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Sample records for carbonate rocks

  1. Digital carbonate rock physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, Erik H.; Vialle, Stephanie; Lebedev, Maxim; Uribe, David; Osorno, Maria; Duda, Mandy; Steeb, Holger

    2016-08-01

    Modern estimation of rock properties combines imaging with advanced numerical simulations, an approach known as digital rock physics (DRP). In this paper we suggest a specific segmentation procedure of X-ray micro-computed tomography data with two different resolutions in the µm range for two sets of carbonate rock samples. These carbonates were already characterized in detail in a previous laboratory study which we complement with nanoindentation experiments (for local elastic properties). In a first step a non-local mean filter is applied to the raw image data. We then apply different thresholds to identify pores and solid phases. Because of a non-neglectable amount of unresolved microporosity (micritic phase) we also define intermediate threshold values for distinct phases. Based on this segmentation we determine porosity-dependent values for effective P- and S-wave velocities as well as for the intrinsic permeability. For effective velocities we confirm an observed two-phase trend reported in another study using a different carbonate data set. As an upscaling approach we use this two-phase trend as an effective medium approach to estimate the porosity-dependent elastic properties of the micritic phase for the low-resolution images. The porosity measured in the laboratory is then used to predict the effective rock properties from the observed trends for a comparison with experimental data. The two-phase trend can be regarded as an upper bound for elastic properties; the use of the two-phase trend for low-resolution images led to a good estimate for a lower bound of effective elastic properties. Anisotropy is observed for some of the considered subvolumes, but seems to be insignificant for the analysed rocks at the DRP scale. Because of the complexity of carbonates we suggest using DRP as a complementary tool for rock characterization in addition to classical experimental methods.

  2. Rock weathering and Carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strozza, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    In the history of the Earth system, we can find indicators of hot or glacial periods, as well as brutal climatic change… How can we explain those climate variations on a geological timescale ? One of the causative agents is probably the fluctuation of atmospheric CO2 amounts, (gas responsible for the greenhouse effect). A concrete study of some CO2 fluxes between Earth system reservoirs (atmo, hydro and lithosphere) is proposed in this poster. Hydrogencarbonate is the major ion in river surface waters and its amount is so high that it can not be explained by a simple atmospheric Carbon diffusion. From a simple measurement of river HCO3- concentration, we can estimate the consumption of atmospheric CO2 that arises from carbonate and silicate weathering processes. Practical experiments are proposed. These are carried out in the local environment, and are conform to the curriculums of Chemistry and Earth sciences. These tests enable us to outline long-term Carbon cycles and global climatic changes. Key words : Erosion, rock weathering, CO2 cycle, Hydrogencarbonate in waters, climatic changes

  3. The thermal evolution indicator of carbonate rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆云; 范璞; 程克明

    1995-01-01

    It has been studied by the solid state 13C NMR analysis that the chemical composition and the structure feature of kerogen of carbonate rocks are characteristic of different types and evolution degree. The purpose is to show the evolution degree using the structure parameters of kerogen of carbonate rocks. The detailed analysis of the carbon aromaticity (fa), the hydrogen aromaticity (Ha) and the average aromatic cluster size (Xb) indicates that Xb is the most effective indicator of evolution degree, and it is not influenced by the type and evolution degree of kerogen. The correlation between the average aromatic cluster size and vitrinite reflectance value of kerogen has also been established.

  4. Influence of Carbon on the Electrical Properties of Crustal Rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathez, E. A.

    2002-11-19

    The report summarizes work to determine the nature and distribution of carbon on microcracks in crystalline rocks by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. It also summarizes the results of a workshop devoted to investigating how carbon in rocks influences electrical conductivity and whether carbon on fracture surfaces can account for the electrical conductivity structure of the crust.

  5. Preliminary Study on weathering and pedogenesis of carbonate rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王世杰; 季宏兵; 欧阳自远; 周德全; 郑乐平; 黎廷宇

    1999-01-01

    South China is the largest continuous distribution area of carbonate rock in the world. The origin of the soils over the bedrock carbonate rock has long been a controversial topic. Here further exploration is made by taking five soil profiles as examples, which are developed over the bedrock dolomitite and limestone and morphologically located in upland in karst terrain in the central, west and north Guizhou as well as west Hunan, and proved to be the weathering profiles of carbonate rock by the research results of acid-dissolved extraction experiment of bedrock, mineralogy and trace element geochemistry. Field, mineralogical and trace element geochemical characteristics of weathering and pedogenesis for carbonate rock are discussed in detail. It is pointed out that weathering and pedogenesis of carbonate rock are important pedogenetic mechanisms for soil resources in karst area, providing a basis for further researches on the origin of soils widely overlying bedrock carbonate rocks in South China.

  6. Fluid flow along faults in carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Valentina; Battaglia, Maurizio; Bigi, Sabina

    2015-04-01

    The study of fluid flow in fractured rocks plays a key role in reservoir management, including CO2 sequestration and waste isolation. We present a mathematical model of fluid flow in a fault zone, based on field data acquired in Majella Mountain, in the Central Apennines (Italy). The Majella is a thrust related, asymmetric, box shaped anticline. The mountain carbonate outcrops are part of a lower Cretaceous-Miocene succession, covered by a siliciclastic sequence of lower Pliocene age. We study a fault zone located in the Bolognano Formation (Oligo-Miocene age) and exposed in the Roman Valley Quarry near the town of Lettomanoppello, in the northern sector of the Majella Mountain. This is one of the best places in the Apennines to investigate a fault zone and has been the subject of numerous field studies. Faults are mechanical and permeability heterogeneities in the upper crust, so they strongly influence fluid flow. The distribution of the main components (core, damage zone) can lead a fault zone to act as a conduit, a barrier or a combined conduit-barrier system. We integrated existing and our own structural surveys of the area to better identify the major fault features (e.g., kind of fractures, statistical properties, geometry and pertrophysical characteristics). Our analytical model describe the Bolognano Formation using a dual porosity/dual permeability model: global flow occurs through the fracture network only, while rock matrix contain the majority of fluid storage and provide fluid drainage to the fractures. Pressure behavior is analyzed by examining the pressure drawdown curves, the derivative plots and the effects of the characteristic parameters. The analytical model has been calibrated against published data on fluid flow and pressure distribution in the Bolognano Formation.

  7. New York and New England carbonate-rock aquifers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the extent of the New York and New England carbonate-rock aquifers in the states of New York, Vermont, Maine, Massachusetts, Connecticut,...

  8. Mineralogical Characteristics of Carbonate Rock-Hosted Naturally Occurring Asbestos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, E.; Roh, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) occurs in rocks and soils as a result of natural weathering and human activities. The parent rocks of asbestos have been associated with ultramafic and mafic rocks, and carbonate rock. The previous studies on naturally occurring asbestos were mainly limited to ultramafic and mafic rock-hosted asbestos and studies on carbonate rock-hosted asbestos are relatively rare in South Korea. Therefore, this study was aimed to characterize mineralogy of carbonate rock-hosted NOA at Muju and Jangsu, Jeonbuk province and Seosan and Asan, Chungnam province. The rock types at the four sites are consisting mainly of Precambrian metasedimentary rock. XRD and PLM analyses showed fibrous minerals in the sites were tremolite and actinolite of acicular and columnar forms. SEM-EDS analyses showed that asbestiform tremolite and actinolite had various ratios of length and diameters over 12:1, and needle and columnar forms. A columnar forms of tremolite and actinolite were showed small acicular at the edge of the particle. Its main chemical compositions are mainly Si, O, Mg, Ca, which were identical to tremolite. Actinolite contains Fe in addition to Si, O, Mg, Ca. EPMA analyses of asbestos occurred at Muju indicated that chemical composition are 55% SiO2, 23.2% MgO, 13.1 % CaO, and 0.61 % FeO and the chemical formula calculated as (K0.01Na0.01)Ca2.01(Mg4.94Fe0.05) (Al0.004Si7.98)O22(OH)2, which is close to ideal tremolite. In addition to tremolite, actinolite was also occurred at Seosan, Chungnam. XRD analyses showed that antigorite was existed at Muju, but PLM and SEM analyses showed the antigorite was platy structure, not asbestiform. These results indicate that asbestiform tremolite and actinolite with acicular forms contains in carbonate rocks at Muju and Jangsu, Jeonbuk and Seosan and Asan, Chungnam province South Korea.

  9. Heterogeneity of Parent Rocks and Its Constraints on Geochemical Criteria in Weathering Crusts of Carbonate Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shijie; FENG Zhigang

    2004-01-01

    Owing to the low contents of their acid-insoluble components, carbonate rocks tend to decrease sharply in volume in association with the formation of weathering crust. The formation of a 1 m-thick weathering crust would usually consume more than ten meters to several tens of meters of thickness of parent rocks. The knowledge of how to identify the homogeneity of parent rocks is essential to understand the formation mechanism of weathering crust in karst regions,especially that of thick-layered red weathering crust. In this work the grain-size analyses have demonstrated that the three profiles studied are the residual weathering crust of carbonate rocks and further showed that there objectively exists the heterogeneity of parent rocks in the three studied weathering crusts. The heterogeneity of parent rocks can also be reflected in geochemical parameters of major elements, just as the characteristics of frequency plot of grain-size distribution.Conservative trace element ratios Zr/Hf and Nb/Ta are proven to be unsuitable for tracing the heterogeneity of parent rocks of weathering crust, but its geochemical mechanism is unclear. The authors strongly suggest in this paper that the identification of the homogeneity of parent rocks of weathering crust in karst regions is of prime necessity.

  10. Investigation of Jordanian uranium resources in carbonate rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of uranium content in Jordanian carbonate rocks has been investigated using three different detection techniques; neutron activation analysis, gamma ray spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The average uranium concentrations from the different methods were in good agreements. A leaching test was also performed using deionized water as a leaching solution (pH = 5.7) and it was calculated that about 9 % of the total uranium amount leached out. The results showed that carbonate rocks at Central Jordan Area contains a promising amount of uranium and more investigations need to be conducted to explore the uranium content in this area. (author)

  11. Methane and carbon at equilibrium in source rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Mango, Frank D

    2013-01-01

    Methane in source rocks may not exist exclusively as free gas. It could exist in equilibrium with carbon and higher hydrocarbons: CH4 + C  Hydrocarbon. Three lines of evidence support this possibility. 1) Shales ingest gas in amounts and selectivities consistent with gas-carbon equilibrium. There is a 50% increase in solid hydrocarbon mass when Fayetteville Shale is exposed to methane (450 psi) under moderate conditions (100°C): Rock-Eval S2 (mg g-1) 8.5 = > 12.5. All light hydrocarbons are i...

  12. Digital Rock Simulation of Flow in Carbonate Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemin, D.; Andersen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Reservoir engineering has becomes more complex to deal with current challenges, so core analysts must understand and model pore geometries and fluid behaviors at pores scales more rapidly and realistically. We introduce an industry-unique direct hydrodynamic pore flow simulator that operates on pore geometries from digital rock models obtained using microCT or 3D scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. The PVT and rheological models used in the simulator represent real reservoir fluids. Fluid-solid interactions are introduced using distributed micro-scale wetting properties. The simulator uses density functional approach applied for hydrodynamics of complex systems. This talk covers selected applications of the simulator. We performed microCT scanning of six different carbonate rock samples from homogeneous limestones to vuggy carbonates. From these, we constructed digital rock models representing pore geometries for the simulator. We simulated nonreactive tracer flow in all six digital models using a digital fluid description that included a passive tracer solution. During the simulation, we evaluated the composition of the effluent. Results of tracer flow simulations corresponded well with experimental data of nonreactive tracer floods for the same carbonate rock types. This simulation data of the non-reactive tracer flow can be used to calculate the volume of the rock accessible by the fluid, which can be further used to predict response of a porous medium to a reactive fluid. The described digital core analysis workflow provides a basis for a wide variety of activities, including input to design acidizing jobs and evaluating treatment efficiency and EOR economics. Digital rock multiphase flow simulations of a scanned carbonate rock evaluated the effect of wettability on flow properties. Various wetting properties were tested: slightly oil wet, slightly water wet, and water wet. Steady-state relative permeability simulations yielded curves for all three

  13. Clumped-isotope thermometry of magnesium carbonates in ultramafic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    García del Real, Pablo; Maher, Kate; Kluge, Tobias; Bird, Dennis K.; Brown, Gordon E.; John, Cédric M.

    2016-11-01

    Magnesium carbonate minerals produced by reaction of H2O-CO2 with ultramafic rocks occur in a wide range of paragenetic and tectonic settings and can thus provide insights into a variety of geologic processes, including (1) deposition of ore-grade, massive-vein cryptocrystalline magnesite; (2) formation of hydrous magnesium carbonates in weathering environments; and (3) metamorphic carbonate alteration of ultramafic rocks. However, the application of traditional geochemical and isotopic methods to infer temperatures of mineralization, the nature of mineralizing fluids, and the mechanisms controlling the transformation of dissolved CO2 into magnesium carbonates in these settings is difficult because the fluids are usually not preserved. Clumped-isotope compositions of magnesium carbonates provide a means to determine primary mineralization or (re)equilibration temperature, which permits the reconstruction of geologic processes that govern magnesium carbonate formation. We first provide an evaluation of the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates using synthetic magnesite and hydromagnesite, along with natural metamorphic magnesite and low-temperature hydromagnesite precipitated within a mine adit. We show that the acid fractionation correction for magnesium carbonates is virtually indistinguishable from other carbonate acid fractionation corrections given current mass spectrometer resolution and error. In addition, we employ carbonate clumped-isotope thermometry on natural magnesium carbonates from various geologic environments and tectonic settings. Cryptocrystalline magnesite vein deposits from California (Red Mountain magnesite mine), Austria (Kraubath locality), Turkey (Tutluca mine, Eskişehir district) and Iran (Derakht-Senjed deposit) exhibit broadly uniform Δ47 compositions that yield apparent clumped-isotope temperatures that average 23.7 ± 5.0 °C. Based on oxygen isotope thermometry, these clumped-isotope temperatures suggest

  14. Use of nanotomographic images for structure analysis of carbonate rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Rodrigo; Appoloni, Carlos Roberto [State University of Londrina, Physics Department, P.O. Box 10010, 86057-970, Londrina- PR (Brazil)

    2014-11-11

    Carbonate rocks store more than 50% of world's petroleum. These rocks' structures are highly complex and vary depending on many factors regarding their formation, e.g., lithification and diagenesis. In order to perform an effective extraction of petroleum it is necessary to know petrophysical parameters, such as total porosity, pore size and permeability of the reservoir rocks. Carbonate rocks usually have a range of pore sizes that goes from nanometers to meters or even dozen of meters. The nanopores and micropores might play an important role in the pores connectivity of carbonate rocks. X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been widely used to analyze petrophysical parameters in recent years. This technique has the capability to generate 2D images of the samples' inner structure and also allows the 3D reconstruction of the actual analyzed volume. CT is a powerful technique, but its results depend on the spatial resolution of the generated image. Spatial resolution is a measurement parameter that indicates the smallest object that can be detected. There are great difficulties to generate images with nanoscale resolution (nanotomographic images). In this work three carbonate rocks, one dolomite and two limestones (that will be called limestone A and limestone B) were analyzed by nanotomography. The measurements were performed with the SkyScan2011 nanotomograph, operated at 60 kV and 200 μA to measure the dolomite sample and 40 kV and 200 μA to measure the limestone samples. Each sample was measured with a given spatial resolution (270 nm for the dolomite sample, 360 nm for limestone A and 450 nm for limestone B). The achieved results for total porosity were: 3.09 % for dolomite, 0.65% for limestone A and 3.74% for limestone B. This paper reports the difficulties to acquire nanotomographic images and further analysis about the samples' pore sizes.

  15. Migration and enrichment of trace elements of Lower Palaeozoic carbonate rock strata in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Analyses of trace elements of the Lower Palaeozoic carbonate rock strata in Beijing show that the contents of As, Hg, F increase from primary carbonate rocks to weathered carbonate rocks and from primary carbonate rocks to the soil coexisting with carbonate rocks, but the distribution regularity of S is not obvious. In the whole weathered stages, the sorption of As is mainly affected by Fe2O3. In soil Fe2O3 is also the main affecting factor of Hg enrichment. The main existing forms of Hg in primary carbonate rocks should simply be physical adsorption, coprecipitation and false isomorphous form between surface of carbonate rock and Hg. In soil the enrichment of F has little relationship with sul-fides and Fe2O3. In primary carbonate rocks, F is mainly absorbed by sulfides and clay minerals, etc. Weathered samples have closer genetic relationships with primary carbonate rocks. This also implies that weathered carbonate rocks have the close existing forms to that of primary carbonate rocks. In primary carbonate rocks FeS2 and FeS are the main forms of S, and sulfides have fixation effect on some heavy metals, whereas in weathered carbonate rocks and soil the fixation effect is weakened.

  16. Comparative study on CO2 sources in soil developed on carbonate rock and non-carbonate rock in Central Guizhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎廷宇; 王世杰; 郑乐平

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, by using concentration and carbon stable isotope the CO2 sources of soil profiles developed on limestone, dolostone and claystone basements in Central Guizhou, China are comparatively studied. The results show that CO2 concentration of soil profiles developed on different basements is different, having the following sequence: limestone>dolostone>claystone. Below the soil depth of 20 cm from the surface the ? 13C value of CO2 in soil profile developed on limestone ranges from -12.811‰ - -13.492‰(PDB), that in soil profile developed on dolostone varys from -13.212‰ - -14.271‰(PDB) and that in soil profile developed on claystone is about -20.234‰ - -21.485‰(PDB). Taking the carbon isotope of soil organic matter and carbonate rock as two isotopic endmembers, the proportion of soil CO2 generated by dissolution of carbonate rock is calculated, about 21%-25% for soil profile developed on limestone basement, 19%-21% for soil profile developed on dolostone basement. There is almost no influx of CO2 generated by the dissolution of carbonate rock in soil profile developed on claystone basement.

  17. Quantitative microstructure characterization and elastic properties upscaling of carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialle, Stephanie; Lebedev, Maxim

    2016-04-01

    Most Rock Physics models commonly used to predict elastic properties rely on a very simplified representation of the pore and grains geometry. Initially developed for siliclastic rocks, they do not apply easily and/or with as much success, to rocks with more complicated microstructure such as carbonates, which exhibit complex relationships between geophysical attributes and rock properties, such as P-wave velocity versus porosity. Furthermore, until recently, most microstructure imaging techniques such as optical microscopy, SEM, X-ray micro-CT, etc., only give a qualitative description of the pore and grain arrangement. Nano-indentation technique is a method that gives quantitative information by mean of local (micrometer size) measurements of elastic moduli. We used this technique to obtain 300 μm * 300 μm maps of Young's moduli (around 1000 data points) of two microporous carbonates of same mineralogy but of two different microstructures. As the size of the indenter tip is much smaller than the characteristic length of the heterogeneities in microstructure, the distribution of the Young's moduli can be deconvolved into its component parts (i.e. phases). SEM imaging of the same areas than the ones mapped by nano-indentation shows correlations between type of micrite and phases of different mean Young's modulus: tight micrites exhibiting a higher Young's modulus (up to 64 GPa) than microporous micrites (as low as 9 GPa). We then investigate different ways to upscale the measurements in order to get the effective bulk and shear moduli, from simply using volume fractions of the different phases, classical Hashin-Shrikman bounds, and Hill average; to using micro-CT imaging and analysis combined with rock physics models. Though more work is still needed to render nano-indentation technique a robust method for rock physics, both on the theory behind and on the upscaling of the measurements, these results that use nano-indentation method in a statistical way are very

  18. Correlation between permeability and groundwater flow patterns in carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y.; Lee, J.; Park, Y.; Keehm, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Groundwater flow in carbonate rocks is controlled by many factors such as degree of fracture and pore development, weathering and diagenesis. Among these factors, fracture is main factor and can form main flow path. Also, flow patterns in carbonate area are decided by these factors. This study was performed to understand factors controlling permeability and flow patterns in carbonate area and to evaluate correlation between permeability and flow patterns. Data used in this study were collected from many literatures and these data were analyzed and evaluated using graphic and statistical analysis. In many carbonate areas, branching conduit patterns were dominant. Of these areas, permeability was relatively high in areas where moving distance of flow was short and hydraulic gradient was steep. This work was supported by the Energy Resources R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government Ministry of Knowledge Economy (No. 2009201030001A).

  19. Comparative study on CO2 sources in soil developed on carbonate rock and non-carbonate rock in Central Guizhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎廷宇; 王世杰; 郑乐平

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, by using concentration and carbon stable isotope the.CO2 sources of soil profiles developed on limestone, dolostone and claystone basements in Central Guizhou, China are comparatively studied. The results show that CO2 concentration of soil profiles developed on different basements is different, having the following sequence: limestone>dolostone>claystone. Below the soil depth of 20 cm from the surface the δ13C value of CO2 in soil profile developed on limestone ranges from -12.811‰ - -13.492‰(PDB), that in soil profile developed on dolostone varys from -13.212‰--14.271‰(PDB) and that in soil profile developed on claystone is about -20.234‰- -21.485‰(PDB). Taking the carbon isotope of soil organic matter and carbonate rock as two isotopic endmembers, the proportion of soil C02 generated by dissolution of carbonate rock is calculated, about 21%-25% for soil profile developed on limestone basement, 19%-21% for soil profile developed on dolostone basement. There is almost no influx of

  20. Application of isotope techniques to carbonate rock aquifers: Some Indian examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope hydrological investigations were carried out to study the origin of ground water and surface water-ground water interactions in two carbonate rock terrains - Jhamarkotra rock phosphate mine, Rajasthan and Amner river basin, Madhya Pradesh - situated in different settings

  1. Automatic photometric titrations of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, L.; Brannock, W.W.

    1955-01-01

    Rapid nonsubjective methods have been developed for the determination of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks. From a single solution of the sample, calcium is titrated directly, and magnesium is titrated after a rapid removal of R2O3 and precipitation of calcium as the tungstate. A concentrated and a dilute solution of disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetate are used as titrants. The concentrated solution is added almost to the end point, then the weak solution is added in an automatic titrator to determine the end point precisely.

  2. Carbon Dioxide - rock interaction: from molecular observations to theorised interactions in fluid-rock systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcara, Massimo; Borgia, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    Current global warming theories have produced some benefits: among them, detailed studies on CO2 and its properties, possible applications and perspectives. Starting from its use as a "green solvent" (for instance in decaffeination process), to enhance system in oil recovery, to capture and storage enough amount of CO2 in geological horizon. So, a great debate is centred around this molecule. One More useful research in natural horizon studies is its theorised use in Enhanced Geothermal Systems with CO2 as the only working fluid. In any case, the CO2 characteristics should be deeply understood, before injecting a molecule prone to change easily its aggregation state at relatively shallow depth. CO2 Rock interaction becomes therefore a focal point in approaching research sectors linked in some manner to natural or induced presence of carbon dioxide in geological horizons. Possible chemical interactions between fluids and solids have always been a central topic in defining evolution of the system as a whole in terms of dissolutions, reactions, secondary mineral formation and, in case of whichever plant, scaling. Questions arise in case of presence of CO2 with host rocks. Chemical and molecular properties are strategic. CO2 Rock interactions are based on eventual solubility capability of pure liquid and supercritical CO2 seeking and eventually quantifying its polar and/or ionic solvent capabilities. Single molecule at STP condition is linear, with central carbon atom and oxygen atoms at opposite site on a straight line with a planar angle. It has a quadrupolar moment due to the electronegativity difference between carbon and oxygen. As soon as CO2 forms bond with water, it deforms even at atmospheric pressure, assuming an induced dipole moment with a value around 0.02 Debye. Hydrated CO2 forms a hydrophilic bond; it deforms with an angle of 178 degrees. Pure CO2 forms self aggregates. In the simplest case a dimer, with two molecules of CO2 exerting mutual attraction

  3. Characteristics of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion in matrix and stylolite of carbonate rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高岗; 郝石生; 王晖

    1999-01-01

    Characteristics of organic matter content, hydrocarbon generation and expulsion of carbonate rocks are discussed by analysis of organic carbon and pyrolysis. There is a strong inhomogeneity in distribution of organic matter in carbonate rocks. The organic matter abundance is higher in stylolites, carbonate varves or marls, while it is the lowest in matrixes (purer carbonate rocks around stylolites). Because of stable thickness and broad area, marls and carbonate varves may become good source rocks. At the same depth, stylolites, carbonate varves and matrixes generate and expel hydrocarbons almost at the same time. Expulsion efficiency of carbonate varve is the highest; that of matrixes is the lowest and that of stylolites is between marl’s or carbonate varve’s and matrix’ s.

  4. Friction and Wear of Carbonate Rocks Under High Velocity Sliding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneh, Y.; Sagy, A.; Reches, Z.

    2012-12-01

    We experimentally investigated the relations between friction and wear-rate during steady-state, high-velocity slip along carbonate faults. Our observations demonstrate a systematic reduction of both friction coefficient and wear-rate with increase of both slip-velocity and normal stress. The experiments were conducted with a rotary shear apparatus on solid, ring-shaped rock samples that slipped for displacements up to tens of meters, with continuous monitoring of stresses, wear and temperature. We performed 107 experiments on experimental faults made of Kasota dolomite, Dover limestone and a fault made of rock-pair Kasota dolomite and Blue quartzite. The friction/wear analysis is focused on the steady-state stage under slip velocity range of 0.002 to 0.96 m/s, and normal stress from 0.25 to 6.9 MPa. The experiments reveal a combined effect of slip-velocity and normal stress on the wear-rate. Under relatively low velocities (V wear-rate is proportional to the normal stress, in agreement with Archard (1953) model. On the other hand, in the higher velocity range of V ~ 0.5 - 1 m/s, the wear-rate is not proportional to the normal stress and it reduces with increasing slip-velocity. Further, the velocity effect on the wear-rate becomes stronger with increasing normal stress approaching negligible wear production. The experiments indicate that the steady-state frictional strength of these carbonate samples is best correlated with the power-density (= shear stress * slip-velocity, MW/m2). The observed friction/power-density relation show three regimes: (1) high (μ ~ 0.9), quasi-constant friction coefficient under low power-density of 0.4 MW/m2; and (3) transition zone of friction coefficient dropping from ~ 0.9 to ~ 0.3 for intermediated power density ranging 0.05 - 0.4 MW/m2. During experiments with high power-density, the carbonate fault surface underwent thermal decomposition of the carbonate (Han et al., 2007; Green et al., 2010) that generate a smooth, shiny

  5. Molecular and carbon isotopic compositions of gas inclusions of deep carbonate rocks in the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shixin; WANG Xianbin; MENG Zifang; LI Yuan; Paul Farrimond; LI Liwu; DUAN Yi

    2004-01-01

    Gaseous components of gas inclusions in deep carbonate rocks (>5700 m) from the Tacan 1 well were analyzed by online mass spectrometry by means of either the stepwise heating technique or vacuum electromagnetism crushing. The carbon isotopic compositions of gases released by vacuum electromagnetism crushing were also measured. Although the molecular compositions of gas inclusions show differences between the two methods, the overall characteristics are that gas inclusions mainly contain CO2, whilst hydrocarbon gases, such as CH4, C2H6 and C3H8, are less abundant. The content of CO is higher in the stepwise heating experiment than that in the method of vacuum electromagnetism crushing, and there are only minor amounts of N2, H2 and O2 in gas inclusions. Methane δ13C values of gas inclusions in Lower Ordovician and Upper Cambrian rocks (from 5713.7 to 6422 m; -52‰-63‰) are similar to those of bacterial methane, but their chemical compositions do not exhibit the dry character in comparison with biogenic gases. These characteristics of deep gas inclusions may be related to the migration fractionation. Some deep natural gases with light carbon isotopic characteristics in the Tazhong Uplift may have a similar origin. The δ13C1 values of gas inclusions in Lower Cambrian rocks (7117-7124 m) are heavier (-39‰), consistent with highly mature natural gases. Carbon isotopic compositions of CO2 in the gas inclusions of deep carbonate rocks are similar (from -4‰ to -13‰) to those of deep natural gases, indicating predominantly an inorganic origin.

  6. Stress path dependent hydromechanical behaviour of heterogeneous carbonate rock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimanov A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of stress paths, representative of reservoir conditions, on the hydromechanical behavior of a moderately heterogeneous carbonate has been investigated. Multiscale structural heterogeneities, common for instance in carbonate rocks, can strongly alter the mechanical response and significantly influence the evolution of flow properties with stress. Using a triaxial cell, the permeability evolutions during compression and the effects of brittle (fracture and plastic (pore collapse deformations at yield, were measured. A strong scattering was observed on the mechanical response both in term of compressibility and failure threshold. Using the porosity scaling predicted by an adapted effective medium theory (based on crack growth under Hertzian contact, we have rescaled the critical pressures by the normalized porosity deviation. This procedure reduces efficiently the scattering, revealing in the framework of proportional stress path loading, a linear relation between the critical pressures and the stress path parameter through all the deformation regimes. It leads to a new formulation for the critical state envelope in the 'mean stress, deviatoric stress' diagram. The attractive feature of this new yield envelope formulation relies on the fact that only the two most common different mechanical tests 'Uniaxial Compression' and 'Hydrostatic Compression', are needed to define entirely the yield envelope. Volumic strains and normalized permeabilities are finally mapped in the stresses diagram and correlated.

  7. Comprehensive geochemical identification of highly evolved marine carbonate rocks as hydrocarbon-source rocks as exemplified by the Ordos Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tenger; LIU; Wenhui; XU; Yongchang; CHEN; Jianfa

    2006-01-01

    This study reversed the developing environments of hydrocarbon-source rocks in the Ordos Basin and evaluated carbonate rocks as hydrocarbon-source rocks and their distributions on account of the fact that China's marine carbonate rocks as hydrocarbon-source rocks are characterized by intensive thermal evolution and relatively low abundance of organic matter, by taking the Lower Paleozoic of the Ordos Basin for example and in light of the calculated enrichment coefficients of trace elements, the REE distribution patterns, the mathematical statistics analysis of elements and carbon isotopes and their three-dimensional diagrammatization in combination with the necessary organic parameters. As for the Ordos Basin, TOC=0.2% is an important boundary value. Studies have shown that in the strata where TOC is greater than 0.2%, Ba is highly enriched with positive δ13Ccarb shifts and δ13Corg less than -28‰, reflecting a thigh paleo-productivity, high burial amounts of organic matter, relatively good hydrocarbon-generating potentiality and intensive REE fractionation. All these indicated that the settlement rates are low and the geological conditions are good for the preservation of organic matter, hence favoring the development of hydrocarbon-source rocks. The Klimory and Wulalik formations show certain regularities in those aspects and, therefore, they can be regarded as the potential effective hydrocarbon-source rocks. In the strata where total TOC is less than 0.2%, the contents of Ba are low, δ13Ccarb values are mostly negative, and δ13Corg values range from -24‰--28‰, demonstrating low burial amounts of organic matter, poor potentialities of hydrocarbon generation, weak REE fractionation and rapid settlement rates. These facts showed that most of the hydrocarbon-source rocks were formed in shallow-water, high-energy oxidizing environments, thus unfavoring the development of hydrocarbon-source rocks. It is feasible to make use of the geochemical method to

  8. Carbonation by fluid-rock interactions at high-pressure conditions: Implications for carbon cycling in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Francesca; Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Beyssac, Olivier; Martinez, Isabelle; Ague, Jay J.; Chaduteau, Carine

    2016-07-01

    Carbonate-bearing lithologies are the main carbon carrier into subduction zones. Their evolution during metamorphism largely controls the fate of carbon, regulating its fluxes between shallow and deep reservoirs. Recent estimates predict that almost all subducted carbon is transferred into the crust and lithospheric mantle during subduction metamorphism via decarbonation and dissolution reactions at high-pressure conditions. Here we report the occurrence of eclogite-facies marbles associated with metasomatic systems in Alpine Corsica (France). The occurrence of these marbles along major fluid-conduits as well as textural, geochemical and isotopic data indicating fluid-mineral reactions are compelling evidence for the precipitation of these carbonate-rich assemblages from carbonic fluids during metamorphism. The discovery of metasomatic marbles brings new insights into the fate of carbonic fluids formed in subducting slabs. We infer that rock carbonation can occur at high-pressure conditions by either vein-injection or chemical replacement mechanisms. This indicates that carbonic fluids produced by decarbonation reactions and carbonate dissolution may not be directly transferred to the mantle wedge, but can interact with slab and mantle-forming rocks. Rock-carbonation by fluid-rock interactions may have an important impact on the residence time of carbon and oxygen in subduction zones and lithospheric mantle reservoirs as well as carbonate isotopic signatures in subduction zones. Furthermore, carbonation may modulate the emission of CO2 at volcanic arcs over geological time scales.

  9. Study of the Factors Affecting the Abundance of Organic Matter in Jurassic Carbonate Rocks in Qiangtang Basin, Tibet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文志刚; 胡明毅; 龚文平; 肖传桃

    2004-01-01

    Field and laboratory analyses of carbonate rock samples from the Qiangtang Basin,Tibet, indicate that carbonate source rocks are mainly developed in the Middle Jurassic Xiali Formation and Upper Jurassic Suowa Formation. Comprehensive studies showed that the Suowa Formation carbonate source rocks have a favorable hydrocarbon-generating potential. The abundance of organic matter in the carbonate rocks is controlled mainly by sedimentary environment and inorganic compounds in the rocks, which is higher in the restricted platform facies than in the open platform facies. Organic carbon contents decrease with increasing CaO contents in the source rocks.

  10. Carbon Sources to Authigenic Carbonate Rock at Chemosynthetic Communities: Lower Slope of the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassen, R.; Jung, W.; Zhang, C.; Defreitas, D. A.

    2004-12-01

    Flux of biogenic methane, crude oil and associated hydrocarbon gases occurs from the deep subsurface to the seafloor, water column, and atmosphere of the Gulf of Mexico slope. Chemosynthetic communities occur at sites of relatively high gas flux, frequently with gas hydrate, but always with authigenic carbonate rock \\(ACR\\). ACR contains carbonate carbon derived from microbial hydrocarbon oxidation that geologically sequesters much fossil carbon, perturbing the carbon cycle. ACR was collected using the ALVIN from sites with chemosynthetic communities in Alaminos Canyon, Atwater Valley, and the Florida Escarpment areas at water depths as much as 3.3 km. Bulk δ 13C was measured and carbonate petrology used to identify carbonate cements, normal marine carbonate, and non-carbonate components such as metal oxides and sulfides. ACR is depleted in 13C. However, the δ 13C of major hydrocarbon types is typically more depleted in 13C than the associated ACR. For example, the mean δ 13C of biogenic methane seeps in the Gulf slope is -74.0\\permil PDB but the lightest bulk ACR measured in the study area is -46.6\\permil PDB. Carbonate cements from hydrocarbon oxidation are shown to enclose skeletal remains of chemosynthetic fauna such as mussels, clams, as well as other fauna characterized by normal marine carbonate \\(\\sim 0\\permil PDB\\). The best explanation of why the δ 13C of ACR does not closely correspond to that of the hydrocarbon starting products is that normal marine carbon dilutes the δ 13C from hydrocarbon oxidation and thus affects the bulk isotopic properties of ACR.

  11. Waterproofing of porous carbonate rocks: Efficiency-controlling its properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esbert, R. M.

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to establish which physical properties may be used, in a routine way, in order to know the efficacy rate of a treatment applied on a specific rocky substrate. Whit this purpose, two types of carbonated rocks, the limestone of Hontoria (Burgos and the dolomite of Laspra (Asturias have been chosen, with a very different configuration of their porosity systems. Three protection products, with silico-organic nature and widely used have been used, to wit: two siloxenes and a copolymer. Tue properties chosen (contact angle and water vapour permeability have been the proper ones in order to determine the efficacy level of the different treatments. This level was demonstrated to be conditioned by the chemical characteristics of this product, and the influence of the characteristics is practically null. Other investigations are being carried out with the same rocks and treatment products in order to establish the corelationships between the efficacy rate of these treatments and the durability of the rock-treatment systems.

    La finalidad del presente estudio es la de tratar de establecer que propiedades físicas pueden ser empleadas de una forma rutinaria para conocer el grado de eficacia de un tratamiento aplicado sobre un determinado sustrato pétreo. Con esta finalidad se han seleccionado dos tipos de rocas carbonatadas, la caliza de Hontoria (Burgos y la dolomía de Laspra (Asturias, con una configuración del sistema poroso muy diferente. Se han empleado tres productos protectores de naturaleza silicoorgánica, ampliamente utilizados, dos siloxanos y un copolímero. Las propiedades seleccionadas (ángulo de contado y permeabilidad al vapor de agua han resultado idóneas para determinar el grado de eficacia de los distintos tratamientos. Se ha comprobado que dicho grado está condicionado por las características químicas del producto, siendo prácticamente nula la influencia de las características de la roca. Se

  12. The hydrocarbon generation mechanism and the threestage type model of hydrocarbon generation for carbonate source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆云; 程克明

    1997-01-01

    The diagenetic mechanism and process of carbonate rocks, which is different to that of clastic rocks, decides the existence of different existing state organic matters in carbonate rocks. This has been verified by both the microscopic observation of organic petrology and the analysis of organic geochemistry of many samples. Based on the hydrous pyrolysis simulation experiment of the low-mature carbonate rocks, the contrasting study on the yield and their geochemistry characteristics of different existing state soluble organic matters of a series of various maturity samples shows that the different existing state organic matters make different contributions to hydrocarbon generation during every evolution state. So that, the hydrocarbon generation process of carbonate rocks can be summarized as the following three stages; the first is the direct degradation of biogenic bitumen macromolecules during the immature stage, the second is the thermal degradation of a large amount of kerogen at the mature stage,

  13. High=porosity Cenozoic carbonate rocks of South Florida: progressive loss of porosity with depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Robert B.; Schmoker, James W.

    1983-01-01

    Porosity measurements by borehole gravity meter in subsurface Cenozoic carbonates of South Florida reveal an extremely porous mass of limestone and dolomite which is transitional in total pore volume between typical porosity values for modern carbonate sediments and ancient carbonate rocks. A persistent decrease of porosity with depth, similar to that of chalks of the Gulf Coast, occurs in these rocks. Carbonate strata with less than 20% porosity are absent from the rocks studied here. Aquifers and aquicludes cannot be distinguished on the basis of porosity. Aquifers are not exceptionally porous when compared to other Tertiary carbonate rocks in South Florida. Permeability in these strata is governed more by the spacial distribution of pore space and matrix than by total volume of porosity present. Dolomite is as porous as, or slightly less porous than, limestones in these rocks. This observation places limits on any model proposed for dolomitization and suggests that dolomitization does not take place by a simple ion-for-ion replacement of magnesium for calcium. Dolomitization may be selective for less porous limestone, or it may involve the incorporation of significant amounts of carbonate as well as magnesium into the rock. The great volume of pore space in these rocks serves to highlight the inefficiency of early diagenesis in reducing carbonate porosity and to emphasize the importance of later porosity reduction which occurs during the burial or late near-surface history of limestones and dolomites.

  14. Study on the threshold value of organic enrichment of carbonate as gas source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE; Haitao; LU; Shuangfang; ZHONG; Ningning; WANG; Bo

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, calculations have been performed about gas quantity of generation, adsorption, dissolving in oil, dissolving in water, diffusion of unit area carbonate rocks at different geologic conditions in the Tarim basin. According to the material balance principle, the corresponding organic carbon content when gas started expelling from source rocks with separate phases has been worked out. We regard it as the theoretical threshold value (TOCmin) of gas source rocks under the same geologic condition. Based on the simulating calculation, a fact has been discovered that TOCmin decreases with the increasing source rocks thickness, decreases at the beginning and then increases with the increasing maturity and decreases with the better type of organic matter. TOCmin evaluation table of carbonate gas source rocks in the Tarim basin has been established. Investigations indicate that the TOCmin of carbonate gas source rocks varies greatly with the differences of geologic conditions, and gas source rocks cannot be evaluated with a unified TOC threshold value. And we also establish a preliminary evaluation table of TOC industrial threshold value, TOCgy, of carbonate gas source rocks in the Tarim basin.

  15. Second Hydrocarbon—Generation from Organic Matter Trapped in Fluid Inclusions in Carbonate Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施继锡; 余孝颖

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism and significance of second hydrocarbon-generation from organic matter trapped in fluid inclusions in carbonate rocks are discussed.The types of organic matter and the relationship between them are also reviewed.The organic matter trapped in inclusions and crystals,which account for more than 20%of the total organic matter in carbonate rocks,may be of great significance in the generation of hydrocarbons.High-temperature oil resulting from second hydrocarbon-generation should be an important target,in addition to natural gas,in oilgas prospecting in regions of high-maturity carbonate rocks.

  16. Hydromechanical behavior of heterogeneous carbonate rock under proportional triaxial loadings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautriat, JéRéMie; Gland, Nicolas; Dimanov, Alexandre; Raphanel, Jean

    2011-01-01

    The influence of stress paths representative of reservoir conditions on the poromechanical behavior and coupled directional permeabilities evolution of a heterogeneous carbonate has been studied. Our experimental methodology is based on performing confined compression tests keeping constant a stress path coefficient K = Δσr/Δσa ratio of the radial and axial stress magnitudes, commonly assumed to be representative of reservoir stress state evolution during production. The experiments are performed in a triaxial cell specially designed to measure the permeability in two orthogonal directions, along and transverse to the direction of maximum stress. The tested rock is a heterogeneous bioclastic carbonate, the Estaillades limestone, with a bimodal porosity, of mean value around 28% and a moderate permeability of mean value 125 mdarcy. Microstructural analyses of initial and deformed samples have been performed combining X-ray tomography and microtomography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, and mercury injection porosimetry. The microstructural heterogeneity, observable by SEM, is characterized by the arrangement of the micrograins of calcite in either dense or microporous aggregates surrounded by larger pores. The spatial distribution of the two kinds of aggregates is responsible for important density fluctuations throughout the samples, recorded by X-ray tomography, which characterizes the mesoheterogeneity. We show that this mesoheterogeneity is a source of a large directional variability of permeability for a given specimen and also from sample to sample. In addition, the fluctuation of the porosity in the tested set of samples, from 24% to 31%, is an expression of the macroheterogeneity. Macroscopic mechanical data and the stress path dependency of porosity and permeability have been measured in the elastic, brittle, and compaction regimes. No significant effect of the stress path on the evolution of directional permeabilities is observed in the

  17. Noble gas isotopic composi-tions of deep carbonate rocks from the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Abundances and isotopic compositions of noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr) with various existence states in carbonate rocks from the Tacanl Well have been investigated by means of the stepwise heating technique. The elemental abundance patterns of noble gases in the samples show the enrichment of heavy noble gases and depletion of 20Ne relative to the atmosphere, which are designated as type- I and are similar to that observed in water, natural gases and sedimentary rocks. The 3He/4He ratios of deep carbonate samples at lower and medium temperature (300-700℃) and a majority of samples at higher temperature (1100-1500℃) steps are very similar to those of natural gases in the same strata in this area, this feature of radiogenic crustal helium shows that the Tazhong Uplift is relatively stable.However, significant helium and argon isotopic anomalies are found at the 1100℃ step in the Middle-Upper Ordoviclan carbonate rock, suggesting the incorporation of manfie-derived volatiles, this may be due to minor igneous minerals contained in sedimentary carbonate rocks. The 40Ar/36Ar ratios in the Cambrian carbonate rock are slightly higher than those in Ordovician carbonate rocks, which may reflect the influence of the chronologic accumulation effect of crust radiogenic 40Ar. Argon isotopes of various existence states in source rocks are much more different, both 38Ar/36Ar and 40Ar/36Ar ratios at the higher temperature steps are higher than those at the lower temperature steps.``

  18. Carbon and Oxygen Isotope Stratigraphy of the Oxfordian Carbonate Rocks in Amu Darya Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rongcai Zheng; Yanghui Pan; Can Zhao; Lei Wu; Renjin Chen; Rui Yang

    2013-01-01

    Based on the detailed research on petrologic and geochemical characteristics of deposition and diagenesis of Oxfordian carbonate rocks in Amu Darya Basin,Turkmenistan,carbon and oxygen isotopes were analyzed.The results show that the paleoenvironmental evolution reflected by the samples with well-preserved original carbon isotopes coincides with the carbon-isotope stratigraphic carve and is almost consistent with the global sea-level curve,the Mid-Oxfordian wide transgression,and the positive carbon-isotope excursion event.The Mid-Oxfordian continuing transgression not only laid the foundation for the development of the Oxfordian reef and shoal reservoirs in Amu Darya Basin but also provided an example for the Oxfordian global transgression and the resulting development of reefs and banks and high-speed organic carbon burial events.The response of oxygen isotopes in diagenetic environment showed that micrite limestones and granular limestones underwent weak diagenetic alteration,and the samples largely retained the original seawater features.Dolomitization and the precipitation of hydrothermal calcites tilling solution vugs and fractures before hydrocarbon accumulation occurred in a closed diagenetic environment where the main controlling factor is the temperature,and the diagenetic fluids were from the deep hot brine.The chalkification of the limestones after hydrocarbon accumulation occurred in the oiltield water systems.

  19. Multiscale imaging of carbonate rocks and representative sampling for digital rock physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, H.; Dewers, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Geomaterials containing nano-pores (e.g., shales and carbonate rocks) have become increasingly important for emerging problems such as unconventional gas and oil resources, enhanced oil recovery, and geologic storage of CO2. Accurate prediction of coupled geophysical and chemical processes at the pore scale requires realistic representation of pore structure and topology. This is especially true for chalk materials, where pore networks are small and complex, and require characterization at sub-micron scale. In this work, we apply laser scanning confocal microscopy with various filters to characterize pore structures and microlithofacies at a thin-section scale (micron resolution) and dual focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) for 3D imaging of nanometer-to-micron scale microcracks and pore distributions. With imaging techniques advanced for nano-pore characterization, it is critical to define representative sampling of FIB-SEM images and apply it to the thin-section or larger scale. In this work, several texture characterization techniques are applied for segmentation clusters represented by a couple of 3-D FIB-SEM image stacks per each cluster. Pore structure evolution is characterized based on geometric and topological properties from a set of FIB-SEM images and lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to obtain permeability at several different scales. Upscaling of permeability to the Darcy scale (e.g., the thin-section scale) with image dataset will be discussed with emphasis on understanding microfracture-matrix interaction, representative volume for FIB-SEM sampling, and multiphase flow and reactive transport. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. In Situ Evaluation of Water-Rock Reactions during Carbon Dioxide Injection in Basaltic and Metasedimentary Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, J. M.; Assayag, N.; Goldberg, D.; Takahashi, T.

    2006-12-01

    Large differences between laboratory and field derived mineral reaction rates underscore the importance of evaluating mineral-fluid reactions under in situ conditions in a natural environment. This study investigates the extent of in situ water-rock reactions in basaltic and metasedimentary rocks (rich in Ca, Mg silicates) after the injection of CO2 enriched water, with the objective of providing information pertinent to permanent storage of anthropogenic CO2 in geologic reservoirs. CO2 injections were conducted using a single-well push-pull testing strategy. CO2 saturated water (pH 3.5) was injected into a hydraulically isolated and permeable aquifer in a 300-m experimental borehole. Water samples were retrieved after the CO2 injection. Mass transfer terms for Ca, Mg, Na, and Si were determined by using the measured ion concentrations. Using the mass balance, the weeks-long incubation time of the injected solution, and geometric estimates of the reactive surface area of the host rocks, in situ bulk rock dissolution rates of aquifer material were estimated. In addition, δ13C data coupled with total CO2 concentration were used as a tracer to quantitatively evaluate processes such as carbonate dissolution and precipitation, oxidation of organic matter and biological activity within the aquifer. Results show that the injected CO2 was neutralized within several days by two processes; mixing with aquifer water, and rock-water reactions. Calculated bulk rock dissolution rates decrease with increasing pH. The pH dependence of the dissolution rate for Ca is twice as large as for Mg, strongly favoring Ca release and possibly suggesting an additional source of Ca besides silicate minerals. Analyses of δ13C on water and rock samples confirm dissolution of calcium carbonates within the aquifer.

  1. Geochemistry of silicate-rich rocks can curtail spreading of carbon dioxide in subsurface aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, S. S. S.; Andres, J. T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Pools of carbon dioxide are found in natural geological accumulations and in engineered storage in saline aquifers. It has been thought that once this CO2 dissolves in the formation water, making it denser, convection streams will transport it efficiently to depth, but this may not be so. Here, we assess theoretically and experimentally the impact of natural chemical reactions between the dissolved CO2 and the rock formation on the convection streams in the subsurface. We show that, while in carbonate rocks the streaming of dissolved carbon dioxide persists, the chemical interactions in silicate-rich rocks may curb this transport drastically and even inhibit it altogether. These results challenge our view of carbon sequestration and dissolution rates in the subsurface, suggesting that pooled carbon dioxide may remain in the shallower regions of the formation for hundreds to thousands of years. The deeper regions of the reservoir can remain virtually carbon free.

  2. Metasomatic Mechanism of Weathering-Pedogenesis of Carbonate Rocks: I. Mineralogical and Micro-Textural Evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱立军; 李景阳

    2002-01-01

    On the basis of mineralogical, geochemical and micro-textural studies of the typical sections of the red weathering crust of carbonate rocks in the subtropical karst areas of Guizhou Province and Guangxi Autonomous Region, we have found, either on a microscopic or on a macroscopical scale and in different positions of the sections, the most direct and most important mineralogical and micro-textural evidence for the development of metasomatism in the process of weathering-pedogenesis of numerous carbonate rocks. This paper also has expounded for the first time and systematically the mechanism of metasomatism involved in the process of weathering pedogenesis of carbonate rocks and proposed the sequence of mineral metasomatic evolution in the process of weathering-pedogenesis of carbonate rocks.

  3. Research on determining organic carbon in rock and mineral samples by gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors introduce results of research on transformation mechanism, temperature and time of organic carbon during analysis of rock and mineral samples by gas chromatography, as well as conditions for eliminating carbonate constituent that may produce carbon dioxide gas. The research has solved the problem of connecting the chemical processing and instrument determination. The newly-established method is characterized by high sensitivity, good exactitude, simple and fast operation, and may be applied to the determination of organic carbon in rock, mineral, as well as sediment samples

  4. The nature of carbon material in the black shale rock mass of Kazakhstan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchenko, L.G.

    1981-01-01

    Carbon material is closely tied to ores of various origin lying in the carbon (black shale) rock masses of Kazakhastan. The nature of the carbon material in several gold fields is closely examined. Shungite, its paragenesis with ore materials and its role in the carbon and ore material processes, is described. The accumulation of shungite in zones determined to consist of ores, is looked at in terms of prospecting criteria.

  5. Integrated Experimental and Modeling Studies of Mineral Carbonation as a Mechanism for Permanent Carbon Sequestration in Mafic/Ultramafic Rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhengrong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Qiu, Lin [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhang, Shuang [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bolton, Edward [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bercovici, David [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Ague, Jay [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Karato, Shun-Ichiro [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Oristaglio, Michael [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhu, Wen-Iu [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Lisabeth, Harry [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Johnson, Kevin [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    A program of laboratory experiments, modeling and fieldwork was carried out at Yale University, University of Maryland, and University of Hawai‘i, under a DOE Award (DE-FE0004375) to study mineral carbonation as a practical method of geologic carbon sequestration. Mineral carbonation, also called carbon mineralization, is the conversion of (fluid) carbon dioxide into (solid) carbonate minerals in rocks, by way of naturally occurring chemical reactions. Mafic and ultramafic rocks, such as volcanic basalt, are natural candidates for carbonation, because the magnesium and iron silicate minerals in these rocks react with brines of dissolved carbon dioxide to form carbonate minerals. By trapping carbon dioxide (CO2) underground as a constituent of solid rock, carbonation of natural basalt formations would be a secure method of sequestering CO2 captured at power plants in efforts to mitigate climate change. Geochemical laboratory experiments at Yale, carried out in a batch reactor at 200°C and 150 bar (15 MPa), studied carbonation of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacting with CO2 brines in the form of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions. The main carbonation product in these reactions is the carbonate mineral magnesite (MgCO3). A series of 32 runs varied the reaction time, the reactive surface area of olivine grains and powders, the concentration of the reacting fluid, and the starting ratio of fluid to olivine mass. These experiments were the first to study the rate of olivine carbonation under passive conditions approaching equilibrium. The results show that, in a simple batch reaction, olivine carbonation is fastest during the first 24 hours and then slows significantly and even reverses. A natural measure of the extent of carbonation is a quantity called the carbonation fraction, which compares the amount of carbon removed from solution, during a run, to the maximum amount

  6. Evaluation criteria for gas source rocks of marine carbonate in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhaoyun; ZHAO Wenzhi; WANG Yunpeng

    2005-01-01

    Hydrocarbon generating and expulsion simulation experiments are carried out using samples artifically matched between the acid-dissolved residue of relatively low-maturity limestone and the original sample. This work makes up for the insufficiency of source rock samples with high abundance of organic matters and low maturity in China. The organic carbon content of the 10 prepared samples varies between 0.15 % and 0.74 %. Pyrolysis data and simulation experiment results of hydrocarbon generating and expulsion, which were obtained by a high-temperature and high-pressure open system, indicate that the lower limit of organic carbon content for marine carbonate rock to generate and expel hydrocarbons is 0.23 %-0.31%. In combination with the numerical analysis of organic carbon in marine carbonate rocks from Tarim Basin, Sichuan Basin, Ordos Basin and North China, as well as the contribution of these gas source rocks to the discovered gas pools, we think that the organic carbon criterion for carbonate gas source rocks should be 0.3%.

  7. Burial stress and elastic strain of carbonate rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Burial stress on a sediment or sedimentary rock is relevant for predicting compaction or failure caused by changes in, e.g., pore pressure in the subsurface. For this purpose, the stress is conventionally expressed in terms of its effect: “the effective stress” defined as the consequent elastic...... strain multiplied by the rock frame modulus. We cannot measure the strain directly in the subsurface, but from the data on bulk density and P‐wave velocity, we can estimate the rock frame modulus and Biot's coefficient and then calculate the “effective vertical stress” as the total vertical stress minus...... the product of pore pressure and Biot's coefficient. We can now calculate the elastic strain by dividing “effective stress” with the rock frame modulus. By this procedure, the degree of elastic deformation at a given time and depth can be directly expressed. This facilitates the discussion of the deformation...

  8. Characterizing petrophysical properties of carbonate rocks using nuclear magnetic resonance and spectral induced polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Chi; Rankey, Eugene

    2016-04-01

    Unlike sandstones, with well-characterized correlations between porosity and permeability, carbonate rocks are well known for their highly complex petrophysical behaviors due to their intrinsically heterogeneous pore shape, pore size, and pore distributions and connectivity. The characterization of petrophysical properties of carbonate rocks, including rock properties and rock-fluid interactions, remains big challenges. This laboratory study focuses on integrating two geophysical methods: nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and spectral induced polarization (SIP) to determine porosity, pore size distribution, and permeability of carbonate rocks. NMR measures the relaxation of hydrogen nuclei at pore scale. Samples with different pore structures saturated by fluids have molecular relaxation responses to the external magnetic field which could generate various NMR signals. Permeability estimation from NMR in siliciclastic rocks is routine, however, is problematic in carbonates. SIP determines complex resistivity of a sample across a wide range of frequency and is sensitive to variations in the properties of solid-fluid and fluid-fluid interfaces in porous media. Previous studies investigated the relationships between permeability and parameters derived from SIP data, but are restricted to narrow lithology range. Our study used carbonate core samples from three depositional environments: tidal zone, shallow marine, and platform/reef margin of an atoll. Samples were fully saturated by water for T2 relaxation measurements and complex conductivity measurements at low frequencies. We compare the pore volume to surface area ratio measured from NMR and SIP and assess the applicability of established petrophysical models to estimate permeability from NMR and SIP data. We hope to build a relationship between NMR signals, SIP responses and petrophysical properties in carbonate rocks. The results could also provide new data and help further understand the unique and complex pore

  9. Rock Physics of Geologic Carbon Sequestration/Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvorkin, Jack; Mavko, Gary

    2013-05-31

    This report covers the results of developing the rock physics theory of the effects of CO{sub 2} injection and storage in a host reservoir on the rock's elastic properties and the resulting seismic signatures (reflections) observed during sequestration and storage. Specific topics addressed are: (a) how the elastic properties and attenuation vary versus CO{sub 2} saturation in the reservoir during injection and subsequent distribution of CO{sub 2} in the reservoir; (b) what are the combined effects of saturation and pore pressure on the elastic properties; and (c) what are the combined effects of saturation and rock fabric alteration on the elastic properties. The main new results are (a) development and application of the capillary pressure equilibrium theory to forecasting the elastic properties as a function of CO{sub 2} saturation; (b) a new method of applying this theory to well data; and (c) combining this theory with other effects of CO{sub 2} injection on the rock frame, including the effects of pore pressure and rock fabric alteration. An important result is translating these elastic changes into synthetic seismic responses, specifically, the amplitude-versus-offset (AVO) response depending on saturation as well as reservoir and seal type. As planned, three graduate students participated in this work and, as a result, received scientific and technical training required should they choose to work in the area of monitoring and quantifying CO{sub 2} sequestration.

  10. Distribution of organic carbon and petroleum source rock potential of Cretaceous and lower Tertiary carbonates, South Florida Basin: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacas, James George

    1978-01-01

    Analyses of 134 core samples from the South Florida Basin show that the carbonates of Comanchean age are relatively richer in average organic carbon (0.41 percent) than those of Coahuilan age (0.28 percent), Gulfian age (0.18 percent) and Paleocene age (0.20 percent). They are also nearly twice as rich as the average world, wide carbonate (average 0.24 percent). The majority of carbonates have organic carbons less than 0.30 percent but the presence of many relatively organic rich beds composed of highly bituminous, argillaceous, highly stylolitic, and algal-bearing limestones and dolomites accounts for the higher percentage of organic carbon in some of the stratigraphic units. Carbonate rocks that contain greater than 0.4 percent organic carbon and that might be considered as possible petroleum sources were noted in almost each subdivision of the Coahuilan and Comanchean Series but particularly the units of Fredericksburg 'B', Trinity 'A', Trinity 'F', and Upper Sunniland. Possible source rocks have been ascribed by others to the Lower Sunniland, but lack of sufficient samples precluded any firm assessment in this initial report. In the shallower section of the basin, organic-rich carbonates containing as much as 3.2 percent organic carbon were observed in the lowermost part of the Gulfian Series and carbonate rocks with oil staining or 'dead' and 'live oil' were noted by others in the uppermost Gulfian and upper Cedar Keys Formation. It is questionable whether these shallower rocks are of sufficient thermal maturity to have generated commercial oil. The South Florida basin is still sparsely drilled and produces only from the Sunniland Limestone at an average depth of 11,500 feet (3500 m). Because the Sunniland contains good reservoir rocks and apparently adequate source rocks, and because the success rate of new oil field discoveries has increased in recent years, the chances of finding additional oil reserves in the Sunniland are promising. Furthermore, the

  11. A simple method for producing high-quality porecasts of carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, D.; Sellwood, B. W.

    1991-04-01

    The study of porecasts is an important technique for evaluating the distribution, and quantity, of porosity in carbonate rocks. This paper sets out a method by which high-quality porecasts may be produced, quickly and easily. The procedure consists of impregnation firstly under vacuum, then under pressure with low viscosity (6 × 10 -3 Pa s) epoxy resin. Examination under SEM reveals penetration of intragranular porosity at a submicron scale without disruption of the rock fabric.

  12. Acoustic Velocity Data for Clay Bearing Carbonate Rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Ida; Shogenova, Alla

    1998-01-01

    Two sets of acoustic data on carbonates were combined to span the porosity interval from below 5% to more than 75%: dolomite and limestone of Paleozoic age from Estonia and mixed sediments from the Caribbean. The carbonate content of the samples ranges from less than 50% to 100%, and it was attem...

  13. Preliminary Rock Physics Characterization of Mississippian Carbonate Reservoir in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.; Keehm, Y.; Kim, H.

    2011-12-01

    The Mississippian formations in the Western Canada Sedimentary Basin are known to have large hydrocarbon resources. The Lodgepole formation is the most important reservoir for oil production in Daly and Virden fields. In this study, we performed preliminary reservoir characterization using rock physics modeling. We first delineated the Lodgepole formation by geological information, well-logs and core analysis data. Then, we conducted rock physics analyses such as GR-AI, DEM modeling, porosity-Vp, density-Vp, and porosity-permeability. We identified the Lodgepole formation has different porosity types, volume of shale, and the degree of fractures in difference intervals. In the upper part of the formation, we found that vuggy pores are well developed. Inter-particular porosity and fractures become significant as the depth increases. We found that the lower part can be divided into two groups by acoustic impedance. The prospective reservoir interval, one of the two groups, has higher fracture density, which can be identified by lower acoustic impedance. This result also implies that we could also use AVO analyses to delineate good reservoir intervals. In conclusion, rock physics modeling can be effectively applied to characterize the Lodgepole formation quantitatively with well-log and core analysis data. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by the Energy Resources R&D program of the Korea Institute of Energy Technology Evaluation and Planning (KETEP) grant funded by the Korea government Ministry of Knowledge Economy (No. 2009201030001A).

  14. Mineral replacements during carbonation of peridotite: implications for carbon dioxide sequestration in ultramafic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinlich, Andreas; Hövelmann, Jörn; Plümper, Oliver; Austrheim, Hâkon

    2010-05-01

    In contact with CO2, ultramafic rocks are known to be reactive and eventually form ophicarbonates and listwaenites. Here we present observations from serpentinized peridotite clasts from the Solund Devonian Basin, SW Norway. These clasts show evidence for a stepwise reaction history starting with initial serpentinization and resulting in the formation of carbonates (mainly calcite and dolomite) and quartz. Thus, they represent a natural analogue for CO2 sequestration in ultramafic rocks, which was proposed by the Inter Governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005) as one possibility for long-term CO2 storage. In several layers of the basin, the carbonatized ultramafic clasts are important constituents and account for up to 20 vol. % of the basin infill. The investigated clasts show a concentric build-up with green to grey colored cores surrounded by mm to 10 cm thick zones of red to black shades. Textural evidence indicates the following alteration sequence: An early stage is represented by serpentinization of peridotite resulting in a typical mesh texture, with veins of serpentine and Ni-rich hematite surrounding compartments of relict olivine (Fo90). Subsequently, relict olivine breaks down to form an alteration product which is significantly depleted in Mg relative to the precursor olivine. In the more advanced ophicarbonate stage, compartments are filled with calcite, quartz, and talc. In the most advanced stage, quartz, calcite, and hematite dominate and occur together with minor amounts of chromite, talc, and chlorite. The textural evolution is accompanied by a decrease in whole-rock MgO from 40 to 2 wt. % and a CaO increase from 1 to 35 wt. %. All clasts are characterized by high Cr and Ni (1000-4000 and 500-3000 ppm, respectively) revealing their ultramafic origin. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations indicate that the alteration product after olivine is composed of an amorphous material, which is compositionally close to serpentine

  15. Anisotropic rock physics models for interpreting pore structures in carbonate reservoirs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Sheng-Jie; Shao Yu; Chen Xu-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    We developed an anisotropic effective theoretical model for modeling the elastic behavior of anisotropic carbonate reservoirs by combining the anisotropic self-consistent approximation and differential effective medium models. By analyzing the measured data from carbonate samples in the TL area, a carbonate pore-structure model for estimating the elastic parameters of carbonate rocks is proposed, which is a prerequisite in the analysis of carbonate reservoirs. A workfl ow for determining elastic properties of carbonate reservoirs is established in terms of the anisotropic effective theoretical model and the pore-structure model. We performed numerical experiments and compared the theoretical prediction and measured data. The result of the comparison suggests that the proposed anisotropic effective theoretical model can account for the relation between velocity and porosity in carbonate reservoirs. The model forms the basis for developing new tools for predicting and evaluating the properties of carbonate reservoirs.%♦Corresponding author: Li Sheng-Jie (Email: Richard@cup.edu.cn)

  16. Carbon isotopic studies of organic matter in Precambrian rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, D. Z.; Schopf, J. W.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    A survey has been undertaken of the carbon composition of the total organic fraction of a suite of Precambrian sediments to detect isotopic trends possibly correlative with early evolutionary events. Early Precambrian cherts of the Fig Tree and upper and middle Onverwacht groups of South Africa were examined for this purpose. Reduced carbon in these cherts was found to be isotopically similar to photosynthetically produced organic matter of younger geological age. Reduced carbon in lower Onverwacht cherts was found to be anomalously heavy; it is suggested that this discontinuity may reflect a major event in biological evolution.

  17. Delineation of Magnesium-rich Ultramafic Rocks Available for Mineral Carbon Sequestration in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krevor, S.C.; Graves, C.R.; Van Gosen, B. S.; McCafferty, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    The 2005 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage suggested that a major gap in mineral carbon sequestration is locating the magnesium-silicate bedrock available to sequester CO2. It is generally known that silicate minerals with high concentrations of magnesium are suitable for mineral carbonation. However, no assessment has been made covering the entire United States detailing their geographical distribution and extent, or evaluating their potential for use in mineral carbonation. Researchers at Columbia University and the U.S. Geological Survey have developed a digital geologic database of ultramafic rocks in the continental United States. Data were compiled from varied-scale geologic maps of magnesium-silicate ultramafic rocks. These rock types are potentially suitable as source material for mineral carbon-dioxide sequestration. The focus of the national-scale map is entirely on suitable ultramafic rock types, which typically consist primarily of olivine and serpentine minerals. By combining the map with digital datasets that show non-mineable lands (such as urban areas and National Parks), estimates on potential depth of a surface mine, and the predicted reactivities of the mineral deposits, one can begin to estimate the capacity for CO2 mineral sequestration within the United States. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Complex resistivity spectra in relation to multiscale pore geometry in carbonates and mixed-siliciclastic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbisrath, Jan Henrik

    Carbonate rocks are known to have complex and heterogeneous pore structures, which result from their biogenic origin and strong affinity for diagenetic processes that change their pore structure after burial. The combination of sheer endless variations of precursor biogenic material, depositional environments, and diagenetic effects results in rocks that are interesting to study but intricate to understand. Many schemes to categorize the diversity of carbonate rocks are in use today; most are based on the macropore structure and qualitative thin-section analysis. Many studies, however, acknowledge that micropores have a significant influence on the macroscopic petrophysical rock properties, which are essential to determine reservoir quality. Micropores are, by definition, smaller than the thickness of a thin-section (cementation factors (m) in rocks with such microporosity type. The BIB-SEM method is also used on a dataset of mixed carbonate-siliciclastic (mudrock) samples with high kerogen and pyrite content. Results show that the nanopore geometry here has little influence on cementation factors, and instead porosity is the main control on m in mudrocks. Cementation factors are crucial for estimates of oil-in-place and water saturation in a wireline application, and a slight change of (assumed) cementation factor can change the interpreter's evaluation from dry hole to discovery. Therefore, accurate determination of cementation factors is a critical task in formation evaluation, similar to accurate estimates of permeability. To achieve this goal, this dissertation utilizes a new approach of using complex resistivity spectra (CRS) to assess the pore geometry and its resulting electrical and fluid flow properties. Specifically, frequency dispersion of complex resistivity in the kHz range is used as input for a new model to predict cementation factor and permeability in a wide variety of core plug samples. The underlying concept that relates CRS to flow properties

  19. Weathering-pedogenesis of Carbonate Rocks and Its Environmental Effects in Subtropical Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Lijun; HE Shouyang; LI Jingyang

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the weathering-pedogenesis of carbonate rocks and its environmental effects in subtropical regions of China. The investigation demonstrated that the weathering-pedogenesis of carbonate rocks is the process of a joint action of corrosion and illuviation and metasomatism in subtropical region. It is characterized by multi-stage, multi-path and multi-style.With the persisting development of weathering-pedogenesis of carbonate rocks, metasomatic pedogenesis progressively became the main process of the weathering-pedogenesis and the dominant style of formation of minerals. And it proceeds through the whole process of evolution of theweathering-pedogenesis of carbonate rocks. The stage evolution of wcathering-pedogenesis ofcarbonate rocks and the fractionation evolution of newly produced minerals are characterized byobvious vertically zoning structures and the rules of gradation of elements geochemical characteristics in the carbonate rocks weathering profiles. The geochemical process of weathering-pedogenesis of carbonate rocks can be divided into three geochemical evolution stages, I.e., the Ca, Mg-depletion and Si, AI-enrichment stage; the Fe, Mn enrichment stage and the Si-depletion and Al-enrichment stage in the subtropical regions. Consistent with the three geochemical evolution stages, the sequence of formation and evolution of minerals can be divided into the clay mineral stage; the Fe, Mn oxide and the gibbsite stage. The influence of weathering-pedogenesis of carbonate rocks on the chemical forms of heavy elements is mainly affected via newly produced components and minerals in the process of weathering-pedogenesis, e.g., iron oxide minerals and organic matters. The important mechanism for the mobilization, transport and pollution of F and As is affected the selective adsorption and desorption of F and As on the surface of iron oxide minerals in the subtropical karst zones, I.e., the selective adsorption and desorption on mineral surfaces of

  20. Integrated Experimental and Modeling Studies of Mineral Carbonation as a Mechanism for Permanent Carbon Sequestration in Mafic/Ultramafic Rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhengrong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Qiu, Lin [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhang, Shuang [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bolton, Edward [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bercovici, David [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Ague, Jay [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Karato, Shun-Ichiro [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Oristaglio, Michael [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Zhu, Wen-Iu [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Lisabeth, Harry [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Johnson, Kevin [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    A program of laboratory experiments, modeling and fieldwork was carried out at Yale University, University of Maryland, and University of Hawai‘i, under a DOE Award (DE-FE0004375) to study mineral carbonation as a practical method of geologic carbon sequestration. Mineral carbonation, also called carbon mineralization, is the conversion of (fluid) carbon dioxide into (solid) carbonate minerals in rocks, by way of naturally occurring chemical reactions. Mafic and ultramafic rocks, such as volcanic basalt, are natural candidates for carbonation, because the magnesium and iron silicate minerals in these rocks react with brines of dissolved carbon dioxide to form carbonate minerals. By trapping carbon dioxide (CO2) underground as a constituent of solid rock, carbonation of natural basalt formations would be a secure method of sequestering CO2 captured at power plants in efforts to mitigate climate change. Geochemical laboratory experiments at Yale, carried out in a batch reactor at 200°C and 150 bar (15 MPa), studied carbonation of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacting with CO2 brines in the form of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) solutions. The main carbonation product in these reactions is the carbonate mineral magnesite (MgCO3). A series of 32 runs varied the reaction time, the reactive surface area of olivine grains and powders, the concentration of the reacting fluid, and the starting ratio of fluid to olivine mass. These experiments were the first to study the rate of olivine carbonation under passive conditions approaching equilibrium. The results show that, in a simple batch reaction, olivine carbonation is fastest during the first 24 hours and then slows significantly and even reverses. A natural measure of the extent of carbonation is a quantity called the carbonation fraction, which compares the amount of carbon removed from solution, during a run, to the maximum amount

  1. Capillary Trapping of CO2 in Oil Reservoirs: Observations in a Mixed-Wet Carbonate Rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Menhali, Ali S; Krevor, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    Early deployment of carbon dioxide storage is likely to focus on injection into mature oil reservoirs, most of which occur in carbonate rock units. Observations and modeling have shown how capillary trapping leads to the immobilization of CO2 in saline aquifers, enhancing the security and capacity of storage. There are, however, no observations of trapping in rocks with a mixed-wet-state characteristic of hydrocarbon-bearing carbonate reservoirs. Here, we found that residual trapping of supercritical CO2 in a limestone altered to a mixed-wet state with oil was significantly less than trapping in the unaltered rock. In unaltered samples, the trapping of CO2 and N2 were indistinguishable, with a maximum residual saturation of 24%. After the alteration of the wetting state, the trapping of N2 was reduced, with a maximum residual saturation of 19%. The trapping of CO2 was reduced even further, with a maximum residual saturation of 15%. Best-fit Land-model constants shifted from C = 1.73 in the water-wet rock to C = 2.82 for N2 and C = 4.11 for the CO2 in the mixed-wet rock. The results indicate that plume migration will be less constrained by capillary trapping for CO2 storage projects using oil fields compared with those for saline aquifers. PMID:26812184

  2. CaCO3, its reaction and carbonate rocks: terahertz spectroscopy investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Honglei; Wu, Shixiang; Zhao, Kun; Bao, Rima; Xiao, Lizhi

    2016-10-01

    Carbonate-rich rocks cover a primary part of the earth’s petroleum geology reservoir. The study of carbonate has special significance and more effective study methods are now needed. In order to improve the availability of carbonate rock detection, terahertz (THz) spectroscopy was employed to investigate relevant materials in Na2CO3  +  CaCl2  =  CaCO3  +  2NaCl, which is often used to generate CaCO3. By comparing the materials composited with different ions, it can be revealed that Ca2+, \\text{CO}32- , Na+ and Cl- have respective absorption features at different frequencies. Furthermore, by utilizing a conservation equation it can be observed that the average refractive indices of Na2CO3 as well as CaCl2 equal those of CaCO3 and NaCl in the entire range. Combining the absorption and refractive effect of the materials in the reaction can comprehensively characterize the different substances and reveal the inner interaction during the reaction. THz spectra can deduce the process of molecule rearrangement in the chemical reaction of long-term rock evolution. Besides, the absorption features of the real carbonate rock collected from the nearest town of Sinan county, Guizhou province in Yunnan-Guizhou plateau validate the peaks’ central frequencies of ions and the principal components of carbonates, which can be in agreement with the SEM-EDS analysis. This research will supply a spectral tool to identify the particles in the rock and deduce an evolution of petroleum carbonate reservoir.

  3. Sr isotopic chemostratigraphy of Precambrian carbonate rocks in the Amderma Rise, Pai-Khoi Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A. B.; Starikova, E. V.; Maslov, A. V.; Konstantinova, G. V.

    2016-08-01

    The Sr and C isotopic compositions of Precambrian carbonate rocks are determined for Amderma Rise, in the northeastern margin of Pai-Khoi Ridge. Based on the Sr isotopic chemostratigraphy, it is established for the first time that the Amderma Formation is referred to the Early Vendian, while the Morozovsk Formation is Late Riphean in age. This conclusion along with detailed mapping proves that the Precambrian "section" of the Amderma Rise is a series of tectonic plates combined in a nonchronostratigraphic order. Volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Morozovsk and Sokolninsk formations make up the allochthon proper, while carbonate rocks of the Amderma Formation make up the para-autochthon. The high values of δ13C (up to +9.5‰) identified in limestones of both formations suggest a considerable distance of the Pai-Khoi paleobasin from the passive margin of the Baltic Region upon facies similarity to the Laurentia active margins.

  4. Reproducing early Martian atmospheric carbon dioxide partial pressure by modeling the formation of Mg-Fe-Ca carbonate identified in the Comanche rock outcrops on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Wolfgang; Fu, Yunjiao; Ilger, Jan-Michael

    2012-10-01

    The well defined composition of the Comanche rock's carbonate (Magnesite0.62Siderite0.25Calcite0.11Rhodochrosite0.02) and its host rock's composition, dominated by Mg-rich olivine, enable us to reproduce the atmospheric CO2partial pressure that may have triggered the formation of these carbonates. Hydrogeochemical one-dimensional transport modeling reveals that similar aqueous rock alteration conditions (including CO2partial pressure) may have led to the formation of Mg-Fe-Ca carbonate identified in the Comanche rock outcrops (Gusev Crater) and also in the ultramafic rocks exposed in the Nili Fossae region. Hydrogeochemical conditions enabling the formation of Mg-rich solid solution carbonate result from equilibrium species distributions involving (1) ultramafic rocks (ca. 32 wt% olivine; Fo0.72Fa0.28), (2) pure water, and (3) CO2partial pressures of ca. 0.5 to 2.0 bar at water-to-rock ratios of ca. 500 molH2O mol-1rock and ca. 5°C (278 K). Our modeled carbonate composition (Magnesite0.64Siderite0.28Calcite0.08) matches the measured composition of carbonates preserved in the Comanche rocks. Considerably different carbonate compositions are achieved at (1) higher temperature (85°C), (2) water-to-rock ratios considerably higher and lower than 500 mol mol-1 and (3) CO2partial pressures differing from 1.0 bar in the model set up. The Comanche rocks, hosting the carbonate, may have been subjected to long-lasting (>104 to 105 years) aqueous alteration processes triggered by atmospheric CO2partial pressures of ca. 1.0 bar at low temperature. Their outcrop may represent a fragment of the upper layers of an altered olivine-rich rock column, which is characterized by newly formed Mg-Fe-Ca solid solution carbonate, and phyllosilicate-rich alteration assemblages within deeper (unexposed) units.

  5. Isotopic studies of beach rock carbonates from Konkan, central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, B.; Rajamanickam, G.V.; Gujar, A.R.

    The beach rock carbonates from the 200 km long stretch from Guhagar in the north to Deogad in the south along the Konkan coast (Maharashtra, India) are studied for sup(14)C dating and sup(13)C : sup(12)C and sup(18)O : sup(16)O ratio determination...

  6. Weathering of Carbonate Rocks by Biological Soil Crusts in Karst Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Chen; Bin Lian; Zuoying Yin; Yuan Tang

    2014-01-01

    The weathering of carbonate rocks by biological soil crusts (BSC) in karst areas is very common. It is helpful to understand the weathering mechanisms and processes for avoiding karst rock-desertification. The weathering of carbonate rocks by BSC in karst areas, namely the expansion, contraction and curl resulting from environmental wetting-drying cycles, was investigated and ana-lyzed in this paper. The bulk density, area and thickness of BSC were determined and the weathering amount of limestone and dolomite per unit area of BSC was calculated as 3 700 and 3 400 g·m-2; the amount of biomass on the surface of limestone and dolomite was calculated as 1 146 and 1 301 g·m-2, respectively. Such an increased weathering amount was not only the result of chemical and physical weathering of BSC on carbonate rocks, but also the attachment and cementation of BSC to clay parti-cles, dust-fall, sand particles, solid particles brought by strong air currents, wind and other factors in the surrounding environment, which may also be related to the special environment and the special time period. Based on the results obtained, a weathering mode of BSC is studied, and the mechanisms of weathering by BSC are discussed. In conclusion, we suggest that the mechanical force exerted by the expansion and constriction of gelatinous and mucilaginous substances through wetting and drying of BSC play a significant role in the physical weathering process of the carbonate substrates.

  7. Laboratory Experiments to Evaluate Matrix Diffusion of Dissolved Organic Carbon Carbon-14 in Southern Nevada Fractured-rock Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Ronald L. [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute; Fereday, Wyatt [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) carbon-14 (14C) is used to estimate groundwater ages by comparing the DIC 14C content in groundwater in the recharge area to the DIC 14C content in the downgradient sampling point. However, because of chemical reactions and physical processes between groundwater and aquifer rocks, the amount of DIC 14C in groundwater can change and result in 14C loss that is not because of radioactive decay. This loss of DIC 14C results in groundwater ages that are older than the actual groundwater ages. Alternatively, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 14C in groundwater does not react chemically with aquifer rocks, so DOC 14C ages are generally younger than DIC 14C ages. In addition to chemical reactions, 14C ages may also be altered by the physical process of matrix diffusion. The net effect of a continuous loss of 14C to the aquifer matrix by matrix diffusion and then radioactive decay is that groundwater appears to be older than it actually is. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure matrix diffusion coefficients for DOC 14C in volcanic and carbonate aquifer rocks from southern Nevada. Experiments were conducted using bromide (Br-) as a conservative tracer and 14C-labeled trimesic acid (TMA) as a surrogate for groundwater DOC. Outcrop samples from six volcanic aquifers and five carbonate aquifers in southern Nevada were used. The average DOC 14C matrix diffusion coefficient for volcanic rocks was 2.9 x 10-7 cm2/s, whereas the average for carbonate rocks was approximately the same at 1.7 x 10-7 cm2/s. The average Br- matrix diffusion coefficient for volcanic rocks was 10.4 x 10-7 cm2/s, whereas the average for carbonate rocks was less at 6.5 x 10-7 cm2/s. Carbonate rocks exhibited greater variability in

  8. Hydrocarbon accumulation in deep fluid modified carbonate rock in the Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The activities of deep fluid are regionalized in the Tarim Basin. By analyzing the REE in core samples and crude oil, carbon isotope of carbon dioxide and inclusion temperature measurement in the west of the Tazhong Uplift in the western Tarim Basin, all the evidence confirms the existence of deep fluid. The deep fluid below the basin floor moved up into the basin through discordogenic fauit and volcanicity to cause corrosion and metaaomatosis of carbonate rock by exchange of matter and energy. The pore structure and permeability of the carbonate reservoirs were improved, making the carbonate reservoirs an excellent type of deeply buried modification. The fluorite ore belts discovered along the large fault and the volcanic area in the west of the Tazhong Uplift are the outcome of deep fluid action. Such carbonate reservoirs are the main type of reservoirs in the Tazhong 45 oilfield. The carbonate reservoirs in well YM 7 are improved obviously by thermal fluid dolomitization. The origin and territory of deep fluid are associated with the discordogenic fault and volcanicity in the basin. The discordogenic fault and volcanic area may be the pointer of looking for the deep fluid modified reservoirs. The primary characteristics of hydrocarbon accumulation in deep fluid reconstructed carbonate rock are summarized as accumulation near the large fault and volcano passage, late-period hydrocarbon accumulation after volcanic activity, and subtle trap reservoirs controlled by lithology.

  9. The role of forest trees and their mycorrhizal fungi in carbonate rock weathering and its significance for global carbon cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorley, Rachel M S; Taylor, Lyla L; Banwart, Steve A; Leake, Jonathan R; Beerling, David J

    2015-09-01

    On million-year timescales, carbonate rock weathering exerts no net effect on atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, on timescales of decades-to-centuries, it can contribute to sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 and increase land-ocean alkalinity flux, counteracting ocean acidification. Historical evidence indicates this flux is sensitive to land use change, and recent experimental evidence suggests that trees and their associated soil microbial communities are major drivers of continental mineral weathering. Here, we review key physical and chemical mechanisms by which the symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi of forest tree roots potentially enhance carbonate rock weathering. Evidence from our ongoing field study at the UK's national pinetum confirms increased weathering of carbonate rocks by a wide range of gymnosperm and angiosperm tree species that form arbuscular (AM) or ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungal partnerships. We demonstrate that calcite-containing rock grains under EM tree species weather significantly faster than those under AM trees, an effect linked to greater soil acidification by EM trees. Weathering and corresponding alkalinity export are likely to increase with rising atmospheric CO2 and associated climate change. Our analyses suggest that strategic planting of fast-growing EM angiosperm taxa on calcite- and dolomite-rich terrain might accelerate the transient sink for atmospheric CO2 and slow rates of ocean acidification.

  10. Diagenetic Pattern in the Citarate Carbonate Rocks, Cilograng Area, Lebak Regency, Banten Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Basuki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v7i3.142The carbonate sequence overlies conformably the tuffaceous sandstone unit, and in turn is conformably underlain by the tuff-sandstone unit, both of which are members of the Citarate Formation. The Citarate carbonate rocks were deposited in an open platform back reef environment, which was temporarily drowned by local sea level rise. Regional Middle Miocene deformation formed NNE-WSW trend faults and E-W trend folds in the researched area. This paper discusses the nature of diagenetic alteration of the Citarate carbonate rocks based on petrographic analyses of twenty surface samples. Carbonate rocks from bottom to top comprise algae packstone, packstone-grainstone, coral-algae packstone, and foraminifer wackestone-packstone. Fragments of coral, coralline red algae, and large foraminifera are the dominant bioclasts in most of the observed samples, whereas echinoids and bivalves are less abundant; they are set in a recrystallized micrite matrix. Planktonic foraminifera are abundant only in few samples. Fragments of plagioclase, igneous volcanic rocks, pyroclastic rocks (tuff, and much less abundant quartz are commonly present in all the studied samples. A generalized diagenesis includes early marine cementation by fibrous aragonite, compaction, aragonite dissolution and/or neomorphism, precipitation of equant-grained calcite cement in a phreatic environment, dissolution to form moldic porosities, dolomitization, the formation of stylolites and fractures, and precipitation of late ferroan calcite during burial. Multiple carbonate cements occur as pore-filling phases, with ferroan calcite cementation taking place during later-stage burial. Secondary porosities were formed during different stages in diagenetic processes, such as dissolution, dolomitization, and stylolite and fracture formations. Although precipitation of nonferroan and ferroan calcite cement occluded porosities, porosity enhancement during early selective

  11. DETERMINATION OF ROCK-BREAKING PERFORMANCE OF HIGH-PRESSURE SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE JET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Yu-kun; WANG Rui-he; NI Hong-jian; LI Mu-kun; SONG Wei-qiang; SONG Hui-fang

    2012-01-01

    In this study,a well-designcd cxperimental setup is used to determine the rock-breaking performance of a high-pressure supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) jet.Its rock-breaking performance is first compared with that of a high-pressure water jet under the same operation conditions.The effects of five major factors that affect the rock-breaking performance of the high-pressure SC-CO2 jet,i.e.,the nozzle diameter,the standoff distance,the jet pressure,the rock compressive strength and the jet temperature are experimentally determined.The experimental results indicate that the rock-breaking performance of the SC-CO2 jet is significantly improved over the high-pressure water jet.It is also found that the rock-breaking performance of the SC-CO2 jet is improved with the increase of the nozzle diameter or the standoff distance,until the nozzle diameter or the standoff distance reaches a certain critical value and after that it begins to deteriorate.The rock-breaking performance of the SC-CO2 jet improves monotonically with the increase of the jet pressure,while it shows a monotonic deterioration with the increase of the rock compressive strength.In addition,it is found that,under the same working conditions,the SC-CO2 jet can always provide a better rock-breaking performance than the subcritical liquid CO2 jet.

  12. "Frictional processes" in carbonate-bearing rocks at seismic deformation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Toro, G.; Spagnuolo, E.; Violay, M.; Rempe, M.; Smith, S. A. F.; Nielsen, S. B.; Fondriest, M.; Plumper, O.

    2015-12-01

    Moderate to large earthquakes often rupture and propagate along faults in carbonate-bearing rocks (dolostones, limestones, marbles, etc.). Compared to silicate-bearing rocks, which melt, weaken and wear when sheared at seismic slip rates (ca. 1 m/s), carbonate-bearing rocks do not melt, the minimum friction coefficient can be much lower (down to 5% of static friction) and the wear rate is negligible at seismic slip rates. In cohesive carbonate-bearing rocks, experiments simulating seismic deformation conditions and stopped at slip initiation (solid lubricant) at asperity contacts. With progressive slip and bulk temperature increase, nanograins accommodate large strain rates (ca. 104 s-1) by grain boundary sliding as suggested by several authors. The presence of a microporous fabric boosts pore-controlled diffusive process propelled by CO2 gas exhaust due to decarbonation. Enhanced pore-controlled diffusive processes allow (1) efficient mass transfer during grain boundary sliding and (2) sintering of the nanograins into a foam-like slip surface at the end of the experiment.

  13. Sinkhole susceptibility in carbonate rocks of the Apulian karst (southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Santo, Antonio; Fazio, Nunzio L.; Fiore, Antonio; Lollino, Piernicola; Luisi, Michele; Miccoli, Maria N.; Pagliarulo, Rosa; Parise, Mario; Perrotti, Michele; Pisano, Luca; Spalluto, Luigi; Vennari, Carmela; Vessia, Giovanna

    2016-04-01

    modelling the instability processes, and the development of charts for a preliminary evaluation of the stability of underground caves. Two distinct approaches were established to take into account the different petrographic, structural and geotechnical features of both the hard and soft carbonate rocks. The approach dealing with hard carbonate rocks (where natural karst caves develop) is based on speleological and geometrical surveys of the caves and on an integrated geological and geomechanical characterization of the carbonate rock mass, aimed at individuating the main critical aspects of the karst caves in terms of likely effects on the society. On the other hand, the approach to verify the stability of soft rocks where artificial cavities have been excavated is mostly dependent upon the peculiar petrographic and geomechanical characteristics of the calcarenite rock mass, typically massive and unaffected by tectonic discontinuities. As a consequence, the traditional analytical methods of rock mass classification fail in these materials, since the rock strength of soft calcarenites is mostly dependent upon sediment texture, porosity type and distribution and degree of cementation. The fluid circulation into the rock mass is also important because the removal of the rock matrix may induce a rapid deterioration of the mechanical behaviour of the rock mass. The approach to the calcarenite is mostly based on the characterization of petrographic and geotechnical parameters by means of direct sampling from the rock walls and in situ surveys (wells, trenches, etc.). Through implementation of the two approaches, our goal is to reconstruct accurate geometrical, geological and geotechnical models for both natural caves and artificial cavities. These models will be useful also to plan specific monitoring activities in order to understand the development of underground instability, and the related evolution through the rock mass, possibly threatening the urban areas and

  14. Experimental determination of natural carbonate rock dissolution rates with a focus on temperature dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirstein, Jens; Hellevang, Helge; Haile, Beyene G.; Gleixner, Gerd; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2016-05-01

    The denudation of carbonate rocks at landscape scale is controlled by factors like mineral composition, temperature, precipitation, runoff, fracture spacing and vegetation cover. Knowledge on carbonate denudation is important in order to understand landscape development and long-term terrestrial/marine carbon transport, but there are few laboratory studies done on weathering rates of natural carbonate rocks under the low temperatures relevant for glacial-interglacial periods. To enhance the understanding of carbonate dissolution kinetics we studied low-temperature dissolution reactions of various natural Triassic carbonate rocks belonging to the Lower Muschelkalk in Germany. We conducted batch and flow-through experiments investigating the direct correlation of dissolution rates with temperature, and to establish whether the fine-grained carbonate rocks (micrite) are more reactive than the coarser-grained sparitic limestones. By increasing the temperature from 5 to 26 °C far-from-equilibrium dissolution rates of micritic and sparitic limestone samples increased from 2.42 × 10- 07 to 10.88 × 10- 07 and 4.19 × 10- 07 to 7.74 × 10- 07 mol m- 2 s- 1, respectively (Specific Surface Areas (SSA) of about 0.006-0.01 m2/g). The dissolution rates of dolomite rock samples varied only slightly from 1.06 × 10- 07 to 2.02 × 10- 07 mol m- 2 s- 1 (SSA approximately 0.002 m2/g) in the temperature range 5-25 °C at circum-neutral pH. The obtained apparent activation energies are in the range of earlier experiments done at higher temperatures, but there is a distinct difference between the calcite in the micrite (~ 51 kJ/mol) and sparitic (~ 20-22 kJ/mol) lithologies, indicating that the dissolution mechanisms are not the same. Using these activation energies in modelling of natural carbonate denudation we see that there is a clear effect of changing temperature, but this is mostly through the increased solubility at lower temperatures and not through the increasing far

  15. Decrypting the Formation Conditions of the Basement Carbonate-Bearing Rocks at Nili Fossae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Nili Fossae region is the site of a number of proposed Landing Sites for the Mars 2020 Rover. A distinguishing feature of many of these sites is the access to large exposures of carbonate (Ehlmann et al. 2008). Serpentinization has been proposed as a formation mechanism of these carbonates, including carbonated (Brown et al. 2010, Viviano, et al. 2013) and low temperature, near surface serpentinization. The potential for carbonated serpentization at Nili Fossae links the region to Earth analogs in terrestrial greenstone belts such as the Pilbara in Western Australia, where talc-carbonate bearing komatiite cumulate units of the Dresser Formation overlie the siliceous, stromatolite-bearing Strelley Pool Chert unit (Van Kranendonk and Pirajno, 2004). If a similar relationship exists on Mars, investigations of rocks stratigraphically beneath the carbonate-bearing units at Nili Fossae ("the basement rocks") may provide the best chance to examine well preserved organic material from the Noachian. This hypothesis is testable by Mars 2020. In preparation for the the Mars 2020 landing site, we are examining the thermodynamic relationships that favor formation of serpentine and talc-carbonate and different pressures and temperatures in the crust (Barnes 2007). This will allow us to constrain the low grade metamorphism required to replicate the proposed models of serpentinisation and help us understand the regional metamophic gradient that is critical to furthering our knowledge of the ancient rocks of Nili Fossae. Refs:Barnes, S. J. "Komatiites: Petrology, Volcanology, Metamorphism, and Geochemistry." S.E.G. 13 (2007): 13. Brown, A. J., et al.. "Hydrothermal Formation of Clay-Carbonate Alteration Assemblages in the Nili Fossae Region of Mars." EPSL 297 (2010): 174-82. Ehlmann, B. L. et al. "Orbital Identification of Carbonate-Bearing Rocks on Mars." Science 322, no. 5909 1828-32. Van Kranendonk, M.J., and F. Pirajno. "Geochemistry of Metabasalts and Hydrothermal

  16. Orbital evidence for more widespread carbonate-bearing rocks on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, James J.; Murchie, Scott L.; Bishop, Janice L.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Milliken, Ralph E.; Wilhelm, Mary Beth; Seelos, Kimberly D.; Chojnacki, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Carbonates are key minerals for understanding ancient Martian environments because they are indicators of potentially habitable, neutral-to-alkaline water and may be an important reservoir for paleoatmospheric CO2. Previous remote sensing studies have identified mostly Mg-rich carbonates, both in Martian dust and in a Late Noachian rock unit circumferential to the Isidis basin. Here we report evidence for older Fe- and/or Ca-rich carbonates exposed from the subsurface by impact craters and troughs. These carbonates are found in and around the Huygens basin northwest of Hellas, in western Noachis Terra between the Argyre basin and Valles Marineris, and in other isolated locations spread widely across the planet. In all cases they cooccur with or near phyllosilicates, and in Huygens basin specifically they occupy layered rocks exhumed from up to ~5 km depth. We discuss factors that might explain their observed regional distribution, arguments for why carbonates may be even more widespread in Noachian materials than presently appreciated and what could be gained by targeting these carbonates for further study with future orbital or landed missions to Mars.

  17. Biodiversity on the Rocks: Macrofauna Inhabiting Authigenic Carbonate at Costa Rica Methane Seeps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Levin

    Full Text Available Carbonate communities: The activity of anaerobic methane oxidizing microbes facilitates precipitation of vast quantities of authigenic carbonate at methane seeps. Here we demonstrate the significant role of carbonate rocks in promoting diversity by providing unique habitat and food resources for macrofaunal assemblages at seeps on the Costa Rica margin (400-1850 m. The attendant fauna is surprisingly similar to that in rocky intertidal shores, with numerous grazing gastropods (limpets and snails as dominant taxa. However, the community feeds upon seep-associated microbes. Macrofaunal density, composition, and diversity on carbonates vary as a function of seepage activity, biogenic habitat and location. The macrofaunal community of carbonates at non-seeping (inactive sites is strongly related to the hydrography (depth, temperature, O2 of overlying water, whereas the fauna at sites of active seepage is not. Densities are highest on active rocks from tubeworm bushes and mussel beds, particularly at the Mound 12 location (1000 m. Species diversity is higher on rocks exposed to active seepage, with multiple species of gastropods and polychaetes dominant, while crustaceans, cnidarians, and ophiuroids were better represented on rocks at inactive sites. Macro-infauna (larger than 0.3 mm from tube cores taken in nearby seep sediments at comparable depths exhibited densities similar to those on carbonate rocks, but had lower diversity and different taxonomic composition. Seep sediments had higher densities of ampharetid, dorvilleid, hesionid, cirratulid and lacydoniid polychaetes, whereas carbonates had more gastropods, as well as syllid, chrysopetalid and polynoid polychaetes. Stable isotope signatures and metrics: The stable isotope signatures of carbonates were heterogeneous, as were the food sources and nutrition used by the animals. Carbonate δ13Cinorg values (mean = -26.98‰ ranged from -53.3‰ to +10.0‰, and were significantly heavier than

  18. Accelerated weathering of carbonate rocks following the 2010 forest wildfire on Mt. Carmel, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtober-Zisu, Nurit; Tessler, Naama; Tsatskin, Alexander; Greenbaum, Noam

    2015-04-01

    Massive destruction of carbonate rocks occurred on the slopes of Mt. Carmel, during the severe forest fire in 2010. The bedrock surfaces exhibited extensive exfoliation into flakes and spalls covering up to 80%-100% of the exposed rocks; detached boulders were totally fractured or disintegrated. The fire affected six carbonate units -- various types of chalk, limestone, and dolomite. The burned flakes show a consistent tendency towards flatness, in all lithologies, as 85%-95% of the flakes were detached in the form of blades, plates, and slabs. The effects of the fire depend to a large extent on the rocks' physical properties and vary with lithology: the most severe response was found in the chalk formations which are covered by calcrete (Nari crusts). These rocks reacted by extreme exfoliation, at an average depth of 7.7 to 9.6 cm and a maximum depth of 20 cm. The flakes formed in chalk were thicker, longer, and wider than those of limestone or dolomite formations. Moreover, the chalk outcrops were exfoliated in a laminar structure, one above the other, to a depth of 10 cm and more. Their shape also tended to be blockier or rod-like. In contrast, the limestone flakes were the thinnest, with 99% of them shaped like blades and plates. Scorched and blackened faces under the upper layer of spalls provided strong evidence that chalk breakdown took place at an early stage of the fire. The extreme response of the chalks can be explained by the laminar structure of the Nari, which served as planes of weakness for the rock destruction. Three years after the fire, the rocks continue to exfoliate and break down internally. As the harder surface of the Nari was removed, the more brittle underlying chalk is exposed to erosion. If fires can obliterate boulders in a single wildfire event, it follows that wildfires may serve as limiting agents in the geomorphic evolution of slopes. However, it is difficult to estimate the frequency of high-intensity fires in the Carmel region

  19. In search of early life: Carbonate veins in Archean metamorphic rocks as potential hosts of biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Carl A.; Piazolo, Sandra; Webb, Gregory E.; Dutkiewicz, Adriana; George, Simon C.

    2016-11-01

    The detection of early life signatures using hydrocarbon biomarkers in Precambrian rocks struggles with contamination issues, unspecific biomarkers and the lack of suitable sedimentary rocks due to extensive thermal overprints. Importantly, host rocks must not have been exposed to temperatures above 250 °C as at these temperatures biomarkers are destroyed. Here we show that Archean sedimentary rocks from the Jeerinah Formation (2.63 billion yrs) and Carawine Dolomite (2.55 billion yrs) of the Pilbara Craton (Western Australia) drilled by the Agouron Institute in 2012, which previously were suggested to be suitable for biomarker studies, were metamorphosed to the greenschist facies. This is higher than previously reported. Both the mineral assemblages (carbonate, quartz, Fe-chlorite, muscovite, microcline, rutile, and pyrite with absence of illite) and chlorite geothermometry suggest that the rocks were exposed to temperatures higher than 300 °C and probably ∼400 °C, consistent with greenschist-facies metamorphism. This facies leads to the destruction of any biomarkers and explains why the extraction of hydrocarbon biomarkers from pristine drill cores has not been successful. However, we show that the rocks are cut by younger formation-specific carbonate veins containing primary oil-bearing fluid inclusions and solid bitumens. Type 1 veins in the Carawine Dolomite consist of dolomite, quartz and solid bitumen, whereas type 2 veins in the Jeerinah Formation consist of calcite. Within the veins fluid inclusion homogenisation temperatures and calcite twinning geothermometry indicate maximum temperatures of ∼200 °C for type 1 veins and ∼180 °C for type 2 veins. Type 1 veins have typical isotopic values for reprecipitated Archean sea-water carbonates, with δ13CVPDB ranging from - 3 ‰ to 0‰ and δ18OVPDB ranging from - 13 ‰ to - 7 ‰, while type 2 veins have isotopic values that are similar to hydrothermal carbonates, with δ13CVPDB ranging from - 18

  20. Shrinkage Cracking: A mechanism for self-sustaining carbon mineralization reactions in olivine rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Fusseis, F.; Lisabeth, H. P.; Xing, T.; Xiao, X.; De Andrade, V. J. D.; Karato, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    The hydration and carbonation of olivine results in an up to ~44% increase in solid molar volume, which may choke off of fluid supply and passivate reactive surfaces, thus preventing further carbonation reactions. The carbonation of olivine has ben studied extensively in the laboratory. To date, observations from these experimental studies indicate that carbonation reaction rates generally decrease with time and the extent of carbonation is limited in olivine rocks. Field studies, however, show that 100% hydration and carbonation occur naturally in ultramafic rocks. The disagreement between the laboratory results under controlled conditions and the field observations underlines the lack of understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the self-sustaining carbonation interaction in nature. We developed a state-of-the-art pressurized hydrothermal cell that is transparent to X-rays to characterize the real-time evolution of pore geometry during fluid-rock interaction using in-situ synchrotron-based X-ray microtomography. Through a time series of high-resolution 3-dimensional images, we document the microstructural evolution of a porous olivine aggregate reacting with a sodium bicarbonate solution at elevated pressure and temperature conditions. We observed porosity increases, near constant rate of crystal growth, and pervasive reaction-induced fractures. Based on the nanometer scale tomography data, we propose that shrinkage cracking is the mechanism responsible for producing new reactive surface and keep the carbonation reaction self-sustaining in our experiment. Shrinkage cracks are commonly observed in drying mud ponds, cooling lava flows and ice wedge fields. Stretching of a contracting surface bonded to a substrate of nearly constant dimensions leads to a stress buildup in the surface layer. When the stress exceeds the tensile strength, polygonal cracks develop in the surface layer. In our experiments, the stretching mismatch between the surface and interior of

  1. Radiocarbon dating of prehistoric rock paintings by selective oxidation of organic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, J.; Hyman, M.; Shafer, H.J.; Rowe, M.W. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA))

    1990-12-27

    Dating of prehistoric rock paintings (pictographs) has traditionally relied on indirect evidence. This includes inferences based on the archaeological context, such as superpositions of pictorial styles and the depiction of images that constrain their ages, as well as dating of deposits that either cover the art in situ or contain separated fragments of the painted surface. Migration of ions between the bulk rock and the natural coatings that form on a newly exposed surface has also been exploited to date petroglyphs (rock carvings) in desert regions. Until recently, however, direct dating (by radiocarbon techniques) of pictographs has not been possible, mainly because of the problem of separating inorganic carbon from the organic material in the pigments. Here we report on a new technique which allows this separation to be effected by using a low-temperature, low-pressure oxygen plasma to oxidize selectively the organic component; this may then be analysed using standard {sup 14}C methods. We have applied this technique to a portion of a pictograph from the Lower Pecos region of southwest Texas. The date obtained, 3,865{plus minus}100 yr BP (before present) is consistent with that expected on the basis of archaeological inference. As organic carbon is a ubiquitous component of pictograph paints, this technique should be applicable to rock paintings throughout the world. (author).

  2. The rock physics and geochemistry of carbonates exposed to reactive brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Anthony C.; Vanorio, Tiziana

    2016-03-01

    When carbonate-rich rocks are brought into contact with an acidic brine their mechanical and acoustic responses depend on many factors including pH, porosity, permeability, effective stress, and time. These complexities hinder the understanding of processes such as hydrothermal fluid circulation, seismicity, and deep burial diagenesis. The present study addresses how different lithofacies exposed to the same reactive brine undergo varying degrees of transformation and whether it is possible to remotely detect these phenomena in the Earth. Results are presented from fluid injections carried out on a large and varied set of calcareous rocks under hydrostatic stress. The output brine was analyzed for dissolved mineral concentrations and the rock porosity, permeability, axial strain, ultrasonic velocity, and images from electron microscopy were contrasted before and after injection. Stromatolites were found to be the lithofacies most vulnerable to changes in their transport properties. However, all samples irreversibly compacted with the greatest strain in the most porous and permeable cores. The most extreme structural changes discovered through imaging were the welding of microporous zones, grain sliding, and the fracturing of various phases. Observations are consistent with a chemically enhanced weakening of the rock frame that generated compliant pores. The associated decrease in velocity of the dry rock can be approximated with linear relations that depend on both porosity and effective stress.

  3. Raman spectroscopy of carbon and solid bitumens in sedimentary and metamorphic rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehlicka, Jan; Urban, Ondrej; Pokorný, Jan

    2003-08-01

    Different types of carbonaceous matter from rocks display Raman spectral features which knowledge permits to obtain structural information of these materials. Application of Raman microspectroscopy to investigate kerogen, bitumen, fossils, highly carbonified amorphous carbon as well as graphite from different environments is reviewed. Differences in Raman spectra and structural differences between carbonaceous samples differing in their metamorphic history are discussed on the basis of new data.

  4. Organic carbon sources and transformations in mangrove sediments : a Rock-Eval pyrolysis approach

    OpenAIRE

    Marchand, Cyril; Lallier-Vergès, Elisabeth; Disnar, Jean-Robert; Kéravis, Didier

    2008-01-01

    International audience A Rock-Eval pyrolysis study was carried out on sedimentary cores and leaf and woody tissue of vascular plant species from the mangroves of French Guiana. These forests develop on moving mudbanks and have a lifetime limited to few decades before being eroded. Our main purpose was to complete the understanding of carbon cycling in this specific environment using a method that allows monitoring the depth evolution of sources and transformation of organic matter (OM) wit...

  5. Bonding preference of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen in niobium-based rock-salt structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Akira; Takei, Takahiro; Kumada, Nobuhiro; Wada, Satoshi; Magome, Eisuke; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2013-09-01

    Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen are essential components in solid-state materials. However, understanding their preference on the bonding to metals has not been straightforward. Here, niobium carbide, nitride, and oxide with simple rock-salt-based structures were analyzed by first-principles calculations and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. We found that an increase in the atomic number from carbon to oxygen formed fewer and shorter bonds to metals with better hybridization of atomic orbitals. This can provide a simple guiding principle for understanding the bonding and designing carbides, nitrides, oxides, and mixed-anion compounds. PMID:23937352

  6. Advanced Characterization of Fractured Reservoirs in Carbonate Rocks: The Michigan Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, James R.; Harrison, William B.

    2000-10-24

    The main objective of this project is for a university-industry consortium to develop a comprehensive model for fracture carbonate reservoirs based on the ''data cube'' concept using the Michigan Basin as a prototype. This project combined traditional historical data with 2D and 3D seismic data as well as data from modern logging tools in a novel way to produce a new methodology for characterizing fractured reservoirs in carbonate rocks. Advanced visualization software was used to fuse the data and to image it on a variety of scales, ranging from basin-scale to well-scales.

  7. Effect of pore structure on seismic rock-physics characteristics of dense carbonates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Jian-Guo; Wang Hong-Bin; Li Chuang; Zhao Jian-Guo

    2015-01-01

    The Ordovician carbonate rocks of the Yingshan formation in the Tarim Basin have a complex pore structure owing to diagenetic and secondary structures. Seismic elastic parameters (e.g., wave velocity) depend on porosity and pore structure. We estimated the average specific surface, average pore-throat radius, pore roundness, and average aspect ratio of carbonate rocks from the Tazhong area. High P-wave velocity samples have small average specific surface, small average pore-throat radius, and large average aspect ratio. Differences in the pore structure of dense carbonate samples lead to fluid-related velocity variability. However, the relation between velocity dispersion and average specifi c surface, or the average aspect ratio, is not linear. For large or small average specifi c surface, the pore structure of the rock samples becomes uniform, which weakens squirtfl ow and minimizes the residuals of ultrasonic data and predictions with the Gassmann equation. When rigid dissolved (casting mold) pores coexist with less rigid microcracks, there are significant P-wave velocity differences between measurements and predictions.

  8. Digital Rock Physics: Mechanical Properties of Carbonate Core Plug at Different Resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouini, M. S.; Faisal, T. F.; Islam, A.; Chevalier, S.; Jouiad, M.; Sassi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Digital Rock Physics (DRP) is a novel technology that could be used to generate accurate, fast and cost effective special core analysis (SCAL) properties to support reservoir characterization and simulation tools. For this work, Micro-CT images at different resolutions have been used to run simulations to determine elastic properties like bulk, shear, Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio of a dry carbonate core plug from Abu Dhabi reservoirs. Pre processing and segmentation of raw images is performed in FEI 3D visualization and analysis tool Avizo. Carbonates are characterized by a very complex pore-space structure and so a high degree of heterogeneity. Abaqus that is based on Finite Element Method is used to run 2D and 3D elastic simulations. Results will be compared by simulating the same core-plug in an alternative segmentation and FEM modeling environment used previously by Jouini & Vega et al. 2012 [1]. Acoustic wave propagation experiments at different confining pressures are performed in the laboratory Triaxial machine to determine the dynamic Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio for the same core plug. Expeirmental results are compared with numerical results. [1] Jouini, M.S. and Vega, S. 2012. Simulation of carbonate rocks elastic properties using 3D X-Ray computed tomography images based on Discrete Element Method and Finite Element Method. 46th US Rock Mechanics / Geomechanics Symposium, Chicago, Il, USA, 24-27 June 2012.

  9. Influence of host lithofacies on fault rock variation in carbonate fault zones: A case study from the Island of Malta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michie, E. A. H.

    2015-07-01

    Relatively few studies have examined fault rock microstructures in carbonates. Understanding fault core production helps predict the hydraulic behaviour of faults and the potential for reservoir compartmentalisation. Normal faults on Malta, ranging from <1 m to 90 m displacement, cut two carbonate lithofacies, micrite-dominated and grain-dominated carbonates, allowing the investigation of fault rock evolution with increasing displacement in differing lithofacies. Lithological heterogeneity leads to a variety of deformation mechanisms. Nine different fault rock types have been identified, with a range of deformation microstructures along an individual slip surface. The deformation style, and hence type of fault rock produced, is a function of host rock texture, specifically grain size and sorting, porosity and uniaxial compressive strength. Homogeneously fine-grained micrtie-dominated carbonates are characterised by dispersed deformation with large fracture networks that develop into breccias. Alternatively, this lithofacies is commonly recrystallised. In contrast, in the coarse-grained, heterogeneous grain-dominated carbonates the development of faulting is characterised by localised deformation, creating protocataclasite and cataclasite fault rocks. Cementation also occurs within some grain-dominated carbonates close to and on slip surfaces. Fault rock variation is a function of displacement as well as juxtaposed lithofacies. An increase in fault rock variability is observed at higher displacements, potentially creating a more transmissible fault, which opposes what may be expected in siliciclastic and crystalline faults. Significant heterogeneity in the fault rock types formed is likely to create variable permeability along fault-strike, potentially allowing across-fault fluid flow. However, areas with homogeneous fault rocks may generate barriers to fluid flow.

  10. Structural investigation of brittle carbonate fault rocks at various scales: implications for fluid migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröckenfuchs, Theresa-Christina; Bauer, Helene; Decker, Kurt; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    The EW-striking, sinistral Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg fault system is a prominent feature in the Northern Calcareous Alps (NCA) in Austria. In particular, within the eastern part of the NCA, in Styria, it creates characteristic fault rocks in carbonates, comparable to fault rocks from similar tectonic regimes in other areas. Furthermore, faults and their characteristic fault rocks in this area play an important role in groundwater filtering, fluid pathways and in initiating karstification; this is of great social and economic importance since most of the drinking water for Vienna is obtained from that area. The fault zones are therefore ideal for investigating reservoir properties such as porosity and permeability evolution. Since detailed studies of such fault rocks on a micro scale are still rare, this work focuses on investigating structures and processes that create typical features in carbonate fault rocks from field- to nano-scale. Additionally, reservoir properties have been characterized. Apart from detailed structural field-work and porosity and permeability-measurements in the laboratory, thin-sections were analysed by optical microscopy, cathodoluminescence microscopy and electron microscopy using backscattered electron pictures and focused ion-beam techniques. The analytical methods provide an insight on processes and features such as grain size reduction, cementation and recrystallization, and point out porosity and permeability differences due to deformation mechanisms and cementation events. The results show that besides the common theory of grain interaction (rotation, gliding), in situ grain size reduction, predominantly controlled by pore fluid, plays an important role in creating cataclastic fabrics. Microscopic observations reveal a high amount of matrix porosity in dolomitic fault-core rocks, such as cataclasites and dilation breccias, which explains the high porosity values for those rocks measured in the laboratory; generally

  11. Role of Carbonic Anhydrase as an Activator in Carbonate Rock Dissolution and Its Implication for Atmospheric CO2 Sink

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘再华

    2001-01-01

    The conversion of CO2 into H+ and is a relatively slow reaction. Hence, its kinetics may be rate determining in carbonate rock dissolution. Carbonic anhydrase (CA), which is widespread in nature, was used to catalyze the CO2 conversion process in dissolution experiments of limestone and dolomite. It was found that the rate of dissolution increases by a factor of about 10 after the addition of CA at a high CO2 partial pressure (Pco2) for limestone and about 3 at low Pco2 for dolomite. This shows that reappraisal is necessary for the importance of chemical weathering (including carbonate rock dissolution and silicate weathering) in the atmospheric CO2 sink and the mysterious missing sink in carbon cycling. It is doubtless that previous studies of weathering underestimated weathering rates due to the ignorance of CA as an activator in weathering, thus the contribution of weathering to the atmospheric CO2 sink is also underestimated. This finding also shows the need to examine the situ distribution and activity of CA in different waters and to investigate the role of CA in weathering.``

  12. An assessment of global resources of rocks as suitable raw materials for carbon capture and storage by mineralisation

    OpenAIRE

    Bide, T.P.; Styles, M. T.; Naden, J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage by mineralisation (CCSM) is a method proposed for capturing CO2 by reacting it with magnesium in ultramafic rocks to form carbonate minerals and silica. Large quantities of magnesium silicate rocks are required for this process and to demonstrate the feasibility, and adequately plan for the development and supply of mineral resources, their locations and quantities must be known. This study attempts to globally define the spatial extent and quantity of resources tha...

  13. Estimation of compressional seismic wave attenuation of carbonate rocks in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchaala, Fateh; Ali, Mohammed Y.; Farid, Asam

    2014-07-01

    The subsurface geology of Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates is primarily composed of carbonate rocks. Such media are known to be highly heterogeneous. Very few studies have attempted to estimate attenuation in carbonate rocks. In Abu Dhabi no attenuation profile has been published. This study provides the first seismic wave attenuation profiles in Abu Dhabi using dense array of VSP data. We estimated three attenuation profiles: the apparent, the scattering, and the intrinsic attenuations. The apparent attenuation profile was computed using amplitude decay and spectral-ratio methods. The scattering attenuation profile was estimated using a generalized reflection-transmission matrix forward model. It is usually estimated from the sonic log, but to be more consistent with the apparent attenuation, we succeeded in this paper to estimate it from the VSP data. We subtracted the scattering attenuation from the apparent attenuation to deduce the intrinsic attenuation. The results of the study indicate that the scattering attenuation is significant compared to the published studies that are mainly based on clastic rocks. The high scattering attenuation can reach up to 0.02. It can be explained by the strong heterogeneity of the carbonate rocks. This study demonstrates that the Simsima and Rus Formations have considerable scattering and intrinsic attenuations. These formations are considered aquifers in Abu Dhabi; we therefore interpreted this high intrinsic attenuation zones to be due to the heterogeneity and to the fluids contained in these formations. The Umm-Er-Radhuma Formation is a more homogenous formation with limited aquifer potential. Hence, scattering and intrinsic attenuations of the Umm-Er-Radhuma Formation are low.

  14. Talc-carbonate alteration of ultramafic rocks within the Leka Ophiolite Complex, Central Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerga, A.; Konopásek, J.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2015-06-01

    Petrographic and geochemical analyses of partly and completely serpentinized and carbonated peridotites within the ultramafic section of the Leka Ophiolite Complex have been used to elucidate the evolution of alterations and identify possible fluid sources. The alterations show no evidence for any major deformation and are located along low-angle structures that were formed in a late stage of the structural evolution of the ophiolite complex. Modeling of mineral equilibria in the SiO2-MgO-FeO-Fe2O3-CaO-H2O ± CO2 system has been utilized to constrain the conditions during serpentinization and carbonation. The partly altered peridotites consist of the mineral assemblage olivine-clinopyroxene-serpentine-magnetite-brucite and formed at temperatures isotope values determined for dolomite from crosscutting carbonate lenses within the talc-carbonate rock yield δ13C values of ~- 5 indicative of a mantle source for the carbon required for the carbonation. Oxygen isotope values δSMOW18O of ~ 10.8-11.3‰ together with initial 87Sr/86Sri = 400Ma values of 0.7029 and 0.7063, suggest dehydration of rocks with mantle affinity as a source for the fluids. Based on analytical results and field observations we propose that the formation of the talc- and carbonate-bearing alteration zones is caused by the focused infiltration of fluids that originated at the bottom of already partly serpentinized ophiolite complex during extension-driven burial at the late stage of the Caledonian orogeny.

  15. Rock physics modeling of heterogeneous carbonate reservoirs:porosity estimation and hydrocarbon detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Hao; Ba Jing; Carcione Jose; Li Jin-Song; Tang Gang; Zhang Xing-Yang; He Xin-Zhen; Ouyang Hua

    2014-01-01

    In heterogeneous natural gas reservoirs, gas is generally present as small patch-like pockets embedded in the water-saturated host matrix. This type of heterogeneity, also called“patchy saturation”, causes significant seismic velocity dispersion and attenuation. To establish the relation between seismic response and type of fluids, we designed a rock physics model for carbonates. First, we performed CT scanning and analysis of the fluid distribution in the partially saturated rocks. Then, we predicted the quantitative relation between the wave response at different frequency ranges and the basic lithological properties and pore fluids. A rock physics template was constructed based on thin section analysis of pore structures and seismic inversion. This approach was applied to the limestone gas reservoirs of the right bank block of the Amu Darya River. Based on poststack wave impedance and prestack elastic parameter inversions, the seismic data were used to estimate rock porosity and gas saturation. The model results were in good agreement with the production regime of the wells.

  16. Estimating permeability of carbonate rocks from porosity and v(p)/v(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Ida Lykke; Baechle, G.; Eberli, G.P.;

    2007-01-01

    We present a method for predicting permeability from sonic and density data. The method removes the porosity effect on the ratio upsilon(p)/upsilon(s), of dry rock, and it addresses the specific surface as an indirect measure of permeability. We look at ultrasonic data, porosity, and the permeabi......We present a method for predicting permeability from sonic and density data. The method removes the porosity effect on the ratio upsilon(p)/upsilon(s), of dry rock, and it addresses the specific surface as an indirect measure of permeability. We look at ultrasonic data, porosity......, and the permeability of 114 carbonate core plugs. In doing so, we establish an empirical relationship between the specific surface of the solid phase (as calculated by Kozeny's equation) and upsilon(p)/upsilon(s) (linearly transformed to remove the porosity effect). One must view the specific surface derived by using...... Kozeny's equation as an effective specific surface because Kozeny's equation only holds for homogeneous rock with interconnected pores. The ratio upsilon(p)/upsilon(s) of dry rocks, on the other hand, seems to be controlled by the true specific surface, pointing to an inherent limitation in the method...

  17. Source rock potential of the organic rich Turonian - Upper Campanian carbonates of northern Lebanon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daher, S. Bou; Littke, R. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Energy and Mineral Resources Group (EMR); Nader, F.H. [IFP Energies nouvelles, Paris (France). Dept. of Sedimentology-Stratigraphy

    2013-08-01

    Upper Cretaceous chalks, marls, and shales are arguably the most prolific petroleum source rocks in the eastern Mediterranean region. 209 core samples from the Turonian - Upper Campanian rock succession in north Lebanon were collected and analyzed for their organic matter (OM) content, quality, and maturity. The total organic carbon (TOC) measurements revealed a very good source rock potential for a 150 m interval within the Upper Santonian - Upper Campanian, with an average of 2% TOC. High HI values (average 707 mg/g TOC) characterize these source rocks as type I kerogen and reflect a very good preservation of the organic matter. T{sub max} values (average 421 C) match the other maturity parameters such as vitrinite reflectance (average 0.35%), and all point towards immature organic matter. The equivalent Upper Cretaceous in the offshore Levant basin has enough overburden to have reached maturity. However, the accurate extrapolation of the organic matter quality and quantity to the offshore is yet a challenge with the data at hand. (orig.)

  18. Fracture Dissolution of Carbonate Rock: An Innovative Process for Gas Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James W. Castle; Ronald W. Falta; David Bruce; Larry Murdoch; Scott E. Brame; Donald Brooks

    2006-10-31

    The goal of the project is to develop and assess the feasibility and economic viability of an innovative concept that may lead to commercialization of new gas-storage capacity near major markets. The investigation involves a new approach to developing underground gas storage in carbonate rock, which is present near major markets in many areas of the United States. Because of the lack of conventional gas storage and the projected growth in demand for storage capacity, many of these areas are likely to experience shortfalls in gas deliverability. Since depleted gas reservoirs and salt formations are nearly non-existent in many areas, alternatives to conventional methods of gas storage are required. The need for improved methods of gas storage, particularly for ways to meet peak demand, is increasing. Gas-market conditions are driving the need for higher deliverability and more flexibility in injection/withdrawal cycling. In order to meet these needs, the project involves an innovative approach to developing underground storage capacity by creating caverns in carbonate rock formations by acid dissolution. The basic concept of the acid-dissolution method is to drill to depth, fracture the carbonate rock layer as needed, and then create a cavern using an aqueous acid to dissolve the carbonate rock. Assessing feasibility of the acid-dissolution method included a regional geologic investigation. Data were compiled and analyzed from carbonate formations in six states: Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and New York. To analyze the requirements for creating storage volume, the following aspects of the dissolution process were examined: weight and volume of rock to be dissolved; gas storage pressure, temperature, and volume at depth; rock solubility; and acid costs. Hydrochloric acid was determined to be the best acid to use because of low cost, high acid solubility, fast reaction rates with carbonate rock, and highly soluble products (calcium chloride

  19. Relationship between the consolidation parameter, porosity and aspect ratio in microporous carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ceia, Marco A. R.; Misságia, Roseane M.; Neto, Irineu Lima; Archilha, Nathaly

    2015-11-01

    The estimation of dry bulk modulus is required for the successful application of the Biot-Gassmann theory to forecast fluid changes within a reservoir. The Pride model is one of the several models described in the literature for predicting the dry elastic moduli of rocks. However, the accuracy of the Pride model depends on the estimation of the consolidation parameter. In this paper, the consolidation parameter was estimated using the pore stiffness, mineral bulk modulus and porosity. That approach allowed calculating the dry bulk modulus of a set of microporous carbonate rocks according to the Pride model and compare those estimates to the results obtained using the elastic velocities. The change in the consolidation parameter over a range of pressures suggests that the relationship between this parameter and the unconfined porosity increases at high effective pressure. Statistical analyses of the distribution of those consolidation parameter values were performed to verify how the effective pressure influences the mean value and variance. Mean pore aspect ratios were estimated using Kuster-Toksoz methodology to establish a relationship with the consolidation parameter and the unconfined porosity. Such relationship also accounts for pressure-dependence within the studied pressure range. Although only 20 samples were analyzed, those studies can contribute to advise the estimation of the consolidation parameter in this type of carbonate rocks.

  20. Petrophysical studies of north American carbonate rock samples and evaluation of pore-volume compressibility models

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Gilberto Peixoto; Franco, Daniel R.; Stael, Giovanni C.; da Costa de Oliveira Lima, Maira; Sant'Anna Martins, Ricardo; de Moraes França, Olívia; Azeredo, Rodrigo B. V.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we evaluate two pore volume compressibility models that are currently discussed in the literature (Horne, 1990; Jalalh, 2006b). Five groups of carbonate rock samples from the three following sedimentary basins in North America that are known for their association with hydrocarbon deposits were selected for this study: (i) the Guelph Formation of the Michigan Basin (Middle Silurian); (ii) the Edwards Formation of the Central Texas Platform (Middle Cretaceous); and (iii) the Burlington-Keokuk Formation of the Mississippian System (Lower Mississippian). In addition to the evaluation of the compressibility model, a petrophysical evaluation of these rock samples was conducted. Additional characterizations, such as grain density, the effective porosity, absolute grain permeability, thin section petrography, MICP and NMR, were performed to complement constant pore-pressure compressibility tests. Although both models presented an overall good representation of the compressibility behavior of the studied carbonate rocks, even when considering their broad porosity range (~ 2-38%), the model proposed by Jalalh (2006b) performed better with a confidence level of 95% and a prediction interval of 68%.

  1. Carbon isotopic characteristics of hydrocarbon gases from coal-measure source rocks--A thermal simulation experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jianjing; HU Huifang; SUN Guoqiang; JI Limin

    2006-01-01

    Gaseous hydrocarbon geochemistry research through a thermal simulation experiment in combination with the natural evolution process in which natural gases were formed from coal-measure source rocks revealed that the δ13C1 values of methane vary from light to heavy along with the increase of thermal evolution degree of coal-measure source rocks, and the δ13C2 values of ethane range from -28.3‰ to -20‰ (PDB). δ13C2 value was -28‰± ( Ro= 0.45% - 0.65%) at the lower thermal evolution stage of coal-measure source rocks. After the rocks entered the main hydrocarbon-generating stage (Ro=0.65% - 1.50%), δ13C2 values generally varied within the range of -26‰ - -23‰±; with further thermal evolution of the rocks the carbon isotopes of ethane became heavier and heavier, but generally less than - 20‰.The partial carbon isotope sequence inversion of hydrogen gases is a characteristic feature of mixing of natural gases of different origins. Under the condition of specially designated type of organic matter, hydrogen source rocks may show this phenomenon via their own evolution.In the lower evolution stages of the rocks, it is mainly determined by organic precursors that gaseous hydrocarbons display partial inversion of the carbon isotope sequence and the carbon isotopic values of ethane are relatively low. These characteristic features also are related to the geochemical composition of primary soluble organic matter.

  2. Fission track dating of authigenic quartz in red weathering crusts of carbonate rocks in Guizhou province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cenozoic evolution history of Guizhou Province, which is located on the southeastern flank of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, is unclear because of the lack of sedimentation records. The red weathering crusts widespread on the Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau may bear critical information about their evolution history. This work firstly determined the ages of four red weathering crusts in eastern, central and northern Guizhou. The material used in fission track dating is well-crystallized quartz occurring in many in-situ weathering crusts of carbonate rocks. The results showed that the fission track ages of quartz vary over a wide range from 1 Ma to 25 Ma in the four profiles, significantly younger than the ages of Triassic and Cambrian parent rocks. In combination with the regionally geological evolution history during the period from 25 Ma to 1 Ma, the ages of quartz can exclude the possibility that the origin of quartz has nothing to do with primary clastic minerals in parent rocks, authigenesis during diagenesis and hydrothermal precipitation or replacement by volcanic activities. It is deduced that the well-crystallized quartz was precipitated from Si-rich weathering fluids during weathering processes of carbonate rocks. The recorded ages of quartz from the four profiles are consistent with the episodes of planation surfaces on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, the stages of red soil in the tropics of South China, the tectonically stable periods in Guizhou, and the ages of weathering in other parts of the world during the Cenozoic era. That is to say, the ages of authigenic quartz dated by the fission track method are well feasible and credible. (authors)

  3. Fission Track Dating of Authigenic Quartz in Red Weathering Crusts of Carbonate Rocks in Guizhou Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiuming; WANG Shijie; ZHANG Feng

    2004-01-01

    The Cenozoic evolution history of Guizhou Province, which is located on the southeastem flank of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, is unclear because of the lack of sedimentation records. The red weathering crusts widespread on the Yunnan-Guizhou Plateau may bear critical information about their evolution history. This work firstly determined the ages of four red weathering crusts in eastern, central and northern Guizhou. The material used in fission track dating is well-crystallized quartz occurring in many in-situ weathering crusts of carbonate rocks. The results showed that the fission track ages of quartz vary over a wide range from 1 to 25 Ma in the four profiles, significantly younger than the ages of the Triassic and Cambrian parent rocks. In combination with the evolution history of the regional geology during the period from 25 to 1 Ma, the ages of quartz can exclude the possibility that the origin of quartz has nothing to do with primary clastic minerals in parent rocks, authigenesis during diagenesis and hydrothermal precipitation or replacement by volcanic activities. It is deduced that the well-crystallized quartz was precipitated from Si-rich weathering fluids during the weathering process of carbonate rocks. The recorded ages of quartz from the four profiles are consistent with the episodes of the planation surfaces on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, the forming stages of red soil in the tropics of South China, the tectonically stable periods in Guizhou, and the ages of weathering in other parts of the world during the Cenozoic era. That is to say, the ages of authigenic quartz dated by the fission track method are well feasible and credible.

  4. Enhanced Oil Recovery from Oil-wet Carbonate Rock by Spontaneous Imbibition of Aqueous Surfactant Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Standnes, Dag Chun

    2001-09-01

    The main theme of this thesis is an experimental investigation of spontaneous imbibition (SI) of aqueous cationic surfactant solution into oil-wet carbonate (chalk- and dolomite cores). The static imbibition process is believed to represent the matrix flow of oil and water in a fractured reservoir. It was known that aqueous solution of C{sub 12}-N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Br (C12TAB) was able to imbibe spontaneously into nearly oil-wet chalk material, but the underlying mechanism was not understood. The present work was therefore initiated, with the following objectives: (1) Put forward a hypothesis for the chemical mechanism underlying the SI of C12TAB solutions into oil-wet chalk material based on experimental data and (2) Perform screening tests of low-cost commercially available surfactants for their ability to displace oil by SI of water into oil-wet carbonate rock material. It is essential for optimal use of the surfactant in field application to have detailed knowledge about the mechanism underlying the SI process. The thesis also discusses some preliminary experimental results and suggests mechanisms for enhanced oil recovery from oil-wet carbonate rock induced by supply of thermal energy.

  5. Study on the restitution coefficient of original total organic carbon for high mature marine source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Jianzhong; ZHENG Longju; Tenger

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the results of hydropyrolysis simulations for about 90 different types of immature to mature source rocks selected from about 5 000 marine source rocks in China,along with the natural thermal evolution profiles,the following conclusions were obtained.(1) Total organic carbon (TOC) content of excellent marine source rocks does not change obviously when Ro<0.8% or Ro > 1.3%,and the residual TOC content is decreasing gradually with the maturity increase at 0.8% <Ro< 1.3%.(2) At the high-post mature stage (Ro > 1.3%),the decreased maximums of residual TOC content for the kerogen of sapropel (Ⅰ),Ⅱ1,and Ⅱ are usually 40%,32% and 24%,respectively,and their TOC restitution coefficient is,respectively,1.68,1.48 and 1.32.(3)Both the TOC decreasing amplitude and the restitution coefficient decrease gradually with the decrease of TOC content for the source rocks with low organic matter abundance (usually 0.3% < TOC < 1.0%).The TOC restitution coefficients are,respectively,1.20 and 1.0,when 0.3%<TOC<0.5% and TOC < 0.3%.(4) TOCres.of solid bitumen and shale with high organic matter abundance (TOC > 30%) also require no restitution at the high mature stage.Such kind of TOC restitution is further supported by the coincidence of the decrease of residual TOC with the decreasing of S1 + S2 and the increasing of hydrocarbon quantity during the experimental simulation of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion for marine source rocks (0.3%<TOC&<30%) in natural thermal evolution profiles.

  6. Reactive Transport Modeling of CO2-induced Porosity and Permeability Changes in Heterogeneous Carbonate Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Y.; Smith, M. M.; Mason, H. E.; Carroll, S.

    2015-12-01

    It has long been appreciated that chemical interactions have a major effect on rock porosity and permeability evolution and may alter the behavior or performance of both natural and engineered reservoir systems. Such reaction-induced permeability evolution is of particular importance for geological CO2 sequestration and storage associated with enhanced oil recovery. In this study we used a three-dimensional Darcy scale reactive transport model to simulate CO2 core flood experiments in which the CO2-equilibrated brine was injected into dolostone cores collected from the Arbuckle carbonate reservoir, Wellington, Kansas. Heterogeneous distributions of macro pores, fractures, and mineral phases inside the cores were obtained from X-ray computed microtomography (XCMT) characterization data, and then used to construct initial model macroscopic properties including porosity, permeability, and mineral compositions. The reactive transport simulations were performed by using the Nonisothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport (NUFT) code, and their results were compared with experimental data. It was observed both experimentally and numerically that the dissolution fronts became unstable in highly heterogeneous and less permeable formations, leading to the development of highly porous flow paths or wormholes. Our model results indicate that the continuum-scale reactive transport models are able to adequately capture the evolution of distinct dissolution fronts as observed in carbonate rocks at a core scale. The impacts of rock heterogeneity, chemical kinetics and porosity-permeability relationships were also examined in this study. The numerical model developed in this study will not only help improve understanding of coupled physical and chemical processes controlling carbonate dissolution, but also provide a useful basis for upscaling transport and reaction properties from core scale to field scale. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy

  7. Rock Outcrops Redistribute Organic Carbon and Nutrients to Nearby Soil Patches in Three Karst Ecosystems in SW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dianjie; Shen, Youxin; Li, Yuhui; Huang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Emergent rock outcrops are common in terrestrial ecosystems. However, little research has been conducted regarding their surface function in redistributing organic carbon and nutrient fluxes to soils nearby. Water that fell on and ran off 10 individual rock outcrops was collected in three 100 × 100 m plots within a rock desertification ecosystem, an anthropogenic forest ecosystem, and a secondary forest ecosystem between June 2013 and June 2014 in Shilin, SW China. The concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (N), total phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) in the water samples were determined during three seasons, and the total amounts received by and flowing out from the outcrops were calculated. In all three ecosystems, TOC and N, P, and K were found throughout the year in both the water received by and delivered to nearby soil patches. Their concentrations and amounts were generally greater in forested ecosystems than in the rock desertification ecosystem. When rock outcrops constituted a high percentage (≥ 30%) of the ground surface, the annual export of rock outcrop runoff contributed a large amount of organic carbon and N, P, and K nutrients to soil patches nearby by comparison to the amount soil patches received via atmospheric deposition. These contributions may increase the spatial heterogeneity of soil fertility within patches, as rock outcrops of different sizes, morphologies, and emergence ratios may surround each soil patch. PMID:27509199

  8. Rock Outcrops Redistribute Organic Carbon and Nutrients to Nearby Soil Patches in Three Karst Ecosystems in SW China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dianjie; Shen, Youxin; Li, Yuhui; Huang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Emergent rock outcrops are common in terrestrial ecosystems. However, little research has been conducted regarding their surface function in redistributing organic carbon and nutrient fluxes to soils nearby. Water that fell on and ran off 10 individual rock outcrops was collected in three 100 × 100 m plots within a rock desertification ecosystem, an anthropogenic forest ecosystem, and a secondary forest ecosystem between June 2013 and June 2014 in Shilin, SW China. The concentrations of total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (N), total phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) in the water samples were determined during three seasons, and the total amounts received by and flowing out from the outcrops were calculated. In all three ecosystems, TOC and N, P, and K were found throughout the year in both the water received by and delivered to nearby soil patches. Their concentrations and amounts were generally greater in forested ecosystems than in the rock desertification ecosystem. When rock outcrops constituted a high percentage (≥ 30%) of the ground surface, the annual export of rock outcrop runoff contributed a large amount of organic carbon and N, P, and K nutrients to soil patches nearby by comparison to the amount soil patches received via atmospheric deposition. These contributions may increase the spatial heterogeneity of soil fertility within patches, as rock outcrops of different sizes, morphologies, and emergence ratios may surround each soil patch. PMID:27509199

  9. WETTABILITY ALTERATION OF CARBONATE ROCK MEDIATED BY BIOSURFACTANT PRODUCED FROM HIGH-STARCH AGRICULTURAL EFFLUENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehdi Salehi; Stephen Johnson; Gregory Bala; Jenn-Tai Liang

    2006-09-01

    Surfactants can be used to alter wettability of reservoir rock, increasing spontaneous imbibition and thus improving oil yields. Commercial synthetic surfactants are often prohibitively expensive and so a crude preparation of the anionic biosurfactant, surfactin, from Bacillus subtilis grown on high-starch industrial and agricultural effluents has been proposed as an economical alternative. To assess the effectiveness of the surfactin, it is compared to commercially available surfactants. In selecting a suitable benchmark surfactant, two metrics are examined: the ability of the surfactants to alter wettability at low concentrations, and the degree to which they are absorbed onto reservoir matrix. We review the literature to survey the adsorption models that have been developed to describe surfactant adsorption in porous media. These models are evaluated using the experimental data from this study. Crushed carbonate rock samples are cleaned and aged in crude oil. The wettability change mediated by dilute solutions of commercial anionic surfactants and surfactin is assessed using a two-phase separation; and surfactant loss due to retention and adsorption the rock is determined.

  10. Developing high-resolution carbon-13 and silicon-29 MRI of solids in sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Robert; Barrett, Sean; Viswanathan, Ravinath; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-03-01

    Mapping pore structure and flow properties of sedimentary rock is directly relevant to current challenges in geophysics like carbon sequestration and oil/gas exploration. Such applications require detailed information about both structure and composition of porous rocks. However, existing scanning methods tend to be limited to gathering one or the other type of information. MRI could be used to measure both composition and structure simultaneously, but conventional MRI in such systems, which targets the proton signal of interstitial fluid, is severely limited by signal losses due to magnetic susceptibility inhomogeneity. Our lab has recently made advances in obtaining high spatial resolution (sub-400 μm)3 three-dimensional 31P MRI of bone through use of the quadratic echo line-narrowing sequence (1). In this talk, we describe our current work applying these methods to sedimentary rock, targeting the isotopes 13C and 29Si. We describe the results of characterization of limestone and shale samples, and we discuss our progress with producing MRI of these systems. (1) M. Frey, et al. PNAS 109: 5190 (2012)

  11. Thermal simulation experiment on the hydrocarbon regeneration of marine carbonate source rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI HuiLi; JIN ZhiJun; HE ZhiLiang; QIN JianZhong; SHAO ZhiBing

    2007-01-01

    Hydrocarbon regeneration of marine carbonate source rock was simulated with thermal experiments in a laboratory. The results reveal that hydrocarbon regeneration does not simply continue the primary hydrocarbon generation process, and that, for marine carbonate source rock, discontinuous hydrocarbon generation differs greatly from the continuous generation. Several different features of hydrocarbon regeneration were observed in the experiments. First, the liquid hydrocarbon generation peak was always observed no matter what the initial maturity of the sample was. Moreover, the maturity and the liquid hydrocarbon yield corresponding to the peak varied with the sample's initial maturity. Second, the hydrocarbon regeneration started earlier than the continuous one. In the experiments, the hydrocarbon could be re-generated when the sample maturity did not rise to any great extent. Third, the accumulative hydrocarbon-generating quantity during discontinuous generation was always more than that during continuous generation. And the hydrocarbon-generating quantity varied with the discontinuous generation history. Chemical kinetic analysis suggests that discontinuous hydrocarbon generation should not only be explained by the parallel reaction mechanism but also by the consecutive reaction mechanism which has been ignored in the traditional chemical kinetic model for continuous hydrocarbon generation.

  12. Comparative chemical analyses of soils formed on carbonate rocks in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Németh, Eszter; Sajó, István; Bidló, András

    2014-05-01

    The present study focuses on the physical and chemical investigation of soils formed primarily on carbonate rocks. One part of the investigated soil profiles originated from the top of the Bükk Hills, the Bükk-Highlands' limestone plateau, which is located in the North-Eastern part of Hungary. The rest of the samples were taken from the Szárhalom Forest (located in West Hungary). The different location and climate of the sites forms a basis of the comparison of the soils with similar base rock. These soils are formed mainly on limestones, however they differ significantly in terms of certain characteristic properties. The following physical parameters were evaluated from the samples: transition, structure, compactness, roots, skeletal percent, colour, physical assortment, concretion and soil defect. Laboratory analysis involved the measurement of acidity, particle distribution, carbonated lime content, humus content, ammonium lactate-acetic acid soluble phosphorus- and potassium content, potassium chloride soluble calcium- and magnesium content, ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic-acid (EDTA) and diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic-acid (DTPA) soluble copper-, iron-, manganese- and zinc content. X-ray diffraction, thermoanalytical measurements and ICP-OES were also carried out to determine the mineral composition of the soils and the content of heavy metals. Evaluation focused on the comprehensive analysis of the data with a special regard to possible relationships and correlations. Research was supported financially by the "Silva naturalis (TÁMOP-4.2.2.A-11/1/KONV-2012-0004)" project.

  13. Origin and role of fluids involved in the seismic cycle of extensional faults in carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeraglia, Luca; Berra, Fabrizio; Billi, Andrea; Boschi, Chiara; Carminati, Eugenio; Doglioni, Carlo

    2016-09-01

    We examine the potentially-seismic right-lateral transtensional-extensional Tre Monti Fault (central Apennines, Italy) with structural and geochemical methods and develop a conceptual evolutionary model of extensional faulting with fluid involvement in shallow (≤3 km depth) faults in carbonate rocks. In the analysed fault zone, multiscale fault rock structures include injection veins, fluidized ultracataclasite layers, and crackle breccias, suggesting that the fault slipped seismically. We reconstructed the relative chronology of these structures through cross-cutting relationship and cathodoluminescence analyses. We then used C- and O-isotope data from different generations of fault-related mineralizations to show a shift from connate (marine-derived) to meteoric fluid circulation during exhumation from 3 to ≤1 km depths and concurrent fluid cooling from ∼68 to hydrological system, where prevalently connate fluids circulated within the fault zone at temperatures between 60° and 75 °C. During fault zone exhumation, at depths ≤1 km and temperatures hydrological circulation became open and meteoric-derived fluids progressively infiltrated and circulated within the fault zone. The role of these fluids during syn-exhumation seismic cycles of the Tre Monti Fault has been substantially passive along the whole fault zone, the fluids being passively redistributed at hydrostatic pressure following co-seismic dilatancy. Only the principal fault has been characterized, locally and transiently, by fluid overpressures. The presence of low-permeability clayey layers in the sedimentary sequence contributed to control the type of fluids infiltrating into the fault zone and possibly their transient overpressures. These results can foster the comprehension of seismic faulting at shallow depths in carbonate rocks of other fold-thrust belts involved in post-collisional seismogenic extensional tectonics.

  14. PETROLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY OF EARLY PRECAMBRIAN CARBONATE ROCKS FROM THE UMPAVALLI AREA, EASTERN GHATS, INDIA AND THEIR COMPARISON WITH ANTARCTICA

    OpenAIRE

    / ヨシダ, マサル; M. Venkata, RAO; A.T., RAO; K.S., RAO; Masaru, YOSHIDA

    1993-01-01

    Precambrian granulite terrain of the Umpavalli area forms a portion of the Eastern Ghats province of the Indian Shield in between latitude 18°20′39″and 18°25′08″ and longitude 82°54′07″ and 83°04′43″ in the Survey of India toposheet numbers 65J/15 and 65N/3. The granulite terrain of the Eastern Ghats province encompasses mainly khondalite and charnockite groups of rocks, and the Umpavalli area is one of the best areas to study the supracrustal rocks of the Precambrian. The carbonate rocks (do...

  15. Kinetic study of the hydrocarbon generation from marine carbonate source rocks characterization of products of gas and liquid hydrocarbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Xinhua; GENG Ansong; XIONG Yongqiang; LIU Jinzhong; ZHANG Haizu; ZHAO Qingfang

    2006-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of hydrocarbon generation from the marine carbonate source rocks were determined and calibrated through kinetic simulating experiment. The kinetic parameters of hydrocarbon generation then were extrapolated to geological condition by using the relative software.The result shows that gaseous hydrocarbons (C1, C2,C3, C4-5) were generated in condition of 150℃<T<220℃(1.0%<Ro <3.0% ). Light hydrocarbons (C6-13)and heavy hydrocarbons ( C13+) were generated in condition of 100 ℃<T<170 ℃ (0.5%<Ro<1.5%). A quantitative reference to examine the natural evolution of hydrocarbon of marine carbonate source rocks can be established through the results. It also provides a new method for evaluating the highly mature marine carbonate source rock more reasonably.

  16. Acoustic and reservoir properties of microporous carbonate rocks: Implication of micrite particle size and morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnet, J. B.; Robion, P.; David, C.; Fortin, J.; Brigaud, B.; Yven, B.

    2015-02-01

    This integrated study provides significant insight into parameters controlling the acoustic and reservoir properties of microporous limestones, improving the knowledge of the relationships among petrophysic and microstructural content. Petrophysical properties measured from laboratory and logging tools (porosity, permeability, electrical conductivity, and acoustic properties) have been coupled with thin section and scanning electron microscope observations on the EST205 borehole from the Oxfordian limestone aquifer of the eastern part of the Paris Basin. A major achievement is the establishment of the link between micrite microtexture types (particle morphology and nature of intercrystal contacts) and the physical response, introducing a new effective and interesting rock-typing approach for microporous reservoirs. Fluid-flow properties are enhanced by the progressive augmentation of intercrystalline microporosity and associated pore throat diameter, as the coalescence of micrite particles decreases. Concerning acoustic properties, the slow increase of P wave velocity can be seen as a reflection of crystal size and growing contact cementation leading to a more cohesive and stiffer micrite microtexture. By applying poroelasticity theory on our samples, we show that velocity dispersion can be a very useful tool for data discrimination in carbonates. This dispersion analysis highlights the presence of microcracks in the rocks, and their overall effect on acoustic and transport properties. The presence of microcracks is also confirmed with observations and permeability measurements under high confining pressure. Finally, a possible origin of high porous levels in neritic limestones is a mineralogical transformation of carbonates through freshwater-related diagenesis during subaerial exposure time. Finally, by applying poroelasticity theory on our samples, we show that velocity dispersion can be a very useful tool for data discrimination in carbonates.

  17. Chromium Isotopes in Carbonate Rocks: New Insights into Proterozoic Atmospheric Oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kah, L. C.; Gilleaudeau, G. J.; Frei, R.; Kaufman, A. J.; Azmy, K.; Bartley, J. K.; Chernyavskiy, P.; Knoll, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    There has been a long-standing debate in geobiology about the role that Earth's oxygenation played in the evolution of complex life. Temporal linkages exist between the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) and the evolution of eukaryotes, as well as Neoproterozoic rise in oxygen and the diversification of metazoans. Further advances have been hampered, however, by the lack of direct proxies that mark specific levels of atmospheric pO2 in the geologic past. Chromium (Cr) isotopes show promise in this regard because the oxidation of Cr during terrestrial weathering—which results in isotopic fractionation—is dependent on a specific threshold of atmospheric pO2 (0.1-1% of the present atmospheric level [PAL]). This threshold value broadly coincides with recent estimates of the oxygen requirements of early animals. Here we report new Cr-isotope data from four late Mesoproterozoic carbonate-dominated successions. Samples were collected from the Turukhansk Uplift (Siberia), the El Mreiti Group (Mauritania), the Vazante Group (Brazil), and the Angmaat Formation (Canada). We emphasize the application of Cr-isotopes to carbonate rocks because the broad temporal range of this lithology in the geologic record provides an opportunity to significantly expand our understanding of Proterozoic oxygenation on shorter time scales. Our data indicate that pO2 levels required to support early animals were attained long before Neoproterozoic metazoan diversification, although the large degree of isotopic heterogeneity in our dataset may indicate that pO2 > 0.1-1% PAL was only a transient phenomenon in the Mesoproterozoic. This study demonstrates the utility of Cr-isotopes as an atmospheric redox proxy in carbonate rocks and helps inform future avenues of research on Proterozoic pO2 thresholds.

  18. Planetary rover robotics experiment in education: carbonate rock collecting experiment of the Husar-5 rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalay, Kristóf; Lang, Ágota; Horváth, Tamás; Prajczer, Péter; Bérczi, Szaniszló

    2013-04-01

    Introduction: The new experiment for the Husar-5 educational space probe rover consists of steps of the technology of procedure of finding carbonate speci-mens among the rocks on the field. 3 main steps were robotized: 1) identification of carbonate by acid test, 2) measuring the gases liberated by acid, and 3) magnetic test. Construction of the experiment: The basis of the robotic realization of the experiment is a romote-controlled rover which can move on the field. Onto this rover the mechanism of the experiments were built from Technics LEGO elements and we used LEGO-motors for making move these experiments. The operation was coordinated by an NXT-brick which was suitable to programming. Fort he acetic-test the drops should be passed to the selected area. Passing a drop to a locality: From the small holder of the acid using densified gas we pump some drop onto the selected rock. We promote this process by pumpig the atmospheric gas into another small gas-container, so we have another higher pressure gas there. This is pumped into the acid-holder. The effect of the reaction is observed by a wireless onboard camera In the next step we can identify the the liberated gas by the gas sensor. Using it we can confirm the liberation of the CO2 gas without outer observer. The third step is the controll of the paramagnetic properties.. In measuring this feature a LEGO-compass is our instrumentation. We use a electric current gener-ated magnet. During the measurements both the coil and the gas-sensor should be positioned to be near to the surface. This means, that a lowering and an uplifting machinery should be constructed. Summary: The sequence of the measurement is the following. 1) the camera - after giving panorama images - turns toward the soil surface, 2) the dropping onto the rock surface 3) at the same time the gas-sensor starts to move down above the rock 4) the compass sensor also moves down on the arm which holds both the gas-sensor and the compass-sensor 5

  19. Detailed Study of Seismic Wave Attenuation in Carbonate Rocks: Application on Abu Dhabi Oil Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchaala, F.; Ali, M. Y.; Matsushima, J.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wave attenuation is a promising attribute for the petroleum exploration, thanks to its high sensitivity to physical properties of subsurface. It can be used to enhance the seismic imaging and improve the geophysical interpretation which is crucial for reservoir characterization. However getting an accurate attenuation profile is not an easy task, this is due to complex mechanism of this parameter, although that many studies were carried out to understand it. The degree of difficulty increases for the media composed of carbonate rocks, known to be highly heterogeneous and with complex lithology. That is why few attenuation studies were done successfully in carbonate rocks. The main objectives of this study are, Getting an accurate and high resolution attenuation profiles from several oil fields. The resolution is very important target for us, because many reservoirs in Abu Dhabi oil fields are tight.Separation between different modes of wave attenuation (scattering and intrinsic attenuations).Correlation between the attenuation profiles and other logs (Porosity, resistivity, oil saturation…), in order to establish a relationship which can be used to detect the reservoir properties from the attenuation profiles.Comparison of attenuation estimated from VSP and sonic waveforms. Provide spatial distribution of attenuation in Abu Dhabi oil fields.To reach these objectives we implemented a robust processing flow and new methodology to estimate the attenuation from the downgoing waves of the compressional VSP data and waveforms acquired from several wells drilled in Abu Dhabi. The subsurface geology of this area is primarily composed of carbonate rocks and it is known to be highly fractured which complicates more the situation, then we separated successfully the intrinsic attenuation from the scattering. The results show that the scattering is significant and cannot be ignored. We found also a very interesting correlation between the attenuation profiles and the

  20. Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from calcareous-marly rock under stress: experimental tests results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Plescia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The identified emissions of abiogenic carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and methane are generally attributed to volcanic activity or to geochemical processes associated with thermometamorphic effects. In this paper we show another possible abiogenic source of emission, induced by mechanical, and not thermal, stresses. We investigated the mechanochemical production of carbon dioxide and methane when friction is applied to marly-type rock and studied the mechanisms determining the strong CO2 and CH4 emissions observed. A ring mill was used to apply friction and oriented pressure upon a synthetic calcite-clay mixture of varying proportions. We found that the CO2 and CH4 release versus the grinding action has a non-linear trend reflecting the behaviour of decreasing crystallinity, which indicates a close link between crystallinity and gas production. For the CO2 emission, we propose a release mechanism connected with the friction-induced fractures and the increase in structural disorders induced by creep in the lattice. The CH4 emission could be explained by a Sabatier reaction in which CO2 and hydrogen are involved to form CH4 and water.

  1. Biological marker characteristics of oils and asphalts from carbonate source rocks in a rapidly subsiding graben, Dead Sea, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullkötter, Jürgen; Spiro, Baruch; Nissenbaum, Arie

    1985-06-01

    A detailed GC/MS study of biological marker compounds in the saturated and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions of oils and asphalts from the Dead Sea area, Israel, provided decisive information to the solution of a long-lasting controversy by showing that the asphalts are products of early generation in an immature stage from the same type of carbonate source rock which generated more mature oils. The asphalts are not biodegraded residues of the oils. Oils from six different wells, and asphalts from wells, outcrops, and a floating block from the Dead Sea all have very similar sterane and triterpane patterns. They all lack rearranged steranes (diasteranes) indicating a carbonate source matrix and compare reasonably well with a sample of Upper Cretaceous bituminous chalk from Nebi Musa. The main difference between the oils and the asphalts is a significantly higher triaromatic to mono- plus triaromatic steroid hydrocarbon ratio in the former. This is explained as a result of rapid subsidence and heating of their source rock close to the deep parts of the Dead Sea graben. The oils thus were generated in the more deeply buried source rock blocks under the graben fill, whereas the asphalts either originate from an immature source rock section closer to the graben rims or represent an earlier phase of generation and expulsion. This study also provides general information on the evolution of biological markers in carbonate source rocks. Low-activation-energy processes, like isomerisation of steranes, appear to occur much faster at low temperatures than in shales. The high sulfur content and less cross-linking of the biogenic organic matter into a complex kerogen structure are suggested to be responsible for this. Care should be taken when using only sterane isomerisation to assess the maturity of hydrocarbons from carbonate rocks and of carbonate-derived oils.

  2. Chemical kinetics study of hydrocarbon regeneration from organic matter in carbonate source rocks and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU ShuangFang; ZHONG NingNing; XUE HaiTao; PAN ChangChun; LI JiJun; LI HongTao

    2007-01-01

    In the comparison research of hydrocarbon regeneration, a low maturity carbonate source rock is heated to different temperatures in a gold tube to obtain a series of samples with different maturities. Then, the heated samples, before and after extraction, are subjected to Rock-Eval pyrolysis through a thermal simulation of hydrocarbon regeneration in order to inspect pyrolysis characteristics and probe into the characteristics of the chemical kinetics of each sample. The results indicate that, whether hydrocarbon regeneration peak is delayed or advanced, the potential of hydrocarbon regeneration is closely related to the expulsion amount and breakdown maturity of primary hydrocarbon generation. After extraction, the average activation energy of artificially maturated samples increases with the in creasing maturity, but the chemical kinetic properties of un-extracted samples decrease. The calibrated chemical kinetic models that describe extracted and un-extracted samples are applied to the Bohai Bay and the Songliao Basin, and the results indicate that the combination of the two models can explain some contradictory conclusions previously reported. These results also facilitate the quantitative evaluation of the amount of hydrocarbon regeneration by the chemical kinetic method.

  3. The determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks by flame photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Henry

    1956-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks using the Beckman flame photometer, with photomultiplier attachement. The sample is dissolved in hydrofluoric, nitric, and perchloric acids, the hydrofluoric and nitric acids are expelled, a radiation buffer consisting of aluminum, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, phosphoric acid, and nitric acid is added, and the solution is atomized in an oxy-hydrogen flame with an instrument setting of 554 mµ. Measurements are made by comparison against calcium standards, prepared in the same manner, in the 0 to 50 ppm range. The suppression of calcium emission by aluminum and phosphate was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. This addition almost completely restores the standard curve obtained from a solution of calcium nitrate. Interference was noted when the iron concentration in the aspirated solution (including the iron from the buffer) exceeded 100 ppm iron. Other common rock-forming elements did not interfere. The results obtained by this procedure are within ± 2 percent of the calcium oxide values obtained by other methods in the range 1 to 95 percent calcium oxide. In the 0 to 1 percent calcium oxide range the method compares favorably with standard methods.

  4. Chemical kinetics study of hydrocarbon regeneration from organic matter in carbonate source rocks and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the comparison research of hydrocarbon regeneration, a low maturity carbonate source rock is heated to different temperatures in a gold tube to obtain a series of samples with different maturities. Then, the heated samples, before and after extraction, are subjected to Rock-Eval pyrolysis through a thermal simulation of hydrocarbon regeneration in order to inspect pyrolysis characteristics and probe into the characteristics of the chemical kinetics of each sample. The results indicate that, whether hy- drocarbon regeneration peak is delayed or advanced, the potential of hydrocarbon regeneration is closely related to the expulsion amount and breakdown maturity of primary hydrocarbon generation. After extraction, the average activation energy of artificially maturated samples increases with the in- creasing maturity, but the chemical kinetic properties of un-extracted samples decrease. The calibrated chemical kinetic models that describe extracted and un-extracted samples are applied to the Bohai Bay and the Songliao Basin, and the results indicate that the combination of the two models can explain some contradictory conclusions previously reported. These results also facilitate the quantitative evaluation of the amount of hydrocarbon regeneration by the chemical kinetic method.

  5. Characterization of nanometer-scale porosity in reservoir carbonate rock by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Gunda, Naga Siva Kumar; Mitra, Sushanta K; Vick, Douglas

    2012-02-01

    Sedimentary carbonate rocks are one of the principal porous structures in natural reservoirs of hydrocarbons such as crude oil and natural gas. Efficient hydrocarbon recovery requires an understanding of the carbonate pore structure, but the nature of sedimentary carbonate rock formation and the toughness of the material make proper analysis difficult. In this study, a novel preparation method was used on a dolomitic carbonate sample, and selected regions were then serially sectioned and imaged by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy. The resulting series of images were used to construct detailed three-dimensional representations of the microscopic pore spaces and analyze them quantitatively. We show for the first time the presence of nanometer-scale pores (50-300 nm) inside the solid dolomite matrix. We also show the degree of connectivity of these pores with micron-scale pores (2-5 μm) that were observed to further link with bulk pores outside the matrix.

  6. The influence of carbonates in parent rocks on the biological properties of mountain soils of the Northwest Caucasus region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazeev, K. Sh.; Kutrovskii, M. A.; Dadenko, E. V.; Vezdeneeva, L. S.; Kolesnikov, S. I.; Val'kov, V. F.

    2012-03-01

    The biological activity of different subtypes of soddy-calcareous soils (rendzinas) of the Northwest Caucasus region was studied. In the Novorossiisk-Abrau-Dyurso region (dry subtropics), typical soddy-calcareous soils with the high content of carbonates predominate; in the more humid conditions of the Lagonaki Plateau (Republic of Adygeya), leached soddy-calcareous soils carbonate-free down to the parent rock are spread. The number of microarthropods, the populations of fungi and bacteria, and the enzyme activity (catalase, dehydrogenase, and invertase) testify that the biological activity of these soils significantly differs. In the typical soddy-calcareous soils of the dry subtropics, the content of carbonates does not affect the characteristics mentioned; in the more humid conditions of the West Caucasus region, the presence of carbonates in the parent rocks intensifies the biological activity of the soddy-calcareous soils.

  7. Interaction between Fingering and Heterogeneity during Viscous Oil Recovery in Carbonate Rocks (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, K. K.; Doorwar, S.

    2013-12-01

    Due to the fast depleting conventional oil reserves, research in the field of petroleum engineering has shifted focus towards unconventional (viscous and heavy) oils. Many of the viscous oil reserves are in carbonate rocks. Thermal methods in carbonate formations are complicated by mineral dissolution and precipitation. Non-thermal methods should be developed for viscous oils in carbonates. In viscous oil reservoirs, oil recovery due to water flood is low due to viscous fingering. Polymer flood is an attractive process, but the timing of the polymer flood start is an important parameter in the optimization of polymer floods. Vuggy Silurian dolomite cores were saturated with formation brine and reservoir oil (150-200 cp). They were then displaced by either a polymeric solution (secondary polymer flood) or brine followed the polymeric solution (tertiary polymer flood). The amount of brine injection was varied as a parameter. Oil recovery and pressure drop was monitored as a function of the starting point of the polymer flood. To visualize the displacement at the pore-scale, two types of micromodels were prepared: one with isolated heterogeneity and the other with connected heterogeneity. The wettability of the micromodels was either water-wet or oil-wet. The micromodels were saturated with formation brine and oil. A series of water flood and polymer flood was conducted to identify the mechanism of fluid flow. Dolomite corefloods show that a tertiary polymer flood following a secondary water flood recovers a substantial amount of oil unlike what is observed in typical sandstone cores with light oil. The tertiary oil recovery plus the secondary waterflood recovery can exceed the oil recovery in a secondary polymer flood in dolomite-viscous oil-brine system. These experiments were repeated in a Berea-oil-brine system which showed that the oil recovered in the secondary polymer flood was similar to the cumulative oil recovery in the tertiary polymer flood. The high

  8. Estimation of Physical Property Changes by Oil Saturation in Carbonates and Sandstone Using Computational Rock Physics Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M.; Keehm, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Carbonate Reservoirs are drawing a great attention as global energy demands and consumption increase rapidly, since more than 60% of oil and 40% of gas of world reserves are in carbonate rocks. However, most of them are hard to develop mainly due to their complexity and heterogeneity, especially at the pore scale. In this study, we perform computational rock physics modeling (numerical simulations on pore microstructures of carbonate rocks) and compare the results with those from sandstone. The brief procedure of the method is (1) to obtain high-resolution pore microstructure with a spatial resolution of 1-2 micron by X-ray microtomography technique, (2) to perform two-phase lattice-Boltzmann (LB) flow simulation to obtain various oil and water saturations, then (3) to calculate physical properties, such as P-wave velocity and electrical conductivity through pore-scale property simulation techniques. For the carbonate rock, we identified much more isolated pores than sandstone by investigating pore microstructures. Thus permeability and electrical conductivity were much smaller than those of sandstone. The electrical conductivity versus oil saturation curve of the carbonate rock showed sharper decrease at low oil saturation, but similar slope at higher oil saturation. We think that higher complexity of pore connectivity is responsible for this effect. The P-wave velocity of the carbonate rock was much higher than sandstone and the it did not show any significant changes during the change of oil saturation. Therefore, we think that fluid discrimination by seismic data with P-wave velocity alone would pose a greate challenge in most carbonate reservoirs. In addition, the S-wave velocity seems not to be sensitive either, which suggest that the AVO-type analysis would also be difficult, though requires more researches. On the other hand, our computational rock physics approach can be useful in preliminary analysis of carbonate reservoirs since it can determine the

  9. Unusual N—Alkane Distributions in Extracts from Marine Carbonate Rocks at High Levels of Maturity and Overmaturity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李景贵; R.PAULPHILP; 等

    2002-01-01

    N-alkanes in extracts from possible carbonate source rocks of the Lower Ordovician Majiagou Formation in the central gas field of the Shanganning Basin and the Upper Sinian Dengying Formation in the Weiyuan gas field of the Sichuan Basin,are characterized by bimodal distributions with the dominant carbon numbers in the range C17-C21 and C25-C29.In most sam-ples,the lower carbon number components are present in greater abundance than the higher car-bon number ones.Most samples contain significant concentrations of waxy hydrocarbons(C22+)with C21-/C22+ ratios between 0.50 to 3.16 ,and an average value of 1.34.The n-alkanes in extracts of outcrops and shallow core samples of Upper Proterozoic and Lower Palaeozoic carbon-ate rocks in the western and southern parts of the North China Basin are of unimodal distribu-tions dominated by n-alkanes maximizing in the C25-C29 range.These extracts have very high concentrations of waxy hydrocarbons with C21-/C22+ ratios all<1.0,ranging from 0.14 to 0.90 and averaging 0.36.All of the extracts have a marked odd/even predominance in the high mo-lecular weight n-alkane range regardless of whether they are from shallow or deep cores or out-crop samples.Simulation experiments were performed using typical sapropelic-type kerogens from the immature Sinian Lower Xiamalin Formation carbonate-rich shales collected at Jixian ,Hebei Province,North China Basin ,and the contemporary microplanktonic blue-green algae Spirulina subsala.Results indicate that the unusual distribution of n-alkanes in the extracts of Upper Proterozoic and Lower Palaeozoic carbonate rocks possibly originated from algae in the source rocks at high levels fo maturity and overmaturity.

  10. An Experimental Study of Mixture Corrosion Effects of Carbonate Rocks in the Transitional Zone of Littoral Karst Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈鸿汉; 邹胜章; 朱远峰; 陈从喜

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism for development of littoral karst differs from that of inland karst, and the mixture corrosion effects are one of the most important factors that control the development of littoral karst. Through seven groups of static experiments carried out in a closed CO2-H2O system, basic conclusions can be drawn as follows: (1) the basic law of corrosion process in a transitional zone of seawater-freshwater in littoral karst areas is identical with that in the fresh water,i.e., the lithologic characteristics and rock structure are the main factors which control the development of littoral karst; (2)the mixture corrosion rate of the carbonate rock in the above transitional zone is faster than that in fresh water or seawater;(3) the mechanism for development of carbonate rocks differs at various pressures of CO2 in a transitional zone in littoral karst areas.``

  11. Silurian and Devonian source rocks and crude oils from the western part of Libya: Organic geochemistry, palynology and carbon stratigraphy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elkelani, Mohamed M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The Early Silurian “hot” shales and Late Devonian black shales are major regional oil and gas source rocks in North Africa. Their deposition probably played a major role in global carbon cycling in general because of the large areas of the ocean affected. Comparing the Libyan δ13C record with record

  12. The thin section rock physics: Modeling and measurement of seismic wave velocity on the slice of carbonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardaya, P. D., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Noh, K. A. B. M., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my; Yusoff, W. I. B. W., E-mail: pongga.wardaya@utp.edu.my [Petroleum Geosciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Ridha, S. [Petroleum Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak, 31750 (Malaysia); Nurhandoko, B. E. B. [Wave Inversion and Subsurface Fluid Imaging Research Laboratory (WISFIR), Dept. of Physics, Institute of Technology Bandung, Bandung, Indonesia and Rock Fluid Imaging Lab, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-09-25

    This paper discusses a new approach for investigating the seismic wave velocity of rock, specifically carbonates, as affected by their pore structures. While the conventional routine of seismic velocity measurement highly depends on the extensive laboratory experiment, the proposed approach utilizes the digital rock physics view which lies on the numerical experiment. Thus, instead of using core sample, we use the thin section image of carbonate rock to measure the effective seismic wave velocity when travelling on it. In the numerical experiment, thin section images act as the medium on which wave propagation will be simulated. For the modeling, an advanced technique based on artificial neural network was employed for building the velocity and density profile, replacing image's RGB pixel value with the seismic velocity and density of each rock constituent. Then, ultrasonic wave was simulated to propagate in the thin section image by using finite difference time domain method, based on assumption of an acoustic-isotropic medium. Effective velocities were drawn from the recorded signal and being compared to the velocity modeling from Wyllie time average model and Kuster-Toksoz rock physics model. To perform the modeling, image analysis routines were undertaken for quantifying the pore aspect ratio that is assumed to represent the rocks pore structure. In addition, porosity and mineral fraction required for velocity modeling were also quantified by using integrated neural network and image analysis technique. It was found that the Kuster-Toksoz gives the closer prediction to the measured velocity as compared to the Wyllie time average model. We also conclude that Wyllie time average that does not incorporate the pore structure parameter deviates significantly for samples having more than 40% porosity. Utilizing this approach we found a good agreement between numerical experiment and theoretically derived rock physics model for estimating the effective seismic

  13. Unusual N-Alkane Distributions in Extracts from Marine Carbonate Rocks at High Levels of Maturity and Overmaturity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI JINGGUI(李景贵); R. PAUL PHILP; CUI MINGZHONG(崔明中)

    2002-01-01

    N-alkanes in extracts from possible carbonate source rocks of the Lower Ordovician Majiagou Formation in the central gas field of the Shanganning Basin and the Upper Sinian Dengying Formation in the Weiyuan gas field of the Sichuan Basin, are characterized by bimodal distributions with the dominant carbon numbers in the range C17-C21 and C25-C29. In most samples, the lower carbon number components are present in greater abundance than the higher carbon number ones. Most samples contain significant concentrations of waxy hydrocarbons ( C22 + )with C21-/C22+ ratios between 0.50 to 3.16, and an average value of 1.34. The n-alkanes in extracts of outcrops and shallow core samples of Upper Proterozoic and Lower Palaeozoic carbonate rocks in the western and southern parts of the North China Basin are of unimodal distributions dominated by n-alkanes maximizing in the C25-C29 range. These extracts have very high concentrations of waxy hydrocarbons with C21 -/C22 + ratios all <1.0, ranging from 0. 14 to 0. 90 and averaging 0.36. AⅡ of the extracts have a marked odd/even predominance in the high molecular weight n-alkane range regardless of whether they are from shallow or deep cores or outcrop samples. Simulation experiments were performed using typical sapropelic-type kerogens from the immature Sinian Lower Xiamalin Formation carbonate-rich shales collected at Jixian,Hebei Province, North China Basin, and the contemporary microplanktonic blue-green algae Spirulina subsala. Results indicate that the unusual distribution of n-alkanes in the extracts of Upper Proterozoic and Lower Palaeozoic carbonate rocks possibly originated from algae in the source rocks at high levels of maturity and overmaturity.

  14. Carbon and sulfur isotopes as tracers of fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interaction in geothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, A.; Keller, N. S.; Gunnarsson Robin, J.; Kjartansdottir, R.; Ono, S.; Sveinbjörnsdottir, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon and sulfur are among major components in geothermal systems. They are found in various oxidation state and present in solid phases and fluids (water and vapor). In order to study the reactions and mass movement within multiphase geothermal systems, we have combined geochemical fluid-fluid and fluid-rock modelling with sulfur and carbon isotope fractionation modelling and compared the results with measured carbon and sulfur isotopes in geothermal fluids (water and vapor) for selected low- and high-enthalpy geothermal systems in Iceland. In this study we have focused on δ34S for H2S in vapor and water and SO4 in water as well as δ13C for CO2 in vapor and water phases. Isotope fractionations for CO2 and H2S between vapor and liquid water, upon aqueous speciation and upon carbonate and sulfide mineral formation were revised. These were combined with reaction modelling involving closed system boiling and progressive water-rock interaction to constrain the mass movement and isotope abundance between various phases. The results indicate that for a closed system, carbon and sulfur isotope abundance is largely dependent on progressive fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interaction and the initial total δ34S and δ13C value of the system. Initially, upon progressive fluid rock interaction the δ34S and δ13C values for the bulk aqueous phase approach that of the host rocks. Secondary mineral formation may alter these values, the exact isotope value of the mineral and resulting aqueous phase depending on aqueous speciation and isotope fractionation factor. In turn, aqueous speciation and mineral saturation depends on progressive fluid-rock interaction, fluid-fluid interaction, temperature and acid supply to the system. Depressurization boiling also results in isotope fractionation, the exact isotope value of the vapor and aqueous phase depending on aqueous speciation and isotope fractionation fractor. In this way, carbon and sulfur isotopes may be used combined with

  15. Strain localization in carbonate rocks experimentally deformed in the ductile field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.; Dresen, G.

    2012-04-01

    The deformation of rocks in the Earth's crust is often localized, varying from brittle fault gauges in shallow environments to mylonites in ductile shear zones at greater depth. A number of theoretical, experimental, and field studies focused on the evolution and extend of brittle fault zones, but little is known so far about initiation of ductile shear zones. Strain localization in rocks deforming at high temperature and pressure may be induced by several physical, chemical, or structurally-related mechanisms. We performed simple and pure shear deformation experiments on carbonate rocks containing structural inhomogenities in the ductile deformation regime. The results may help to gain insight into the evolution of high temperature shear zones. As starting material we used cylindrical samples of coarse-grained Carrara marble containing one or two 1 mm thin artificially prepared sheets of fine-grained Solnhofen limestone, which act as soft inclusions under the applied experimental conditions. Length and diameter of the investigated solid and hollow cylinders were 10-20 mm and 10-15 mm, respectively. Samples were deformed in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900° C temperature and confining pressures of 300 and 400 MPa. Three samples were deformed in axial compression at a bulk strain rate of 8x10-5 s-1to axial strains between 0.02 and 0.21 and 15 samples were twisted in torsion at a bulk shear strain rate of 2x10-4 s-1 to shear strains between 0.01 and 3.74. At low strain, specimens deformed axially and in torsion show minor strain hardening that is replaced by strain weakening at shear strains in excess of about 0.2. Peak shear stress at the imposed condition is about 20 MPa. Strain localized strongly within the weak inclusions as indicated by inhomogeneous bending of initially straight strain markers on sample jackets. Maximum strain concentration within inclusions with respect to the adjacent matrix was between 4 and 40, depending on total strain and

  16. Petroleum geological features and exploration prospect of deep marine carbonate rocks in China onshore: A further discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Wenzhi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Deep marine carbonate rocks have become one of the key targets of onshore oil and gas exploration and development for reserves replacement in China. Further geological researches of such rocks may practically facilitate the sustainable, steady and smooth development of the petroleum industry in the country. Therefore, through a deep investigation into the fundamental geological conditions of deep marine carbonate reservoirs, we found higher-than-expected resource potential therein, which may uncover large oil or gas fields. The findings were reflected in four aspects. Firstly, there are two kinds of hydrocarbon kitchens which were respectively formed by conventional source rocks and liquid hydrocarbons cracking that were detained in source rocks, and both of them can provide large-scale hydrocarbons. Secondly, as controlled by the bedding and interstratal karstification, as well as the burial and hydrothermal dolomitization, effective carbonate reservoirs may be extensively developed in the deep and ultra-deep strata. Thirdly, under the coupling action of progressive burial and annealing heating, some marine source rocks could form hydrocarbon accumulations spanning important tectonic phases, and large quantity of liquid hydrocarbons could be kept in late stage, contributing to rich oil and gas in such deep marine strata. Fourthly, large-scale uplifts were formed by the stacking of multi-episodic tectonism and oil and gas could be accumulated in three modes (i.e., stratoid large-area reservoir-forming mode of karst reservoirs in the slope area of uplift, back-flow type large-area reservoir-forming mode of buried hill weathered crust karst reservoirs, and wide-range reservoir-forming mode of reef-shoal reservoirs; groups of stratigraphic and lithologic traps were widely developed in the areas of periclinal structures of paleohighs and continental margins. In conclusion, deep marine carbonate strata in China onshore contain the conditions for

  17. Ground-water quality in the carbonate-rock aquifer of the Great Basin, Nevada and Utah, 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Donald H.; Thiros, Susan A.; Rosen, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    The carbonate-rock aquifer of the Great Basin is named for the thick sequence of Paleozoic limestone and dolomite with lesser amounts of shale, sandstone, and quartzite. It lies primarily in the eastern half of the Great Basin and includes areas of eastern Nevada and western Utah as well as the Death Valley area of California and small parts of Arizona and Idaho. The carbonate-rock aquifer is contained within the Basin and Range Principal Aquifer, one of 16 principal aquifers selected for study by the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water- Quality Assessment Program. Water samples from 30 ground-water sites (20 in Nevada and 10 in Utah) were collected in the summer of 2003 and analyzed for major anions and cations, nutrients, trace elements, dissolved organic carbon, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, radon, and microbiology. Water samples from selected sites also were analyzed for the isotopes oxygen-18, deuterium, and tritium to determine recharge sources and the occurrence of water recharged since the early 1950s. Primary drinking-water standards were exceeded for several inorganic constituents in 30 water samples from the carbonate-rock aquifer. The maximum contaminant level was exceeded for concentrations of dissolved antimony (6 ?g/L) in one sample, arsenic (10 ?g/L) in eleven samples, and thallium (2 ?g/L) in one sample. Secondary drinking-water regulations were exceeded for several inorganic constituents in water samples: chloride (250 mg/L) in five samples, fluoride (2 mg/L) in two samples, iron (0.3 mg/L) in four samples, manganese (0.05 mg/L) in one sample, sulfate (250 mg/L) in three samples, and total dissolved solids (500 mg/L) in seven samples. Six different pesticides or metabolites were detected at very low concentrations in the 30 water samples. The lack of VOC detections in water sampled from most of the sites is evidence thatVOCs are not common in the carbonate-rock aquifer. Arsenic values for water range from 0.7 to 45.7 ?g

  18. Pore space characterization in carbonate rocks - Approach to combine nuclear magnetic resonance and elastic wave velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Huber, Edith; Schön, Jürgen; Börner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Pore space features influence petrophysical parameters such as porosity, permeability, elastic wave velocity or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Therefore they are essential to describe the spatial distribution of petrophysical parameters in the subsurface, which is crucial for efficient reservoir characterization especially in carbonate rocks. While elastic wave velocity measurements respond to the properties of the solid rock matrix including pores or fractures, NMR measurements are sensitive to the distribution of pore-filling fluids controlled by rock properties such as the pore-surface-to-pore-volume ratio. Therefore a combination of both measurement principles helps to investigate carbonate pore space using complementary information. In this study, a workflow is presented that delivers a representative average semi-axis length of ellipsoidal pores in carbonate rocks based on the pore aspect ratio received from velocity interpretation and the pore-surface-to-pore-volume ratio Spor as input parameters combined with theoretical calculations for ellipsoidal inclusions. A novel method to calculate Spor from NMR data based on the ratio of capillary-bound to movable fluids and the thickness of the capillary-bound water film is used. To test the workflow, a comprehensive petrophysical database was compiled using micritic and oomoldic Lower Muschelkalk carbonates from Germany. The experimental data indicate that both mud-dominated and grain-dominated carbonates possess distinct ranges of petrophysical parameters. The agreement between the predicted and measured surface-to-volume ratio is satisfying for oomoldic and most micritic samples, while pyrite or significant sample heterogeneity may lead to deviations. Selected photo-micrographs and scanning electron microscope images support the validity of the estimated representative pore dimensions.

  19. Microbial Growth and Air Pollutants in the Corrosion of Carbonate Rocks: Results from Laboratory and Outdoor Experimental Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, B.; Poli, G.; Pitzurra, L.

    2003-04-01

    Microorganisms and atmospheric pollution are primary causes of deterioration of materials exposed to open air. Due to the variety of chemical-mineralogical compositions and textures, stone represents a variegated substrate that interacts with environmental fluids and particulate, and is a selective environment for biological proliferation. Carbonate rocks, in particular, are highly exposed to environmental decay and extremely susceptible to acid attack caused by atmospheric pollutants and metabolic acid production. The aim of this work is to study the combined effect of microbial contamination and atmospheric pollutants in the weathering of carbonate rocks by means of laboratory and outdoor exposure tests. Laboratory experiments performed on carbonate rocks allowed evaluation of the influence of the gas mixture in the chemical modifications of the lithic substrate, and formulation of a kinetic model of sulphation. The obtained results suggest that nucleation alternates with growth as leading processes in the development of sulphation. In particular, nucleation of the reaction products is the leading process in the initial period of sulphation, which is characterized by a marked slowdown of the reaction progress, whereas growth of the products is the leading process in the subsequent period of resumption of sulphation. In situ experiments performed by exposing limestone specimens at two air monitoring stations in Perugia with different degrees of urban air pollution showed high levels of fungal colonization at early times and the presence of weathering products (i.e. gypsum) in the longer term. Results point to a combined effect of microbial colonization and atmospheric pollutants in promoting the weathering of stone through acid attack within the film of water present on the surface of the exposed material, and through the oxidation of metal sulphide particulate pollutant to sulphate. Laboratory tests assaying the extent of fungal colonization and/or chemical

  20. Interpretation of hydraulic tests performed at a carbonate rock site for CO2 storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    María Gómez Castro, Berta; Fernández López, Sheila; Carrera, Jesús; de Simone, Silvia; Martínez, Lurdes; Roetting, Tobias; Soler, Joaquim; Ortiz, Gema; de Dios, Carlos; Huber, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Interpretation of hydraulic tests performed at a carbonate rock site for CO2 storage Berta Gómez, Sheila Fernández, Tobias Roetting, Lurdes Martínez, Silvia de Simone, Joaquim Soler, Jesus Carrera, Gema Ortiz, Christophe Huber, Carlos de Dios Proper design of CO2 geological storage facilities requires knowledge of the reservoir hydraulic parameters. Specifically, permeability controls the flux of CO2, the rate at which it dissolves, local and regional pressure buildup and the likelihood of induced seismicity. Permeability is obtained from hydraulic tests, which may yield local permeability, which controls injectivity, and large scale permeability, which controls pressure buildup at the large scale. If pressure response measurements are obtained at different elevations, hydraulic tests may also yield vertical permeability, which controls the rate at which CO2 dissolves. The objective of this work is to discuss the interpretation of hydraulic tests at deep reservoirs and the conditions under which these permeabilities can be obtained. To achieve this objective, we have built a radially symmetric model, including a skin and radial as well as vertical heterogeneity. We use this model to simulate hydraulic tests with increasing degrees of complexity about the medium response. We start by assuming Darcy flow, then add coupled mechanical effects (fractures opening) and, finally, we add thermal effects. We discuss how these affect the conventional interpretation of the tests and how to identify their presence. We apply these findings to the interpretation of hydraulic tests at Hontomin.

  1. Petrographical Study of Ewekoro Carbonate Rocks, in Ibese, South Western Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osinowo O.O.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Limestone deposits can be found in every system of the geologic column since the Precambrian. In classifying this rock, various attempts have been made and notable among them is the classification scheme based on three components: allochems, cements and matrix. Another classification divided limestoneonthe basis of texture into grainstone, packstone, mudstone, wackestone and boundstone. Texturally, limestone ranges from fine to coarse grained with aragonite and calcite as the most common minerals. This work was aimed at identifying and describing both the allochemical and orthochemical components of the limestone deposits in order to classify and deduce their depositional environment.

    Eight core samples of limestone deposits representing the Ewekoro Formation of the Dahomey Basin were studied petrographically.

    The result of the analysis carried out on the samples showed that the Ibese limestone is composed of the following allochems: sponges, echinoids, bivalves, coralline algae, and pelecypod which represent the skeletal content and intraclasts, pellets and ooids which represent the non skeletal grains. The orthochemical constituents include the carbonate mud matrix and the sparry calcite cement.

    These constituents observed from the slides indicate that the Ibese limestone belongs to the class of wackestone and could have been deposited in a quiet and low energy environment.

  2. Sulfur and carbon isotopic variations in Neoproterozoic sedimentary rocks from southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Xuelei; ZHANG Qirui; ZHANG Tonggang; FENG Lianjun

    2003-01-01

    A new set of δ34Ssulfide, δ34Ssulfate and δ13Ccarbonate values has been reported from Neoproterozoic sedimentary rocks in southern China. The interglacial black shales of the Datangpo Fm. display higher δ34Ssulfide values with >+20‰ average, but the postglacial black shales from the Doushantuo Fm. show negative δ34Ssulfide values. However, the Jinjiadong Fm., the same post-glaciation as the Doushantuo Fm., has positive δ34Ssulfide values, implying that the δ34S value of sedimentary sulfides would be controlled by lithofacies and paleogeographic environments. The δ34Ssulfate values relative to δ13Ccarbonate were obtained by extraction of trace sulfate from the successive carbonate sequences in the Yangtze Gorges sections. A preliminary interpretation suggests that the oceanic environment may fluctuate dramatically at the post-glacial Doushantuo stage and, then, recover its stability at the Dengying stage on the basis of the high resolution δ34S and δ13C curves of seawater.

  3. Quantitative Estimation of Carbonate Rock Fraction in Karst Regions Using Field Spectra in 2.0–2.5 μm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangjian Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the important roles of carbonate rock fraction in karst rocky desertification areas and their potential for indicating damage to vegetation, improved knowledge is desired to assess the application of spectroscopy and remote sensing to characterizing and quantifying the biophysical constituents of karst landscapes. In this study, we examined the spectra of major surface constituents in karst areas for direct evidence of absorption features attributable to carbonate rock fraction. Using spectral feature analysis with continuum removal, we observed that there are overlapping spectral absorption in 2.149–2.398 μm by soils and non-photosynthetic vegetation. These overlapping features complicated the carbonate absorption feature near 2.340 μm in synthetic mixed spectra. To remove the overprint signal, two hyperspectral carbonate rock indices (HCRIs were developed. Compared to the absorption features including depths, areas, and KRDSIs (karst rocky desertification synthesis indices, linear regression of HCRIs with carbonate rock fraction in linear synthetic mixtures resulted in higher correlations and lower errors. This study demonstrates that spectral variation of the surface constituents spectra in 2.270–2.398 μm region can indicate carbonate rock fraction and be used to quantify them. Still, additional research is needed to advance our understanding of the spectral influences from carbonate petrography relative to carbonate mineralogy, components and physical state of rock surface.

  4. Determination of carbon isotopic composition of individual light hydrocarbons evolved from pyrolysis of source rocks by using GC-IRMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual light hydrocarbons generated from source rocks that had been pyrolysed in vacuum glass tube were determined by using the GC-IRMS techniques. The results indicate that abundant CO2 in the pyrolysates has a remarkable effect on the determination of CH4δ13C. Running cryogenically with an initial temperature of -40℃can effectively eliminate the effect. In addition, it conduces to measuring the δ13C of C2+ hydrocarbons by increasing the injection volume and/or absorbing CO2 with the solution of sodium hydroxide.The above measures will help to get the carbon isotopic composition of C1-C7 components, which is of great significance for gas/source rock correlation and for study on the genesis of natural gas.

  5. Biological marker characteristics of oils and asphalts from carbonate source rocks in a rapidly subsiding graben, Dead Sea, Israel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rullkoetter, J.; Spiro, B.; Nissenbaum, A.

    1985-06-01

    A detailed GC/MS study of biological marker compounds in the saturated and aromatic hydrocarbon fractions of oils and asphalts from the Dead Sea area, Israel, provided decisive information to the solution of a long-lasting controversy by showing that the asphalts are products of early generation in an immature stage from the same type of carbonate source rock which generated more mature oils. The asphalts are not biodegraded residues of the oils. This study also provides general information on the evolution of biological markers in carbonate source rocks. Low-activation-energy processes, like isomerization of steranes, appear to occur much faster at low temperatures than in shales. The high sulfur content and less cross-linking of the biogenic organic matter into a complex kerogen structure are suggested to be responsible for this. 41 references, 8 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Carbonate rock classification applied to brazilian sedimentary basins; Classificacao de rochas carbonaticas aplicavel as bacias sedimentares brasileiras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terra, Gerson Jose Salamoni [Universidade Petrobras, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Ciencias e Tecnologias de Exploracao e Producao], E-mail: gersonterra@petrobras.com.br; Spadini, Adali Ricardo [Petrobras E e P, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Exploracao], E-mail: spadini@petrobras.com.br; Franca, Almerio Barros [Centro de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento Leopoldo A. Miguez de Mello (CENPES), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Sedimentologia e Petrologia] (and others)

    2009-11-15

    A new classification of carbonate rocks is proposed seeking to cover the entire spectrum of their occurrence in Brazilian basins. Emphasis is given to those in oil exploration and production locations, especially since the discovery of giant oil fields in the so called Pre-Salt section. This classification is a synergy between the various existing classifications adapting or modifying some terms and introducing new names. The carbonate rocks were divided into four groups according to their depositional texture: 1) elements not bound during deposition (mudstone, wackestone, packstone, grainstone, floatstone, rudstone, bioaccumulated, breccia), 2) elements bound during deposition, or in situ (boundstone, stromatolite, arborescent stromatolite, arbustiform stromatolite, dendriform stromatolite, thrombolite, dendrolite, leiolite, spherulitite, travertine and tufa), 3) elements bound or not bound during deposition (laminite, smooth laminite, crenulated laminite); 4) unrecognized depositional texture (crystalline limestone, dolomite). (author)

  7. Effect of tomography resolution on the calculated microscopic properties of porous materials: Comparison of sandstone and carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooya, R.; Bruns, S.; Müter, D.; Moaddel, A.; Harti, R. P.; Stipp, S. L. S.; Sørensen, H. O.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray computed tomography is useful for providing insight into the internal structure of porous materials. Extracting reliable quantitative information is difficult because the derived properties rely heavily on data resolution, i.e., very different values emerge, depending on the relationship between size of the features in the sample and the resolution of the 3D tomograms. Here, we present a method for testing if resolution is sufficient for determining reliable petrophysical parameters, i.e., with low levels of uncertainty. We derived the physical properties of sandstone and carbonate rocks over a range of voxel dimensions by computationally reducing raw data resolution in our high resolution images. Lower resolution decreases the calculated surface area for all samples and increases the derived permeability for sandstone. The permeability vs change in resolution was not monotonic for carbonates. The differences in trends for the two rock types result from different pore sizes and pore size distributions.

  8. The overthrusted Zaza Terrane of middle Cretaceous over the North American continental carbonate rocks of upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous age - relationships to oil generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echevarria Rodriguez, G.; Castro, J.A.; Amaro, S.V. [Centro de Investigaciones del Petroleo, La Habana (Cuba)

    1996-08-01

    The Zaza Terrane is part of the Caribbean plate thrust over the southern edge of the North American basinal and platform carbonate rocks of upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous age. Zaza Terrane are volcanic and ophiolitic rocks of Cretaceous age. The ophiolites are mostly serpentines which behave as reservoirs and seals. All Cuban oil fields are either within Zaza Terrane or basinal carbonates underneath, or not far away to the north of the thrust contacts. It appears that the overthrusting of the Zaza Terrane caused the generation of oil in the basinal carbonate source rocks underneath, due to the increase of rock thickness which lowered the oil window to a deeper position and increased the geothermal gradient. Oil generation was after thrusting, during post-orogenic. API gravity of oil is light toward the south and heavy to very heavy to the north. Source rocks to the south are probably of terrigenous origin.

  9. Carbonation processes of basalts and ultra-basic rocks in subsurface conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For mitigating against rising levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere, several ways are envisaged to store it geologically. Among them, mineral trapping by carbonation of basic and ultra-basic rocks is thought to be the safest. However, little is known about the reaction kinetics and mechanisms of the process, which would ultimately make us able to foresee the fate of CO2 over long time spans, and possibly enhance the efficiency of the mineral trapping. As a consequence, this thesis aimed at bringing new constrains on the weathering processes of (ultra)basic silicates, with (or without) high pCO2. Original experimental data of dissolution and carbonation processes were acquired on five silicates: wollastonite (CaSiO3), forsterite (Mg2SiO4), diopside (CaMgSi2O6), lizardite (Mg3Si2O5(OH)4) and fayalite (Fe2SiO4). The main parameters which could affect the rates of carbonation were assessed: role and mechanism of formation of passivating layers, saturation state of the fluid, specific effect of CO2 and behaviour of iron (II). Each mineral was thought to be relevant to bring new insights on each one of these questions. Wollastonite carbonation was first investigated in batch reactors. At 90 C and pCO2 = 25 MPa, the reaction reaches completion within a couple of days. The measured carbonation rate is similar to the modelled one, indicating that the rate-limiting step of the process is wollastonite dissolution. Consequently, the thick amorphous silica coatings (≥ 100 μm) that form onto wollastonite surface do not prevent the fluid to reach the pristine mineral. This result is in agreement with the structure of the silica coating, determined to be meso-porous at the nm-scale. Besides, the chemical gradient of calcium across the silica layer suggests that it is formed by a dissolution-precipitation mechanism instead of a solid-state diffusion mechanism. On the other hand, the dissolution of forsteritic olivine is inhibited by the formation of a thin (∼ 40 nm

  10. Experimental reactivity with CO2 of clayey cap-rock and carbonate reservoir of the Paris basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The constant increase in the quantity of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is regarded as being the principal cause of the current global warming. The geological sequestration of CO2 seems to be an ideal solution to reduce the increase of greenhouse gases (of which CO2) in the atmosphere but only if the reservoir's cap-rock keep its integrity for several hundreds or thousands of years. Batch experimental simulations were conducted to observe the reactivity of a cap-rock made of clay and a carbonate reservoir with CO2 at 80 C and 150 C for a pressure of 150 bar with an equilibrated water. The analytical protocol established allowed to compare the rocks before and after experimentations finding a very low reactivity, focusing on aluminium in phyllosilicates. Textural analysis shows that CO2 does not affect the properties of adsorption and the specific surface. The study of carbonate reservoir by confocal microscopy has revealed phenomena of dissolution-precipitation which have no significant impact on chemistry and structure of the reservoir. The numerical simulations carried out on mineral reference as calcium montmorillonite or clinochlore show a significant reaction in the presence of CO2 not achieved experimentally, probably due to lacunas in the thermodynamic databases or the kinetics of reactions. The simulations on Bure show no reaction on the major minerals confirming the results with batch experiments. (author)

  11. Multicriteria decision-making analysis based methodology for predicting carbonate rocks' uniaxial compressive strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersoy Hakan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available

    ABSTRACT

    Uniaxial compressive strength (UCS deals with materials' to ability to withstand axially-directed pushing forces and especially considered to be rock materials' most important mechanical properties. However, the UCS test is an expensive, very time-consuming test to perform in the laboratory and requires high-quality core samples having regular geometry. Empirical equations were thus proposed for predicting UCS as a function of rocks' index properties. Analytical hierarchy process and multiple regression analysis based methodology were used (as opposed to traditional linear regression methods on data-sets obtained from carbonate rocks in NE Turkey. Limestone samples ranging from Devonian to late Cretaceous ages were chosen; travertine-onyx samples were selected from morphological environments considering their surface environmental conditions Test results from experiments carried out on about 250 carbonate rock samples were used in deriving the model. While the hierarchy model focused on determining the most important index properties affecting on UCS, regression analysis established meaningful relationships between UCS and index properties; 0. 85 and 0. 83 positive coefficient correlations between the variables were determined by regression analysis. The methodology provided an appropriate alternative to quantitative estimation of UCS and avoided the need for tedious and time consuming laboratory testing


    RESUMEN

    La resistencia a la compresión uniaxial (RCU trata con la capacidad de los materiales para soportar fuerzas empujantes dirigidas axialmente y, especialmente, es considerada ser uno de las más importantes propiedades mecánicas de

  12. Evapotranspiration units in the Basin and Range carbonate-rock aquifer system, White Pine County, Nevada, and adjacent parts of Nevada and Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Accurate estimates of ground-water discharge are crucial in the development of a water budget for the Basin and Range Carbonate-rock Aquifer System (BARCAS) study...

  13. Transport Properties of Carbonate and Sandstone Samples: Digital Rock Physics and Laboratory Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabbad, A. A.; Dvorkin, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    We examined six carbonate samples that included three pairs, each pair cut from the same core, normal and parallel to the bedding. We also examined three sandstone samples comprised of a pair, cur normal and parallel to the bedding, and one sample cut normal to the bedding. For each of these samples, we obtained dual energy digital images with the resolution approximately 0.004 mm, coarser than the pore-scale resolution. As a result, we did not resolve the pore structure. Still, these images provided us with the bulk density (ρb) and photoelectric factor (Pf) at each voxel in 3D. The Pf volumes were used to estimate the mineralogy at each voxel by partitioning the carbonate mineralogy between calcite and dolomite and partitioning the sandstone mineralogy between pure quartz and "dirty sandstone" (Plumb et al., 1991) for one scenario and between pure quartz and illite for the other scenario. From this mineralogy we obtained the grain (matrix) density (ρs) at each voxel. Next, by using ρb and ρs and assuming that the pores were filled with air, we computed the total porosity (ϕt) at each voxel from mass balance. Porosity thus obtained was used to estimate the electrical formation factor (F) at each voxel by assuming that F relates to ft according to Archie's equation (Archie, 1942). We also computed the absolute permeability (k) at each voxel by assuming that k relates to ϕt according to the Kozeny-Carman equation (Carman, 1956). Next, by employing a Darcy simulator, these 3D resistivity and permeability volumes were used to compute the effective permeability and electrical formation factor of the whole samples along the three axial directions to assess the anisotropy of these transport properties. These computational results were compared to laboratory measurements. The computed effective bulk density, grain density, and porosity appeared to closely match the laboratory values. So did the formation factor. By selecting an appropriate grain size, we also

  14. The variation in composition of ultramafic rocks and the effect on their suitability for carbon dioxide sequestration by mineralisation following acid leaching

    OpenAIRE

    Styles, M. T.; Sanna, A.; Lacinska, A.M.; Naden, J.; Maroto-Valer, M.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage by mineralization has been proposed as a possible technology to contribute to the reduction of global CO2 levels. A main candidate as a feed material, to supply Mg cations for combination with CO2 to form carbonate, is the family of ultramafi c rocks, Mgrich silicate rocks with a range of naturally occurring mineralogical compositions. A classifi cation scheme is described and a diagram is proposed to display the full range of both fresh and alte...

  15. Thermal and cementation histories of Permian shelf-edge carbonate rocks in the Nanpanjiang Basin, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Robert B.; Parrish, Judith T.; Zahn, Xie; Wenhai, Hu; Scholle, Peter A.; Zhongrui, Su; Yirong, Zhang; Yunming, Huang; Guangxuan, Li

    1989-01-01

    As of 1984, the Nanpanjiang Basin of South China has had almost no exploration by drilling although oil seeps exist among its margins and producing wells occur in adjacent basins.  however, cooperative studies by petroleum geologists and geochemists of the United States and the People's Republic of China (1982-1984) show that calcite-cemented reef and fore-reef carbonate rocks near Ziyun contain bitumen in Upper Permian shelf-edge sediment.  the cementation history consists of three episodes: (1)precipitation of syndepositional marine cement (formerly botryoidal aragonnite and fibrous magnesian calcite); (2)precipitation of post-depositional early cement (radiaxial calcite); and (3)precipitation of late burial cement (white calcite spar).  Hydrocarbons were introduced into the rocks between cementation episodes 2 and 3.  Fluid inclusion analysis of secondary inclusions in the burial cement indicates that the rocks were heated to nearly 200 C after hydrocarbon migration and cementation episode 3.  Bitumen remains in the rocks as evidence of the earlier presence of liquid hydrocarbons.

  16. Ultra-fine grinding and mechanical activation of mine waste rock using a high-speed stirred mill for mineral carbonation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-jie Li; Michael Hitch

    2015-01-01

    CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation can permanently store CO2 and mitigate climate change. However, the cost and reaction rate of mineral carbonation must be balanced to be viable for industrial applications. In this study, it was attempted to reduce the carbonation costs by using mine waste rock as a feed stock and to enhance the reaction rate using wet mechanical activation as a pre-treatment method. Slurry rheological properties, particle size distribution, specific surface area, crystallinity, and CO2 sequestration reaction efficiency of the initial and mechanically activated mine waste rock and olivine were characterized. The results show that serpentine acts as a catalyst, in-creasing the slurry yield stress, assisting new surface formation, and hindering the size reduction and structure amorphization. Mechanically activated mine waste rock exhibits a higher carbonation conversion than olivine with equal specific milling energy input. The use of a high-speed stirred mill may render the mineral carbonation suitable for mining industrial practice.

  17. In Situ X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Gas-Solid Carbonation of Ultramafic Rocks: Implications for Carbon Capture and Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Rong

    2012-01-01

    [ANGLÈS] With the increasing carbon dioxide emission in the atmosphere, there has been an interesting interest in CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage). Mineral carbonation was considered as a better option for storage atmospheric CO2 to slow climate change down. It’s a better method for storing CO2 without re-releasing CO2 in the atmosphere. The reaction rate of carbonation is too slow to be used at industrial scale under natural conditions containing ambient temperature and pressu...

  18. Nyerereite from carbonatite rocks at Vulture volcano: implications for mantle metasomatism and petrogenesis of alkali carbonate melts Research Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoppa, Francesco; Jones, Adrian; Sharygin, Victor

    2009-06-01

    Vulture volcano displays a wide range of mafic to alkaline, carbonate-, and/or CaO-rich volcanic rocks, with subvolcanic and plutonic rocks together with mantle xenoliths in pyroclastic ejecta. The roles of magmatic volatiles such as CO2, S, and Cl have been determined from compositions and trapping temperatures of inclusions in phenocrysts, which include the Na-K-Ca-carbonate nyerereite within melilite. We surmise that this alkali carbonate crystallised from an appropriate carbonatitic melt at relatively high temperature. Carbonatitic metasomatic features are traceable throughout many of the mantle xenoliths, and various carbonatitic components are found in the late stage extrusive suite. There is no evidence that alkali carbonatite developed as a separate magma, but it may have been an important evolutionary stage. We compare the rare occurrence of nyerereite at Vulture with other carbonatites and with an unaltered kimberlite from the Udachnaya pipe. We review the evidence at Vulture for associated carbonatitic metasomatism in the mantle, and we suggest that low viscosity alkali carbonatitic melts may have a primary and much deeper origin than previously considered.

  19. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction of Organic Matter from Petroleum Source Rocks and Its Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈忠民; 周光甲; 等

    1996-01-01

    Organic matter was experimentally extracted by supercritical fluids(CO2+1% isopropanol)from petroleum source rocks of different thermo-maturities at different buried depths in the same stratigraphic unit in the Dongying Basin.The results show that supercritical fluid extraction(SFE)is more effective than Soxhlet extraction(SE),with higher amounts and greater varieties of hydrocarbons and soluble organic matter becoming extractive.The supercritical CO2 extraction is therefore considered more valuable in evaluation of petroleum source rocks and oil resources,particularly those of immature types.

  20. Experimental studies of the deformation of carbonated rocks by dissolution crystallization under stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this research thesis reports the experimental investigation and the modelling of the deformation of poly-mineral rocks under the influence of mechanism of dissolution-crystallization under stress. This mechanism has a significant role in the compaction of sedimentary rocks, in the folding process of the earth's crust. The author notably reports the results of the experimental deformation of calcite in presence of water (calcite is present in marls in which the deposit of nuclear wastes in planned in France). The second part deals with the fact that healing is possible between two grains of similar mineralogy, and slows down or even stops deformation

  1. Deteriorating effects of lichen and microbial colonization of carbonate building rocks in the Romanesque churches of Segovia (Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, Asuncion de los [Instituto de Recursos Naturales, Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales (CSIC), Serrano 115 dpdo., 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: arios@ccma.csic.es; Camara, Beatriz [Instituto de Recursos Naturales, Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales (CSIC), Serrano 115 dpdo., 28006 Madrid (Spain); Garcia del Cura, Ma Angeles [Instituto de Geologia Economica CSIC-UCM, Laboratorio de Petrologia Aplicada, Unidad Asociada CSIC-UA, Alicante (Spain); Rico, Victor J. [Departamento de Biologia Vegetal II, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Galvan, Virginia [Facultad Patrimonio Cultural, Universidad SEK, Convento de Santa Cruz la Real, 40003 Segovia (Spain); Ascaso, Carmen [Instituto de Recursos Naturales, Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales (CSIC), Serrano 115 dpdo., 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-01-15

    In this study, the deterioration effects of lichens and other lithobionts in a temperate mesothermal climate were explored. We examined samples of dolostone and limestone rocks with visible signs of biodeterioration taken from the exterior wall surfaces of four Romanesque churches in Segovia (Spain): San Lorenzo, San Martin, San Millan and La Vera Cruz. Biofilms developing on the lithic substrate were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The most common lichen species found in the samples were recorded. Fungal cultures were then obtained from these carbonate rocks and characterized by sequencing Internal Transcribed Spacers (ITS). Through scanning electron microscopy in back-scattered electron mode, fungi (lichenized and non-lichenized) were observed as the most frequent microorganisms occurring at sites showing signs of biodeterioration. The colonization process was especially conditioned by the porosity characteristics of the stone used in these buildings. While in dolostones, microorganisms mainly occupied spaces comprising the rock's intercrystalline porosity, in bioclastic dolomitized limestones, fungal colonization seemed to be more associated with moldic porosity. Microbial biofilms make close contact with the substrate, and thus probably cause significant deterioration of the underlying materials. We describe the different processes of stone alteration induced by fungal colonization and discuss the implications of these processes for the design of treatments to prevent biodeterioration.

  2. Mineralogical Characteristics of Sepiolite Occurring in the Carbonate-rock regions in Seosan, Muju and Jangsu, Republic of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, H.; Jeong, H.; Roh, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Sepiolite is a fibrous phyllosilicate mineral. Sepiolite has been utilized in a wide range of industrial applications and used as a substitute to asbestos in some applications. Since sepiolite is structurally, compositionally and optically similar to chrysotile, so it can be expected to be an alternative to chrysotile in diverse industrial applications. However, occurrence and mineralogical characteristics of sepiolite have been rarely investigated in S. Korea. The aim of this study was to investigate mineralogical characteristics of sepiolite occurring in carbonated rocks S. Korea. Bedded vein types of sepiolite have occurred in Seosan, Muju and Jangsu, where mainly Precambrian carbonate metasedimentary rocks are dominant. The occurrence of sepiolite in Seosan, Muju and Jangsu was filled in fractures. The mineralogical characteristics of the samples from Seosan, Muju and Jangsu were examined by XRD, PLM, SEM-EDS, and EPMA analyses. And BSEM analysis was also used to examine the genesis of sepiolite. XRD and PLM analyses showed sepiolite was observed in all vein-type minerals, and tremolite asbestos was also co-existed in all sites. Sepiolite was analyzed by central stop dispersion staining objective (DSO) showed horizontally blue and vertically pale yellow and which of chrysotile appeared as horizontally magenta and vertically blue. SEM-EDS analysis showed fibrous crystals joined together in a bundle and chemically consisted of Mg, Si and O. The structural formulae of sepiolite in Seosan, Muju and Jangsu were (Mg7.49Fe0.03Ca0.02)(Si12.21)O30(OH)4, (Mg7.12Fe0.13)(Si12.17)O30(OH)4, and (Mg7.46Fe0.12Ca0.04)(Si12.07)O30(OH)4 respectively. BSEM images showed sepiolite developed along the fracture of carbonate mineral on the distinct interface between sepiolite and carbonate mineral without altered minerals such as talc and diopside. In all areas, sepiolite coexisted with asbestiform tremolite of amphibole group. In addition the mineralogical characteristics of

  3. Quantifying the pluri-centennial soil organic carbon pool using Rock-Eval pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cécillon, Lauric; Baudin, François; Chenu, Claire; Christensen, Bent T.; Houot, Sabine; Kätterer, Thomas; Lutfalla, Suzanne; Macdonald, Andy; van Oort, Folkert; Plante, Alain F.; Savignac, Florence; Soucémarianadin, Laure; Barré, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Soil C is a key component of climate change. Any alteration of the soil organic C (SOC) reservoir yields a rapid modification of the atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, a part of the SOC reservoir will not contribute significantly to next century's land CO2 emissions as its residence time exceeds this timescale. The size of the pluri-centennial SOC pool is supposed to be large (ca. one third of total SOC), but is in fact highly uncertain as it cannot be estimated accurately by any analytical method. This methodological gap hampers the proper initialization of SOC dynamics models, questioning their predictions on the evolution of the global SOC reservoir. Here, using an exceptional soil sample set coming from long-term agronomic experiments in Western and Northern Europe, we show that a multivariate regression model based on Rock-Eval 6 (RE6) pyrolysis data can accurately predict the proportion of the pluri-centennial SOC pool in a soil sample with a prediction error lower than 6% for a wide range of soil types and land-uses. One hundred and six soil samples coming from four sites (Grignon, FR; Rothamsted, UK; Ultuna, SW; Versailles, FR) with long-term bare fallow (LTBF) and associated non bare fallow treatments (organic amendments, cropping systems, grasslands) were used to calibrate and validate the model. In a previous study, the modelling of SOC decay in LTBF experiments allowed estimating the size of the pluri-centennial persistant SOC pool at each of these sites (Barré et al., 2010, Biogeosciences 7:3839-3850). Based on these estimates, we calculated the proportion of pluri-centennial persistant SOC (% of total SOC) in each of the 106 soil samples. They showed very diverse proportions of pluri-centennial persistant SOC pool (from 6 to 100% of total SOC, with total SOC concentrations ranging from 5 to 46 gC.kg-1soil). All samples were analysed using RE6 pyrolysis. Five RE6 pyrograms per sample were used to compute the temperatures at which a specific

  4. Quantifying the pluri-centennial soil organic carbon pool using Rock-Eval pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cécillon, Lauric; Baudin, François; Chenu, Claire; Christensen, Bent T.; Houot, Sabine; Kätterer, Thomas; Lutfalla, Suzanne; Macdonald, Andy; van Oort, Folkert; Plante, Alain F.; Savignac, Florence; Soucémarianadin, Laure; Barré, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Soil C is a key component of climate change. Any alteration of the soil organic C (SOC) reservoir yields a rapid modification of the atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, a part of the SOC reservoir will not contribute significantly to next century's land CO2 emissions as its residence time exceeds this timescale. The size of the pluri-centennial SOC pool is supposed to be large (ca. one third of total SOC), but is in fact highly uncertain as it cannot be estimated accurately by any analytical method. This methodological gap hampers the proper initialization of SOC dynamics models, questioning their predictions on the evolution of the global SOC reservoir. Here, using an exceptional soil sample set coming from long-term agronomic experiments in Western and Northern Europe, we show that a multivariate regression model based on Rock-Eval 6 (RE6) pyrolysis data can accurately predict the proportion of the pluri-centennial SOC pool in a soil sample with a prediction error lower than 6% for a wide range of soil types and land-uses. One hundred and six soil samples coming from four sites (Grignon, FR; Rothamsted, UK; Ultuna, SW; Versailles, FR) with long-term bare fallow (LTBF) and associated non bare fallow treatments (organic amendments, cropping systems, grasslands) were used to calibrate and validate the model. In a previous study, the modelling of SOC decay in LTBF experiments allowed estimating the size of the pluri-centennial persistant SOC pool at each of these sites (Barré et al., 2010, Biogeosciences 7:3839-3850). Based on these estimates, we calculated the proportion of pluri-centennial persistant SOC (% of total SOC) in each of the 106 soil samples. They showed very diverse proportions of pluri-centennial persistant SOC pool (from 6 to 100% of total SOC, with total SOC concentrations ranging from 5 to 46 gC.kg-1soil). All samples were analysed using RE6 pyrolysis. Five RE6 pyrograms per sample were used to compute the temperatures at which a specific

  5. Water - rock interaction in different rock environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study assesses the groundwater geochemistry and geological environment of 44 study sites for radioactive waste disposal. Initially, the study sites were divided by rock type into 5 groups: (1) acid - intermediate rocks, (2) mafic - ultramafic rocks, (3) gabbros, amphibolites and gneisses that contain calc-silicate (skarn) rocks, (4) carbonates and (5) sandstones. Separate assessments are made of acid - intermediate plutonic rocks and of a subgroup that comprises migmatites, granite and mica gneiss. These all belong to the group of acid - intermediate rocks. Within the mafic -ultramafic rock group, a subgroup that comprises mafic - ultramafic plutonic rocks, serpentinites, mafic - ultramafic volcanic rocks and volcanic - sedimentary schists is also evaluated separately. Bedrock groundwaters are classified by their concentration of total dissolved solids as fresh, brackish, saline, strongly saline and brine-class groundwaters. (75 refs., 24 figs., 3 tabs.)

  6. Variations in hydraulic conductivity with scale of measurement during aquifer tests in heterogeneous, porous carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Cherkauer, Douglas S.

    Previous studies have shown that hydraulic conductivity of an aquifer seems to increase as the portion of the aquifer tested increases. To date, such studies have all relied on different methods to determine hydraulic conductivity at each scale of interest, which raises the possibility that the observed increase in hydraulic conductivity is due to the measurement method, not to the scale. This study analyzes hydraulic conductivity with respect to scale during individual aquifer tests in porous, heterogeneous carbonate rocks in southeastern Wisconsin, USA. Results from this study indicate that hydraulic conductivity generally increases during an individual test as the volume of aquifer impacted increases, and the rate of this increase is the same as the rate of increase determined by using different measurement methods. Thus, scale dependence of hydraulic conductivity during single tests does not depend on the method of measurement. This conclusion is supported by 22 of 26 aquifer tests conducted in porous-flow-dominated carbonate units within the aquifer. Instead, scale dependency is probably caused by heterogeneities within the aquifer, a conclusion supported by digital simulation. All of the observed types of hydraulic-conductivity variations with scale during individual aquifer tests can be explained by a conceptual model of a simple heterogeneous aquifer composed of high-conductivity zones within a low-conductivity matrix. Résumé Certaines études ont montré que la conductivité hydraulique d'un aquifère semble augmenter en même temps que la partie testée de l'aquifère s'étend. Jusqu'à présent, ces études ont toutes reposé sur des méthodes de détermination de la conductivité hydraulique différentes pour chaque niveau d'échelle, ce qui a conduit à penser que l'augmentation observée de la conductivité hydraulique pouvait être due aux méthodes de mesure et non à l'effet d'échelle. Cette étude analyse la conductivité hydraulique par

  7. Molecular marker and stable carbon isotope analyses of carbonaceous Ambassador uranium ores of Mulga Rock in Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaraula, C.; Schwark, L.; Moreau, X.; Grice, K.; Bagas, L.

    2013-12-01

    Mulga Rock is a multi-element deposit containing uranium hosted by Eocene peats and lignites deposited in inset valleys incised into Permian rocks of the Gunbarrel Basin and Precambrian rocks of the Yilgarn Craton and Albany-Fraser Orogen. Uranium readily adsorbs onto minerals or phytoclasts to form organo-uranyl complexes. This is important in pre-concentrating uranium in this relatively young ore deposit with rare uraninite [UO2] and coffinite [U(SiO4)1-x(OH)4x], more commonly amorphous and sub-micron uranium-bearing particulates. Organic geochemical and compound-specific stable carbon isotope analyses were conducted to identify possible associations of molecular markers with uranium accumulation and to recognize effect(s) of ionizing radiation on molecular markers. Samples were collected from the Ambassador deposit containing low (2000 ppm) uranium concentrations. The bulk rock C/N ratios of 82 to 153, Rock-Eval pyrolysis yields of 316 to 577 mg hydrocarbon/g TOC (Hydrogen Index, HI) and 70 to 102 mg CO2/g TOC (Oxygen Index, OI) are consistent with a terrigenous and predominantly vascular plant OM source deposited in a complex shallow water system, ranging from lacustrine to deltaic, swampy wetland and even shallow lake settings as proposed by previous workers. Organic solvent extracts were separated into saturated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbon, ketone, and a combined free fatty acid and alcohol fraction. The molecular profiles appear to vary with uranium concentration. In samples with relatively low uranium concentrations, long-chain n-alkanes, alcohols and fatty acids derived from epicuticular plant waxes dominate. The n-alkane distributions (C27 to C31) reveal an odd/even preference (Carbon Preference Index, CPI=1.5) indicative of extant lipids. Average δ13C of -27 to -29 ‰ for long-chain n-alkanes is consistent with a predominant C3 plant source. Samples with relatively higher uranium concentrations contain mostly intermediate-length n

  8. In vitro receptivity of carbonate rocks to endolithic lichen-forming aposymbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favero-Longo, Sergio E; Borghi, Alessandro; Tretiach, Mauro; Piervittori, Rosanna

    2009-10-01

    Sterile cultured isolates of lichen-forming aposymbionts have not yet been used to investigate lichen-rock interactions under controlled conditions. In this study mycobionts and photobiont of the endolithic lichens Bagliettoa baldensis and Bagliettoa marmorea were isolated and inoculated with coupons of one limestone and four marbles commonly employed in the Cultural Heritage framework. After one year of incubation, microscopic observations of polished cross-sections were performed to verify if the typical colonization patterns observed in the field may be reproduced in vitro and to evaluate the receptivity of the five lithotypes to endolithic lichens. The mycobionts of the two species developed both on the surface of and within all the lithotypes, showing different penetration pathways which depend on mineralogical and structural features and highlight different receptivity. By contrast, algae inoculated with the coupons did not penetrate them. Observations suggest that the hyphal penetration along intrinsic discontinuities of rocks is a relatively fast phenomenon when these organisms are generally considered as slow-growing. Samples from limestone outcrops and abandoned marble quarries, colonized by the same species or other representatives of Verrucariaceae, showed penetration pathways intriguingly similar to those reproduced in vitro and highlighted that lichen-driven erosion processes only increase the availability of hyphal passageways after a long-term colonization. These results show that in vitro incubation of sterile cultured lichen-forming ascomycetes with rock coupons is a practicable experimental system to investigate the lichen-rock interactions under controlled conditions and, together with analysis in situ, may support decisions on conservative treatments of historical and cultural significant stone substrata. PMID:19683572

  9. Experimental high strain-rate deformation products of carbonate-silicate rocks: Comparison with terrestrial impact materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Bogert, C. H.; Schultz, P. H.; Spray, J. G.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction. The response of carbonate to impact processes has thus far been investigated using a combination of thermodynamic modelling, shock experiments, and impact experiments. Localized shear deformation was suggested to play an important role in the failure of carbonate during some shock experiments [1,2], and was invoked to explain significant degassing of carbonates during oblique impact experiments [3]. The results of the impact experiments are at odds with experiments [4] that show back-reaction of CO2 with CaO and MgO could significantly reduce CO2 degassing during impact events. We performed a frictional-welding experiment in order to investigate the effects of high strain-rate deformation on carbonate-silicate target materials, exclusive of shock deformation effects, and to investigate the differing results of other experiments. Samples and Techniques. A frictional melting experiment was performed using dolomitic marble and quartzite samples to simulate conditions during an impact into carbonate-silicate target rocks. The experiment followed the method of Spray (1995) [5]. The 1.5 cm3 samples were mounted onto separate steel cylinders with epoxy. Using a Blacks FWH-3 axial friction-welding rig, the samples were brought into contact at room temperature and under dry conditions with ~5 MPa applied pressure. Contact was maintained for two seconds at 750 rpm for a sustained strain-rate of 102 to 103 s-1. Results. Vapor or fine dust escaped from the interface during the experiment. Immediately after sample separation, the interfaces were incandescent. Once cooled, opaque white material adhered to both the quartzite and dolomitic marble samples. Quartzite sample. Material was injected into cracks that formed in the quartzite sample. Cooling and crystallization of the friction products resulted in the formation of submicron-sized minerals such as periclase and Ca- and Ca,Mg-silicates (Fig. 1) including merwinite and åkermanite. While periclase was observed

  10. Fracture system influence on the reservoirs rock formation of Ordovician-Devonian carbonates in West Siberia tectonic depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koveshnikov, A. E.; Nesterova, A. C.; Dolgaya, T. F.

    2016-09-01

    During the Paleozoic period from the beginning of the Cambrian to the end of the Carboniferous in the boundaries of the West Siberia tectonic depression there occurred the sea, where the carbonate platforms were formed by the limestones accumulation. All the area at the end of the Carboniferous period was turned to land. Resulting from Gertsynskaya folding in the times of Permian - Triassic the formed deposits were folded and denudated to a considerable extent. Besides, the reservoir rocks of the crust of weathering including redeposited one, were formed as a result of hypergenesis, during the continental stand of the area in the near-surface zone. A new geological prospecting unit has been suggested which underlies these crusts of weathering and formed during fracture tectonic processes with hydrothermal-metasomatic limestones reworking and the processes of hydrothermal leaching and dolomitization. So, in the carbonate platforms the system of fissure zones related to tectonic disturbance was formed. This has a dendrite profile where the series of tangential, more thinned fractures deviate from the stem and finish in pores and caverns. The carbonate platforms formation in the West Siberia tectonic depression has been analyzed, their dynamics and gradual increasing from the minimal in Ordovician and Silurian to maximal at the end of the Late Devonian has been shown.

  11. Compositional, mechanical and transport properties of carbonate fault rocks and the seismic cycle in limestone terrains : A case study of surface exposures on the Longmenshan Fault, Sichuan, China (Utrecht Studies in Earth Sciences 076)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Jianye

    2015-01-01

    Destructive earthquakes are common in tectonically active regions dominated by carbonate cover rocks. The catastrophic Wenchuan earthquake that struck Sichuan, China, also affected a section of carbonate cover terrain. Numerous studies have focused on characterizing the compositional, transport and

  12. Early diagenetic growth of carbonate concretions in the upper Doushantuo Formation in South China and their significance for the assessment of hydrocarbon source rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Jin; ZHANG ShiHong; JIANG GanQing; ZHAO QingLe; LI HaiYan; SHI XiaoYing; LIU JunLai

    2008-01-01

    Mineralogical and textural characteristics and organic carbon composition of the carbonate concretions from the upper Doushantuo Formation (ca.551 Ma) in the eastern Yangtze Gorge area reveal their early diagenetic (shallow) growth in organic-rich shale.High organic carbon content (up to 10%) and abundance of framboidal pyrites in the hosting shale suggest an anoxic or euxinic depositional environment.Well-preserved cardhouse clay fabrics in the concretions suggest their formation at 0-3 m burial depth, likely associated with microbial decomposition of organic matter and anaerobic oxidation of methane.Gases through decomposition of organic matter and/or from methanogenesis created bubbles and cavities, and anaerobic methane oxidation at the sulfate reduction zone resulted in carbonate precipitation, filling in bubbles and cavities to form spherical structures of the concretions.Rock pyrolysis analyses show that the carbonate concretions have lower total organic carbon (TOC) content but higher effective carbon than those in the host rocks.This may be caused by enclosed organic matter in pores of the concretions so that organic matter was protected from further modification during deep burial and maintained high hydrocarbon generating potential even in over-matured source rock.As a microbialite sensu latu, concretions have special growth conditions and may provide important information on the microbial activities in depositional and early burial environments.

  13. Early diagenetic growth of carbonate concretions in the upper Doushantuo Formation in South China and their significance for the assessment of hydrocarbon source rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Mineralogical and textural characteristics and organic carbon composition of the carbonate concretions from the upper Doushantuo Formation (ca. 551 Ma) in the eastern Yangtze Gorge area reveal their early diagenetic (shallow) growth in organic-rich shale. High organic carbon content (up to 10%) and abundance of framboidal pyrites in the hosting shale suggest an anoxic or euxinic depositional environment. Well-preserved cardhouse clay fabrics in the concretions suggest their formation at 0-3 m burial depth, likely associated with microbial decomposition of organic matter and anaerobic oxidation of methane. Gases through decomposition of organic matter and/or from methanogenesis created bubbles and cavities, and anaerobic methane oxidation at the sulfate reduction zone resulted in carbonate precipitation, filling in bubbles and cavities to form spherical structures of the concretions. Rock pyrolysis analyses show that the carbonate concretions have lower total organic carbon (TOC) content but higher effective carbon than those in the host rocks. This may be caused by enclosed organic matter in pores of the concretions so that organic matter was protected from further modification during deep burial and maintained high hydrocarbon generating potential even in over-matured source rock. As a microbialite sensu latu, concretions have special growth conditions and may provide important information on the microbial activities in depositional and early burial environments.

  14. Assessing potential diagenetic alteration of primary iodine-to-calcium ratios in carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardisty, D. S.; Lu, Z.; Swart, P. K.; Planavsky, N.; Gill, B. C.; Loyd, S. J.; Lyons, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    We have evaluated iodine-to-calcium (I/Ca) ratios from a series of carbonate samples with well-constrained histories of diagenetic alteration to assess the likelihood of overprints on primary water column-derived signals. Because only the oxidized iodine species, iodate, is incorporated during carbonate precipitation, I/Ca ratios have strong potential as proxies for both marine redox and carbon cycling. This utility lies with the combination of iodate's redox sensitivity as well as the close association between iodine and marine organic matter. However, despite the possibility of large pore water iodine enrichments relative to overlying seawater, carbonate alteration under reducing diagenetic conditions, and iodate-to-iodide reduction, no study has assessed the prospect of diagenetic alteration of primary I/Ca ratios. Here, we evaluated aragonite-to-calcite transformations and dolomitization within the Key Largo Limestone of South Florida and the Clino and Unda drill cores of the Bahamas Bank. Also, early burial diagenesis was studied through analysis of I/Ca ratios in short cores from a variety of shallow settings within the Exuma Bay, Bahamas. Further, we evaluated authigenic carbonates through analysis of iodine in concretions constrained to have formed during varying stages of evolving pore fluid chemistry. In all cases, I/Ca ratios show the potential for diagenetic iodine loss relative to water-column derived values, consistent with observations of quantitative reduction of dissolved iodate to iodide in pore waters before or synchronous with carbonate alteration. In no case, however, did we observe an increase in I/Ca during diagenetic transformation. Our results suggest both that primary I/Ca values and trends can be preserved but that maximum I/Ca ratios should be considered a minimum estimate of seawater iodate. We recommend that ancient carbonates with distinct I/Ca trends not indicative of diagenetic iodine loss reflect preservation of or very early

  15. Mineral CO2 sequestration in basalts and ultra-basic rocks: impact of secondary silicated phases on the carbonation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of carbonates constitutes a stable option for carbon dioxide (CO2) geological sequestration, and is prone to play a significant role in reducing emissions of anthropic origin. However, our comprehension of the carbonation mechanism, as well as of the kinetics limitations encountered during this chemical reaction, remains poorly developed. Though there is a large number of studies focusing on the dissolution kinetics of basic silicates and on the precipitation of carbonates, few have inquired about the impact that the formation of non-carbonated secondary phases can have on these reaction's kinetics. It is the approach chosen here, as only solid knowledge of the global carbonation mechanism can make this process predictive and efficient. Experimental data on dissolution and carbonation have therefore been determined in batch reactors, on relevant minerals and rocks. Firstly, we studied the carbonation of olivine (a major phase within peridotites and minor within basalts) at 90 deg. C and under pCO2 of 280 bars. The dissolution of San Carlos olivine (Mg1.76Fe0.24SiO4) is slowed down by the formation of a surface silica gel, when the fluid reaches equilibrium with amorphous silica. The transport of species to the reactive medium becomes the limiting step of the process, slowing down the dissolution process of San Carlos olivine by 5 orders of magnitude. However, this passivation doesn't occur during the alteration of Ca-olivine (Ca2SiO4), though a surface silica layer does form. This comparison suggests that it isn't the structure of the silicate but its chemical composition, which controls the transport properties through the interfacial layer. The second part explores the effects of organic ligands and of temperature variations on the formation of those phases. The addition of citrate at 90 deg. C increases the kinetics of San Carlos olivine by one order of magnitude, and allows the release of enough Mg in the aqueous medium to form carbonates, before

  16. Application of Optimized Neural Network Models for Prediction of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Parameters in Carbonate Reservoir Rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Ghiasi-Freez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Neural network models are powerful tools for extracting the underlying dependency of a set of input/output data. However, the mentioned tools are in danger of sticking in local minima. The present study went to step forward by optimizing neural network models using three intelligent optimization algorithms, including genetic algorithm (GA, particle swarm optimization (PSO, and ant colony (AC, to eliminate the risk of being exposed to local minima. This strategy was capable of significantly improving the accuracy of a neural network by optimizing network parameters such as weights and biases. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR log measures some of the most useful characteristics of reservoir rock; the capabilities of the optimized models were used for prediction of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR log parameters in a carbonate reservoir rock of Iran. Conventional porosity logs, which are the easily accessible tools compared to NMR log’s parameters, were introduced to the models as inputs while free fluid porosity and permeability, which were measured by NMR log, are desire outputs. The performance of three optimized models was verified by some unseen test data. The results show that PSO-based network and ACO-based network is the best and poorest method, respectively, in terms of accuracy; however, the convergence time of GA-based model is considerably smaller than PSO-based and GA-based models.

  17. How the rock fabrics can control the physical properties - A contribution to the understanding of carbonate reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerrast, H.; Siegesmund, S. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The correlation between microfabrics and physical properties will be illustrated in detail on three dolomitic carbonate reservoir rocks with different porosity. For this study core segments from the Zechstein Ca2-layer (Permian) of the Northwest German Basin were kindly provided by the Preussag Energie GmbH, Lingen. The mineral composition was determined by using the X-ray diffraction method. Petrographic and detailed investigation of the microfabrics, including the distribution and orientation of the cracks were done macroscopally (core segments) and microscopally with the optical microscope and the Scanning Electron Microscope (thin sections in three orthogonally to each other oriented directions). Different kinds of petrophysical measurements were carried out, e.g. porosity, permeability, electrical conductivity, seismic velocities. (orig.)

  18. Assessment of grain-scale homogeneity and equilibration of carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of minerals in carbonate-bearing metamorphic rocks by ion microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, John M.; Ushikubo, Takayuki; Kita, Noriko T.; Valley, John W.

    2010-11-01

    Nineteen samples of metamorphosed carbonate-bearing rocks were analyzed for carbon and oxygen isotope ratios by ion microprobe with a ˜5-15 μm spot, three from a regional terrain and 16 from five different contact aureoles. Contact metamorphic rocks further represent four groups: calc-silicate marble and hornfels (6), brucite marble (2), samples that contain a reaction front (4), and samples with a pervasive distribution of reactants and products of a decarbonation reaction (4). The average spot-to-spot reproducibility of standard calcite analyses is ±0.37‰ (2 standard deviations, SD) for δ 18O and ±0.71‰ for δ 13C. Ten or more measurements of a mineral in a sample that has uniform isotope composition within error of measurement can routinely return a weighted mean with a 95% confidence interval of 0.09-0.16‰ for δ 18O and 0.10-0.29‰ for δ 13C. Using a difference of >6SD as the criterion, only four of 19 analyzed samples exhibit significant intracrystalline and/or intercrystalline inhomogeneity in δ 13C at the 100-500 μm scale, with differences within individual grains up to 3.7‰. Measurements are consistent with carbon isotope exchange equilibrium between calcite and dolomite in five of six analyzed samples at the same scale. Because of relatively slow carbon isotope diffusion in calcite and dolomite, differences in δ 13C can survive intracrystalline homogenization by diffusion during cooling after peak metamorphism and likely represent the effects of prograde decarbonation and infiltration. All but 2 of 11 analyzed samples exhibit intracrystalline differences in δ 18O (up to 9.4‰), intercrystalline inhomogeneity in δ 18O (up to 12.5‰), and/or disequilibrium oxygen isotope fractionations among calcite-dolomite, calcite-quartz, and calcite-forsterite pairs at the 100-500 μm scale. Inhomogeneities in δ 18O and δ 13C are poorly correlated with only a single mineral (dolomite) in a single sample exhibiting both. Because of relatively

  19. Genesis of Pb-Zn-Cu-Ag Deposits within Permian Carboniferous-Carbonate Rocks in Madina Regency, North Sumatra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhakti Hamonangan Harahap

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Strong mineralized carbonate rock-bearing Pb-Zn-Cu-Ag-(Au ores are well exposed on the Latong River area, Madina Regency, North Sumatra Province. The ore deposit is hosted within the carbonate rocks of the Permian to Carboniferous Tapanuli Group. It is mainly accumulated in hollows replacing limestone in the forms of lensoidal, colloform, veins, veinlets, cavity filling, breccia, and dissemination. The ores dominantly consist of galena (126 000 ppm Pb and sphalerite (2347 ppm Zn. The other minerals are silver, azurite, covellite, pyrite, marcasite, and chalcopyrite. This deposit was formed by at least three phases of mineralization, i.e. pyrite and then galena replaced pyrite, sphalerite replaced galena, and pyrite. The last phase is the deposition of chalcopyrite that replaced sphalerite. The Latong sulfide ore deposits posses Pb isotope ratio of 206Pb/204Pb = 19.16 - 20.72, 207Pb/204Pb = 16.16 - 17.29, and 208Pb/204Pb = 42.92 - 40.78. The characteristic feature of the deposit indicates that it is formed by a sedimentary process rather than an igneous activity in origin. This leads to an interpretation that the Latong deposit belongs to the Sedimentary Hosted Massive Sulfide (SHMS of Mississippi Valley-Type (MVT. The presence of SHMS in the island arc such as Sumatra has become controversial. For a long time, ore deposits in the Indonesian Island Arc are always identical with the porphyry and hydrothermal processes related to arc magmatism. This paper is dealing with the geology of Latong and its base metal deposits. This work is also to interpret their genesis as well as general relationship to the regional geology and tectonic setting of Sumatra.

  20. Proposal of a New Parameter for the Weathering Characterization of Carbonate Flysch-Like Rock Masses: The Potential Degradation Index (PDI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, M.; Tomás, R.

    2016-07-01

    The susceptibility of clay bearing rocks to weathering (erosion and/or differential degradation) is known to influence the stability of heterogeneous slopes. However, not all of these rocks show the same behaviour, as there are considerable differences in the speed and type of weathering observed. As such, it is very important to establish relationships between behaviour quantified in a laboratory environment with that observed in the field. The slake durability test is the laboratory test most commonly used to evaluate the relationship between slaking behaviour and rock durability. However, it has a number of disadvantages; it does not account for changes in shape and size in fragments retained in the 2 mm sieve, nor does its most commonly used index (Id2) accurately reflect weathering behaviour observed in the field. The main aim of this paper is to propose a simple methodology for characterizing the weathering behaviour of carbonate lithologies that outcrop in heterogeneous rock masses (such as Flysch slopes), for use by practitioners. To this end, the Potential Degradation Index (PDI) is proposed. This is calculated using the fragment size distribution curves taken from material retained in the drum after each cycle of the slake durability test. The number of slaking cycles has also been increased to five. Through laboratory testing of 117 samples of carbonate rocks, extracted from strata in selected slopes, 6 different rock types were established based on their slaking behaviour, and corresponding to the different weathering behaviours observed in the field.

  1. MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen C. Ruppel

    2005-02-01

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the US contain large quantities of remaining oil and gas that constitute a huge target for improved diagnosis and imaging of reservoir properties. The resource target is especially large in carbonate reservoirs, where conventional data and methodologies are normally insufficient to resolve critical scales of reservoir heterogeneity. The objectives of the research described in this report were to develop and test such methodologies for improved imaging, measurement, modeling, and prediction of reservoir properties in carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs. The focus of the study is the Permian-age Fullerton Clear Fork reservoir of the Permian Basin of West Texas. This reservoir is an especially appropriate choice considering (a) the Permian Basin is the largest oil-bearing basin in the US, and (b) as a play, Clear Fork reservoirs have exhibited the lowest recovery efficiencies of all carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin.

  2. Low Ni olivine in silica-undersaturated ultrapotassic igneous rocks as evidence for carbonate metasomatism in the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammannati, Edoardo; Jacob, Dorrit E.; Avanzinelli, Riccardo; Foley, Stephen F.; Conticelli, Sandro

    2016-06-01

    Subduction drags a large amount of CO2 into the Earth's interior, which is partly returned to the atmosphere by arc volcanism. Processes involved in the recycling of subducted carbon within the upper mantle are mainly related to mineralogical transformation. Subducted CO2 may dramatically affect the equilibria among peridotitic minerals (olivine vs. pyroxenes) changing their stability fields and hence their modal abundances. This process is accompanied by a subduction-induced change in the budget of some incompatible trace and major elements (e.g., K, Ca, HFSE), whereas it has a minimal effect on the mass balance of compatible elements (e.g., Ni). We report trace elements in olivine in subduction-related mafic alkaline ultrapotassic rocks from Italy, which are used as a proxy to define mantle wedge mineralogy and metasomatic processes. Minor element concentrations, and in particular the high Li and low Ti of all the olivines, confirm a major role for recycled sediment in the generation of Italian ultrapotassic magmas. The distinct contents of Ni, Mn, and Ca in olivine reflect the bimodal character of silica-rich and silica-poor ultrapotassic Italian rocks and constrain two distinct mineralogical reactions between metasomatic agents and peridotite. Olivine chemistry from silica-saturated rocks reflects the reaction of silicate melts with the ambient mantle, with consequent consumption of olivine in favour of orthopyroxene. In contrast, the low-Ni, high-Mn/Fe of olivine crystallised from silica-undersaturated leucitites require a mantle source enriched in olivine (and clinopyroxene) compared to orthopyroxene, as a result of the interaction between the ambient peridotitic mantle and CaCO3-rich metasomatic agents. The change from silica-oversaturated lamproites to silica-undersaturated leucitites and thus the difference in the olivine composition is due to a change in composition of the subducting sediment from pelitic to carbonate-rich. The results of this study

  3. The flame photometric determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, H.

    1957-01-01

    A flame photometric method of determining calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate locks has been developed Aluminum and phosphate interference was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. The method is rapid and suitable for routine analysis Results obtained are within ?? 2% of the calcium oxide content. ?? 1957.

  4. Geochemical features of the geothermal CO2-water-carbonate rock system and analysis on its CO2 sources--Examples from Huanglong Ravine and Kangding, Sichuan, and Xiage, Zhongdian, Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Taking Huanglong Ravine and Kangding, Sichuan, and Xiage, Zhongdian, Yunnan, as examples, the authors summarize the hydrogeochemical and carbon stable isotopic features of the geothermal CO2-water-carbonate rock system and analyze the CO2 sources of the system. It was found that the hydrogeochemical and carbon stable isotopic features of such a system are different from those of shallow CO2-water-carbonate rock system, which is strongly influenced by biosphere. The former has higher CO2 partial pressure, and is rich in heavy carbon stable isotope. In addition, such a geothermal system is also different from that developed in igneous rock. The water in the latter system lacks Ca2+, and thus, there are few tufa deposits on ground surface, but it is rich in light carbon stable isotope. Further analysis shows that CO2 of the geothermal CO2-water-carbonate rock system is a mixture of metamorphic CO2 and magmatic CO2.

  5. delta 15N and non-carbonate delta 13C values for two petroleum source rock reference materials and a marine sediment reference material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennen, Kristin O.; Johnson, Craig A.; Otter, Marshall L.; Silva, Steven R.; Wandless, Gregory A.

    2006-01-01

    Samples of United States Geological Survey (USGS) Certified Reference Materials USGS Devonian Ohio Shale (SDO-1), and USGS Eocene Green River Shale (SGR-1), and National Research Council Canada (NRCC) Certified Marine Sediment Reference Material (PACS-2), were sent for analysis to four separate analytical laboratories as blind controls for organic rich sedimentary rock samples being analyzed from the Red Dog mine area in Alaska. The samples were analyzed for stable isotopes of carbon (delta13Cncc) and nitrogen (delta15N), percent non-carbonate carbon (Wt % Cncc) and percent nitrogen (Wt % N). SDO-1, collected from the Huron Member of the Ohio Shale, near Morehead, Kentucky, and SGR-1, collected from the Mahogany zone of the Green River Formation are petroleum source rocks used as reference materials for chemical analyses of sedimentary rocks. PACS-2 is modern marine sediment collected from the Esquimalt, British Columbia harbor. The results presented in this study are, with the exceptions noted below, the first published for these reference materials. There are published information values for the elemental concentrations of 'organic' carbon (Wt % Corg measured range is 8.98 - 10.4) and nitrogen (Wt % Ntot 0.347 with SD 0.043) only for SDO-1. The suggested values presented here should be considered 'information values' as defined by the NRCC Institute for National Measurement Reference Materials and should be useful for the analysis of 13C, 15N, C and N in organic material in sedimentary rocks.

  6. Acid neutralizing capacity and leachate results for igneous rocks, with associated carbon contents of derived soils, Animas River AML site, Silverton, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Douglas B.; Stanton, Mark R.; Choate, LaDonna M.; Burchell,

    2009-01-01

    Mine planning efforts have historically overlooked the possible acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) that local igneous rocks can provide to help neutralize acidmine drainage. As a result, limestone has been traditionally hauled to mine sites for use in neutralizing acid drainage. Local igneous rocks, when used as part of mine life-cycle planning and acid mitigation strategy, may reduce the need to transport limestone to mine sites because these rocks can contain acid neutralizing minerals. Igneous hydrothermal events often introduce moderately altered mineral assemblages peripheral to more intensely altered rocks that host metal-bearing veins and ore bodies. These less altered rocks can contain ANC minerals (calcite-chlorite-epidote) and are referred to as a propylitic assemblage. In addition, the carbon contents of soils in areas of new mining or those areas undergoing restoration have been historically unknown. Soil organic carbon is an important constituent to characterize as a soil recovery benchmark that can be referred to during mine cycle planning and restoration. This study addresses the mineralogy, ANC, and leachate chemistry of propylitic volcanic rocks that host polymetallic mineralization in the Animas River watershed near the historical Silverton, Colorado, mining area. Acid titration tests on volcanic rocks containing calcite (2 – 20 wt %) and chlorite (6 – 25 wt %), have ANC ranging from 4 – 146 kg/ton CaCO3 equivalence. Results from a 6-month duration, kinetic reaction vessel test containing layered pyritic mine waste and underlying ANC volcanic rock (saturated with deionized water) indicate that acid generating mine waste (pH 2.4) has not overwhelmed the ANC of propylitic volcanic rocks (pH 5.8). Sequential leachate laboratory experiments evaluated the concentration of metals liberated during leaching. Leachate concentrations of Cu-Zn-As-Pb for ANC volcanic rock are one-to-three orders of magnitude lower when compared to leached solution from

  7. Reservoir Modeling of Carbonate on Fika Field: The Challenge to Capture the Complexity of Rock and Oil Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erawati Fitriyani Adji

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i2.181The carbonate on Fika Field has a special character, because it grew above a basement high with the thickness and internal character variation. To develop the field, a proper geological model which can be used in reservoir simulation was needed. This model has to represent the complexity of the rock type and the variety of oil types among the clusters. Creating this model was challenging due to the heterogeneity of the Baturaja Formation (BRF: Early Miocene reef, carbonate platform, and breccia conglomerate grew up above the basement with a variety of thickness and quality distributions. The reservoir thickness varies between 23 - 600 ft and 3D seismic frequency ranges from 1 - 80 Hz with 25 Hz dominant frequency. Structurally, the Fika Field has a high basement slope, which has an impact on the flow unit layering slope. Based on production data, each area shows different characteristics and performance: some areas have high water cut and low cumulative production. Oil properties from several clusters also vary in wax content. The wax content can potentially build up a deposit inside tubing and flow-line, resulted in a possible disturbance to the operation. Five well cores were analyzed, including thin section and XRD. Seven check-shot data and 3D seismic Pre-Stack Time Migration (PSTM were available with limited seismic resolution. A seismic analysis was done after well seismic tie was completed. This analysis included paleogeography, depth structure map, and distribution of reservoir and basement. Core and log data generated facies carbonate distribution and rock typing, defining properties for log analysis and permeability prediction for each zone. An Sw prediction for each well was created by J-function analysis. This elaborates capillary pressure from core data, so it is very similar to the real conditions. Different stages of the initial model were done i.e. scale-up properties, data analysis, variogram modeling

  8. Elastic properties of continental carbonate rocks: controlling factors and applicable model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnet, Jean-Baptiste; Fortin, Jérôme; Guéguen, Yves; Pellerin, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Continental carbonates gained interest following the discovery of the supergiant field in the post- and pre-salt deposits in offshore Brazil, as they account for a large portion of the deepwater production. The genesis of continental carbonates is generally associated with physico-chemical and biological precipitation of carbonates, coupled with a strong influence of clastic mineralogical inputs. This results in a complex mineralogical mixing, associated with a wide heterogeneity of pore types due to the intense diagenetic overprint potential of carbonate deposits (cementation, dissolution, recrystallisation, dolomitisation...). With that in mind, we propose insights on the controling factors of elastic properties in a continental carbonate dataset, analogue of the brazilian pre-salt deposits. An applicable model based on the effective medium theory is proposed and discussed regarding the experimental results, and try to account for the wide variability of the elastic properties. Analyzed samples exhibit large variation of (1) sedimentary texture (coquinas grainstones, muddy facies (mudstones to packtones), travertines and stromatolites, (2) pore types (moldic, intercrystalline, vuggy and micropores) and shapes (aspect ratio values fall between 0.2 and 0.5) and (3) physical properties (porosity, acoustic velocity). Regarding composition, samples are characterized by three major mineralogical assemblages, from pure calcite, dolomite, to quartz/clay mixing. If porosity is clearly the first order parameter controlling P-wave velocities, the mineralogical overprint can be accounted for the wide variability of the p-wave velocities at a given porosity (figure 1). The lower porosity-velocity relationship trend is dominated by samples with low to large quartz/clay proportions, whereas the higher trend is dominated by dolomitized samples. Two input parameters are extracted from the previous experimental observation: porosity and mineralogical composition of each sample

  9. Rock Magnetism of the limestone-dolomite ribbon carbonates in the Doushantuo Formation in Yichang, South China and their implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Zhang, S.; Bai, L.; Wang, T.; Zhao, Q.; Wu, H.; Yang, T.; Zhao, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Doushantuo Formation in South China is one of the most popular Ediacaran strata in the world. It consists of four lithological members: the first one is a 5-meter-thick cap carbonate; the second one is the alternant deposition of shale and carbonate, with firestone inclusion; the third one includes the lower thick carbonate and the upper limestone-dolomite ribbon carbonates; the forth one is one set of 10-meter-thick organic-rich shale. Rock magnetism and mineral analysis are employed on the third member of the Doushantuo Formation in Yichang, South China, in order to distinguish magnetic minerals in the sediments and discuss the possible mechanism of past environmental changes. Mineral observation indicated that this set of carbonates is the alternant deposition of the light grey calcite layer and the dark grey dolomite layer. XRD results showed that the clay minerals in the calcite layer are less than those in the dolomite layer. Magnetic susceptibility (MS), susceptibility of anhysteretic remanent magnetization (χARM), saturation isothermal remanence (SIRM) displayed an abnormal magnetic (AM) section (11.18 m - 11.65 m), whose magnetism is much stronger than any other sections. Furthermore, for the section above this AM section, MS values of the calcite layers are higher than those of the dolomite layers; while for the section below this AM section, MS values of the calcite layers are lower than those of the dolomite layers. κ-T curvers of the section above this AM section are mainly reversible; while the cooling curves of the section below this AM section are much higher than the heating curves, which indicate a lot of magnetite is produced during heating. However, for the whole sequence, the remanence of the calcite layers is always higher than that of the dolomite layers. Lowrie experiments (Lowrie, 1990) suggested that the magnetic minerals in the AM section and its above and below section are different. For the section above the AM section, magnetite

  10. Preliminary investigations on the carbon dioxide sequestering potential of the ultramafic rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, F.; Guthrie, G.; Counce, D.; Kluk, E.; Bergfeld, D.; Snow, M.

    1997-08-01

    Fossil fuels continue to provide major sources of energy to the modern world even though global emissions of CO{sub 2} are presently at levels of 19 Gt/yr. Future antipollution measures may include sequestering of waste CO{sub 2} as magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}) by processing ultramafic rocks to obtain reactable Mg. Huge ultramafic deposits consisting of relatively pure Mg-rich silicates exist throughout much of the world in ophiolites and layered intrusions. Peridotites (especially dunites) and serpentinites comprise the best ores because they contain the most Mg by weight and are relatively reactive to hot acids such as HCl. Although mining such deposits on a large scale would have environmental impacts, the sequestering process could provide Cr, Ni, and other metals as byproducts and could dispose of existing waste (white) asbestos. Small ultramafic bodies ({approximately} 1 km{sup 3}) can potentially sequester about 1 Gt of CO{sub 2} or about 20% of annual US emissions. A single large deposit of dunite ({approximately} 30 km{sup 3}) could dispose of about 20 yr of current US CO{sub 2} emissions. The cost and environmental impact of mining these deposits must be weighed against the increased costs of energy and benefits to the atmosphere and climate.

  11. Summary of Radionuclide Reactive Transport Experiments in Fractured Tuff and Carbonate Rocks from Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, M; Roberts, S; Reimus, P; Johnson, M

    2006-10-11

    , Mercury, Nevada. Readers are referred to the original reports ''Radionuclide Transport in Tuff and Carbonate Fractures from Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site'' (Zavarin et al., 2005) and ''Radionuclide Sorption and Transport in Fractured Rocks of Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site'' (Ware et al., 2005) for specific details not covered in this summary report.

  12. Analyzing the Influence of Mineralogy on Strength Properties of Carbonate Rock in Sagamu and Ewekoro, Ogun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okewale

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The research analyzed the influence of mineralogy on strength properties of carbonate rocks in Sagamu and Ewekoro in Ogun State, Nigeria. The research was conducted using the rock samples collected from the two locations. Sagamu has coordinate (latitude 60 451N and longitude 30 351E and Ewekoro has coordinate (latitude 60 351N and longitude 3o 121E.The result of modal analysis from the thin section shows that Sagamu has the mineralogical composition of 79.5% calcite, 13.5% quartz and 7.0% opaque while Ewekoro has 77.5% calcite, 17.0% quartz and 5.5% opaque. The rebound hardness result shows that Sagamu has an average value of 32.3 while Ewekoro rebound hardness value has an average of 35.1. The result of uniaxial compressive strength as estimated from the correlation chart between average density and Schmidt hardness shows that Sagamu has average strength of 61.8 MPa while Ewekoro has an average uniaxial compressive strength of 72.4 MPa. The point load strength index for Sagamu has an average value of 1.6 MPa while Ewekoro has an average value of 1.8 MPa. The tensile strength as estimated from point load strength index for Sagamu has an average value of 2.5 MPa while Ewekoro has an average value of 2.7 MPa. The results show that sagamu has higher percentage of calcite, lower percentage of quartz and higher percentage of opaque mineral compared with Ewekoro with lower percentage of calcite, higher percentage of quartz and lower percentage of opaque mineral. Ewekoro has higher hardness and strength values compared with sagamu and these can be attributed to higher percentage of quartz

  13. Strontium Isotopic Composition of Paleozoic Carbonate Rocks in the Nevada Test Site Vicinity, Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties, Nevada and Inyo County, California.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James B. Paces; Zell E. Peterman; Kiyoto Futa; Thomas A. Oliver; and Brian D. Marshall.

    2007-08-07

    Ground water moving through permeable Paleozoic carbonate rocks represents the most likely pathway for migration of radioactive contaminants from nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The strontium isotopic composition (87Sr/86Sr) of ground water offers a useful means of testing hydrochemical models of regional flow involving advection and reaction. However, reaction models require knowledge of 87Sr/86Sr data for carbonate rock in the Nevada Test Site vicinity, which is scarce. To fill this data gap, samples of core or cuttings were selected from 22 boreholes at depth intervals from which water samples had been obtained previously around the Nevada Test Site at Yucca Flat, Frenchman Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Mercury Valley. Dilute acid leachates of these samples were analyzed for a suite of major- and trace-element concentrations (MgO, CaO, SiO2, Al2O3, MnO, Rb, Sr, Th, and U) as well as for 87Sr/86Sr. Also presented are unpublished analyses of 114 Paleozoic carbonate samples from outcrops, road cuts, or underground sites in the Funeral Mountains, Bare Mountain, Striped Hills, Specter Range, Spring Mountains, and ranges east of the Nevada Test Site measured in the early 1990's. These data originally were collected to evaluate the potential for economic mineral deposition at the potential high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain and adjacent areas (Peterman and others, 1994). Samples were analyzed for a suite of trace elements (Rb, Sr, Zr, Ba, La, and Ce) in bulk-rock powders, and 87Sr/86Sr in partial digestions of carbonate rock using dilute acid or total digestions of silicate-rich rocks. Pre-Tertiary core samples from two boreholes in the central or western part of the Nevada Test Site also were analyzed. Data are presented in tables and summarized in graphs; however, no attempt is made to interpret results with respect to ground-water flow paths in this report. Present-day 87Sr/86Sr values are compared to

  14. Variation in stable carbon isotopes in organic matter from the Gunflint Iron Formation. [Precambrian rock analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghoorn, E. S.; Knoll, A. H.; Dembicki, H., Jr.; Meinschein, W. G.

    1977-01-01

    Results are presented for an isotopic analysis of the kerogen separated from 15 samples of the Gunflint Iron Formation, Ontario, and the conformably overlying Rove Formation. Reasons for which the Gunflint Iron Formation is suitable for such a study of a single Precambrian formation are identified. The general geology of the formation is outlined along with sample selection, description, and preparation. Major conclusions are that the basal Gunflint algal chert and shale facies are depleted in C-13 relative to the chert-carbonate and taconite facies, that differences in the delta C-13 values between Gunflint facies correlate with marked differences in their biological source materials as evidenced by their respective microbiotas, that the anthraxolites are anomalously depleted in C-13 relative to the kerogen of their encompassing cherts and shales, and that the effects of igneous intrusion and concomitant thermal alteration are shown by a marked loss of C-12 at the contact. The demonstration that not all kerogens are isotopically alike stresses the importance of facies data to the interpretation of C-13/C-12 ratios of ancient organic matter.

  15. Alkali-aggregate reactivity of typical siliceious glass and carbonate rocks in alkali-activated fly ash based geopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Duyou; Liu, Yongdao; Zheng, Yanzeng; Xu, Zhongzi; Shen, Xiaodong

    2013-08-01

    For exploring the behaviour of alkali-aggregate reactivity (AAR) in alkali-activated geopolymeric materials and assessing the procedures for testing AAR in geopolymers, the expansion behaviour of fly ash based geopolymer mortars with pure silica glass and typical carbonate rocks were studied respectively by curing at various conditions, i.e. 23°C and 38°C with relative humidity over 95%, immersed in 1M NaOH solution at 80°C. Results show that, at various curing conditions, neither harmful ASR nor harmful ACR was observed in geopolymers with the criteria specified for OPC system. However, with the change of curing conditions, the geopolymer binder and reactive aggregates may experience different reaction processes leading to quite different dimensional changes, especially with additional alkalis and elevated temperatures. It suggests that high temperature with additional alkali for accelerating AAR in traditional OPC system may not appropriate for assessing the alkali-aggregate reactivity behaviour in geopolymers designed for normal conditions. On the other hand, it is hopeful to control the dimensional change of geopolymer mortar or concrete by selecting the type of aggregates and the appropriate curing conditions, thus changing the harmful AAR in OPC into beneficial AAR in geopolymers and other alkali-activated cementitious systems.

  16. Interaction between ultrapotassic magmas and carbonate rocks: Evidence from geochemical and isotopic (Sr, Nd, O) compositions of granular lithic clasts from the Alban Hills Volcano, Central Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peccerillo, Angelo; Federico, Marcella; Barbieri, Mario; Brilli, Mauro; Wu, Tsai-Wan

    2010-05-01

    Magma-carbonate rock interaction is investigated through a geochemical and Sr-Nd-O isotope study of granular lithic clasts ( ejecta) from the Alban Hills ultrapotassic volcano, Central Italy. Some samples (Group-1) basically represent intrusive equivalents of Alban Hills magmas. A few samples (Group-2) are ultramafic, have high MgO (˜30 to 40 wt%) and δ 18O‰, and originated by accumulation of mafic phases that crystallised from ultrapotassic melts during assimilation of dolomitic rocks. Group-3 ejecta consist of dominant K-feldspar, and show major element compositions similar to phonolites, which, however, are absent among the Alban Hills volcanics. Finally, another group (Group-4) contains corroded K-feldspars, surrounded by a microgranular to porphyritic matrix, made of igneous minerals (K-feldspar, foids, clinopyroxene, phlogopite) plus wollastonite, garnet, and some cuspidine. Group-4 ejecta are depleted in SiO 2 and enriched in CaO with respect to Group-3. The analysed ejecta have similar 143Nd/ 144Nd (0.51204-0.51217) as the Alban Hills lavas, whereas 87Sr/ 86Sr (0.70900-0.71067) is similar to lower. Whole rocks δ 18O‰ ranges from +7.0 to +13.2, reaching maximum values in ultramafic samples. A positive correlation with CaO is observed in single rock groups. Large Ion Lithophile Element (LILE) abundances and REE fractionation are generally high, and extreme values of Th, U and LREE are found in some Group-3 and Group-4 rocks. Mineralogical, petrological and geochemical data reveal extensive interaction between magma and carbonate wall rocks, involving both dolostones and limestones. These processes had dramatic effects on magma compositions, especially on phonolites, which were transformed to foidites. Evidence of such a process is found in Group-4 samples, in which K-feldspar is observed to react with a matrix that represents strongly undersaturated melts formed by interaction between silicate magma and carbonates. Trace element data also testify to a

  17. Vertical Microbial Community Variability of Carbonate-based Cones may Provide Insight into Formation in the Rock Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, C.; Bojanowski, C.; Daille, L. K.; Bradley, J.; Johnson, H.; Stamps, B. W.; Stevenson, B. S.; Berelson, W.; Corsetti, F. A.; Spear, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Stromatolite morphogenesis is poorly understood, and the process by which microbial mats become mineralized is a primary question in microbialite formation. Ancient conical stromatolites are primarily carbonate-based whereas the few modern analogues in hot springs are either non-mineralized or mineralized by silica. A team from the 2015 International GeoBiology Course investigated carbonate-rich microbial cones from near Little Hot Creek (LHC), Long Valley Caldera, California, to investigate how conical stromatolites might form in a hot spring carbonate system. The cones are up to 3 cm tall and are found in a calm, ~45° C pool near LHC that is 4 times super-saturated with respect to CaCO3. The cones rise from a flat, layered microbial mat at the edge of the pool. Scanning electron microscopy revealed filamentous bacteria associated with calcite crystals within the cone tips. Preliminary 16S rRNA gene analysis indicated variability of community composition between different vertical levels of the cone. The cone tip had comparatively greater abundance of filamentous cyanobacteria (Leptolyngbya and Phormidium) and fewer heterotrophs (e.g. Chloroflexi) compared to the cone bottom. This supports the hypothesis that cone formation may depend on the differential abundance of the microbial community and their potential functional roles. Metagenomic analyses of the cones revealed potential genes related to chemotaxis and motility. Specifically, a genomic bin identified as a member of the genus Isosphaera contained an hmp chemotaxis operon implicated in gliding motility in the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme [1]. Isosphaera is a Planctomycete shown to have phototactic capabilities [2], and may play a role in conjunction with cyanobacteria in the vertical formation of the cones. This analysis of actively growing cones indicates a complex interplay of geochemistry and microbiology that form structures which can serve as models for processes that occurred in the past and are

  18. Spring Database for the Basin and Range Carbonate-Rock Aquifer System, White Pine County, Nevada, and Adjacent Areas in Nevada and Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelko, Michael T.

    2007-01-01

    A database containing nearly 3,400 springs was developed for the Basin and Range carbonate-rock aquifer system study area in White Pine County, Nevada, and adjacent areas in Nevada and Utah. The spring database provides a foundation for field verification of springs in the study area. Attributes in the database include location, geographic and general geologic settings, and available discharge and temperature data for each spring.

  19. POSSIBLE LATE MIDDLE ORDOVICIAN ORGANIC CARBON ISOTOPE EXCURSION: EVIDENCE FROM ORDOVICIAN OILS AND HYDROCARBON SOURCE ROCKS, MID-CONTINENT AND EAST-CENTRAL UNITED STATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Joseph R.; Jacobson, Stephen R.; Witzke, Brian J.; Risatti, J. Bruno; Anders, Donald E.; Watney, W. Lynn; Newell, K. David; Vuletich, April K.

    1987-01-01

    Oils generated by Middle Ordovician rocks are found throughout the Mid-Continent and east-central regions of the United States. Gas chromatographic characteristics of these oils include a relatively high abundance of n-alkanes with carbon numbers less than 20, a strong predominance of odd-numbered n-alkanes between C//1//0 and C//2//0, and relatively small amounts of branched and cyclic alkanes. The wide ranges in delta **1**3C for oils and rock extracts reflect a major, positive excursion(s) in organic matter delta **1**3C in late Middle Ordovician rocks. This excursion has at least regional significance in that it can be documented in sections 480 mi apart in south-central Kansas and eastern Iowa. The distance may be as much as 930 mi. The parallel shifts in organic and carbonate delta **1**3C in core samples from 1 E. M. Greene well, Washington County, Iowa, imply changes in the isotope composition of the ocean-atmosphere carbon reservoir. These and other aspects of the subject are discussed.

  20. Vulnerability of shallow ground water and drinking-water wells to nitrate in the United States: Model of predicted nitrate concentration in shallow, recently recharged ground water -- Input data set for carbonate rocks (gwava-s_crox)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the presence or absence of Valley and Ridge carbonate rocks in the conterminous United States. The data set was used as an input data layer...

  1. The human impact on natural rock reserves using basalt, anorthosite, and carbonates as raw materials in insulation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Tais Wittchen; Clausen, Anders U.; Hansen, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    lithosphere or subducted with oceanic crust and recycled through the mantle by plate tectonics. Insulation products have a chemical composition similar to average crustal rocks and participate in the natural rock cycle. However, these products need not accumulate in nature, inasmuch as old insulation...

  2. Influence of Lithofacies and Diagenetic Processes on the Physical and Mechanical Properties of Carbonate Rocks - Case Study from Sinawin-Sha'wa Area, Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uroš Barudžija

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Geological investigations were carried out in the Sinawin-Sha'wa area, in northwestern Libya, in order to find suitable rocks for aggregate in asphalt mixtures for Nalut - Ghadamis Road reconstruction. By combined field work and micropetrographical analysis four different carbonate lithofacies were determined within Upper Cretaceous sedimentary sequence: lithofacies A - micritic limestones; lithofacies B - dolomitic marls; lithofacies C - dolobiomicrites; lithofacies D -biosparites and biosparudites. Diagenetic processes of cementation, recrystallization, dolomitization and silicification were identified within these lithofacies. Stone samples, taken from three lithofacies A, C, and D, were analyzed in order to determine its physical and mechanical properties (apparent density, open porosity, water absorption, uniaxial compressive strength. In addition, aggregate produced by crushing of the rock from lithofacies D is tested on resistance to crushing and abrasion (LA test. Samples from lithofacies B were not included in the testing of physical and mechanical properties since it is estimated as not suitable rock material for crushed aggregate. Samples from lithofacies A, C and D showed significant differences in the physical and mechanical properties. These differences stem from differences in mineralogical and petrographical composition as well as from diagenetic processes. Stone of lithofacies D were estimated as the most appropriate rocks available in the area, for aggregate in asphalt mixtures.

  3. A porous silica rock ("tripoli") in the footwall of the Jurassic Úrkút manganese deposit, Hungary: composition, and origin through carbonate dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgari, Marta; Szabo, Zoltan; Szabo-Drubina, Magda; Hein, James R.; Yeh, Hsueh-Wen

    2005-01-01

    The mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic compositions were determined for a white tripoli from the footwall of the Jurassic Úrkút Mn-oxide ore deposit in the Bakony Mountains, Hungary. The tripoli consists of quartz and chalcedony, with SiO2 contents up to 100 wt.%; consequently, trace-element contents are very low. Oxygen isotopes and quartz crystallinity indicate a low-temperature diagenetic origin for this deposit. The tripoli was formed by dissolution of the carbonate portion of the siliceous (sponge spicules) Isztimér Limestone. Dissolution of the carbonate was promoted by inorganic and organic acids generated during diagensis and left a framework composed of diagenetic silica that preserved the original volume of the limestone layer. The relative enrichment of silica and high porosity is the result of that carbonate dissolution. The silty texture of this highly friable rock is due to the structurally weak silica framework.

  4. A porous silica rock (“tripoli”) in the footwall of the Jurassic Úrkút manganese deposit, Hungary: Composition, and origin through carbonate dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgári, Márta; Szabó, Zoltán; Szabó-Drubina, Magda; Hein, James R.; Yeh, Hsueh-Wen

    2005-06-01

    The mineralogical, chemical, and isotopic compositions were determined for a white tripoli from the footwall of the Jurassic Úrkút Mn-oxide ore deposit in the Bakony Mountains, Hungary. The tripoli consists of quartz and chalcedony, with SiO 2 contents up to 100 wt.%; consequently, trace-element contents are very low. Oxygen isotopes and quartz crystallinity indicate a low-temperature diagenetic origin for this deposit. The tripoli was formed by dissolution of the carbonate portion of the siliceous (sponge spicules) Isztimér Limestone. Dissolution of the carbonate was promoted by inorganic and organic acids generated during diagensis and left a framework composed of diagenetic silica that preserved the original volume of the limestone layer. The relative enrichment of silica and high porosity is the result of that carbonate dissolution. The silty texture of this highly friable rock is due to the structurally weak silica framework.

  5. On origin of Molar Tooth carbonate rocks%再论臼齿碳酸盐岩成因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    旷红伟; 柳永清; 彭楠; 刘燕学; 李家华

    2011-01-01

    Molar Tooth (abbreviated MT) carbonate rocks, i.e. , the Proterozoic carbonate rocks with particular texture, are characterized by the enigmatic micro-spar fabric, limitation of temporal and spatial distribution or diverse origin interpretations since the discovery of more than a hundred years, and attract the attention of numerous geologists worldwide. Based on the previous researches and our own new studies on MT microscopic fabric in the recent decade, some new results were proposed in this paper. MT is a stacked equant calcite sparry constructed by aggradated accretion of calcite microspar surrounding an initial nucleus of calcite. The Proterozoic ocean was a deoxidation or suboxidation environment with a high carbonate saturation. As a result, the crystallization and consolidation of lime mud on the bottom of the shallow sea became more slowly. Due to continuous decomposition of organic matter in lime mud, gas was generated. And then, within a closed system, the concentration of the gas was increased to a higher value, resulting in the formation of cracks and voids in the plastic lime mud. Cracks were perhaps generated by some unknown mechanisms and enlarged in size or deformed, destructed as well. By the catalyzed reaction of organic matter, calcites (mainly CaCO3 ) were precipitated quickly from liquids within voids or cracks, and then the initial nucleus of calcite appeared. Afterwards, a stacked equant calcite sparry was constructed by the aggradated accretion of calcite microspar surrounding an initial nucleus of calcite. Consequently, calcite sparry was solidified and deposited within the cracks. The proposed model for the MT formation indicates that the void-forming and crack-filling represents microscale gas-sediment interactions and the geophysical and geochemical condition of the Proterozoic paleo-ocean plays an important role,which is not only the geological setting constraint but also provides sediment materials and dynamic condi tions, and

  6. Micro-scale experimental investigation of the effect of flow rate on trapping in sandstone and carbonate rock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khishvand, Mahdi; Akbarabadi, Morteza; Piri, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a pore-scale experimental study of residual trapping in consolidated sandstone and carbonate rock samples under confining stress. We investigate how the changes in wetting phase flow rate impacts pore-scale distribution of fluids during imbibition in natural, water-wet porous media. We systematically study pore-scale trapping of the nonwetting phase as well as size and distribution of its disconnected globules. Seven sets of drainage-imbibition experiments were performed with brine and oil as the wetting and nonwetting phases, respectively. We utilized a two-phase miniature core-flooding apparatus integrated with an X-ray microtomography system to examine pore-scale fluid distributions in small Bentheimer sandstone (D = 4.9 mm and L = 13 mm) and Gambier limestone (D = 4.4 mm and L = 75 mm) core samples. The results show that with increase in capillary number, the residual oil saturation at the end of the imbibition reduces from 0.46 to 0.20 in Bemtheimer sandstone and from 0.46 to 0.28 in Gambier limestone. We use pore-scale displacement mechanisms, in-situ wettability characteristics, and pore size distribution information to explain the observed capillary desaturation trends. The reduction was believed to be caused by alteration of the order in which pore-scale displacements took place during imbibition. Furthermore, increase in capillary number produced significantly different pore-scale fluid distributions during imbibition. We explored the pore fluid occupancies and studied size and distribution of the trapped oil clusters during different imbibition experiments. The results clearly show that as the capillary number increases, imbibition produces smaller trapped oil globules. In other words, the volume of individual trapped oil globules decreased at higher brine flow rates. Finally, we observed that the pore space in the limestone sample was considerably altered through matrix dissolution at extremely high brine flow rates. This

  7. Quantification of sub-resolution porosity in carbonate rocks by applying high-salinity contrast brine using X-ray microtomography differential imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qingyang; Al-Khulaifi, Yousef; Blunt, Martin J.; Bijeljic, Branko

    2016-10-01

    Characterisation of the pore space in carbonate reservoirs and aquifers is of utmost importance in a number of applications such as enhanced oil recovery, geological carbon storage and contaminant transport. We present a new experimental methodology that uses high-salinity contrast brine and differential imaging acquired by X-ray tomography to non-invasively obtain three-dimensional spatially resolved information on porosity and connectivity of two rock samples, Portland and Estaillades limestones, including sub-resolution micro-porosity. We demonstrate that by injecting 30 wt% KI brine solution, a sufficiently high phase contrast can be achieved allowing accurate three-phase segmentation based on differential imaging. This results in spatially resolved maps of the solid grain phase, sub-resolution micro-pores within the grains, and macro-pores. The total porosity values from the three-phase segmentation for two carbonate rock samples are shown to be in good agreement with Helium porosity measurements. Furthermore, our flow-based method allows for an accurate estimate of pore connectivity and a distribution of porosity within the sub-resolution pores.

  8. Characterization of reactive flow-induced evolution of carbonate rocks using digital core analysis- part 1: Assessment of pore-scale mineral dissolution and deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qajar, Jafar; Arns, Christoph H.

    2016-09-01

    The application of X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT) for quantitatively characterizing reactive-flow induced pore structure evolution including local particle detachment, displacement and deposition in carbonate rocks is investigated. In the studies conducted in this field of research, the experimental procedure has involved alternating steps of imaging and ex-situ core sample alteration. Practically, it is impossible to return the sample, with micron precision, to the same position and orientation. Furthermore, successive images of a sample in pre- and post-alteration states are usually taken at different conditions such as different scales, resolutions and signal-to-noise ratios. These conditions accompanying with subresolution features in the images make voxel-by-voxel comparisons of successive images problematic. In this paper, we first address the respective challenges in voxel-wise interpretation of successive images of carbonate rocks subject to reactive flow. Reactive coreflood in two carbonate cores with different rock types are considered. For the first rock, we used the experimental and imaging results published by Qajar et al. (2013) which showed a quasi-uniform dissolution regime. A similar reactive core flood was conducted in the second rock which resulted in wormhole-like dissolution regime. We particularly examine the major image processing operations such as transformation of images to the same grey-scale, noise filtering and segmentation thresholding and propose quantitative methods to evaluate the effectiveness of these operations in voxel-wise analysis of successive images of a sample. In the second part, we generalize the methodology based on the three-phase segmentation of normalized images, microporosity assignment and 2D histogram of image intensities to estimate grey-scale changes of individual image voxels for a general case where the greyscale images are segmented into arbitrary number of phases. The results show that local (voxel

  9. Characterization of reactive flow-induced evolution of carbonate rocks using digital core analysis- part 1: Assessment of pore-scale mineral dissolution and deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qajar, Jafar; Arns, Christoph H

    2016-09-01

    The application of X-ray micro-computed tomography (μ-CT) for quantitatively characterizing reactive-flow induced pore structure evolution including local particle detachment, displacement and deposition in carbonate rocks is investigated. In the studies conducted in this field of research, the experimental procedure has involved alternating steps of imaging and ex-situ core sample alteration. Practically, it is impossible to return the sample, with micron precision, to the same position and orientation. Furthermore, successive images of a sample in pre- and post-alteration states are usually taken at different conditions such as different scales, resolutions and signal-to-noise ratios. These conditions accompanying with subresolution features in the images make voxel-by-voxel comparisons of successive images problematic. In this paper, we first address the respective challenges in voxel-wise interpretation of successive images of carbonate rocks subject to reactive flow. Reactive coreflood in two carbonate cores with different rock types are considered. For the first rock, we used the experimental and imaging results published by Qajar et al. (2013) which showed a quasi-uniform dissolution regime. A similar reactive core flood was conducted in the second rock which resulted in wormhole-like dissolution regime. We particularly examine the major image processing operations such as transformation of images to the same grey-scale, noise filtering and segmentation thresholding and propose quantitative methods to evaluate the effectiveness of these operations in voxel-wise analysis of successive images of a sample. In the second part, we generalize the methodology based on the three-phase segmentation of normalized images, microporosity assignment and 2D histogram of image intensities to estimate grey-scale changes of individual image voxels for a general case where the greyscale images are segmented into arbitrary number of phases. The results show that local (voxel

  10. Joint Commission on rock properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    A joint commission on Rock Properties for Petroleum Engineers (RPPE) has been established by the International Society of Rock Mechanics and the Society of Petroleum Engineers to set up data banks on the properties of sedimentary rocks encountered during drilling. Computer-based data banks of complete rock properties will be organized for sandstones (GRESA), shales (ARSHA) and carbonates (CARCA). The commission hopes to access data sources from members of the commission, private companies and the public domain.

  11. Equilibrium of Groundwater with Carbonate Minerals of the Water-Bearing Rocks under Anthropogenic Impact (by the example of Kishinev, Moldova)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoshenkova, A. N.; Pasechnik, E. Yu; Tokarenko, O. G.

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents calculation results of equilibrium of groundwater in Kishenev with a variety of secondary carbonate minerals. It is shown that the groundwater-rock system is in equilibrium with some minerals, such as calcite, magnesite, dolomite, siderite, but at the same time is not in equilibrium with strontianite. It indicates that secondary mineral precipitation is possible. Specific nitrate chemical water type, which is rarely observed in nature and characterized by the presence of anthropogenic impact in this territory, in some cases is of higher saturation as compared to calcite, dolomite and magnesite due to the fact that nitrate ion content increases with the increase of calcium content.

  12. Influences of marine floor hydrothermal activity on organic matter abundance in marine carbonate rocks--A case study of middle-upper Proterozoic in the northern part of North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Study indicates that the elements rich in marine floor hydrothermal fluids have a positive influence, not only on total organic carbon (TOC), but also on the abundance of SiO2 in some Middle-Upper Proterozoic strata. The TOC bears a better positive correlation with abundance of SiO2. By the correlation analysis between organic matter and sea-floor hot fluid characterized trace elements such as P, Cu, Zn, Ni, Ba, etc in marine carbonate rocks, we conclude that organic matter enrichment of carbonate rocks were related to marine floor hydrothermal activity in a part of layers. Some thin-layered cherts, which were thought to be the indicators of hydrothermal activity, frequently occurring in Gaoyuzhuang, Wumishan, Tieling and Xiamaling formation support our conclusion. With the increasing of trace elements in marine carbonate rocks, the TOC and Fe/Ti ratio is creasing. In contrast, the Al/(Al+Fe+Mn) ratio is usually decreasing.

  13. Using synchrotron X-ray microtomography to characterize the pore network of reservoir rocks: A case study on carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzilli, F.; Cilona, A.; Mancini, L.; Tondi, E.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we propose a new methodology to calculate pore connectivity in granular rocks. This method is useful to characterize the pore networks of natural and laboratory compaction bands (CBs), and compare them with the host rock pore network. Data were collected using the synchrotron X-ray microtomography technique and quantitative analyses were carried out using the Pore3D software library. The porosity was calculated from segmented tridimensional images of deformed and pristine rocks. A process of skeletonization of the pore space was used to obtain the number of connected pores within the rock volume. By analyzing the skeletons the differences between natural and laboratory CBs were highlighted. The natural CB has a lower porosity than to the laboratory one. In natural CBs, the grain contacts appear welded, whereas laboratory CBs show irregular pore shape. Moreover, we assessed for the first time how pore connectivity evolves as a function of deformation, documenting the mechanism responsible for pore connectivity drop within the CBs.

  14. Silicate-carbonate-salt liquid immiscibility and origin of the sodalite-haüyne rocks: study of melt inclusions in olivine foidite from Vulture volcano, S. Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panina, Liya; Stoppa, Francesco

    2009-12-01

    Melt inclusions in clinopyroxenes of olivine foidite bombs from Serra di Constantinopoli pyroclastic flows of the Vulture volcano (Southern Italy) were studied in detail. The rocks contain abundant zoned phenocrysts and xenocrysts of clinopyroxene, scarce grains of olivine, leucite, haüyne, glass with microlites of plagioclase and K-feldspar. The composition of clinopyroxene in xenocrysts (Cpx I), cores (Cpx II), and in rims (Cpx III) of phenocrysts differs in the content of Mg, Fe, Ti, and Al. All clinopyroxenes contain two types of primary inclusion-pure silicate and of silicate-carbonate-salt composition. This fact suggests that the phenomena of silicate-carbonate immiscibility took place prior to crystallization of clinopyroxene. Homogenization of pure silicate inclusions proceeded at 1 225 - 1 190°C. The composition of conserved melts corresponded to that of olivine foidite in Cpx I, to tephrite-phonolite in Cpx II, and phonolite-nepheline trachyte in Cpx III. The amount of water in them was no more than 0.9 wt.%. Silicate-carbonate inclusions decrepitated on heating. Salt globules contained salts of alkali-sulphate, alkali-carbonate, and Ca-carbonate composition somewhat enriched in Ba and Sr. This composition is typical of carbonatite melts when decomposed into immiscible fractions. The formation of sodalite-haüyne rocks from Vulture is related to the presence of carbonate-salt melts in magma chamber. The melts conserved in clinopyroxenes were enriched in incompatible elements, especially in Cpx III. High ratios of La, Nb, and Ta in melts on crystallization of Cpx I and Cpx II suggest the influence of a carbonatite melt as carbonatites have extremely high La/Nb and Nb/Ta and this is confirmed by the appearance of carbonatite melts in magma chamber. Some anomalies in the concentrations and relatives values of Eu and especially Ga seems typical of Italian carbonatite related melts. The mantle source for initial melts was, most likely, rather uniform

  15. Structural analysis of the Jebel Fadeloun anticline, Tunisia: Impact of fractures and faults on the petrophysical properties of carbonate rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Kjelkenes, Fredrik Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing the structure, evolution and fluid flow within the earth's crust is a critical issue for both academic and applied geoscience. This study presents structural analysis of an anticline, which aim is to elucidate the (1) structure and evolution of the fold, as well as the associated faults and fractures, (2) to better investigate how tectonics have impacted the microstructural character of the host rock, and (3) to discuss possible implications for petro...

  16. KREEP Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹永廖; 徐琳; 欧阳自远

    2004-01-01

    KREEP rocks with high contents of K, REE and P were first recognized in Apollo-12 samples, and it was confirmed later that there were KREEP rock fragments in all of the Apollo samples, particularly in Apollo-12 and-14 samples. The KREEP rocks distributed on the lunar surface are the very important objects of study on the evolution of the moon, as well as to evaluate the utilization prospect of REE in KREEP rocks. Based on previous studies and lunar exploration data, the authors analyzed the chemical and mineral characteristics of KREEP rocks, the abundance of Th on the lunar surface materials, the correlation between Th and REE of KREEP rocks in abundance, studied the distribution regions of KREEP rocks on the lunar surface, and further evaluated the utilization prospect of REE in KREEP rocks.

  17. Rock Stars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国平

    2000-01-01

    Around the world young people are spending unbelievable sums of money to listen to rock music. Forbes Magazine reports that at least fifty rock stars have incomes between two million and six million dollars per year.

  18. Quantifying Fracture Heterogeneity in Different Domains of Folded Carbonate Rocks to Improve Fractured Reservoir Analog Fluid Flow Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisdom, K.; Bertotti, G.; Gauthier, B.D.M.; Hardebol, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    Fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs is largely controlled by multiscale fracture networks. Significant variations of fracture network porosity and permeability are caused by the 3D heterogeneity of the fracture network characteristics, such as intensity, orientation and size. Characterizing fracture

  19. Rock Finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  20. Microbiotic crusts on soil, rock and plants: neglected major players in the global cycles of carbon and nitrogen?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Elbert

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbiotic crusts consisting of bacteria, fungi, algae, lichens, and bryophytes colonize most terrestrial surfaces, and they are able to fix carbon and nitrogen from the atmosphere. Here we show that microbiotic crusts are likely to play major roles in the global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen, and we suggest that they should be further characterized and taken into account in studies and models of the Earth system and climate.

    For the global annual net uptake of carbon by microbiotic crusts we present a first estimate of ~3.6 Pg a−1. This uptake corresponds to ~6% of the estimated global net carbon uptake by terrestrial vegetation (net primary production, NPP: ~60 Pg a−1, and it is of the same magnitude as the global annual carbon turnover due to biomass burning. The estimated rate of nitrogen fixation by microbiotic crusts (~45 Tg a−1 amounts to ~40% of the global estimate of biological nitrogen fixation (107 Tg a−1. With regard to Earth system dynamics and global change, the large contribution of microbiotic crusts to nitrogen fixation is likely to be important also for the sequestration of CO2 by terrestrial plants (CO2 fertilization, because the latter is constrained by the availability of fixed nitrogen.

  1. 模拟酸雨条件下石灰土-碳酸盐岩体系的碳汇效应%Carbon sink effect of simulated acid rain in lime soil and carbonate rock system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春龙; 赵家梅; 龙偲; 陈中吉; 周运超; 张春来

    2014-01-01

    为揭示不同酸度降雨对石灰土-碳酸盐岩体系内岩溶碳汇效应的影响,以贵阳市花溪区历史降水量为参照,选取贵阳市青岩镇纯灰岩发育土壤与贵阳市花溪水库三叠纪大冶组纯灰岩为样本进行淋溶试验。测定了6个月时长内不同酸度降水﹑不同土壤深度下模拟石灰土-碳酸盐岩体系降水淋出液的 HCO-3﹑DOC含量和土壤呼吸速率,研究了模拟酸雨对石灰土-石灰岩体系碳汇的影响。结果表明:(1)在土壤深度10~50 cm 匀质状态的样本中,随着土壤厚度的增加,淋出液中 HCO-3含量逐渐增大﹑DOC含量逐渐减小﹑土壤呼吸速率逐渐增大,显示出土壤厚度对石灰土-碳酸盐岩体系的碳汇效应有着明显的影响;(2)在 pH=3.5~6.8的范围内,降水酸度的增强可以抑制岩溶作用与有机碳的溶解,并降低岩溶碳汇效应;(3)在日降水量90~230 mm 范围内,随着降水量的增大碳汇效应也会随之增强。%In order to investigate the influence of rainfall acidity on the carbon sink in a lime soil and carbonate rock system,a leaching test was conducted using lime soil sample developed in pure limestone in Qingyan town and a pure limestone sample of Triassic Daye formation from Huaxi reservoir,Guiyang,comparing to the historical precipitation in Huaxi district,Guiyang.The influence of simulated acid rain on lime soil and the limestone system carbon sink was studied by measuring the HCO-3 content,DOC in the leachates and the soil respiration rate in the lime soil and carbonate rocks system leached over six-months using a range of pre-cipitation acidities and at various depths in the soil.The results showed that,(1)in the homogeneous sample in the soil of 10-50 cm deep ,the content of HCO-3 increased with increased thickness of soil,however the DOC content decreased and the rate of soil respiration increased,indicating that soil thickness significantly affected the carbon sink in

  2. A Study of the Connection Among Basin-Fill Aquifers, Carbonate-Rock Aquifers, and Surface-Water Resources in Southern Snake Valley, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The Secretary of the Interior through the Southern Nevada Public Lands Management Act approved funding for research to improve understanding of hydrologic systems that sustain numerous water-dependent ecosystems on Federal lands in Snake Valley, Nevada. Some of the streams and spring-discharge areas in and adjacent to Great Basin National Park have been identified as susceptible to ground-water withdrawals (Elliott and others, 2006) and research has shown a high potential for ground-water flow from southern Spring Valley into southern Snake Valley through carbonate rocks that outcrop along a low topographic divide known as the Limestone Hills (Welch and others, 2007). Comprehensive geologic, hydrologic, and chemical information will be collected and analyzed to assess the hydraulic connection between basin-fill aquifers and surface-water resources, water-dependent ecological features, and the regional carbonate-rock aquifer, the known source of many high-discharge springs. Understanding these connections is important because proposed projects to pump and export ground water from Spring and Snake Valleys in Nevada may result in unintended capture of water currently supplying springs, streams, wetlands, limestone caves, and other biologically sensitive areas (fig. 1). The methods that will be used in this study may be transferable to other areas in the Great Basin. The National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and U.S. Forest Service submitted the proposal for funding this research to facilitate science-based land management. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water Resources and Geologic Disciplines, and the University of Nevada, Reno, will accomplish four research elements through comprehensive data collection and analysis that are concentrated in two distinct areas on the eastern and southern flanks of the Snake Range (fig. 2). The projected time line for this research is from July 2008 through September 2011.

  3. Dawsonite and other carbonate veins in the Cretaceous Izumi Group, SW Japan: a natural support for fracture self-sealing in mud-stone cap-rock in CGS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuyama, Yasuko; Funatsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Takashi [Institute for Geo-Resources and environment, GSJ, AISI, 1-1-1 Higashi, Central 7, Tsukuba, ibaraki 305-8567 (Japan); Take, Shuji [Kishiwada Nature Club, c/o Kishiwada City Natural History Museum, Sakai-Machi 5-6, Kishiwada, Osaka 596-0072 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    Dawsonite-bearing carbonate veins are abundant in a compact mud-stone layer of the lower part of the Izumi Group, SW Japan. The mode of occurrence of the veins probably indicates fracturing and mineral sealing associated with upwelling of CO{sub 2}-rich fluid evolved in the reservoir beneath. The carbonate veins studied here can be a natural support to fracturing and healing of mud-stone cap-rock in the CO{sub 2} geological storage. (authors)

  4. Integration of stable carbon isotope, microbial community, dissolved hydrogen gas, and 2HH2O tracer data to assess bioaugmentation for chlorinated ethene degradation in fractured rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Révész, Kinga M.; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood; Kirshtein, Julie D.; Tiedeman, Claire R.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Goode, Daniel J.; Shapiro, Allen M.; Voytek, Mary A.; Lancombe, Pierre J.; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2014-01-01

    An in situ bioaugmentation (BA) experiment was conducted to understand processes controlling microbial dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC), West Trenton, NJ. In the BA experiment, an electron donor (emulsified vegetable oil and sodium lactate) and a chloro-respiring microbial consortium were injected into a well in fractured mudstone of Triassic age. Water enriched in 2H was also injected as a tracer of the BA solution, to monitor advective transport processes. The changes in concentration and the δ13C of TCE, cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC); the δ2H of water; changes in the abundance of the microbial communities; and the concentration of dissolved H2 gas compared to pre- test conditions, provided multiple lines of evidence that enhanced biodegradation occurred in the injection well and in two downgradient wells. For those wells where the biodegradation was stimulated intensively, the sum of the molar chlorinated ethene (CE) concentrations in post-BA water was higher than that of the sum of the pre-BA background molar CE concentrations. The concentration ratios of TCE/(cis-DCE + VC) indicated that the increase in molar CE concentration may result from additional TCE mobilized from the rock matrix in response to the oil injection or due to desorption/diffusion. The stable carbon isotope mass-balance calculations show that the weighted average 13C isotope of the CEs was enriched for around a year compared to the background value in a two year monitoring period, an effective indication that dechlorination of VC was occurring. Insights gained from this study can be applied to efforts to use BA in other fractured rock systems. The study demonstrates that a BA approach can substantially enhance in situ bioremediation not only in fractures connected to the injection well, but also in the rock matrix around the well due to processes such as diffusion and desorption. Because the effect of the

  5. Cyclic Sequences, Events and Evolution of the Sino-Korean Plate,with a Discussion on the Evolution of Molar-tooth Carbonates,Phosphorites and Source Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xianghua; GE Ming

    2003-01-01

    This paper gives an account of the research that the authors conducted on the cyclic sequences, events and evolutionary history from Proterozoic to Meso-Cenozoic in the Sino-Korean plate based on the principle of the Cosmos-Earth System. The authors divided this plate into 20 super-cyclic or super-mega-cyclic periods and more than 100 Oort periods. The research focused on important sea flooding events, uplift interruption events, tilting movement events, molar-tooth carbonate events, thermal events, polarity reversal events, karst events, volcanic explosion events and storm events, as well as types of resource areas and paleotectonic evolution. By means of the isochronous theory of the Cosmos-Earth System periodicity and based on long-excentricity and periodicity, the authors elaborately studied the paleogeographic evolution of the aulacogen of the Sino-Korean plate, the oolitic beach platform formation, the development of foreland basin and continental rift valley basin, and reconstructed the evolution of tectonic paleogeography and stratigraphic framework in the Sino-Korean plate in terms of evolutionary maps. Finally, the authors gave a profound discussion on the formation and development of molar-tooth carbonates, phosphorites and source rocks.

  6. From Basin Black Shales to Platform Carbonate Rocks: A Study on Sequence Stratigraphy for the Lower Cambrian of the Upper-Yangtze Region in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the Upper-Yangtze region, especially in Guizhou Province and its adjacent areas, the Lower Cambrian is well developed and is marked by a succession from black shales of the basin facies to carbonate rocks of the platform facies. The drowning event of the platform occurring at the turn from Sinian to Cambrian resulted in a set of black shales, i.e. the Niutitang Formation, which makes up the bottom part of the Lower Cambrian. With the shoaling of the sedimentary environment, a set of carbonate rocks, i.e. the Qingxudong Formation, was formed in the top part of the Lower Cambrian. Thus, the Lower Cambrian in the study area makes up one second-order sequence that can be further subdivided into five third-order sequences, and forms a regularly cyclic succession of transgression-regression. There is a regularly vertical stacking pattern for the third-order sequences in the second-order sequence. From bottom to top, the succession of the "CS (condensed section)+HST (high-stand system tract)" of the third-order sequences is changed into the succession of the "TST (transgressive system tract)+CS+HST". Correspondingly, the drowning-type sequence boundary is changed into the exposure-type one. Therefore, both the second-order and the third-order sequences have similar sedimentary-facies architectures. A concomitant with these temporal changes,the Lower Cambrian with a thickness of 1000 m that contains five third-order sequences is changed into a condensed succession that cannot identify third-order sequences toward the southeast with the deepening of the sedimentary environment. According to the elementary features of the third-order sequences, i.e. the regularity o sedimentary-facies successions in space and the synchronism of sedimentary-environment changes in time, the detailed division of the third-order sequences at main logged sections in different paleogeographical background becomes the basis to establish the sequence-stratigraphic framework that can demonstrate

  7. Training and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Marte

    2013-05-31

    Colorado School of Mines conducted research and training in the development and validation of an advanced CO{sub 2} GS (Geological Sequestration) probabilistic simulation and risk assessment model. CO{sub 2} GS simulation and risk assessment is used to develop advanced numerical simulation models of the subsurface to forecast CO2 behavior and transport; optimize site operational practices; ensure site safety; and refine site monitoring, verification, and accounting efforts. As simulation models are refined with new data, the uncertainty surrounding the identified risks decrease, thereby providing more accurate risk assessment. The models considered the full coupling of multiple physical processes (geomechanical and fluid flow) and describe the effects of stochastic hydro-mechanical (H-M) parameters on the modeling of CO{sub 2} flow and transport in fractured porous rocks. Graduate students were involved in the development and validation of the model that can be used to predict the fate, movement, and storage of CO{sub 2} in subsurface formations, and to evaluate the risk of potential leakage to the atmosphere and underground aquifers. The main major contributions from the project include the development of: 1) an improved procedure to rigorously couple the simulations of hydro-thermomechanical (H-M) processes involved in CO{sub 2} GS; 2) models for the hydro-mechanical behavior of fractured porous rocks with random fracture patterns; and 3) probabilistic methods to account for the effects of stochastic fluid flow and geomechanical properties on flow, transport, storage and leakage associated with CO{sub 2} GS. The research project provided the means to educate and train graduate students in the science and technology of CO{sub 2} GS, with a focus on geologic storage. Specifically, the training included the investigation of an advanced CO{sub 2} GS simulation and risk assessment model that can be used to predict the fate, movement, and storage of CO{sub 2} in

  8. Morphometric patterns in Modern carbonate platforms can be applied to the ancient rock record: Similarities between Modern Alacranes Reef and Upper Palaeozoic platforms of the Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkis, Sam; Casini, Giulio; Hunt, Dave; Colpaert, Arnout

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, considerable research has been undertaken in order to gain a better quantitative understanding of morphometric patterns within modern carbonate depositional systems. The industrial application of the scaling/juxtaposition relationships derived from the Modern to subsurface Cenozoic carbonate reservoirs appears relatively straightforward, given that many key biota are common to both. However, the direct application of Modern sedimentary insight further back into the geologic rock record is more controversial, given the enormous changes in the biota, climate, sea level, water chemistry and so on, that have taken place. To justify such an approach, we contend that similar morphometric patterns should be observed in both the Modern and ancient data. In the Norwegian Barents Sea, numerous seismic surveys have imaged Upper Palaeozoic carbonate buildups arranged in polygonal networks, or reticular patterns. These patterns are observed in both warm water photozoan and cool water heterozoan carbonate stratigraphies, and are developed atop platforms founded on stable shelves, in tectonically active settings and platforms developed over basinal evaporites. GIS mapping of multiple seismic horizons allows the Palaeozoic reticulated morphology to be numerically compared to that mapped in Alacranes Reef from QuickBird satellite imagery. QuickBird's metre-scale resolution allows identification of subtle cross-platform trends, such as windward-leeward differences in the packing density of ridge-and-pond complexes, which can be correlated with the kilometre-scale patterning extracted in the Barents subsurface. Despite different controls and architecture, the patterning of reticular networks is statistically inseparable between the two systems, once the metre-scale Modern dataset is down-sampled to seismic resolution. Whilst other controls cannot unequivocally be ruled out, these results suggest that biotic self-organisation is a fundamental driver of sedimentary

  9. The Formation of Carbonate Minerals and the Mobility of Heavy Metals during Water-CO2-Mafic Rock Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Jonas

    are consistent with values of controlled laboratory experiments from the literature for Ba, Cd, Co, Cu, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Sr and Zn. The calcium carbonates also scavenge other elements, including rare earth elements (REE) and the toxic metals As and Pb. This and the next study can be considered natural analogues...... for 74 elements. The effluent was alkaline and high release rates of mainly S, Na, Ca, Mg, F and Cl were observed during the first 10 minutes. After 12 hours, the most abundant element released was Si. Secondary phases of Al and Fe precipitated on the ash surfaces and these were suspected of scavenging...... to the carbonate precipitation in CarbFix project. In the third study, water and solid samples from two alkaline springs in Oman were examined. The elements detected in the spring waters in order of abundance were Na, Cl, Ca, Mg, SO4, K, Br, Si, F, B, Sr, Al, Fe, Mo, Zn, Ni, Cu, Mn, V, Ba, Cr, Co, Ti, Hg and Pb...

  10. ASSESSMENT OF CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF ULTRAMAFIC ROCKS IN CHINA%中国超基性岩封存CO2的潜力研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盛雪芬; 季峻峰; 陈骏

    2011-01-01

    大气CO浓度上升引起的气候效应正受到国际社会的高度关注.超基性岩石与CO反应可生成稳定的碳酸盐矿物而永久性地固定CO,有效地降低人类活动排放到大气中CO浓度,从而缓解日趋严重的温室效应带来的全球气候恶化.根据各省记载的超基性岩体的岩石学、地球化学资料,按照公式:T=1/3·a·t·r·d·(1-φ)计算,对各省市自治区的CO封存量进行了详细统计和评估.计算表明,中国超基性岩封存CO的潜力巨大,总封存量可达13.02×10CO,约为2008年全国CO总排放量的1887倍.其中超过11.55×10t CO的封存量(占全国总量的89%)在西藏和新疆地区,其他地区占全国的11%,总量达到1.46x10tCO,相当于2008年全国总排放量的212倍,因此具有较高的碳封存潜力.由于各省工业产业结构分布的不均匀导致CO排放量有着很大的差异,因此利用超基性岩封存CO的潜力相差悬殊.东南沿海和华南地区等经济发达地区相对封存储量较少,应考虑其他方式来封存.%The global is facing a major challenge due to anthropogenic CO2 emission from the utilization of fossil fuels.Ultra-mafic rock storage is potential to reduce the atmospheric CO2 ,with high reactivity to form carbonates leading to a very stable sequestration, eventually to relief the increasingly dangerous global warming originating from the greenhouse effect.After the statistics on the data of petrology and geochemistry of the ultra-mafic rocks recorded in the regional geology of 27 provinces in China,we used the equation: T= 1/3 · a · t · r · d · (1-φ)( T is the potential CO2 storage capacity sequestrating in the ultra-mafic rocks; a is the area of the ultra-mafic rock outcrops; t is the estimated depth of the ultra-mafic rocks; r is how much CO2 can be consumed by 1 t peridotite or 1 t serpentine,which is 0. 63 t and 0. 46 t respectively; d is the densities of the ultra-mafic rocks, peridotite is 3.4g/mi3 and serpentine is

  11. The role of fluid pressure in induced vs. triggered seismicity: insights from rock deformation experiments on carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuderi, Marco M.; Collettini, Cristiano

    2016-04-01

    Fluid overpressure is one of the primary mechanisms for tectonic fault slip, because fluids lubricate the fault and fluid pressure reduces the effective normal stress that holds the fault in place. However, current models of earthquake nucleation, based on rate- and state- friction laws, imply that stable sliding is favoured by the increase of pore fluid pressure. Despite this controversy, currently, there are only a few studies on the role of fluid pressure under controlled, laboratory conditions. Here, we use laboratory experiments, to show that the rate- and state- friction parameters do change with increasing fluid pressure. We tested carbonate gouges from sub hydrostatic to near lithostatic fluid pressure conditions, and show that the friction rate parameter (a ‑ b) evolves from velocity strengthening to velocity neutral behaviour. Furthermore, the critical slip distance, Dc, decreases from about 90 to 10 μm. Our data suggest that fluid overpressure plays an important role in controlling the mode of fault slip. Since fault rheology and fault stability parameters change with fluid pressure, we suggest that a comprehensive characterization of these parameters is fundamental for better assessing the role of fluid pressure in natural and human induced earthquakes.

  12. The role of fluid pressure in induced vs. triggered seismicity: insights from rock deformation experiments on carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuderi, Marco M.; Collettini, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    Fluid overpressure is one of the primary mechanisms for tectonic fault slip, because fluids lubricate the fault and fluid pressure reduces the effective normal stress that holds the fault in place. However, current models of earthquake nucleation, based on rate- and state- friction laws, imply that stable sliding is favoured by the increase of pore fluid pressure. Despite this controversy, currently, there are only a few studies on the role of fluid pressure under controlled, laboratory conditions. Here, we use laboratory experiments, to show that the rate- and state- friction parameters do change with increasing fluid pressure. We tested carbonate gouges from sub hydrostatic to near lithostatic fluid pressure conditions, and show that the friction rate parameter (a − b) evolves from velocity strengthening to velocity neutral behaviour. Furthermore, the critical slip distance, Dc, decreases from about 90 to 10 μm. Our data suggest that fluid overpressure plays an important role in controlling the mode of fault slip. Since fault rheology and fault stability parameters change with fluid pressure, we suggest that a comprehensive characterization of these parameters is fundamental for better assessing the role of fluid pressure in natural and human induced earthquakes. PMID:27112408

  13. Water Resources of the Basin and Range Carbonate-Rock Aquifer System, White Pine County, Nevada, and Adjacent Areas in Nevada and Utah - Draft Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Alan H.; Bright, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    Summary of Major Findings This report summarizes results of a water-resources study for White Pine County, Nevada, and adjacent areas in east-central Nevada and western Utah. The Basin and Range carbonate-rock aquifer system (BARCAS) study was initiated in December 2004 through Federal legislation (Section 131 of the Lincoln County Conservation, Recreation, and Development Act of 2004) directing the Secretary of the Interior to complete a water-resources study through the U.S. Geological Survey, Desert Research Institute, and State of Utah. The study was designed as a regional water-resource assessment, with particular emphasis on summarizing the hydrogeologic framework and hydrologic processes that influence ground-water resources. The study area includes 13 hydrographic areas that cover most of White Pine County; in this report however, results for the northern and central parts of Little Smoky Valley were combined and presented as one hydrographic area. Hydrographic areas are the basic geographic units used by the State of Nevada and Utah and local agencies for water-resource planning and management, and are commonly defined on the basis of surface-water drainage areas. Hydrographic areas were further divided into subbasins that are separated by areas where bedrock is at or near the land surface. Subbasins represent subdivisions used in this study for estimating recharge, discharge, and water budget. Hydrographic areas represent the subdivision used for reporting summed and tabulated subbasin estimates.

  14. Water Resources of the Basin and Range Carbonate-Rock Aquifer System, White Pine County, Nevada, and Adjacent Areas in Nevada and Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Alan H.; Bright, Daniel J.; Knochenmus, Lari A.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This report summarizes results of a water-resources study for White Pine County, Nevada, and adjacent areas in east-central Nevada and western Utah. The Basin and Range carbonate-rock aquifer system (BARCAS) study was initiated in December 2004 through Federal legislation (Section 301(e) of the Lincoln County Conservation, Recreation, and Development Act of 2004; PL108-424) directing the Secretary of the Interior to complete a water-resources study through the U.S. Geological Survey, Desert Research Institute, and State of Utah. The study was designed as a regional water-resource assessment, with particular emphasis on summarizing the hydrogeologic framework and hydrologic processes that influence ground-water resources. The study area includes 13 hydrographic areas that cover most of White Pine County; in this report however, results for the northern and central parts of Little Smoky Valley were combined and presented as one hydrographic area. Hydrographic areas are the basic geographic units used by the State of Nevada and Utah and local agencies for water-resource planning and management, and are commonly defined on the basis of surface-water drainage areas. Hydrographic areas were further divided into subbasins that are separated by areas where bedrock is at or near the land surface. Subbasins are the subdivisions used in this study for estimating recharge, discharge, and water budget. Hydrographic areas are the subdivision used for reporting summed and tabulated subbasin estimates.

  15. Groundwater in granitic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of published chemical analyses of ground waters found in granitic rocks from a variety of locations shows that their compositions fall into two distinct classes. Ground waters from shallow wells and springs have a high bicarbonate/chloride ratio resulting from the neutralization of carbonic acid (dissolved CO2) by weathering reactions. The sodium, potassium, and silica released by weathering reactions drive the solutions away from equilibrium with the dominant minerals in the granites (i.e., quartz, muscovite, potassium feldspar, and albite). On the other hand, ground waters from deep wells and excavations are rich in chloride relative to bicarbonate. Their Na, K, H, and silica activities indicate that they are nearly equilibrated with the granite minerals suggesting a very long residence time in the host rock. These observations furnish the basis for a powerful tool to aid in selecting sites for radioactive waste disposal in granitic rocks. When water-bearing fractures are encountered in these rocks, a chemical analysis of the solutions contained within the fracture can determine whether the water came from the surface, i.e., is bicarbonate rich and not equilibrated, or whether it is some sort of connate water that has resided in the rock for a long period, i.e., chloride rich and equilibrated. This technique should allow immediate recognition of fracture systems in granitic radioactive waste repositories that would allow radionuclides to escape to the surface

  16. Critical elements in sediment-hosted deposits (clastic-dominated Zn-Pb-Ag, Mississippi Valley-type Zn-Pb, sedimentary rock-hosted Stratiform Cu, and carbonate-hosted Polymetallic Deposits): A review: Chapter 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Erin; Hitzman, Murray W.; Leach, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Some sediment-hosted base metal deposits, specifically the clastic-dominated (CD) Zn-Pb deposits, carbonate-hosted Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposits, sedimentary-rock hosted stratiform copper deposits, and carbonate-hosted polymetallic (“Kipushi type”) deposits, are or have been important sources of critical elements including Co, Ga, Ge, and Re. The generally poor data concerning trace element concentrations in these types of sediment-hosted ores suggest that there may be economically important concentrations of critical elements yet to be recognized.

  17. Effects of trace gas components in carbon capture and storage: geochemical experiments and simulation of laboratory-scale brine-rock-CO2-trace gas interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Susanne; Nowak, Thomas; Heeschen, Katja; Riße, Andreas; Ostertag-Henning, Christian

    2010-05-01

    In the research activities on geological storage of carbon dioxide many studies mainly focus on the impact of pure CO2 gas on the storage formations. However, flue gas streams of power plants not only contain CO2, but also number of trace gases such as O2, N2, Ar, NOX, SOX, CO, H2, H2S, COS and CH4. These trace gases may not only interact with pipeline material, but can also trigger short-term and long-term changes within the subsurface storage lithology. The chemical reactivity of each of these compounds has to be evaluated and their interactions with each other have to be understood, especially since some of them are far more reactive than CO2. Within the project COORAL (= CO2 Purity for Capture and Storage) we concentrate on geochemical investigations to determine reaction pathways and kinetics of different mineral phases typical for potential German storage formations as influenced by the presence of trace gases within the flue gas stream. Quantitative measurements of these reactions are relatively well described for pure CO2 systems but are so far not well described for multi-component mixtures. We combine laboratory experiments (batch and flow-through) with numerical simulations applying the geochemical simulators PHREEQC and ChemApp, which will be coupled to GeoSys/RockFlow for coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) process simulations. Calculations and experiments are performed for temperatures up to 200°C and pressures up to 50 MPa. The aim of the study is to determine optimal maximum concentration levels of trace gases in flue gas streams to be used in geological CO2 storage.

  18. 关于碳酸盐岩生油潜力的研究%Research on genetic potential of the carbonate rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢青; 江宽; 耿进卫

    2012-01-01

    碳酸盐岩有着良好的沉积环境,丰富而质优的有机质来源,作为其有机质丰度指标的有机碳含量(TOC)和氯仿沥青“A”含量相对较低,同时由于碳酸盐岩内不合或含有很少的粘土物质,所以粘土物质的催化作用对其大量生烃不起作用,因而只有碳酸盐岩埋藏足够深才能达到生烃的温度.本文就沉积环境、有机质来源、类型、衡量指标、促使有机质生烃作用等碳酸盐岩的生油条件探讨了碳酸盐岩的生油潜力.%Being relative to the types of the argillaceous rock, carbonatite has special oil and gas source conditions, such as good sedimentary environment, rich and high organic sources, abundance indexes of the organic matter of it; organic carbon content (TOC) and chloroform bitumen "A" content are relatively lower. And because the carbonatite does not contain or contains a spot of clay material , so the catalysis of clay material doesn' t work for lots of hydrocarbon generation, thus only carbonatite is buried deeply enough to moderate temperature to generate hydrocarbon. The oil source potentiality was discussed from the oil generating condition including sedimentary environment, source and type of organic material, evaluating index and prompting function of organic hydrocarbon generation.

  19. Vulnerability of shallow ground water and drinking-water wells to nitrate in the United States: Model of predicted nitrate concentration in U.S. ground water used for drinking (simulation depth 50 meters) -- Input data set for sandstone and carbonate rocks (gwava-dw_sscb)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set represents the presence or absence of sandstone and carbonate rock aquifers in the conterminous United States. The data set was used as an input data...

  20. 鄂尔多斯奥陶系碳酸盐岩碳氧同位素特征及其意义%Characteristics of carbon and oxygen isotopes of the Ordovician carbonate rocks in Ordos and their implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈强; 张慧元; 李文厚; 郝松立; 刘卓

    2012-01-01

    鄂尔多斯古生代海相地层沉积厚度巨大.鄂尔多斯奥陶系碳酸盐岩的碳氧同位素组成受后期成岩作用影响较小,基本保留了原始海洋的同位素组成:δ13C值分布于-7.30‰~2.26‰之间,均值-0.30‰;δ18O值分布于-13.14‰~-1.94‰之间,均值-6.38‰,碳氧同位素组成与全球基本一致.区域上,鄂尔多斯西缘具有相对较高的δ13C值,南缘次之,而东缘最低.纵向上,碳同位素组成逐渐增重,并在中晚奥陶世发生明显的正向偏移,δ13C均值由马家沟组的-0.36‰增加到平凉组的0.15‰,至背锅山组增加至0.68‰.碳同位素的区域分布差异表明鄂尔多斯西缘水体相对较深,南缘次之,东缘相对较浅,由早奥陶世至晚奥陶世水体逐渐加深,碳同位素组成反映的海平面变化趋势与沉积相演化一致.鄂尔多斯西南缘中晚奥陶世碳同位素组成的正向偏移,标志着较高的生产力和有机碳埋藏率,具有重要的石油地质学意义,西南缘的平凉组/乌拉力克组和背锅山组是下古生界最重要和有效的烃源岩层.%The Ordos has gigantically thick Paleozoic marine strata. The carbon and oxygen isotopes of the Ordovician carbonate rocks in the Ordos are less modified by post-depositional diagenesis, and thus provide helpful insights into the original ocean. The δ13C values of the Ordovician carbonate rocks in the Ordos range from - 7. 30‰ to 2. 26‰ with a mean value of - 0. 30‰ and the δ18O varies between -13. 14‰ and -1.94‰, averaging at -6. 38‰, which indicate the carbon and oxygen isotopes of the Ordovician in the Ordos are comparable to those of the global Ordovician. Spatially, the δ13C shows a decreasing trend, indicating shoaling in water-depth from the western margin of the Ordos, to the southern margin and then to the eastern margin. Temporally, the S C gradually increases, showing that sea level rose from the Early to the Late Ordovician, with a significant

  1. Rock Paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Julienne Edwards

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the integration of art and academics in a fifth-grade instructional unit on Native American culture. Describes how students studied Native American pictographs, designed their own pictographs, made their own tools, and created rock paintings of their pictographs using these tools. Provides a list of references on Native American…

  2. Intellektuaalne rock

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Briti laulja-helilooja ja näitleja Toyah Willcox ning Bill Rieflin ansamblist R.E.M. ja Pat Mastelotto King Krimsonist esinevad koos ansamblitega The Humans ja Tuner 25. okt. Tallinnas Rock Cafés ja 27. okt Tartu Jaani kirikus

  3. Using HySpex SWIR-320m hyperspectral data for the identification and mapping of minerals in hand specimens of carbonate rocks from the Ankloute Formation (Agadir Basin, Western Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baissa, Rachid; Labbassi, Kamal; Launeau, Patrick; Gaudin, Anne; Ouajhain, Brahim

    2011-08-01

    Nowadays the development of sensors for acquiring hyperspectral images has contributed greatly to the identification of different constituents of the earth's surface and therefore to the improvement of cartographic products. Carbonate rocks are often altered by physical and chemical processes. The natural tendency in most carbonate sediments is that primary porosity is substantially reduced by cementation and compaction during post-depositional. For example the subaerial meteoric diagenetic (freshwater) was promoted as a means of explaining porosity evolution in carbonates. These processes lead to the formation of new carbonate minerals with highly variable phase crystallization. Frequently, with the optical microscope, the precise identification and discrimination of these phases are beyond the resolving power of the eye, which makes mapping mineralogical microfacies difficult. It requires, first, the use of staining techniques. This work proposes to study hand specimens of the carbonate facies of Jurassic age in the Agadir Basin, using hyperspectral imagery provided by the camera HySpex SWIR-320m, at wavelengths ranging from 1300 to 2500 nm. These images offer the possibility to identify with precision the different carbonate minerals and to allow diagenetic facies characterization. The approach is to calculate an index of carbonate, called the Normalized Difference Carbonate Index or NDCI, to study the deepening of the main absorption band of carbonates and a supervised classification method based on the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) to study the overall shape of reflection spectra of carbonates and to map other accessory minerals. This method has allowed the development of mineralogical maps supplemented by their degrees of diagenesis.

  4. Rock stresses (Grimsel rock laboratory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the research and development project 'Rock Stress Measurements' the BGR has developed and tested several test devices and methods at GTS for use in boreholes at a depth of 200 m and has carried out rock mechanical and engineering geological investigations for the evaluation and interpretation of the stress measurements. The first time a computer for data processing was installed in the borehole together with the BGR-probe. Laboratory tests on hollow cylinders were made to study the stress-deformation behavior. To validate and to interprete the measurement results some test methods were modelled using the finite-element method. The dilatometer-tests yielded high values of Young's modulus, whereas laboratory tests showed lower values with a distinct deformation anisotropy. Stress measurements with the BGR-probe yielded horizontal stresses being higher than the theoretical overburden pressure and vertical stresses which agree well with the theoretical overburden pressure. These results are comparable to the results of the hydraulic fracturing tests, whereas stresses obtained with CSIR-triaxial cells are generally lower. The detailed geological mapping of the borehole indicated relationships between stress and geology. With regard to borehole depth different zones of rock structure joint frequency, joint orientation, and orientation of microfissures as well as stress magnitude, stress direction, and degree of deformation anisotropy could be distinguished. (orig./HP)

  5. High-temperature carbidization of carboniferous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, B. A.; Grass, V. E.; Nadutkin, A. V.; Nazarova, L. Yu.

    2009-08-01

    Processes of thermal metamorphism of carboniferous rocks have been studied experimentally. The conditions of high-temperature interaction of shungite carbon with components of the contained rocks, leading to formation of carbide compounds, have been determined. The results of this investigation contribute to the works on searching for new raw material for prospective material production.

  6. Analysis of organic acid salts of marine carbonate rocks in Tarim Basin%塔里木盆地海相碳酸盐岩中有机酸盐的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙敏卓; 孟仟祥; 郑建京; 王国仓; 房嬛; 王作栋

    2013-01-01

    提出热重/差热(TG/DTA)、红外光谱(IR)和气相色谱/质谱联用结合(GC/MS)分析塔里木盆地海相碳酸盐岩中有机酸盐的方法.用TG/DTA对标样(硬脂酸、硬脂酸镁、硬脂酸钙和碳酸钙)进行分析,确定有机酸气化而有机酸盐不气化的温度区间,由此设计从碳酸盐岩中分离和提取有机酸盐的实验步骤.研究结果表明:验证碳酸盐岩中确实存在有机酸盐;塔里木盆地海相碳酸盐岩中有机酸盐的含量与样品中的碳酸盐含量无相关性,而与样品的沉积相类型具有一定的相关性,即斜坡相沉积环境的沉积岩中相对富集有机酸盐.%A method was developed for the determination of the organic acid salts of marine carbonate rocks in Tarim Basin by the thermogravimetric/differential thermal (TG/DTA), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS).By analyzing the guide sample such as the stearic acid, the magnesium stearate, the calcium stearate and the calcium carbonate by TG/DTA, the temperature range where the organic acid was gasificated while the organic acid salt wasn't gasificated were defined, and thereby the experimental procedures for separating and extracting the organic acid salt from the carbonatite rock was designed.The results show that the organic acid salt exists in carbonatite rock by using the infrared spectroscopy and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The quantity of the organic acid salts of marine carbonate rocks in Tarim Basin is insignificantly correlated with the carbonate content of samples, but it is correlated with the types of sedimentary facies of samples, namely relative enrichment of the organic acid salts in sedimentary strata of the slope facies sedimentary environment.

  7. Discussion on Acidic Mining Drainage Production and Prevention in Carbonate Rock Area%碳酸盐岩地区矿山酸性排水的产生及其防治初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗远红; 雷良奇; 常耀辉; 马于涛

    2011-01-01

    The sulphide in tailings produces acidic mining drainage(AMD) after a series of physical and chemical reactions with air,water,microorganisms.People once have considered that the tailings in carbonate rock areas will not cause acid pollutions because the carbonate minerals in tailings and surrounding rocks have neutralization effect.But there are serious acid pollutions in typical carbonate rock areas like Dachang of Guangxi province,Fankou and Dabaoshan of Guangdong province,Niujiaotang of Guizhou province,etc.The main cause is that in the process of carbonate mineral neutralization,the secondary minerals precipitate and adhere to the surface of carbonate minerals and stop further response,so the actual neutralization dose can not meet the theoretical value.Acidic mining drainage carries large amounts of metal ions which could bring serious damage to ecological environment and mine engineering facilities in carbonate rock areas.According to the characteristics of tailings in carbonate rock areas,the most efficient method for acidification of tailings is to adopt covering method for new tailings and permeable reactive barriers for acidified tailings.%尾矿中的硫化物在空气、水、微生物等的作用下,发生一系列的物理化学反应,形成矿山酸性排水(AMD)。在碳酸盐岩地区,由于尾矿和围岩中都含有大量对酸具有中和效应的碳酸盐矿物,于是人们一直认为碳酸盐岩地区的尾矿不存在酸污染。而如广西大厂、广东凡口及大宝山、贵州牛角塘等碳酸盐岩地区矿山的尾矿却存在着严重的酸污染,其主要原因是碳酸盐矿物在中和酸水过程中,表面会形成阻止反应进一步进行的次生包壳,碳酸盐矿物的实际中和量达不到其理论值。矿山酸性排水携带大量的重金属离子,对碳酸盐岩地区的生态环境及矿山工程设施带来严重的危害。针对碳酸盐岩地区尾矿自身的特殊性,对新建尾矿堆采用覆盖

  8. 上扬子地区早三叠世异常碳酸盐岩的分类与特征%Classification and characters of the Early Triassic anomalous carbonate rocks in Upper Yangtze Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    时志强; 安红艳; 伊海生; 张华; 曾德勇

    2011-01-01

    The anomalous carbonates of the late period of Late Permian and Early Triassic in the Upper Yangtze Area can be divided into three main types by genesis: A—biogenic anomalous carbonate rocks, B—abiogenetic (chemical and hydrodynamic ) anomalous carbonate rocks, C—multi-genetic anomalous carbonate rocks. Eight specific sorts of the anomalous carbonate rocks can be further distinguished, including microbiolite, brecciform limestone, flat-pebble limestone, ribbon limestone, thinbedded or laminated argillaceous limestone, oolitic limestone and 2 kinds of vermiculate limestone ( Type a and Type b). The extreme palaeoceanic environment and paleoclimatic conditions are the basis of the development of the anomalous carbonate rocks (mainly anachronistic facies) around P/T boundary. After the P/T mass extinction, the destruction of benthonic animals living on the surface of marine sediments was nearly stopped and the ocean currents were almost stagnated, meanwhile the surface layer of the sea water suffered the disturbing of megamonsoon and cyclonic storms, the algo-fungus ecosystem of euphoriczone grew and formed the wave-resistance microbiolites on the biohermal facies or on the shallow water carbonate platform. Seafloor was often affected by frequent storms which tear up the unconsolidated syngenetic carbonate ooze and thus the syngenetic pebble formed. At the same time, the particular gradient of the paleotopography intensified the development of carbonate gravity flows which might also be triggered by the storms; moreover the calcium carbonate-supersaturated sea water allowed the carbonate directly precipitating in the forms of chemical precipitation on the seafloor and the clays brought by the megamonsoon deposited together with the carbonate chemical precipitation. All the mentioned process happened at the earliest Early Triassic specific palaeoenvironment, which resulted in the appearance of the diverse anomalous carbonate deposition in the Upper Yangzte Area

  9. CERN Rocks

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The 15th CERN Hardronic Festival took place on 17 July on the terrace of Rest 3 (Prévessin). Over 1000 people, from CERN and other International Organizations, came to enjoy the warm summer night, and to watch the best of the World's High Energy music. Jazz, rock, pop, country, metal, blues, funk and punk blasted out from 9 bands from the CERN Musiclub and Jazz club, alternating on two stages in a non-stop show.  The night reached its hottest point when The Canettes Blues Band got everybody dancing to sixties R&B tunes (pictured). Meanwhile, the bars and food vans were working at full capacity, under the expert management of the CERN Softball club, who were at the same time running a Softball tournament in the adjacent "Higgs Field". The Hardronic Festival is the main yearly CERN music event, and it is organized with the support of the Staff Association and the CERN Administration.

  10. 热水解-催化分光光度法测定海相碳酸盐岩中的溴%Determination of Bromine in Marine Carbonate Rocks by Using Pyrohydrolysis-Catalytic Spectrophotometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武丽平; 袁红战; 祝云军

    2013-01-01

    目前衡量古海洋生产力的指标都存在一定的局限性,本文提出将溴元素作为研究古海洋生产力的新指标,建立了海相碳酸盐岩的分解方法以及其中溴元素的测定方法,即热水解-分光光度法.采用热水解方法对海相碳酸盐岩样品进行分解,吸收液充分吸收其释放出的溴,分光光度法检测样品中溴元素的含量.试验确定了热水解的最佳条件和分光光度检测的最佳波长,实际样品加标回收率为97.5% ~ 101.6%,相对标准偏差为1.2%~3.6%(n=10).本方法的样品分解时间较短,能很好地实现溴与基体组分分离,且所需仪器均为比较常见的仪器,操作简单,成本低廉,适合于海相碳酸盐岩样品的批量分解和元素测定.%It is very important to research the primary productive forces of the ancient sea in order to attempt to find a solution for the current energy and climate problems. At present, all of the proxies to estimate the primary productive forces of the sea have certain limitations. In this paper, a new proxy of Br is introduced and the description of establishing a new method for Pyrohydrolysis-Catalytic Spectrophotometry to digest marine carbonate rock and determine Br. The Permian marine carbonate rocks were decomposed by pyrohydrolysis, the Br was trapped by NaOH solution (0. 1%) and measured by Catalytic Spectrophotometry. The optimal experimental conditions for pyrohydrolysis and the optimal wave length for Catalytic Spectrophotometry are described. The recovery rates were in the range of 97. 5% -101.6% with RSD ( n = 10 ) from 1.2% to 3. 6% . This experimental technique is highly suitable for marine carbonate rock samples due to its use of commonly available equipment, simple operation, short operational process and low cost.

  11. Carbon-dioxide storage in the subsurface: towards an understanding of crack development in the cap-rock including phase transition processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häberle, K.; Ehlers, W.

    2012-04-01

    Supercritical CO2 can be injected into deep saline aquifers to reduce the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere and thus, lessen the impact on the global warming. Qualified reservoirs should be in a sufficient depth to guarantee the thermodynamical environment for the supercritical state of CO2. Furthermore, an impermeable cap-rock layer must confine the reservoir layer, in order to collect the CO2 in the desired region. In CO2 storage it is crucial to guarantee the safety of the storage site and to eliminate possibilities of leakage. Therefore, deformation processes of the rock matrix and the cap-rock layer, which might be induced by the high pressure injection of CO2, must be investigated. The increase in stress may also cause crack development in the cap-rock layer. These could either be new developing fractures or the break-up of already existing but cemented cracks or faults. If such cracks occur, CO2 could migrate to shallower regions where the temperature and pressure cannot support the supercritical condition of the CO2 anymore. Thus, it is important to describe the phase transition process between supercritical, liquid and gaseous CO2. This requires a proper understanding of the thermodynamical behaviour of CO2 within the reservoir. The Theory of Porous Media (TPM) provides a useful continuum-mechanical basis to describe real natural systems in a thermodynamically consistent way. Hence, the TPM is applied to model multiphasic flow of CO2 and water and include elasto-plastic solid deformations of the porous matrix. The Peng-Robinson equation is implemented as a cubic equation of state to describe the phase behaviour of CO2 in the liquid, gaseous and supercritical region. However, in the two-phase region the isotherms show a horizontal section and kinks at the boiling and vapour curve. This cannot be represented by a continuously differentiable function such as the Peng-Robinson equation. To circumvent this problem, the Antoine equation provides additional

  12. Fractures network analysis and interpretation in carbonate rocks using a multi-criteria statistical approach. Case study of Jebal Chamsi and Jebal Belkhir, South-western part of Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msaddek, Mohamed Haythem; Moumni, Yahya; Chenini, Ismail; Mercier, Eric; Dlala, Mahmoud

    2016-11-01

    The quantitative analysis of fractures in carbonate rocks across termination folds is important for the understanding of the fractures network distribution and arrangement. In this study, we performed a quantitative analysis and interpretation of fracture network to identify the fracture networks type. For this reason, we used a multi-criteria statistical analysis. The distribution of directional families in all measured stations and their elemental distribution are firstly examined. Then we performed the analysis of directional criteria for each of the two and three neighbouring stations. Finally, the elemental analyses of fracture families crossing others were carried out. This methodology was applied to the folds of Jebal Chamsi and Jebal Belkhir areas located in south western Tunisia characterized by simple folds of carbonate geological formations. The application of the global and the elemental statistical analysis criteria of directional families show a random arrangement of fractures. However, elemental analysis of two and three neighbouring stations for families crossing one another shows a pseudo-organization of fracture arrangements.

  13. Characterisation of carbonate rocks from near-surface cross-hole and reflection GPR investigations - A case study from southeast Zealand, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars; Looms, Majken Caroline; Hansen, Thomas Mejer;

    Carbonates found in the near-surface of southeast Zealand, eastern Denmark, are analogous to deposits serving as groundwater and hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Danish region. The study site is located in the Boesdal limestone quarry. A 20 by 20 m area of the bottom of the quarry was levelled using...... a bulldozer, and a grid of 100 MHz and 250 Mhz reflection profiles were collected to facilitate geological interpretation of structures in the uppermost part of the subsurface. Secondly, four 15 m deep boreholes were drilled in a square geometry with side lengths of 5 m. Core material was recovered from...... to facilitate deeper imaging of the carbonates. The section studied with the cross-hole data is water-saturated. Simple 1D modelling of the cross-hole data indicates a strong drop in GPR velocity at 7 to 8 m depth. Different 2D inversion strategies are tested for fine scale resolution of the inter...

  14. Rock formation characterization for CO2-EOR and carbon geosequestration; 3D seismic amplitude and coherency anomalies, Wellington Field, Kansas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, D.; Raef, A.; Watnef, L.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a workflow for a Mississipian carbonates characterization case-study integrating post-stack seismic attributes, well-logs porosities, and seismic modeling to explore relating changes in small-scale "lithofacies" properties and/or sub-seismic resolution faulting to key amplitude and coherency 3D seismic attributes. The main objective of this study is to put emphasis on reservoir characterization that is both optimized for and subsequently benefiting from pilot tertiary CO2-EOR in preparation for future carbon geosequestration in a depleting reservoir and a deep saline aquifer. The extracted 3D seismic coherency attribute indicated anomalous features that can be interpreted as a lithofacies change or a sub-seismic resolution faulting. A 2D finite difference modeling has been undertaken to understand and potentially build discriminant attributes to map structural and/or lithofacies anomalies of interest especially when embarking upon CO2-EOR and/or carbon sequestration monitoring and management projects. ?? 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  15. Evaluating the seismic risk of mineral carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-04-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration, in which carbon is captured and stored underground, has been proposed as one way to mitigate the climatic effects of carbon dioxide emissions. One method of geologic carbon sequestration is to inject carbon dioxide in aqueous solution into rocks. However, as the solution fills the pore space in the rocks, the fluid pressure on the rocks increases, potentially increasing the risk of earthquakes. Another option would be to inject carbon dioxide solutions into mafic rocks; the silicate minerals in these rocks react with the carbon dioxide, leaving solid carbonate reaction products, which decrease the amount of pore fluid.

  16. Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

  17. Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

    2003-11-15

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

  18. Determination of chlorine in silicate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, L.C.

    1959-01-01

    In a rapid accurate method for the determination of chlorine in silicate rocks, the rock powder is sintered with a sodium carbonate flux containing zinc oxide and magnesium carbonate. The sinter cake is leached with water, the resulting solution is filtered, and the filtrate is acidified with nitric acid. Chlorine is determined by titrating this solution with mercuric nitrate solution using sodium nitroprusside as the indicator. The titration is made in the dark with a beam of light shining through the solution. The end point of the titration is found by visually comparing the intensity of this beam of light with that of a similar beam of light in a reference solution.

  19. Rock Plasticity from Microtomography and Upscaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Liu; Reem Freij-Ayoub; Klaus Regenauer-Lieb

    2015-01-01

    We present a workflow for upscaling of rock properties using microtomography and percolation theory. In this paper we focus on a pilot study for assessing the plastic strength of rocks from a digital rock image. Firstly, we determine the size of mechanical representative volume ele-ment (RVE) by using upper/lower bound dissipation computations in accordance with thermody-namics. Then the mechanical RVE is used to simulate the rock failure at micro-scale using FEM. Two cases of different pressures of linear Drucker-Prager plasticity of rocks are computed to com-pute the macroscopic cohesion and the angle of internal friction of the rock. We also detect the criti-cal exponents of yield stress for scaling laws from a series of derivative models that are created by a shrinking/expanding algorithm. We use microtomographic data sets of two carbonate samples and compare the results with previous results. The results show that natural rock samples with irregular structures may have the critical exponent of yield stress different from random models. This unex-pected result could have significant ramifications for assessing the stability of solid materials with internal structure. Therefore our pilot study needs to be extended to investigate the scaling laws of strength of many more natural rocks with irregular microstructure.

  20. My Pet Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  1. The rock diet

    OpenAIRE

    Fordyce, Fiona; Johnson, Chris

    2002-01-01

    You may think there is little connection between rocks and our diet, indeed a serving of rocks may sound very unappetising! But rocks are a vital source of the essential elements and minerals we need to keep us healthy, such as calcium for healthy teeth and bones.

  2. The Formation and Distribution of the Marine Hydrocarbon Source Rock in the Tarim Basin, NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xiyuan; WANG Yi

    2008-01-01

    There are significant differences in type and distribution between marine source rock and continental source rock. According to the lithology, the Cambrian-Ordovician source rock in the Tarim basin is divided into two types: the carbonate source rock and the mud source rock. The two sets of source rocks are developed mainly in three sets of formations, Lower-Middle Cambrian carbonate source rock and mud source rock, Lower-Middle Ordovician mud source rock and Upper Ordovician lime mud source rock. The stratigraphic and areal distributions of the source rocks are controlled by the altitude and the sedimentary facies respectively. The mud source rock is developed in slope-semi deep sea environment. The source rock developed in the slope sedimentary environment is related with the anoxic environment and the one developed in semi deep sea has a close relationship with the up-flowing sea water. The carbonate source rock is developed mainly in platform slope of highstand systems tract and it is usually intimately associated with the salt rock. The Lower-Middle Cambrian carbonate source rock is developed mainly in the Bachu, Tazhong, Taugguzibasi and Yingmaili areas. The Lower-Middle Cambrian mud source rock is mainly developed in the areas east of the line of Kunan 1-Tadong 1. The Lower-Middle Ordovician mud source rock is developed mainly in the east slope of the Manjiaer depression. The carbonate source rock of Early Ordovician is developed mainly in the platform slope of highstand systems tract, such as the south margin of Tabei, the north slope of Tazhong, the Bachu area and Keping area.

  3. Micrometer scale carbon isotopic study of bitumen associated with Athabasca uranium deposits: Constraints on the genetic relationship with petroleum source-rocks and the abiogenic origin hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangély, L.; Chaussidon, M.; Michels, R.; Brouand, M.; Cuney, M.; Huault, V.; Landais, P.

    2007-06-01

    In situ analytical techniques - Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (μFTIR) and ion microprobe - have been used to unravel the origin of solid bitumen associated with the uranium deposits of Athabasca (Saskatchewan, Canada). Both aliphaticity and carbon isotopic compositions within the samples are heterogeneous but spatially organized in concentric zonations at the micrometer scale. Finally, the δ13C values are positively correlated to the aliphatic contents over an extremely large isotopic range from ˜ - 49‰ to ˜ - 31‰. We infer that this positive correlation may be related to the carbon isotopic fractionations associated with the synthesis of bitumen through the catalytic hydrogenation of CO 2, rather than the result of pre-existing petroleum product precipitation and/or alteration (such as radiolysis). This explanation is consistent with (i) published results of abiogenic synthesis experiments, in which the differences in δ13C values between saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons range from + 2 and + 19‰, in contrast to the differences systematically observed in conventional bitumen and petroleum ranging from 0‰ to - 4‰; (ii) the absence of a similar positive correlation between aliphatic contents and δ13C values in the other bitumen analyzed in the present study, for which a biogenic origin has been unequivocally established (samples from Oklo, Gabon, and Lodève, France, uranium deposits); (iii) the presence of CO 2 and H 2 in the gas-phase of fluid inclusions in the Athabasca uranium deposits, H 2 resulting from water radiolysis. The present results suggest that the δ13C vs. aliphaticity correlation could be used as a criterion to discriminate between abiogenic vs. biogenic origin of macromolecular organic matter.

  4. 湖相碳酸盐岩烃源岩有机显微组分分类及其岩石学特征——以酒西盆地为例%A petrographic classification of macerals in lacustrine carbonate source rocks and their organic petrological characteristics: A case study on Jiuxi basin, NW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂建琪; 陈建平; 张大江; 程克明; 陈建军; 杨智明

    2012-01-01

    酒西盆地主力烃源岩为下白垩统下沟组和赤金堡组暗色半深湖相-深湖相的白云质泥岩和泥质白云岩,是典型的湖相碳酸盐岩烃源岩.通过对酒西盆地下白垩统二百多块湖相碳酸盐岩烃源岩详细的有机岩石学研究,解剖了湖相碳酸盐岩烃源岩中有机质的赋存形式,揭示了藻纹层为有机质纹层的主要发育形式,其与富泥晶白云石纹层和富粘土纹层构成湖相碳酸盐岩烃源岩特有的“三元式纹层”沉积结构,系统总结了各显微组分的光性、成因、生烃性及分布规律,提出了以全岩和干酪根为基础的湖相碳酸盐岩有机显微组分分类方案,首次鉴定出对酒西盆地油气有贡献的主要生烃组分为腐泥无定形体、腐殖无定形体以及浮游藻类体、孢粉体、壳屑体五种有机显微组分.%The typical lacustrine carbonate source rocks include dark dolomitic mudstone and argillaceous dolomite of Chijinpu ami Xiagou formations of Lower Cretaceous, which represent major petroleum source rocks in Jiuxi basin, NW China. Over 200 samples were selected from Lower Cretaceous lacustrine carbonate source rocks in Jiuxi basin for a detailed organic petrology analysis. Organic laminae has been recognized which is mainly algal laminae and "three-layer" structure is unique for lacustrine carbonate source rocks, which consists of algal laminae, micrite dolomite laminae and clay laminae. A petrographic classification of macerals in lacustrine carbonate source rocks has been suggested on the basis of whole rock and kerogen analysis. The discussion has also been carried out on the origins, the optical properities, hydrocarbon generation potential and geological distribution of macerals in these lacustrine carbonate source rocks. Five major hydrocarbon-generating macerals contributed to petroleum resources are firstly identified which are sapropelic amorphogen, humic amorphogen, alginite, sporopollenite and

  5. Rock History and Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Éric

    2013-01-01

    Two ambitious works written by French-speaking scholars tackle rock music as a research object, from different but complementary perspectives. Both are a definite must-read for anyone interested in the contextualisation of rock music in western popular culture. In Une histoire musicale du rock (i.e. A Musical History of Rock), rock music is approached from the point of view of the people – musicians and industry – behind the music. Christophe Pirenne endeavours to examine that field from a m...

  6. Spectrophotometric determination of fluorine in silicate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, L.C.; Smith, V.C.

    1964-01-01

    The rock powder is sintered with a sodium carbonate flux containing zinc oxide and magnesium carbonate, the sinter-cake leached with water and the resulting solution filtered. Fluorine is separated from the acidified filtrate by steam distillation and determined spectrophotometrically by means of a zirconium-SPADNS reagent. If a multiple-unit distillation apparatus is used, 12 determinations can be completed per man-day. ?? 1964.

  7. Life Found Lurking under Arctic Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah Graham; 刘晓

    2004-01-01

    @@ The Arctic tundra② would not appear a welcoming environment for life. But a paper published today in the journal Nature suggests that polar deserts may house photosynthetic③ organisms in a very unlikely place--under rocks. The discovery of the photosynthetic cyanobacteria④ could potentially double estimates of the carbon sequestration⑤ potential in these extreme environments.

  8. Radiocarbon dating of ancient rock paintings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilger, W.A.; Hyman, M.; Rowe, M.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Southon, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-06-20

    This report presents progress made on a technique for {sup 14}C dating pictographs. A low-temperature oxygen plasma is used coupled with high-vacuum technologies to selectively remove C-containing material in the paints without contamination from inorganic carbon from rock substrates or accretions.

  9. Hungry for Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit hazard identification camera shows the rover's perspective just before its first post-egress drive on Mars. On Sunday, the 15th martian day, or sol, of Spirit's journey, engineers drove Spirit approximately 3 meters (10 feet) toward its first rock target, a football-sized, mountain-shaped rock called Adirondack (not pictured). In the foreground of this image are 'Sashimi' and 'Sushi' - two rocks that scientists considered investigating first. Ultimately, these rocks were not chosen because their rough and dusty surfaces are ill-suited for grinding.

  10. 塔里木盆地下古生界海相碳酸盐岩油气的特殊性%Particularities of Hydrocarbon in Lower Paleozoic Marine Carbonate Rocks in Tarim Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邬光辉; 刘虎; 石晓龙

    2014-01-01

    勘探开发资料的综合分析表明,塔里木盆地寒武系-奥陶系以石灰岩储层为主的碳酸盐岩油气藏复杂多样,不同于世界典型的中新生界海相碳酸盐岩。塔里木盆地下古生界碳酸盐岩在地质条件方面存在四大特性:(1)小克拉通多旋回构造运动,构造改造强烈;(2)烃源岩古老,海西晚期石油资源与喜马拉雅晚期天然气资源造成盆地富油也富气;(3)石灰岩为主的次生改造型储层非均质性极强;(4)埋深大,储盖组合较差。塔里木盆地海相碳酸盐岩油气藏具有四大特性:(1)以非构造油气藏为主;(2)经历多期油气充注与调整改造,流体性质复杂多变;(3)大面积、中低储量丰度的小型油气藏叠置连片;(4)油气水产出复杂,油气产量主要来自少量高效井。%Based on the comprehensive analysis of a great number of exploration and development data, it is shown that the Cambrian-Ordovician limestone-predominated carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs in Tarim Basin are quite multifarious and complicated and they are different from the typical Meso-Cenozoic carbonate reservoirs in the world. The Lower Paleozoic carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs present four particular features in geological conditions in this basin: 1) Multi-period tectonic movements in the small craton have brought about intensive structural reformations on hydrocarbon accumulation. 2) Contributing to the late Hercynian hydrocarbon charge and the late Himalayan gas enrichment, the basin is rich in both oil and gas resources on the basis of ancient Cambrian-Ordovician source rocks. 3) Most of limestone-predominated reservoirs with reformed secondary pores are of low matrix porosity and permeability and excessive heterogeneity. 4) Carbonate reservoirs are deep buried more than 5000m with poor reservoir-cap assemblages in the basin. The Lower Paleozoic reformed marine carbonate reservoirs in the

  11. Soft rocks in Argentina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giambastiani; Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Soft rocks are a still fairly unexplored chapter in rock mechanics. Within this category are the clastic sedimentary rocks and pyroclastic volcanic rocks, of low to moderate lithification (consolidation, cemen-tation, new formed minerals), chemical sedimentary rocks and metamorphic rocks formed by minerals with Mohs hardness less than 3.5, such as limestone, gypsum, halite, sylvite, between the first and phyllites, graphitic schist, chloritic shale, talc, etc., among the latter. They also include any type of rock that suffered alteration processes (hydrothermal or weathering). In Argentina the study of low-strength rocks has not received much attention despite having extensive outcrops in the Andes and great impact in the design criteria. Correlation between geomechanical properties (UCS, deformability) to physical index (porosity, density, etc.) has shown promising results to be better studied. There are many studies and engineering projects in Argentina in soft rock geological environments, some cited in the text (Chihuído dam, N. Kirchner dam, J. Cepernic Dam, etc.) and others such as International Tunnel in the Province of Mendoza (Corredor Bioceánico), which will require the valuable contribution from rock mechanics. The lack of consistency between some of the physical and mechanical parameters explored from studies in the country may be due to an insufficient amount of information and/or non-standardization of criteria for testing materials. It is understood that more and better academic and professional efforts in improv-ing techniques will result in benefits to the better understanding of the geomechanics of weak rocks.

  12. Catalytic decarboxylations of fatty acids in immature oil source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李哲; 张再龙; 孙燕华; 劳永新; 蔺五正; 吴卫芳

    2003-01-01

    Catalytic decarboxylations of fatty acids in immature oil source rock samples were examined in this study. The rock samples were obtained from seven oil fields in China. In order to clarify the effect of each mineral matter in the rock samples, both the Fe M?ssbauer effect and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to determine the relative content of each mineral in the rock samples, and the catalytic activities of several minerals like clays, carbonates and pyrite were determined. The Fe M?ssbauer effect and the XRD studies show that clays are the main mineral components in the rock samples except for the samples from Biyang and Jianghan in which the main mineral component is ankerite. The other mineral components include calcite, plagioclase, quartz, feldspar, siderite, aragonite, pyrite, analcime, pyroxene and anhydrite. The studies of the catalytic decarboxylations of fatty acids suggest that carbonates and pyrite can make much greater contributions to the catalytic activities of the rock samples than clays. It is found that the overall catalytic activities of the rock samples are well related to the relative contents and the catalytic activities of clays, carbonates and pyrite in the rock samples.

  13. Investigation of the porosity of rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods for characterizing the nature of rock porosity in conjunction with diffusion experiments, are amongst the primary tools used in repository-site selection investigations. At this time no experimental method, alone, is capable of giving an unambiguous picture of the narrow-aperture pore space in crystalline rock. Methods giving information on overall properties must be complemented by those having high spatial resolution; then the lateral distribution of porosity within the matrix and its association with particular mineral phases or features, such as microfissures, fissure fillings, weathered or altered mineral phases etc, and the identification of diffusion pathways in inhomogeneous rock matrices can be determined. Nonsorbing, nonelectrolytic tracers should be used when one wants to determine rock-typical properties of the internal porosity without interference of interactions with surfaces. Preliminary information on a new method fulfilling these criteria is given. Impregnating rock samples with methylmethacrylate labeled with carbon-14 which, after impregnation, was polymerized by gamma radiation, gave specimens that made preparation of sections suitable for quantification by autoradiographic methods easy. Diffusion experiments can be conducted so that labeled MMA diffuses out of rock specimens into inactive free, MMA. Additional information may be gained by leaching PMMA fractions of lower molecular weight from the matrix

  14. Extraction of whole versus ground source rocks: Fundamental petroleum geochemical implications including oil-source rock correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, L.C.; Clayton, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    In petroleum geochemistry, extractable hydrocarbons (HCs) in source rocks have typically been studied by grinding the rock to a fine powder (???100 mesh) and then extracting the HCs from the rock with a solvent. This procedure carries the implicit assumption that the HCs are homogeneously distributed throughout the rock. However, sequential Soxhlet extractions of whole (unpowdered) source rocks have shown that progressive extracts from the same rock can be quite different and may not even correlate with each other. A crude oil-like material clearly has been fractionated from indigenous bitumen in these rocks, has moved to cracks and parting laminae in the rocks, is ready for expulsion from the rocks, and is thus most accessible to the first extracting solvents. This process, which we believe is largely due to HC gases and carbon dioxide generated over all maturation ranks in source rocks, carries petroleum geochemical implications of a fundamental nature for oil-source rock correlations and gives insight into primary migration mechanisms, origin of oil deposits, and use of maturity and organic-facies indices. ?? 1992.

  15. Depositional Characteristics and Their Geological Implications of the Permo-Carboniferous Carbonate Rocks from Yingen-Ejinaqi and Their Surrounding Areas, Inner Mongolia, China%银根-额济纳旗及邻区石炭-二叠纪碳酸盐岩的沉积特征及其地质意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵省民; 陈登超; 邓坚; 李锦平

    2011-01-01

    火山岩或火山碎屑岩、辫状三角洲或扇三角洲砂砾岩,以及碳酸盐岩建造中的火山岩、火山碎屑岩和砂砾岩夹层,成为本区域石炭一二叠纪的潜在油气储层.%A study of depositional characteristics on carbonate rocks of Permo-Carboniferous was carried out by analyzing of petrology and their formation characteristics of carbonate rocks. A lot of fieldworks of the Permo-Carboniferous system in the study area indicate that, the carbonate rocks of Permo-Carboniferouus are dominated by calcirudite, crinoidal limestone and micrite with massive structure and graded bedding, volcanic or pyroclastic rocks acting as pedestals and interteds of the carbonate formations prevail in the area, which show the neritic paleoenvironmental settings of frequent tension-faulting, strong volcanisn, steep topography and deeper water during the period of Permo-Carboniferous. The Permo-Carboniferous carbonate rock formations respeetively on the pedestals of volcanic or pyroclastic rocks, granulites from braided river or fan deltas, mudstones originated from littoral zone and shelf comprise volcano-elevated carbonate rock formation (VEF). delta-elevated carbonate rock formation (DEF), coast-subsiding carbonate rock formation (CSF) and shelf-sboaling carbonate rock formation (SSF). The formations, all of which were formed by working together of region tectonics andchange in sea level, show the distinct mechanism of construction. Among of them, the voleano-elevated formation, with volcanic or py-roclastic interbeds and prevailling in the area, originated from the relative sea level fall driven by volcano eruption r~ulting from tectonicextension, in the setting of long-term ri~ in sea level The delta-elevated formation inferior to the volcano-elevated in development,with granulite interbeds, arose from the relative swa level fall driven by braided river or fan deltas progradation r~ulting from tectonicuplifting, in the context of long-term ri~ in sea

  16. Space Weathering of Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering discussions have generally centered around soils but exposed rocks will also incur the effects of weathering. On the Moon, rocks make up only a very small percentage of the exposed surface and areas where rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions we find in remote sensing data. However, our studies of weathered Ap 17 rocks 76015 and 76237 show that significant amounts of weathering products can build up on rock surfaces. Because rocks have much longer surface lifetimes than an individual soil grain, and thus record a longer history of exposure, we can study these products to gain a deeper perspective on the weathering process and better assess the relative impo!1ance of various weathering components on the Moon. In contrast to the lunar case, on small asteroids, like Itokowa, rocks make up a large fraction of the exposed surface. Results from the Hayabusa spacecraft at Itokowa suggest that while the low gravity does not allow for the development of a mature regolith, weathering patinas can and do develop on rock surfaces, in fact, the rocky surfaces were seen to be darker and appear spectrally more weathered than regions with finer materials. To explore how weathering of asteroidal rocks may differ from lunar, a set of ordinary chondrite meteorites (H, L, and LL) which have been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser were examined by TEM. NpFe(sup 0) bearing glasses were ubiquitous in both the naturally-weathered lunar and the artificially-weathered meteorite samples.

  17. Relating rock avalanche morphology to emplacement processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, Anja; Prager, Christoph; Bösmeier, Annette

    2015-04-01

    The morphology, structure and sedimentological characteristics of rock avalanche deposits reflect both internal emplacement processes and external influences, such as runout path characteristics. The latter is mainly predisposed by topography, substrate types, and hydrogeological conditions. Additionally, the geological setting at the source slope controls, e.g. the spatial distribution of accumulated lithologies and hence material property-related changes in morphology, or the maximum clast size and amount of fines of different lithological units. The Holocene Tschirgant rock avalanche (Tyrol, Austria) resulted from failure of an intensely deformed carbonate rock mass on the southeast face of a 2,370-m-high mountain ridge. The initially sliding rock mass rapidly fragmented as it moved towards the floor of the Inn River valley. Part of the 200-250 x 106 m3 (Patzelt 2012) rock avalanche debris collided with and moved around an opposing bedrock ridge and flowed into the Ötz valley, reaching up to 6.3 km from source. Where the Tschirgant rock avalanche spread freely it formed longitudinal ridges aligned along motion direction as well as smaller hummocks. Encountering high topography, it left runup ridges, fallback patterns (i.e. secondary collapse), and compressional morphology (successively elevated, transverse ridges). Further evidence for the mechanical landslide behaviour is given by large volumes of mobilized valley-fill sediments (polymict gravels and sands). These sediments indicate both shearing and compressional faulting within the rock avalanche mass (forming their own morphological units through, e.g. in situ bulldozing or as distinctly different hummocky terrain), but also indicate extension of the spreading landslide mass (i.e. intercalated/injected gravels encountered mainly in morphological depressions between hummocks). Further influences on its morphology are given by the different lithological units. E.g. the transition from massive dolomite

  18. CRITERIA FOR ROCK ENGINEERING FAILURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUDeren; ZHANGYuzhuo

    1995-01-01

    A great number of underground rock projects are maintained in the rock mass which is subject to rock damage and failure development. In many cases, the rock. engineering is still under normal working conditions even though rock is already fails to some extent. This paper introduces two different concepts: rock failure and rock engineering failure. Rock failure is defined as a mechanical state under which an applicable characteristic is changed or lost.However, the rock engineering failure is an engineering state under which an applicable function is changed or lost. The failure of surrounding rocks is the major reason of rock engineering failure. The criterion of rock engineering failure depends on the limit of applicable functions. The rock engineering failure state possesses a corresponding point in rock failure state. In this paper, a description of rock engineering failure criterion is given by simply using a mechanical equation or expression. It is expected that the study of rock engineering failure criterion will be an optimal approach that combines research of rock mechanics with rock engineering problems.

  19. CHARACTERISTIC OF OXYGEN-CARBON ISOTOPES AND ITS ENVIRON-MENTAL SIGNIFICANCE OF LOWER PERMIAN CARBONATE ROCK IN KONGSHAN SECTION,NANJING,JIANGSU%南京孔山剖面早二叠世冰川旋回期内氧碳同位素演化特征及其环境意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈学方; 方念乔; 方建勤; 刘秀明

    2001-01-01

    在南京孔山地区早二叠世的碳酸盐岩沉积序列中系统地采集了样品并进行了氧、碳同位素分析,同时作了有关海平面变化的研究。结果表明,处于浅水和近岸环境的碳酸盐岩的氧同位素值系“全球冰川效应”和区域的淡水掺混两种作用相互平衡的结果。它的变化特征虽然可以忠实地记录原生沉积环境的变迁,但不能简单套用远洋沉积物中所总结出的模式。碳同位素亦非古代海平面变化的简单函数。有机碳埋藏速率及与之相关的氧化-还原环境应是δ13C值的最终控制因素。%Taken from Nanjing Kongshan section in series,samples of LowerPermian carbonate rock are studied isotopically in this paper.Researches,are related with sea level change,are also completed by studying the variation of oxygen-carbon isotopes of the section.The result shows that value of oxygen isotope is controlled mainly by the balance between “Global Ice Effect” and regional mixed freshwater effect in seashore.Although the characteristic of oxygen isotope can not be illustrated by an extant model designed for pelagic sediment,it can reflect the change of original environment faithfully.Value of carbon isotope is not a linear function of ancient sea level change.The most important factors,which control the values of carbon isotope,are the embedding velocity of organic carbon and relative environment of reduction-oxidation.

  20. The enrichment characteristics of uranium and thorium in weathering profiles of carbonate rocks and the implications of their leaching experiments%碳酸盐岩风化剖面U和Th的富集特征及淋溶实验的指示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯志刚; 马强; 王世杰; 李石朋; 梁连东

    2013-01-01

    Based on researches on the distribution of U and Th in twelve weathering profiles of carbonate rocks, elemental variation features of dynamic leaching residues of rock-powder-layer samples at the rock-soil interface, and elemental mass balance in weathering profiles, the authors revealed the enrichment characteristics of U and Th in weathering profiles of carbonate rocks. Some conclusions have been reached: ① In the weathering system of carbonate rocks, U is significantly active, and Th appears both inert in some special cases and a litde active. ② During the weathering of carbonate rocks, the rock-soil interface is a main geochemical place which can cause drastic enrichment of U and Th in weathering residues, but the change of U and Th is a long and slow process during the further development and evolution of weathering profiles. In rock-soil interface reaction, U is massively moved out from the weathering system by weathering fluid with the rapid dissolution of carbonate rocks, and shows significant losses; at the same time, the intensive reduction of the volume of weathering residuals leads to strong relative enrichment of U in residues, so U presents unique geo- chemical behaviors characterized by low background value, strong losses, and high enrichment during weathering of carbonate rocks. As for Th, when it is in the active state, it is geochemically similar to U; when it is in the inert state, its enrichment in profiles is mainly due to absolute remaining after the dissolution of soluble components. ③ The enrichment factors of U and Th in weathering profiles show significant negative correlation with acid-insoluble content of carbonate bedrocks, suggesting the following relationships: the lower the acid-insoluble content of carbonate rock, the greater the volume of dissolved carbonate, the more the active U or Th that moves out with the weathering fluid, the stronger the reduction of the volume of weathering residuals, and therefore the higher the

  1. Fracture systems in normal fault zones crosscutting sedimentary rocks, Northwest German Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyer, Dorothea; Bauer, Johanna F.; Philipp, Sonja L.

    2012-12-01

    Field studies of fracture systems associated with 58 normal fault zones crosscutting sedimentary rocks were performed in the Northwest German Basin. Fracture orientations, densities, apertures and lengths, as well as fault zone structural indices, were analysed separately for fault damage zones and host rocks. The results show a pronounced difference between carbonate and clastic rocks: mainly in carbonate rocks we found presence of clear damage zones, characterized by higher fracture densities than in the host rocks. While the maximum aperture is similar for both units, the percentage of fractures with large apertures is much higher in the damage zones than in the host rocks. Based on laboratory measurements of Young's moduli and field measurements of fracture densities, we calculate effective stiffnesses Ee, that is the Young's moduli of the in situ rock masses, within the normal fault zones. Compared with carbonate rocks, Ee computed for clastic-rock damage zones decreases significantly less due to lower fracture densities. We conclude that normal fault zones in carbonate rocks have more profound effects on enhancing permeability in fluid reservoirs than those in clastic rocks. The results are of great importance for modelling the hydromechanical behaviour of normal fault zones in subsurface fluid reservoirs.

  2. Rock kinoekraanil / Katrin Rajasaare

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Rajasaare, Katrin

    2008-01-01

    7.-11. juulini kinos Sõprus toimuval filminädalal "Rock On Screen" ekraanile jõudvatest rockmuusikuid portreteerivatest filmidest "Lou Reed's Berlin", "The Future Is Unwritten: Joe Strummer", "Control: Joy Division", "Hurriganes", "Shlaager"

  3. Pop & rock / Berk Vaher

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vaher, Berk, 1975-

    2001-01-01

    Uute heliplaatide Redman "Malpractice", Brian Eno & Peter Schwalm "Popstars", Clawfinger "A Whole Lot of Nothing", Dario G "In Full Color", MLTR e. Michael Learns To Rock "Blue Night" lühitutvustused

  4. Rock mechanics research awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, John E.

    The U.S. National Committee for Rock Mechanics, at its June 1983 annual meeting, adopted three actions to enhance the competition and public awareness of its annual awards program for rock mechanics papers. It will issue a call for nominations of outstanding papers; it will request participating societies to announce the names of award winners and the titles of papers, and it will publish an abstract of the winning papers in the proceedings of the annual U.S. Rock Mechanics Symposium in the year following the awards.The competition is open to papers, by U.S residents or students in a U.S. school, published in an English language publication normally available in the United States. The following authors and papers are the 1983 award winners:

  5. Rock engineering applications, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book demonstrates how to apply the theories and principles of rock engineering to actual engineering and construction tasks. It features insights on geology for mining and tunnelling applications. It is practical resource that focuses on the latest technological innovation and examines up-to-date procedures used by engineers for coping with complex rock conditions. The authors also discuss question related to underground space, from design approaches to underground housing and storage. And they cover the monitoring of storage caverns for liquid and gaseous products or toxic and radioactive wastes

  6. Rock Hellsinki, Marketing Research

    OpenAIRE

    Todd, Roosa; Jalkanen, Katariina

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a qualitative research about rock and heavy metal music tourism in the capital city of Finland, Helsinki. As Helsinki can be considered the city of contrasts, the silent nature city mixed with urban activities, it is important to also use the potential of the loud rock and heavy metal music contrasting the silence. Finland is known abroad for bands such as HIM, Nightwish, Korpiklaani and Children of Bodom so it would make sense to utilize these in the tourism sector as well. The...

  7. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  8. Radiocarbon determinations for Chillagoe rock paintings: small sample AMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armitage, R.A.; Hyman, M.; Rowe, M. W. [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States). Department of Chemistry; David, B. [Queensland Univ St. Lucia, QLD (Australia); Tuniz, C.; Lawson, E.; Jacobsen, G.; Hua, G. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Indirect dating methods have been applied to the rock paintings of Chillagoe, north Queensland, revealing patterns of superimposition, depictions of items of known antiquity, the use of fragile paints such as mud, and in-situ pigment stratigraphies (David 1994). These patterns suggest that the Chillagoe rock paintings are relatively young, likely less than 3000 years old. A change in the geographical distribution of rock painting styles suggests a regionalization of the styles starting around 3000 years BP. Such regionalization implies that major cultural changes accompanied the changes in rock painting styles. This model of temporal change is now being investigated through a collaboration between the University of Queensland, ANSTO and the Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University to directly analyze radiocarbon in the charcoal pigments in several of the Chillagoe rock paintings. Samples collected from fourteen separate charcoal rock drawings at five rock shelters in the Chillagoe region were submitted to plasma chemical treatment. Though unreactive, the excited and energetic argon atoms in the plasma remove surface-absorbed CO{sub 2} through inelastic collisions. Samples yielding less than 100 micrograms carbon required special handling for AMS analysis. An isotope dilution technique utilizing {sup 14}C-free carbon was chosen. Radiocarbon analysis were also performed and the results will be presented. Paper No. 25; 2 refs., 1 tab.

  9. Ordovician Structural- Depositional Model and Prediction forProfitable Crack Reservoir of Carbonate Rock in Tazhong Area, Tarim Basin%塔里木盆地塔中地区奥陶系构造-沉积模式与碳酸盐岩裂缝储层预测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏国齐; 贾承造; 宋惠珍; 施央申; 卢华复; 李亚红

    2000-01-01

    奥陶系碳酸盐岩是塔中地区油气勘探的重要目的层。本文在讨论塔中地区奥陶纪区域构造背景和奥陶系岩性段划分的基础上,建立了塔中地区奥陶系构造-沉积模式,并用三维有限元数值模拟方法对塔中地区有利碳酸盐岩裂缝储层发育区进行了预测,以期指导塔中地区碳酸盐岩的油气勘探。%Ordovician carbonate rock formation is an important target for oil and gas exploration. In this paper, on thebasis of regional structure backgrounds , Ordovician lithologic intervals are divided in Tazhong area and, structural- depositional model is built up. With the help of three dimension finite element simulation method, the favorableareas of carbonate fracture reservoirs are predicted. The purpose of this paper is to give a direction for carbonate oiland gas exploration in Tazhong area. Conclusions could be summed up as follows: (1) The lithologic characters ofmiddle - upper Ordovician in the major part of Ordovician uplift in Tazhong are dramatically different from that ofadjacent slope, especially from that of slope of south Manjiaer depression in the north of Tazhong number onefault. The lithology of Ordovician in the major part of Tazhong uplift is dominated by carbonate rocks, and thelithology of middle - upper Ordovician is mainly sandy mudstone in the slope of south Manjiaer in the north ofTazhong number one fault. (2) Sedimentation during Ordovician in Tazbong area is controlled by intracratonic de-pression and Cratonic margin aulacogen, which are with different properties of prototype basin. The uplift and sagin intracratonic depression have prominent control to the sedimentation of Ordovician. Middle - upper Ordoviciandeposition in the major part of Tazhong uplift is controlled by the large scale anticline in the intracratonic depressionformedn early Caledonian (the end of early Ordovician). The restrained platform facies are developed in shallowwater in such places where

  10. Rocking and Rolling Rattlebacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Rod

    2013-01-01

    A rattleback is a well-known physics toy that has a preferred direction of rotation. If it is spun about a vertical axis in the "wrong" direction, it will slow down, start rocking from end to end, and then spin in the opposite (i.e. preferred) direction. Many articles have been written about rattlebacks. Some are highly mathematical and…

  11. Umhlanga Rocks coastal defense

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, L.; De Jong, B.; Ivanova, M.; Gerritse, A.; Rietberg, D.; Dorrepaal, S.

    2014-01-01

    The eThekwini coastline is a vulnerable coastline subject to chronic erosion and damage due to sea level rise. In 2007 a severe storm caused major physical and economic damage along the coastline, proving the need for action. Umhlanga Rocks is a densely populated premium holiday destination on the e

  12. Rock solid energy solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scientists believe naturally radioactive rocks below the earth's surface could provide an inexhaustible and environmentally friendly power source. And Australia could be a geological hotbed should the concept get off the ground. Despite the scale, the concept itself is simple. The Earth's reserves of heat in naturally radioactive rocks could provide an effectively inexhaustible and environmentally friendly source of power. No greenhouse gas emissions, little water usage and minimal pollution. Natural hot springs are already used to make power in some parts of the world, such as Iceland, but creating artificial hot springs by drilling deep into granite -the hardest of rocks - is a much more ambitious concept. One cubic kilometre of hot granite at 250 deg C has the stored energy equivalent of 40 million barrels of oil. In a nutshell, water is pumped into the hot zone - some 3km to 5km down in Australian conditions - and spreads through a 'reservoir' of hot, cracked rocks. Once superheated, it returns to the surface as steam through a separate production well to spin turbines and generate electricity. The water can then be recaptured and reused, with test sites around the world recovering up to around 90 per cent

  13. Rock-hard coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aircraft jet engines have to be able to withstand infernal conditions. Extreme heat and bitter cold tax coatings to the limit. Materials expert Dr Ir. Wim Sloof fits atoms together to develop rock-hard coatings. The latest invention in this field is known as ceramic matrix composites. Sloof has sign

  14. Slippery Rock University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnhold, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Slippery Rock University (SRU), located in western Pennsylvania, is one of 14 state-owned institutions of higher education in Pennsylvania. The university has a rich tradition of providing professional preparation programs in special education, therapeutic recreation, physical education, and physical therapy for individuals with disabilities.…

  15. The Marocche rock avalanches (Trentino, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Martin, Silvana; Campedel, Paolo; Viganò, Alfio; Alberti, Silvio; Rigo, Manuel; Vockenhuber, Christof

    2015-04-01

    The floors of the Adige and Sarca River valleys are punctuated by numerous rock avalanche deposits of undetermined age. With a view to understanding predisposition and triggering factors, thus ultimately paleoseismicity in the region, we are studying the geomorphology and timing of the largest rock avalanches of the River Sarca-Lake Garda area (e.g., Marocche, Monte Spinale, Lago di Tovel, Lago di Molveno, San Giovanni and Torbole). Among the most extensive of these deposits, with an area of 13 km2 and a volume of about 109 m3, are the Marocche. Marocche deposits cover the lower Sarca valley north of Lake Garda for a length of more than 8 km with 200 m of debris. Both collapse and bedding parallel sliding are a consequence of dip slopes and the extreme relief on the right side of the valley of nearly 2000 m from the bedrock below the valley floor to the peaks combined with the zones of structural weakness. The rock avalanches developed within carbonate rocks of Mesozoic age, mainly limestones of the Jurassic Calcari Grigi Group. The main scarps are located on the western side of the lower Sarca Valley, along the steep faces of Mt. Brento and Mt. Casale. The presence of these scarps is strictly related to the Southern Giudicarie and the Ballino fault systems. The former is here constituted by regular NNE-directed ESE-vergent thrust faults. The latter has been reactivated as normal faults. These complicated structural relationships favored complex failure mechanisms, including rock slide and massive collapse. At the Marocche itself, based on field relationships and analysis of lidar imagery, we differentiated two large rock avalanches: the Marocca di Kas in the south which overlies and in part buries the Marocche (s.s.) in the northern sector. Previous mapping had suggested up to five rock avalanches in the area where we differentiate two. In spite of hypotheses suggesting failure of the rock avalanches onto stagnating late Pleistocene glaciers, preliminary 36Cl

  16. Comprehensive geochemical identification of highly evolved marine hydrocarbon source rocks: Organic matter, paleoenvironment and development of effective hydrocarbon source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENGER; LIU Wenhui; XU Yongchang; CHEN Jianfa; HU Kai; GAO Changlin

    2006-01-01

    This study analyzed the developing environments of hydrocarbon source rocks in the Ordos Basin and evaluated carbonate rocks as hydrocarbon source rocks and their distributions on account of the fact that China's marine carbonate rocks as hydrocarbon source rocks are characterized by the intensive thermal evolution and relatively low abundance of organic matter, by taking the Lower Paleozoic of the Ordos Basin for example and in light of the calculated enrichment coefficients of trace elements, the profile analysis of trace element contents, ratios of relevant elements, and stable isotopic compositions and their three-dimensional diagrammatization in combination with the necessary organic parameters. As for the Ordos Basin, TOC=0.2% is an important boundary value. Studies have shown that in the strata TOC>0.2%, V/(V+Ni)>0.50, Zr/Rb<2, Rb/K(×104)>30, Z>122, Th/U>0.80, Zn and Mo are enriched with a positive δ13Ccarb excursion. All these indicated a stagnant and stratified sedimentary environment that has low energy, anoxia and high salinity in bottom water. In these strata the geological conditions are good for the preservation of organic matter, hence favoring the development of hydrocarbon source rocks. These strata have δ13Corg<-28‰ (Ⅰ-Ⅱtype) and high hydrocarbon-generated potential. The Klimory and Wulalik formations show certain regularities in those aspects, therefore, they can be regarded as the potential effective hydrocarbon source rocks. In the strata TOC≤0.2%, Zr/Rb>1, V/(V+Ni)<0.50, Rb/K<30, Th/U<0.80, Cu, Zn, etc are depleted, and δ13Corg values range from -24‰ to -28‰. All these facts showed that most of the carbonate rocks or mudstones were formed in high-energy oxidizing environments, thus unfavorable to the development of hydrocarbon source rocks. It is feasible to make use of the geochemical method to comprehensively assess the highly evolved marine carbonates rocks as potential hydrocarbon source rocks and

  17. Rock and mineral magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    O’Reilly, W

    1984-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed a revolution in the earth sciences. The quantitative, instrument-based measurements and physical models of. geophysics, together with advances in technology, have radically transformed the way in which the Earth, and especially its crust, is described. The study of the magnetism of the rocks of the Earth's crust has played a major part in this transformation. Rocks, or more specifically their constituent magnetic minerals, can be regarded as a measuring instrument provided by nature, which can be employed in the service of the earth sciences. Thus magnetic minerals are a recording magnetometer; a goniometer or protractor, recording the directions of flows, fields and forces; a clock; a recording thermometer; a position recorder; astrain gauge; an instrument for geo­ logical surveying; a tracer in climatology and hydrology; a tool in petrology. No instrument is linear, or free from noise and systematic errors, and the performance of nature's instrument must be assessed and ...

  18. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential

  19. Uranium in alkaline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Bowman, H.; Flexser, S.; Carmichael, I.

    1978-04-01

    Geologic and geochemical criteria were developed for the occurrence of economic uranium deposits in alkaline igneous rocks. A literature search, a limited chemical analytical program, and visits to three prominent alkaline-rock localities (Ilimaussaq, Greenland; Pocos de Caldas, Brazil; and Powderhorn, Colorado) were made to establish criteria to determine if a site had some uranium resource potential. From the literature, four alkaline-intrusive occurrences of differing character were identified as type-localities for uranium mineralization, and the important aspects of these localities were described. These characteristics were used to categorize and evaluate U.S. occurrences. The literature search disclosed 69 U.S. sites, encompassing nepheline syenite, alkaline granite, and carbonatite. It was possible to compare two-thirds of these sites to the type localities. A ranking system identified ten of the sites as most likely to have uranium resource potential.

  20. Limados : Rock peruano

    OpenAIRE

    García Morete, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    Incentivado por la corriente nuevaolera que llegaba de México, fue señalado por especialistas como pionero del punk. Aunque el plan, era tocar con lo que hubiera. Un recodo ínfimo de un período breve pero sorprendentemente poderoso, los 60 en un país que hizo del rock una expresión propia de su cultura.

  1. Deformations of fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the DBM and FEM analysis in this study indicate that a suitable rock mass for repository of radioactive waste should be moderately jointed (about 1 joint/m2) and surrounded by shear zones of the first order. This allowes for a gentle and flexible deformation under tectonic stresses and prevent the development of large cross-cutting failures in the repository area. (author)

  2. Rock pushing and sampling under rocks on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, H.J.; Liebes, S.; Crouch, D.S.; Clark, L.V.

    1978-01-01

    Viking Lander 2 acquired samples on Mars from beneath two rocks, where living organisms and organic molecules would be protected from ultraviolet radiation. Selection of rocks to be moved was based on scientific and engineering considerations, including rock size, rock shape, burial depth, and location in a sample field. Rock locations and topography were established using the computerized interactive video-stereophotogrammetric system and plotted on vertical profiles and in plan view. Sampler commands were developed and tested on Earth using a full-size lander and surface mock-up. The use of power by the sampler motor correlates with rock movements, which were by plowing, skidding, and rolling. Provenance of the samples was determined by measurements and interpretation of pictures and positions of the sampler arm. Analytical results demonstrate that the samples were, in fact, from beneath the rocks. Results from the Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer of the Molecular Analysis experiment and the Gas Exchange instrument of the Biology experiment indicate that more adsorbed(?) water occurs in samples under rocks than in samples exposed to the sun. This is consistent with terrestrial arid environments, where more moisture occurs in near-surface soil un- der rocks than in surrounding soil because the net heat flow is toward the soil beneath the rock and the rock cap inhibits evaporation. Inorganic analyses show that samples of soil from under the rocks have significantly less iron than soil exposed to the sun. The scientific significance of analyses of samples under the rocks is only partly evaluated, but some facts are clear. Detectable quantities of martian organic molecules were not found in the sample from under a rock by the Molecular Analysis experiment. The Biology experiments did not find definitive evidence for Earth-like living organisms in their sample. Significant amounts of adsorbed water may be present in the martian regolith. The response of the soil

  3. Authigenic Carbonate and the History of the Global Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Daniel P.; Higgins, John. A.; Macdonald, Francis A.; Johnston, David T.

    2013-02-01

    We present a framework for interpreting the carbon isotopic composition of sedimentary rocks, which in turn requires a fundamental reinterpretation of the carbon cycle and redox budgets over Earth's history. We propose that authigenic carbonate, produced in sediment pore fluids during early diagenesis, has played a major role in the carbon cycle in the past. This sink constitutes a minor component of the carbon isotope mass balance under the modern, high levels of atmospheric oxygen but was much larger in times of low atmospheric O2 or widespread marine anoxia. Waxing and waning of a global authigenic carbonate sink helps to explain extreme carbon isotope variations in the Proterozoic, Paleozoic, and Triassic.

  4. Rock in Rio: forever young

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ferreira Freitas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of Rock in Rio: The Musical, as herald of megafestival Rock in Rio. Driven by the success that musicals have reached in Brazil, we believe that the design of this spectacle of music, dance and staging renews the brand of the rock festival, once it adds the force of young and healthy bodies to its concept. Moreover, the musical provides Rock in Rio with some distance from the controversal trilogy of sex, drugs and rock and roll, a strong mark of past festivals around the world. Thus, the musical expands the possibilities of growth for the brand.

  5. Genesis and organic geochemical characteristics of the carbonaceous rock stratabound gold deposits, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡凯; 翟建平; 刘英俊; 王鹤年; 张景荣; 贾蓉芬

    2000-01-01

    The organic matter of three different chronological major carbonaceous rock gold-bearing formations of South China (Middle Proterozoic Shangqiaoshan group of northeastern Jiangxi, Lower Cambrian Shuikou group of northern Guangxi and Devonian Shetianqiao group of eastern Hunan) and related carbonaceous stratabound gold deposits such as Jinshan, Longshui and Shixia deposits, respectively, has been characterized by organic geochemical techniques. These organic geochemical results show that the average total organic carbon (TOC) content of the three chronological carbonaceous rock gold-bearing formations of South China ranges from 0.15% to 1.56%. The thermal maturity of the organic matter of host rocks in the three gold-bearing formations is high. The micro-component of the organic matter of the host rocks consists primarily of solid bitumen and graphite. The organic carbon and gold of the host rocks appear to syndeposit in situ during the formation of the gold-bearing formations. The organic carbon played

  6. Carbon, oxygen, strontium isotope characteristics and cause analysis of Carboniferous carbonate rocks in the eastern Sichuan Basin%川东地区石炭系碳酸盐岩碳、氧、锶同位素特征及其成因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王坤; 李伟; 陆进; 张朝军

    2011-01-01

    利用微量元素和碳、氧同位素特征对样品有效性作出了检验.在证明样品未受明显蚀变的前提下对川东地区石炭系碳酸盐岩碳、氧、锶同位素进行了分析.在层序地层格架中对比不同体系域、不同岩性的碳、氧同位素特征,87Sr/86Sr比值特征,Z值与古温度特征,分析了碳酸盐岩的成岩环境.低位体系域以膏盐湖及萨巴哈环境为主,炎热干旱,陆源淡水对成岩作用影响有限,去膏化、去白云岩化作用导致次生灰岩和“鸡笼铁丝”构造的发育.海侵体系域以半局限—局限陆棚环境为主,锶同位素特征表明陆源淡水对成岩作用影响增强,广泛沉积白云岩.高位体系域仍以陆棚环境为主,沉积海相灰岩为主,幔源锶含量增加,表明海平面上升,陆源锶的注入明显降低.白云岩碳、氧、锶同位素值差异较大,主要存在4种沉积环境:(1)Z值较低的淡水沉积环境;(2)海相环境下的中—浅埋藏环境;(3)海相环境,温度较低的蒸发潟湖环境;(4)温度最高的高温环境.结合87Sr/86Sr比值特征与岩石学特征相,认为川东地区主要存在淡水、埋藏、准同生、热液等4种白云岩化作用.%The validity of the samples was tested using trace elements and carbon and oxygen isotopes. Carbon, O and Sr isotope data of least altered Carboniferous carbonate rock in the eastern Sichuan Basin were processed. The C, O, and 87Sr/86Sr isotope characteristics, and paleosalinity and paleotemperature of different stratigraphic framework and different lithology were compared, aiming at better constraints on the diagenetic environment of carbonate rocks. The results suggest that it is mainly gypsic saline lake and sabkha environment when lowstand system tract (LST) deposited. The climate was hot and dry, terrestrial source fresh water was limited on impacting the diagenesis, anti-gypsumization and anti-dolomitization cause secondary limestone, with "wire cages

  7. Rock bolts - Improved design and possibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas-Lepine, Capucine

    2012-01-01

    SummaryRock Bolts, improved design and possibilitiesMaster thesis NTNU 2012Student : Capucine Thomas-LepineSupervisor : Leif LiaKey words : rock foundation, small concrete dam, rock mass classification, rock joints, shear strength of rock discontinuities, fully grouted passive rock bolts designMasters Thesis : “Rock bolts, improved design and possibilities” is a continuation from the Masters Thesis NTNU 2011 “Rock bolts in dams, expected capacity” by Lars Kristian Neby. In...

  8. A revision of the Haiming rock avalanche (Eastern Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, Anja; Ostermann, Marc; Kelfoun, Karim; Ring, Max; Asam, Dario; Prager, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The carbonate Haiming rock avalanche is directly neighbouring the larger Tschirgant rock avalanche deposit, both located in the upper Inn valley (Tyrol, Austria). Based on detailed morpho-lithologic mapping of the deposit, which has not been done at Haiming before, the sedimentology of the Holocene landslide debris is characterised. Structural-tectonic elements of the bedrock units at the scarp area are supplemented with borehole data from drillings at the source area giving valuable insights into the complex geological bedrock composition and structure. New source and runout reconstructions allow updated volumetric calculations, which are subsequently integrated into numerical runout modelling. Haiming is one of few topographically unobstructed rock avalanches, yet its morphology was greatly influenced by fluvial terraces, which are still discernible through the deposit on LiDAR hillshade images. We also address the influence of the rock avalanche on the valley floor and local river system as a short-lived dam and its interaction with fluvial incision. Finally, we discuss the Haiming rock avalanche in view of the other massive rock slope failures in the area ("Fernpass cluster"), their spatio-temporal distribution, and point out further highlights of this simple(?) rock avalanche deposit.

  9. Rock mechanics for hard rock nuclear waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mined geologic burial of high level nuclear waste is now the favored option for disposal. The US National Waste Terminal Storage Program designed to achieve this disposal includes an extensive rock mechanics component related to the design of the wastes repositories. The plan currently considers five candidate rock types. This paper deals with the three hard rocks among them: basalt, granite, and tuff. Their behavior is governed by geological discontinuities. Salt and shale, which exhibit behavior closer to that of a continuum, are not considered here. This paper discusses both the generic rock mechanics R and D, which are required for repository design, as well as examples of projects related to hard rock waste storage. The examples include programs in basalt (Hanford/Washington), in granitic rocks (Climax/Nevada Test Site, Idaho Springs/Colorado, Pinawa/Canada, Oracle/Arizona, and Stripa/Sweden), and in tuff

  10. Sealing of fractured rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper consists of a presentation of the third phase of the Stripa Project. This phase was dedicated to fracture sealing. First of all it has been necessary to show that fine-grained grouts could effectively be injected in relatively fine cracks, and that the fluidity of bentonite could also be enhanced. The field tests comprised investigation of excavation-induced disturbance and attempts to seal disturbed rock, and, in separate tests, grouting of deposition holes and a natural fine-fracture zone. (TEC). 12 figs., 1 tab., 6 refs

  11. From stones to rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, Marie-Astrid; Jean-Leroux, Kathleen; Cirio, Raymond

    2013-04-01

    With the Aquila earthquake in 2009, earthquake prediction is more and more necessary nowadays, and people are waiting for even more accurate data. Earthquake accuracy has increased in recent times mainly thanks to the understanding of how oceanic expansion works and significant development of numerical seismic prediction models. Despite the improvements, the location and the magnitude can't be as accurate as citizen and authorities would like. The basis of anticipating earthquakes requires the understanding of: - The composition of the earth, - The structure of the earth, - The relations and movements between the different parts of the surface of the earth. In order to answer these questions, the Alps are an interesting field for students. This study combines natural curiosity about understanding the predictable part of natural hazard in geology and scientific skills on site: observing and drawing landscape, choosing and reading a representative core drilling, replacing the facts chronologically and considering the age, the length of time and the strength needed. This experience requires students to have an approach of time and space radically different than the one they can consider in a classroom. It also limits their imagination, in a positive way, because they realize that prediction is based on real data and some of former theories have become present paradigms thanks to geologists. On each location the analyzed data include landscape, core drilling and the relation established between them by students. The data is used by the students to understand the meaning, so that the history of the formation of the rocks tells by the rocks can be explained. Until this year, the CBGA's perspective regarding the study of the Alps ground allowed students to build the story of the creation and disappearance of the ocean, which was a concept required by French educational authorities. But not long ago, the authorities changed their scientific expectations. To meet the

  12. Rock mechanics data package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This data package provides a summary of available laboratory and in situ stress field test results from site characterization investigations by the Basalt Waste Isolation Project Modeling and Analysis Group. The objective is to furnish rock mechanics information for use by Rockwell Hanford Operations and their subcontractors in performance assessment and engineering studies. This release includes Reference Repository Location (RRL) site specific laboratory and field test data from boreholes RRL-2, RRL-6, and RRL-14 as well as previous Hanford wide data available as of April, 1985. 25 refs., 9 figs., 16 tabs

  13. Estimating elastic moduli of rocks from thin sections: Digital rock study of 3D properties from 2D images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Nishank; Mavko, Gary

    2016-03-01

    Estimation of elastic rock moduli using 2D plane strain computations from thin sections has several numerical and analytical advantages over using 3D rock images, including faster computation, smaller memory requirements, and the availability of cheap thin sections. These advantages, however, must be weighed against the estimation accuracy of 3D rock properties from thin sections. We present a new method for predicting elastic properties of natural rocks using thin sections. Our method is based on a simple power-law transform that correlates computed 2D thin section moduli and the corresponding 3D rock moduli. The validity of this transform is established using a dataset comprised of FEM-computed elastic moduli of rock samples from various geologic formations, including Fontainebleau sandstone, Berea sandstone, Bituminous sand, and Grossmont carbonate. We note that using the power-law transform with a power-law coefficient between 0.4-0.6 contains 2D moduli to 3D moduli transformations for all rocks that are considered in this study. We also find that reliable estimates of P-wave (Vp) and S-wave velocity (Vs) trends can be obtained using 2D thin sections.

  14. 安徽霍邱安阳山晚石炭世碳酸盐岩地层中奥陶纪牙形石和虫颚化石的发现%DiSCovery of orDoviC iAn ConoDont AnD SColeCoDont foSSilS in lAter CArbonACeouS CArbonAte roCk StrAtA in AnyAnG Mt, huoQiu, Anhui

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程成; 李双应; 稽在飞; 王松; 杨栋栋; 张强

    2014-01-01

    A latest research indicated that carbonate rock member in the lower part of the Anyang Mt (Baida Mt) section, Huoqiu, Anhui belongs to late Carbonaceous epoch, clastic rock member in the upper part to Qingbaikouan period. Further micropaleonlogical analysis found abundant such fossils in the late carbonaceous carbonate rock, of which conodont and scolecodont fossils dominate in quantity. Identified conodont is Belodina, scolecodonts include Marlenites marginatus,Chairidogenys borealis,Cornugenys sp.,Porrhogrnys sp.,Channahania sp.,Paradrilonersgenys cherylae, etc. Belodina dated back to late Ordovician epoch and scolecodonts Ordovician period. Ordovician fossils occurring in later Carbonaceous epoch suggested that there may have been an Ordovician source of micro fossils, which were eroded, transported, re-deposited and preserved in late Carbonaceous carbonate rock. Obviously, this discovery may not be significant stratigraphically, but paleogeographically and paleotectonically.%最近的研究表明,安徽霍邱地区安阳山(白大山)剖面下部碳酸盐岩段属于晚石炭世,上部碎屑岩段属于青白口纪。我们进一步对剖面进行了微体古生物分析,在晚石炭世碳酸盐岩中发现了丰富的微体古生物化石,其中以牙形石和虫颚化石数量最多。经鉴定,有牙形石Belodina和虫颚化石Marlenites marginatus,Chairidogenys borealis,Cornugenys sp.,Porrhogrnys sp.,Channahania sp.,Paradrilonersgenys cherylae等,Belodina时代为晚奥陶世,虫颚化石的时代为奥陶纪。晚石炭世地层中存在奥陶纪化石,表明可能存在奥陶系的物源区,微体化石是通过剥蚀、搬运再沉积保存到晚石炭世碳酸盐岩中。显然,新发现的微体化石可能并不具有地层意义,但是具有古地理和古构造意义。

  15. Rock composition and origin of the Duwi Formation calcareous rocks, Upper Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baioumy H.M.; Attia A.M.; Boulis S.N.; Hassan M.S.; Helmy M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Upper Cretaceous phosphorite beds of the Duwi Formation, Upper Egypt, are intercalated with limestone, sandy limestone, marl, calcareous shales, and calcareous sandstone. Calcareous intercalations were subjected to field and detailed petrographic, mineralogical and geochemical investigations in order to constrain their rock composition and origin.Mineralogically, dolomite, calcite, quartz, francolite and feldspars are the non-clay minerals. Smectite, kaolinite and illite represent the clay minerals. Major and trace elements can be classified as the detrital and carbonate fractions based on their sources. The detrital fraction includes the elements that are derived from detrital sources, mainly clay minerals and quartz, such as Si, Al, Fe, Ti, K, Ba, V, Ni, Co, Cr, Zn, Cu, Zr, and Mo. The carbonate fraction includes the elements that are derived from carbonates, maily calcite and dolomite, such as Ca, Mg and Sr. Dolomite occurs as being dense, uniform, mosaic, very fine-to-fine, non-ferroan, and non-stoichiometrical suggesting its early diagenetic formation in a near-shore oxidizing shallow marine environment. The close association and positive correlation between dolomite and smectite indicates the role of clay minerals in the formation of dolomite as a source of Mg 2+-rich solutions.Calcareous rocks were deposited in marine, oxidizing and weakly alkaline conditions, marking a semi-arid climatic period. The calcareous/argillaceous alternations are due to oscillations in clay/carbonate ratio.

  16. Fossils, rocks, and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Lucy E.; Pojeta, John

    1999-01-01

    We study our Earth for many reasons: to find water to drink or oil to run our cars or coal to heat our homes, to know where to expect earthquakes or landslides or floods, and to try to understand our natural surroundings. Earth is constantly changing--nothing on its surface is truly permanent. Rocks that are now on top of a mountain may once have been at the bottom of the sea. Thus, to understand the world we live on, we must add the dimension of time. We must study Earth's history. When we talk about recorded history, time is measured in years, centuries, and tens of centuries. When we talk about Earth history, time is measured in millions and billions of years. Time is an everyday part of our lives. We keep track of time with a marvelous invention, the calendar, which is based on the movements of Earth in space. One spin of Earth on its axis is a day, and one trip around the Sun is a year. The modern calendar is a great achievement, developed over many thousands of years as theory and technology improved. People who study Earth's history also use a type of calendar, called the geologic time scale. It looks very different from the familiar calendar. In some ways, it is more like a book, and the rocks are its pages. Some of the pages are torn or missing, and the pages are not numbered, but geology gives us the tools to help us read this book.

  17. Rock Properties Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process

  18. A smart rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressel, Phil

    2014-12-01

    This project was to design and build a protective weapon for a group of associations that believed in aliens and UFO's. They collected enough contributions from societies and individuals to be able to sponsor and totally fund the design, fabrication and testing of this equipment. The location of this facility is classified. It also eventually was redesigned by the Quartus Engineering Company for use at a major amusement park as a "shoot at targets facility." The challenge of this project was to design a "smart rock," namely an infrared bullet (the size of a gallon can of paint) that could be shot from the ground to intercept a UFO or any incoming suspicious item heading towards the earth. Some of the challenges to design this weapon were to feed cryogenic helium at 5 degrees Kelvin from an inair environment through a unique rotary coupling and air-vacuum seal while spinning the bullet at 1500 rpm and maintain its dynamic stability (wobble) about its spin axis to less than 10 micro-radians (2 arc seconds) while it operated in a vacuum. Precision optics monitored the dynamic motion of the "smart rock."

  19. Rock Properties Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Lum

    2004-09-16

    The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process.

  20. Rock critics as 'Mouldy Modernists'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becky Shepherd

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary rock criticism appears to be firmly tied to the past. The specialist music press valorise rock music of the 1960s and 1970s, and new emerging artists are championed for their ‘retro’ sounding music by journalists who compare the sound of these new artists with those included in the established ‘canon’ of rock music. This article examines the narrative tropes of authenticity and nostalgia that frame the retrospective focus of this contemporary rock writing, and most significantly, the maintenance of the rock canon within contemporary popular culture. The article concludes by suggesting that while contemporary rock criticism is predominately characterised by nostalgia, this nostalgia is not simply a passive romanticism of the past. Rather, this nostalgia fuels a process of active recontextualisation within contemporary popular culture.

  1. Research on The Surrounding Rock Deformation Law of Carbon Shale Small Interval Tunnel%炭质页岩小净距隧道围岩变形规律研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段宝福; 翁现合

    2012-01-01

    以湖北宴家隧道工程为例,结合现场施工监测,采用有限元程序对节理围岩隧道施工进行模拟,对节理围岩隧道的开挖对地层扰动的范围进行定量确定.对小间距双线隧道在炭质页岩条件下节理面上游隧道先行施工进行数值模拟,将实测数据与数值模拟进行对比,总结出炭质页岩小间距隧道左右洞有施工差别时围岩变形规律.%Taking the Hubei Yanjia tunnel project as an example, the construction of jointed surrounding rock tunnels was simulated using finite element software and the range of disturbance caused by the excavation was quantatively determined. Numerical simulations were also performed for the upper tunnel under carbonaceous shale in small interval tunnel and simulation results were compared against site measurement.Conclusions were drawn regarding the principles of tunnel surrounding rock deformation when the two holes are constructed differently.

  2. [Hearing disorders and rock music].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhardt, Bjarne Orskov

    2008-12-15

    Only few studies have investigated the frequency of hearing disorders in rock musicians. Performing rock music is apparently associated with a hearing loss in a fraction of musicians. Tinnitus and hyperacusis are more common among rock musicians than among the background population. It seems as if some sort of resistance against further hearing loss is developed over time. The use of ear protection devices have not been studied systematically but appears to be associated with diminished hearing loss. PMID:19128557

  3. Chemical composition of sedimentary rocks in California and Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Thelma P.

    1981-01-01

    A compilation of published chemical analyses of sedimentary rocks of the United States was undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1952 to make available scattered data that are needed for a wide range of economic and scientific uses. About 20,000-25,000 chemical analyses of sedimentary rocks in the United States have been published. This report brings together 2,312 of these analyses from California and Hawaii. The samples are arranged by general lithologic characteristics and locality. Indexes of stratigraphy, rock name, commercial uses, and minor elements are provided. The sedimentary rocks are classified into groups and into categories according to the chemical analyses. The groups (A through F2) are defined by a system similar to that proposed by Brian Mason in 1952, in which the main parameters are the three major components of sedimentary rocks: (1) uncombined silica, (2) clay (R203 ? 3Si02 ? nH20), and (3) calcium-magnesium carbonate. The categories are based on the degree of admixture of these three major components with other components, such as sulfate, phos- phate, and iron oxide. Common-rock, mixed-rock, and special-rock categories apply to rocks consisting of 85 percent or more, 50-84 percent, and less than 49 percent, respectively, of the three major components combined. Maps show distribution of sample localities by States; triangular diagrams show the lithologic characteristics and classification groups. Cumulative-frequency curves of each constituent in each classification group of the common-rock and mixed-rock categories are also included. The numerous analyses may not adequately represent the geochemical nature of the rock types and formations of the region because of sampling bias. Maps showing distribution of sample localities indicate that many of the localities are in areas where, for economic or other reasons, special problems attracted interest. Most of the analyzed rocks tended to be fairly simple in composition - mainly mixtures of

  4. Inclusões fluidas crepitadas, fluidos hipersalinos e aquo-carbônicos em quartzo associado a rochas micáceas no Granito Xinguara - Terreno Granito-Greenstone de Rio Maria, PA Decrepitated fluid inclusions, aqueous-carbonic and hypersaline fluids in quartz associated to micaceous rocks in the Xinguara Granite - Rio Maria Granite - Greenstone terrain, Pará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Leopoldo Weber

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available As rochas micáceas encontradas no Granito Xinguara, terreno Granito-Greenstone de Rio Maria, Pará, são compostas por muscovita e clorita com níveis de quartzo intercalados, que formam uma xistosidade bem desenvolvida. Essa xistosidade é cortada por veios de quartzo. Ambas as gerações de quartzo apresentam os mesmos tipos de inclusões fluidas em halos ou trilhas secundárias de composições variadas entre aquosas, aquo-carbônicas e saturadas em torno de grandes inclusões primárias crepitadas ou em trilhas transgranulares secundárias. A grande variação de temperaturas de homogeneização, a alta salinidade, as evidências de estrangulamento e a existência das inclusões crepitadas permitem supor forte influência de alterações pós-formacionais e reequilíbrio relacionados à intrusão do granito. Essas rochas foliadas são, portanto, enclaves metassedimentares afetados por fluidos graníticos hipersalinos aquo-carbônicos.The micaceous rocks occurring in the Xinguara Granite, Rio Maria Granite-Greenstone terrain, Pará State, Brazil, are composed of muscovite and chlorite with quartz levels intercalated forming a well developed schistosity. This schistosity is cut by quartz veins. Both quartz generations show the same aqueous, aqueous-carbonic and halite-bearing fluid inclusions either in secondary inclusions halos and trails surrounding decrepitated primary fluid inclusions or in transgranular secondary trails. A wide variation of homogenization temperatures, high salinity, necking down and the decrepitated inclusions existence indicates strong influence of post-formational alteration and reequilibration linked to the granite intrusion. These foliated rocks are metasedimentary enclaves affected by late hypersaline aqueous-carbonic granitic fluids.

  5. Electromagnetic emissions during rock blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, S. G.; Thiel, D. V.

    1991-05-01

    Radio emissions during quarry blasting have been recorded in the audio frequency band. Three distinct mechanisms are suggested to explain the observed results; rock fracture at the time of the explosion, charged rocks discharging on impact with the pit floor and micro-fracture of the remaining rock wall due to pressure adjustment of the bench behind the blast. The last mechanism was evident by a train of discrete impulses recorded for up to one minute after the blast. It is assumed that during this time the rock behind the blast was subjected to a significant change in pressure. This may be related to ELF observations during earthquakes.

  6. Rock.XML - Towards a library of rock physics models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Erling Hugo; Hauge, Ragnar; Ulvmoen, Marit; Johansen, Tor Arne; Drottning, Åsmund

    2016-08-01

    Rock physics modelling provides tools for correlating physical properties of rocks and their constituents to the geophysical observations we measure on a larger scale. Many different theoretical and empirical models exist, to cover the range of different types of rocks. However, upon reviewing these, we see that they are all built around a few main concepts. Based on this observation, we propose a format for digitally storing the specifications for rock physics models which we have named Rock.XML. It does not only contain data about the various constituents, but also the theories and how they are used to combine these building blocks to make a representative model for a particular rock. The format is based on the Extensible Markup Language XML, making it flexible enough to handle complex models as well as scalable towards extending it with new theories and models. This technology has great advantages as far as documenting and exchanging models in an unambiguous way between people and between software. Rock.XML can become a platform for creating a library of rock physics models; making them more accessible to everyone.

  7. Reaction-driven fracturing of porous rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulven, O. I.; Jamtveit, B.; Malthe-Sørenssen, A.

    2014-10-01

    A 2-D computer model has been developed to investigate fluid-mediated transformation processes such as chemical weathering, mineral carbonation, and serpentinization that require transport of H2O and/or CO2 into reacting rock volumes. Hydration and carbonation cause local volume expansion, and the resulting nonuniform stresses may drive fracturing, which increases both the rate of transport and the accessible reactive surface area in the system and thus accelerates the rate of the transformation process. The model couples reactions, fracturing, and fluid transport for systems with a range of initial porosities, assumed constant throughout the process. With low initial porosity, a sharp reaction front between completely reacted material and unreacted material propagates into unaltered rock, while for high porosities, diffuse reaction fronts are formed in which a large fraction of the initial volume is partly reacted. When diffusive transport is rate limiting, the total reaction rate depends on porosity to a power N, where N is in the range 0.45-2. The exponent N increases as the reaction-generated expansion decreases. In high-porosity rocks, the total reaction rate is limited by reaction kinetics, and it is thus insensitive to porosity variations. As the volume increasing reaction proceeds, fracturing divides the unreacted porous material into subdomains, which may undergo further subdivision as they are consumed by the reaction. The total reaction rate and progress depend on the initial geometry of a reacting domain, and this significantly affects the weathering profiles for systems that evolve from an initial assembly of blocks with different sizes and shapes.

  8. Rock the Globe

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    Created in 2005, the Swiss rock band "Wind of Change" is now candidate for the Eurovision Song Contest 2011 with a new song " Night & Light " with the music video filmed at CERN.   With over 20 gigs under their belt and two albums already released, the five members of the band (Alex Büchi, vocals; Arthur Spierer, drums; David Gantner, bass; Romain Mage and Yannick Gaudy, guitar) continue to excite audiences. For their latest composition "Night & Light", the group filmed their music video in the Globe of Science and Innovation. Winning the Eurovision contest would be a springboard in their artistic career for these young musicians. The selection results will be available December 11, 2010.      

  9. Rock and soil rheology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the Euromech Colloquium 196 devoted to Rock and Soil Rheology is to review some of the main results obtained in the last years in this field of research and also to formulate some of the major not yet solved problems which are now under consideration. Exchange of opinions and scientific discussions are quite helpful mainly in those areas where some approaches are controversial and the progress made is quite fast. That is especially true for the rheology of geomaterials, domain of great interest for mining and petroleum engineers, engineering geology, seismology, geophysics, civil engineering, nuclear and industrial waste storage, geothermal energy storage, caverns for sports, culture, telecommunications, storage of goods and foodstuffs (cold, hot and refrigerated storages), underground oil and natural gas reservoirs etc. Some of the last obtained results are mentioned in the present volume. (orig./HP)

  10. Geoelectrical Classification of Gypsum Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinea, Ander; Playà, Elisabet; Rivero, Lluís; Himi, Mahjoub; Bosch, Ricard

    2010-12-01

    Gypsum rocks are widely exploited in the world as industrial minerals. The purity of the gypsum rocks (percentage in gypsum mineral in the whole rock) is a critical factor to evaluate the potential exploitability of a gypsum deposit. It is considered than purities higher than 80% in gypsum are required to be economically profitable. Gypsum deposits have been studied with geoelectrical methods; a direct relationship between the electrical resistivity values of the gypsum rocks and its lithological composition has been established, with the presence of lutites being the main controlling factor in the geoelectrical response of the deposit. This phenomenon has been quantified in the present study, by means of a combination of theoretical calculations, laboratory measurements and field data acquisition. Direct modelling has been performed; the data have been inverted to obtain the mean electrical resistivity of the models. The laboratory measurements have been obtained from artificial gypsum-clay mixture pills, and the electrical resistivity has been measured using a simple electrical circuit with direct current power supply. Finally, electrical resistivity tomography data have been acquired in different evaporite Tertiary basins located in North East Spain; the selected gypsum deposits have different gypsum compositions. The geoelectrical response of gypsum rocks has been determined by comparing the resistivity values obtained from theoretical models, laboratory tests and field examples. A geoelectrical classification of gypsum rocks defining three types of gypsum rocks has been elaborated: (a) Pure Gypsum Rocks (>75% of gypsum content), (b) Transitional Gypsum Rocks (75-55%), and (c) Lutites and Gypsum-rich Lutites (800 ohm.m, can be exploited as industrial rocks. The methodology used could be applied in other geoelectrical rock studies, given that this relationship between the resistive particles embedded within a conductive matrix depends on the connectivity of the

  11. Rock Segmentation through Edge Regrouping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burl, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Rockster is an algorithm that automatically identifies the locations and boundaries of rocks imaged by the rover hazard cameras (hazcams), navigation cameras (navcams), or panoramic cameras (pancams). The software uses edge detection and edge regrouping to identify closed contours that separate the rocks from the background.

  12. Rock Art in Kurdistan Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Lahafian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Kurdistan, with great potential and prehistoric resources, has numerous petroglyphs in different areas of the province. During the last 14 years of extensive field study, more than 30 sites of rock art have been identified and introduced by the author. In this article, we summarize these rock art areas in Iranian Kurdistan.

  13. Rock Art in Kurdistan Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Jamal Lahafian

    2013-01-01

    Kurdistan, with great potential and prehistoric resources, has numerous petroglyphs in different areas of the province. During the last 14 years of extensive field study, more than 30 sites of rock art have been identified and introduced by the author. In this article, we summarize these rock art areas in Iranian Kurdistan.

  14. Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.N. (comp.)

    1981-08-01

    This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

  15. Rock suitability classification RSC 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, T. (ed.) [McEwen Consulting, Leicester (United Kingdom); Kapyaho, A. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Hella, P. [Saanio and Riekkola, Helsinki (Finland); Aro, S.; Kosunen, P.; Mattila, J.; Pere, T.

    2012-12-15

    This report presents Posiva's Rock Suitability Classification (RSC) system, developed for locating suitable rock volumes for repository design and construction. The RSC system comprises both the revised rock suitability criteria and the procedure for the suitability classification during the construction of the repository. The aim of the classification is to avoid such features of the host rock that may be detrimental to the favourable conditions within the repository, either initially or in the long term. This report also discusses the implications of applying the RSC system for the fulfilment of the regulatory requirements concerning the host rock as a natural barrier and the site's overall suitability for hosting a final repository of spent nuclear fuel.

  16. Rock suitability classification RSC 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents Posiva's Rock Suitability Classification (RSC) system, developed for locating suitable rock volumes for repository design and construction. The RSC system comprises both the revised rock suitability criteria and the procedure for the suitability classification during the construction of the repository. The aim of the classification is to avoid such features of the host rock that may be detrimental to the favourable conditions within the repository, either initially or in the long term. This report also discusses the implications of applying the RSC system for the fulfilment of the regulatory requirements concerning the host rock as a natural barrier and the site's overall suitability for hosting a final repository of spent nuclear fuel

  17. ROCKing pulmonary fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sheppard, Dean

    2013-01-01

    Clinical vignette: A 76-year-old man consults you for increasing shortness of breath over the past two years and an increasing requirement for home oxygen. A video-assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy shows findings of usual interstitial pneumonitis, and he has no identifiable cause for pulmonary fibrosis, so he is considered to have idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). His diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) is 45% of predicted, and his total lung capacity is 40% of predicted. Becaus...

  18. Seismic properties of polyphase rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin

    2005-11-01

    Knowledge about the seismic properties of polyphase rocks is fundamental for interpreting seismic refraction and reflection data and for establishing lithospheric structure and composition models. This study aims to obtain more precise relationships between seismic properties of rocks and controlling factors (e.g., pressure, temperature, mineralogical and chemical compositions, microstructure of rocks), particularly for those rocks imprinted by ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphism. These relationships will be very helpful to extrapolate calculated and measured seismic properties of rocks to depths of interest and to engender interpretations relevant to petrological composition and tectonic process. An Internet Database of Rock Seismic Properties (DRSP) was set up and a Handbook of Seismic Properties of Minerals, Rocks and Ores was published. They comprise almost all data available in the literature during the past 4 decades and can serve as a convenient, comprehensive and concise information source on physical properties of rocks to the earth sciences and geotechnical communities. Statistical results of the DRSP reveal the dependence of seismic properties on density, porosity, humidity, and mineralogical and chemical compositions. Using 16 different averaging methods, we calculated P-wave velocities of 696 dry samples according to the volume fraction and elastic constants of each constituent mineral. Although only 22 common minerals were taken into account in the computation, the calculated P-wave velocities agree well with laboratory values measured at about 300 MPa, where most microcracks are closed and the mean Vp of a polymineralic rock is exclusively controlled by its modal composition. However, none of these mixture rules can simultaneously fit measured P-wave velocities for all lithologies or at all pressures. Therefore, more prudence is required in selecting an appropriate mixture rule for calculation of seismic velocities of different rock types.

  19. Spectral-induced polarization characteristics of rocks from Shinyemi deposit in Northeastern South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Samgyu; Shin, Seung Wook; Son, Jeong-Sul; Kim, Changryol

    2016-04-01

    Contact metasomatism between carbonate and igneous rocks leads to the formation of skarn deposits, and ore minerals are abundant. Geophysical methods that visualize the distributions of physical properties have been utilized to determine lithological boundaries in ore deposits. In particular, spectral-induced polarization (SIP) is the most effective of those methods for mineral exploration because it can obtain not only the boundaries but also the abundance and grain size of ore minerals. It is crucial to characterize the SIP responses of in situ rocks for a more realistic interpretation. Thus, typical rocks composed of igneous rock, skarn rock, skarn ore, and carbonate rock were sampled from drilling cores in the Shinyemi deposit, which is one of the well-known skarn deposits in Northeastern South Korea. The purpose of this study was to characterize the SIP responses of rocks by laboratory measurements. The characterization was performed by evaluating spectra and IP parameters. The IP properties were acquired from equivalent circuit analysis using a circuit model based on the electrochemical theory, and the analysis results of this circuit model were relatively well fit compared with those of the traditional Dias and Cole-Cole models. The frequency responses below 100 Hz in the spectra and the chargeability values of the skarn rocks and ores containing magnetite were relatively strong and high, respectively, compared with those of non-mineralized igneous and carbonate rocks. Therefore, it is considered that these characteristics are dependent on the abundance of magnetite. In case of the skarn ores with high magnetite content, the resistivity values were significantly low and the relaxation time values were influenced by the grain size of magnetite. On the other hand, it is considered that the DC resistivity and the relaxation time values of the igneous and carbonate rocks are slightly related to the porosity and the grade of hydrothermal alteration, respectively.

  20. Oil source rocks in sedimentary basins of the CIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neruchev, S. (VNIGRI, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation))

    1993-09-01

    Oil source rocks with dominant kerogen of types I or II and a concentration of organic carbon of 6-7% are widely distributed at specific stratigraphic levels in the Phanerozoic section of the world and control the petroleum richness of the main productive basins. Nineteen stratigraphic levels of source rock distribution have been identified and almost all of these stratigraphic levels are found in basins of the Commonwealth of Independent States. This paper contains a review of their distribution. Black shales and oil shales enriched by P, U, V, Mo, and, occasionally, by Ir, Os and other metals, are found in the same stratigraphic intervals outside petroleum basins. High concentrations of uranium have been identified in terrestrial rocks at several of the stratigraphic intervals. A high concentration of kerogen in oil source rocks is commonly explained by depositional conditions (anoxia and upwelling) that favor accumulation and preservation of organic matter. However, the main factor determining organic matter enrichment of sediments is rifting activity and its associated increase in phosphorus, radioactive elements and heavy metals. This results in ecological crises and global blossoming of plankton (cianobacteria, green algae, zooplankton in the Silurian and diatoms in the Miocene). Rocks with increased concentrations of radioactive elements are present at the boundaries of large stratigraphic units that can be identified by paleontologic data. These rocks mark major events of fauna extinction and other important biotic events. The periodicity of the major global events is about 220 m.y., which corresponds to duration of the galactic year. Smaller periodicity of about 30 m.y. is identified inside the major periods. These regularities in the organic-rich rock distribution can be used to predict the presence of oil source rocks, oil shales, and shales enriched by metals.

  1. Research on Mechanism of Rock Burst Generation and Development for High Stress Rock Tunnels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高全臣; 赫建明; 王代华

    2001-01-01

    Through the investigation and analysis of high stress distribution in surrounding rock during the excavation of rock tunnels,the key factors to cause rock burst and the mechanism of rock burst generation and development are researched. The result shows that the scale and range of rock burst are related with elastic deformation energy storied in rock mass and the characteristics of unloading stress waves. The measures of preventing from rock burst for high stress rock tunnels are put forward.

  2. Application of a fuzzy analytical hierarchy process to the prediction of vibration during rock sawing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mikaeil Reza; Ataei Mohammad; Yousefi Reza

    2011-01-01

    A new predictive model for evaluating the vibration of a sawing machine was developed using a new rock classification system.The predictors are machine parameters and a rock sawability index.The new rock classification system includes four major parameters of the rock:uniaxial compressive strength,abrasivity index,mean Moh's hardness,and Young's modulus.The FAHP approach was used when determining the weights of these parameters by six decision makers.Two groups of carbonate rocks were sawn using a fully-instrumented laboratory sawing rig at different feed rates and depths of cut.During the sawing trials system vibration was monitored as a measure of saw performance.Then,a new statistical model was obtained by multiple regression on the machining parameters and the rock sawability index.The model is very useful for the evaluation of the system vibration,and for selecting suitable machining parameters,from a limited set of mechanical properties.

  3. Rock salt constitutive modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickell, R.E.

    1980-03-18

    The Serata model is the best operational model available today because it incorporates: (1) a yield function to demarcate between viscoelastic and viscoplastic behavior of rock salt; (2) a pressure and temperature dependence for yield stresses; and (3) a standard linear solid, which can be readily extended into the non-linear regime, to represent creep behavior. Its only deficiencies appear to be the lack of secondary creep behavior (a free dashpot) and some unsettling arbitrariness about the Poisson's ratio (..nu.. ..-->.. 0.5) argument for viscoplasticity. The Sandia/WIPP model will have good primary and secondary creep capability, but lacks the viscoplastic behavior. In some cases, estimated inelastic strains may be underpredicted. If a creep acceleration mechanism associated with brine inclusions is observed, this model may require extensive revision. Most of the other models available (SAI, RE-SPEC, etc.) are only useful for short-term calculations, because they employ temporal power law (t/sup n/) primary creep representations. These models are unsatisfactory because they cannot represent dual mechanisms with differing characteristic times. An approach based upon combined creep and plasticity is recommended in order to remove the remaining deficiency in the Serata model. DOE/Sandia/WIPP should be encouraged to move aggressively in this regard.

  4. They will rock you!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    On 30 September, CERN will be the venue for one of the most prestigious events of the year: the concert for the Bosons&More event, the Organization’s celebration of the remarkable performance of the LHC and all its technical systems, as well as the recent fundamental discoveries. Topping the bill will be the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, the CERN Choir, the Zürcher Sing-Akademie and the Alan Parsons Live Project rock group, who have joined forces to create an unforgettable evening’s entertainment.   The Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, directed by Maestro Neeme Järvi, artistic and musical director of the OSR. (Image: Grégory Maillot). >>> From the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande… Henk Swinnen, General Manager of the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande (OSR), answers some questions for the CERN Bulletin, just a few days before the event. How did this project come about? When CERN invited us to take part in the B...

  5. Uranium series, volcanic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    Application of U-series dating to volcanic rocks provides unique and valuable information about the absolute timing of crystallization and differentiation of magmas prior to eruption. The 238U–230Th and 230Th-226Ra methods are the most commonly employed for dating the crystallization of mafic to silicic magmas that erupt at volcanoes. Dates derived from the U–Th and Ra–Th methods reflect crystallization because diffusion of these elements at magmatic temperatures is sluggish (Cherniak 2010) and diffusive re-equilibration is insignificant over the timescales (less than or equal to 10^5 years) typically associated with pre-eruptive storage of nearly all magma compositions (Cooper and Reid 2008). Other dating methods based on elements that diffuse rapidly at magmatic temperatures, such as the 40Ar/39Ar and (U–Th)/He methods, yield dates for the cooling of magma at the time of eruption. Disequilibrium of some short-lived daughters of the uranium series such as 210Po may be fractionated by saturation of a volatile phase and can be employed to date magmatic gas loss that is synchronous with volcanic eruption (e.g., Rubin et al. 1994).

  6. Research into basic rocks types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) has carried out research into basic rock types in Finland. The research programme has been implemented in parallel with the preliminary site investigations for radioactive waste disposal in 1991-1993. The program contained two main objectives: firstly, to study the properties of the basic rock types and compare those with the other rock types under the investigation; secondly, to carry out an inventory of rock formations consisting of basic rock types and suitable in question for final disposal. A study of environmental factors important to know regarding the final disposal was made of formations identified. In total 159 formations exceeding the size of 4 km2 were identified in the inventory. Of these formations 97 were intrusive igneous rock types and 62 originally extrusive volcanic rock types. Deposits consisting of ore minerals, industrial minerals or building stones related to these formations were studied. Environmental factors like natural resources, protected areas or potential for restrictions in land use were also studied

  7. Source rock potential in Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raza, H.A. (Hydrocarbon Development Institute of Pakistan, Islamabad (Pakistan))

    1991-03-01

    Pakistan contains two sedimentary basins: Indus in the east and Balochistan in the west. The Indus basin has received sediments from precambrian until Recent, albeit with breaks. It has been producing hydrocarbons since 1914 from three main producing regions, namely, the Potwar, Sulaisman, and Kirthar. In the Potwar, oil has been discovered in Cambrian, Permian, Jurassic, and Tertiary rocks. Potential source rocks are identified in Infra-Cambrian, Permian, Paleocene, and Eocene successions, but Paleocene/Eocene Patala Formation seems to be the main source of most of the oil. In the Sulaiman, gas has been found in Cretaceous and Tertiary; condensate in Cretaceous rocks. Potential source rocks are indicated in Cretaceous, Paleocene, and Eocene successions. The Sembar Formation of Early Cretaceous age appears to be the source of gas. In the Kirthar, oil and gas have been discovered in Cretaceous and gas has been discovered in paleocene and Eocene rocks. Potential source rocks are identified in Kirthar and Ghazij formations of Eocene age in the western part. However, in the easter oil- and gas-producing Badin platform area, Union Texas has recognized the Sembar Formation of Early Cretaceous age as the only source of Cretaceous oil and gas. The Balochistan basin is part of an Early Tertiary arc-trench system. The basin is inadequately explored, and there is no oil or gas discovery so far. However, potential source rocks have been identified in Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene, and Pliocene successions based on geochemical analysis of surface samples. Mud volcanoes are present.

  8. Dynamic rock fragmentation: thresholds for long runout rock avalanches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.T. Bowman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic fragmentation of rock within rock avalanches is examined using the fragmentation concepts introduced by Grady and co-workers. The analyses use typical material values for weak chalk and limestone in order to determine theoretical strain rate thresholds for dynamic fragmentation and resulting fragment sizes. These are found to compare favourably with data obtained from field observations of long runout rock avalanches and chalk cliff collapses in spite of the simplicity of the approach used. The results provide insight as to the energy requirements to develop long runout behaviour and hence may help to explain the observed similarities between large rock avalanches and much smaller scale chalk cliff collapses as seen in Europe.

  9. Space Weathering of Lunar Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, S. K.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.

    2012-01-01

    All materials exposed at the lunar surface undergo space weathering processes. On the Moon, boulders make up only a small percentage of the exposed surface, and areas where such rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions identified from remote sensing data. Yet space weathered surfaces (patina) are relatively common on returned rock samples, some of which directly sample the surface of larger boulders. Because, as witness plates to lunar space weathering, rocks and boulders experience longer exposure times compared to lunar soil grains, they allow us to develop a deeper perspective on the relative importance of various weathering processes as a function of time.

  10. Towards a geomechanics classification of folded layered rock masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliardi, Federico; Zanchi, Andrea; Bianchi, Federico; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2016-04-01

    Several schemes have been proposed in the last decades to account for the effects of structure and alteration of rock masses on their geo-mechanical properties. Among these, the Geological Strength Index (GSI) turned out as the most effective to account for complex geological conditions, including heavily fractured, heterogeneous (e.g. flysch-like) or tectonically disturbed rock masses. It is well known that folding has a direct impact on the type and degree of fracturing. Nevertheless, no classification scheme has been developed to introduce explicitly the effects of folding and associated fracturing on rock mass strength and deformability. In this perspective, we carried out an exploratory study aimed at establishing relationships between outcrop-scale folding and GSI in layered carbonate rock masses, exceptionally well exposed in a quarry near Bergamo (Lombardia, Southern Alps). A N-S trending, 350m long and 115m high benched rock face exposes a complete cross section of a sub-horizontal inclined fold involving Lower Jurassic cherty mudstones (Moltrasio Lms.) and marly limestones successions (Domaro Lms.). The main fold has an axial surface moderately dipping to the north and is characterised by polyharmonic folds at scales of metres to tens of metres. The site was documented by producing a digital outcrop through a high-resolution terrestrial photogrammetric survey from distances ranging from 70 to 130 m (18 camera stations, 395 pictures), using RTK GNSS measurements for camera station geo-referencing. Data processing by Structure-from-Motion (SfM) techniques resulted in detailed point clouds covering the entire slope with a cm-scale accuracy. In order to establish relationships between lithology, folding styles, and geomechanical properties of folded rock masses we performed a detailed structural analysis at 25 survey stations spread over all the different fold sectors. These surveys include: lithology, bedding attitude and thickness, brittle structures (e

  11. Sedimentology and facies analysis of Devonian Rocks, southern district of Mackenzie, North West Territories, Canada

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer Drees, N.C.

    1989-01-01

    The Devonian rock succession in the southern part of the District of Mackenzie consists of interbedded evaporites and carbonates, fossiliferous carbonates and shales. Inthe study areathe Devonian succession unconformably overlies LowerPaleozoic orPrecambrian strata and thins in a northeastward direc

  12. Sulphate rocks as an arena for karst development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrejchuk V.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The rocks in which karst systems develop are most commonly composed of carbonate sulphate and chloride minerals. The sulphate minerals are quite numerous, but only gypsum and anhydrite form extensive masses in sedimentary sequences. Other minerals, which represent sulphates of K, Mg and Na, normally occur as minor beds (0.1-5.0 m, or as inclusions associated with chloride rocks. However some minerals precipitated in salt-generating basins, such as mirabilite and glauberite (typically formed in the Kara-Bogaz-Gol Gulf, salt lakes of Siberia and in China, form sequences up to 5-10 m thick where karst may develop. Due to the very high solubility of Na -sulphates, karst processes and features occurring in these rocks resemble salt karst. Thus, the term sulphate karst, although not strictly correct, is used mainly to indicate karst developed in gypsum and anhydrite.

  13. Dome-shaped PDC cutters drill harder rock effectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that rock mechanics and sonic travel time log data indicate that bits with convex-shaped polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) cutters can drill harder rock formations than comparable bits with flat PDC cutters. The Dome-shaped cutters have drilled carbonate formations with sonic travel times as small as 50 μsec/ft, compared to the standard cutoff of 75 μsec/ft for flat PCD cutters. Recent field data from slim hole wells drilled in the Permian basin have shown successful applications of the 3/8-in. Dome cutter in the Grayburg dolomite with its sonic travel times as low as 50-55 μsec/ft and compressive strengths significantly greater than the standard operating range for PDC bit applications. These field data indicate that the Dome cutters can successfully drill hard rock. The convex cutter shape as good impact resistance, cuttings removal, heat dissipation, and wear resistance

  14. Metal concentrations and carbonaceous matter in the black shale type rocks of the Urals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilova, T. G.; Shevchuk, S. S.; Isayenko, S. I.

    2016-07-01

    Here, the results of examination of black shale type rocks from the Urals for noble metal mineralization are presented for the first time: they have been obtained using atomic-absorption spectrometry along with data of a complex analysis of a carbon mineralization applying a complex of high-resolution techniques. The data acquired demonstrate anomalously high Au concentrations in all the rocks examined. The carbon matter occurs in a wide range of phase states, including nanocrystalline graphite, carbon nanofiber, nanoglobules, diamond-like carbon, and bitumens. The black shale type rocks were found to be promising for further studies in order to seek industrially valuable objects including in areas of the northern part of the Urals.

  15. Anthropic Rock: a brief history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Cathcart

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Stone tool-making is a reductive process. Synthetic rock manufacturing, preeminently an additive process, will not for-ever be confined to only the Earth-biosphere. This brief focuses on humanity's ancient past, hodiernal and possible future even more massive than present-day creation of artificial rocks within our exploitable Solar System. It is mostly Earth-centric account that expands the factual generalities underlying the unique non-copyrighted systemic technogenic rock classification first publicly presented (to the American Geological Society during 2001, by its sole intellectual innovator, James Ross Underwood, Jr. His pioneering, unique exposition of an organization of this ever-increasingly important aspect of the Anthropic Rock story, spatially expansive material lithification, here is given an amplified discussion for the broader geo and space science social group-purpose of encouragement of a completer 21st Century treatment of Underwood's explicative subject-chart (Fig. 2.

  16. ROCK DEFORMATION. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-05-24

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on ROCK DEFORMATION was held at II Ciocco from 5/19/02 thru 5/24/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  17. Genesis and organic geochemical characteristics of the carbonaceous rock stratabound gold deposits, South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The organic matter of three different chronological major carbonaceous rock gold-bearing formations of South China (Middle Proterozoic Shangqiaoshan group of northeastern Jiangxi, Lower Cambrian Shuikou group of northern Guangxi and Devonian Shetianqiao group of eastern Hunan) and related carbonaceous stratabound gold deposits such as Jinshan, Longshui and Shixia deposits, respectively, has been characterized by organic geochemical techniques. These organic geochemical results show that the average total organic carbon (TOC) content of the three chronological carbonaceous rock gold-bearing formations of South China ranges from 0.15% to 1.56%. The thermal maturity of the organic matter of host rocks in the three gold-bearing formations is high. The micro-component of the organic matter of the host rocks consists primarily of solid bitumen and graphite. The organic carbon and gold of the host rocks appear to syndeposit in situ during the formation of the gold-bearing formations. The organic carbon played a certain role in controlling the geochemical environment of the gold-bearing formations. The metallogenetic mechanism of the carbonaceous rock stratabound gold deposits of South China is closely associated in genesis with the sedimentation, diagenesis and thermal evolution history of the organic matter of host rocks in the gold-bearing formations.

  18. Earthquake fault rock indicating a coupled lubrication mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Okamoto

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available A pseudotachylyte bounded by a carbonate-matrix implosion breccia was found at a fossilized out-of-sequence thrust in the Shimanto accretionary complex, Japan. This occurrence resulted from the following events: first implosion of host rock due to interstitial fluid pressure increase and asymmetric fracturing; second, Ca-Fe-Mg carbonate precipitation; and third, frictional melting. The rock-record suggests that these events took place in a single seismogenic slip event. Resulting from abrupt drop in fluid pressure after implosion, hydro-fracturing and fluid escape, recovered high effective friction promoted melting during fault movement. Coexistence of fluid implosion breccia and pseudotachylyte has never been reported from continental pseudotachylyte, but might be characteristic from hydrous seismogenic faults in subduction zone

  19. TOC changes in the process of thermal evolution of source rock and its controls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG; Ningning; LU; Shuangfang; HUANG; Zhilong; ZHANG; Y

    2004-01-01

    Through geological observation, simulation in laboratory and numerical modeling, the factors that control the changes in total organic content (TOC) of source rock have been studied. When the formula DTOC=(TOC0-TOC)/TOC0 (original organic carbon content in the rock) is used to measure the TOC (total organic carbon content) changes in the source rock through geological time, the degrees and directions of such changes are determined by losses and relative amounts both of organic and inorganic matter in the source rock. The DTOC equation, which is used to calculate the loss rate in the process of maturation for the source rock, is therefore obtained by analyzing the mass balance relations. For a certain type of source rock with a certain maturation history, the changes of its TOC respond only to the rates of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion. In actual cases of geological entities, DTOC generally ranges from -0.05 to 0.2, while the calculated reconversion coefficient (k) for organic carbon content remains between 0.90 and 1.25. Only in an ideal situation where there are extremely high rates of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion can the DTOC value experience significant changes, with k reaching up to 2.5. It is concluded, therefore, that the criterion for carbonates source rock assessment, based on reconverting the TOC to the value of its original state, may have overestimated the course of the "carbon-reduction", which is likely in many cases to make a poor source rock sound better.

  20. Determination of lithium in rocks by distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, M.H.

    1949-01-01

    A method for the quantitative extraction and recovery of lithium from rocks is based on a high temperature volatilization procedure. The sample is sintered with a calcium carbonate-calcium chloride mixture at 1200?? C. for 30 minutes in a platinum ignition tube, and the volatilization product is collected in a plug of Pyrex glass wool in a connecting Pyrex tube. The distillate, which consists of the alkali chlorides with a maximum of 5 to 20 mg. of calcium oxide and traces of a few other elements, is removed from the apparatus by dissolving in dilute hydrochloric acid and subjected to standard analytiaal procedures. The sinter residues contained less than 0.0005% lithium oxide. Lithium oxide was recovered from synthetic samples with an average error of 1.1%.

  1. The fungal colonisation of rock-art caves: experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Valme; Fernandez-Cortes, Angel; Cuezva, Soledad; Laiz, Leonila; Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2009-09-01

    The conservation of rock-art paintings in European caves is a matter of increasing interest. This derives from the bacterial colonisation of Altamira Cave, Spain and the recent fungal outbreak of Lascaux Cave, France—both included in the UNESCO World Heritage List. Here, we show direct evidence of a fungal colonisation of rock tablets in a testing system exposed in Altamira Cave. After 2 months, the tablets, previously sterilised, were heavily colonised by fungi and bacteria. Most fungi isolated were labelled as entomopathogens, while the bacteria were those regularly identified in the cave. Rock colonisation was probably promoted by the dissolved organic carbon supplied with the dripping and condensation waters and favoured by the displacement of aerosols towards the interior of the cave, which contributed to the dissemination of microorganisms. The role of arthropods in the dispersal of spores may also help in understanding fungal colonisation. This study evidences the fragility of rock-art caves and demonstrates that microorganisms can easily colonise bare rocks and materials introduced into the cavity.

  2. Treated and untreated rock dust: Quartz content and physical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Jhy-Charm; Lee, Taekhee; Chisholm, William P; Farcas, Daniel; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Harper, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Rock dusting is used to prevent secondary explosions in coal mines, but inhalation of rock dusts can be hazardous if the crystalline silica (e.g., quartz) content in the respirable fraction is high. The objective of this study is to assess the quartz content and physical characteristics of four selected rock dusts, consisting of limestone or marble in both treated (such as treatment with stearic acid or stearates) and untreated forms. Four selected rock dusts (an untreated and treated limestone and an untreated and treated marble) were aerosolized in an aerosol chamber. Respirable size-selective sampling was conducted along with particle size-segregated sampling using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX) analyses were used to determine quartz mass and particle morphology, respectively. Quartz percentage in the respirable dust fraction of untreated and treated forms of the limestone dust was significantly higher than in bulk samples, but since the bulk percentage was low the enrichment factor would not have resulted in any major change to conclusions regarding the contribution of respirable rock dust to the overall airborne quartz concentration. The quartz percentage in the marble dust (untreated and treated) was very low and the respirable fractions showed no enrichment. The spectra from SEM-EDX analysis for all materials were predominantly from calcium carbonate, clay, and gypsum particles. No free quartz particles were observed. The four rock dusts used in this study are representative of those presented for use in rock dusting, but the conclusions may not be applicable to all available materials. PMID:27314444

  3. Mineral artefacts mimicking microfossils in Archean rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepot, K.; Philippot, P.; Benzerara, K.

    2009-04-01

    Because prokaryotes populating the early Earth were structurally and morphologically very simple, it is difficult to obtain taxonomic information from microfossils, and even more problematic, to distinguish true fossils from abiotic objects. For example, many self-assembly processes associated with the precipitation of nanoscale minerals in the presence of organic compounds generate cell-like structures. Based on high resolution microscopy observations on natural samples, we describe three types of features common to Archean rocks and suggest that they represent microfossil-like artefacts. Using Scanning Electron Microscopy we have observed carbon-free silica inclusions in carbonate sediments that are very similar in size and shape (rods and spheres) to microorganisms. The common distribution of organic carbon at grain boundaries in those rocks indicate that such cell-like minerals, when coated by secondarily-migrated carbonaceous mater, could easily be mistaken for microfossils. The organisation and the micro- to nano-structure of bacteriomorphs might be even more confusing. We have observed chains of spheres that match in size and arrangement with some coccoid bacteria such as streptococci. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) observation of Focused Ion Beam (FIB) sections cut through these spheres shows that they are composed of TiO2nanocrystallites partly rimmed or linked by nanoscale chlorite films. This assemblage creates smooth cell-like structures at the micron-scale. However, the absence of organic carbon in those structures as well as the observation of many similar TiO2 chains of spheres dispersed in volcanic glass shards argue against a biologic origin. Ambient inclusions trails also generate filamentous structures that can be mistaken for microfossils. (Knoll and Barghoorn, 1974) suggested that such pseudofossils could have formed by the displacement of a crystal (e.g. pyrite) in its mineral matrix owing to pressure solution processes linked to gas

  4. Seismic response of rock joints and jointed rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term stability of emplacement drifts and potential near-field fluid flow resulting from coupled effects are among the concerns for safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). A number of factors can induce drift instability or change the near-field flow patterns. Repetitive seismic loads from earthquakes and thermal loads generated by the decay of emplaced waste are two significant factors. One of two key technical uncertainties (KTU) that can potentially pose a high risk of noncompliance with the performance objectives of 10 CFR Part 60 is the prediction of thermal-mechanical (including repetitive seismic load) effects on stability of emplacement drifts and the engineered barrier system. The second KTU of concern is the prediction of thermal-mechanical-hydrological (including repetitive seismic load) effects on the host rock surrounding the engineered barrier system. The Rock Mechanics research project being conducted at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) is intended to address certain specific technical issues associated with these two KTUs. This research project has two major components: (i) seismic response of rock joints and a jointed rock mass and (ii) coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological (TMH) response of a jointed rock mass surrounding the engineered barrier system (EBS). This final report summarizes the research activities concerned with the repetitive seismic load aspect of both these KTUs

  5. Seismic response of rock joints and jointed rock mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, A.; Hsiung, S.M.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1996-06-01

    Long-term stability of emplacement drifts and potential near-field fluid flow resulting from coupled effects are among the concerns for safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). A number of factors can induce drift instability or change the near-field flow patterns. Repetitive seismic loads from earthquakes and thermal loads generated by the decay of emplaced waste are two significant factors. One of two key technical uncertainties (KTU) that can potentially pose a high risk of noncompliance with the performance objectives of 10 CFR Part 60 is the prediction of thermal-mechanical (including repetitive seismic load) effects on stability of emplacement drifts and the engineered barrier system. The second KTU of concern is the prediction of thermal-mechanical-hydrological (including repetitive seismic load) effects on the host rock surrounding the engineered barrier system. The Rock Mechanics research project being conducted at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) is intended to address certain specific technical issues associated with these two KTUs. This research project has two major components: (i) seismic response of rock joints and a jointed rock mass and (ii) coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological (TMH) response of a jointed rock mass surrounding the engineered barrier system (EBS). This final report summarizes the research activities concerned with the repetitive seismic load aspect of both these KTUs.

  6. 30 CFR 57.3203 - Rock fixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... grouting material shall not be used. (f) When rock bolts tensioned by torquing are used as a means of... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock fixtures. 57.3203 Section 57.3203 Mineral... Support-Surface and Underground § 57.3203 Rock fixtures. (a) For rock bolts and accessories addressed...

  7. Use of total organic carbon, spectral gamma ray and bioturbation as tools in the identification of source rock; Carbono organico total, gamaespectrometria e bioturbacao como ferramentas na busca de possiveis horizontes geradores de hidrocarbonetos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Anderson S.; Pereira, Egberto [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Geologia. Dept. de Estratigrafia e Paleontologia

    2008-07-01

    This work presents the result obtained for the gamaespectrometric study of a borehole situated in north of Parana Basin, concerning sediments of the Ponta Grossa Formation. The Total Radioactivity data and the concentrations of Potassium (K), Uranium (U), Thorium (Th) have been compared to the Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and to the degree of bioturbation intensity. The mentioned formation is composed of basal sandstones deposited in shoreface conditions, which pass to siltstones and black shales deposited in offshore conditions. Nine sedimentary facies were identified based on sedimentological characteristics and sedimentary structures. The bioturbation intensity indicates the modification degree of the initial arrangement of sedimentary beds by the action of organisms. High TOC values in the intervals in addition to the increase of the radioactivity values indicate anoxic conditions. These conditions are ideal for the organic matter concentration and preservation, reflecting favorable intervals to the hydrocarbons (HC) generation. Thus, with the integrated use of diverse tools it was possible to confirm that the Givetian-Frasnian interval of the Ponta Grossa Formation presents the best potential of HC generation of the section analyzed. (author)

  8. Ellipsoidal anisotropy in elasticity for rocks and rock masses

    CERN Document Server

    Pouya, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    One of the interesting features with the ellipsoidal models of anisotropy presented in this paper is their acceptance of analytical solutions for some of the basic elasticity problems. It was shown by Pouya (2000) and Pouya and Zaoui (2006) that many closed-form solutions for basic problems involving linear isotropic materials could be extended by linear transformation to cover a variety of "ellipsoidal" materials. This paper will describe two main varieties of ellipsoidal elastic models and show how well they fit the in situ data for sedimentary rocks; numerical homogenization results for several varieties of fractured rock masses will also be provided.

  9. Fracture characteristics in Japanese rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is crucial for the performance assessment of geosphere to evaluate the characteristics of fractures that can be dominant radionuclide migration pathways from a repository to biosphere. This report summarizes the characteristics of fractures obtained from broad literature surveys and the fields surveys at the Kamaishi mine in northern Japan and at outcrops and galleries throughout the country. The characteristics of fractures described in this report are fracture orientation, fracture shape, fracture frequency, fracture distribution in space, transmissivity of fracture, fracture aperture, fracture fillings, alteration halo along fracture, flow-wetted surface area in fracture, and the correlation among these characteristics. Since granitic rock is considered the archetype fractured media, a large amount of fracture data is available in literature. In addition, granitic rock has been treated as a potential host rock in many overseas programs, and has JNC performed a number of field observations and experiments in granodiorite at the Kamaishi mine. Therefore, the characteristics of fractures in granitic rock are qualitatively and quantitatively clarified to some extent in this report, while the characteristics of fractures in another rock types are not clarified. (author)

  10. Tracing Life in the Earliest Terrestrial Rock Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepland, A.; van Zuilen, M.; Arrhenius, G.

    2001-12-01

    The principal method for studying the earliest traces of life in the metamorphosed, oldest (> 3.5 Ga) terrestrial rocks involves determination of isotopic composition of carbon, mainly prevailing as graphite. It is generally believed that this measure can distinguish biogenic graphite from abiogenic varieties. However, the interpretation of life from carbon isotope ratios has to be assessed within the context of specific geologic circumstances requiring (i) reliable protolith interpretation (ii) control of secondary, metasomatic processes, and (iii) understanding of different graphite producing mechanisms and related carbon isotopic systematics. We have carried out a systematic study of abundance, isotopic composition and petrographic associations of graphite in rocks from the ca. 3.8 Ga Isua Supracrustal Belt (ISB) in southern West Greenland. Our study indicates that most of the graphite in ISB occurs in carbonate-rich metasomatic rocks (metacarbonates) while sedimentary units, including banded iron formations (BIFs) and metacherts, have exceedingly low graphite concentrations. Regardless of isotopic composition of graphite in metacarbonate rocks, their secondary origin disqualifies them from providing evidence for traces of life stemming from 3.8 Ga. Recognition of the secondary origin of Isua metacarbonates thus calls for reevaluation of biologic interpretations by Schidlowski et al. (1979) and Mojzsis et al. (1996) that suggested the occurrence of 3.8 Ga biogenic graphite in these rocks. The origin of minute quantities of reduced carbon, released from sedimentary BIFs and metacherts at combustion steps > 700 C remains to be clarified. Its isotopic composition (d13C from -18 to -25%) may hint at a biogenic origin. However, such isotopically light carbon was also found in Proterozoic mafic dykes cross-cutting the metasedimentary units in the ISB. The occurrence of isotopically light, reduced carbon in biologically irrelevant dykes may indicate secondary graphite

  11. Application of frequency attenuation attributes to oil and gas exploration in deep carbonate rocks%频率衰减属性在深层碳酸盐岩油气勘探中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨璐; 贺振华; 文晓涛; 杨小江; 盛秋红

    2012-01-01

    According to deep burial depth,uneven oil and gas distribution of carbonate reef flat lithologic reservoir of Changxing Formation in BL area,this paper put forward a train of thought for hydrocarbon detection which combined frequency attenuation attributes and low frequency ad joint-shadow phenomenon.This paper first introduced the principle of frequency attenuation attributes and low frequency ad joint-shadow phenomenon;secondly established geological model combined with the reservoir physical parameters of Changxing Formation in BL area,and simulated and analyzed the seismic response characteristics of the reservoir by using viscosity-diffusivity wave equation.The model analysis result shows that it is feasible to detect gas-bearing properties of reservoir by using frequency attenuation attributes and low frequency ad joint-shadow phenomenon.Application of real data demonstrates that frequency attenuation attributes and low frequency ad joint-shadow phenomenon has good instruction to the reservoir,and improved the accuracy of reservoir prediction and fluid detection,which can provide a way for oil-gas identification and fluid detecttion of carbonate reef flat lithologic reservoir and similar reservoirs of Changxing Formation in BL area.%针对BL地区长兴组地层碳酸盐岩礁滩相岩性油气藏具有埋藏深、油气分布不均匀的特征,提出了应用频率衰减梯度属性和低频伴影现象相结合进行油气检测的思路。首先介绍了频率衰减梯度和低频伴影现象的方法原理;其次结合研究区长兴组地层的储层物性参数建立地质模型,运用黏滞弥散型波动方程模拟和分析了该类储层的地震响应特征,模型分析表明利用频率衰减梯度属性和低频伴影现象识别此类储层的含气性是可行的。实际资料的应用证实频率衰减梯度属性和低频伴影现象对该类储层都有较好的指示,其预测结果能够相互验证,提高了储层预测及流体

  12. Geochemical characteristics of the oceanic island- type volcanic rocks in the Chiang Mai zone, northern Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Shangyue; FENG Qinglai; ZHANG Zhibin; CHONGPAN Chonglakmani

    2009-01-01

    The oceanic island volcanic rocks in the Chiang Mai zone, northern Thailand, are usually covered by Lower Carboniferous and Upper Permian shallow-water carbonate rocks, with the Hawaii rocks and potash trachybasalt being the main rock types. The alkaline series is dominant with sub-alkaline series occurring in few cases. The geochemical characteristics are described as follows: the major chemical compositions are characterized by high TiO2, high P2O5 and medium K2O; the rare-earth elements are characterized by right-inclined strong LREE-enrichment patterns; the trace element patterns are of the upward-bulging K-Ti enrichment type; multi-component plots falling within the fields of oceanic island basalts and alkali basalts, belonging to the oceanic island-type volcanic rocks, which are similar to the equivalents in Deqin and Gengma (the Changning-Menglian zone) of Yunnan Province, China.

  13. Fracture Analysis of basement rock: A case example of the Eastern Part of the Peninsular Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In general, reservoir rocks can be defined into carbonates, tight elastics and basement rocks. Basement rocks came to be highlighted as their characteristics are quite complicated and remained as a significant challenge in exploration and production area. Motivation of this research is to solve the problem in some area in the Malay Basin which consist fractured basement reservoirs. Thus, in order to increase understanding about their characteristic, a study was conducted in the Eastern part of the Peninsular Malaysia. The study includes the main rock types that resemble the offshore rocks and analysis on the factors that give some effect on fracture characteristic that influence fracture systems and fracture networks. This study will allow better fracture prediction which will be beneficial for future hydrocarbon prediction in this region

  14. Sedimentary environments of organic matter from Middle Permian source rocks in northern Xinjiang,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO Jianyu; KOU Hansheng; ZHOU Lifa; HAN Zhongyuan

    2006-01-01

    A systematic analysis of the inorganic and organic geochemistry of Middle Permian source rocks comprising carbonate rocks and mudstones was carried out, with samples collected from the outcrop and bore of the Junggar, Turpan and Ili basins in northern Xinjiang. This study confirmed that sedimentary parameters for an ancient water body, such as inorganic geochemistry and paleosalinity, have a close relation to the organic matter of source rocks. It is also disclosed that phytane predominance in the source rocks is mainly due to a reducing environment. Biomarkers, such as gammacerane and β-carotene, in the samples reflect a specific salinity in the sedimentary environments. Sedimentary zones with a strong reducing environment are more likely to produce deposits of primary organic matter, which will be buried and preserved contemporarily. Consequently, the source rocks are generally high in organic content and better in organic type than ordinary ones, and vice versa.

  15. Inference of coastal submergence from the study of beach rock off Visakhapatnam

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajamanickam, G.V.; Rao, K.M.; Rao, T.C.S.

    rock, also known as beach sandstone or beach conglomerate is a friable to well cemented rock, made up of quartz sand, coral rubble, basalt boulders, bottle caps or something else, but bonded exclusively by cal cium carbonate that too, of calcite... and subse quently the unconsolidated sediments' cap might have been remlwed by the strong bottom currents (2.5 knots/ hr) prevailing at this place and got deposited elsewhere. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors wish to express their gratitude to Director...

  16. Retardation of radionuclides in back-fill materials of TVO VLJ repository and in rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retardation and diffusion in rock and rock-bentonite back-fill of the following reactor waste elements are reviewed: carbon, cobalt, nickel, strontium, technetium, iodine, cesium, plutonium and americium. Such conservative values for distribution coefficients and diffusion coefficients are proposed for the use in safety assessment of the final disposal of the waste that they lead to overestimations in biosphere radiation doses. Also more realistic values are proposed

  17. Integrated geophysical and geological investigations applied to sedimentary rock mass characterization

    OpenAIRE

    S. Negri; Mazzone, F; Margiotta, S.; G. Leucci; M. T. Carrozzo

    2008-01-01

    The Salento Peninsula (south-eastern Italy) is characterized by sedimentary rocks. The carbonatic nature of the rocks means they are affected by karst phenomena, forming such features as sinkholes, collapsed dolines and caverns, as a result of chemical leaching of carbonates by percolating water. The instability of these phenomena often produces land subsidence problems. The importance of these events is increasing due to growing urbanization, numerous quarries affecting both the subsoil and ...

  18. Detrital input and early diagenesis in sediments from Lake Baikal revealed by rock magnetism

    OpenAIRE

    Demory, F.; Hedi Oberhänsli; Norbert Nowaczyk; Matthias Gottschalk; Richard Wirth; Rudolf Naumann

    2005-01-01

    A rock magnetic study was performed on sediment cores from six locations in Lake Baikal. For a comprehensive approach of the processes influencing the rock magnetic signal, additional data are presented such as total organic carbon (TOC), total sulphur (TS), opal, water content and relative variations in iron and titanium measured on selected intervals. In glacial sediments, the magnetic signal is dominated by magnetite, which is considered to be of detrital origin. This predominance of magne...

  19. Uranium endowments in phosphate rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study seeks to identify and specify the components that make up the prospects of U recovery from phosphate rock. A systems approach is taken. The assessment includes i) reviewing past recovery experience and lessons learned; ii) identifying factors that determine recovery; and iii) establishing a contemporary evaluation of U endowments in phosphate rock reserves, as well as the available and recoverable amounts from phosphate rock and phosphoric acid production. We find that in the past, recovery did not fulfill its potential and that the breakup of the Soviet Union worsened then-favorable recovery market conditions in the 1990s. We find that an estimated 5.7 million tU may be recoverable from phosphate rock reserves. In 2010, the recoverable tU from phosphate rock and phosphoric acid production may have been 15,000 tU and 11,000 tU, respectively. This could have filled the world U supply-demand gap for nuclear energy production. The results suggest that the U.S., Morocco, Tunisia, and Russia would be particularly well-suited to recover U, taking infrastructural considerations into account. We demonstrate future research needs, as well as sustainability orientations. We conclude that in order to promote investment and production, it seems necessary to establish long-term contracts at guaranteed prices, ensuring profitability for phosphoric acid producers. - Highlights: • We identify components that underlie the recovery of uranium from phosphate rock. • We estimate that 11,000 tU may have been recoverable from phosphoric acid in 2010. • Recovery is a resource conservation and environmental pollution control strategy. • To ensure investment in recovery technology, profitability needs to be secured

  20. Carbon isotope anomalies in carbonates of the Karelian series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iudovich, Ia. E.; Makarikhin, V. V.; Medvedev, P. V.; Sukhanov, N. V.

    1990-07-01

    Results are presented on carbon isotope distributions in carbonates of the Karelian complex. A highly anomalous isotopic composition was found in carbonate rocks aged from 2.6 to 1.9 b.y. In the stromatolitic carbonates of the Onega water table, delta-(C-13) reaches a value of +18 percent, while the shungite layer of the Zaonega horizon is characterized by a wide dispersion (from +7.9 to -11.8 percent). These data are in good agreement with the known geochemical boundary (about 2.2 b.y. ago) in the history of the earth.

  1. Some rock mass assessment procedures for discontinuous crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underground radioactive waste repositories place especially stringent demands on rock mass assessment and excavation design methodologies. As part of the Building Research Establishment's programme of research into geotechnical site assessment methodology, experiments were undertaken at an underground test site in granite at Troon, Cornwall, and in the Imperial College Laboratories. The results of discontinuity surveys showed that the borehole impression packer probe technique can provide an important source of information for radioactive waste repository site assessment. Similarly, borehole pressure tests can provide valuable data on discontinuity apertures and hydraulic conductivities and on rock mass permeabilities. A versatile, modular borehole pressure test system for use from restricted underground locations was developed and used successfully. Field tests gave values of equivalent parallel plate apertures and discontinuity hydraulic conductivities in similar ranges to those measured in laboratory tests on samples recovered from the site. Discontinuity normal stiffnesses were also measured successfully using the Terra Tek Geothermal Rock Mechanics Test System which proved itself capable of providing laboratory test data required to support geotechnical site assessment procedures for radioactive waste repositories in discontinuous rock. (author)

  2. Thermal recovery of bitumen from carbonate reservoirs: formation damage aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thimm, H.F. [Thimm Petroleum Technologies Inc. (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In Alberta, about a third of bitumen resources are located in carbonate reservoirs but none of it is considered as a reserve by the Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB). In fact no pilot has been successful in recovering bitumen from carbonate reservoirs due to formation damage problems. Carbonate rock is chemically active at the high temperatures reached in thermal recovery processes, carbon dioxide is generated and carbonate minerals are precipitated. The aim of this paper is to find methods to control the phenomenon. Kinetic and thermodynamic controls were used. Results showed that formation damage is due to aqueous carbon dioxide attacking the reservoir rock. They found that a reduction of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide could inhibit the initial dissolution of rock material by reducing the concentration of aqueous carbon dioxide. A method to overcome the formation damage problem was found and a co-injection of gas and steam process was developed to apply it.

  3. 不同水流速度下温度对奥陶系碳酸盐岩溶蚀速度的影响%Influence of temperature on dissolution rate in Ordovician carbonate rock in different water flow rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵东梅

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the influence of temperature on dissolution rate in Ordovician carbonate brock in different water flow rate, dissolution experiment was conducted at different temperature, different water flow rate and different CO2 pressure with self-designed and manufactured dissolution device which can simulates water flow conditions and contains 24 samples as platform, samples collected from Zhangji mine in Huainan, Zhangcun mine in Luan and Dongtan mine in Yanzhou were used as representative samples. The experiment results show that when water flow rate is relatively low(16.67 mL/min), the influence of environmental temperature change on dissolution rate is insignificant(the average dissolution volume is 0.0006g/cm2), when the water flow rate is high (60mL/min), the influence of temperature change on dissolution rate is significant (the average dissolution volume is 0.003 8g/cm2). That is to say, in strong run-off zone of ground water, the influence of temperature on dissolution rate is bigger and the dissolution rate is higher, so fcarst is developed.%为了解不同水流速度下温度对碳酸盐岩溶蚀速度的影响,以自行设计、制造的能够模拟水流条件,并且可同时容纳24个样品的溶蚀试验装置为平台,以淮南张集矿、潞安漳村矿和兖州东滩矿奥陶系灰岩为代表性岩石试样,选取不同温度、水流速度及CO2压力,进行了溶蚀试验.试验结果显示,在水流速度较低时(16.67 mL/min),环境温度的变化对溶蚀速度的影响比较微小(平均溶蚀变化量为0.0006 g/cm2).在水流速度较大时(60 mL/min),温度的改变对溶蚀速度影响较大(平均溶蚀变化量为0.0038g/cm2).也就是说在地下水的强径流带,温度对溶蚀速度的影响相对较大,溶蚀速度较快,所以岩溶较发育.

  4. Preliminary environmental assessments of disposal of rock mined during excavation of a federal repository for radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the environmental impact of mined rock handling will be dependent not only upon the nature of the material and the way in which it might be disposed but also upon the features of the disposal site area and surroundings, it was necessary to select ''reference environmental locii'' within the regions of geological interest to typify the environmental setting into which the rock would be placed. Reference locii (locations) were developed for consideration of the environmental implications of mined rock from: bedded rock salt from the Salina region, bedded rock salt from the Permian region, dome rock salt from the Gulf Interior region, Pierre shale from the Argillaceous region, granite from the crystalline rock region, volcanic basalt rock from the crystalline ash region, and carbonate rock from the limestone region. Each of these reference locii was examined with respect to those demographic, geographic, physical and ecological attributes which might be impacted by various mined rock disposal alternatives. Alternatives considered included: onsite surface storage, industrial or commercial use, offsite disposal, and environmental blending. Potential impact assessment consists of a qualitative look at the environmental implications of various alternatives for handling the mined rock, given baseline characteristics of an area typified by those represented by the ''reference locus''

  5. Grouting methodology in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For this paper, an initial literature review was conducted to investigate the potential applications of grouting technology for geological disposal of high level radioactive waste (hereafter called geological disposal), and the potential grouting material for each application. The results show the necessity of using suspension grout, such as cement-based grout, during excavation work, especially deep underground. Next, the method to achieve highly effective seals in crystalline rock with cement grout is studied. To enhance the sealing quality, cement grout should penetrate into very fine fractures, e.g. less than 100 μm aperture. In the case of suspension grout, clogging with grout at the openings of rock fractures, especially fine fractures, tends to occur, which results in poor grout penetration. A laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the clogging phenomenon; the results suggest that high injection pressures could be effective to prevent clogging. Finally, focusing on pre-excavation grouting for horizontal tunnels in crystalline rock, the effective grout hole patterns for achieving high quality sealing was studied. A series of theoretical calculations for water inflow and cost studies were conducted. The results indicate that a dense arrangement of grout holes in a relatively narrow area around a tunnel section, as practised in the Nordic countries, is favorable in hard crystalline rock. (author)

  6. Inelastic deformation in crystalline rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, H.; Borja, R. I.

    2011-12-01

    The elasto-plastic behavior of crystalline rocks, such as evaporites, igneous rocks, or metamorphic rocks, is highly dependent on the behavior of their individual crystals. Previous studies indicate that crystal plasticity can be one of the dominant micro mechanisms in the plastic deformation of crystal aggregates. Deformation bands and pore collapse are examples of plastic deformation in crystalline rocks. In these cases twinning within the grains illustrate plastic deformation of crystal lattice. Crystal plasticity is governed by the plastic deformation along potential slip systems of crystals. Linear dependency of the crystal slip systems causes singularity in the system of equations solving for the plastic slip of each slip system. As a result, taking the micro-structure properties into account, while studying the overall behavior of crystalline materials, is quite challenging. To model the plastic deformation of single crystals we use the so called `ultimate algorithm' by Borja and Wren (1993) implemented in a 3D finite element framework to solve boundary value problems. The major advantage of this model is that it avoids the singularity problem by solving for the plastic slip explicitly in sub steps over which the stress strain relationship is linear. Comparing the results of the examples to available models such as Von Mises we show the significance of considering the micro-structure of crystals in modeling the overall elasto-plastic deformation of crystal aggregates.

  7. Contaminant migration in rock aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with fractured rock as a host for deposits of hazardous waste. A literature review of modelling approaches and methods for field investigations concerning flow and migration in fractured rock is given. The literature study on field observations shows that the water flow in fractured rock is unevenly distributed, which contradicts the porous medium approach. Some idealized examples are given to investigate where to find low hydraulic gradients. The ability of a laminar pipe-flow model to reproduce the hydrodynamic transport of contaminated groundwater in fractured rock is investigated. It is assumed that the cross-section areas in an ensemble of tubes have a gamma distribution. The model is applied to field tracer experiments at two sites. An attempt is made to model a fracture with irregular aperture as a two-dimensional stochastic process with known correlation structure. It is assumed that the fracture aperture is lognormally distributed, and that the flow is laminar. A particle following algorithm is applied. A comparison with the porous medium approach, and with the laminar pipe flow model is made. 135 refs, 41 figs, 4 tabs

  8. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>20070252 Chen Meilan (Biological and Environmental College, Zhejiang Shuren University, Hangzhou 310015, China); Li Li Study on Adsorption of Phenol by Modified Organobentonite (Rock and Mineral Analysis, ISSN0254-5357, CN11-2131/TD, 24(4), 2005, p.259-261, 267, 6 illus., 1 table, 11 refs.) Key words: bentonite, benzene, adsorption

  9. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>20140786Deng Zhenping(Institute of Karst Geology,Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences,Guilin 541004,China);Yang Wen-qiong Application of Stripping Voltammetry with a Solid Amalgam Electrode for Determination of Copper in a Tracer and Groundwater Tracing Experiment(Rock and Mineral Analy-

  10. 羌塘盆地双湖地区曲色组冷泉碳酸盐岩及其地质意义%Characteristics and significance of the cold-vent carbonate rocks from the Quse Formation in the Shuanghu area, Qiangtang Basin, northern Xizang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏国清; 伊海生

    2015-01-01

    The carbonate concretions occur in large numbers in the Quse Formation, Shuanghu area, Qiangtang Basin, northern Xizang, and display hummocky, ellipsoidal, lenticular, stratoid, vein, dendritic, clotted, vesicular and seepage textures and structures. These nodules consist dominantly of micritic carbonate minerals with minor amount of clay minerals, quartz, framboidal and subhedral pyrite with an average grain size of about 5. 0μm,in which the sun-flower structures may be observed. The organic fossils such as bivalves, ammonites, worm-like or dendritic fossils and ultra-microbial fossils are found to be arranged with a higher density. The carbon isotopes in the analyzed samples are noticeably negative excursion while the sulfur isotopes in the analyzed samples exhibit a markedly distinct positive excursion. The results of research outlined above are in good agreement with the mechanisms for the formation of the cold-vent carbonate rocks produced by the seepage and release of the modern submarine natural gas. It is inferred from this reason that the carbonate concretions in the study area may be originated from the seepage and eruption of ancient natural gas. The presence of numerous submarine natural gas vents implies that there is a direct correlation between the oceanic anoxic events and the eruption of the submarine natural gas hydrates in the Shuanghu area, Qiangtang Basin during the Early Jurassic.%羌塘盆地南部双湖地区曲色组地层发育大量碳酸盐岩结核,这些结核多呈丘状、椭球状、透镜状、似层状、脉状、树枝状产出。其物质组分主要为泥微晶碳酸盐矿物,少量粘土矿物、石英及草莓状、半自形黄铁矿等。草莓状黄铁矿平均粒径在5.0μm左右,内部可见葵花状构造。发育凝块状、气孔状和渗漏孔等特殊构造。产双壳类、菊石类、蠕虫状或树枝状生物及超微生物化石,生物密度极高。碳同位素明显负偏,硫同位素则明显正

  11. Gas migration through crystalline rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fractured rocks have been considered as potential host rocks for the deep disposal of radioactive waste in a number of countries. The representative repository concepts involved: a) Low- and intermediate-level waste in water-saturated fractured rock. b) Spent fuel (or HLW) in water-saturated fractured rock. c) Spent fuel in unsaturated fractured tuff (Yucca Mountain). The key gas-related issues are likely to be different for these three repository concepts. Concept (a) typically involves the emplacement of packaged wastes in caverns or tunnels, probably backfilled with a cement grout, and perhaps involving structural concrete lining. The quantities of gas produced for a given volume of waste are expected to be larger than for spent fuel or high-level waste and may include radioactive gases whose release at the surface requires assessment for its potential radiological consequences. For this concept, understanding the mechanisms and effects of gas migration through the geosphere is important in repository performance assessment. For concept (b), the waste is typically contained in long-lasting canisters emplaced in holes lined with compacted bentonite. The bentonite barriers are intended to provide the main barrier to groundwater access to the waste, and the quantities of gas expected to be produced are predicted to be sufficiently small that the host rock is not expected to provide a serious obstacle to gas escape from the region of the canister. In this concept, the main barrier to gas migration is considered to be the bentonite buffer; gas migration through this is discussed in a companion paper. Concept (c) is unique in involving emplacement of wastes in unsaturated rock, well above the water table, in a semi-arid region at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. Here the two-phase flow issues relate primarily to the infiltration of water through the fractured rock from the surface, which may involve flow channelling and intermittent flow, and the generation of strongly heat

  12. Carbon cycle makeover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene; Kump, Lee R.

    2013-01-01

    remaining in sediments after respiration leave a residual of oxygen in the atmosphere. The source of oxygen to the atmosphere represented by organic matter burial is balanced by oxygen sinks associated with rock weathering and chemical reaction with volcanic gases. This is the long-term carbon and oxygen...... geochemical cycle. But Earth is an old planet, and oxygen levels have changed through time (2). On page 540 of this issue, Schrag et al. (3) challenge the most commonly used geochemical approach to assess long-term changes in the coupled oxygen and carbon cycles....

  13. What do we really know about (terrestrial) carbonate diagenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasier, Alex; Foubert, Anneleen

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial carbonates including tufas and travertines are known as palaeoenvironmental archives. Increasingly evidence points to continued growth of tufas and travertines after deposition of the primary fabric. If we do not understand 'early diagenetic' processes then we do not understand the geochemical and petrographic data archived within terrestrial carbonate rocks. In many cases early (syn-sedimentary) diagenesis reflects an unstable precursor such as amorphous calcite or aragonite (see Jones & Peng, Sedimentary Geology, 2012), or recrystallization from non-carbonate precursors like calcium oxalates (see for example Cailleau et al., Biogeosciences, 2011). In other cases fabric or geochemical changes may simply reflect highly porous carbonate rock fabrics that allow fluids to flow within the deposit, promoting continued calcite crystal growth. Examples of these and how we might differentiate them will be discussed. There is a fundamental problem with our approach to understanding processes of carbonate diagenesis. Normally we take our evidence from the rock products, making assumptions about the relative ages of rock fabrics and the processes that have affected them. In most cases this is probably unavoidable, but not for rocks that precipitate rapidly, measurable at rates of centimetres or even metres per year. We will highlight the limits of the traditional petrographic approach using examples from Mono Lake (California, USA), Italy, and the UK, and discuss what can be learned from experiments aimed at understanding what really happens during 'early diagenesis' in terrestrial carbonate rocks. This has implications for understanding diagenesis of carbonate rocks of all types and of all ages.

  14. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>20080934 Cai Yuman(Geological Survey of Jiangsu Province,Nanjing 210018,China);Lu Lijuan Determination of Carbonate(Anhydride Carbonate)in Natural Gypsum by Acid-Base Titration(Jiangsu Geology,ISSN1003-6474,CN32-1258/P,31(2),2007,p.127-129,3 illus.,8 refs.)Key words:titration,carbonatesThe authors establish a method of acid-base ti

  15. Comparative analysis of cyanobacteria inhabiting rocks with different light transmittance in the Mojave Desert: a Mars terrestrial analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Heather D.; Baqué, Mickael; Duncan, Andrew G.; Lloyd, Christopher R.; McKay, Christopher P.; Billi, Daniela

    2014-05-01

    The Mojave Desert has been long considered a suitable terrestrial analogue to Mars in many geological and astrobiological aspects. The Silver Lake region in the Mojave Desert hosts several different rock types (talc, marble, quartz, white carbonate and red-coated carbonate) colonized by hypoliths within a few kilometres. This provides an opportunity to investigate the effect of rock type on hypolithic colonization in a given environment. Transmission measurements from 300 to 800 nm showed that the transmission of blue and UVA varied between rock types. The wavelength at which the transmission fell to 1% of the transmission at 600 nm was 475 nm for white carbonate and quartz, 425 nm for red-coated carbonate and talc and 380 nm for marble. The comparative analysis of the cyanobacterial component of hypoliths under different rocks, as revealed by sequencing 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, showed no significant variation with rock type; hypoliths were dominated by phylotypes of the genus Chroococcidiopsis, although less abundant phylotypes of the genus Loriellopsis, Leptolyngbya and Scytonema occurred. The comparison of the confocal laser scanning microscopy-λ (CLSM-λ) scan analysis of the spectral emission of the photosynthetic pigments of Chroococcidiopsis in different rocks with the spectrum of isolated Chroococcidiopsis sp. 029, revealed a 10 nm red shift in the emission fingerprinting for quartz and carbonate and a 5 nm red shift for talc samples. This result reflects the versatility of Chroococcidiopsis in inhabiting dry niches with different light availability for photosynthesis.

  16. Regulation of ROCK Activity in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Wewer, Ulla M; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    , these findings demonstrate additional modes to regulate ROCK activity. This review describes the molecular mechanisms of ROCK activity regulation in cancer, with emphasis on ROCK isoform-specific regulation and interaction partners, and discusses the potential of ROCKs as therapeutic targets in cancer.......Cancer-associated changes in cellular behavior, such as modified cell-cell contact, increased migratory potential, and generation of cellular force, all require alteration of the cytoskeleton. Two homologous mammalian serine/threonine kinases, Rho-associated protein kinases (ROCK I and II), are key...... regulators of the actin cytoskeleton acting downstream of the small GTPase Rho. ROCK is associated with cancer progression, and ROCK protein expression is elevated in several types of cancer. ROCKs exist in a closed, inactive conformation under quiescent conditions, which is changed to an open, active...

  17. Are there rocks from the Brezovské Karpaty Mts. suitable for construction and decoration purposes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Holzer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This research has focused on assessing the most important physical and mechanical properties of rocks quarried in the Brezovské Karpaty Mts. Carbonate sandstones and conglomerates of Upper Cretaceous and carbonate sandstone of Neogene sedimentary strata were considered. The sites Chtelnica – Trianova and Chtelnica – Malé Skalky were chosen as appropriate material for monuments and for restoration work. Samples for the assessment of rock properties were taken from abandoned and operated quarries. The tested specimens for laboratory tests in a form of cubes and cylinders were prepared from monoliths and drilled cores were taken from the depth up to 1 m within the rock mass. To broaden the scope of the investigations previous research results from quarries at St. Margarethen (Burgenland, Austria in similar lithological type were also included. Thin sections were made from one of the drill cores from each quarry. The rock quality and durability were assessed through laboratory testing of physical and mechanical properties, including measurements of real and apparent density, porosity, water absorption capacity, uniaxial compressive strength (UCS for both dry and water-saturated rock samples and for samples following repeated freeze-thaw cycles, the coefficient of softening and the coefficient of freezing. All investigated rock samples had different porosities and absorption capacities. They also differed in their UCS values, which varied greatly but mostly belonged to the weak rock category (UCS below 50 MPa. Based on physical and mechanical properties of rocks assessed on a number of tested samples from two investigated sites in Slovakia and one comparable site in Austria, quality assurance of the rock utilization as a decoration/restoration material is presented.

  18. Experimental evaluation of in situ CO2-water-rock reactions during CO2 injection in basaltic rocks: Implications for geological CO2 sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matter, Juerg M.; Takahashi, Taro; Goldberg, David

    2007-02-01

    Deep aquifers are potential long-term storage sites for anthropogenic CO2 emissions. The retention time and environmental safety of the injected CO2 depend on geologic and physical factors and on the chemical reactions between the CO2, the aquifer water, and the host rocks. The pH buffer capacity of the aquifer water and the acid neutralization potential of the host rocks are important factors for the permanent stabilization of the injected CO2. Mafic rocks, such as basalt, which primarily consists of Ca, Mg silicate minerals, have a high acid neutralization capacity by providing alkaline earth elements that form stable carbonate minerals. The carbonate minerals formed thus sequester CO2 in a chemically stable and environmentally benign form. In this study, we present results from a small-scale CO2 injection test in mafic and metasedimentary rocks. The injection test was conducted using a single-well push-pull test strategy. CO2 saturated water (pH = 3.5) was injected into a hydraulically isolated and permeable aquifer interval to study the acid neutralization capacity of Ca, Mg silicate rocks and to estimate in situ cation release rates. Release rates for Ca, Mg, and Na were calculated by use of solute compositions of water samples retrieved after the CO2 injection, the incubation time of the injected solution within the aquifer, and geometric estimates of the reactive surface area of the host rocks. Our results confirm rapid acid neutralization rates and water-rock reactions sufficient for safe and permanent storage of CO2. Carbonic acid was neutralized within hours of injection into a permeable mafic aquifer by two processes: mixing between the injected solution and the aquifer water, and water-rock reactions. Calculated cation release rates decrease with increasing pH that is confirmed by laboratory-based experiments. Large differences between release rates obtained from the field and laboratory experiments may be mainly due to uncertainties in the estimation

  19. 21 CFR 868.5180 - Rocking bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rocking bed. 868.5180 Section 868.5180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5180 Rocking bed. (a) Identification. A rocking bed is a...

  20. Rock Art: Connecting to the Past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipe, Marianne

    2001-01-01

    Presents an activity for fourth-grade students in which they learn about ancient art and create their own authentic-looking rock sculptures with pictograms, or painted images. Explains how the students create their own rocks and then paint a pictograph on the rocks with brown paint. (CMK)

  1. Differentiation and analysis on rock breaking characteristics of TBM disc cutter at different rock temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭青; 张桂菊; 夏毅敏; 李建芳

    2015-01-01

    In order to study rock breaking characteristics of tunnel boring machine (TBM) disc cutter at different rock temperatures, thermodynamic rock breaking mathematical model of TBM disc cutter was established on the basis of rock temperature change by using particle flow code theory and the influence law of interaction mechanism between disc cutter and rock was also numerically simulated. Furthermore, by using the linear cutting experiment platform, rock breaking process of TBM disc cutter at different rock temperatures was well verified by the experiments. Finally, rock breaking characteristics of TBM disc cutter were differentiated and analyzed from microscale perspective. The results indicate the follows. 1) When rock temperature increases, the mechanical properties of rock such as hardness, and strength, were greatly reduced, simultaneously the microcracks rapidly grow with the cracks number increasing, which leads to rock breaking load decreasing and improves rock breaking efficiency for TBM disc cutter. 2) The higher the rock temperature, the lower the rock internal stress. The stress distribution rules coincide with the Buzin Neske stress circle rules: the maximum stress value is below the cutting edge region and then gradually decreases radiant around; stress distribution is symmetrical and the total stress of rock becomes smaller. 3) The higher the rock temperature is, the more the numbers of micro, tensile and shear cracks produced are by rock as well as the easier the rock intrusion, along with shear failure mode mainly showing. 4) With rock temperature increasing, the resistance intrusive coefficients of rock and intrusion power decrease obviously, so the specific energy consumption that TBM disc cutter achieves leaping broken also decreases subsequently. 5) The acoustic emission frequency remarkably increases along with the temperature increasing, which improves the rock breaking efficiency.

  2. Radionuclide fixation mechanisms in rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the safety evaluation of the radioactive waste disposal in geological environment, the mass balance equation for radionuclide migration is given. The sorption of radionuclides by geological formations is conventionally represented by the retardation of the radionuclides as compared with water movement. In order to quantify the sorption of radionuclides by rocks and sediments, the distribution ratio is used. In order to study quantitatively the long term behavior of waste radionuclides in geological environment, besides the distribution ratio concept in short term, slower radionuclide retention reaction involving mineral transformation should be considered. The development of microspectroscopic method for long term reaction path modeling, the behavior of iron during granite and water interaction, the reduction precipitation of radionuclides, radionuclide migration pathways, and the representative scheme of radionuclide migration and fixation in rocks are discussed. (K.I.)

  3. Kimberley rock art dating project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The art's additional value, unequalled by traditionally recognised artefacts, is its permanent pictorial documentation presenting a 'window' into the otherwise intangible elements of perceptions, vision and mind of pre-historic cultures. Unfortunately it's potential in establishing Kimberley archaeological 'big picture' still remains largely unrecognised. Some of findings of the Kimberley Rock Art Dating Project, using AMS and optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating techniques, are outlined. It is estimated that these findings will encourage involvement by a greater diversity of specialist disciplines to tie findings into levels of this art sequence as a primary reference point. The sequence represents a sound basis for selecting specific defined images for targeting detailed studies by a range of dating technique. This effectively removes the undesirable ad hoc sampling of 'apparently old paintings'; a process which must unavoidably remain the case with researchers working on most global bodies of rock art

  4. Isotopic and multi-proxy continental records in the Precambrian rocks, Aldan Shield, Russian Federation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guliy, Vasyl

    2015-04-01

    Clay minerals and hematite from paleo-weathering profiles, observed on and within Precambrian rocks of the apatite deposits, have been investigated from the view-points of geology, mineralogy, pedology. Weathering phenomena have been recognized in the Fedorovskaya and Gorbyliakhskaya Formations of the Precambrian Aldan Shield. Two complexes that differ in rock composition and structure are involved in the geological sections of the deposits. The lower complex (basement) is a stratum (up to 500m) of interlayered gneisses, schists and apatite-bearing carbonate and calc-silicate rocks. The upper complex (up to 200m) is a blanket-like residual deposit intensely crushed and strongly altered formations of the basement. Clay minerals (hydromica, vermiculite, chlorite, illite, and kaolinite) are predominantly developed in the upper complex of the deposits, whereas in the lower complex they occur dissipated as separate crystals and grains or concentrated in layers and nests mainly in the apatite-carbonate rocks. The carbonate rocks are typically medium-grained, massive, mottled or banded, and red-brown in color. Their oxidized character is expressed by high Fe3+/Fe2+ ratio. The banded structure is due to throughgoing bands a few millimeters to several decimeters in thickness. Some of the mottled rocks contain pocket-like isolation and thin beds rich in clay, hematite (after magnetite), and rounded apatite and seem to be of paleo-carstic origin. The isotopic data for the carbonates from coexisting poor and rich in clay minerals bands are similar to those under- and overlaying massive carbonates. It is consistent with the proposed model of simultaneous chemogenic and detrital deposition and intra-formational erosion during weathering processes.

  5. Mechanism of Rock Burst Occurrence in Specially Thick Coal Seam with Rock Parting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-chao; Jiang, Fu-xing; Meng, Xiang-jun; Wang, Xu-you; Zhu, Si-tao; Feng, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Specially thick coal seam with complex construction, such as rock parting and alternative soft and hard coal, is called specially thick coal seam with rock parting (STCSRP), which easily leads to rock burst during mining. Based on the stress distribution of rock parting zone, this study investigated the mechanism, engineering discriminant conditions, prevention methods, and risk evaluation method of rock burst occurrence in STCSRP through setting up a mechanical model. The main conclusions of this study are as follows. (1) When the mining face moves closer to the rock parting zone, the original non-uniform stress of the rock parting zone and the advancing stress of the mining face are combined to intensify gradually the shearing action of coal near the mining face. When the shearing action reaches a certain degree, rock burst easily occurs near the mining face. (2) Rock burst occurrence in STCSRP is positively associated with mining depth, advancing stress concentration factor of the mining face, thickness of rock parting, bursting liability of coal, thickness ratio of rock parting to coal seam, and difference of elastic modulus between rock parting and coal, whereas negatively associated with shear strength. (3) Technologies of large-diameter drilling, coal seam water injection, and deep hole blasting can reduce advancing stress concentration factor, thickness of rock parting, and difference of elastic modulus between rock parting and coal to lower the risk of rock burst in STCSRP. (4) The research result was applied to evaluate and control the risk of rock burst occurrence in STCSRP.

  6. Gas migration through salt rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salt as a host rock for a repository for radioactive waste may appear as a layered formation as observed at the WIPP site in the USA or as domed salt, which is abundant in the northern part of central Europe. Planned or actual repository sites like Gorleben, Morsleben or Asse in Germany are located in such salt domes. They have risen up in geological time from Permian salt beds until their upward movement has come to an end. Rock salt exists under geological conditions as an extremely dry material with a residual moisture content well below 1 %. Due to its crystalline nature, its permeability and porosity are very low. In addition, because of its plastic behaviour under stress salt has a high self-healing capacity. In fact, under undisturbed conditions, rock salt is considered as impermeable (permeability less than 10-22 m2). This is demonstrated impressively by brine inclusions which have been included millions of years ago and are kept in place until today. Thus, in considering conditions for two phase flow, undisturbed salt neither offers sufficient water nor appropriate hydraulic properties for scenarios involving normal two-phase flow to occur. Therefore, there is a fundamental difference to other host rock material, in that long term safety analyses for waste repositories in salt have, in general, to assume accident scenarios or some kind of faulted conditions to produce a scenario where gas production and two-phase flow become relevant. The main focus of those safety analyses is on compacted crushed salt as backfill material, possibly on seals and plugs for emplacement rooms or borehole closures and on the engineering disturbed zone (EDZ). (author)

  7. Punk rock as popular theatre

    OpenAIRE

    Double, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Punk rock performance consciously draws on popular theatre forms like music hall and stand-up comedy, as exemplified by the occasion when Max Wall appeared with Ian Dury at the Hammersmith Odeon. Oliver Double traces the historical and stylistic connections between punk, music hall and stand-up, and argues that punk shows can be considered a form of popular theatre in their own right. He examines a wide range of punk bands and performers- including Sex Pistols, Iggy Pop, Devo, ...

  8. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  9. Uranium deposits in volcanic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-eight papers were presented at the meeting and two additional papers were provided. Three panels were organized to consider the specific aspects of the genesis of uranium deposits in volcanic rocks, recognition criteria for the characterization of such deposits, and approaches to exploration. The papers presented and the findings of the panels are included in the Proceedings. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of these papers

  10. Microbial Leaching of Some Valuable Elements From Egyptian Phosphate Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four phosphate rock samples representing different phosphate mineralization modes in Egypt were selected from Abu Tartar, Nile valley and Red sea areas. Factors affecting the phosphate rock solubilization and some of the contained valuable elements by Aspergillus niger, Penicillium sp. and Pseudomonas fluorescence, were studied with especial orientation towards the completion of phosphate rock samples solubilization especially die low grade one. Effect of nitrogen source type on leaching efficiency by Aspergillus niger when two nitrogen sources on the phosphate bioleaching efficiency, it is clear that the ammonium chloride is more favorable as nitrogen source than sodium nitrate in the bioleaching of phosphate rocks. When Aspergillus niger was applied under die following conditions: 50 g/1 of sucrose as a carbon source, 0.1 N of ammonium chloride as a nitrogen source, 10 days incubation period, 0.5% solid: liquid ratio for P2O5 and 5% for U and REE and - 270 mesh of grain size. The optimum leaching of P2O5 , U and REE from phosphate rock samples reached (23.27%, 17.4%, 11.4%, respectively), while at -60 mesh they reached to 16.58%, 28.9%, 30.2% respectively. The optimum conditions for the maximal leaching efficiencies of P2O5 , U and REE when applying the Penicillium sp. from the phosphate rock samples were: 100 g/1 of sucrose as a carbon source for P2O5 and U and 10 g/1 for REE, 7,15 and 10 days incubation period for P2O5 , U and REE, respectively, 0.5% solid: liquid ratio for P2O5 and 5% for U and REE. Finally, the application of phosphate rock samples grinded to -270 mesh of grain size for P2O5 and (-60 to -140) for U and REE. The studied leaching efficiency of P2O5 , U and REE gave at -270 mesh 33.66%, 24.3%, 15.9% respectively, while at -60 mesh they gave 33.76%, 26.7%, 17.8% and at -140 mesh gave 31.32%, 27.9%, 17.6%, respectively.The optimum conditions for the P2O5 leaching efficiency when applying the Pseudomonas fluorescence were: 10 g/1 of beef extract

  11. Source rock hydrocarbons. Present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report first presents the characteristics of conventional oil and gas system, and the classification of liquid and gaseous non conventional hydrocarbons, with the peculiar case of coal-bed methane. The authors then describe how source rock hydrocarbons are produced: production of shale oils and gases (horizontal drilling, hydraulic fracturing, exploitation) and of coal-bed methane and coal mine methane. In the next part, they address and discuss the environmental impact of source rock hydrocarbon production: installation footprint, water resource management, drilling fluids, fracturing fluids composition, toxicity and recycling, air pollution, induced seismicity, pollutions from other exploitation and production activities. They propose an overview of the exploitation and production of source rock gas, coal-bed gas and other non conventional gases in the world. They describe the current development and discuss their economic impacts: world oil context and trends in the USA, in Canada and other countries, impacts on the North American market, on the world oil industry, on refining industries, on the world oil balance. They analyse the economic impacts of non conventional gases: development potential, stakes for the world gas trade, consequence for gas prices, development opportunities for oil companies and for the transport sector, impact on CO2 emissions, macro-economic impact in the case of the USA

  12. Process-response theory and its application to the Lacustrine carbonate rocks:A case study of the Es4 in the mid-northern part of the western sag of Liaohe depression%过程响应理论及其在湖相碳酸盐岩中的应用--以辽河西部凹陷中北部地区Es4为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王青春; 贺萍; 王对兴; 危宇宁; 武新民

    2016-01-01

    As a new method of basin sedimentological research, the process-response theory is based on the earth system science. This kind of method is composed of process research and response research. The controlling role of the basin evolution in the sedimentary process is emphasized in this theory. The process-response theory was successfully applied to the study of lacustrine carbonate rocks in the 4th member of Shahejie Formation (Es4) within the mid-northern part of the western sag of Liaohe depression. The results show that the formation and distribution of lacustrine carbonate rocks are obviously controlled by basin evolution process in time and space. Based on the study of the Es4 in the mid-northern part of the western sag of Liaohe depression, the authors hold that the sedimentary environment of lacustrine carbonate rocks has three key points. The first one is the suitable topography and hydrodynamic conditions. The second one is the favorable climate and water media, and the last one is the rich provenance supply and the dolomitic conditions. The application of the process-response theory, together with the research on the three key points and the comprehensive sedimentary model of lacustrine carbonate rocks, constitutes the basis for establishing the composite sedimentary model with more reference and guidance value.%提过程响应理论是在地球系统科学基础上提出的一种盆地沉积学研究方法,主要包括过程研究和响应研究两个方面,强调盆地演化过程对其沉积过程的控制意义。论文运用过程响应理论对辽河坳陷西部凹陷中北部地区Es4碳酸盐岩进行了研究,取得了很好的效果。研究表明,湖相碳酸盐岩的形成和分布在时间和空间上受湖盆演化过程控制明显,有利的地形和水动力条件、有利的气候和水介质条件、有利的物源和白云岩化条件,这三个关键要素,共同铸就了辽河坳陷西部凹陷中北部地区Es4湖相碳

  13. The impact of mechanical properties of rock to the collision of rock piece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borut Macuh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analytical solution of the rock piece motion considering influences of geometrical and mechanical characteristics of rock mass on the arbitrary slope. The main objective of the paper is to determine the motion of the rock piece considering possibility of rock piece failure due to collision. Brief description of the analytical solution of the rock piece motion on a steep slope is given. The laboratory tests were performed to determine uniaxial compressive strength and elastic properties of the considered rock mass. Further, velocities that cause rock piece failure were determined. These maximum velocities indirectly belong to certain mass of rock piece and can be lower than velocities calculated in rock-fall analysis for certain slope geometry. Consequently, the energy magnitude is limited, because at certain velocity and mass of rock piece bigger pieces crash at collision.

  14. Committee neural network model for rock permeability prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheripour, Parisa

    2014-05-01

    Quantitative formulation between conventional well log data and rock permeability, undoubtedly the most critical parameter of hydrocarbon reservoir, could be a potent tool for solving problems associated with almost all tasks involved in petroleum engineering. The present study proposes a novel approach in charge of the quest for high-accuracy method of permeability prediction. At the first stage, overlapping of conventional well log data (inputs) was eliminated by means of principal component analysis (PCA). Subsequently, rock permeability was predicted from extracted PCs using multi-layer perceptron (MLP), radial basis function (RBF), and generalized regression neural network (GRNN). Eventually, a committee neural network (CNN) was constructed by virtue of genetic algorithm (GA) to enhance the precision of ultimate permeability prediction. The values of rock permeability, derived from the MPL, RBF, and GRNN models, were used as inputs of CNN. The proposed CNN combines results of different ANNs to reap beneficial advantages of all models and consequently producing more accurate estimations. The GA, embedded in the structure of the CNN assigns a weight factor to each ANN which shows relative involvement of each ANN in overall prediction of rock permeability from PCs of conventional well logs. The proposed methodology was applied in Kangan and Dalan Formations, which are the major carbonate reservoir rocks of South Pars Gas Field-Iran. A group of 350 data points was used to establish the CNN model, and a group of 245 data points was employed to assess the reliability of constructed CNN model. Results showed that the CNN method performed better than individual intelligent systems performing alone.

  15. The physical principles of rock magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Frank

    1974-01-01

    Developments in Solid Earth Geophysics 5: The Physical Principles of Rock Magnetism explores the physical principles of rock magnetism, with emphasis on the properties of finely divided magnetic materials. It discusses the origin and stability of rock magnetizations, the role of remanent magnetism in interpreting magnetic surveys, magnetic anisotropy as an indicator of rock fabric, and the relationship between piezomagnetic changes and seismic activity. Organized into 13 chapters, this volume discusses the properties of solids, magnetite and hematite grains, and rocks with magnetite grains

  16. Dispersivity as an oil reservoir rock characteristic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.

    1989-12-01

    The main objective of this research project is to establish dispersivity, {alpha}{sub d}, as an oil reservoir rock characteristic and to use this reservoir rock property to enhance crude oil recovery. A second objective is to compare the dispersion coefficient and the dispersivity of various reservoir rocks with other rock characteristics such as: porosity, permeability, capillary pressure, and relative permeability. The dispersivity of a rock was identified by measuring the physical mixing of two miscible fluids, one displacing the other in a porous medium. 119 refs., 27 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Petrology of unshocked crystalline rocks and shock effects in lunar rocks and minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, E.C.T.; James, O.B.; Minkin, J.A.; Boreman, J.A.; Jackson, E.D.; Raleigh, C.B.

    1970-01-01

    On the basis of rock modes, textures, and mineralogy, unshocked crystalline rocks are classified into a dominant ilmenite-rich suite (subdivided into intersertal, ophitic, and hornfels types) and a subordinate feldspar-rich suite (subdivided into poikilitic and granular types). Weakly to moderately shocked rocks show high strain-rate deformation and solid-state transformation of minerals to glasses; intensely shocked rocks are converted to rock glasses. Data on an unknown calcium-bearing iron metasilicate are presented.

  18. Relationship between fluvial clastic sediment and source rock abundance in Rapti river basin of central Nepal Himalayas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many tributaries from carbonate sedimentary, metamorphic and igneous rocks of the Lesser Himalayan and clastic sedimentary rocks of the Sub-Himalayan Ranges carry gravelly sediments to the Rapti River. River bar sediments were analyzed for composition and texture to evaluate downstream changes in properties, and to establish relationship between proportion of clasts and the abundance of rock types in the source areas. Percent quartzite clast or granite clast increases whereas that of carbonate, schist or slate decreases along downstream. The largest grain size decreases downstream, whereas fatness index and sphericity tend to increase. Despite of little diminish in relative abundance of rock types in source areas along the river, the relative proportion of corresponding clast type shows rapid reduction (e.g. slate or phyllite or carbonate clasts) or rapid enhancement (e.g. granite clast). The relationships of quartzite clast and schist clasts with their corresponding source rocks are statistically significant suggesting that these clasts can provide clue to source rock abundance. About 85 to 94% of the gravel clasts represent rock types of the Lesser Himalayan Range suggesting that this range has been contributing enormous amount of sediments.

  19. Integrated geophysical and geological investigations applied to sedimentary rock mass characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Negri

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The Salento Peninsula (south-eastern Italy is characterized by sedimentary rocks. The carbonatic nature of the rocks means they are affected by karst phenomena, forming such features as sinkholes, collapsed dolines and caverns, as a result of chemical leaching of carbonates by percolating water. The instability of these phenomena often produces land subsidence problems. The importance of these events is increasing due to growing urbanization, numerous quarries affecting both the subsoil and the surface, and an important coastline characterized by cliffs. This paper focuses on geological and geophysical methods for the characterization of soft sedimentary rock, and presents the results of a study carried out in an urban area of Salento. Taking the Q system derived by Barton (2002 as the starting point for the rock mass classification, a new approach and a modification of the Barton method are proposed. The new equation proposed for the classification of sedimentary rock mass (Qsrm takes account of the permeability of the rock masses, the geometry of the exposed rock face and their types (for example, quarry face, coastal cliff or cavity, the nature of the lithotypes that constitute the exposed sequence, and their structure and texture. This study revises the correlation between Vp and Q derived by Barton (2002, deriving a new empirical equation correlating P-wave velocities and Qsrm values in soft sedimentary rock. We also present a case history in which stratigraphical surveys, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT, and seismic surveys were applied to in situ investigations of subsidence phenomena in an urban area to estimate rock mass quality. Our work shows that in the analysis of ground safety it is important to establish the rock mass quality of the subsurface structures; geophysical exploration can thus play a key role in the assessment of subsidence risk.

  20. The Australian national reactive phosphate rock project - Aims, experimental approach, and site characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field-based cutting trials were established across Australia in a range of environments to evaluate the agronomic effectiveness of 5 phosphate rocks, and 1 partially acidulated phosphate rock, relative to either single super-phosphate or triple superphosphate. The phosphate rocks differed in reactivity, as determined by the degree of carbonate substitution for phosphate in the apatite structure and solubility of phosphorus present in the fertilizers in 2% formic acid, 2% citric acid and neutral ammonium citrate. Sechura (Bayovar) and North Carolina phosphate rocks were highly reactive (>70% solubility in 2% formic acid), whilst Khouribja (Moroccan) and Hamrawein (Egypt) phosphate rock were moderately reactive. Duchess phosphate rock from Queensland was relatively unreactive (2, from 4.0 to 5.1, and Colwell extractable phosphorus ranged from 3 to 47 μg/g prior to fertilizer application. Two core experiments were established at each site. The first measured the effects of phosphate rock reactivity on agronomic effectiveness, while the second core experiment measured the effects of the degree of water solubility of the phosphorus source on agronomic effectiveness. The National Reactive Phosphate Rock Project trials provided the opportunity to confirm the suitability of accepted procedures to model fertilizer response and to develop new approaches for comparing different fertilizer responses. The Project also provided the framework for subsidiary studies such as the effect of fertilizer source on soil phosphorus extractability; cadmium and fluorine concentrations in herbage; evaluation of soil phosphorus tests; and the influence of particle size on phosphate rock effectiveness. The National Reactive Phosphate Rock Project presents a valuable model for a large, Australia-wide, collaborative team approach to an important agricultural issue. The use of standard and consistent experimental methodologies at every site ensured that maximum benefit was obtained from data

  1. Rock support system development test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Test Plan has been prepared to support design activities for the development of a rock support system for a Nuclear Waste Repository in Basalt (NWRB). The rock support system is assumed to consist of a combination of shotcrete and rock bolts. The seven testing activities include mix development and physical testing of shotcrete, durability testing of shotcrete, durability testing of rock bolt grouts, field tests on rock bolts, field testing of shotcrete, and heated room test. The objective of the Test Plan is to develop required data through combined laboratory, field, and office studies for design and design validation of the rock support system. The overall Test Plan is developed to provide a logical progression from laboratory tests performed to characterize fundamental thermomechanical properties of shotcrete and grouts, to field tests on rock bolts and shotcrete, and in situ performance tests. 21 refs., 15 figs., 33 tabs

  2. Rock bending creep and disturbance effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付志亮; 郑颖人; 刘元雪

    2008-01-01

    The bending creep and its disturbance effects of red sandstone rock beam and oil shale rock beam were studied by adopting the self-developed gravitation level style rock creep test machine and bending creep test system,and the constitutive equations were established.It is found that fracture morphology of rock beams under no disturbance load is regular,cracking position of fractures is on part of loading concentration,the crack starts from a neutral plane.However,fracture morphology of rock beams under disturbance load is irregular,cracking position of fractures deviates from a neutral plane.Delayed instability of rock beam occurs for some time under constant disturbance load.When disturbance load is beyond a certain range,suddenly instability of occurs rock beam in a certain time.The results show that there is a guiding significance for creep stability in the geotechnical engineering fields.

  3. Depositional environment and organic geochemistry of the Upper Permian Ravenfjeld Formation source rock in East Greenland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiansen, F.G.; Piasecki, S.; Stemmerik, L. (Geologoical Survey of Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Telnaes, N. (Norsk Hydro Research Center, Bergen (Norway))

    1993-09-01

    The Upper Permian Ravnefjeld Formation in East Greenland is composed of shales that laterally pass into carbonate buildups and platforms of the Wegener Halvo Formation. The Ravnefjeld Formation is subdivided into five units that can be traced throughout the Upper Permian depositional basin. Two of the units are laminated and organic rich and were deposited under anoxic conditions. They are considered good to excellent source rocks for liquid hydrocarbons with initial average TOC (total organic carbon) values between 4 and 5% and HI (hydrogen index) between 300 and 400. The cumulative source rocks are separated and enclosed by three units of bioturbated siltstone with a TOC of less than 0.5% and an HI of less than 100. These siltstones were deposited under relatively oxic conditions. The organic geochemistry of the source rocks is typical for marine source rocks with some features normally associated with carbonate/evaporite environments [low Pr/Ph (pristane/phytane), low CPI (carbon preference index), distribution of tricyclic and pentacyclic terpanes]. The establishment of anoxic conditions and subsequent source rock deposition was controlled by eustatic sea level changes. The subenvironment (paleogeographic setting, influx of carbonate material, water depth, salinity) has some influence on a number of bulk parameters [TOC-HI relations, TOC-TS (total sulfur) relations] and, in particular, biomarker parameters such as Pr/Ph and terpane ratios. All the basal shales or shales in the vicinity of carbonate buildups of platforms are characterized by low Pr/Ph, high C[sub 23] tricyclic terpanes, and high C[sub 35] and C[sub 33] hopanes. 52 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Brittle and semibrittle creep in a low porosity carbonate rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Aurélien; Fortin, Jérôme; Regnet, Jean-Baptiste; Dimanov, Alexandre; Guéguen, Yves

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of limestones at room temperature is brittle at low confining pressure and becomes semi-brittle with the increase of the confining pressure. The brittle behavior is characterized by a macroscopic dilatancy due to crack propagation, leading to a stress drop when cracks coalesce at failure. The semi-brittle behavior is characterized by diffuse deformation due to intra-crystalline plasticity (dislocation movements and twinning) and microcracking. The aim of this work is to examine the influence of pore fluid and time on the mechanical behavior. Constant strain rate triaxial deformation experiments and stress-stepping creep experiments were performed on white Tavel limestone (porosity 14.7%). Elastic wave velocity evolutions were recorded during each experiment and inverted to crack densities. Constant strain rate triaxial experiments were performed for confining pressure in the range of 5-90 MPa. For Pc≤55 MPa our results show that the behavior is brittle. In this regime, water-saturation decreases the differential stress at the onset of crack propagation and enhances macroscopic dilatancy. For Pc≥70 MPa, the behavior is semi-brittle. Inelastic compaction is due to intra-crystalline plasticity and micro-cracking. However, in this regime, our results show that water-saturation has no clear effect at the onset of inelastic compaction. Stress stepping creep experiments were performed in a range of confining pressures crossing the brittle-ductile transition. In the brittle regime, the time-dependent axial deformation is coupled with dilatancy and a decrease of elastic wave velocities, which is characteristic of crack propagation and/or nucleation. In the semi-brittle regime, the first steps are inelastic compactant because of plastic pore collapse. But, following stress steps are dilatant because of crack nucleation and/or propagation. However, our results show that the axial strain rate is always controlled by plastic phenomena, until the last step, during which the axial strain rate increases significantly because of crack interactions leading to the macroscopic failure Our results show the complex interplay between confining pressure, pore fluid and strain rate (i.e. time), which has an influence on the micromechanisms of deformation and thus on the macroscopic behavior.

  5. A Simple Hydromechanical Modeling of Carbon Sequestration in Sedimentary Rocks

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, Hamed O

    2009-01-01

    In this study, over different scenarios we will simulate a week coupling of hydromechanical loads in a long term CO2 injection with a hypothetical reservoir while the effect of pore water pressure and then multi-phase flow procedure has been ignored. In the first basic case the homogenous case has been considered when the theory of poroelasticity was employed. Second case covers the effects of directional heterogeneity, constructed by random faults, on the flow paths of gas and other attributes of the system. Also, in the latter case the impact of stress state as an active loads (body loads) has been regarded. Thanks to multiple directional heterogeneity, which induces only one heterogenic parameter (intrinsic permeability), distinguishable flow paths can be recognized. In another process, the failure ability of system regard to Mohr-Columb criterion is measured as well as options that, presumably, the system has continuum faults (zero cohesion). The results over different cases shows absedince of ground surf...

  6. Core-flood experiment for transport of reactive fluids in rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, H; de Kloe, K; van Bakel, M; Vos, F; van Pelt, A; Legerstee, P; Bauer, A; Eide, K; van der Linden, A; Berg, S; Makurat, A

    2012-08-01

    Investigation of the transport of reactive fluids in porous rocks is an intriguing but challenging task and relevant in several areas of science and engineering such as geology, hydrogeology, and petroleum engineering. We designed and constructed an experimental setup to investigate physical and chemical processes caused by the flow of reactive and volatile fluids such as supercritical CO(2) and/or H(2)S in geological formations. Potential applications are geological sequestration of CO(2) in the frame of carbon capture and storage and acid-gas injection for sulfur disposal and/or enhanced oil recovery. The present paper outlines the design criteria and the realization of reactive transport experiments on the laboratory scale. We focus on the spatial and time evolution of rock and fluid composition as a result of chemical rock fluid interaction and the coupling of chemistry and fluid flow in porous rocks.

  7. Alkalic rock-carbonatite complexes of the Superior Structural Province northern Ontario,CANADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkinson, D. (Carleton Univ, Ottawa ON (CA). Dept. of Earth Sciences); Sage, R.P. (Ontario Geological Survey, Toronto,ON (CA))

    1991-09-01

    Alkalic rock-carbonatite complexes of the Superior Structural Province, Ontario, and adjacent parts of the Grenville and Southern Structural Provinces, are closely associated with long-lived regional fractures. The forty-one alkalic rock-carbonatite intrusions are lithologically and chemically zoned. Variable depths of emplacement are inferred from the relative widths of fenitic halo to carbonatite diameter and the relative ratio of carbonatite rich to silicate-rich rocks. Alkalic rock complexes ranging in lithology from alkalic gabbro to granite are ring complexes or massive stocks. Carbonatite complexes consist mainly of ijolite, malignite, pyroxenite and carbonate-rich rocks. Carbonatites are enriched in niobium, phosphorus, rare-earth elements and uranium, but the deposits are not economic. In spite of intense glacial scouring of the Superior Structural Province, residual caps containing concentrations of these elements remain above several of the carbonatites. Alkalic rock-carbonatite magmatism has occurred sporadically in different parts of the stable Superior craton. Migration of alkalic rock intrusive centres with time was not systematic and there has been no apparent decoupling of the source of magmas from the crust since Archean time.

  8. Impact of Diagenetic Alterations on the Petrophysical and Multiphase Flow Properties of Carbonate Rocks Using a Reactive Pore Network Modeling Approach Impact des altérations diagénétiques sur les propriétés pétrophysiques et d’écoulement polyphasique de roches carbonates en utilisant une modélisation par l’approche réseau de pores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algive L.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentary reservoir rocks generally have complex and heterogeneous pore networks that are related to the original depositional rock texture and subsequent diagenetic alterations. Such alterations are in part controlled by the original mineralogy and sedimentological facies, the compaction history, the involved fluids (and rock/fluid interactions, the flow history and the related physico-chemical conditions. During the diagenetic evolution (paragenesis, cycles of alternating dissolution (porosity enhancement and precipitation (porosity destruction caused by changes in chemical and thermodynamic conditions may lead to heterogeneous rock structure at both local and reservoir scale. In the absence of cored plugs to measure the petrophysical properties (i.e. porosity, permeability and formation factor and multiphase flow properties (i.e. capillary pressure, relative permeability and resistivity index, a numerical tool that calculates these properties from pore structure data by predicting its evolution during the diagenetic cycle is of great interest for the petroleum industry and reservoir characterization studies. A Pore Network Model (PNM provides opportunities to study transport phenomena in fundamental ways because detailed information is available at the pore scale. It has been used over the last decades to understand basic phenomena such as capillarity, multiphase flow or coupled phenomena. In particular, this modeling approach is appropriate to study the rock/fluid interactions since the mass exchange at surfaces can be modeled explicitly. It can provide quantitative information both on the effective transport property modifications due to the reactions and on the structure evolution resulting from dissolution/precipitation mechanisms. In the present paper, this approach is used to study the effect of the diagenetic cycle on the petrophysical properties of carbonate rocks. It involves three discrete steps. The first step consists of

  9. Thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis coupled with chromatography as a thermal simulation experimental method and its application to gaseous hydrocarbons from different source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Ji'an; ZHAO Xin; WANG Qi; LIU Quanyou

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis method coupled with chromatography (TG-DTA-GC) has been adopted to simulate the generation of gaseous hydrocarbons from different hydrocarbon source rocks such as coals, mudstones, and carbonate rocks with different maturities. The temperature programming for thermal simulation experiment is 20℃/min from ambient temperature to 700℃. As viewed from the quantities and composition of generated gaseous hydrocarbons at different temperatures, it is shown that low-mature coal has experienced the strongest exothermic reaction and the highest loss of weight in which the first exothermic peak is relatively low. Low-mature coal samples have stronger capability of generating gaseous hydrocarbons than high-mature samples. The amounts and composition of gaseous hydrocarbons generated are closely related not only to the abundance of organic carbon in source rocks, but also to the type of kerogen in the source rocks, and their thermal maturity. In the present highly mature and over-mature rock samples organic carbon, probably, has already been exhausted, so the production of gaseous hydrocarbons in large amounts is impossible. The contents of heavy components in gaseous hydrocarbons from the source rocks containing type-Ⅰand -Ⅱ kerogens are generally high; those of light components such as methane and ethane in gaseous hydrocarbons from the source rocks with Ⅲ-type kerogens are high as well. In the course of thermal simulation of carbonate rock samples, large amounts of gaseous hydrocarbons were produced in a high temperature range.

  10. Hydraulic testing in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swedish Geolocical Company (SGAB) conducted and carried out single-hole hydraulic testing in borehole Fi 6 in the Finnsjoen area of central Sweden. The purpose was to make a comprehensive evaluation of different methods applicable in crystalline rocks and to recommend methods for use in current and scheduled investigations in a range of low hydraulic conductivity rocks. A total of eight different methods of testing were compared using the same equipment. This equipment was thoroughly tested as regards the elasticity of the packers and change in volume of the test section. The use of a hydraulically operated down-hole valve enabled all the tests to be conducted. Twelve different 3-m long sections were tested. The hydraulic conductivity calculated ranged from about 5x10-14 m/s to 1x10-6 m/s. The methods used were water injection under constant head and then at a constant rate-of-flow, each of which was followed by a pressure fall-off period. Water loss, pressure pulse, slug and drill stem tests were also performed. Interpretation was carried out using standard transient evaluation methods for flow in porous media. The methods used showed themselves to be best suited to specific conductivity ranges. Among the less time-consuming methods, water loss, slug and drill stem tests usually gave somewhat higher hydraulic conductivity values but still comparable to those obtained using the more time-consuming tests. These latter tests, however, provided supplementary information on hydraulic and physical properties and flow conditions, together with hydraulic conductivity values representing a larger volume of rock. (orig./HP)

  11. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1990-01-01

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic

  12. Lander and Mini Matterhorn rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    One of the two forward cameras aboard the Sojourner rover took this image of the Sagan Memorial Station on Sol 26. The angular resolution of the camera is about three milliradians (.018 degrees) per pixel, which is why the image appears grainy. The field of view of each rover camera is about 127 degrees horizontally and 90 degrees vertically.Features seen on the lander include (from left to right): the Atmospheric Structure Instrument/Meteorology Package (ASI/MET) mast with windsocks; the low-gain antenna mast, the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on its mast at center; the disc-shaped high-gain antenna at right, and areas of deflated airbags. The dark circle on the lander body is a filtered vent that allowed air to escape during launch, and allowed the lander to repressurize upon landing. The high-gain antenna is pointed at Earth. The large rock Yogi, which Sojourner has approached and studied, as at the far right of the image. Mini Matterhorn is the large rock situated in front of the lander at left.The horizontal line at the center of the image is due to differences in light-metering for different portions of the image. The shadow of Sojourner and its antenna are visible at the lower section of the image. The antenna's shadow falls across a light-colored rock.Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages and Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  13. Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks

    CERN Multimedia

    Brian Cox; John Barrowman; Eddie Izzard

    2008-01-01

    Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

  14. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    20150204 Abaydulla Alimjan(Department of Chemistry and Environmental Sciences,Kashgar Teachers College,Kashgar 844006,China);Cheng Chunying Non-Metallic Element Composition Analysis of Non-Ferrous Metal Ores from Oytagh Town,Xinjiang(Rock and Mineral Analysis,ISSN0254-5357,CN11-2131/TD,33(1),2014,p.44-50,5illus.,4tables,28refs.)Key words:nonferrous metals ore,nonmetals,chemical analysis,thermogravimetric analysis Anions in non-ferrous ore materials

  15. Numerical study of rock blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, Yu. P.; Bakeev, R. A.; Yudin, A. S.; Kuznetsova, N. S.

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents numerical simulation results on fracture of a concrete block due to dynamic explosive loads applied to the walls of a blast hole. Considered in the study is the influence of the pulse shape and rock properties on the pattern of irreversible deformation and cracking. It is found that a fractured zone bounded by a plastically deformed contour always arises around the explosion site. Comparison of elastoplastic deformation and fracture induced in the concrete block by explosion pulses of different durations and amplitudes shows that shorter pulses with higher amplitudes and steeper rise times provide a higher blasting efficiency.

  16. Does carbon dioxide pool or stream in the subsurface?

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Silvana S S

    2014-01-01

    Pools of carbon dioxide are found in natural geological accumulations and in engineered storage in saline aquifers. It has been thought that once this CO2 dissolves in the formation water, making it denser, convection streams would transport it efficiently to depth, but this may not be so. Here, we assess the impact of natural chemical reactions between the dissolved CO2 and the rock formation on the convection streams in the subsurface. We show that, while in carbonate rocks the streaming of dissolved carbon dioxide persists, the chemical interactions in silicate-rich rocks may curb this transport drastically and even inhibit it altogether. New laboratory experiments confirm the curtailing of convection by reaction. Wide and narrow streams of dense carbon-rich water are shut-off gradually as reaction strength increases until all transport of the pooled carbon dioxide occurs by slow molecular diffusion. These results show that the complex fluid dynamic and kinetic interactions between pooled carbon dioxide an...

  17. Microcraters on Apollo 15 and 16 rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, D. A.; Mckay, D. S.; Fruland, R. M.; Moore, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    Microcrater frequency distributions, determined for 11 Apollo 16 rocks and three Apollo 15 rocks, fall into four categories. Category 1 rocks (68415, 68416, 62235) are angular, cratered on one side only, and have moderate crater densities. Category 2 rocks (60016, 66075, 61175) are subrounded, cratered on all sides, and have distributions suggestive of the steady state. Category 3 rocks (61015, 62295) are subangular and cratered on only one side, but the crater frequency distributions have some of the characteristics of category 2 rocks. Category 4 rocks (15015, 15017, 15076, 60335) are angular, cratered on only one side, and have moderated to very low crater densities. The crater frequency distributions of categories 1 and 4 have properties indicating the possibility of estimating the time they were exposed to micrometeor bombardment. Category 1 rocks appear to have been exposed for 2 to 3 m.y. These rocks, particularly 68415, 68416, and 69935, may be ejecta from South Ray Crater, indicating an age of 2 to 3 m.y. for South Ray Crater. Category 4 rocks have been exposed for much shorter periods.

  18. Infiltration Flow Path Distributions in Unsaturated Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, T. K.; Olson, K. R.; Wan, J.

    2004-12-01

    Spatial distributions of infiltration flow paths through rock formations are complex networks that determine flow velocities, control rates of natural geochemical reactions in the subsurface, as well as rates of contaminant transport to underlying groundwater. Despite these important consequences, distributions of infiltration paths and locally fast seepage rates through rocks are not well understood. Laboratory-based studies on fractured rocks cannot easily be conducted on systems large enough to include sufficient fracture network complexity, so that inferences of field-scale flux distributions cannot be reliably made. Field-based studies to date have permitted quantification of only a small fraction of the flow distribution, typically while imposing extremely high fluxes, and therefore have not allowed comprehensive delineation of flow distributions expected under natural recharge. Based on hydraulic scaling considerations, we hypothesize that unsaturated flow path distributions in rock deposits will be similar to those occurring in fractured rock formations under low overall infiltration rates. Talus rock deposits and mine waste rock piles control flow and transport into their respective underlying groundwaters. All of these reasons motivated infiltration experiments in rock packs. Experiments have been conducted on 4 different rock types and system scales ranging from 1 to 46 rock layers. Our experiments showed that infiltration through rocks conforms to no previously reported behavior in soils, and that flow paths do not progressively converge into fewer and fewer flow paths. Instead, a fundamentally different hydraulic structure develops, having an exponential (geometric) flux distribution, with the characteristic scale determined by the characteristic rock size. Although the phenomena are very different, the evolution of flow path distributions and local seepage rate distributions is predictable based on a statistical mechanical model for energy

  19. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    OpenAIRE

    G. Rohini Devi; K. Rama Rao

    1993-01-01

    Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several indust...

  20. Aespoe hard rock laboratory Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the new Aespoe hard rock laboratory is to demonstrate state of the art of technology and evaluation methods before the start of actual construction work on the planned deep repository for spent nuclear fuel. The nine country OECD/NEA project in the Stripa mine in Sweden has been an excellent example of high quality international research co-operation. In Sweden the new Aespoe hard rock laboratory will gradually take over and finalize this work. SKB very much appreciates the continued international participation in Aespoe which is of great value for the quality efficiency, and confidence in this kind of work. We have invited a number of leading experts to this first international seminar to summarize the current state of a number of key questions. The contributions show the great progress that has taken place during the years. The results show that there is a solid scientific basis for using this knowledge on site specific preparation and work on actual repositories. (au)

  1. Laboratory characterization of rock joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laboratory characterization of the Apache Leap tuff joints under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loads has been undertaken to obtain a better understanding of dynamic joint shear behavior and to generate a complete data set that can be used for validation of existing rock-joint models. Study has indicated that available methods for determining joint roughness coefficient (JRC) significantly underestimate the roughness coefficient of the Apache Leap tuff joints, that will lead to an underestimation of the joint shear strength. The results of the direct shear tests have indicated that both under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loadings the joint resistance upon reverse shearing is smaller than that of forward shearing and the joint dilation resulting from forward shearing recovers during reverse shearing. Within the range of variation of shearing velocity used in these tests, the shearing velocity effect on rock-joint behavior seems to be minor, and no noticeable effect on the peak joint shear strength and the joint shear strength for the reverse shearing is observed

  2. Laboratory characterization of rock joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiung, S.M.; Kana, D.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Ghosh, A. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses

    1994-05-01

    A laboratory characterization of the Apache Leap tuff joints under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loads has been undertaken to obtain a better understanding of dynamic joint shear behavior and to generate a complete data set that can be used for validation of existing rock-joint models. Study has indicated that available methods for determining joint roughness coefficient (JRC) significantly underestimate the roughness coefficient of the Apache Leap tuff joints, that will lead to an underestimation of the joint shear strength. The results of the direct shear tests have indicated that both under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loadings the joint resistance upon reverse shearing is smaller than that of forward shearing and the joint dilation resulting from forward shearing recovers during reverse shearing. Within the range of variation of shearing velocity used in these tests, the shearing velocity effect on rock-joint behavior seems to be minor, and no noticeable effect on the peak joint shear strength and the joint shear strength for the reverse shearing is observed.

  3. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rohini Devi

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several industrial and biomedical applications. The multidirectional carbon-carbon product technology is versatile and offers design flexibility. This paper describes the multidirectional preform and carbon-carbon process technology and research and development activities within the country. Carbon-carbon product experience at DRDL has also been discussed. Development of carbon-carbon brake discs process technology using the liquid impregnation process is described. Further the test results on material characterisation, thermal, mechanical and tribological properties are presented.

  4. Carbon dioxide released from subduction zones by fluid-mediated reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ague, Jay J.; Nicolescu, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    The balance between the subduction of carbonate mineral-bearing rocks into Earth's mantle and the return of CO2 to the atmosphere by volcanic and metamorphic degassing is critical to the carbon cycle. Carbon is thought to be released from subducted rocks mostly by simple devolatilization reactions. However, these reactions will also retain large amounts of carbon within the subducting slab and have difficulty in accounting for the mass of CO2 emitted from volcanic arcs. Carbon release may therefore occur via fluid-induced dissolution of calcium carbonate. Here we use carbonate δ18O and δ13C systematics, combined with analyses of rock and fluid inclusion mineralogy and geochemistry, to investigate the alteration of the exhumed Eocene Cycladic subduction complex on the Syros and Tinos islands, Greece. We find that in marble rocks adjacent to two fluid conduits that were active during subduction, the abundance of calcium carbonate drastically decreases approaching the conduits, whereas silicate minerals increase. Up to 60-90% of the CO2 was released from the rocks--far greater than expected via simple devolatilization reactions. The δ18O of the carbonate minerals is 5-10 lighter than is typical for metamorphosed carbonate rocks, implying that isotopically light oxygen was transported by fluid infiltration from the surroundings. We suggest that fluid-mediated carbonate mineral removal, accompanied by silicate mineral precipitation, provides a mechanism for the release of enormous amounts of CO2 from subduction zones.

  5. Various numerical simulation methods for acoustic emission in rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acoustic Emission (AE) or Microseismicity (MS) is a very useful method to understand fracture mechanism and to predict serious rock fracture like rockburst. This method can be applied to monitor reservoirs where water and gas are injected, for example, in underground sequestration of carbon dioxide and in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) of petroleum industry. If a numerical simulation helps to interpret AE monitoring results, AE monitoring would become much more powerful tool for the rock engineering. Thus, in this paper, the authors review various methods that can simulate occurrence of AE events incorporating inhomogeneity of rock. A code of Finite Element Method (FEM) developed by Tang et al., those of Boundary Element Method (BEM) by Napier's and Stephansson's groups and those of Distinct Element Method (DEM) by Shimizu et. al., Fakhimi et al. and Cai et al. are briefly introduced as simulation methods of brittle fracture like rockburst. For simulation of AE events induced by water or gas injection, DEM incorporating Fluid Flow Algorism by Shimizu et al. are introduced, with showing their simulation results of hydraulic fracturing. (author)

  6. Rock-property changes during reservoir compaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, N. (Conoco, Inc., Ponca City, OK (United States)); Gray, K.E. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)); Srouji, F.A.A.; Jogi, P.N. (Teleco Oilfield Services Inc., Meviden, CT (US))

    1992-09-01

    Deformations, absolute permeability, electrical resistivity, PV change, and compressional- and shear-wave velocities were measured for Berea sandstone under various loading paths at temperatures from 70 to 380{degrees} F. The experimental behavior was subdivided into five categories. The experimental results were analyzed for each category, and the analysis was used to construct semianalytical rock-property equations, are expressed in terms of strain components. This formalism is practical because strains are more directly related to rock properties that are stress components. This paper presents unique rock-property data, including axial and radial measurements with various loading paths and temperatures; semianalytical equations that accurately simulate rock properties under various loading paths up to rock failure; and realistic predictions of rock-property changes during reservoir compaction.

  7. Preliminary Rock Physics Analysis on Lodgepole Formation in Manitoba, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, N.; Keehm, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We present rock physics analysis results of Lodgepole Formation, a carbonate reservoir in Daly Field, Manitoba, Canada. We confirmed that the Lodgepole Formation can be divided into six units in the study area: Basal Limestone, Cromer Shale, Cruickshank Crinoidal, Cruickshank Shale, Daly member and Flossie Lake member from the bottom, using eight well log data and previous works. We then performed rock physics analyses on four carbonate units (Basal Limestone, Cruickshank Crinoidal, Daly and Flossie Lake), such as Vp-porosity, AI-porosity, DEM (differential effective medium) modeling, and fluid substitution analysis. In Vp-porosity domain, the top unit, Flossie Lake member has lower porosity and higher velocity, while the other units show similar porosity and velocity. We think that this results from the diagenesis of Flossie Lake member since it bounds with unconformity. However, the four units show very similar trend in Vp-porosity domain, and we can report one Vp-porosity relation for all carbonate units of the Lodgepole formation. We also found that the acoustic impedance varies more than 10% from low porosity zone (3-6%) to high porosity zone (9-12%) from AI-porosity analysis. Thus one can delineate high porosity zone from seismic impedance data. DEM modeling showed that Flossie Lake would have relatively low aspect ratio of pores than the others, which implies that the top unit has been influenced by diagenesis. To determine fluid sensitivity of carbonate units, we conducted fluid substitution on four units from 100% water to 100% oil. The top unit, Flossie Lake, showed slight increase of Vp, which seems to be density effect. The others showed small decrease of Vp, but not significant. If we observe Vp/Vs rather than Vp, the sensitivity increases. However, fluid discrimination would be difficult because of high stiffness of rock frame. In summary, three lower carbonate units of Lodgepole Formation would be prospective and high porosity zone can be delineated

  8. The kinetics of binding carbon dioxide in magnesium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butt, D.P.; Lackner, K.S.; Wendt, C.H.; Vaidya, R.; Pile, D.L.; Park, Y.; Holesinger, T.; Harradine, D.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nomura, Koji [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.]|[Chichibu Onada Cement Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    Humans currently consume about 6 Gigatons of carbon annually as fossil fuel. In some sense, the coal industry has a unique advantage over many other anthropogenic and natural emitters of CO{sub 2} in that it owns large point sources of CO{sub 2} from which this gas could be isolated and disposed of. If the increased energy demands of a growing world population are to be satisfied from coal, the implementation of sequestration technologies will likely be unavoidable. The authors` method of sequestration involves binding carbon dioxide as magnesium carbonate, a thermodynamically stable solid, for safe and permanent disposal, with minimal environmental impact. The technology is based on extracting magnesium hydroxide from common ultramafic rock for thermal carbonation and subsequent disposition. The economics of the method appear to be promising, however, many details of the proposed process have yet to be optimized. Realization of a cost effective method requires development of optimal technologies for efficient extraction and thermal carbonation.

  9. Vulnerability Mapping of an Apulian Deep Carbonate Aquifer Using GIS

    OpenAIRE

    Polemio, M.; CNR-IRPI; Ricchetti, E.; Università di Bari

    1999-01-01

    Computer techniques such as Geographic Information Systems are applied to the evaluation of the vulnerability of a deep carbonate aquifer. The study area, of about 150 km2, is located in the low Murgia Plateau (Apulia) and characterized by Mesozoic limestone and dolomite rocks of several thousand meters thickness. A wide and thick aquifer resides in these carbonate rocks. Its groundwater flows toward the sea mainly under pressure and with maximum piezometric level of about 200 m a.s.l.. Du...

  10. Geochemical Characteristics and Metallogenesis of Volcanic Rocks as Exemplified by Volcanic Rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘铁庚; 叶霖

    1997-01-01

    Volcanic rocks in Ertix,Xinjiang,occurring in the collision zone between the Siberia Plate and the Junggar Plate,are distributed along the Eritix River Valley in northern Xinjiang.The volcanic rocks were dated at Late Paleozoic and can be divided into the spilite-keratophyre series and the basalt-andesite series.The spilite-keratophyre series volcanic rocks occur in the Altay orogenic belt at the southwest margin of the Siberia Plate.In addition to sodic volcanic rocks.There are also associated potassic-sodic volcanic rocks and potassic volcanic rocks.The potassic-sodic volcanic rocks occur at the bottom of the eruption cycle and control the distribution of Pb and Zn deposits.The potassic volcanic rocks occur at the top of the eruption cycle and are associated with Au and Cu mineralizations.The sodic volcanic rocks occur in the middle stage of eruption cycle and control the occurrence of Cu(Zn) deposits.The basalt-andesite series volcanic rocks distributed in the North Junggar orogenic belt at the north margin of the Junggar-Kazakstan Plate belong to the potassic sodic volcain rocks.The volcanic rocks distributed along the Ulungur fault are relatively rich in sodium and poor in potassium and are predominated by Cu mineralization and associated with Au mineralization.Those volcanic rocks distributed along the Ertix fault are relatively rich in K and poor in Na,with Au mineralization being dominant.

  11. Grain-rimming kaolinite in Permian Rotliegend reservoir rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Svenja; Gaupp, Reinhard

    2016-04-01

    precipitation. Under the presence of sulfate (SO42 -), partial hematite dissolution and the reduction of Fe3 + to Fe2 + occur, where the latter is further incorporated in Fe-Mg-rich carbonates. The sulfate is bonded in anhydrite. The results of this study are relevant for reservoir quality predictions in kaolinite-dominated systems, as well as for CO2 storage projects and the prediction of long-term fluid-rock interactions under the participation of carbon dioxide and/or other gases.

  12. Wave generations from confined explosions in rocks

    OpenAIRE

    C. L. Liu; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    In order to record P- and S-waves generated from confined explosions in rocks in the laboratory, a method is developed based on the interactions between incident P- and SV-waves and free-surfaces of rocks. The relations between particle displacements of incident P- and SV-waves, and the strains measured using strain gauges attached on free-surfaces of rocks are analytically derived. P- and SV-waves generated from confined explosions in Bedford limestone are recorded.

  13. ROCK GLACIERS IN THE KOLYMA HIGHLAND

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Galanin

    2015-01-01

    Based on remote mapping and field studies inGrand Rapids, Tumansky,Hasynsky,Del-Urechen Ridges as well as Dukchinsky and Kilgansky Mountain Massifs there were identified about 1160 landforms which morphologically are similar to the rock glaciers or they develop in close association with them. Besides tongue-shaped cirque rock glaciers originated due to ablation, a large number of lobate-shaped slope-associated rock glaciers were recognized. Significant quantity of such forms are developing wi...

  14. The rock resources of the Northern Emirates

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive; Styles, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The Rock Resources of the Northern Emirates The United Arab Emirates (UAE) has vast resources of limestone and hard rock in the northern Emirates. These are currently exploited by quarrying companies to produce construction aggregate and raw material for the manufacture of cement, with a small amount being used to produce rock wool, dimension stone and mineral filler. The demand by industry for higher value mineral products that could be produced from these resources is mostly met by impor...

  15. Toe rock stability for rubble mound breakwaters

    OpenAIRE

    Baart, S.; Ebbens, R.; Nammuni-Krohn, J.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Present design tools, as found in the Rock Manual or Coastal Engineering Manual, for the determination of toe rock size for rubble mound breakwaters are based on test data with a large spread: data is relatively dispersed around the centre and descriptive equations have limited applicability ranges. New research has been undertaken to contribute to a more accurate description of toe rock stability. Flume tests have lead to an empirical design criterion for toe bunds in very shallow water base...

  16. Roof sounding device - A loose rock detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Bureau of Mines has developed a method and device designed to detect loose rock material in underground mines. The technology is designed to be an aid to mine workers in detecting hazardous roof conditions in underground mines which can complement or replace the traditional roof sounding techniques where the miner relies on experience to determine whether rock conditions are sound. The leading cause of accidents and fatalities in underground mines is falls of loose rock pieces or rock slabs from the mine roof. In previous research the Bureau of Mines found that loose rock, when impacted, vibrates at a much lower frequency than intact rock material. A major problem in determining rock stability using this technique has been the repeatability of the impact signal. This difficulty has been greatly reduced in the current design by measuring the power spectra contained in two separate frequency bands of the signal produced by striking the rock in question. The ratio of the energy contained in each band is computed. This process minimizes any striking force differences, producing accurate, repeatable results for solid rock as well as loose, drummy material. The prototype has been successfully tested in a variety of underground environments including coal, uranium, molybdenum, silver, and salt. The technology has ben investigated by the US Mine Health and Safety Administration and the Department of Energy for use in detecting detached tunnel lining areas in nuclear repositories. The paper will discuss the technique, applicable results, and future applications

  17. Evaluation of agricultural best-management practices in the Conestoga River headwaters, Pennsylvania; effects of pipe-outlet terracing on quantity and quality of surface runoff and ground water in a small carbonate-rock basin near Churchtown, Pennsylvania, 1983-89

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietman, P.L.; Gustafson-Minnich, L. C.; Hall, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    Terracing effects on surface-runoff and ground- water quantity and quality were investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources, during 1983-89 at a 23.1-acre agricultural site in Lancaster County, Pa., as part of the 1982 Rural Clean Water Program. The site, underlain by carbonate rock, was primarily corn and alfalfa fields; the median slope was 6 percent.Normal precipitation is about 42 inches per year. Average annual runoff was 11 percent and ground- water recharge was 37 percent of precipitation.Runoff quantity, suspended-sediment, and nutrient data, ground-water level and nutrient data, and precipitation-quantity data were collected for 21 months prior to, and 58 months after, pipe-outlet terrace construction. Data were analyzed by use of graphical, regression, covariate, cluster, Mann- Whitney Rank Sum test, and double-mass curvetechniques. Terracing changed runoff characteristics. Storm characteristics were similar throughout the study period. However, after terracing, storms producing less than 0.4 inch of precipitation rarely produced runoff. Total-storm discharge as a function of precipitation did not change significantly throughout the range of runoff-producing storms after terracing. Multiple-discharge peaks on hydrographs before terracing did not occur after terracing when hydrographs reflected the stepwisedraining of each terrace through the pipe outlet. After an initial 2-year period of terrace stabilization, suspended-sediment yield in runoff decreased significantly as a function of runoff. This result was expected because terracing decreased runoff energy, and because terrace ponding allowed time for sediment redeposition. Nitrate plus nitrite yields increased proportionally throughout the range of runoff during the post-terracing period relative to the pre- terracing period. After terracing, a combination of increased soil contact time and increased nitrification caused by wetter

  18. Kissing Mars Rocks with the Rover's RATs: An Educational Exercise to Understand Drilling Rocks on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. A.; Whelley, P. L.; Bleacher, J. E.; Cave, S. R.; Zabala-Aliberto, V. A.; Zabala, A. A.; Greeley, R.

    2007-03-01

    This abstract discusses an E/PO exercise we created for elementary school children that uses Hershey Kisses and straws to simulate the drilling of different rocks on Mars by the MER Rock Abrasion Tool.

  19. Prediction of rock brittleness using nondestructive methods for hard rock tunneling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rennie B. Kaunda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The material and elastic properties of rocks are utilized for predicting and evaluating hard rock brittleness using artificial neural networks (ANN. Herein hard rock brittleness is defined using Yagiz' method. A predictive model is developed using a comprehensive database compiled from 30 years' worth of rock tests at the Earth Mechanics Institute (EMI, Colorado School of Mines. The model is sensitive to density, elastic properties, and P- and S-wave velocities. The results show that the model is a better predictor of rock brittleness than conventional destructive strength-test based models and multiple regression techniques. While the findings have direct implications on intact rock, the methodology can be extrapolated to rock mass problems in both tunneling and underground mining where rock brittleness is an important control.

  20. Prediction of rock brittleness using nondestructive methods for hard rock tunneling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rennie B. Kaunda; Brian Asbury

    2016-01-01

    The material and elastic properties of rocks are utilized for predicting and evaluating hard rock brit-tleness using artificial neural networks (ANN). Herein hard rock brittleness is defined using Yagiz’ method. A predictive model is developed using a comprehensive database compiled from 30 years’ worth of rock tests at the Earth Mechanics Institute (EMI), Colorado School of Mines. The model is sensitive to density, elastic properties, and P-and S-wave velocities. The results show that the model is a better predictor of rock brittleness than conventional destructive strength-test based models and mul-tiple regression techniques. While the findings have direct implications on intact rock, the methodology can be extrapolated to rock mass problems in both tunneling and underground mining where rock brittleness is an important control.

  1. Petrology and geochemistry of the marbles and calcosilicated rocks from Ipira, Bahia - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work explains a study of marbles and diopsitites from Serra das Panelas, Ipira, Bahia, Brazil. Petrographic analysis, chemistry some elements, trace elements and rare earths, isotopic analysis of Strontium, carbon and oxigen, and geochronological determinations were done. The ages founded correspond to Transamazonic Orogenetic cicle, with Archean age, confirmed by the 18O values found, which give to marble, ages about 2.500 my. The mineralogy and the texture give to marble an invulgar aspect, making a confusion with carbonate. The petrochemical data and the geochemistry of 13C and 18O isotopes showed that the marble and diopsitites was formed from the old marine carbonates. The geochemistry of rare earth suggests a strong correlation with carbonitic and alkaline rocks. An hybrid origem to this rocks is proposed. (C.D.G.)

  2. Seismic attenuation: Laboratory measurements in fluid saturated rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyan, Shankar; Madonna, Claudio; Tisato, Nicola; Saenger, Erik; Quintal, Beatriz

    2014-05-01

    Seismic wave attenuation could be used as an indicator of reservoir fluids due to its dependence on rock and fluid properties. Over the past 30 years, many laboratory methodologies to study attenuation in rocks have been employed, such as ultrasonic (MHz), resonant bar (kHz) and forced oscillation methods in the low frequency range (0.01-100Hz) (Tisato & Madonna 2012; Madonna & Tisato 2013). Forced oscillation methods have gained prominence over time as the frequency range of measurements correspond to that of field seismic data acquired for oil/gas exploration. These experiments measure attenuation as the phase shift between the applied stress (sinusoidal) and measured strain. Since the magnitudes of measured phase shifts are quite low (Q-1 ~0.01-0.1) and the amplitudes of strain applied to the rock samples are of the order ~10-6 (i.e., similar orders of magnitude to seismic waves), it is challenging. A comparison of such forced oscillation setups will be presented to provide an overview of the various possibilities of design and implementation for future setups. In general, there is a lack of laboratory data and most of the published data are for sandstones. Currently, attenuation measurements are being carried out on carbonate and sandstone samples. We employ the Seismic Wave Attenuation Module (SWAM, Madonna & Tisato 2013) to measure seismic attenuation in these samples for different saturation degrees (90% and 100% water) and under three different confining pressures (5, 10 and 15MPa). Preliminary results from these investigations will be discussed. REFERENCES Madonna, C. & Tisato, N. 2013: A new seismic wave attenuation module to experimentally measure low-frequency attenuation in extensional mode. Geophysical Prospecting, doi: 10.1111/1365-2478.12015. Tisato, N. & Madonna, C. 2012: Attenuation at low seismic frequencies in partially saturated rocks: Measurements and description of a new apparatus. Journal of Applied Geophysics, 86, 44-53.

  3. Developmental modes of the Neoproterozoic-Lower Paleozoic marine hydrocarbon source rocks in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on the researches on rock type, the mode of occurrence, diagnostic minerals and creatures, the sedimentary geochemistry and organic facies of Chinese marine source rocks from wells and outcrops,and on the research findings of developmental modes of foreign marine source rock, the authors consider that it is impossible to objectively make clear the formation mechanism of hydrocarbon source rock with high organic matter abundance by either single mode of preservation or high organic matter productivity. According to the Chinese geological features, the formation mechanism of the Neoproterozoic-Lower Paleozoic marine source rock is generalized into four modes, namely, thermal water activity-upwelling flow-anoxic; carbonate gentle slope-upwelling flow; xerothermic climate-brine euxinic milieu; and humid climate-retained euxinic milieu; as the Lower Cambrian undercompensation basin organic facies (the Tarim Basin, South China and southwestern margin of North China), carbonate gentle lime mud bound organic facies (the Upper Ordovician in Tazhong region of the Tarim Basin and the Lower Silurian in the Upper Yangtze Platform), the Middle Cambrian evaporation laggon organic facies (the Tarim Basin and the Upper Yangtze Platform), enclosed undercompensation terrigenous bay organic facies (the Middle-Upper Ordovician in the west of the Tarim Basin, the Lower Silurian Longmaxi Formation in the Upper Yangtze platform). Chinese marine sedimentations with lower organic matter abundance are generalized into two modes of consumption-dilution mode of open epicontinental sea and depletion-dilution mode of supercompensation basin.

  4. Some influences of rock strength and strain rate on propagation of rock avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Elisabeth; Rait, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Rock avalanches are extreme and destructive mass movements in which large volumes of rock (typically >1 million cubic metres) travel at high speeds, covering large distances, and the occurrence of which is highly unpredictable. The "size effect" in rock avalanches, whereby those with larger volumes produce greater spreading efficiency (as defined by an increase in normalised runout) or lower farboschung angle (defined as the tangent of the ratio of fall height to runout length), is well known. Studies have shown that rock strength is a controlling factor in the mobility of rock avalanches - that is, mass movements involving lower strength rock are generally found to produce greater mobility as evidenced by the spread of deposits or low farboschung angle. However, there are conflicting ideas as to how and why this influence is manifested. This paper discusses different theories of rock comminution in light of numerical simulations of rock clasts undergoing normal and shear induced loading, experimental work on rock avalanche behaviour, and dynamic fracture mechanics. In doing so, we introduce the idea of thresholds of strain rate for the production of dynamic fragmentation (as opposed to pseudo-static clast crushing) that are based, inter alia, on static rock strength. To do this, we refer to data from physical models using rock analogue materials, field data on chalk cliff collapses, and field statistics from documented rock avalanches. The roles of normal and shear loading and loading rate within a rock avalanche are examined numerically using 3D Discrete Element Method models of rock clasts loaded to failure. Results may help to reconcile the observations that large rock avalanches in stronger materials tend not to fragment as much as those in weaker materials and also possess lower mobility, while small cliff collapses (typically > 1000 cubic metres) in weak chalk can exhibit rock avalanche-like behaviour at much smaller volumes.

  5. ROCKS & MINERALS DETERMINATION AND ANALYSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>20091570 Ge Yunjin(College of Geo-Resource and Information,China University of Petroleum,Dongying 257061,China);Chen Yong Advance in Low Temperature Phase Transition and Raman Spectrum Technique in Composition Determination of Fluid Inclusions(Rock and Mineral Analysis,ISSN0254-5357,CN11-2131/TD,27(3),2008,p.207-210,22 refs.)Key words:fluid inclusions,Raman spectraThe principle and development of low-temperature analytical techniques for fluid inclusions were expounded.The traditional low-temperature analytical technology mainly focused on the measurement of inorganic salt using congealed microthermometry,but now it is developed to semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis of fluid inclusions using in-situ cryogenic Raman spectrometry.

  6. Hydraulic conductivity of rock fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada contains numerous geological units that are highly fractured. A clear understanding of the hydraulic conductivity of fractures has been identified as an important scientific problem that must be addressed during the site characterization process. The problem of the flow of a single-phase fluid through a rough-walled rock fracture is discussed within the context of rigorous fluid mechanics. The derivation of the cubic law is given as the solution to the Navier-Stokes equations for flow between smooth, parallel plates, the only fracture geometry that is amenable to exact treatment. The various geometric and kinetic conditions that are necessary in order for the Navier-Stokes equations to be replaced by the more tractable lubrication or Hele-Shaw equations are studied and quantified. Various analytical and numerical results are reviewed pertaining to the problem of relating the effective hydraulic aperture to the statistics of the aperture distribution. These studies all lead to the conclusion that the effective hydraulic aperture is always less than the mean aperture, by a factor that depends on the ratio of the mean value of the aperture to its standard deviation. The tortuosity effect caused by regions where the rock walls are in contact with each other is studied using the Hele-Shaw equations, leading to a simple correction factor that depends on the area fraction occupied by the contact regions. Finally, the predicted hydraulic apertures are compared to measured values for eight data sets from the literature for which aperture and conductivity data were available on the same fracture. It is found that reasonably accurate predictions of hydraulic conductivity can be made based solely on the first two moments of the aperture distribution function, and the proportion of contact area. 68 refs

  7. The long-term carbon cycle, fossil fuels and atmospheric composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Robert A

    2003-11-20

    The long-term carbon cycle operates over millions of years and involves the exchange of carbon between rocks and the Earth's surface. There are many complex feedback pathways between carbon burial, nutrient cycling, atmospheric carbon dioxide and oxygen, and climate. New calculations of carbon fluxes during the Phanerozoic eon (the past 550 million years) illustrate how the long-term carbon cycle has affected the burial of organic matter and fossil-fuel formation, as well as the evolution of atmospheric composition.

  8. Origin of beach-stranded tars from source rocks indigeneous to Seychelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plummer, P.S. [Seychelles National Oil Co., Mahe (South Africa)

    1996-03-01

    Tarballs have been found stranded as traction deposits on a beach on northwest Mahe Island, Seychelles, with every ebbing tide. Weekly collections from mid-1993 to mid-1994 gathered nearly 4750 samples of two types of tar: a dominant black malleable tar and a less common brownish-black hard tar. Both tars represent moderately degraded extracts of crude oils seemingly derived from mature source rocks dominated by a combination of oil-prone phytoplanktonic and algal organic matter over gas-prone land-plant organic matter. Source rock deposition occurred principally in paralic to open-marine environments. The presence of minor oleanane and bicadinane, and a general preponderance of diasteranes and tricyclic terpanes in the hard tar suggest derivation from a Late Cretaceous clastic source rock with possible carbonate interbeds. By contrast, no samples of the malleable tar contain oleanane or bicadinane, but all contain significant norhopane and tetracyclic terpanes, which, along with significant sulfur and low diasterane contents, indicate derivation from a carbonate source rock of perhaps pre-Late Cretaceous age. Additionally, maturity and limited geochemical data from proven and potential source rocks present in the offshore wells enable the malleable and hard tars to be equated with specific units in the Seychelles stratigraphy; the malleable tar is seemingly derived from a Middle Jurassic carbonate of Tethyan affinity and the hard tar possibly originated from either Campanian or Maastrichtian-Paleocene shales. These tars are thus concluded to be natural seepage products derived from source rocks indigenous to Seychelles, and their persistent beach stranding significantly reduces the risk of hydrocarbon exploration in this frontier province.

  9. Comparison of two non-linear prediction techniques for estimation of some intact rock parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagiz, Saffet; Sezer, Ebru; Gokceoglu, Candan

    2010-05-01

    Traditionally, some regression techniques have been used for prediction of some rock properties using their physical and index parameters. For this purpose, numerous models and empirical equations have been proposed in the literature to predict the uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) and the elasticity modules (E) of intact rocks. Two of the powerful modeling techniques for this purpose is that the non-linear multivariable regression (NLMR) and the artificial neural networks (ANN). The aim of the study is to develop some models to predict the UCS and E of rocks using predictive tools. Further, to investigate whether two-cycle or four-cycle slake durability index as an input parameter into the models demonstrates better characterization capacity for carbonate rocks, and also, to introduce two new performance ranking approaches via performance index and degree of consistency to select the best predictor among the developed models, complex and their rank cannot be solved by using a simple ranking approach introduced previously in the literature. To obtain these purposes, seven type of carbonate rocks was collected from quarries in the southwestern Turkey and their properties including the uniaxial compressive strength, the Schmidt hammer, effective porosity, dry unit weight, P-wave velocity, the modulus of elasticity, and both two and four-cycle of slake durability indices were determined for establishing a dataset used for construction of the models. As a result of this study, it is found that four-cycle slake durability index exhibits more characterization capacity for carbonate rock in the models in comparison with two-cycle slake durability index. Also, the ANN models having two outputs (UCS and E) exhibit more accurate estimation capacity than the NLMR models. In addition, newly introduced performance ranking index and degree of consistency may be accepted as useful indicators to be considered to obtain the performance ranking of complex models. Consequently

  10. Susceptibility of Granite Rock to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees C and 250 degrees C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, T.; Gill, S., Ecker, L., Butcher, T., Warren, J.

    2011-01-01

    Granite rock comprising anorthoclase-type albite and quartz as its major phases and biotite mica as the minor one was exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2})/water at 250 C and 13.78 MPa pressure for 104 hours. For comparison purpose, four other rocks, albite, hornblende, diorite, and quartz, also were exposed. During the exposure of granite, ionic carbonic acid, known as the wet carbonation reactant, preferentially reacted with anorthoclase-type albite and biotite, rather than with quartz. The susceptibility of biotite to wet carbonation was higher than that of anorthoclase-type albite. All the carbonation by-products of anorthoclase-type albite were amorphous phases including Na- and K-carbonates, a kaolinite clay-like compound, and silicon dioxide, while wet carbonation converted biotite into potassium aluminum silicate, siderite, and magnesite in crystalline phases and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Three of these reaction by-products, Na- and K-carbonates and HF, were highly soluble in water. Correspondingly, the carbonated top surface layer, about 1.27 mm thick as carbonation depth, developed porous microstructure with numerous large voids, some of which have a size of {>=} 10 {mu}m, reflecting the erosion of granite by the leaching of these water-soluble reaction by-products. Comparing with this carbonation depth, its depth of other minerals was considerable lower, particularly, for hornblende and diorite with 0.07 and 0.02 mm, while no carbonate compound was detected in quartz. The major factor governing these low carbonation depths in these rocks was the formation of water-insensitive scale-like carbonate by-products such as calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), and magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). Their formation within the superficial layer of these minerals served as protective barrier layer that inhibits and retards further carbonation of fresh underlying minerals, even if the exposure time was extended. Thus, the coverage by this barrier layer

  11. Mixing-controlled uncertainty in long-term predictions of acid rock drainage from heterogeneous waste-rock piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedretti, D.; Beckie, R. D.; Mayer, K. U.

    2015-12-01

    The chemistry of drainage from waste-rock piles at mine sites is difficult to predict because of a number of uncertainties including heterogeneous reactive mineral content, distribution of minerals, weathering rates and physical flow properties. In this presentation, we examine the effects of mixing on drainage chemistry over timescales of 100s of years. We use a 1-D streamtube conceptualization of flow in waste rocks and multicomponent reactive transport modeling. We simplify the reactive system to consist of acid-producing sulfide minerals and acid-neutralizing carbonate minerals and secondary sulfate and iron oxide minerals. We create multiple realizations of waste-rock piles with distinct distributions of reactive minerals along each flow path and examine the uncertainty of drainage geochemistry through time. The limited mixing of streamtubes that is characteristic of the vertical unsaturated flow in many waste-rock piles, allows individual flowpaths to sustain acid or neutral conditions to the base of the pile, where the streamtubes mix. Consequently, mixing and the acidity/alkalinity balance of the streamtube waters, and not the overall acid- and base-producing mineral contents, control the instantaneous discharge chemistry. Our results show that the limited mixing implied by preferential flow and the heterogeneous distribution of mineral contents lead to large uncertainty in drainage chemistry over short and medium time scales. However, over longer timescales when one of either the acid-producing or neutralizing primary phases is depleted, the drainage chemistry becomes less controlled by mixing and in turn less uncertain. A correct understanding of the temporal variability of uncertainty is key to make informed long-term decisions in mining settings regarding the management of waste material.

  12. Geochemistry of Eagle Ford group source rocks and oils from the first shot field area, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edman, Janell D.; Pitman, Janet K.; Hammes, Ursula

    2010-01-01

    Total organic carbon, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, and vitrinite reflectance analyses performed on Eagle Ford Group core and cuttings samples from the First Shot field area, Texas demonstrate these samples have sufficient quantity, quality, and maturity of organic matter to have generated oil. Furthermore, gas chromatography and biomarker analyses performed on Eagle Ford Group oils and source rock extracts as well as weight percent sulfur analyses on the oils indicate the source rock facies for most of the oils are fairly similar. Specifically, these source rock facies vary in lithology from shales to marls, contain elevated levels of sulfur, and were deposited in a marine environment under anoxic conditions. It is these First Shot Eagle Ford source facies that have generated the oils in the First Shot Field. However, in contrast to the generally similar source rock facies and organic matter, maturity varies from early oil window to late oil window in the study area, and these maturity variations have a pronounced effect on both the source rock and oil characteristics. Finally, most of the oils appear to have been generated locally and have not experienced long distance migration. 

  13. Raman microscopy of hand stencils rock art from the Yabrai Mountain, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernanz, Antonio; Chang, Jinlong; Iriarte, Mercedes; Gavira-Vallejo, Jose M.; de Balbín-Behrmann, Rodrigo; Bueno-Ramírez, Primitiva; Maroto-Valiente, Angel

    2016-07-01

    A series of rock art pictographs in the form of hand stencils discovered in two sites of the Yabrai Mountain, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region (China) has been studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electronic microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy for the first time. These studies have made possible to characterise the materials present. The minerals α-quartz, phlogopite, albite and microcline have been identified in the granitic rocks supporting the paintings. Calcite and dolomite micro-particles detected on the rock surface have been attributed to desert dust. Accretions of gypsum, anhydrite and whewellite have also been identified on the rock surface. Haematite is the pigment used in the red pictographs, whereas well-crystallised graphite has been used in the black ones. The use of crystalline graphite instead of amorphous carbon (charcoal, soot or bone black) as a black pigment in rock art is an interesting novelty. Overlapped hands are proposed as a new type of hand stencils to make an unusual pictorial symbol in rock art that has been found in these sites.

  14. Permeability Evolution and Rock Brittle Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Qiang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports an experimental study of the evolution of permeability during rock brittle failure and a theoretical analysis of rock critical stress level. It is assumed that the rock is a strain-softening medium whose strength can be described by Weibull’s distribution. Based on the two-dimensional renormalization group theory, it is found that the stress level λ c (the ratio of the stress at the critical point to the peak stress depends mainly on the homogeneity index or shape parameter m in the Weibull’s distribution for the rock. Experimental results show that the evolution of permeability is closely related to rock deformation stages: the permeability has a rapid increase with the growth of cracks and their surface areas (i.e., onset of fracture coalescence point, and reaches the maximum at rock failure. Both the experimental and analytical results show that this point of rapid increase in permeability on the permeabilitypressure curve corresponds to the critical point on the stress-strain curve; for rock compression, the stress at this point is approximately 80% of the peak strength. Thus, monitoring the evolution of permeability may provide a new means of identifying the critical point of rock brittle fracture

  15. Rock Music and Korean Adolescent's Antisocial Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Inkyung; Kwak, Keumjoo; Chang, Geunyoung; Yang, Jinyoung

    The relationship between rock music preference and antisocial behavior among Korean adolescents was examined. The Korean versions of the Sensation Seeking Scale and the Antisocial Behavior Checklist were used to measure sensation seeking motivation and delinquency. Adolescents (N=1,079) were categorized as "rock/metal,""dance," or "ballad" based…

  16. Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, R.G.; Gregory, R.T.; Brown, G.F.

    2016-01-01

    The Cenozoic volcanic rocks of Saudi Arabia cover about 90,000 km2, one of the largest areas of alkali olivine basalt in the world. These volcanic rocks are in 13 separate fields near the eastern coast of the Red Sea and in the western Arabian Peninsula highlands from Syria southward to the Yemen Arab Republic.

  17. Toe rock stability for rubble mound breakwaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, S.; Ebbens, R.; Nammuni-Krohn, J.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Present design tools, as found in the Rock Manual or Coastal Engineering Manual, for the determination of toe rock size for rubble mound breakwaters are based on test data with a large spread: data is relatively dispersed around the centre and descriptive equations have limited applicability ranges.

  18. Evaluating CO2 mineralization capacity of sedimentary rock Using BCR sequential extraction procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang-Ting; Yu, Chi-Wen; Yang, Hsiao-Ming; Chiao, Chung-Hui; Yang, Ming-Wei

    2015-04-01

    To relief the high concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, carbon capture and storage (CCS) is gradually becoming an important concept to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In IPCC Special Report on CCS, the storage mechanisms for geological formations are categorized into structural/stratigraphic, hydrodynamic and geochemical trappings. Geochemical trapping is considered as a storage mechanism, which can further increase storage capacity, effectiveness and security in terms of permanent CO2 sequestration. The injected CO2 can have geochemical interactions with pore fluid and reservoir rocks and transform into minerals. It is important to evaluate the capacity of reservoir rock for sequestrating CO2. In this study, sedimentary rock samples were collected from a 2-km-deep well in Midwestern Taiwan; and, the BCR sequential extraction experiments developed by European Union Measurement and Testing Programme were conducted. BCR was designed for extracting three major phases from soil, including exchangeable phase and carbonates (the first stage), reducible phase (the second stage) and oxidizable phase (the third stage). The chemistry of extracted solutions and rock residues were measured with ICP-MS and XRF, respectively. According to the results of XRF, considerable amounts of calcium and iron can be extracted by BCR procedures but other cations are negligible. In general, shale has a higher capacity of CO2 sequestration than sandstone. The first stage of extraction can release about 6 (sandstone) to 18.5 (shale) g of calcium from 1 kg rock, which are equivalent to 6.6 and 20.4 g CO2/kg rock, respectively. In the second stage extraction, 0.71 (sandstone) to 1.38 (shale) g/kg rock of iron can be released and can mineralized 0.56 to 1.08 g CO2/kg rock. However, there are no considerable cations extracted in the third stage of BCR as shown by the XRF analysis. In addition, the results of ICP-MS show that Mg can be released in the order of 10-3 g from 1 kg rock

  19. Fluid-rock Interaction and Episodic Fluid Flow within the Hurricane Fault-zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koger, J.; Newell, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Hurricane Fault is an active 250-km long, west dipping, Basin and Range bounding normal fault in SW Utah and NW Arizona. Fault rock alteration and mineralization is common in the damage zone along strike, indicating that this structure has influenced past groundwater flow. Multiple Quaternary basaltic centers are located proximal to the fault. This study tests the hypothesis that fault-zone diagenesis is being driven by deeply circulated meteoric groundwater infiltration and associated rock-water interaction that is punctuated by periods of hydrothermal alteration associated with local magmatism. Fault-parallel/oblique fractures and small-offset antithetic and synthetic normal faults have been found within fault-zone rocks. The intensity of fracturing and associated evidence of fluid-rock interaction progressively decreases away from the main fault trace into the footwall. Host rock alteration, hematite mineralized fault surfaces, and calcite and hematite cemented deformation bands and veins are observed. These features are focused in 1 - 2 m wide zones of fracturing with densities of 6 - 18 m-1 located within the footwall damage zone. Host rock alteration in the form of both "bleaching" and oxidation along fractures provides evidence for past redox reactions. Mineralization in deformation bands suggests that some fluid flow and diagenesis was penecontemporaneous with deformation. Laminations and cross-cutting relationships in veins indicate periodic mineralization that could be controlled by episodic fluid flow, or fracturing and degassing leading to calcite precipitation. Stable isotopic results from calcite veins show δ13CPDB values of -7 to 3 ‰ and δ18OPDB values of -19 to -9 ‰. Carbon stable isotope ratios suggest multiple carbon sources such as marine carbonates, organic sedimentary rocks, and mantle derived CO2. Temperature differences in paleofluids and associated fluid-rock interaction may explain the observed range in δ18O values. Fluid

  20. Classification and description of dolomitic fabrics of rocks from the Floridan aquifer, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randazzo, Anthony F.; Zachos, Louis G.

    1984-01-01

    Biozones of the Lake City Formation, Avon Park Formation and Ocala Limestone are characterized by interbedded, massive, fossiliferous carbonate rocks (wackestones to grainstones) and thinly bedded, peloidal and carbonaceous rocks (mudstones and wackestones). Several horizons have been partly or completely dolomitized. A wide range of early to late stages of dolomitic fabrics are recognized. The fabrics are classified descriptively as equigranular (unimodal) or inequigranular (multimodal). Fabrics composed of crystals processes of dolomitization are suggested: (a) homogeneous dolomitization resulting in a single-stage development of microtextured (groundmass crystals original depositional fabric and lithofacies from the dolomitic fabric except where extensive neomorphism has occurred.

  1. Sorption of cesium in intact rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puukko, E. [Univ. of Helsinki, Dept. of Chemistry (Finland)

    2014-04-15

    The mass distribution coefficient K{sub d} is used in performance assessment (PA) to describe sorption of a radionuclide on rock. The R{sub d} is determined using crushed rock which causes uncertainty in converting the R{sub d} values to K{sub d} values for intact rock. This work describes a method to determine the equilibrium of sorption on intact rock. The rock types of the planned Olkiluoto waste disposal site were T-series mica gneiss (T-MGN), T-series tonalite granodiorite granite gneiss (T-TGG), P-series tonalite granodiorite granite gneiss (P-TGG) and pegmatitic granite (PGR). These rocks contain different amount of biotite which is the main sorbing mineral. The sorption of cesium on intact rock slices was studied by applying an electrical field to speed up migration of cesium into the rock. Cesium is in the solution as a noncomplex cation Cs{sup +} and it is sorbed by ion exchange. The tracer used in the experiments was {sup 134}Cs. The experimental sorption on the intact rock is compared with values calculated using the in house cation exchange sorption model (HYRL model) in PHREEQC program. The observed sorption on T-MGN and T-TGG rocks was close to the calculated values. Two PGR samples were from a depth of 70 m and three samples were from a depth of 150 m. Cesium sorbed more than predicted on the two 70 m PGR samples. The sorption of Cs on the three 150 m PGR samples was small which was consistent with the calculations. The pegmatitic granite PGR has the smallest content of biotite of the four rock types. In the case of P-TGG rock the observed values of sorption were only half of the calculated values. Two kind of slices were cut from P-TGG drill core. The slices were against and to the direction of the foliation of the biotite rims. The sorption of cesium on P-TGG rock was same in both cases. The results indicated that there was no effect of the directions of the electric field and the foliation of biotite in the P-TGG rock. (orig.)

  2. Age and paleoenvironmental reconstruction of partially remagnetized lacustrine sedimentary rocks (Oligocene Aktoprak basin, central Anatolia, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, Maud J. M.; Strauss, Becky E.; Özkaptan, Murat; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Mulch, Andreas; Whitney, Donna L.; Kaymakçı, Nuretdin

    2016-03-01

    The age and paleoenvironmental record of lacustrine deposits in the Aktoprak basin of south-central Turkey provides information about the evolution of topography, including the timing of development of an orographic rain shadow caused by uplift of the mountain ranges fringing the Central Anatolian Plateau. New magnetostratigraphy-based age estimates, in combination with existing biostratigraphic ages, suggest that the partially remagnetized Kurtulmuş Tepe section of the basin is Chattian (Upper Oligocene). The mean carbon and oxygen stable isotope ratios (δ18O= 24.6 ± 2.0 ‰, δ13C= -4.9 ± 1.1‰) are largely constant through the section and indicative of a subtropical, open freshwater lake. These isotopic values are also similar to those of the Chattian Mut basin to the south, on the Mediterranean side of the modern orographic barrier (Tauride Mountains), and indicate absence of an orographic barrier during Late Oligocene basin deposition. Post-depositional partial remagnetization occurred after tilting of the basin sequence and was mineralogically controlled, affecting grey, carbonate-rich rocks (average %CaCO3= 82), whereas interlayered pink carbonate-poor rocks (average %CaCO3= 38) carry a primary, pretilt magnetization. The pink rocks are rich in clay minerals that may have reduced the permeability of these rocks that carry a primary magnetization, concentrating basinal fluid flow in the carbonate-rich grey layers and leading to the removal and reprecipitation of magnetic minerals. The normal and reverse polarities recorded by the remagnetized rocks suggest that remagnetization occurred over a protracted period of time.

  3. Characteristics of fluid substitution in porous rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shengjie

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of the effect of changes in fluid properties of rocks on the compressional-wave velocity VP and shear-wave velocity Vs is very important for understanding the rock physical properties, especially in oilfield exploration and development.The fluid substitution process was analyzed by using ultrasonic measurement and theoretical calculations.The results showed that the effect of fluid substitution on the rock elastic modulus was mainly controlled by fluid properties, saturation, and confining pressure.For a rock with specific properties and porosity, the result of theoretical prediction for fluid substitution accorded with the experimental result under high confining pressure (higher than 60 MPa for our experimental data), but failed to describe the trend of experimental result under low confining pressure and VP predicted by Gassmann's equation was higher than that measured by experiment.A higher porosity resulted in stronger sensitivity of the bulk modulus of saturated rocks to the change of fluid properties.

  4. A study of rock bolting failure modes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Chen; Jan Nemcik; Ren Ting; Naj Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Rock bolting has advanced rapidly during the past 4 decades due to a better understanding of load transfer mechanisms and advances made in the bolt system technology.Bolts are used as permanent and temporary support systems in tunnelling and mining operations.A review of has indicated that three systems of reinforcement devices have evolved as part of rock bolt and ground anchor while the rock is not generally thought of as being a component of the reinforcement system.A classification of rock bolting reinforcement systems is presented,followed by the fundamental theory of the load transfer mechanism.The failure mode of two phases of rock bolting system is formularised.The failure modes of cable bolting are discussed using a bond strength model as well as an iterative method.Finally,the interfacial shear stress model for ribbed bar is introduced and a closed form solution is obtained using a tri-line stress strain relationship.