate binding and suggests a possible catalytic mechanism, in which Glu130 functions as a bifunctional general acid-base catalyst and the metal ion polarizes the carbonyl of the acetyl group.

  17. The Expression of Genes Encoding Secreted Proteins in Medicago truncatula A17 Inoculated Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUCIA KUSUMAWATI

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Subtilisin-like serine protease (MtSBT, serine carboxypeptidase (MtSCP, MtN5, non-specific lipid transfer protein (MtnsLTP, early nodulin2-like protein (MtENOD2-like, FAD-binding domain containing protein (MtFAD-BP1, and rhicadhesin receptor protein (MtRHRE1 were among 34 proteins found in the supernatant of M. truncatula 2HA and sickle cell suspension cultures. This study investigated the expression of genes encoding those proteins in roots and developing nodules. Two methods were used: quantitative real time RT-PCR and gene expression analysis (with promoter:GUS fusion in roots. Those proteins are predicted as secreted proteins which is indirectly supported by the findings that promoter:GUS fusions of six of the seven genes encoding secreted proteins were strongly expressed in the vascular bundle of transgenic hairy roots. All six genes have expressed in 14-day old nodule. The expression levels of the selected seven genes were quantified in Sinorhizobium-inoculated and control plants using quantitative real time RT-PCR. In conclusion, among seven genes encoding secreted proteins analyzed, the expression level of only one gene, MtN5, was up-regulated significantly in inoculated root segments compared to controls. The expression of MtSBT1, MtSCP1, MtnsLTP, MtFAD-BP1, MtRHRE1 and MtN5 were higher in root tip than in other tissues examined.

  18. Bioinformatics Data Mining Approach Suggests Coexpression of AGTPBP1 with an ALS-linked Gene C9orf72

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouta Kitano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Expanded GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeats located in the noncoding region of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 ( C9orf72 gene represent the most common genetic abnormality for familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD. Formation of nuclear RNA foci, accumulation of repeat-associated non-ATG-translated dipeptide-repeat proteins, and haploinsufficiency of C9orf72 are proposed for pathological mechanisms of C9ALS/FTD. However, at present, the physiological function of C9orf72 remains largely unknown. Methods By searching on a bioinformatics database named COXPRESdb composed of the comprehensive gene coexpression data, we studied potential C9orf72 interactors. Results We identified the ATP/GTP binding protein 1 ( AGTPBP1 gene alternatively named NNA1 encoding a cytosolic carboxypeptidase whose mutation is causative of the degeneration of Purkinje cells and motor neurons as the most significant gene coexpressed with C9orf72. We verified coexpression and interaction of AGTPBP1 and C9orf72 in transfected cells by immunoprecipitation and in neurons of the human brain by double-labeling immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, we found a positive correlation between AGTPBP1 and C9orf72 mRNA expression levels in the set of 21 human brains examined. Conclusions These results suggest that AGTPBP1 serves as a C9orf72 interacting partner that plays a role in the regulation of neuronal function in a coordinated manner within the central nervous system.

  19. Disruption of KEX1 gene reduces the proteolytic degradation of secreted two-chain Insulin glargine in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivas, Suma; Krishnaiah, Sateesh M; Shyam Mohan, Anil H; Mallikarjun, Niveditha; Govindappa, Nagaraja; Chatterjee, Amarnath; Sastry, Kedarnath N

    2016-02-01

    Insulin glargine is a slow acting analog of insulin used in diabetes therapy. It is produced by recombinant DNA technology in different hosts namely E. coli and Pichia pastoris. In our previous study, we have described the secretion of fully folded two-chain Insulin glargine into the medium by over-expression of Kex2 protease. The enhanced levels of the Kex2 protease was responsible for the processing of the glargine precursor with in the host. Apart from the two-chain glargine product we observed a small proportion of arginine clipped species. This might be due to the clipping of arginine present at the C-terminus of the B-chain as it is exposed upon Kex2 cleavage. The carboxypeptidase precursor Kex1 is known to be responsible for clipping of C-terminal lysine or arginine of the proteins or peptides. In order to address this issue we created a Kex1 knock out in the host using Cre/loxP mechanism of targeted gene deletion. When two-chain glargine was expressed in the Kex1 knock out host of P. pastoris GS115 the C-terminal clipped species reduced by ∼80%. This modification further improved the process by reducing the levels of product related impurities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A pro-cathepsin L mutant is a luminal substrate for endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T Miedel

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic-reticulum associated degradation (ERAD is a major cellular misfolded protein disposal pathway that is well conserved from yeast to mammals. In yeast, a mutant of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY* was found to be a luminal ER substrate and has served as a useful marker to help identify modifiers of the ERAD pathway. Due to its ease of genetic manipulation and the ability to conduct a genome wide screen for modifiers of molecular pathways, C. elegans has become one of the preferred metazoans for studying cell biological processes, such as ERAD. However, a marker of ERAD activity comparable to CPY* has not been developed for this model system. We describe a mutant of pro-cathepsin L fused to YFP that no longer targets to the lysosome, but is efficiently eliminated by the ERAD pathway. Using this mutant pro-cathepsin L, we found that components of the mammalian ERAD system that participate in the degradation of ER luminal substrates were conserved in C. elegans. This transgenic line will facilitate high-throughput genetic or pharmacological screens for ERAD modifiers using widefield epifluorescence microscopy.

  1. Difference gel electrophoresis (DiGE) identifies differentially expressed proteins in endoscopically-collected pancreatic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, Joao A.; Lee, Linda S.; Banks, Peter A.; Steen, Hanno; Conwell, Darwin L.

    2012-01-01

    Alterations in the pancreatic fluid proteome of individuals with chronic pancreatitis may offer insights into the development and progression of the disease. The endoscopic pancreas function test (ePFT) can safely collect large volumes of pancreatic fluid that are potentially amenable to proteomic analyses using difference gel electrophoresis (DiGE) coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Pancreatic fluid was collected endoscopically using the ePFT method following secretin stimulation from three individuals with severe chronic pancreatitis and three chronic abdominal pain controls. The fluid was processed to minimize protein degradation and the protein profiles of each cohort, as determined by DiGE and LC-MS/MS, were compared. This DiGE-LC-MS/MS analysis reveals proteins that are differentially expressed in chronic pancreatitis compared to chronic abdominal pain controls. Proteins with higher abundance in pancreatic fluid from chronic pancreatitis individuals include: actin, desmoplankin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, SNC73, and serotransferrin. Those of relatively lower abundance include carboxypeptidase B, lipase, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, alpha-2-macroglobulin, Arp2/3 subunit 4, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and protein disulfide isomerase. Endoscopic collection (ePFT) in tandem with DiGE-LC-MS/MS is a suitable approach for pancreatic fluid proteome analysis, however, further optimization of our protocol, as outlined herein, may improve proteome coverage in future analyses. PMID:21792986

  2. Detecting the formation of products of radiolysis of tryptophan in foods rich in protein and irradiated with γ rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleeberg, K.K.; Wickern, B. van; Simat, T.J.; Steinhart, H.

    1999-01-01

    N-formyl kynurenine (NFK), OIA and the four hydroxytryptophan isomers (4-, 5-, 6- and 7-OH-TRP) were found as the major radiolysis products in γ-ray irradiated solutions containing tryptophan, in tripeptides and lysozyme. Their identification was achieved by enzymatic hydrolysis with pronase E under mild conditions (40 C, 30-60 min), applying electrochemical methods and RP-HPLC and uv fluroscence methods. Highly significant dissimilarity of results was shown for all the radiolysis products found in the specimens irradiated with 1.3 or 5 kGy and in non-irradiated samples. For release of the radiolysis products from protein-rich foods (egg white, white chicken meat, North Sea shrimps), a two-stage enzymatic hydrolytic process was developed, using proteinase K and carboxypeptidase A for egg white and chicken meat, and proteinase K and pronase E for the shrimps. The four OH-TRP isomers could be detected and quantified in all specimens. The contents varied from 0.02 to 1.97 mg/kg of proteine. Significant deviation of results between irradiated and non-irradiated specimens of egg white and chicken meat could be detected as from an applied dose of 3 kGy. In the shrimps, deviations were evident only at applied doses of 5 kGy. (orig./CB) [de

  3. Carnivorous Nutrition in Pitcher Plants (Nepenthes spp.) via an Unusual Complement of Endogenous Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda; Zhang, Ye; Ozar, Brittany; Sensen, Christoph W; Schriemer, David C

    2016-09-02

    Plants belonging to the genus Nepenthes are carnivorous, using specialized pitfall traps called "pitchers" that attract, capture, and digest insects as a primary source of nutrients. We have used RNA sequencing to generate a cDNA library from the Nepenthes pitchers and applied it to mass spectrometry-based identification of the enzymes secreted into the pitcher fluid using a nonspecific digestion strategy superior to trypsin in this application. This first complete catalog of the pitcher fluid subproteome includes enzymes across a variety of functional classes. The most abundant proteins present in the secreted fluid are proteases, nucleases, peroxidases, chitinases, a phosphatase, and a glucanase. Nitrogen recovery involves a particularly rich complement of proteases. In addition to the two expected aspartic proteases, we discovered three novel nepenthensins, two prolyl endopeptidases that we name neprosins, and a putative serine carboxypeptidase. Additional proteins identified are relevant to pathogen-defense and secretion mechanisms. The full complement of acid-stable enzymes discovered in this study suggests that carnivory in the genus Nepenthes can be sustained by plant-based mechanisms alone and does not absolutely require bacterial symbiosis.

  4. Thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) - A possible link between coagulation and complement activation in the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, Giorgia; Vikerfors, Anna; Woodhams, Barry; Adam, Mariette; Bremme, Katarina; Holmström, Margareta; Ågren, Anna; Eelde, Anna; Bruzelius, Maria; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Antovic, Aleksandra

    2017-10-01

    Thrombosis and complement activation are pathogenic features of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Their molecular link is Plasma carboxypeptidase-B, also known as thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa), which plays a dual role: anti-fibrinolytic, by cleaving carboxyl-terminal lysine residues from partially degraded fibrin, and anti-inflammatory, by downregulating complement anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. To investigate the levels of TAFI (proenzyme) and TAFIa (active enzyme) in relation to complement activation, fibrin clot permeability and fibrinolytic function in clinical and immunological subsets of 52 APS patients and 15 controls. TAFI (pAPS patients compared to controls. Furthermore, TAFIa was increased (pAPS patients affected by arterial thrombosis compared to other APS-phenotypes. Positive associations were found between TAFI and age, fibrinogen and C5a, and between TAFIa and age, fibrinogen and thrombomodulin. TAFI and TAFIa levels were increased in patients with APS as a potential response to complement activation. Interestingly, TAFI activation was associated with arterial thrombotic APS manifestations. Thus, TAFIa may be considered a novel biomarker for arterial thrombosis in APS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical Applications of Phage-Derived sFvs and sFv Fusion Proteins

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    K. A. Chester

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Single chain Fv antibodies (sFvs have been produced from filamentous bacteriophage libraries obtained from immunised mice. MFE-23, the most characterised of these sFvs, is reactive with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, a glycoprotein that is highly expressed in colorectal adenocarcinomas. MFE-23 has been expressed in bacteria and purified in our laboratory for two clinical trials; a gamma camera imaging trial using 123I-MFE-23 and a radioimmunoguided surgery trial using 125I-MFE-23, where tumour deposits are detected by a hand-held probe during surgery. Both these trials show MFE-23 is safe and effective in localising tumour deposits in patients with cancer. We are now developing fusion proteins which use MFE-23 to deliver a therapeutic moiety; MFE-23::CPG2 targets the enzyme carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2 for use in the ADEPT (antibody directed enzyme prodrug therapy system and MFE::TNFα aims to reduce sequestration and increase tumor concentrations of systemically administered TNFα.

  6. Cathepsin X Cleaves Profilin 1 C-Terminal Tyr139 and Influences Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis.

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    Urša Pečar Fonović

    Full Text Available Cathepsin X, a cysteine carboxypeptidase, is upregulated in several types of cancer. Its molecular target in tumor cells is profilin 1, a known tumor suppressor and regulator of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Cathepsin X cleaves off the C-terminal Tyr139 of profilin 1, affecting binding of poly-L-proline ligands and, consequently, tumor cell migration and invasion. Profilin 1 with mutations at the C-terminus, transiently expressed in prostate cancer cells PC-3, showed that Tyr139 is important for proper function of profilin 1 as a tumor suppressor. Cleaving off Tyr139 prevents the binding of clathrin, a poly-L-proline ligand involved in endocytosis. More profilin 1-clathrin complexes were present in PC-3 cells when cathepsin X was inhibited by its specific inhibitor AMS36 or silenced by siRNA. As a consequence, the endocytosis of FITC-labeled dextran and transferrin conjugate was significantly increased. These results constitute the first report of the regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in tumor cells through proteolytic processing of profilin 1.

  7. Cathepsin X Cleaves Profilin 1 C-Terminal Tyr139 and Influences Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečar Fonović, Urša; Kos, Janko

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsin X, a cysteine carboxypeptidase, is upregulated in several types of cancer. Its molecular target in tumor cells is profilin 1, a known tumor suppressor and regulator of actin cytoskeleton dynamics. Cathepsin X cleaves off the C-terminal Tyr139 of profilin 1, affecting binding of poly-L-proline ligands and, consequently, tumor cell migration and invasion. Profilin 1 with mutations at the C-terminus, transiently expressed in prostate cancer cells PC-3, showed that Tyr139 is important for proper function of profilin 1 as a tumor suppressor. Cleaving off Tyr139 prevents the binding of clathrin, a poly-L-proline ligand involved in endocytosis. More profilin 1—clathrin complexes were present in PC-3 cells when cathepsin X was inhibited by its specific inhibitor AMS36 or silenced by siRNA. As a consequence, the endocytosis of FITC-labeled dextran and transferrin conjugate was significantly increased. These results constitute the first report of the regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis in tumor cells through proteolytic processing of profilin 1. PMID:26325675

  8. Cysteine cathepsins B and X promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrović, Ana; Pečar Fonović, Urša; Kos, Janko

    2017-09-01

    Cathepsins B and X are lysosomal cysteine carboxypeptidases suggested as having a redundant role in cancer. They are involved in a number of processes leading to tumor progression but their role in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) remains unknown. We have investigated the contribution of both cathepsins B and X in EMT using tumor cell lines differing in their expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers and cell morphology. Higher levels of both cathepsins are shown to promote EMT and are associated with the mesenchymal-like cell phenotype. Moreover, simultaneous knockdown of the two peptidases triggers a reverse, mesenchymal to epithelial transition. Of the two cathepsins, cathepsin B appears to be the stronger promotor of EMT. Furthermore, we evaluated the involvement of cathepsin B and X in the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) signaling pathway, one of the key signaling mechanisms triggering EMT in cancer. In MCF-7 cells the expression of cathepsin B was shown to depend on their activation with TGF-β1 while, for cathepsin X, a TGF-β1 independent mechanism of induction during EMT is indicated. EMT is thus shown to be another mechanism linking cathepsins B and X with tumor progression. With silencing of their expression or inhibition of enzymatic activity, the tumor cells could be reverted to less aggressive epithelial-like phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Profilin 1 as a Target for Cathepsin X Activity in Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pečar Fonović, Urša; Jevnikar, Zala; Rojnik, Matija; Doljak, Bojan; Fonović, Marko; Jamnik, Polona; Kos, Janko

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin X has been reported to be a tumor promotion factor in various types of cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms linking its activity with malignant processes are not understood. Here we present profilin 1, a known tumor suppressor, as a target for cathepsin X carboxypeptidase activity in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Profilin 1 co-localizes strongly with cathepsin X intracellularly in the perinuclear area as well as at the plasma membrane. Selective cleavage of C-terminal amino acids was demonstrated on a synthetic octapeptide representing the profilin C-terminal region, and on recombinant profilin 1. Further, intact profilin 1 binds its poly-L-proline ligand clathrin significantly better than it does the truncated one, as shown using cathepsin X specific inhibitor AMS-36 and immunoprecipitation of the profilin 1/clathrin complex. Moreover, the polymerization of actin, which depends also on the binding of poly-L-proline ligands to profilin 1, was promoted by AMS-36 treatment of cells and by siRNA cathepsin X silencing. Our results demonstrate that increased adhesion, migration and invasiveness of tumor cells depend on the inactivation of the tumor suppressive function of profilin 1 by cathepsin X. The latter is thus designated as a target for development of new antitumor strategies. PMID:23326535

  10. Profilin 1 as a target for cathepsin X activity in tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urša Pečar Fonović

    Full Text Available Cathepsin X has been reported to be a tumor promotion factor in various types of cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms linking its activity with malignant processes are not understood. Here we present profilin 1, a known tumor suppressor, as a target for cathepsin X carboxypeptidase activity in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. Profilin 1 co-localizes strongly with cathepsin X intracellularly in the perinuclear area as well as at the plasma membrane. Selective cleavage of C-terminal amino acids was demonstrated on a synthetic octapeptide representing the profilin C-terminal region, and on recombinant profilin 1. Further, intact profilin 1 binds its poly-L-proline ligand clathrin significantly better than it does the truncated one, as shown using cathepsin X specific inhibitor AMS-36 and immunoprecipitation of the profilin 1/clathrin complex. Moreover, the polymerization of actin, which depends also on the binding of poly-L-proline ligands to profilin 1, was promoted by AMS-36 treatment of cells and by siRNA cathepsin X silencing. Our results demonstrate that increased adhesion, migration and invasiveness of tumor cells depend on the inactivation of the tumor suppressive function of profilin 1 by cathepsin X. The latter is thus designated as a target for development of new antitumor strategies.

  11. Non-invasive detection of candidate pregnancy protein biomarkers in the feces of captive polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, E; Stoops, M A; Roth, T L

    2012-07-15

    Currently, there is no method of accurately and non-invasively diagnosing pregnancy in polar bears. Specific proteins may exhibit altered profiles in the feces of pregnant bears, but predicting appropriate candidate proteins to investigate is speculative at best. The objective of this study was to identify potential pregnancy biomarker proteins based on their increased abundance in the feces of pregnant polar bears compared to pseudopregnant females (controls) using two-dimensional in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) and mass spectrometry (MS). Three 2D-DIGE gels were performed to evaluate fecal protein profiles from controls (n=3) and pregnant polar bears (n=3). There were 2224.67±52.39 (mean±SEM) spots resolved per gel. Of these, only five proteins were elevated in the pregnant group (P99.9% confidence interval. The 11 spots represented seven distinct proteins, five of which were significantly more abundant in the pregnant group: IgGFc-binding protein, filamin-C, carboxypeptidase B, transthyretin, and immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region. To our knowledge, this was the first study that employed 2D-DIGE to identify differentially expressed proteins in fecal samples to characterize a physiological condition other than those related to gastrointestinal disorders. These promising results provided a strong foundation for ensuing efforts to develop a non-invasive pregnancy assay for use in both captive and wild polar bears. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Application of Proteomics to the Study of Pollination Drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Prior

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Pollination drops are a formative component in gymnosperm pollen-ovule interactions. Proteomics offers a direct method for the discovery of proteins associated with this early stage of sexual reproduction. Methods: Pollination drops were sampled from eight gymnosperm species: Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (Port Orford cedar, Ephedra monosperma, Ginkgo biloba, Juniperus oxycedrus (prickly juniper, Larix ×marschlinsii, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir, Taxus ×media, and Welwitschia mirabilis. Drops were collected by micropipette using techniques focused on preventing sample contamination. Drop proteins were separated using both gel and gel-free methods. Tandem mass spectrometric methods were used including a triple quadrupole and an Orbitrap. Results: Proteins are present in all pollination drops. Consistency in the protein complement over time was shown in L. ×marschlinsii. Representative mass spectra from W. mirabilis chitinase peptide and E. monosperma serine carboxypeptidase peptide demonstrated high quality results. We provide a summary of gymnosperm pollination drop proteins that have been discovered to date via proteomics. Discussion: Using proteomic methods, a dozen classes of proteins have been identified to date. Proteomics presents a way forward in deepening our understanding of the biological function of pollination drops.

  13. Complete covalent structure of statherin, a tyrosine-rich acidic peptide which inhibits calcium phosphate precipitation from human parotid saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, D H; Hay, D I

    1977-03-10

    The complete amino acid sequence of human salivary statherin, a peptide which strongly inhibits precipitation from supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions, and therefore stabilizes supersaturated saliva, has been determined. The NH2-terminal half of this Mr=5380 (43 amino acids) polypeptide was determined by automated Edman degradations (liquid phase) on native statherin. The peptide was digested separately with trypsin, chymotrypsin, and Staphylococcus aureus protease, and the resulting peptides were purified by gel filtration. Manual Edman degradations on purified peptide fragments yielded peptides that completed the amino acid sequence through the penultimate COOH-terminal residue. These analyses, together with carboxypeptidase digestion of native statherin and of peptide fragments of statherin, established the complete sequence of the molecule. The 2 serine residues (positions 2 and 3) in statherin were identified as phosphoserine. The amino acid sequence of human salivary statherin is striking in a number of ways. The NH2-terminal one-third is highly polar and includes three polar dipeptides: H2PO3-Ser-Ser-H2PO3-Arg-Arg-, and Glu-Glu-. The COOH-terminal two-thirds of the molecule is hydrophobic, containing several repeating dipeptides: four of -Gn-Pro-, three of -Tyr-Gln-, two of -Gly-Tyr-, two of-Gln-Tyr-, and two of the tetrapeptide sequence -Pro-Tyr-Gln-Pro-. Unusual cleavage sites in the statherin sequence obtained with chymotrypsin and S. aureus protease were also noted.

  14. Lysosomal multienzyme complex: pros and cons of working together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonten, Erik J; Annunziata, Ida; d'Azzo, Alessandra

    2014-06-01

    The ubiquitous distribution of lysosomes and their heterogeneous protein composition reflects the versatility of these organelles in maintaining cell homeostasis and their importance in tissue differentiation and remodeling. In lysosomes, the degradation of complex, macromolecular substrates requires the synergistic action of multiple hydrolases that usually work in a stepwise fashion. This catalytic machinery explains the existence of lysosomal enzyme complexes that can be dynamically assembled and disassembled to efficiently and quickly adapt to the pool of substrates to be processed or degraded, adding extra tiers to the regulation of the individual protein components. An example of such a complex is the one composed of three hydrolases that are ubiquitously but differentially expressed: the serine carboxypeptidase, protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA), the sialidase, neuraminidase-1 (NEU1), and the glycosidase β-galactosidase (β-GAL). Next to this 'core' complex, the existence of sub-complexes, which may contain additional components, and function at the cell surface or extracellularly, suggests as yet unexplored functions of these enzymes. Here we review how studies of basic biological processes in the mouse models of three lysosomal storage disorders, galactosialidosis, sialidosis, and GM1-gangliosidosis, revealed new and unexpected roles for the three respective affected enzymes, Ppca, Neu1, and β-Gal, that go beyond their canonical degradative activities. These findings have broadened our perspective on their functions and may pave the way for the development of new therapies for these lysosomal storage disorders.

  15. Draft Genome Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of Aspergillus sojae NBRC4239

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Atsushi; Oshima, Kenshiro; Noguchi, Hideki; Ogawa, Masahiro; Takahashi, Tadashi; Oguma, Tetsuya; Koyama, Yasuji; Itoh, Takehiko; Hattori, Masahira; Hanya, Yoshiki

    2011-01-01

    We conducted genome sequencing of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus sojae NBRC4239 isolated from the koji used to prepare Japanese soy sauce. We used the 454 pyrosequencing technology and investigated the genome with respect to enzymes and secondary metabolites in comparison with other Aspergilli sequenced. Assembly of 454 reads generated a non-redundant sequence of 39.5-Mb possessing 13 033 putative genes and 65 scaffolds composed of 557 contigs. Of the 2847 open reading frames with Pfam domain scores of >150 found in A. sojae NBRC4239, 81.7% had a high degree of similarity with the genes of A. oryzae. Comparative analysis identified serine carboxypeptidase and aspartic protease genes unique to A. sojae NBRC4239. While A. oryzae possessed three copies of α-amyalse gene, A. sojae NBRC4239 possessed only a single copy. Comparison of 56 gene clusters for secondary metabolites between A. sojae NBRC4239 and A. oryzae revealed that 24 clusters were conserved, whereas 32 clusters differed between them that included a deletion of 18 508 bp containing mfs1, mao1, dmaT, and pks-nrps for the cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) biosynthesis, explaining the no productivity of CPA in A. sojae. The A. sojae NBRC4239 genome data will be useful to characterize functional features of the koji moulds used in Japanese industries. PMID:21659486

  16. Latexin is involved in bone morphogenetic protein-2-induced chondrocyte differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadouchi, Ichiro; Sakamoto, Kei; Tangjiao, Liu; Murakami, Takashi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Hoshino, Yuichi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Latexin is the only known carboxypeptidase A inhibitor in mammals. We previously demonstrated that BMP-2 significantly induced latexin expression in Runx2-deficient mesenchymal cells (RD-C6 cells), during chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation. In this study, we investigated latexin expression in the skeleton and its role in chondrocyte differentiation. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that proliferating and prehypertrophic chondrocytes expressed latexin during skeletogenesis and bone fracture repair. In the early phase of bone fracture, latexin mRNA expression was dramatically upregulated. BMP-2 upregulated the expression of the mRNAs of latexin, Col2a1, and the gene encoding aggrecan (Agc1) in a micromass culture of C3H10T1/2 cells. Overexpression of latexin additively stimulated the BMP-2-induced expression of the mRNAs of Col2a, Agc1, and Col10a1. BMP-2 treatment upregulated Sox9 expression, and Sox9 stimulated the promoter activity of latexin. These results indicate that latexin is involved in BMP-2-induced chondrocyte differentiation and plays an important role in skeletogenesis and skeletal regeneration.

  17. Proteolytic activities in yeast after UV irradiation. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwencke, J.; Moustacchi, E.

    1982-04-01

    Specific proteolytic activities are known to be induced in Escherichia coli following irradiation. Consequently it seemed of interest to investigate whether variations in proteinase activities occur in yeast. Among the five most well known proteinases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have found that proteinase B activity increases up to three times in wild-type RAD/sup +/ yeast cells after a dose of 50 Jm/sup -2/ of 254 nm ultraviolet light (40% survival). Carboxypeptidase Y and aminopeptidase I (leucin aminopeptidase) activities were only moderately increased. Proteinase A activity was only slightly enhanced, while aminopeptidase II (lysin aminopeptidase) was unaffected in both RAD/sup +/ strains studied. The observed post UV-increase in proteinase B activity was inhibited by cycloheximide and was dose dependent. Increases in proteinase B levels were independent of the activation method used to destroy the proteinase B-inhibitor complex present in the crude yeast extracts. A standard method for comparison of the postirradiation levels among different proteinases, strains and methods of activation is presented.

  18. CPM Is a Useful Cell Surface Marker to Isolate Expandable Bi-Potential Liver Progenitor Cells Derived from Human iPS Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Taketomo; Koui, Yuta; Suzuki, Kaori; Kobayashi, Ayaka; Miura, Yasushi; Chern, Edward Y; Tanaka, Minoru; Miyajima, Atsushi

    2015-10-13

    To develop a culture system for large-scale production of mature hepatocytes, liver progenitor cells (LPCs) with a high proliferation potential would be advantageous. We have found that carboxypeptidase M (CPM) is highly expressed in embryonic LPCs, hepatoblasts, while its expression is decreased along with hepatic maturation. Consistently, CPM expression was transiently induced during hepatic specification from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). CPM(+) cells isolated from differentiated hiPSCs at the immature hepatocyte stage proliferated extensively in vitro and expressed a set of genes that were typical of hepatoblasts. Moreover, the CPM(+) cells exhibited a mature hepatocyte phenotype after induction of hepatic maturation and also underwent cholangiocytic differentiation in a three-dimensional culture system. These results indicated that hiPSC-derived CPM(+) cells share the characteristics of LPCs, with the potential to proliferate and differentiate bi-directionally. Thus, CPM is a useful marker for isolating hiPSC-derived LPCs, which allows development of a large-scale culture system for producing hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Epoetin Delta Reduces Oxidative Stress in Primary Human Renal Tubular Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelies De Beuf

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (EPO exerts (renal tissue protective effects. Since it is unclear whether this is a direct effect of EPO on the kidney or not, we investigated whether EPO is able to protect human renal tubular epithelial cells (hTECs from oxidative stress and if so which pathways are involved. EPO (epoetin delta could protect hTECs against oxidative stress by a dose-dependent inhibition of reactive oxygen species formation. This protective effect is possibly related to the membranous expression of the EPO receptor (EPOR since our data point to the membranous EPOR expression as a prerequisite for this protective effect. Oxidative stress reduction went along with the upregulation of renoprotective genes. Whilst three of these, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, aquaporin-1 (AQP-1, and B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2 have already been associated with EPO-induced renoprotection, this study for the first time suggests carboxypeptidase M (CPM, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV, and cytoglobin (Cygb to play a role in this process.

  20. Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity in tropical calcific pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Sumit; Bhaskar, Seema; Chandak, Giriraj R

    2014-12-14

    Tropical calcific pancreatitis (TCP) is a form of chronic non-alcoholic pancreatitis initially reported in the developing parts of the tropical world. The clinical phenotype of TCP has undergone marked changes since its first description in 1968. The disease is now seen in relatively older people with less severe symptoms. In addition, there are varying reports on the proportion of cases presenting with imaging abnormalities like calcification, ductal dilation, and glandular atrophy. Significant progress has also been made in understanding the etiopathology of TCP. The role of malnutrition and cassava toxicity in its pathogenesis is disproven and few studies have focused on the role of micronutrient deficiency and oxidative stress in the etiopathogenesis of TCP. Emerging evidence support an important role for genetic risk factors in TCP. Several studies have shown that, rather than mutations in trypsinogens, variants in serine protease inhibitor kazal type 1, cathepsin B, chymotrypsin C, cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, and carboxypeptidase A1, predict risk of TCP. These studies also provided evidence of mutational heterogeneity between TCP and chronic pancreatitis in Western populations. The current review summarizes recent advances that have implications in the understanding of the pathophysiology and thus, heterogeneity in genotype-phenotype correlations in TCP.

  1. Pancreas-specific deletion of mouse Gata4 and Gata6 causes pancreatic agenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Shouhong; Borok, Matthew J.; Decker, Kimberly J.; Battle, Michele A.; Duncan, Stephen A.; Hale, Michael A.; Macdonald, Raymond J.; Sussel, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic agenesis is a human disorder caused by defects in pancreas development. To date, only a few genes have been linked to pancreatic agenesis in humans, with mutations in pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1) and pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a (PTF1A) reported in only 5 families with described cases. Recently, mutations in GATA6 have been identified in a large percentage of human cases, and a GATA4 mutant allele has been implicated in a single case. In the mouse, Gata4 and Gata6 are expressed in several endoderm-derived tissues, including the pancreas. To analyze the functions of GATA4 and/or GATA6 during mouse pancreatic development, we generated pancreas-specific deletions of Gata4 and Gata6. Surprisingly, loss of either Gata4 or Gata6 in the pancreas resulted in only mild pancreatic defects, which resolved postnatally. However, simultaneous deletion of both Gata4 and Gata6 in the pancreas caused severe pancreatic agenesis due to disruption of pancreatic progenitor cell proliferation, defects in branching morphogenesis, and a subsequent failure to induce the differentiation of progenitor cells expressing carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1) and neurogenin 3 (NEUROG3). These studies address the conserved and nonconserved mechanisms underlying GATA4 and GATA6 function during pancreas development and provide a new mouse model to characterize the underlying developmental defects associated with pancreatic agenesis. PMID:23006325

  2. Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2714, a representative of a duplicated gene family in Actinobacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graña, Martin; Bellinzoni, Marco; Miras, Isabelle; Fiez-Vandal, Cedric; Haouz, Ahmed; Shepard, William; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Alzari, Pedro M.

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structure of Rv2714, a protein of unknown function from M. tuberculosis, has been determined at 2.6 Å resolution using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction methods. The gene Rv2714 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which codes for a hypothetical protein of unknown function, is a representative member of a gene family that is largely confined to the order Actinomycetales of Actinobacteria. Sequence analysis indicates the presence of two paralogous genes in most mycobacterial genomes and suggests that gene duplication was an ancient event in bacterial evolution. The crystal structure of Rv2714 has been determined at 2.6 Å resolution, revealing a trimer in which the topology of the protomer core is similar to that observed in a functionally diverse set of enzymes, including purine nucleoside phosphorylases, some carboxypeptidases, bacterial peptidyl-tRNA hydrolases and even the plastidic form of an intron splicing factor. However, some structural elements, such as a β-hairpin insertion involved in protein oligomerization and a C-terminal α-helical domain that serves as a lid to the putative substrate-binding (or ligand-binding) site, are only found in Rv2714 bacterial homologues and represent specific signatures of this protein family

  3. Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2714, a representative of a duplicated gene family in Actinobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graña, Martin; Bellinzoni, Marco [Institut Pasteur, Unité de Biochimie Structurale, URA CNRS 2185, 25 Rue du Dr Roux, 75724 Paris (France); Miras, Isabelle; Fiez-Vandal, Cedric; Haouz, Ahmed; Shepard, William [Institut Pasteur, Plate-forme de Cristallogenèse et Diffraction des Rayons X, 25 Rue du Dr Roux, 75724 Paris (France); Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Alzari, Pedro M., E-mail: alzari@pasteur.fr [Institut Pasteur, Unité de Biochimie Structurale, URA CNRS 2185, 25 Rue du Dr Roux, 75724 Paris (France)

    2009-10-01

    The crystal structure of Rv2714, a protein of unknown function from M. tuberculosis, has been determined at 2.6 Å resolution using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction methods. The gene Rv2714 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which codes for a hypothetical protein of unknown function, is a representative member of a gene family that is largely confined to the order Actinomycetales of Actinobacteria. Sequence analysis indicates the presence of two paralogous genes in most mycobacterial genomes and suggests that gene duplication was an ancient event in bacterial evolution. The crystal structure of Rv2714 has been determined at 2.6 Å resolution, revealing a trimer in which the topology of the protomer core is similar to that observed in a functionally diverse set of enzymes, including purine nucleoside phosphorylases, some carboxypeptidases, bacterial peptidyl-tRNA hydrolases and even the plastidic form of an intron splicing factor. However, some structural elements, such as a β-hairpin insertion involved in protein oligomerization and a C-terminal α-helical domain that serves as a lid to the putative substrate-binding (or ligand-binding) site, are only found in Rv2714 bacterial homologues and represent specific signatures of this protein family.

  4. Somatic ACE regulates self-renewal of mouse spermatogonial stem cells via the MAPK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tingting; Zhao, Xin; Liu, Chenchen; Shao, Binbin; Zhang, Xi; Li, Kai; Cai, Jinyang; Wang, Su; Huang, Xiaoyan

    2018-05-24

    Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) self-renewal is an indispensable part of spermatogenesis. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase that plays a critical role in regulation of the renin-angiotensin system. Here, we used RT-PCR and Western blot analysis to confirm that somatic ACE (sACE) but not testicular ACE (tACE) is highly expressed in mouse testis before postpartum day 7 and in cultured SSCs. Our results revealed that sACE is located on the membrane of SSCs. Treating cultured SSCs with the ACE competitive inhibitor captopril was found to inhibit sACE activity, and significantly reduced the proliferation rate of SSCs. Microarray analysis identified 651 genes with significant differential expression. KEGG pathway analysis showed that these differentially expressed genes are mainly involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway and cell cycle. sACE was found to play an important role in SSC self-renewal via the regulation of MAPK-dependent cell proliferation.

  5. 3T3 fibroblasts induce cloned interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells to resemble connective tissue mast cells in granular constituency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayton, E.T.; Pharr, P.; Ogawa, M.; Serafin, W.E.; Austen, K.F.; Levi-Schaffer, F.; Stevens, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    As assessed by ultrastructure, histochemical staining, and T-cell dependency, in vitro-differentiated interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells are comparable to the mast cells that reside in the gastrointestinal mucosa but not in the skin or the serosal cavity of the mouse. The authors now demonstrate that when cloned interleukin 3-dependent mast cells are cocultured with mouse skin-derived 3T3 fibroblasts in the presence of WEHI-3 conditioned medium for 28 days, the mast cells acquire the ability to stain with safranin, increase their histamine content ∼ 50-fold and their carboxypeptidase. A content ∼ 100-fold, and augment ∼ their biosynthesis of proteoglycans bearing 35 S-labeled haparin relative to 35 S-labeled chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. Thus, fibroblasts induce interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells to change phenotype from mucosal-like to connective tissue-like, indicating that the biochemical and functional characteristics of this mast cell type are strongly influenced by the connective tissue microenvironment

  6. Lin- CD34hi CD117int/hi FcεRI+ cells in human blood constitute a rare population of mast cell progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Joakim S; Malinovschi, Andrei; Öhrvik, Helena; Sandelin, Martin; Janson, Christer; Alving, Kjell; Hallgren, Jenny

    2016-01-28

    Mast cells are rare tissue-resident immune cells that are involved in allergic reactions, and their numbers are increased in the lungs of asthmatics. Murine lung mast cells arise from committed bone marrow-derived progenitors that enter the blood circulation, migrate through the pulmonary endothelium, and mature in the tissue. In humans, mast cells can be cultured from multipotent CD34(+) progenitor cells. However, a population of distinct precursor cells that give rise to mast cells has remained undiscovered. To our knowledge, this is the first report of human lineage-negative (Lin(-)) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) progenitor cells, which represented only 0.0053% of the isolated blood cells in healthy individuals. These cells expressed integrin β7 and developed a mast cell-like phenotype, although with a slow cell division capacity in vitro. Isolated Lin(-) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) blood cells had an immature mast cell-like appearance and expressed high levels of many mast cell-related genes as compared with human blood basophils in whole-transcriptome microarray analyses. Furthermore, serglycin, tryptase, and carboxypeptidase A messenger RNA transcripts were detected by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Altogether, we propose that the Lin(-) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) blood cells are closely related to human tissue mast cells and likely constitute an immediate precursor population, which can give rise to predominantly mast cells. Furthermore, asthmatics with reduced lung function had a higher frequency of Lin(-) CD34(hi) CD117(int/hi) FcεRI(+) blood mast cell progenitors than asthmatics with normal lung function. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. Secretory overexpression and isotopic labeling of the chimeric relaxin family peptide R3/I5 in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu-Qi; Wu, Qing-Ping; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Shen, Ting; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2015-06-01

    Relaxin family peptides are a group of peptide hormones with divergent biological functions. Mature relaxin family peptides are typically composed of two polypeptide chains with three disulfide linkages, rendering their preparation a challenging task. In the present study, we established an efficient approach for preparation of the chimeric relaxin family peptide R3/I5 through secretory overexpression in Pichia pastoris and in vitro enzymatic maturation. A designed single-chain R3/I5 precursor containing the B-chain of human relaxin-3 and the A-chain of human INSL5 was overexpressed in PichiaPink strain 1 by high-density fermentation in a two-liter fermenter, and approximately 200 mg of purified precursor was obtained from one liter of the fermentation supernatant. We also developed an economical approach for preparation of the uniformly (15)N-labeled R3/I5 precursor by culturing in shaking flasks, and approximately 15 mg of purified (15)N-labeled precursor was obtained from one liter of the culture supernatant. After purification by cation ion-exchange chromatography and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography, the R3/I5 precursor was converted to the mature two-chain form by sequential treatment with endoproteinase Lys-C and carboxypeptidase B. The mature R3/I5 peptide had an α-helix-dominated conformation and retained full receptor-binding and receptor activation activities. Thus, Pichia overexpression was an efficient approach for sample preparation and isotopic labeling of the chimeric R3/I5 peptide. This approach could also be extended to the preparation of other relaxin family peptides in future studies.

  8. Regulation of presynaptic Ca2+, synaptic plasticity and contextual fear conditioning by a N-terminal β-amyloid fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, James L M; Tong, Mei; Alfulaij, Naghum; Sherrin, Tessi; Contarino, Mark; White, Michael M; Bellinger, Frederick P; Todorovic, Cedomir; Nichols, Robert A

    2014-10-22

    Soluble β-amyloid has been shown to regulate presynaptic Ca(2+) and synaptic plasticity. In particular, picomolar β-amyloid was found to have an agonist-like action on presynaptic nicotinic receptors and to augment long-term potentiation (LTP) in a manner dependent upon nicotinic receptors. Here, we report that a functional N-terminal domain exists within β-amyloid for its agonist-like activity. This sequence corresponds to a N-terminal fragment generated by the combined action of α- and β-secretases, and resident carboxypeptidase. The N-terminal β-amyloid fragment is present in the brains and CSF of healthy adults as well as in Alzheimer's patients. Unlike full-length β-amyloid, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment is monomeric and nontoxic. In Ca(2+) imaging studies using a model reconstituted rodent neuroblastoma cell line and isolated mouse nerve terminals, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment proved to be highly potent and more effective than full-length β-amyloid in its agonist-like action on nicotinic receptors. In addition, the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment augmented theta burst-induced post-tetanic potentiation and LTP in mouse hippocampal slices. The N-terminal fragment also rescued LTP inhibited by elevated levels of full-length β-amyloid. Contextual fear conditioning was also strongly augmented following bilateral injection of N-terminal β-amyloid fragment into the dorsal hippocampi of intact mice. The fragment-induced augmentation of fear conditioning was attenuated by coadministration of nicotinic antagonist. The activity of the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment appears to reside largely in a sequence surrounding a putative metal binding site, YEVHHQ. These findings suggest that the N-terminal β-amyloid fragment may serve as a potent and effective endogenous neuromodulator. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3414210-09$15.00/0.

  9. Bi-allelic Alterations in AEBP1 Lead to Defective Collagen Assembly and Connective Tissue Structure Resulting in a Variant of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Patrick R; Xu, Zhi; Tumelty, Kathleen E; Zhao, Rose W; Monis, William J; Harris, Kimberly G; Gass, Jennifer M; Cousin, Margot A; Boczek, Nicole J; Mitkov, Mario V; Cappel, Mark A; Francomano, Clair A; Parisi, Joseph E; Klee, Eric W; Faqeih, Eissa; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Layne, Matthew D; McDonnell, Nazli B; Atwal, Paldeep S

    2018-04-05

    AEBP1 encodes the aortic carboxypeptidase-like protein (ACLP) that associates with collagens in the extracellular matrix (ECM) and has several roles in development, tissue repair, and fibrosis. ACLP is expressed in bone, the vasculature, and dermal tissues and is involved in fibroblast proliferation and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into collagen-producing cells. Aebp1 -/- mice have abnormal, delayed wound repair correlating with defects in fibroblast proliferation. In this study, we describe four individuals from three unrelated families that presented with a unique constellation of clinical findings including joint laxity, redundant and hyperextensible skin, poor wound healing with abnormal scarring, osteoporosis, and other features reminiscent of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). Analysis of skin biopsies revealed decreased dermal collagen with abnormal collagen fibrils that were ragged in appearance. Exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous variants in AEBP1 (c.1470delC [p.Asn490_Met495delins(40)] and c.1743C>A [p.Cys581 ∗ ]) in the first individual, a homozygous variant (c.1320_1326del [p.Arg440Serfs ∗ 3]) in the second individual, and a homozygous splice site variant (c.1630+1G>A) in two siblings from the third family. We show that ACLP enhances collagen polymerization and binds to several fibrillar collagens via its discoidin domain. These studies support the conclusion that bi-allelic pathogenic variants in AEBP1 are the cause of this autosomal-recessive EDS subtype. Copyright © 2018 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Amino acid derivatives of 5-ASA as novel prodrugs for intestinal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, C; Gentili, G; Boschetti, E; Santucci, C; Aburbeh, A G; Natalini, B; Pellicciari, R; Morelli, A

    1994-12-01

    In an attempt to obtain site-specific delivery of 5-ASA in the intestinal tract, we have determined the extent of absorption and metabolism of a number of novel 5-ASA derivatives, namely, (N-L-glutamyl)-amino-2-salicylic acid (1), (N-L-aspartyl)-amino-2-salicylic-acid (2), 5-aminosalicyl-L-proline-L-leucine (3), and 5-(N-L-glutamyl)-aminosalicyl-L-proline-L-leucine (4), which are selectively cleaved by intestinal brush border aminopeptidase A and carboxypeptidases. These novel prodrugs, 5-ASA, and sulfasalazine were administered to adult Fisher rats (N = 30) and to animals that had undergone prior colostomy (N = 30). Urine and feces were collected at timed intervals for 48 hr and the metabolites, 5-ASA, and N-acetyl-5-ASA were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The absorption and metabolism of all compounds were essentially identical in colostomized and normal animals. 5-ASA exhibited a rapid proximal intestinal absorption as evidenced by the high cumulative urinary excretion (> 65%) and low fecal excretion. Sulfasalazine, as expected, exhibited a lower urinary recovery (metabolite. The novel glutamate and aspartate derivatives (1 and 2) behaved similarly to sulfasalazine, while administration of the proline-leucine derivative (3) resulted in urinary and fecal recovery values intermediate with respect to those observed with 5-ASA and sulfasalazine. 5-(N-L-Glutamyl)-aminosalicyl-L-proline-L-leucine yielded the highest fecal recovery of 5-ASA and its N-acetyl derivative, indicating a more efficient delivery to the distal bowel. Amino acid derivatives of 5-ASA appear to be potentially useful prodrugs for the site-specific delivery of 5-ASA to different regions of the intestinal tract.

  11. Cathepsin L of Triatoma brasiliensis (Reduviidae, Triatominae): sequence characterization, expression pattern and zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waniek, Peter J; Pacheco Costa, Juliana E; Jansen, Ana M; Costa, Jane; Araújo, Catarina A C

    2012-01-01

    Triatoma brasiliensis is considered one of the main vectors of Chagas disease commonly found in semi-arid areas of northeastern Brazil. These insects use proteases, such as carboxypeptidase B, aminopeptidases and different cathepsins for blood digestion. In the present study, two genes encoding cathepsin L from the midgut of T. brasiliensis were identified and characterized. Mature T. brasiliensis cathepsin L-like proteinases (TBCATL-1, TBCATL-2) showed a high level of identity to the cathepsin L-like proteinases of other insects, with highest similarity to Rhodnius prolixus. Both cathepsin L transcripts were highly abundant in the posterior midgut region, the main region of the blood digestion. Determination of the pH in the whole intestine of unfed T. brasiliensis revealed alkaline conditions in the anterior midgut region (stomach) and acidic conditions in the posterior midgut region (small intestine). Gelatine in-gel zymography showed the activity of at least four distinct proteinases in the small intestine and the cysteine proteinase inhibitors transepoxysuccinyl-l-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)butane (E-64) and cathepsin B inhibitor and N-(l-3-trans-propylcarbamoyl-oxirane-2-carbonyl)-l-isoleucyl-l-proline (CA-074) were employed to characterize enzymatic activity. E-64 fully inhibited cysteine proteinase activity, whereas in the samples treated with CA-074 residual proteinase activity was detectable. Thus, proteolytic activity could at least partially be ascribed to cathepsin L. Western blot analysis using specific anti cathepsin L antibodies confirmed the presence of cathepsin L in the lumen of the small intestine of the insects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mast cell chymase degrades the alarmins heat shock protein 70, biglycan, HMGB1, and interleukin-33 (IL-33) and limits danger-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ananya; Ganesh, Goutham; Sippola, Helena; Bolin, Sara; Sawesi, Osama; Dagälv, Anders; Schlenner, Susan M; Feyerabend, Thorsten; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kjellén, Lena; Hellman, Lars; Åbrink, Magnus

    2014-01-03

    During infection and tissue damage, virulence factors and alarmins are pro-inflammatory and induce activation of various immune cells including macrophages and mast cells (MCs). Activated MCs instantly release preformed inflammatory mediators, including several proteases. The chymase mouse mast cell protease (MCPT)-4 is thought to be pro-inflammatory, whereas human chymase also degrades pro-inflammatory cytokines, suggesting that chymase instead limits inflammation. Here we explored the contribution of MCPT4 and human chymase to the control of danger-induced inflammation. We found that protein extracts from wild type (WT), carboxypeptidase A3-, and MCPT6-deficient mice and MCs and recombinant human chymase efficiently degrade the Trichinella spiralis virulence factor heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) as well as endogenous Hsp70. MC-(W(sash))-, serglycin-, NDST2-, and MCPT4-deficient extracts lacked this capacity, indicating that chymase is responsible for the degradation. Chymase, but not MC tryptase, also degraded other alarmins, i.e. biglycan, HMGB1, and IL-33, a degradation that was efficiently blocked by the chymase inhibitor chymostatin. IL-7, IL-22, GM-CSF, and CCL2 were resistant to chymase degradation. MCPT4-deficient conditions ex vivo and in vivo showed no reduction in added Hsp70 and only minor reduction of IL-33. Peritoneal challenge with Hsp70 resulted in increased neutrophil recruitment and TNF-α levels in the MCPT4-deficient mice, whereas IL-6 and CCL2 levels were similar to the levels found in WT mice. The rapid and MC chymase-specific degradation of virulence factors and alarmins may depend on the presence of accessible extended recognition cleavage sites in target substrates and suggests a protective and regulatory role of MC chymase during danger-induced inflammation.

  13. Mast Cell Chymase Degrades the Alarmins Heat Shock Protein 70, Biglycan, HMGB1, and Interleukin-33 (IL-33) and Limits Danger-induced Inflammation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ananya; Ganesh, Goutham; Sippola, Helena; Bolin, Sara; Sawesi, Osama; Dagälv, Anders; Schlenner, Susan M.; Feyerabend, Thorsten; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kjellén, Lena; Hellman, Lars; Åbrink, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    During infection and tissue damage, virulence factors and alarmins are pro-inflammatory and induce activation of various immune cells including macrophages and mast cells (MCs). Activated MCs instantly release preformed inflammatory mediators, including several proteases. The chymase mouse mast cell protease (MCPT)-4 is thought to be pro-inflammatory, whereas human chymase also degrades pro-inflammatory cytokines, suggesting that chymase instead limits inflammation. Here we explored the contribution of MCPT4 and human chymase to the control of danger-induced inflammation. We found that protein extracts from wild type (WT), carboxypeptidase A3-, and MCPT6-deficient mice and MCs and recombinant human chymase efficiently degrade the Trichinella spiralis virulence factor heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) as well as endogenous Hsp70. MC-(Wsash)-, serglycin-, NDST2-, and MCPT4-deficient extracts lacked this capacity, indicating that chymase is responsible for the degradation. Chymase, but not MC tryptase, also degraded other alarmins, i.e. biglycan, HMGB1, and IL-33, a degradation that was efficiently blocked by the chymase inhibitor chymostatin. IL-7, IL-22, GM-CSF, and CCL2 were resistant to chymase degradation. MCPT4-deficient conditions ex vivo and in vivo showed no reduction in added Hsp70 and only minor reduction of IL-33. Peritoneal challenge with Hsp70 resulted in increased neutrophil recruitment and TNF-α levels in the MCPT4-deficient mice, whereas IL-6 and CCL2 levels were similar to the levels found in WT mice. The rapid and MC chymase-specific degradation of virulence factors and alarmins may depend on the presence of accessible extended recognition cleavage sites in target substrates and suggests a protective and regulatory role of MC chymase during danger-induced inflammation. PMID:24257755

  14. Distorted secretory granule composition in mast cells with multiple protease deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujic, Mirjana; Calounova, Gabriela; Eriksson, Inger; Feyerabend, Thorsten; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Tchougounova, Elena; Kjellén, Lena; Pejler, Gunnar

    2013-10-01

    Mast cells are characterized by an abundance of secretory granules densely packed with inflammatory mediators such as bioactive amines, cytokines, serglycin proteoglycans with negatively charged glycosaminoglycan side chains of either heparin or chondroitin sulfate type, and large amounts of positively charged proteases. Despite the large biological impact of mast cell granules and their contents on various pathologies, the mechanisms that regulate granule composition are incompletely understood. In this study, we hypothesized that granule composition is dependent on a dynamic electrostatic interrelationship between different granule compounds. As a tool to evaluate this possibility, we generated mice in which mast cells are multideficient in a panel of positively charged proteases: the chymase mouse mast cell protease-4, the tryptase mouse mast cell protease-6, and carboxypeptidase A3. Through a posttranslational effect, mast cells from these mice additionally lack mouse mast cell protease-5 protein. Mast cells from mice deficient in individual proteases showed normal morphology. In contrast, mast cells with combined protease deficiency displayed a profound distortion of granule integrity, as seen both by conventional morphological criteria and by transmission electron microscopy. An assessment of granule content revealed that the distorted granule integrity in multiprotease-deficient mast cells was associated with a profound reduction of highly negatively charged heparin, whereas no reduction in chondroitin sulfate storage was observed. Taken together with previous findings showing that the storage of basic proteases conversely is regulated by anionic proteoglycans, these data suggest that secretory granule composition in mast cells is dependent on a dynamic interrelationship between granule compounds of opposite electrical charge.

  15. Trace element deficiency and its diagnosis by biochemical criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchgessner, M.; Grassmann, E.; Roth, H.P.; Spoerl, R.; Schnegg, A.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of trace element deficiency on growth of rats and dairy cows is demonstrated using zinc and nickel. The effect of copper deficiency on reproductive performance is shown to be associated with increased death rates of pregnant animals and their foetuses. For the diagnosis of suboptimum states of trace element supply, biochemical criteria are needed. The mere analysis of the trace element content of various body tissues may lead to falase diagnoses because of the often slow response to varying intake and because of interactions with other dietary ingredients affecting absorption and metabolic efficiency of utilization. Thus copper deficiency is associated with a decrease in the serum level of both copper and iron, despite adequate iron intake, and simultaneously with an accumulation of iron in the liver of the animal. Enzymes and hormones containing the essential trace element as an integral constituent may serve as biochemical criteria. A sensitive response to zinc intake is exhibited by the activity of the alkaline phosphatase of serum or bones, and by the activity of the pancreatic carboxypeptidase A, all of which show a significant reaction to deficient intake within two to four days, and perhaps by the biopotency of insulin. Ceruloplasmin responds to the supply of copper. Its biosynthesis in the liver is possible only from copper available for this purpose. Thus, the determination of ceruloplasmin may take account of at least part of the copper available to the body for metabolic functions. Among various criteria, the catalase activity in blood may provide additional information on the state of iron supply. Malate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase respond to nickel-deficient intake. Nickel deficiency also involves anaemia due to disorders in iron absorption

  16. Improving chocolate flavor in poor-quality cocoa almonds by enzymatic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Hilana Salete Silva; Mamede, Maria Eugênia Oliveira; Góes-Neto, Aristóteles; Koblitz, Maria Gabriela Bello

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to enzymatically treat poor-quality cocoa almonds (known as "slate") to ensure the formation of chocolate flavor precursors. The production of flavor precursors improves the quality of these almonds, which are usually responsible for the low quality of the liquor produced. Proteases and carboxypeptidases from different sources were tested under various conditions. The different treatments were evaluated by chemical analysis (hydrolysis efficiency) and sensory analysis of the treated material compared to good-quality cocoa almonds. The results show that it is possible, through the use of microbial enzymes, to generate the mixture of compounds that will release, after roasting, the characteristic chocolate flavor in poor-quality almonds. However, it is necessary to optimize the conditions of enzymatic treatment to obtain better results and thus establish a process that can be used for industrial purposes for manufacturing cocoa and chocolate. The basidiomycete Moniliophtora perniciosa is the causative agent of witches' broom disease (WBD) of the cocoa tree, whose seeds are the source of chocolate. It is the most important phytopathological problem of cocoa-producing areas of the American continent, and has decimated the Brazilian cocoa industry. In Bahia (Brazil), M. perniciosa was identified in 1989 and, as a consequence of its spreading, the annual production of cocoa almonds dropped from 450,000 to 90,000 tons within 12 y, reducing export values from an all-time high of about US$ 1 billion to 110 million. The high incidence of WBD incapacitates Brazil to produce enough cocoa almonds even for the internal market, leading the country to import low-quality cocoa almonds mainly from African countries. Our work proposes an enzymatic treatment to increase the quality of that cocoa almonds and, consequently, to improve the quality of the chocolate produced and consumed in the country. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. Structure of Csd3 from Helicobacter pylori, a cell shape-determining metallopeptidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Doo Ri; Kim, Hyoun Sook; Kim, Jieun; Im, Ha Na; Yoon, Hye Jin; Yoon, Ji Young; Jang, Jun Young; Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Mobashery, Shahriar; Kim, Soon-Jong; Lee, Byung Il; Suh, Se Won

    2015-01-01

    H. pylori Csd3 (HP0506), together with other peptidoglycan hydrolases, plays an important role in determining cell shape. Its crystal structure in the latent state is reported. Helicobacter pylori is associated with various gastrointestinal diseases such as gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer. Its colonization of the human gastric mucosa requires high motility, which depends on its helical cell shape. Seven cell shape-determining genes (csd1, csd2, csd3/hdpA, ccmA, csd4, csd5 and csd6) have been identified in H. pylori. Their proteins play key roles in determining the cell shape through modifications of the cell-wall peptidoglycan by the alteration of cross-linking or by the trimming of peptidoglycan muropeptides. Among them, Csd3 (also known as HdpA) is a bifunctional enzyme. Its d, d-endopeptidase activity cleaves the d-Ala 4 -mDAP 3 peptide bond between cross-linked muramyl tetrapeptides and pentapeptides. It is also a d, d-carboxypeptidase that cleaves off the terminal d-Ala 5 from the muramyl pentapeptide. Here, the crystal structure of this protein has been determined, revealing the organization of its three domains in a latent and inactive state. The N-terminal domain 1 and the core of domain 2 share the same fold despite a very low level of sequence identity, and their surface-charge distributions are different. The C-terminal LytM domain contains the catalytic site with a Zn 2+ ion, like the similar domains of other M23 metallopeptidases. Domain 1 occludes the active site of the LytM domain. The core of domain 2 is held against the LytM domain by the C-terminal tail region that protrudes from the LytM domain

  18. The Prediction of the Expected Current Selection Coefficient of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Associated with Holstein Milk Yield, Fat and Protein Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Sup Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Milk-related traits (milk yield, fat and protein have been crucial to selection of Holstein. It is essential to find the current selection trends of Holstein. Despite this, uncovering the current trends of selection have been ignored in previous studies. We suggest a new formula to detect the current selection trends based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP. This suggestion is based on the best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP and the Fisher’s fundamental theorem of natural selection both of which are trait-dependent. Fisher’s theorem links the additive genetic variance to the selection coefficient. For Holstein milk production traits, we estimated the additive genetic variance using SNP effect from BLUP and selection coefficients based on genetic variance to search highly selective SNPs. Through these processes, we identified significantly selective SNPs. The number of genes containing highly selective SNPs with p-value <0.01 (nearly top 1% SNPs in all traits and p-value <0.001 (nearly top 0.1% in any traits was 14. They are phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B, serine/threonine kinase 40 (STK40, collagen, type XI, alpha 1 (COL11A1, ephrin-A1 (EFNA1, netrin 4 (NTN4, neuron specific gene family member 1 (NSG1, estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1, neurexin 3 (NRXN3, spectrin, beta, non-erythrocytic 1 (SPTBN1, ADP-ribosylation factor interacting protein 1 (ARFIP1, mutL homolog 1 (MLH1, transmembrane channel-like 7 (TMC7, carboxypeptidase X, member 2 (CPXM2 and ADAM metallopeptidase domain 12 (ADAM12. These genes may be important for future artificial selection trends. Also, we found that the SNP effect predicted from BLUP was the key factor to determine the expected current selection coefficient of SNP. Under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of SNP markers in current generation, the selection coefficient is equivalent to 2*SNP effect.

  19. Mechanistic Inferences from the Binding of Ligands to LpxC, A Metal-Dependent Deacetylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gennadios, H.; Whittington, D.; Li, X.; Fierke, C.; Christianson, D.

    2006-01-01

    The metal-dependent deacetylase LpxC catalyzes the first committed step of lipid A biosynthesis in Gram-negative bacteria. Accordingly, LpxC is an attractive target for the development of inhibitors that may serve as potential new antibiotics for the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections. Here, we report the 2.7 Angstroms resolution X-ray crystal structure of LpxC complexed with the substrate analogue inhibitor TU-514 and the 2.0 Angstroms resolution structure of LpxC complexed with imidazole. The X-ray crystal structure of LpxC complexed with TU-514 allows for a detailed examination of the coordination geometry of the catalytic zinc ion and other enzyme-inhibitor interactions in the active site. The hydroxamate group of TU-514 forms a bidentate chelate complex with the zinc ion and makes hydrogen bond interactions with conserved active site residues E78, H265, and T191. The inhibitor C-4 hydroxyl group makes direct hydrogen bond interactions with E197 and H58. Finally, the C-3 myristate moiety of the inhibitor binds in the hydrophobic tunnel of the active site. These intermolecular interactions provide a foundation for understanding structural aspects of enzyme-substrate and enzyme-inhibitor affinity. Comparison of the TU-514 complex with cacodylate and imidazole complexes suggests a possible substrate diphosphate binding site and highlights residues that may stabilize the tetrahedral intermediate and its flanking transition states in catalysis. Evidence of a catalytic zinc ion in the native zinc enzyme coordinated by H79, H238, D242, and two water molecules with square pyramidal geometry is also presented. These results suggest that the native state of this metallohydrolase may contain a pentacoordinate zinc ion, which contrasts with the native states of archetypical zinc hydrolases such as thermolysin and carboxypeptidase A

  20. Specific fluorogenic substrates for neprilysin (neutral endopeptidase, EC 3.4.24.11 which are highly resistant to serine- and metalloproteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.S. Medeiros

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Two intramolecularly quenched fluorogenic peptides containing o-aminobenzoyl (Abz and ethylenediamine 2,4-dinitrophenyl (EDDnp groups at amino- and carboxyl-terminal amino acid residues, Abz-DArg-Arg-Leu-EDDnp (Abz-DRRL-EDDnp and Abz-DArg-Arg-Phe-EDDnp (Abz-DRRF-EDDnp, were selectively hydrolyzed by neutral endopeptidase (NEP, enkephalinase, neprilysin, EC 3.4.24.11 at the Arg-Leu and Arg-Phe bonds, respectively. The kinetic parameters for the NEP-catalyzed hydrolysis of Abz-DRRL-EDDnp and Abz-DRRF-EDDnp were Km = 2.8 µM, kcat = 5.3 min-1, kcat/Km = 2 min-1 µM-1 and Km = 5.0 µM, kcat = 7.0 min-1, kcat/Km = 1.4 min-1 µM-1, respectively. The high specificity of these substrates was demonstrated by their resistance to hydrolysis by metalloproteases [thermolysin (EC 3.4.24.2, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE; EC 3.4.24.15], serineproteases [trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4, a-chymotrypsin (EC 3.4.21.1] and proteases present in tissue homogenates from kidney, lung, brain and testis. The blocked amino- and carboxyl-terminal amino acids protected these substrates against the action of aminopeptidases, carboxypeptidases and ACE. Furthermore, DR amino acids ensured total protection of Abz-DRRL-EDDnp and Abz-DRRF-EDDnp against the action of thermolysin and trypsin. Leu-EDDnp and Phe-EDDnp were resistant to hydrolysis by a-chymotrypsin. The high specifity of these substrates suggests their use for specific NEP assays in crude enzyme preparations

  1. The primary structure of rat liver ribosomal protein L37. Homology with yeast and bacterial ribosomal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, A; McNally, J; Wool, I G

    1983-09-10

    The covalent structure of the rat liver 60 S ribosomal subunit protein L37 was determined. Twenty-four tryptic peptides were purified and the sequence of each was established; they accounted for all 111 residues of L37. The sequence of the first 30 residues of L37, obtained previously by automated Edman degradation of the intact protein, provided the alignment of the first 9 tryptic peptides. Three peptides (CN1, CN2, and CN3) were produced by cleavage of protein L37 with cyanogen bromide. The sequence of CN1 (65 residues) was established from the sequence of secondary peptides resulting from cleavage with trypsin and chymotrypsin. The sequence of CN1 in turn served to order tryptic peptides 1 through 14. The sequence of CN2 (15 residues) was determined entirely by a micromanual procedure and allowed the alignment of tryptic peptides 14 through 18. The sequence of the NH2-terminal 28 amino acids of CN3 (31 residues) was determined; in addition the complete sequences of the secondary tryptic and chymotryptic peptides were done. The sequence of CN3 provided the order of tryptic peptides 18 through 24. Thus the sequence of the three cyanogen bromide peptides also accounted for the 111 residues of protein L37. The carboxyl-terminal amino acids were identified after carboxypeptidase A treatment. There is a disulfide bridge between half-cystinyl residues at positions 40 and 69. Rat liver ribosomal protein L37 is homologous with yeast YP55 and with Escherichia coli L34. Moreover, there is a segment of 17 residues in rat L37 that occurs, albeit with modifications, in yeast YP55 and in E. coli S4, L20, and L34.

  2. Structure of Csd3 from Helicobacter pylori, a cell shape-determining metallopeptidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Doo Ri [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoun Sook [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Seoul 151 742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jieun; Im, Ha Na; Yoon, Hye Jin; Yoon, Ji Young; Jang, Jun Young [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Mobashery, Shahriar [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Kim, Soon-Jong [Mokpo National University, Chonnam 534-729 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Il [National Cancer Center, Gyeonggi 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Se Won, E-mail: sewonsuh@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    H. pylori Csd3 (HP0506), together with other peptidoglycan hydrolases, plays an important role in determining cell shape. Its crystal structure in the latent state is reported. Helicobacter pylori is associated with various gastrointestinal diseases such as gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer. Its colonization of the human gastric mucosa requires high motility, which depends on its helical cell shape. Seven cell shape-determining genes (csd1, csd2, csd3/hdpA, ccmA, csd4, csd5 and csd6) have been identified in H. pylori. Their proteins play key roles in determining the cell shape through modifications of the cell-wall peptidoglycan by the alteration of cross-linking or by the trimming of peptidoglycan muropeptides. Among them, Csd3 (also known as HdpA) is a bifunctional enzyme. Its d, d-endopeptidase activity cleaves the d-Ala{sup 4}-mDAP{sup 3} peptide bond between cross-linked muramyl tetrapeptides and pentapeptides. It is also a d, d-carboxypeptidase that cleaves off the terminal d-Ala{sup 5} from the muramyl pentapeptide. Here, the crystal structure of this protein has been determined, revealing the organization of its three domains in a latent and inactive state. The N-terminal domain 1 and the core of domain 2 share the same fold despite a very low level of sequence identity, and their surface-charge distributions are different. The C-terminal LytM domain contains the catalytic site with a Zn{sup 2+} ion, like the similar domains of other M23 metallopeptidases. Domain 1 occludes the active site of the LytM domain. The core of domain 2 is held against the LytM domain by the C-terminal tail region that protrudes from the LytM domain.

  3. The inactivation of the sortilin gene leads to a partial disruption of prosaposin trafficking to the lysosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Jibin; Racicott, Jesse; Morales, Carlos R.

    2009-01-01

    Lysosomes are intracellular organelles which contain enzymes and activator proteins involved in the digestion and recycling of a variety of cellular and extracellular substances. We have identified a novel sorting receptor, sortilin, which is involved in the lysosomal trafficking of the sphingolipid activator proteins, prosaposin and GM 2 AP, and the soluble hydrolases cathepsin D, cathepsin H, and acid sphingomyelinase. Sortilin belongs to a growing family of receptors with homology to the yeast Vps10 protein, which acts as a lysosomal sorting receptor for carboxypeptidase Y. In this study we examined the effects of the sortilin gene inactivation in mice. The inactivation of this gene did not yield any noticeable lysosomal pathology. To determine the existence of an alternative receptor complementing the sorting function of sortilin, we quantified the concentration of prosaposin in the lysosomes of the nonciliated epithelial cells lining the efferent ducts. These cells were chosen because they express sortilin and have a large number of lysosomes containing prosaposin. In addition, the nonciliated cells are known to endocytose luminal prosaposin that is synthesized and secreted by Sertoli cells into the seminiferous luminal fluids. Consequently, the nonciliated cells are capable of targeting both exogenous and endogenous prosaposin to the lysosomes. Using electron microscope immunogold labeling and quantitative analysis, our results demonstrate that inactivation of the sortilin gene produces a significant decrease of prosaposin in the lysosomes. When luminal prosaposin was excluded from the efferent ducts, the level of prosaposin in lysosomes was even lower in the mutant mice. Nonetheless, a significant amount of prosaposin continues to reach the lysosomal compartment. These results strongly suggest the existence of an alternative receptor that complements the function of sortilin and explains the lack of lysosomal storage disorders in the sortilin-deficient mice.

  4. Genetic Analysis of Japanese Children With Acute Recurrent and Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Nobutomo; Suzuki, Mitsuyoshi; Sakurai, Yumiko; Nakano, Satoshi; Naritaka, Nakayuki; Minowa, Kei; Sai, Jin K; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2016-10-01

    Causes of acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) or chronic pancreatitis (CP) are sometimes difficult to determine in children. In such patients, genetic analysis may prove helpful. The present study analyzed mutations of cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1), serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1), chymotrypsin C (CTRC), and carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1) and investigated the clinical features of children with these mutations. Genetic analyses of mutations in these 4 genes were conducted in 128 patients with ARP or CP. Characteristics of the patients showing mutations were investigated using medical records. Fifty of the 128 (39.1%) subjects had at least 1 mutation (median age at onset, 7.6 years). Abdominal pain was the presenting symptom of pancreatitis in 48 of the 50 patients (96%). Fifteen of those 50 patients (30.0%) had a family history of pancreatitis. Gene mutations were present in PRSS1 in 26 patients, SPINK1 in 23, CTRC in 3, and CPA1 in 5. In the 31 patients with mutations in SPINK1, CTRC, or CPA1, 16 (51.6%) had homozygous or heterozygous mutations with other mutations. Three patients underwent surgery and another 4 patients underwent endoscopy to manage ARP or CP. Although 3 of the 7 patients complained of mild abdominal pain, none of those 7 patients experienced any obvious episode of ARP after treatment. In pediatric patients with idiopathic ARP and CP, genetic analysis is useful for identifying the cause of pancreatitis. Early endoscopic or surgical treatment prevents ARP by extending the interval between episodes of pancreatitis in this population.

  5. Characterization of the Mamestra configurata (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larval midgut protease complement and adaptation to feeding on artificial diet, Brassica species, and protease inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandson, Martin A; Hegedus, Dwayne D; Baldwin, Douglas; Noakes, Amy; Toprak, Umut

    2010-10-01

    The midgut protease profiles from 5th instar Mamestra configurata larvae fed various diets (standard artificial diet, low protein diet, low protein diet with soybean trypsin inhibitor [SBTI], or Brassica napus) were characterized by one-dimensional enzymography in gelatin gels. The gut protease profile of larvae fed B. napus possessed protease activities of molecular masses of approximately 33 and 55 kDa, which were not present in the guts of larvae fed artificial diet. Similarly, larvae fed artificial diet had protease activities of molecular masses of approximately 21, 30, and 100 kDa that were absent in larvae fed B. napus. Protease profiles changed within 12 to 24 h after switching larvae from artificial diet to plant diet and vice versa. The gut protease profiles from larvae fed various other brassicaceous species and lines having different secondary metabolite profiles did not differ despite significant differences in larval growth rates on the different host plants. Genes encoding putative digestive proteolytic enzymes, including four carboxypeptidases, five aminopeptidases, and 48 serine proteases, were identified in cDNA libraries from 4th instar M. configurata midgut tissue. Many of the protease-encoding genes were expressed at similar levels on all diets; however, three chymoptrypsin-like genes (McSP23, McSP27, and McSP37) were expressed at much higher levels on standard artificial diet and diet containing SBTI as was the trypsin-like gene McSP34. The expression of the trypsin-like gene McSP50 was highest on B. napus. The adaptation of M. configurata digestive biochemistry to different diets is discussed in the context of the flexibility of polyphagous insects to changing diet sources.

  6. Production, characterization, and identification using proteomic tools of a polygalacturonase from Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Leonel M; Kikot, Gisele E; Rojas, Natalia L; López, Laura M I; Astoreca, Andrea L; Alconada, Teresa M

    2014-07-01

    Since enzymatic degradation is a mechanism or component of the aggressiveness of a pathogen, enzymatic activities from a Fusarium graminearum isolate obtained from infected wheat spikes of Argentina Pampa region were studied in order to understand the disease progression, tending to help disease control. In particular, the significance of the study of polygalacturonase activity is based on that such activity is produced in the early stages of infection on the host, suggesting a crucial role in the establishment of disease. In this sense, polygalacturonase activity produced by this microorganism has been purified 375 times from 2-day-old culture filtrates by gel filtration and ion-exchange chromatography successively. The purified sample showed two protein bands in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels, with a molecular mass of 40 and 55 kDa. The protein bands were identified as an endopolygalacturonase and as a serine carboxypeptidase of F. graminearum, respectively, by peptide mass fingerprinting (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI TOF/TOF) fragment ion analysis). The pattern of substrate degradation analyzed by thin layer chromatography confirmed the mode of action of the enzyme as an endopolygalacturonase. High activity of the polygalacturonase against polygalacturonic acid was observed between 4 and 6 of pH, and between 30 and 50 °C, being 5 and 50 °C the optimum pH and temperature, respectively. The enzyme was fully stable at pH 5 for 120 min and 30 °C and sensible to the presence of some metal ions. This information would contribute to understand the most favorable environmental conditions for establishment of the disease. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Cadmium effects on embryo growth of pea seeds during germination: Investigation of the mechanisms of interference of the heavy metal with protein mobilization-related factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaouani, Khadija; Karmous, Inès; Ostrowski, Maciej; Ferjani, Ezzedine El; Jakubowska, Anna; Chaoui, Abdelilah

    2018-04-16

    This work aims to give more insight into mechanisms of action of cadmium (Cd) on germinating pea seeds (Pisum sativum L. var. douce province), specifically the different ways by which Cd cations may interfere with the principal factors involved during germination process, notably storage proteins mobilization, amino acids freeing and proteolytic activities. Obtained results revealed that the process of hydrolysis of main storage proteins showed a significant disruption, which resulted in the decrease of the release of free amino acids, thus imposing a lack in nitrogen supply of essential nutrients to growing embryo under Cd stress. This hypothesis was evidenced by Cd-induced changes occurring in main purified protein fractions; Albumins, Legumins and Vicilins, during their breakdown. Besides, at enzymatic level, the activities of main proteases responsible for this hydrolysis were altered. Indeed, assays using synthetic substrates and specific protease inhibitors followed by protease activity measurements demonstrated that Cd inhibited drastically the total azocaseinolytic activity (ACA) and activities of different proteolytic classes: cysteine-, aspartic-, serine- and metallo-endopeptidases (EP), leucine- and proline-aminopeptidases (LAP and PAP, respectively), and glycine-carboxypeptidases (Gly-CP). The data here presented may suggest that the vulnerability of the embryonic axes towards Cd toxicity could be explained as a result of eventual disruption of metabolic pathways that affect mobilization of reserves and availability of nutrients. In vitro studies suggest that Cd cations may act either directly on the catalytic sites of the proteolytic enzymes, which may cause their deactivation, or indirectly via the generation of oxidative stress and overproduction of free radicals that can interact with enzymes, by altering their activity and structure. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic association analysis of 30 genes related to obesity in a European American population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P; Tiwari, H K; Lin, W-Y; Allison, D B; Chung, W K; Leibel, R L; Yi, N; Liu, N

    2014-05-01

    Obesity, which is frequently associated with diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, is primarily the result of a net excess of caloric intake over energy expenditure. Human obesity is highly heritable, but the specific genes mediating susceptibility in non-syndromic obesity remain unclear. We tested candidate genes in pathways related to food intake and energy expenditure for association with body mass index (BMI). We reanalyzed 355 common genetic variants of 30 candidate genes in seven molecular pathways related to obesity in 1982 unrelated European Americans from the New York Cancer Project. Data were analyzed by using a Bayesian hierarchical generalized linear model. The BMIs were log-transformed and then adjusted for covariates, including age, age(2), gender and diabetes status. The single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were modeled as additive effects. With the stipulated adjustments, nine SNPs in eight genes were significantly associated with BMI: ghrelin (GHRL; rs35683), agouti-related peptide (AGRP; rs5030980), carboxypeptidase E (CPE; rs1946816 and rs4481204), glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1R; rs2268641), serotonin receptors (HTR2A; rs912127), neuropeptide Y receptor (NPY5R;Y5R1c52), suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3; rs4969170) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3; rs4796793). We also found a gender-by-SNP interaction (rs1745837 in HTR2A), which indicated that variants in the gene HTR2A had a stronger association with BMI in males. In addition, NPY1R was detected as having a significant gene effect even though none of the SNPs in this gene was significant. Variations in genes AGRP, CPE, GHRL, GLP1R, HTR2A, NPY1R, NPY5R, SOCS3 and STAT3 showed modest associations with BMI in European Americans. The pathways in which these genes participate regulate energy intake, and thus these associations are mechanistically plausible in this context.

  9. Kininase enzymes of cat eye tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, J.W.; Anderson, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Eye tissues contain kininase activities, including an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-like activity. The authors have begun further to characterize the ACE-like activity and to examine for another reputed kininase, carboxypeptidase N (CPN). Homogenates of tissues of 6 cat eyes and paired plasmas were assayed for ACE using 3 acyl-tripeptide substrates, 3 H-benzoylated F-A-P, F-G-P and A-G-P (respectively, BFAP, BFGP and BAGP). CPN was assayed using 3 H-benzoyl-A-R. All eye tissues and fluids contained ACE- and CPN-like activities. The ACE activity was clearly owing to ACE: relative values of Kc/Km for BFAP, BFGP and BAGP were those for pure ACE (2.213, 1.751 and 1.0); reactivities with inhibitors were as expected (Ki for captopril, MK 422 and RAC-X-65: 2.7, 0.62 and 0.31 nM). EDTA inhibited both ACE and CPN (I 50 's: 43 and 47 μM). CPN activity was inhibited by 2-mercaptomethyl-3-guanidinoethylthiopropionate (Ki 2.4 nM). However, distributions of the two enzymes differed markedly. Virtually all tissues contained ACE at specific activities higher than that of plasma. Specific activities appeared to be a function of tissue vascularity (for choroid, ciliary body, iris, retina and plasma: 7.31, 2.57, 1.98, 1.53 and 0.21 pmol/mg protein). Only iris contained more CPN that did plasma (23.0 v. 7.21 pmol/mg protein). The tissue distribution of ACE is that expected for an endothelial-associated enzyme. Plasma may be the major source of CPN in eye tissues other than iris

  10. Effect of chitosan and thiolated chitosan coating on the inhibition behaviour of PIBCA nanoparticles against intestinal metallopeptidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravo-Osuna, Irene; Vauthier, Christine; Farabollini, Alessandra; Millotti, Gioconda; Ponchel, Gilles, E-mail: gilles.ponchel@u-psud.f [UMR CNRS 8612, Universite Paris Sud, Laboratoire de Physicochimie, Faculte de Pharmacie, Pharmacotechnie et Biopharmacie (France)

    2008-12-15

    Surface modified nanoparticles composed of poly(isobutylcyanoacrylate) (PIBCA) cores surrounded by a chitosan and thiolated chitosan gel layer were prepared and characterized in previous works. The presence of such biopolymers on the nanoparticle surface conferred those nanosystems interesting characteristics that might partially overcome the gastrointestinal enzymatic barrier, improving the oral administration of pharmacologically active peptides. In the present work, the antiprotease behaviour of this family of core-shell nanoparticles was in vitro tested against two model metallopeptidases present in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT): Carboxypeptidase A -CP A- (luminal protease) and Leucine Aminopeptidase M -LAP M- (membrane protease). As previous step, the zinc-binding capacity of these nanoparticles was evaluated. Interestingly, an improvement of both the zinc-binding capacity and the antiprotease effect of chitosan was observed when the biopolymers (chitosan and thiolated chitosan) were used as coating component of the core-shell nanoparticles, in comparison with their behaviour in solution, thanks to the different biopolymer chains rearrangement. The presence of amino, hydroxyl and thiol groups on the nanoparticle surface promoted zinc binding and hence the inhibition of the metallopeptidases analysed. On the contrary, the occurrence of a cross-linked structure in the gel layer surrounding the PIBCA cores of thiolated formulations, due to the formation of interchain and intrachain disulphide bonds, partially limited the inhibition of the proteases. The low accessibility of cations to the active groups of the cross-linked polymeric shell was postulated as a possible explanation of this behaviour. Results obtained in this work make this family of surface-modified nanocarriers promising candidates for the successfull administration of pharmacologically active peptides and proteins by the oral route.

  11. Novel Penicillin Analogues as Potential Antimicrobial Agents; Design, Synthesis and Docking Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Zaman; Bais, Abdul; Manir, Md Maniruzzaman; Niazi, Umar

    2015-01-01

    A number of penicillin derivatives (4a-h) were synthesized by the condensation of 6-amino penicillinic acid (6-APA) with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as antimicrobial agents. In silico docking study of these analogues was performed against Penicillin Binding Protein (PDBID 1CEF) using AutoDock Tools 1.5.6 in order to investigate the antimicrobial data on structural basis. Penicillin binding proteins function as either transpeptidases or carboxypeptidases and in few cases demonstrate transglycosylase activity in bacteria. The excellent antibacterial potential was depicted by compounds 4c and 4e against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidus and Staphylococcus aureus compared to the standard amoxicillin. The most potent penicillin derivative 4e exhibited same activity as standard amoxicillin against S. aureus. In the enzyme inhibitory assay the compound 4e inhibited E. coli MurC with an IC50 value of 12.5 μM. The docking scores of these compounds 4c and 4e also verified their greater antibacterial potential. The results verified the importance of side chain functionalities along with the presence of central penam nucleus. The binding affinities calculated from docking results expressed in the form of binding energies ranges from -7.8 to -9.2kcal/mol. The carboxylic group of penam nucleus in all these compounds is responsible for strong binding with receptor protein with the bond length ranges from 3.4 to 4.4 Ǻ. The results of present work ratify that derivatives 4c and 4e may serve as a structural template for the design and development of potent antimicrobial agents.

  12. Comparison of the Internal Dynamics of Metalloproteases Provides New Insights on Their Function and Evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique F Carvalho

    Full Text Available Metalloproteases have evolved in a vast number of biological systems, being one of the most diverse types of proteases and presenting a wide range of folds and catalytic metal ions. Given the increasing understanding of protein internal dynamics and its role in enzyme function, we are interested in assessing how the structural heterogeneity of metalloproteases translates into their dynamics. Therefore, the dynamical profile of the clan MA type protein thermolysin, derived from an Elastic Network Model of protein structure, was evaluated against those obtained from a set of experimental structures and molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. A close correspondence was obtained between modes derived from the coarse-grained model and the subspace of functionally-relevant motions observed experimentally, the later being shown to be encoded in the internal dynamics of the protein. This prompted the use of dynamics-based comparison methods that employ such coarse-grained models in a representative set of clan members, allowing for its quantitative description in terms of structural and dynamical variability. Although members show structural similarity, they nonetheless present distinct dynamical profiles, with no apparent correlation between structural and dynamical relatedness. However, previously unnoticed dynamical similarity was found between the relevant members Carboxypeptidase Pfu, Leishmanolysin, and Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A, despite sharing no structural similarity. Inspection of the respective alignments shows that dynamical similarity has a functional basis, namely the need for maintaining proper intermolecular interactions with the respective substrates. These results suggest that distinct selective pressure mechanisms act on metalloproteases at structural and dynamical levels through the course of their evolution. This work shows how new insights on metalloprotease function and evolution can be assessed with comparison schemes that

  13. Kinetics of reactions of the Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase with specific substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adediran, S A; Kumar, Ish; Nagarajan, Rajesh; Sauvage, Eric; Pratt, R F

    2011-01-25

    The Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase catalyzes the hydrolysis and aminolysis of a number of small peptides and depsipeptides. Details of its substrate specificity and the nature of its in vivo substrate are not, however, well understood. This paper describes the interactions of the R39 enzyme with two peptidoglycan-mimetic substrates 3-(D-cysteinyl)propanoyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine and 3-(D-cysteinyl)propanoyl-D-alanyl-D-thiolactate. A detailed study of the reactions of the former substrate, catalyzed by the enzyme, showed DD-carboxypeptidase, DD-transpeptidase, and DD-endopeptidase activities. These results confirm the specificity of the enzyme for a free D-amino acid at the N-terminus of good substrates and indicated a preference for extended D-amino acid leaving groups. The latter was supported by determination of the structural specificity of amine nucleophiles for the acyl-enzyme generated by reaction of the enzyme with the thiolactate substrate. It was concluded that a specific substrate for this enzyme, and possibly the in vivo substrate, may consist of a partly cross-linked peptidoglycan polymer where a free side chain N-terminal un-cross-linked amino acid serves as the specific acyl group in an endopeptidase reaction. The enzyme is most likely a DD-endopeptidase in vivo. pH-rate profiles for reactions of the enzyme with peptides, the thiolactate named above, and β-lactams indicated the presence of complex proton dissociation pathways with sticky substrates and/or protons. The local structure of the active site may differ significantly for reactions of peptides and β-lactams. Solvent kinetic deuterium isotope effects indicate the presence of classical general acid/base catalysis in both acylation and deacylation; there is no evidence of the low fractionation factor active site hydrogen found previously in class A and C β-lactamases.

  14. Endogenously generated plasmin at the vascular wall injury site amplifies lysine binding site-dependent plasminogen accumulation in microthrombi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Brzoska

    Full Text Available The fibrinolytic system plays a pivotal role in the regulation of hemostasis; however, it remains unclear how and when the system is triggered to induce thrombolysis. Using intra-vital confocal fluorescence microscopy, we investigated the process of plasminogen binding to laser-induced platelet-rich microthrombi generated in the mesenteric vein of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP. The accumulation of GFP-expressing platelets as well as exogenously infused Alexa Fluor 568-labeled Glu-plasminogen (Glu-plg on the injured vessel wall was assessed by measuring the increase in the corresponding fluorescence intensities. Glu-plg accumulated in a time-dependent manner in the center of the microthrombus, where phosphatidylserine is exposed on platelet surfaces and fibrin formation takes place. The rates of binding of Glu-plg in the presence of ε-aminocaproic acid and carboxypeptidase B, as well as the rates of binding of mini-plasminogen lacking kringle domains 1-4 and lysine binding sites, were significantly lower than that of Glu-plg alone, suggesting that the binding was dependent on lysine binding sites. Furthermore, aprotinin significantly suppressed the accumulation of Glu-plg, suggesting that endogenously generated plasmin activity is a prerequisite for the accumulation. In spite of the endogenous generation of plasmin and accumulation of Glu-plg in the center of microthrombi, the microthrombi did not change in size during the 2-hour observation period. When human tissue plasminogen activator was administered intravenously, Glu-plg further accumulated and the microthrombi were lysed. Glu-plg appeared to accumulate in the center of microthrombi in the early phase of microthrombus formation, and plasmin activity and lysine binding sites were required for this accumulation.

  15. Upregulation of CPE promotes cell proliferation and tumorigenicity in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xing-Hua; He, Wen-guang; Huang, Yan-Nian; Zeng, Xian-Cheng; Li, Ling-ling; Wu, Geng-Gang; Xie, Yi-Cheng; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Chen, Wei; Yang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Qi-Long; Li, Wen-Hong

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide and a leading cause of cancer related death. Although the mortality rate of CRC is decreasing, finding novel targets for its therapy remains urgent. Carboxypeptidase E (CPE), a member of the pro-protein convertases, which are involved in the maturation of protein precursors, has recently been reported as elevated in many types of cancer. However, its role and mechanisms in tumor progression are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated expression of CPE in CRC cell lines and tumor tissues using Western blot and real-time qRT-PCR. Plasmids for overexpression and depletion of CPE were constructed and analyzed by Western blot, MTT and colony formation assays and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays. The relative expression of p21, p27, and cyclin D1 were analyzed by Real-time qRT-PCR in the indicated cells. Our study showed that CPE was significantly upregulated in CRC cell lines and tumor tissues. MTT and colony formation assays indicated that overexpression of CPE enhanced cell growth rates. BrdU incorporation and flow-cytometry assays showed that ectopic expression of CPE increased the S-phase fraction cells. Soft agar assay proved enhanced tumorigenicity activity in CPE over-expressing CRC cells. Further studies of the molecular mechanisms of CPE indicated that is promoted cell proliferation and tumorigenicity through downregulation of p21 and p27, and upregulation of cyclin D1. Taken together, these data suggest that CPE plays an important role in cell cycle regulation and tumorigenicity, and may serve as a potential target for CRC therapeutics

  16. Formation and hydrolysis of amide bonds by lipase A from Candida antarctica; exceptional features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljeblad, Arto; Kallio, Pauli; Vainio, Marita; Niemi, Jarmo; Kanerva, Liisa T

    2010-02-21

    Various commercial lyophilized and immobilized preparations of lipase A from Candida antarctica (CAL-A) were studied for their ability to catalyze the hydrolysis of amide bonds in N-acylated alpha-amino acids, 3-butanamidobutanoic acid (beta-amino acid) and its ethyl ester. The activity toward amide bonds is highly untypical of lipases, despite the close mechanistic analogy to amidases which normally catalyze the corresponding reactions. Most CAL-A preparations cleaved amide bonds of various substrates with high enantioselectivity, although high variations in substrate selectivity and catalytic rates were detected. The possible role of contaminant protein species on the hydrolytic activity toward these bonds was studied by fractionation and analysis of the commercial lyophilized preparation of CAL-A (Cat#ICR-112, Codexis). In addition to minor impurities, two equally abundant proteins were detected, migrating on SDS-PAGE a few kDa apart around the calculated size of CAL-A. Based on peptide fragment analysis and sequence comparison both bands shared substantial sequence coverage with CAL-A. However, peptides at the C-terminal end constituting a motile domain described as an active-site flap were not identified in the smaller fragment. Separated gel filtration fractions of the two forms of CAL-A both catalyzed the amide bond hydrolysis of ethyl 3-butanamidobutanoate as well as the N-acylation of methyl pipecolinate. Hydrolytic activity towards N-acetylmethionine was, however, solely confined to the fractions containing the truncated form of CAL-A. These fractions were also found to contain a trace enzyme impurity identified in sequence analysis as a serine carboxypeptidase. The possible role of catalytic impurities versus the function of CAL-A in amide bond hydrolysis is further discussed in the paper.

  17. Novel Penicillin Analogues as Potential Antimicrobial Agents; Design, Synthesis and Docking Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaman Ashraf

    Full Text Available A number of penicillin derivatives (4a-h were synthesized by the condensation of 6-amino penicillinic acid (6-APA with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as antimicrobial agents. In silico docking study of these analogues was performed against Penicillin Binding Protein (PDBID 1CEF using AutoDock Tools 1.5.6 in order to investigate the antimicrobial data on structural basis. Penicillin binding proteins function as either transpeptidases or carboxypeptidases and in few cases demonstrate transglycosylase activity in bacteria. The excellent antibacterial potential was depicted by compounds 4c and 4e against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidus and Staphylococcus aureus compared to the standard amoxicillin. The most potent penicillin derivative 4e exhibited same activity as standard amoxicillin against S. aureus. In the enzyme inhibitory assay the compound 4e inhibited E. coli MurC with an IC50 value of 12.5 μM. The docking scores of these compounds 4c and 4e also verified their greater antibacterial potential. The results verified the importance of side chain functionalities along with the presence of central penam nucleus. The binding affinities calculated from docking results expressed in the form of binding energies ranges from -7.8 to -9.2kcal/mol. The carboxylic group of penam nucleus in all these compounds is responsible for strong binding with receptor protein with the bond length ranges from 3.4 to 4.4 Ǻ. The results of present work ratify that derivatives 4c and 4e may serve as a structural template for the design and development of potent antimicrobial agents.

  18. Ineffective Degradation of Immunogenic Gluten Epitopes by Currently Available Digestive Enzyme Supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, George; Christis, Chantal; Kooy-Winkelaar, Yvonne; Edens, Luppo; Smith, Drew

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the high proline content of gluten molecules, gastrointestinal proteases are unable to fully degrade them leaving large proline-rich gluten fragments intact, including an immunogenic 33-mer from α-gliadin and a 26-mer from γ-gliadin. These latter peptides can trigger pro-inflammatory T cell responses resulting in tissue remodeling, malnutrition and a variety of other complications. A strict lifelong gluten-free diet is currently the only available treatment to cope with gluten intolerance. Post-proline cutting enzymes have been shown to effectively degrade the immunogenic gluten peptides and have been proposed as oral supplements. Several existing digestive enzyme supplements also claim to aid in gluten degradation. Here we investigate the effectiveness of such existing enzyme supplements in comparison with a well characterized post-proline cutting enzyme, Prolyl EndoPeptidase from Aspergillus niger (AN-PEP). Methods Five commercially available digestive enzyme supplements along with purified digestive enzymes were subjected to 1) enzyme assays and 2) mass spectrometric identification. Gluten epitope degradation was monitored by 1) R5 ELISA, 2) mass spectrometric analysis of the degradation products and 3) T cell proliferation assays. Findings The digestive enzyme supplements showed comparable proteolytic activities with near neutral pH optima and modest gluten detoxification properties as determined by ELISA. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed the presence of many different enzymes including amylases and a variety of different proteases with aminopeptidase and carboxypeptidase activity. The enzyme supplements leave the nine immunogenic epitopes of the 26-mer and 33-mer gliadin fragments largely intact. In contrast, the pure enzyme AN-PEP effectively degraded all nine epitopes in the pH range of the stomach at much lower dose. T cell proliferation assays confirmed the mass spectrometric data. Conclusion Currently available digestive enzyme

  19. Clinical utility of polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolism for breast cancer risk prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaik Mohammad Naushad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the issues in translating the laboratory derived data obtained during discovery phase of research to a clinical setting using a breast cancer model. Laboratory-based risk assessment indi-cated that a family history of breast cancer, reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC1 G80A, thymidylate synthase (TYMS 5’-UTR 28bp tandem repeat, methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T and catecholamine-O-methyl transferase (COMT genetic polymorphisms in one-carbon metabolic pathway increase the risk for breast cancer. Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII C1561T and cytosolic serine hydroxymethyl transferase (cSHMT C1420T polymorphisms were found to decrease breast cancer risk. In order to test the clinical validity of this information in the risk prediction of breast cancer, data was stratified based on number of protective alleles into four categories and in each category sensitivity and 1-specificity values were obtained based on the distribution of number of risk alleles in cases and controls. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were plotted and the area under ROC curve (C was used as a measure of discriminatory ability between cases and controls. In subjects without any protective allele, aberrations in one-carbon metabolism showed perfect prediction (C=0.93 while the predictability was lost in subjects with one protective allele (C=0.60. However, predictability increased steadily with increasing number of protective alleles (C=0.63 for 2 protective alleles and C=0.71 for 3 protective alleles. The cut-off point for discrimination was >4 alleles in all predictable combinations. Models of this kind can serve as valuable tools in translational re-search, especially in identifying high-risk individuals and reducing the disease risk either by life style modification or by medical intervention.

  20. The inactivation of the sortilin gene leads to a partial disruption of prosaposin trafficking to the lysosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Jibin; Racicott, Jesse [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Morales, Carlos R., E-mail: carlos.morales@mcgill.ca [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)

    2009-11-01

    Lysosomes are intracellular organelles which contain enzymes and activator proteins involved in the digestion and recycling of a variety of cellular and extracellular substances. We have identified a novel sorting receptor, sortilin, which is involved in the lysosomal trafficking of the sphingolipid activator proteins, prosaposin and GM{sub 2}AP, and the soluble hydrolases cathepsin D, cathepsin H, and acid sphingomyelinase. Sortilin belongs to a growing family of receptors with homology to the yeast Vps10 protein, which acts as a lysosomal sorting receptor for carboxypeptidase Y. In this study we examined the effects of the sortilin gene inactivation in mice. The inactivation of this gene did not yield any noticeable lysosomal pathology. To determine the existence of an alternative receptor complementing the sorting function of sortilin, we quantified the concentration of prosaposin in the lysosomes of the nonciliated epithelial cells lining the efferent ducts. These cells were chosen because they express sortilin and have a large number of lysosomes containing prosaposin. In addition, the nonciliated cells are known to endocytose luminal prosaposin that is synthesized and secreted by Sertoli cells into the seminiferous luminal fluids. Consequently, the nonciliated cells are capable of targeting both exogenous and endogenous prosaposin to the lysosomes. Using electron microscope immunogold labeling and quantitative analysis, our results demonstrate that inactivation of the sortilin gene produces a significant decrease of prosaposin in the lysosomes. When luminal prosaposin was excluded from the efferent ducts, the level of prosaposin in lysosomes was even lower in the mutant mice. Nonetheless, a significant amount of prosaposin continues to reach the lysosomal compartment. These results strongly suggest the existence of an alternative receptor that complements the function of sortilin and explains the lack of lysosomal storage disorders in the sortilin

  1. Ineffective degradation of immunogenic gluten epitopes by currently available digestive enzyme supplements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Janssen

    Full Text Available Due to the high proline content of gluten molecules, gastrointestinal proteases are unable to fully degrade them leaving large proline-rich gluten fragments intact, including an immunogenic 33-mer from α-gliadin and a 26-mer from γ-gliadin. These latter peptides can trigger pro-inflammatory T cell responses resulting in tissue remodeling, malnutrition and a variety of other complications. A strict lifelong gluten-free diet is currently the only available treatment to cope with gluten intolerance. Post-proline cutting enzymes have been shown to effectively degrade the immunogenic gluten peptides and have been proposed as oral supplements. Several existing digestive enzyme supplements also claim to aid in gluten degradation. Here we investigate the effectiveness of such existing enzyme supplements in comparison with a well characterized post-proline cutting enzyme, Prolyl EndoPeptidase from Aspergillus niger (AN-PEP.Five commercially available digestive enzyme supplements along with purified digestive enzymes were subjected to 1 enzyme assays and 2 mass spectrometric identification. Gluten epitope degradation was monitored by 1 R5 ELISA, 2 mass spectrometric analysis of the degradation products and 3 T cell proliferation assays.The digestive enzyme supplements showed comparable proteolytic activities with near neutral pH optima and modest gluten detoxification properties as determined by ELISA. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed the presence of many different enzymes including amylases and a variety of different proteases with aminopeptidase and carboxypeptidase activity. The enzyme supplements leave the nine immunogenic epitopes of the 26-mer and 33-mer gliadin fragments largely intact. In contrast, the pure enzyme AN-PEP effectively degraded all nine epitopes in the pH range of the stomach at much lower dose. T cell proliferation assays confirmed the mass spectrometric data.Currently available digestive enzyme supplements are ineffective in

  2. Activation of human acid sphingomyelinase through modification or deletion of C-terminal cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Huawei; Edmunds, Tim; Baker-Malcolm, Jennifer; Karey, Kenneth P; Estes, Scott; Schwarz, Cordula; Hughes, Heather; Van Patten, Scott M

    2003-08-29

    One form of Niemann-Pick disease is caused by a deficiency in the enzymatic activity of acid sphingomyelinase. During efforts to develop an enzyme replacement therapy based on a recombinant form of human acid sphingomyelinase (rhASM), purified preparations of the recombinant enzyme were found to have substantially increased specific activity if cell harvest media were stored for several weeks at -20 degrees C prior to purification. This increase in activity was found to correlate with the loss of the single free thiol on rhASM, suggesting the involvement of a cysteine residue. It was demonstrated that a variety of chemical modifications of the free cysteine on rhASM all result in substantial activation of the enzyme, and the modified cysteine responsible for this activation was shown to be the C-terminal residue (Cys629). Activation was also achieved by copper-promoted dimerization of rhASM (via cysteine) and by C-terminal truncation using carboxypeptidase Y. The role of the C-terminal cysteine in activation was confirmed by creating mutant forms of rhASM in which this residue was either deleted or replaced by a serine, with both forms having substantially higher specific activity than wild-type rhASM. These results indicate that purified rhASM can be activated in vitro by loss of the free thiol on the C-terminal cysteine via chemical modification, dimerization, or deletion of this amino acid residue. This method of activation is similar to the cysteine switch mechanism described previously for matrix metalloproteinases and could represent a means of posttranslational regulation of ASM activity in vivo.

  3. An Investigation into the Gastrointestinal Stability of Exenatide in the Presence of Pure Enzymes, Everted Intestinal Rings and Intestinal Homogenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanan; Wang, Mengshu; Sun, Bingxue; Li, Feng; Liu, Shubo; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Yan; Chen, Yan; Kong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the gastrointestinal stability of exenatide to determine the key factor(s) contributing to peptide degradation during the oral delivery process. The effects of pH and various digestive enzymes on the degradation kinetics of exenatide were determined. Moreover, the degradation clearances of peptide were also examined using rat everted intestinal rings and intestinal homogenates from various intestinal locations. Exenatide was comparatively stable within a pH range of 1.2-8. However, obvious degradation was observed in the presence of digestive enzymes. The order of enzymes, in terms of ability to degradate exenatide, was chymotrypsin>aminopeptidase N>carboxypeptidase A>trypsin>pepsin. Chymotrypsin showed the greatest ability to degrade exenatide (half-life t1/2, 5.784×10(-2) h), whereas aminopeptidase N and carboxylpeptidase A gave t1/2 values of 3.53 and 10.16 h, respectively. The degradation of exenatide was found to be peptide concentration- and intestinal site-dependent, with a lower clearance in the upper part of the duodenum and the lower part of the ileum. When using intestinal homogenates as enzyme sources, the order, in terms of peptide degradation ability, was ileum>jejunum>duodenum. However, no significant difference was observed in the remaining peptide concentrations throughout 2 h of incubation, which may be due to the involvement of cytosolic enzymes. These results revealed key factors contributing to peptide degradation, and suggest that the inhibition of chymotrypsin and site-specific delivery of exenatide might be advantageous in overcoming metabolic obstacles during its oral delivery.

  4. Targeted Gene Next-Generation Sequencing in Chinese Children with Chronic Pancreatitis and Acute Recurrent Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuan; Yuan, Wentao; Yu, Bo; Guo, Yan; Xu, Xu; Wang, Xinqiong; Yu, Yi; Yu, Yi; Gong, Biao; Xu, Chundi

    2017-12-01

    To identify causal mutations in certain genes in children with acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) or chronic pancreatitis (CP). After patients were enrolled (CP, 55; ARP, 14) and their clinical characteristics were investigated, we performed next-generation sequencing to detect nucleotide variations among the following 10 genes: cationic trypsinogen protease serine 1 (PRSS1), serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR), chymotrypsin C (CTRC), calcium-sensing receptor (CASR), cathepsin B (CTSB), keratin 8 (KRT8), CLAUDIN 2 (CLDN2), carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1), and ATPase type 8B member 1 (ATP8B1). Mutations were searched against online databases to obtain information on the cause of the diseases. Certain novel mutations were analyzed using the SIFT2 and Polyphen-2 to predict the effect on protein function. There were 45 patients with CP and 10 patients with ARP who harbored 1 or more mutations in these genes; 45 patients had at least 1 mutation related to pancreatitis. Mutations were observed in the PRSS1, SPINK1, and CFTR genes in 17 patients, the CASR gene in 5 patients, and the CTSB, CTRC, and KRT8 genes in 1 patient. Mutations were not found in the CLDN, CPA1, or ATP8B1 genes. We found that mutations in SPINK1 may increase the risk of pancreatic duct stones (OR, 11.07; P = .003). The patients with CFTR mutations had a higher level of serum amylase (316.0 U/L vs 92.5 U/L; P = .026). Mutations, especially those in PRSS1, SPINK1, and CFTR, accounted for the major etiologies in Chinese children with CP or ARP. Children presenting mutations in the SPINK1 gene may have a higher risk of developing pancreatic duct stones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Proteomic analysis of apoplastic fluid of Coffea arabica leaves highlights novel biomarkers for resistance against Hemileia vastatrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor eGuerra-Guimarães

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A proteomic analysis of the apoplastic fluid (APF of coffee leaves was conducted to investigate the cellular processes associated with incompatible (resistant and compatible (susceptible Coffea arabica-Hemileia vastatrix interactions, during the 24-96 hai period. The APF proteins were extracted by leaf vacuum infiltration and protein profiles were obtained by 2-DE. The comparative analysis of the gels revealed 210 polypeptide spots whose volume changed in abundance between samples (control, resistant and susceptible during the 24-96 hai period. The proteins identified were involved mainly in protein degradation, cell wall metabolism and stress/defense responses, most of them being hydrolases (around 70%, particularly sugar hydrolases and peptidases/proteases. The changes in the APF proteome along the infection process revealed two distinct phases of defense responses, an initial/basal one (24-48 hai and a late/specific one (72-96 hai. Compared to susceptibility, resistance was associated with a higher number of proteins, which was more evident in the late/specific phase. Proteins involved in the resistance response were mainly, glycohydrolases of the cell wall, serine proteases and pathogen related-like proteins (PR-proteins, suggesting that some of these proteins could be putative candidates for resistant markers of coffee to H. vastatrix. Antibodies were produced against chitinase, pectin methylesterase, serine carboxypeptidase, reticuline oxidase and subtilase and by an immunodetection assay it was observed an increase of these proteins in the resistant sample. With this methodology we have identified proteins that are candidate markers of resistance and that will be useful in coffee breeding programs to assist in the selection of cultivars with resistance to H. vastatrix.

  6. Susceptibility and Immune Defence Mechanisms of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier (Coleoptera: Curculionidae against Entomopathogenic Fungal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abid Hussain

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Insects infected with entomopathogenic fungi, experience physiological changes that influence their growth and immune defence. The potential of nine isolates of entomopathogenic fungi was evaluated after determining percent germination and relative conidial hydrophobicity. However, nutritional indices were evaluated after immersing eighth-instar Rhynchophorus ferrugineus larvae into each isolate suspension (1 × 107 conidia/mL. The results showed that isolates B6884 and M9374 had 44.51% and 39.02% higher conidial hydrophobicity compared with isolate I03011 (least virulent. The results of nutritional index assays revealed a significant reduction in growth indices after infection with different isolates. Compared with control, B6884 and M9374 greatly decreased larval growth by reducing the efficacy of conversion of ingested food (36%–47% and Efficacy of conversion of digested food (50%–63%. Furthermore, only isolate B6884 induced 100% mortality within 12 days. Compared with control, isolate I03011, possessing the lowest conidial hydrophobicity, only reduced 0.29% of the efficacy of conversion of ingested food (ECI and 0.48% of the efficacy of conversion of digested food (ECD. Similarly, transcriptomic analysis of genes related to the Red palm weevil (RPW immune response, including pathogen recognition receptors (C-type lectin and endo-beta-1,4-glucanse, signal modulator (Serine protease-like protein, signal transductors (Calmodulin-like protein and EF-hand domain containing protein and effectors (C-type lysozyme, Cathepsin L., Defensin-like protein, Serine carboxypeptidase, and Thaumatin-like protein, was significantly increased in larval samples infected with B6884 and M9374. These results suggest that for an isolate to be virulent, conidial hydrophobicity and germination should also be considered during pathogen selection, as these factors could significantly impact host growth and immune defence mechanisms.

  7. Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFE-23::CPG2 fusion protein (MFECP1) with 99mTc for quantitation of tumour antibody-enzyme localisation in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, R J; Mather, S J; Chester, K; Sharma, S K; Bhatia, J; Pedley, R B; Waibel, R; Green, A J; Begent, R H J

    2004-08-01

    MFECP1 is a glycosylated recombinant fusion protein composed of MFE-23, a high-affinity anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) single chain Fv (scFv), fused to the enzyme carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2), and has been constructed for use in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT). Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFECP1 with technetium-99m was developed for the purpose of determining tumour localisation of MFECP1 in a phase I ADEPT clinical study. The method used was 99mTc-carbonyl [99mTc(H2O)3(CO)3]+ (abbreviated to TcCO) mediated labelling of 99mTc to the hexahistidine (His) tag of MFECP1. MFECP1 fusion protein was labelled with TcCO under a variety of conditions, and this was shown to be a relatively simple and robust method. Tissue biodistribution was assessed in a CEA-expressing LS174T (human colon carcinoma) nude mouse xenograft model. Tissues were taken at 1, 4 and 6 h for assessment of distribution of radioactivity and for measurement of CPG2 enzyme levels. The amount of radioactivity retained by the tumour proved to be an accurate estimation of actual measured enzyme activity, indicating that this radiolabelling method does not appear to damage the antibody-antigen binding or the enzyme activity of MFECP1. However, correlation between CPG2 enzyme activity and measured radioactivity in liver, spleen and kidney was poor, indicating retention of radioactivity in non-tumour sites but loss of enzyme activity. The high retention of technetium radioisotope in normal tissues may limit the clinical applicability of this radiolabelling method for MFECP1; however, these results suggest that this technique does have applicability for measuring the biodistribution of His-tagged recombinant proteins.

  8. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in vitro peptidase activities: identification and cleavage of kallikrein-kinin system-like substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Kondo, Marcia Y; Oliveira, Lilian C G; Okamoto, Debora N; Paes, Jéssica A; Machado, Mauricio F M; Veronez, Camila L; Motta, Guacyara; Andrade, Sheila S; Juliano, Maria A; Ferreira, Henrique B; Juliano, Luiz; Gouvea, Iuri E

    2013-05-03

    Bacterial proteases are important for metabolic processes and pathogenesis in host organisms. The bacterial swine pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae has 15 putative protease-encoding genes annotated, but none of them have been functionally characterized. To identify and characterize peptidases that could be relevant for infection of swine hosts, we investigated the peptidase activity present in the pathogenic 7448 strain of M. hyopneumoniae. Combinatorial libraries of fluorescence resonance energy transfer peptides, specific inhibitors and pH profiling were used to screen and characterize endopeptidase, aminopeptidase and carboxypeptidase activities in cell lysates. One metalloendopeptidase, one serine endopeptidase, and one aminopeptidase were detected. The detected metalloendopeptidase activity, prominent at neutral and basic pH ranges, was due to a thimet oligopeptidase family member (M3 family), likely an oligoendopeptidase F (PepF), which cleaved the peptide Abz-GFSPFRQ-EDDnp at the F-S bond. A chymotrypsin-like serine endopeptidase activity, possibly a subtilisin-like serine protease, was prominent at higher pH levels, and was characterized by its preference for a Phe residue at the P1 position of the substrate. The aminopeptidase P (APP) activity showed a similar profile to that of human membrane-bound APP. Genes coding for these three peptidases were identified and their transcription was confirmed in the 7448 strain. Furthermore, M. hyopneumoniae cell lysate peptidases showed effects on kallikrein-kinin system-like substrates, such as bradykinin-derived substrates and human high molecular weight kininogen. The M. hyopneumoniae peptidase activities, here characterized for the first time, may be important for bacterial survival strategies and thus represent possible targets for drug development against M. hyopneumoniae swine infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Connective tissue activation. XXXII. Structural and biologic characteristics of mesenchymal cell-derived connective tissue activating peptide-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, A R; Cole, L A; Walz, D A; Castor, C W

    1987-12-01

    Connective tissue activating peptide-V (CTAP-V) is a single-chain, mesenchymal cell-derived anionic protein with large and small molecular forms (Mr of 28,000 and 16,000, respectively), as defined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The proteins have similar specific activities with respect to stimulation of hyaluronic acid and DNA formation in human synovial fibroblast cultures. S-carboxymethylation or removal of sialic acid residues did not modify CTAP-V biologic activity. Rabbit antibodies raised separately against each of the purified CTAP-V proteins reacted, on immunodiffusion and on Western blot, with each antigen and neutralized mitogenic activity. The amino-terminal amino acid sequence of the CTAP-V proteins, determined by 2 laboratories, confirmed their structural similarities. The amino-terminal sequence through 37 residues was demonstrated for the smaller protein. The first 10 residues of CTAP-V (28 kd) were identical to the N-terminal decapeptide of CTAP-V (16 kd). The C-terminal sequence, determined by carboxypeptidase Y digestion, was the same for both CTAP-V molecular species. The 2 CTAP-V peptides had similar amino acid compositions, whether residues were expressed as a percent of the total or were normalized to mannose. Reduction of native CTAP-V protein released sulfhydryl groups in a protein:disulfide ratio of 1:2; this suggests that CTAP-V contains 2 intramolecular disulfide bonds. Clearly, CTAP-V is a glycoprotein. The carbohydrate content of CTAP-V (16 kd) and CTAP-V (28 kd) is 27% and 25%, respectively. CTAP-V may have significance in relation to autocrine mechanisms for growth regulation of connective tissue cells and other cell types.

  10. Kinin B1 Receptor Promotes Neurogenic Hypertension Through Activation of Centrally Mediated Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriramula, Srinivas; Lazartigues, Eric

    2017-12-01

    Hypertension is associated with increased activity of the kallikrein-kinin system. Kinin B1 receptor (B1R) activation leads to vasoconstriction and inflammation. Despite evidence supporting a role for the B1R in blood pressure regulation, the mechanisms by which B1R could alter autonomic function and participate in the pathogenesis of hypertension remain unidentified. We sought to explore whether B1R-mediated inflammation contributes to hypertension and investigate the molecular mechanisms involved. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that activation of B1R in the brain is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension, using the deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt model of neurogenic hypertension in wild-type and B1R knockout mice. Deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt treatment in wild-type mice led to significant increases in B1R mRNA and protein levels and bradykinin levels, enhanced gene expression of carboxypeptidase N supporting an increase in the B1R ligand, associated with enhanced blood pressure, inflammation, sympathoexcitation, autonomic dysfunction, and impaired baroreflex sensitivity, whereas these changes were blunted or prevented in B1R knockout mice. B1R stimulation was further shown to involve activation of the ASK1-JNK-ERK1/2 and NF-κB pathways in the brain. To dismiss potential developmental alterations in knockout mice, we further used B1R blockade selectively in the brain of wild-type mice. Supporting the central origin of this mechanism, intracerebroventricular infusion of a specific B1R antagonist, attenuated the deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt-induced increase in blood pressure in wild-type mice. Our data provide the first evidence of a central role for B1R-mediated inflammatory pathways in the pathogenesis of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension and offer novel insights into possible B1R-targeted therapies for the treatment of neurogenic hypertension. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Characterization of iodinated adrenomedullin derivatives suitable for lung nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Yan; Letourneau, Myriam; Chatenet, David [Laboratoire d' etudes moleculaires et pharmacologiques des peptides, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Ville de Laval, Qc, H7V 1B7 (Canada); Dupuis, Jocelyn [Research Center, Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Qc (Canada); Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Qc (Canada); Fournier, Alain, E-mail: alain.fournier@iaf.inrs.ca [Laboratoire d' etudes moleculaires et pharmacologiques des peptides, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Ville de Laval, Qc, H7V 1B7 (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    Introduction: We have recently demonstrated the effectiveness of 99m-technetium adrenomedullin (AM) as a new molecular lung imaging agent that could provide significant advantages for the diagnosis and follow-up of disorders affecting the pulmonary circulation such as pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension. Having the possibility to conjugate the targeting molecule with different radionuclides would offer more flexibility and potential advantages depending on clinical situations. Since various iodine isotopes are currently used in nuclear medicine and in pharmacological studies, we have evaluated which iodination method should be privileged in order to produce a good iodinated AM-derived nuclear medicine agent. Methods: Synthetic AM was labeled with iodine through chemical and lactoperoxidase oxidation methods. Position of the iodine atom on the peptide was determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis following cyanogen bromide cleavage and carboxypeptidase Y digestion. Binding affinity of iodinated AM analogues was evaluated by competition and saturation binding experiments on dog lung preparations. Results: In this study, we demonstrated that, upon lactoperoxidase oxidation, iodination occurred at Tyr{sup 1} and that this radioligand retained higher binding affinity and specificity over preparations obtained through chemical oxidation. Conclusions: These results emphasize the fact that even a small chemical modification, i.e. iodination, might deeply modify the pharmacological profile of a compound and support observations that the C-terminal tail of human AM plays an important role in the AM receptor binding process. Consequently, incorporation of a radionuclide to produce an AM-based nuclear medicine agent should privilege the N-terminus of the molecule.

  12. A genome-wide immunodetection screen in S. cerevisiae uncovers novel genes involved in lysosomal vacuole function and morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florante Ricarte

    Full Text Available Vacuoles of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are functionally analogous to mammalian lysosomes. Both are cellular organelles responsible for macromolecular degradation, ion/pH homeostasis, and stress survival. We hypothesized that undefined gene functions remain at post-endosomal stage of vacuolar events and performed a genome-wide screen directed at such functions at the late endosome and vacuole interface - ENV genes. The immunodetection screen was designed to identify mutants that internally accumulate precursor form of the vacuolar hydrolase carboxypeptidase Y (CPY. Here, we report the uncovering and initial characterizations of twelve ENV genes. The small size of the collection and the lack of genes previously identified with vacuolar events are suggestive of the intended exclusive functional interface of the screen. Most notably, the collection includes four novel genes ENV7, ENV9, ENV10, and ENV11, and three genes previously linked to mitochondrial processes - MAM3, PCP1, PPE1. In all env mutants, vesicular trafficking stages were undisturbed in live cells as assessed by invertase and active α-factor secretion, as well as by localization of the endocytic fluorescent marker FM4-64 to the vacuole. Several mutants exhibit defects in stress survival functions associated with vacuoles. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed the collection to be significantly enriched in vacuolar morphologies suggestive of fusion and fission defects. These include the unique phenotype of lumenal vesicles within vacuoles in the novel env9Δ mutant and severely fragmented vacuoles upon deletion of GET4, a gene recently implicated in tail anchored membrane protein insertion. Thus, our results establish new gene functions in vacuolar function and morphology, and suggest a link between vacuolar and mitochondrial events.

  13. Design of peptide substrates for nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence assays of proteases: 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene as a noninvasive fluorophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Andreas; Florea, Mara; Roth, Doris; Enderle, Thilo; Nau, Werner M

    2007-01-15

    Fluorescence protease assays were investigated with peptide substrates containing a 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene-labeled asparagine (Dbo) as a fluorescent amino acid. The special characteristic of the fluorophore Dbo is its exceedingly long fluorescence lifetime (ca. 300 ns in water under air), which allows the use of nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence (Nano-TRF) detection to efficiently suppress shorter-lived background emission. In addition, the natural amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine can be employed as intramolecular fluorescence quenchers, which facilitates substrate design. Fourteen synthetic peptide substrates (composed of 2-19 amino acids) and five enzymes (trypsin, pepsin, carboxypeptidase A, leucine aminopeptidase, and chymotrypsin) were investigated and, in all 28 examined combinations, enzymatic activity was detected by monitoring the increase in steady state fluorescence with time and determining the reaction rates as kcat/Km values, which ranged from 0.2 to 80x10(6) M-1 min-1. The results suggest an excellent compatibility of the very small and hydrophilic fluorescent probe Dbo with solid-phase peptide synthesis and the investigated proteases. For all 14 peptides the fluorescence lifetimes before and after enzymatic cleavage were measured and Nano-TRF measurements were performed in 384-well microplates. The fluorescence lifetimes of the different peptides provide the basis for the rational design of Dbo-based fluorescent substrates for protease assays. Measurements in Nano-TRF mode revealed, in addition to efficient suppression of background fluorescence, an increased differentiation between cleaved and uncleaved substrate. The Dbo-based assays can be adapted for high-throughput screening.

  14. Isolation of Lactococcus lactis Mutants Simultaneously Resistant to the Cell Wall-Active Bacteriocin Lcn972, Lysozyme, Nisin, and Bacteriophage c2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roces, Clara; Courtin, Pascal; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Rodríguez, Ana; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Lactococcin 972 (Lcn972) is a nonlantibiotic bacteriocin that inhibits cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. In this work, two mutants resistant to Lcn972, Lactococcus lactis D1 and D1-20, with high (>320 arbitrary units [AU]/ml) and low (80 AU/ml) susceptibilities, respectively, have been isolated. Resistance to Lcn972 did not impose a burden to growth under laboratory conditions, nor did it substantially alter the physicochemical properties of the cell surface. However, the peptidoglycan of the mutants featured a higher content of muropeptides with tripeptide side chains than the wild-type strain, linking for the first time peptidoglycan remodelling to bacteriocin resistance. Moreover, L. lactis lacking a functional d,d-carboxypeptidase DacA (i.e., with a high content of pentapeptide side chain muropeptides) was shown to be more susceptible to Lcn972. Cross-resistance to lysozyme and nisin and enhanced susceptibility to penicillin G and bacitracin was also observed. Intriguingly, the Lcn972-resistant mutants were not infected by the lytic phage c2 and less efficiently infected by phage sk1. Lack of c2 infectivity was linked to a 22.6-kbp chromosomal deletion encompassing the phage receptor protein gene pip. The deletion also included maltose metabolic genes and the two-component system (TCS) F. However, a clear correlation between these genes and resistance to Lcn972 could not be clearly established, pointing to the presence of as-yet-unidentified mutations that account for Lcn972 resistance. PMID:22504807

  15. Enzymatic methylation of band 3 anion transporter in intact human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, L.L.; Clarke, S.

    1987-01-01

    Band 3, the anion transport protein of erythrocyte membranes, is a major methyl-accepting substrate of the intracellular erythrocyte protein carboxyl methyltransferase (S-adenosyl-L-methionine: protein-D-aspartate O-methyltransferase; EC 2.1.1.77). The localization of methylation sites in intact cells by analysis of proteolytic fragments indicated that sites were present in the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain as well as the membranous C-terminal portion of the polypeptide. The amino acid residues that serve as carboxyl methylation sites of the erythrocyte anion transporter were also investigated. 3 H-Methylated band 3 was purified from intact erythrocytes incubated with L-[methyl- 3 H]methionine and from trypsinized and lysed erythrocytes incubated with S-adenosyl-L-[methyl- 3 H]methionine. After proteolytic digestion with carboxypeptidase Y, D-aspartic acid beta-[ 3 H]methyl ester was isolated in low yields (9% and 1%, respectively) from each preparation. The bulk of the radioactivity was recovered as [ 3 H]methanol, and the amino acid residue(s) originally associated with these methyl groups could not be determined. No L-aspartic acid beta-[ 3 H]methyl ester or glutamyl gamma-[ 3 H]methyl ester was detected. The formation of D-aspartic acid beta-[ 3 H]methyl esters in this protein in intact cells resulted from protein carboxyl methyltransferase activity since it was inhibited by adenosine and homocysteine thiolactone, which increases the intracellular concentration of the potent product inhibitor S-adenosylhomocysteine, and cycloleucine, which prevents the formation of the substrate S-adenosyl-L-[methyl- 3 H]methionine

  16. Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFE-23::CPG2 fusion protein (MFECP1) with 99mTc for quantitation of tumour antibody-enzyme localisation in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, R.J.; Chester, K.; Sharma, S.K.; Bhatia, J.; Pedley, R.B.; Green, A.J.; Begent, R.H.J.; Mather, S.J.; Waibel, R.

    2004-01-01

    MFECP1 is a glycosylated recombinant fusion protein composed of MFE-23, a high-affinity anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) single chain Fv (scFv), fused to the enzyme carboxypeptidase G2 (CPG2), and has been constructed for use in antibody-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy (ADEPT). Radiolabelling of glycosylated MFECP1 with technetium-99m was developed for the purpose of determining tumour localisation of MFECP1 in a phase I ADEPT clinical study. The method used was 99m Tc-carbonyl [ 99m Tc(H 2 O) 3 (CO) 3 ] + (abbreviated to TcCO) mediated labelling of 99m Tc to the hexahistidine (His) tag of MFECP1. MFECP1 fusion protein was labelled with TcCO under a variety of conditions, and this was shown to be a relatively simple and robust method. Tissue biodistribution was assessed in a CEA-expressing LS174T (human colon carcinoma) nude mouse xenograft model. Tissues were taken at 1, 4 and 6 h for assessment of distribution of radioactivity and for measurement of CPG2 enzyme levels. The amount of radioactivity retained by the tumour proved to be an accurate estimation of actual measured enzyme activity, indicating that this radiolabelling method does not appear to damage the antibody-antigen binding or the enzyme activity of MFECP1. However, correlation between CPG2 enzyme activity and measured radioactivity in liver, spleen and kidney was poor, indicating retention of radioactivity in non-tumour sites but loss of enzyme activity. The high retention of technetium radioisotope in normal tissues may limit the clinical applicability of this radiolabelling method for MFECP1; however, these results suggest that this technique does have applicability for measuring the biodistribution of His-tagged recombinant proteins. (orig.)

  17. Human mast cell neutral proteases generate modified LDL particles with increased proteoglycan binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaninka, Katariina; Nguyen, Su Duy; Mäyränpää, Mikko I; Plihtari, Riia; Rajamäki, Kristiina; Lindsberg, Perttu J; Kovanen, Petri T; Öörni, Katariina

    2018-04-13

    Subendothelial interaction of LDL with extracellular matrix drives atherogenesis. This interaction can be strengthened by proteolytic modification of LDL. Mast cells (MCs) are present in atherosclerotic lesions, and upon activation, they degranulate and release a variety of neutral proteases. Here we studied the ability of MC proteases to cleave apoB-100 of LDL and affect the binding of LDL to proteoglycans. Mature human MCs were differentiated from human peripheral blood-derived CD34 + progenitors in vitro and activated with calcium ionophore to generate MC-conditioned medium. LDL was incubated in the MC-conditioned medium or with individual MC proteases, and the binding of native and modified LDL to isolated human aortic proteoglycans or to human atherosclerotic plaques ex vivo was determined. MC proteases in atherosclerotic human coronary artery lesions were detected by immunofluorescence and qPCR. Activated human MCs released the neutral proteases tryptase, chymase, carboxypeptidase A3, cathepsin G, and granzyme B. Of these, cathepsin G degraded most efficiently apoB-100, induced LDL fusion, and enhanced binding of LDL to isolated human aortic proteoglycans and human atherosclerotic lesions ex vivo. Double immunofluoresence staining of human atherosclerotic coronary arteries for tryptase and cathepsin G indicated that lesional MCs contain cathepsin G. In the lesions, expression of cathepsin G correlated with the expression of tryptase and chymase, but not with that of neutrophil proteinase 3. The present study suggests that cathepsin G in human atherosclerotic lesions is largely derived from MCs and that activated MCs may contribute to atherogenesis by enhancing LDL retention. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. S28 peptidases: lessons from a seemingly 'dysfunctional' family of two

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozarich John W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent paper in BMC Structural Biology reports the crystal structure of human prolylcarboxypeptidase (PRCP, one of the two members of the S28 peptidase family. Comparison of the substrate-binding site of PRCP with that of its family partner, dipeptidyl dipeptidase 7 (DPP7, helps to explain the different enzymatic activities of these structurally similar proteins, and also reveals a novel apparent charge-relay system in PRCP involving the active-site catalytic histidine. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6807/10/16/ Commentary The S28 serine peptidase family is something of an enzymatic odd couple. While showing low sequence similarity to all proteins except each other, the two known family members appear to be at odds functionally; one, prolylcarboxypeptidase (PRCP, is a carboxypeptidase that cleaves single hydrophobic residues from the carboxyl termini of proteins that end with a Pro-X motif (where X is any hydrophobic amino acid, while the other, human dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP7, is an aminopeptidase that cleaves amino-terminal X-Pro dipeptides. The structural basis of this orthogonal specificity would undoubtedly be interesting, and a recent report in BMC Structural Biology from the Merck Global Structural Biology group (Soisson et al. 1 has now met that expectation. In addition they reveal a new wrinkle to the iconic catalytic triad common to most serine hydrolases. The practical pharmaceutical interest in both these enzymes as potential drug targets is at present speculative. PRCP can inactivate a number of peptide hormones, such as angiotensin II, III and prekallikrein, implicating a role for the enzyme in hypertension, tissue proliferation and smooth-muscle growth. These properties suggest that this enzyme may well be a useful target for hypertension and anti-inflammatory therapy 2. Another (non-S28 family dipeptidyl dipeptidase (DPP4 is a major drug target in type 2 diabetes, and Merck has already

  19. Structural determinants for binding to angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2 and angiotensin receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eClayton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2 is a zinc carboxypeptidase involved in the renin angiotensin system (RAS and inactivates the potent vasopressive peptide angiotensin II (Ang II by removing the C-terminal phenylalanine residue to yield Ang1-7. This conversion inactivates the vasoconstrictive action of Ang II and yields a peptide that acts as a vasodilatory molecule at the Mas receptor and potentially other receptors. Given the growing complexity of RAS and level of cross-talk between ligands and their corresponding enzymes and receptors, the design of molecules with selectivity for the major RAS binding partners to control cardiovascular tone is an on-going challenge. In previous studies we used single β-amino acid substitutions to modulate the structure of Ang II and its selectivity for ACE2, AT1R and angiotensin type 2 (AT2R receptor. We showed that modification at the C-terminus of Ang II generally resulted in more pronounced changes to secondary structure and ligand binding, and here we further explore this region for the potential to modulate ligand specificity. In this study, 1 a library of forty-seven peptides derived from the C-terminal tetra-peptide sequence (-IHPF of Ang II was synthesised and assessed for ACE2 binding, 2 the terminal group requirements for high affinity ACE2 binding were explored by and N- and C-terminal modification, 3 high affinity ACE2 binding chimeric AngII analogues were then synthesized and assessed, 4 the structure of the full-length Ang II analogues were assessed by circular dichroism, and 5 the Ang II analogues were assessed for AT1R/AT2R selectivity by cell-based assays. Studies on the C-terminus of Ang II demonstrated varied specificity at different residue positions for ACE2 binding and four Ang II chimeric peptides were identified as selective ligands for the AT2 receptor. Overall, these results provide insight into the residue and structural requirements for ACE2 binding and angiotensin receptor

  20. The midgut transcriptome of Lutzomyia longipalpis: comparative analysis of cDNA libraries from sugar-fed, blood-fed, post-digested and Leishmania infantum chagasi-infected sand flies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaiem Dia-Eldin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the life cycle of Leishmania within the alimentary canal of sand flies the parasites have to survive the hostile environment of blood meal digestion, escape the blood bolus and attach to the midgut epithelium before differentiating into the infective metacyclic stages. The molecular interactions between the Leishmania parasites and the gut of the sand fly are poorly understood. In the present work we sequenced five cDNA libraries constructed from midgut tissue from the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis and analyzed the transcripts present following sugar feeding, blood feeding and after the blood meal has been processed and excreted, both in the presence and absence of Leishmania infantum chagasi. Results Comparative analysis of the transcripts from sugar-fed and blood-fed cDNA libraries resulted in the identification of transcripts differentially expressed during blood feeding. This included upregulated transcripts such as four distinct microvillar-like proteins (LuloMVP1, 2, 4 and 5, two peritrophin like proteins, a trypsin like protein (Lltryp1, two chymotrypsin like proteins (LuloChym1A and 2 and an unknown protein. Downregulated transcripts by blood feeding were a microvillar-like protein (LuloMVP3, a trypsin like protein (Lltryp2 and an astacin-like metalloprotease (LuloAstacin. Furthermore, a comparative analysis between blood-fed and Leishmania infected midgut cDNA libraries resulted in the identification of the transcripts that were differentially expressed due to the presence of Leishmania in the gut of the sand fly. This included down regulated transcripts such as four microvillar-like proteins (LuloMVP1,2, 4 and 5, a Chymotrypsin (LuloChym1A and a carboxypeptidase (LuloCpepA1, among others. Upregulated midgut transcripts in the presence of Leishmania were a peritrophin like protein (LuloPer1, a trypsin-like protein (Lltryp2 and an unknown protein. Conclusion This transcriptome analysis represents the largest set

  1. The dapE-encoded N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid desuccinylase from Haemophilus influenzae contains two active-site histidine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillner, Danuta M; Bienvenue, David L; Nocek, Boguslaw P; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Zachary, Vincentos; Bennett, Brian; Holz, Richard C

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic and structural properties of the H67A and H349A dapE-encoded N-succinyl-L,L-diaminopimelic acid desuccinylase (DapE) from Haemophilus influenzae were investigated. On the basis of sequence alignment with the carboxypeptidase from Pseudomonas sp. strain RS-16, both H67 and H349 were predicted to be Zn(II) ligands. The H67A DapE enzyme exhibited a decreased catalytic efficiency (180-fold) compared with wild-type (WT) DapE towards N-succinyldiaminopimelic acid. No catalytic activity was observed for H349A under the experimental conditions used. The electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electronic absorption data indicate that the Co(II) ion bound to H349A-DapE is analogous to that of WT DapE after the addition of a single Co(II) ion. The addition of 1 equiv of Co(II) to H67A DapE provides spectra that are very different from those of the first Co(II) binding site of the WT enzyme, but that are similar to those of the second binding site. The EPR and electronic absorption data, in conjunction with the kinetic data, are consistent with the assignment of H67 and H349 as active-site metal ligands for the DapE from H. influenzae. Furthermore, the data suggest that H67 is a ligand in the first metal binding site, while H349 resides in the second metal binding site. A three-dimensional homology structure of the DapE from H. influenzae was generated using the X-ray crystal structure of the DapE from Neisseria meningitidis as a template and superimposed on the structure of the aminopeptidase from Aeromonas proteolytica (AAP). This homology structure confirms the assignment of H67 and H349 as active-site ligands. The superimposition of the homology model of DapE with the dizinc(II) structure of AAP indicates that within 4.0 A of the Zn(II) binding sites of AAP all of the amino acid residues of DapE are nearly identical.

  2. Crystal structure of cathepsin A, a novel target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreuder, Herman A., E-mail: herman.schreuder@sanofi.com; Liesum, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.liesum@sanofi.com; Kroll, Katja, E-mail: katja.kroll@sanofi.com; Böhnisch, Britta, E-mail: britta.boehnisch@sanofi.com; Buning, Christian, E-mail: christian.buning@sanofi.com; Ruf, Sven, E-mail: sven.ruf@sanofi.com; Sadowski, Thorsten, E-mail: thorsten.sadowski@sanofi.com

    2014-03-07

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The structures of active cathepsin A and the inactive precursor are very similar. • The only major difference is the absence of a 40 residue activation domain. • The termini of the active catalytic core are held together by a disulfide bond. • Compound 1 reacts with the catalytic Ser150, building a tetrahedral intermediate. • Compound 2 is cleaved by the enzyme and a fragment remained bound. - Abstract: The lysosomal serine carboxypeptidase cathepsin A is involved in the breakdown of peptide hormones like endothelin and bradykinin. Recent pharmacological studies with cathepsin A inhibitors in rodents showed a remarkable reduction in cardiac hypertrophy and atrial fibrillation, making cathepsin A a promising target for the treatment of heart failure. Here we describe the crystal structures of activated cathepsin A without inhibitor and with two compounds that mimic the tetrahedral intermediate and the reaction product, respectively. The structure of activated cathepsin A turned out to be very similar to the structure of the inactive precursor. The only difference was the removal of a 40 residue activation domain, partially due to proteolytic removal of the activation peptide, and partially by an order–disorder transition of the peptides flanking the removed activation peptide. The termini of the catalytic core are held together by the Cys253–Cys303 disulfide bond, just before and after the activation domain. One of the compounds we soaked in our crystals reacted covalently with the catalytic Ser150 and formed a tetrahedral intermediate. The other compound got cleaved by the enzyme and a fragment, resembling one of the natural reaction products, was found in the active site. These studies establish cathepsin A as a classical serine proteinase with a well-defined oxyanion hole. The carboxylate group of the cleavage product is bound by a hydrogen-bonding network involving one aspartate and two glutamate side chains

  3. Analysis of Milk from Mothers Who Delivered Prematurely Reveals Few Changes in Proteases and Protease Inhibitors across Gestational Age at Birth and Infant Postnatal Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers-Mathieu, Veronique; Nielsen, Søren Drud; Underwood, Mark A; Borghese, Robyn; Dallas, David C

    2017-06-01

    Background: Peptidomics research has demonstrated that protease activity is higher in breast milk from preterm-delivering mothers than from term-delivering mothers. However, to our knowledge, the effect of the degree of prematurity and postnatal age on proteases and protease inhibitors in human milk remains unknown. Objective: We aimed to determine the change of proteases and protease inhibitors in milk from mothers who delivered prematurely across gestational age (GA) and postnatal age. Methods: Milk samples were collected from 18 mothers aged 26-40 y who delivered preterm infants and who lacked mastitis. For analysis, samples were separated into 2 groups: 9 from early GA (EGA) (24-26 wk GA)-delivering mothers and 9 from late GA (LGA) (27-32 wk GA)-delivering mothers. Within the 9 samples in each group, the collection time ranged from postnatal days 2 to 47. The activity and predicted activity of proteases in preterm milk were determined with the use of fluorometric and spectrophotometric assays and peptidomics, respectively. Protease and protease inhibitor concentrations were determined with the use of ELISA. Linear mixed models were applied to compare enzymes across GA and postnatal age. Results: Carboxypeptidase B2, kallikrein, plasmin, elastase, thrombin, and cytosol aminopeptidase were present and active in the milk of preterm-delivering mothers. Most milk protease and antiprotease concentrations did not change with GA or postnatal age. However, the concentration and activity of kallikrein, the most abundant and active protease in preterm milk, increased by 25.4 ng · mL -1 · d -1 and 0.454 μg · mL -1 · d -1 postnatally, respectively, in EGA milk samples while remaining stable in LGA milk samples. Conclusions: This research demonstrates that proteases are active in human milk and begin to degrade milk protein within the mammary gland before consumption by infants. Proteases and protease inhibitors in milk from mothers of premature infants mostly did not

  4. Basophils, high-affinity IgE receptors, and CCL2 in human anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosec, Peter; Turner, Paul J; Silar, Mira; Kopac, Peter; Kosnik, Mitja; Gibbs, Bernhard F; Shamji, Mohamed H; Custovic, Adnan; Rijavec, Matija

    2017-09-01

    The role of basophils in anaphylaxis is unclear. We sought to investigate whether basophils have an important role in human anaphylaxis. In an emergency department study we recruited 31 patients with acute anaphylaxis, predominantly to Hymenoptera venom. We measured expression of basophil activation markers (CD63 and CD203c); the absolute number of circulating basophils; whole-blood FCER1A, carboxypeptidase A3 (CPA3), and L-histidine decarboxylase (HDC) gene expression; and serum markers (CCL2, CCL5, CCL11, IL-3, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin) at 3 time points (ie, during the anaphylactic episode and in convalescent samples 7 and 30 days later). We recruited 134 patients with Hymenoptera allergy and 76 healthy control subjects for comparison. We then investigated whether the changes observed during venom-related anaphylaxis also occur during allergic reactions to food in 22 patients with peanut allergy undergoing double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge to peanut. The number of circulating basophils was significantly lower during anaphylaxis (median, 3.5 cells/μL) than 7 and 30 days later (17.5 and 24.7 cells/μL, P < .0001) and compared with those in patients with venom allergy and healthy control subjects (21 and 23.4 cells/μL, P < .0001). FCER1A expression during anaphylaxis was also significantly lower than in convalescent samples (P ≤ .002) and control subjects with venom allergy (P < .0001). CCL2 levels (but not those of other serum markers) were significantly higher during anaphylaxis (median, 658 pg/mL) than in convalescent samples (314 and 311 pg/mL at 7 and 30 days, P < .001). Peanut-induced allergic reactions resulted in a significant decrease in circulating basophil counts compared with those in prechallenge samples (P = .016), a decrease in FCER1A expression (P = .007), and an increase in CCL2 levels (P = .003). Our findings imply an important and specific role for basophils in the pathophysiology of human

  5. Substrate specificity of low-molecular mass bacterial DD-peptidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemmara, Venkatesh V; Dzhekieva, Liudmila; Sarkar, Kumar Subarno; Adediran, S A; Duez, Colette; Nicholas, Robert A; Pratt, R F

    2011-11-22

    The bacterial DD-peptidases or penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) catalyze the formation and regulation of cross-links in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. They are classified into two groups, the high-molecular mass (HMM) and low-molecular mass (LMM) enzymes. The latter group, which is subdivided into classes A-C (LMMA, -B, and -C, respectively), is believed to catalyze DD-carboxypeptidase and endopeptidase reactions in vivo. To date, the specificity of their reactions with particular elements of peptidoglycan structure has not, in general, been defined. This paper describes the steady-state kinetics of hydrolysis of a series of specific peptidoglycan-mimetic peptides, representing various elements of stem peptide structure, catalyzed by a range of LMM PBPs (the LMMA enzymes, Escherichia coli PBP5, Neisseria gonorrhoeae PBP4, and Streptococcus pneumoniae PBP3, and the LMMC enzymes, the Actinomadura R39 dd-peptidase, Bacillus subtilis PBP4a, and N. gonorrhoeae PBP3). The R39 enzyme (LMMC), like the previously studied Streptomyces R61 DD-peptidase (LMMB), specifically and rapidly hydrolyzes stem peptide fragments with a free N-terminus. In accord with this result, the crystal structures of the R61 and R39 enzymes display a binding site specific to the stem peptide N-terminus. These are water-soluble enzymes, however, with no known specific function in vivo. On the other hand, soluble versions of the remaining enzymes of those noted above, all of which are likely to be membrane-bound and/or associated in vivo and have been assigned particular roles in cell wall biosynthesis and maintenance, show little or no specificity for peptides containing elements of peptidoglycan structure. Peptidoglycan-mimetic boronate transition-state analogues do inhibit these enzymes but display notable specificity only for the LMMC enzymes, where, unlike peptide substrates, they may be able to effectively induce a specific active site structure. The manner in which LMMA (and HMM) DD

  6. Ginkgotides: Proline-Rich Hevein-Like Peptides from Gymnosperm Ginkgo biloba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ka H; Tan, Wei Liang; Serra, Aida; Xiao, Tianshu; Sze, Siu Kwan; Yang, Daiwen; Tam, James P

    2016-01-01

    Hevein and hevein-like peptides belong to the family of chitin-binding cysteine-rich peptides. They are classified into three subfamilies, the prototypic 8C- and the 6C- and 10C-hevein-like peptides. Thus far, only five 8C-hevein-like peptides have been characterized from three angiosperms and none from gymnosperm. To determine their occurrence and distribution in the gymnosperm, Ginkgo biloba leaves were examined. Here, we report the discovery and characterization of 11 novel 8C-hevein-like peptides, namely ginkgotides gB1-gB11. Proteomic analysis showed that the ginkgotides contain 41-44 amino acids (aa), a chitin-binding domain and are Pro-rich, a distinguishing feature that differs from other hevein-like peptides. Solution NMR structure determination revealed that gB5 contains a three β-stranded structure shaped by a cystine knot with an additional disulfide bond at the C-terminus. Transcriptomic analysis showed that the ginkgotide precursors contain a three-domain architecture, comprised of a C-terminal tail (20 aa) that is significantly shorter than those of other 8C- and 10C-hevein-like peptides, which generally contain a protein cargo such as a Barwin-like protein (126 aa) or class I chitinase (254 aa). Transcriptomic data mining found an additional 48 ginkgotide homologs in 39 different gymnosperms. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that ginkgotides and their homologs belong to a new class of 8C-hevein-like peptides. Stability studies showed that ginkgotides are highly resistant to thermal, acidic and endopeptidase degradation. Ginkgotides flanked at both the N- and C-terminal ends by Pro were resistant to exopeptidase degradation by carboxypeptidase A and aminopeptidase. Antifungal assays showed that ginkgotides inhibit the hyphal growth of phyto-pathogenic fungi. Taken together, ginkgotides represent the first suite of hevein-like peptides isolated and characterized from gymnosperms. As a group, they represent a novel class of 8C-hevein-like peptides that

  7. Ginkgotides: Proline-rich Hevein-like Peptides from Gymnosperm Ginkgo biloba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka Ho Wong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hevein and hevein-like peptides belong to the family of chitin-binding cysteine-rich peptides. They are classified into three subfamilies, the prototypic 8C- and the 6C- and 10C-hevein-like peptides. Thus far, only five 8C-hevein-like peptides have been characterized from three angiosperms and none from gymnosperm. To determine their occurrence and distribution in the gymnosperm, Ginkgo biloba leaves were examined. Here, we report the discovery and characterization of eleven novel 8C-hevein-like peptides, namely ginkgotides gB1–gB11. Proteomic analysis showed that the ginkgotides contain 41–44 amino acids (aa, a chitin-binding domain and are Pro-rich, a distinguishing feature that differs from other hevein-like peptides. Solution 1H-NMR structure determination revealed that gB5 contains a three β-stranded structure shaped by a cystine knot with an additional disulfide bond at the C-terminus. Transcriptomic analysis showed that the ginkgotide precursors contain a three-domain architecture, comprised of a C-terminal tail (20 aa that is significantly shorter than those of other 8C- and 10C-hevein-like peptides, which generally contain a protein cargo such as a Barwin-like protein (126 aa or class I chitinase (254 aa. Transcriptomic data mining found an additional 48 ginkgotide homologs in 39 different gymnosperms. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that ginkgotides and their homologs belong to a new class of 8C-hevein-like peptides. Stability studies showed that ginkgotides are highly resistant to thermal, acidic and endopeptidase degradation. Ginkgotides flanked at both the N- and C-terminal ends by Pro were resistant to exopeptidase degradation by carboxypeptidase A and aminopeptidase. Antifungal assays showed that ginkgotides inhibit the hyphal growth of phyto-pathogenic fungi. Taken together, ginkgotides represent the first suite of hevein-like peptides isolated and characterized from gymnosperms. As a group, they represent a novel class of 8C

  8. Genome-wide development and deployment of informative intron-spanning and intron-length polymorphism markers for genomics-assisted breeding applications in chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Rishi; Bajaj, Deepak; Sayal, Yogesh K; Meher, Prabina K; Upadhyaya, Hari D; Kumar, Rajendra; Tripathi, Shailesh; Bharadwaj, Chellapilla; Rao, Atmakuri R; Parida, Swarup K

    2016-11-01

    The discovery and large-scale genotyping of informative gene-based markers is essential for rapid delineation of genes/QTLs governing stress tolerance and yield component traits in order to drive genetic enhancement in chickpea. A genome-wide 119169 and 110491 ISM (intron-spanning markers) from 23129 desi and 20386 kabuli protein-coding genes and 7454 in silico InDel (insertion-deletion) (1-45-bp)-based ILP (intron-length polymorphism) markers from 3283 genes were developed that were structurally and functionally annotated on eight chromosomes and unanchored scaffolds of chickpea. A much higher amplification efficiency (83%) and intra-specific polymorphic potential (86%) detected by these markers than that of other sequence-based genetic markers among desi and kabuli chickpea accessions was apparent even by a cost-effective agarose gel-based assay. The genome-wide physically mapped 1718 ILP markers assayed a wider level of functional genetic diversity (19-81%) and well-defined phylogenetics among domesticated chickpea accessions. The gene-derived 1424 ILP markers were anchored on a high-density (inter-marker distance: 0.65cM) desi intra-specific genetic linkage map/functional transcript map (ICC 4958×ICC 2263) of chickpea. This reference genetic map identified six major genomic regions harbouring six robust QTLs mapped on five chromosomes, which explained 11-23% seed weight trait variation (7.6-10.5 LOD) in chickpea. The integration of high-resolution QTL mapping with differential expression profiling detected six including one potential serine carboxypeptidase gene with ILP markers (linked tightly to the major seed weight QTLs) exhibiting seed-specific expression as well as pronounced up-regulation especially in seeds of high (ICC 4958) as compared to low (ICC 2263) seed weight mapping parental accessions. The marker information generated in the present study was made publicly accessible through a user-friendly web-resource, "Chickpea ISM-ILP Marker Database

  9. An Efficient Strategy Combining SSR Markers- and Advanced QTL-seq-driven QTL Mapping Unravels Candidate Genes Regulating Grain Weight in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daware, Anurag; Das, Sweta; Srivastava, Rishi; Badoni, Saurabh; Singh, Ashok K; Agarwal, Pinky; Parida, Swarup K; Tyagi, Akhilesh K

    2016-01-01

    Development and use of genome-wide informative simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and novel integrated genomic strategies are vital to drive genomics-assisted breeding applications and for efficient dissection of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) underlying complex traits in rice. The present study developed 6244 genome-wide informative SSR markers exhibiting in silico fragment length polymorphism based on repeat-unit variations among genomic sequences of 11 indica, japonica, aus , and wild rice accessions. These markers were mapped on diverse coding and non-coding sequence components of known cloned/candidate genes annotated from 12 chromosomes and revealed a much higher amplification (97%) and polymorphic potential (88%) along with wider genetic/functional diversity level (16-74% with a mean 53%) especially among accessions belonging to indica cultivar group, suggesting their utility in large-scale genomics-assisted breeding applications in rice. A high-density 3791 SSR markers-anchored genetic linkage map (IR 64 × Sonasal) spanning 2060 cM total map-length with an average inter-marker distance of 0.54 cM was generated. This reference genetic map identified six major genomic regions harboring robust QTLs (31% combined phenotypic variation explained with a 5.7-8.7 LOD) governing grain weight on six rice chromosomes. One strong grain weight major QTL region ( OsqGW5.1 ) was narrowed-down by integrating traditional QTL mapping with high-resolution QTL region-specific integrated SSR and single nucleotide polymorphism markers-based QTL-seq analysis and differential expression profiling. This led us to delineate two natural allelic variants in two known cis -regulatory elements (RAV1AAT and CARGCW8GAT) of glycosyl hydrolase and serine carboxypeptidase genes exhibiting pronounced seed-specific differential regulation in low (Sonasal) and high (IR 64) grain weight mapping parental accessions. Our genome-wide SSR marker resource (polymorphic within/between diverse

  10. First report on 3D-QSAR and molecular dynamics based docking studies of GCPII inhibitors for targeted drug delivery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Amit; Sengupta, Sagnik; Krishnan, Mena Asha; Reddy, Ramesh B.; Sharma, Rajesh; Venkatesh, Chelvam

    2018-05-01

    Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) or Glutamate carboxypeptidase II (GCPII) has been identified as an important target in diagnosis and therapy of prostate cancer. Among several types of inhibitors, urea based inhibitors are the most common and widely employed in preclinical and clinical studies. Computational studies have been carried out to uncover active sites and interaction of PSMA inhibitors with the protein by modifying the core structure of the ligand. Analysis of the literature, however, show lack of 3-D quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) and molecular dynamics based molecular docking study to identify structural modifications responsible for better GCPII inhibitory activity. The present study aims to fulfil this gap by analysing well known PSMA inhibitors reported in the literature with known experimental PSMA inhibition constants. Also in order to validate the in silico study, a new GCPII inhibitor 7 was designed, synthesized and experimental PSMA enzyme inhibition was evaluated by using freshly isolated PSMA protein from human cancer cell line derived from lymph node, LNCaP. 3D-QSAR CoMFA models on 58 urea based GCPII inhibitors were generated, and the best correlation was obtained in Gast-Huck charge assigning method with q2, r2 and predictive r2 values as 0.592, 0.995 and 0.842 respectively. Moreover, steric, electrostatic, and hydrogen bond donor field contribution analysis provided best statistical values from CoMSIA model (q2, r2 and predictive r2 as 0.527, 0.981 and 0.713 respectively). Contour maps study revealed that electrostatic field contribution is the major factor for discovering better binding affinity ligands. Further molecular dynamic assisted molecular docking was also performed on GCPII receptor (PDB ID 4NGM) and most active GCPII inhibitor, DCIBzL. 4NGM co-crystallised ligand, JB7 was used to validate the docking procedure and the amino acid interactions present in JB7 are compared with DCIBzL. The results