WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon-covered magnetic nanomaterials

  1. Carbon-covered magnetic nanomaterials and their application for the thermolysis of cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Yang Xu1, Meena Mahmood1, Ashley Fejleh1, Zhongrui Li1, Fumiya Watanabe1, Steve Trigwell2, Reginald B Little3, Vasyl P Kunets4, Enkeleda Dervishi1, Alexandru R Biris5, Gregory J Salamo4, Alexandru S Biris11Nanotechnology Center and Applied Science Department, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR, USA; 2Applied Science and Technology, ASRC Aerospace, NASA Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; 3Department of Chemistry, Elizabeth City State University, Elizabeth City, NC, USA; 4Physics Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 5National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj Napoca, RomaniaAbstract: Three types of graphitic shelled-magnetic core (Fe, Fe/Co, and Co nanoparticles (named as C-Fe, C-Fe/Co, and C-Co NPs were synthesized by radio frequency-catalytic chemical vapor deposition (RF-cCVD. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that the cores inside the carbon shells of these NPs were preserved in their metallic states. Fluorescence microscopy images indicated effective penetrations of the NPs through the cellular membranes of cultured cancer HeLa cells, both inside the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Low RF radiation of 350 kHz induced localized heating of the magnetic NPs, which triggered cell death. Apoptosis inducement was found to be dependent on the RF irradiation time and NP concentration. It was showed that the Fe-C NPs had a much higher ability of killing the cancer cells (over 99% compared with the other types of NPs (C-Co or C-Fe/Co, even at a very low concentration of 0.83 μg/mL. The localized heating of NPs inside the cancer cells comes from the hysteresis heating and resistive heating through eddy currents generated under the RF radiation. The RF thermal ablation properties of the magnetic NPs were correlated with the analysis provided by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID.Keywords: graphitic shelled, magnetic

  2. Magnetic Nanomaterials and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurii K. Gun'ko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This Special Issue of Nanomaterials is dedicated to the development of new magnetic nanomaterials and their applications in biomedicine, catalysis, spintronics and other areas. The publications in this Issue demonstrate that the interest in magnetic nanomaterials is continuously growing and their realm is expanding rapidly. Some highlights of the publications in this issue are discussed below. [...

  3. Nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Vollath, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    This full-colored introduction to nanomaterials and nanotechnology in particular addresses the needs of engineers who need to know the special phenomena and potentials, without getting bogged down in the scientific detail of the physics and chemistry involved. Based on the author's own courses, this textbook shows how to produce nanomaterials and use them in engineering applications for novel products. Following an introduction, the text goes on to treat synthesis, characterization techniques, thermal, optical, magnetic and electronic properties, processing and, finally, emerging applications. A sound overview of the "nano world" from an application-oriented perspective.

  4. Novel Magnetic Nanomaterials Inspired by Magnetotactic Baterial: Topical Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prozorov, Tanya [Ames Laboratory; Bazylinki, Dennis A. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Mallapragada, Surya K. [Ames Laboratory; Prozorov, Ruslan [Ames Laboratory

    2013-05-14

    Magnetotactic bacteria, known to produce magnetic nanocrystals with uniform shapes and sizes at physiological conditions, serve as an inspiration and source of a number of biological macromolecules used for the biomimetic synthesis of a variety of magnetic nanomaterials. This review discusses the current state of understanding of magnetosome biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria, as well as the ways in which iron biomineralization processes can be utilized for tailored in vivo formation of complex magnetic nanomaterials, not occurring in magnetotactic bacteria naturally. The review assesses the current efforts on in vitro synthesis of a variety of magnetic nanoparticles using bioinspired approaches by utilizing mineralization proteins from magnetotactic bacteria, and surveys biomimetic strategies for the rational synthesis of various magnetic nanomaterials under ambient conditions. Finally, this review presents magnetic characterization of nanoparticles, highlighting differences in magnetic behavior between magnetic nanoparticles produced using bioinspired in vivo and in vitro strategies, compared to those produced using conventional methods. This in turn impacts their utility in a wide range of applications for magnetic nanoparticles, which are examined in detail, where bioinspired synthesis methods have potentially provided added advantages.

  5. Optimizing Energy Conversion: Magnetic Nano-materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Dylan; Dann, Martin; Ilie, Carolina C.

    2015-03-01

    We present herein the work started at SUNY Oswego as a part of a SUNY 4E grant. The SUNY 4E Network of Excellence has awarded SUNY Oswego and collaborators a grant to carry out extensive studies on magnetic nanoparticles. The focus of the study is to develop cost effective rare-earth-free magnetic materials that will enhance energy transmission performance of various electrical devices (solar cells, electric cars, hard drives, etc.). The SUNY Oswego team has started the preliminary work for the project and graduate students from the rest of the SUNY 4E team (UB, Alfred College, Albany) will continue the project. The preliminary work concentrates on analyzing the properties of magnetic nanoparticle candidates, calculating molecular orbitals and band gap, and the fabrication of thin films. SUNY 4E Network of Excellence Grant.

  6. Dipole-exchange spin waves in magnetic nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Hoa

    role of the interstripe dipolar coupling. Finally the dipole-exchange spin waves are investigated in spherical ferromagnetic nanoparticles including spheres, spherical shells and part spheres, both singly and in finite-sized arrays. The mode-mixing (hybridization) effects on the spin wave are shown to be important, depending on the particle sizes and geometries. Keywords: spin waves, dipole-exchange theory, ferromagnets, magnetic nanomaterials, ultrathin films, magnetic stripes, magnetic arrays, magnetic spheres, magnetic nanoparticles, Brillouin light scattering, Green function theory.

  7. Spectral absorption of unpolarized light through nano-materials in the absence of a magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Luminosu I.; Popov D.; Zaharie I.

    2008-01-01

    A study of optical properties, such as light absorption, of a colloidal nano-material, provides information on the biphasic, solid - liquid system microstructure. The nano-material under study is a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid). The disperser agent is petroleum mineral oil and the dispersed material is a brown spar powder (nano-particles). The stabilizer is oleic acid. Light absorption through ferrofluid samples reveals the tendency of solid particles in a colloidal solution to form aggregates...

  8. Recent progress in magnetic iron oxide-semiconductor composite nanomaterials as promising photocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Changzhong Jiang, Affc; Roy, Vellaisamy A. L.

    2014-11-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of toxic organic pollutants is a challenging tasks in ecological and environmental protection. Recent research shows that the magnetic iron oxide-semiconductor composite photocatalytic system can effectively break through the bottleneck of single-component semiconductor oxides with low activity under visible light and the challenging recycling of the photocatalyst from the final products. With high reactivity in visible light, magnetic iron oxide-semiconductors can be exploited as an important magnetic recovery photocatalyst (MRP) with a bright future. On this regard, various composite structures, the charge-transfer mechanism and outstanding properties of magnetic iron oxide-semiconductor composite nanomaterials are sketched. The latest synthesis methods and recent progress in the photocatalytic applications of magnetic iron oxide-semiconductor composite nanomaterials are reviewed. The problems and challenges still need to be resolved and development strategies are discussed.

  9. Spectral absorption of unpolarized light through nano-materials in the absence of a magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminosu I.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of optical properties, such as light absorption, of a colloidal nano-material, provides information on the biphasic, solid - liquid system microstructure. The nano-material under study is a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid. The disperser agent is petroleum mineral oil and the dispersed material is a brown spar powder (nano-particles. The stabilizer is oleic acid. Light absorption through ferrofluid samples reveals the tendency of solid particles in a colloidal solution to form aggregates. The paper emphasizes the linear dependence between the spectral absorption coefficient, concentration and wavelength. The aggregates cause deviations of the extinction coefficient from values according to the Bouger-Lambert-Beer law. Fe3O4 aggregates sized 58.76 nm are formed in the system. The average number of nano-particles forming aggregates is 6. The magnetic liquid to be studied is secure stable and, thus, trustful in technological and biological applications.

  10. Preparation of magnetic fluorochromate hybrid nanomaterials with triphenylphosphine surface modified iron oxide nanoparticles and their characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a new magnetic hybrid nanomaterial Fe3O4@SiO2@PPh3@[CrO3F]− is instituted. Firstly, magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles have been synthesized by hydrothermal method. Next, the produced magnetic nanoparticles were covered with a silica shell via modified Stöber method. Then, the core–shell magnetic nanoparticles system Fe3O4@SiO2 functionalization was combined by utilizing (3-chloropropyl)trimethoxysilane and triphenylphosphine, to give the cationic part for immobilization of the anionic part of the Cr(VI) catalysts including [CrO3F]−. The structure of the catalyst after immobilization was investigated by using elemental analysis, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and solid state UV–vis. The particle size and morphology were identified by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and XRD. Magnetization properties of nanoparticles were confirmed by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). - Highlights: • Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized with hydrothermal method. • Fe3O4@SiO2 were prepared through a modified Stober method. • Fe3O4@SiO2 was functionalized with triphenylphosphonium reagent. • Target hybrid nanomaterial was synthesized by immobilization of fluorochromate anion

  11. Thermoresponsive magnetic composite nanomaterials for multimodal cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushotham, S; Ramanujan, R V

    2010-02-01

    The synthesis, characterization and property evaluation of drug-loaded polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) relevant to multimodal cancer therapy has been studied. The hyperthermia and controlled drug release characteristics of these particles was examined. Magnetite (Fe(3)O(4))-poly-n-(isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) composite MNPs were synthesized in a core-shell morphology by dispersion polymerization of n-(isopropylacrylamide) chains in the presence of a magnetite ferrofluid. These core-shell composite particles, with a core diameter of approximately 13nm, were loaded with the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (dox), and the resulting composite nanoparticles (CNPs) exhibit thermoresponsive properties. The magnetic properties of the composite particles are close to those of the uncoated magnetic particles. In an alternating magnetic field (AMF), composite particles loaded with 4.15 wt.% dox exhibit excellent heating properties as well as simultaneous drug release. Drug release testing confirmed that release was much higher above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the CNP, with a release of up to 78.1% of bound dox in 29h. Controlled drug release testing of the particles reveals that the thermoresponsive property can act as an on/off switch by blocking drug release below the LCST. Our work suggests that these dox-loaded polymer-coated MNPs show excellent in vitro hyperthermia and drug release behavior, with the ability to release drugs in the presence of AMF, and the potential to act as agents for combined targeting, hyperthermia and controlled drug release treatment of cancer. PMID:19596094

  12. Modeling of the magnetic properties of nanomaterials with different crystalline structure

    CERN Document Server

    Kirienko, Yury

    2012-01-01

    We propose a method for modeling the magnetic properties of nanomaterials with different structures. The method is based on the Ising model and the approximation of the random field interaction. It is shown that in this approximation, the magnetization of the nanocrystal depends only on the number of nearest neighbors of the lattice atoms and the values of exchange integrals between them. This gives a good algorithmic problem of calculating the magnetization of any nano-object, whether it is ultrathin film or nanoparticle of any shape and structure, managing only a rule of selection of nearest neighbors. By setting different values of exchange integrals, it is easy to describe ferromagnets, antiferromagnets, and ferrimagnets in a unified formalism. Having obtained the magnetization curve of the sample it is possible to find the Curie temperature as a function of, for example, the thickness of ultrathin film. Afterwards one can obtain the numerical values for critical exponents of the phase transition "ferroma...

  13. Different magnetic properties of rhombohedral and cubic Ni2+ doped indium oxide nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingbo Sun

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ions doped indium oxide nanomaterials were potentially used as a kind of diluted magnetic semiconductors in transparent spintronic devices. In this paper, the influences of Ni2+ doped contents and rhombohedral or cubic crystalline structures of indium oxide on magnetic properties were investigated. We found that the magnetic properties of Ni2+ doped indium oxide could be transferred from room temperature ferromagnetisms to paramagnetic properties with increments of doped contents. Moreover, the different crystalline structures of indium oxide also greatly affected the room temperature ferromagnetisms due to different lattice constants and almost had no effects on their paramagnetic properties. In addition, both the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic properties were demonstrated to be intrinsic and not caused by impurities.

  14. Structural, optical and magnetic studies on non-aqueous synthesized CdS:Mn nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► CdS:Mn2+ nanomaterials are prepared by wet chemical method for different Mn concentrations. ► Monodisperse cubic zinc blende phase nanostructured Cd1−xMnxS and cubic MnS secondary phase are identified from XRD. ► The strong blue shift observed in optical analysis is allied with size and dopant concentration. ► Weak Cd2+ interaction is witnessed from FT-IR analysis. ► Variation in the magnetic properties of CdS:Mn2+ nanomaterial is estimated with respect to dopant concentrations.. - Abstract: Manganese doped cadmium sulfide nanomaterials with different Mn concentrations were successfully synthesized using non-aqueous solution method and have been characterized by X-ray diffraction method (XRD), electron microscopic method (HRTEM), UV–visible absorption spectroscopy (UV–Vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analysis. X-ray diffraction study revealed the cubic zinc blende structure of CdS:Mn as primary phase and cubic structured α-MnS as secondary phase. The nanostructured particles with sizes ranging from 15 to 20 nm were confirmed by morphological characterization (HRTEM). The optical absorption spectra of the materials exhibited varying blue shifts in their characteristic λmax region as a function of Mn in CdS host material. The presence of metal sulfur bonding and weak interaction between the anion (S2−) and cations (Cd2+ and Mn2+) were confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopic data. An appreciable magnetic behavior (super paramagnetic state) as the result of spin moment caused by Mn2+ in the crystal structure of CdS:Mn was identified by VSM.

  15. Electrical, dielectric and magnetic characterization of Bi–Cr substituted M-type strontium hexaferrite nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakoor, Sajeela [Institute of Chemical Sciences, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan-60800 (Pakistan); Ashiq, Muhammad Naeem, E-mail: naeemashiqqau@yahoo.com [Institute of Chemical Sciences, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan-60800 (Pakistan); Malana, Muhammad Aslam [Institute of Chemical Sciences, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan-60800 (Pakistan); Mahmood, Azhar; Warsi, Muhammad Farooq [Department of Chemistry, The Islamia University, Bahawalpur (Pakistan); Najam-ul-Haq, Muhammad; Karamat, Nazia [Institute of Chemical Sciences, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan-60800 (Pakistan)

    2014-08-01

    Strontium hexaferrite nanoparticles substituted with bismuth and chromium having nominal composition SrFe{sub 12−2x}Bi{sub x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 19} (x=0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8) have been synthesized by the sol–gel method. The samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), DC electrical resistivity, magnetic and dielectric measurements. The XRD data shows that the nanoparticles are crystallized into single hexagonal magnetoplumbite phase. Room temperature DC electrical resistivity decreases on increasing the Bi–Cr contents. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss and tangent loss decrease with the frequency. The magnetic properties such as saturation magnetization (M{sub s}), remanence (M{sub r}) and coercivity (H{sub c}) increase with increasing the dopant concentration up to x=0.2 and then decrease with further increase in dopant content. Coercivity decreases with increasing the dopant content up to x=0.2 then increases with further increase in dopant content. The increase in M{sub s} and M{sub r} while decrease in H{sub c} indicates that the material with composition SrBi{sub 0.2}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 11.6}O{sub 19} is suitable for magnetic recording media. - Highlights: • Sol–gel method has been employed for the synthesis of single phase hexaferrites nanomaterials. • Dielectric parameters show some relaxation behavior at high frequencies. • We are able to improve the saturation magnetization and remanence. • The synthesized materials are beneficial for recording media.

  16. A new sensor for thermodynamic measurements of magnetization reversal in magnetic nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensor for thermal and thermodynamic measurements of small magnetic systems has been designed and built. It is based on a 5μm-thick suspended polymer membrane, which has a very low heat capacity (∼10-6J/K at nitrogen temperature), and on which a heater and a highly sensitive thermometer are deposited. The sensor properties have been characterized as a function of temperature and frequency. Energy exchanges as small as 1picojoule (10-12J) were detected in the 40-300K temperature range. Such values correspond to those required for measuring the thermal signatures occurring during magnetization reversal in very thin samples (typically 10nm thick), which would be deposited on the membrane. It is expected that this method will constitute a powerful tool in view of analyzing magnetization reversal processes in magnetic nanosystems, e.g. exhibiting the exchange-spring and exchange-bias phenomena

  17. Purifying Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor); Hurst, Janet (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of purifying a nanomaterial and the resultant purified nanomaterial in which a salt, such as ferric chloride, at or near its liquid phase temperature, is used to penetrate and wet the internal surfaces of a nanomaterial to dissolve impurities that may be present, for example, from processes used in the manufacture of the nanomaterial.

  18. The magnetic and transport properties of template-synthesized carbon-based and related nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam Louis

    The porous alumina template-assisted method of nanoscale materials preparation provides a simple, relatively inexpensive, yet highly controllable and repeatable process for nanomaterial synthesis. Various nanostructures can then be made utilizing the porous structure as a scaffold. In this dissertation we study the porous alumina anodization process, the synthesis of porous alumina-assisted materials, and the basic physical properties of these materials, primarily concentrating on the magnetic and transport properties. First, we study the porous alumina formation process as a function of anodization voltage, acid type, and acid concentration. We find that while acid type strongly affects the growth characteristics of porous alumina, pH does not. We also study the stability of pore formation. We characterize the two- and three-dimensional stability of the growth process. We find that in three dimensions, an unstable formation region as a function of pH and voltage will cause the formation of dendrite structures. Next, we study the synthesis of materials in the porous alumina templates. Through chemical self-assembly, electrodeposition is able to make a wide variety of nanowires and nanotubes and we seek to optimize this process. Third, we study the optical properties Au and Ag nanowire arrays embedded in porous alumina. We find that such materials have use as negative index metamaterials owing to the existence of both transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon resonances. Next, we study the basic magnetic properties of new PAni-ferromagnet composite nanostructures and compare these properties to the magnetic properties of the nanotubes and the nanowires alone. We find the high dielectric properties of the PAni to strongly shield the ferromagnetic nanowires from magnetostatic interactions. Fifth, we make devices out of carbon nanotubes synthesized by CVD in the alumina templates. We investigate the transport properties of these carbon nanotubes. Further, we find

  19. Nanomaterial Registry

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nanomaterial Registry compiles data from multiple databases into a single resource. The goal of this resource is to establish a curated nanomaterial registry,...

  20. Bioengineered nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Many varieties of new, complex diseases are constantly being discovered, which leaves scientists with little choice but to embrace innovative methods for controlling the invasion of life-threatening problems. The use of nanotechnology has given scientists an opportunity to create nanomaterials that could help medical professionals in diagnosing and treating problems quickly and effectively. Bioengineered Nanomaterials presents in-depth information on bioengineered nanomaterials currently being developed in leading research laboratories around the world. In particular, the book focuses on nanom

  1. Nanomaterials handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2006-01-01

    Even before it was identified as a science and given a name,  nanotechnology was the province of the most innovative inventors. In medieval times, craftsmen, ingeniously employing nanometer-sized gold particles, created the enchanting red hues found in the gold ruby glass of cathedral windows. Today, nanomaterials are being just as creatively used to improve old products, as well as usher in new ones. From tires to CRTs to sunscreens, nanomaterials are becoming a part of every industry. The Nanomaterials Handbook provides a comprehensive overview of the current state of nanomaterials. Employ

  2. Magnetic system for small-angle neutron scattering investigation at YUMO instrument of nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SANS measurements using unpolarized neutron beams are able to provide quantitative information on the magnetic microstructure and the magnitude and microstructure of the magnetic anisotropy of nanomagnetic materials. Here we describe a new magnetic system for SANS at YUMO spectrometer. The system includes 2.5 T electromagnet established on a two-axes goniometric table, power supply, cooling system, PC-based control equipment. Main features of magnetic system are: big changeable gap for the samples (up to 130 mm size), computer controlled horizontal and vertical rotation and sufficiently large space for the sample holders. The system has been developed in cooperation with the INCDIE ICPE-CA (Bucharest) and CIPEC SRL (Bucharest). First experimental results of SANS in ferrofluids and magnetic elastomers obtained at YUMO spectrometer equipped with the new magnetic system are presented

  3. The magnetic properties of diluted CoFe2O4 nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. Masrour; M. Hamedoun; A. Benvoussef

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic properties of (CoxFe1 -x)A (Zn1 -xFe1+x)BO4 are studied using mean-field theory and the probability distribution law to obtain the saturation magnetization,the coercive field,the critical temperature,and the exchange interactions with different values of D (nm) and x.High-temperature series expansions (HTSEs) combined with the Padé approximant are used to calculate the critical temperature of (CoxFe1-x)A(Zn1-xFe1+x)BO4,and the critical exponent associated with magnetic susceptibility is obtained.

  4. Magnetic Control of Fe3O4 Nanomaterial for Fat Ablation in Microchannel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Chang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, surface modification of iron (II, III oxide Fe3O4 nanoparticles by oleic acid (OA coating is investigated for the microablation of fat in a microchannel. The nanoparticles are synthesized by the co-precipitation method and then dispersed in organic solvent prior to mixing with the OA. The magnetization, agglomeration, and particle size distribution properties of the OA-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles are characterized. The surface modification of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles reveals that upon injection into a microchannel, the lipophilicity of the OA coating influences the movement of the nanoparticles across an oil-phase barrier. The motion of the nanoparticles is controlled using an AC magnetic field to induce magnetic torque and a static gradient field to control linear translation. The fat microablation process in a microchannel is demonstrated using an oscillating driving field of less than 1200 Am−1.

  5. Nanomaterial Registry

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — By leveraging and developing a set of Minimal Information About Nanomaterials (MIAN), ontology and standards through a community effort, it has developed a data...

  6. Applications of nanomaterials in sensors and diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuantranont, Adisorn (ed.) [National Electronics and Computer Technology Center (NECTEC), Pathumthani (Thailand). Nanoelectronics and MEMS Laboratory

    2013-11-01

    Recent progress in the synthesis of nanomaterials and our fundamental understanding of their properties has led to significant advances in nanomaterial-based gas, chemical and biological sensors. Leading experts around the world highlight the latest findings on a wide range of nanomaterials including nanoparticles, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, molecularly imprinted nanostructures or plastibodies, nanometals, DNA-based structures, smart nanomaterials, nanoprobes, magnetic nanomaterials, organic molecules like phthalocyanines and porphyrins, and the most amazing novel nanomaterial, called graphene. Various sensing techniques such as nanoscaled electrochemical detection, functional nanomaterial-amplified optical assays, colorimetry, fluorescence and electrochemiluminescence, as well as biomedical diagnosis applications, e.g. for cancer and bone disease, are thoroughly reviewed and explained in detail. This volume will provide an invaluable source of information for scientists working in the field of nanomaterial-based technology as well as for advanced students in analytical chemistry, biochemistry, electrochemistry, material science, micro- and nanotechnology.

  7. Structure, magnetism, and electron-transport properties of Mn2CrGa-based nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyong; Kharel, Parashu; Skomski, Ralph; Valloppilly, Shah; Li, Xingzhong; Sellmyer, David J.

    2016-05-01

    Mn2CrGa in the disordered cubic structure has been synthesized using rapid quenching and subsequent annealing. The cubic phase transforms to a stable tetragonal phase when a fraction of Cr or Ga is replaced by Pt or Al, respectively. All samples are ferrimagnetic with high Curie temperatures (Tc); Mn2CrGa exhibits the highest Tc of about 813 K. The tetragonal samples have appreciable values of magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy, which leads to an increase in coercivity (Hc) that approaches about 10 kOe in the Pt-doped sample. The Hc linearly increases with a decrease of temperature, concomitant with the anisotropy change with temperature. All samples are metallic and show negative magnetoresistance with room-temperature resistivities on the order of 1 mΩcm. The magnetic properties including high Tc and low magnetic moment suggest that these tetragonal materials have potential for spin-transfer-torque-based devices.

  8. Structure, magnetism, and electron-transport properties of Mn2CrGa-based nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyong Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mn2CrGa in the disordered cubic structure has been synthesized using rapid quenching and subsequent annealing. The cubic phase transforms to a stable tetragonal phase when a fraction of Cr or Ga is replaced by Pt or Al, respectively. All samples are ferrimagnetic with high Curie temperatures (Tc; Mn2CrGa exhibits the highest Tc of about 813 K. The tetragonal samples have appreciable values of magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy, which leads to an increase in coercivity (Hc that approaches about 10 kOe in the Pt-doped sample. The Hc linearly increases with a decrease of temperature, concomitant with the anisotropy change with temperature. All samples are metallic and show negative magnetoresistance with room-temperature resistivities on the order of 1 mΩcm. The magnetic properties including high Tc and low magnetic moment suggest that these tetragonal materials have potential for spin-transfer-torque-based devices.

  9. Selective adsorption of protein by a high-efficiency Cu(2+) -cooperated magnetic imprinted nanomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lu; Tang, Yuhai; Hao, Yi; He, Gaiyan; Gao, Ruixia; Tang, Xiaoshuang

    2016-07-01

    We report a core-shell magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer with high affinity through a facile sol-gel method for the selective adsorption of bovine hemoglobin from real bovine blood. Copper ions grafted on the surface of the matrix could immobilize template protein through chelation, which greatly enhances the orderliness of imprinted cavities and affinity of polymers. The obtained products exhibit a desired level of magnetic susceptibility, resulting in the highly efficient adsorption process. The results of adsorption experiments show that the saturation adsorption capacity of imprinted products could reach 116.3 mg/g within 30 min. Meanwhile, the specific binding experiment demonstrates the high selectivity of polymers for bovine hemoglobin. Furthermore, satisfactory reusability is demonstrated by ten adsorption-desorption cycles with no obvious deterioration in binding capacity. Electrophoretic analysis suggests the polymer could be used successfully in separation and enrichment of bovine hemoglobin from the bovine blood sample, which exhibits potential application in pretreatment of proteomics. PMID:27234958

  10. Computational nano-materials design for high-TC ferromagnetism in wide-gap magnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose materials design of high-TC wide band-gap dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) based on first-principles calculations by using the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent potential approximation (KKR-CPA) method. First, we discuss a unified physical picture of ferromagnetism in II-VI and III-V DMSs and show that DMS family is categorized into two groups depending on the electronic structure. One is the system where Zener's double exchange mechanism dominates in the ferromagnetic interaction, and in the other systems Zener's p-d exchange mechanism dominates. Next, we develop an accurate method for TC calculation for the DMSs and show that the mean field approximation completely fails to predict Curie temperature of DMS in particular for wide-gap DMS where the exchange interaction is short-ranged. The calculated TC of homogeneous DMSs by using the present method agrees very well with available experimental values. For more realistic material design, we simulate spinodal nano-decomposition by applying the Monte Carlo method to the Ising model with ab initio chemical pair interactions between magnetic impurities in DMS. It is found that by controlling the dimensionality of the decomposition various characteristic phases occur in DMS such as 3D Dairiseki-phase and 1D Konbu-phase, and it is suggested that super-paramagnetic blocking phenomena should be important to understand the magnetism of wide-gap DMS. Based on the present simulations for spinodal nano-decomposition, we propose a new crystal growth method of positioning by seeding and shape controlling method in 100 Tera-bit density of nano-magnets in the semiconductor matrix with high-TC (or high-TB)

  11. Nanomaterials, Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlakha-Hutcheon, G.; Khaydarov, R.; Korenstein, R.; Varma, R.; Vaseashta, A.; Stamm, H.; Abdel-Mottaleb, M.

    Nanotechnology is a platform technology that is finding more and more applications daily. Today over 600 consumer products are available globally that utilize nanomaterials. This chapter explores the use of nanomaterials and nanotechnology in three areas, namely Medicine, Environment and Energy. Given the large number of applications being designed that utilize nanomaterials and nanotechnologies, and the perception that nanotechnology can (or will) provide the ultimate solution for the world's problems; questions arise regarding who benefits from these technological advances. Additionally, within the popular press all nanotechnology products are generally portrayed as being beneficial to society without necessarily distinguishing between real and potential benefits of the technology. Lastly, the benefits and implications of these technological advancements in society are explored.1

  12. Biosensor nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Songjun; Li, He; Banerjee, Ipsita A

    2011-01-01

    Focusing on the materials suitable for biosensor applications, such as nanoparticles, quantum dots, meso- and nanoporous materials and nanotubes, this text enables the reader to prepare the respective nanomaterials for use in actual devices by appropriate functionalization, surface processing or directed self-assembly. The main detection methods used are electrochemical, optical, and mechanical, providing solutions to challenging tasks.The result is a reference for researchers and developers, disseminating first-hand information on which nanomaterial is best suited to a particular applicat

  13. Radioactive Nanomaterials for Multimodality Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daiqin; Dougherty, Casey A.; Yang, Dongzhi; Wu, Hongwei; Hong, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear imaging techniques, including primarily positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), can provide quantitative information for a biological event in vivo with ultra-high sensitivity, however, the comparatively low spatial resolution is their major limitation in clinical application. By convergence of nuclear imaging with other imaging modalities like computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical imaging, the hybrid imaging platforms can overcome the limitations from each individual imaging technique. Possessing versatile chemical linking ability and good cargo-loading capacity, radioactive nanomaterials can serve as ideal imaging contrast agents. In this review, we provide a brief overview about current state-of-the-art applications of radioactive nanomaterials in the circumstances of multimodality imaging. We present strategies for incorporation of radioisotope(s) into nanomaterials along with applications of radioactive nanomaterials in multimodal imaging. Advantages and limitations of radioactive nanomaterials for multimodal imaging applications are discussed. Finally, a future perspective of possible radioactive nanomaterial utilization is presented for improving diagnosis and patient management in a variety of diseases.

  14. Role of Zr–Co substitution at iron site on structural, magnetic and electrical properties of Sr-hexaferrites nanomaterials synthesized by the sol–gel combustion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naeem Ashiq, Muhammad, E-mail: naeemashiqqau@yahoo.com [Institute of Chemical Sciences, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); Fahad Ehsan, Muhammad [Institute of Chemical Sciences, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); Javed Iqbal, Muhammad [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Najam-ul-Haq, Muhammad [Institute of Chemical Sciences, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan)

    2013-04-15

    The sol–gel auto-combustion technique has been employed to synthesize the M-type Sr-hexaferrites nanomaterials substituted with binary mixture of zirconium and cobalt at the iron site. The phase purity of the samples is confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis and the crystallite size is found in the range of 31–45 nm. The scanning electron microscopic analysis also confirms that the particles are in nanosize (25–50 nm). The magnetic parameters like saturation magnetization, remanence, squareness ratio and the coercivity are calculated from the hysteresis loops. The values of saturation magnetization and remanence increase with the increase in Zr–Co content up to x=0.4 while the coercivity decreases continuously with the substituents. The squareness ratio is above 0.5 which indicates that the samples are in single magnetic domain. The room temperature DC electrical resistivity is measured by the two point probe method and is found to increase with Zr–Co content up to the substitution level of x=0.6. These materials can be used in microwave devices as these devices require highly resistive materials with low eddy current losses. - Highlights: ► The particle size is found to be 25–50 nm using the simple and economic synthesis method. ► We are able to improve the saturation magnetization, remanence and DC resistivity. ► The synthesized materials are beneficial for recording media and microwave devices.

  15. Nanostructure investigation of magnetic nanomaterial Ni0.5Zn0.3Cu0.2Fe2O4 synthesized by sol-gel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pransisco, Prengki; Shafie, Afza; Guan, Beh Hoe

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic nanomaterial Ni0.5Zn0.3Cu0.2Fe2O4 was successfully prepared by using sol-gel method. Heat treatment on material is always giving defect on properties of material. This paper investigates the effect of heat treatment on nanostructure of magnetic nanomaterial Ni0.5Zn0.3Cu0.2Fe2O4. According to thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) that after 600°C there is no more weight loss detected and it was decided as minimum calcination temperature. Intensity, crystallite size, structure, lattice parameter and d-spacing of the material were investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD). High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) was used to examine nanostructure, nanosize, shape and distribution particle of magnetic material Ni0.5Zn0.3Cu0.2Fe2O4 and variable pressure field emission scanning electron microscope (VP-FESEM) was used to investigate the surface morphology and topography of the material. The XRD result shows single-phase cubic spinel structure with average crystallite size in the range of 25.6-95.9 nm, the value of the intensity of the material was increased with increasing temperature, and followed by lattice parameter was increased with increasing calcination temperature, value of d-spacing was relatively decreased with accompanied increasing temperature. From HRTEM result the distribution of particles was tend to be agglomerates with particle size of 7.8-17.68 nm. VP-FESEM result shows that grain size of the material increases with increasing calcination temperature and the surface morphology shows that the material is in hexagonal shape and it was also proved by mapping result which showing the presence each of constituents inside the compound.

  16. Nanostructure investigation of magnetic nanomaterial Ni0.5Zn0.3Cu0.2Fe2O4 synthesized by sol-gel method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic nanomaterial Ni0.5Zn0.3Cu0.2Fe2O4 was successfully prepared by using sol-gel method. Heat treatment on material is always giving defect on properties of material. This paper investigates the effect of heat treatment on nanostructure of magnetic nanomaterial Ni0.5Zn0.3Cu0.2Fe2O4. According to thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) that after 600°C there is no more weight loss detected and it was decided as minimum calcination temperature. Intensity, crystallite size, structure, lattice parameter and d-spacing of the material were investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD). High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) was used to examine nanostructure, nanosize, shape and distribution particle of magnetic material Ni0.5Zn0.3Cu0.2Fe2O4 and variable pressure field emission scanning electron microscope (VP-FESEM) was used to investigate the surface morphology and topography of the material. The XRD result shows single-phase cubic spinel structure with average crystallite size in the range of 25.6-95.9 nm, the value of the intensity of the material was increased with increasing temperature, and followed by lattice parameter was increased with increasing calcination temperature, value of d-spacing was relatively decreased with accompanied increasing temperature. From HRTEM result the distribution of particles was tend to be agglomerates with particle size of 7.8-17.68 nm. VP-FESEM result shows that grain size of the material increases with increasing calcination temperature and the surface morphology shows that the material is in hexagonal shape and it was also proved by mapping result which showing the presence each of constituents inside the compound

  17. Mutagenicity of carbon nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Håkan; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; White, Paul A;

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such carbon nanotubes, graphene and fullerenes are some the most promising nanomaterials. Although carbon nanomaterials have been reported to possess genotoxic potential, it is imperitive to analyse the data on the genotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials in vivo and in vitro and...

  18. Advances in nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Zishan

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a review of the latest research findings and key applications in the field of nanomaterials. The book contains twelve chapters on different aspects of nanomaterials. It begins with key fundamental concepts to aid readers new to the discipline of nanomaterials, and then moves to the different types of nanomaterials studied. The book includes chapters based on the applications of nanomaterials for nano-biotechnology and solar energy. Overall, the book comprises chapters on a variety of topics on nanomaterials from expert authors across the globe. This book will appeal to researchers and professional alike, and may also be used as a reference for courses in nanomaterials.

  19. A mathematical model of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle magnetic behavior to guide the design of novel nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) exhibit unique magnetic properties that make them highly efficacious as MR imaging contrast agents and laboratory diagnostic tools. The complexity of SPION magnetic behavior and the multiple parameters affecting this behavior complicate attempts at fabricating particles suited for a particular purpose. A mathematical model of SPION magnetic properties derived from experimental relationships and first principles can be an effective design tool for predicting particle behavior before materials are fabricated. Here, a novel model of SPION magnetic properties is described, using particle size and applied magnetic field as the primary variable inputs. The model is capable of predicting particle susceptibility and non-linear particle magnetization as well as describing the vector magnetic field produced by a single particle in an applied field. Magnetization values produced by the model agree with recent experimental measurements of particle magnetizations. The model is used to predict the complex magnetic behavior of clustered magnetic particles in simulated in vivo environment; specifically, interactions between the clusters and water molecules. The model shows that larger particles exhibit more linear magnetic behavior and stronger magnetization and that clusters of smaller particles allow for more numerous SPION–water molecule interactions and more uniform cluster magnetizations.

  20. Synthesis, photophysical analysis, and in vitro cytotoxicity assessment of the multifunctional (magnetic and luminescent) core@shell nanomaterial based on lanthanide-doped orthovanadates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rare earths orthovanadates (REVO4) doped with luminescent lanthanide ions (Ln3+) play an important role as promising light-emitting materials. Gadolinium orthovanadate exhibits strong absorption of ultraviolet radiation and as a matrix doped with Eu3+ ions is well known for its efficient and intense red emission, induced by energy transfer from the VO43− groups to Eu3+ ions. In the presented study, Fe3O4@SiO2@GdVO4:Eu3+ 5 % nanomaterial was investigated. The core@shell structures demonstrate attractive properties, such as higher thermal stability, enhanced water solubility, increased optical response, higher luminescence, longer decay times, and magnetic properties. Silica coating may protect nanocrystals from the surrounding environment. Therefore, such silica-covered nanoparticles (NPs) are successfully utilized in biomedical research. Multifunctional magnetic nanophosphors are very interesting due to their potential biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, hyperthermic treatment, and drug delivery. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate photophysical, chemical, and biological properties of multifunctional REVO4 doped with Ln3+. Moreover, the studied NPs did not affect erythrocyte sedimentation rate, cell membrane permeability, and morphology of human red blood cells

  1. Synthesis, photophysical analysis, and in vitro cytotoxicity assessment of the multifunctional (magnetic and luminescent) core@shell nanomaterial based on lanthanide-doped orthovanadates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczeszak, Agata [Adam Mickiewicz University, Department of Rare Earths, Faculty of Chemistry (Poland); Ekner-Grzyb, Anna [Adam Mickiewicz University, Department of Behavioural Ecology, Faculty of Biology (Poland); Runowski, Marcin [Adam Mickiewicz University, Department of Rare Earths, Faculty of Chemistry (Poland); Mrówczyńska, Lucyna [Adam Mickiewicz University, Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Biology (Poland); Grzyb, Tomasz; Lis, Stefan, E-mail: blis@amu.edu.pl [Adam Mickiewicz University, Department of Rare Earths, Faculty of Chemistry (Poland)

    2015-03-15

    Rare earths orthovanadates (REVO{sub 4}) doped with luminescent lanthanide ions (Ln{sup 3+}) play an important role as promising light-emitting materials. Gadolinium orthovanadate exhibits strong absorption of ultraviolet radiation and as a matrix doped with Eu{sup 3+} ions is well known for its efficient and intense red emission, induced by energy transfer from the VO{sub 4}{sup 3−} groups to Eu{sup 3+} ions. In the presented study, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}@GdVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} 5 % nanomaterial was investigated. The core@shell structures demonstrate attractive properties, such as higher thermal stability, enhanced water solubility, increased optical response, higher luminescence, longer decay times, and magnetic properties. Silica coating may protect nanocrystals from the surrounding environment. Therefore, such silica-covered nanoparticles (NPs) are successfully utilized in biomedical research. Multifunctional magnetic nanophosphors are very interesting due to their potential biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, hyperthermic treatment, and drug delivery. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate photophysical, chemical, and biological properties of multifunctional REVO{sub 4} doped with Ln{sup 3+}. Moreover, the studied NPs did not affect erythrocyte sedimentation rate, cell membrane permeability, and morphology of human red blood cells.

  2. Synthesis, magnetic and dielectric properties of Er-Ni doped Sr-hexaferrite nanomaterials for applications in High density recording media and microwave devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashiq, Muhammad Naeem, E-mail: naeemashiqqau@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); Iqbal, Muhammad Javed [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Najam-ul-Haq, Muhammad [Department of Chemistry, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); Hernandez Gomez, Pablo [Departmento Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, Valladolid 47071 (Spain); Qureshi, Ashfaq Mahmood [Department of Chemistry, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan)

    2012-01-15

    A sol-gel combustion method has been successfully employed for the synthesis of Sr-hexaferrite nanomaterials doped with Er{sup 3+} and Ni{sup 2+} at strontium and iron sites, respectively. The X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the single magnetoplumbite phase and the crystallite size was found to be in the range of 14-16 nm, suitable for obtaining signal-to-noise ratio in the high density recording media. The magnetic properties such as saturation magnetization (M{sub s}), remanence (M{sub r}) and coercivity (H{sub c}) were calculated from hysteresis loops. M{sub s}, M{sub r} and H{sub c} are observed to increase with the Er-Ni content. The dielectric constant ({epsilon}') and dielectric loss (tan {delta}) is found to decrease with the increase in frequency and is explained on the basis of Maxwell-Wagner and Koops theory. The decrease in dielectric constant and dielectric loss but increase in saturation magnetization and remanence with Er-Ni content suggests that the materials are suitable for applications in microwave devices and high density recording media . - Highlights: > A Simple and economic method has been used for synthesis of materials. > The main aim for substitution of Er-Ni in Sr-hexaferrite is to improve magnetic properties and to reduce the crystallite size. > We are able to improve the saturation magnetization and remanence with the doping of Er-Ni. > Crystallite size is in the range 16-14 nm, which is much smaller than that reported earlier. > Dielectric constant is reduced which makes the material suitable for microwave devices.

  3. Stimuli responsive nanomaterials for controlled release applications

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Song

    2012-01-01

    The controlled release of therapeutics has been one of the major challenges for scientists and engineers during the past three decades. Coupled with excellent biocompatibility profiles, various nanomaterials have showed great promise for biomedical applications. Stimuli-responsive nanomaterials guarantee the controlled release of cargo to a given location, at a specific time, and with an accurate amount. In this review, we have combined the major stimuli that are currently used to achieve the ultimate goal of controlled and targeted release by "smart" nanomaterials. The most heavily explored strategies include (1) pH, (2) enzymes, (3) redox, (4) magnetic, and (5) light-triggered release.

  4. Planar graphene oxide-based magnetic ionic liquid nanomaterial for extraction of chlorophenols from environmental water samples coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mei-Qiang; Su, Jie; Hu, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Qian; Dong, Chun-Ying; Pan, Sheng-Dong; Jin, Mi-Cong

    2016-08-12

    A planar graphene oxide-based magnetic ionic liquid nanomaterial (PGO-MILN) was synthesized. The prepared PGO-MILN was characterized by transmission electronmicroscopy (TEM) and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). The results of adsorption experiments showed that the PGO-MILN had great adsorption capacity for 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol (2,3,4,6-TeCP) and pentachlorophenol (PCP). Based on the adsorption experimental data, a sensitive magnetic method for determination of the five CPs in environmental water samples was developed by an effective magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) procedure coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The effects of main MSPE parameters including the solution pH, extraction time, desorption time, and volume of desorption solution on the extraction efficiencies had been investigated in detail. The recoveries ranged from 85.3 to 99.3% with correlation coefficients (r) higher than 0.9994 and the linear ranges were between 10 and 500ngL(-1). The limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) of the five CPs ranged from 0.2 to 2.6ngL(-1) and 0.6 to 8.7ngL(-1), respectively. The intra- and inter- day relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range from 0.6% to 7.4% and from 0.7% to 8.4%, respectively. It was confirmed that the PGO-MILN was a kind of highly effective MSPE materials used for enrichment of trace CPs in the environmental water. PMID:27425762

  5. Nanomaterials in Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    BelBruno, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    This Special Issue of Nanomaterials is focused on the continuing implementation of nanomaterials and nanostructures in the development of more sensitive and more specific sensing devices. As a result, these new devices employ smaller sensing elements and provide more “real time” capability. Often, the inclusion of nanomaterials leads to sensing elements for targets that were previously inaccessible.

  6. Handbook of nanomaterials properties

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Dan; Schricker, Scott R; Sigmund, Wolfgang; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials attract tremendous attention in recent researches. Although extensive research has been done in this field it still lacks a comprehensive reference work that presents data on properties of different Nanomaterials. This Handbook of Nanomaterials Properties will be the first single reference work that brings together the various properties with wide breadth and scope.

  7. Synthesis of magnetic γ-Fe2O3-based nanomaterial for ultrasonic assisted dyes adsorption: Modeling and optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfaram, Arash; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Hajati, Shaaker; Goudarzi, Alireza

    2016-09-01

    γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized and loaded on activated carbon. The prepared nanomaterial was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticle-loaded activated carbon (γ-Fe2O3-NPs-AC) was used as novel adsorbent for the ultrasonic-assisted removal of methylene blue (MB) and malachite green (MG). Response surface methodology and artificial neural network were applied to model and optimize the adsorption of the MB and MG in their individual and binary solutions followed by the investigation on adsorption isotherm and kinetics. The individual effects of parameters such as pH, mass of adsorbent, ultrasonication time as well as MB and MG concentrations in addition to the effects of their possible interactions on the adsorption process were investigated. The numerical optimization revealed that the optimum adsorption (>99.5% for each dye) is obtained at 0.02g, 15mgL(-1), 4min and 7.0 corresponding to the adsorbent mass, each dye concentration, sonication time and pH, respectively. The Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms were studied. The Langmuir was found to be most applicable isotherm which predicted maximum monolayer adsorption capacities of 195.55 and 207.04mgg(-1) for the adsorption of MB and MG, respectively. The pseudo-second order model was found to be applicable for the adsorption kinetics. Blank experiments (without any adsorbent) were run to investigate the possible degradation of the dyes studied in presence of ultrasonication. No dyes degradation was observed. PMID:27150788

  8. A simple solution route to control synthesis of Fe3O4 nanomaterials at low temperature and their magnetic properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A series of nanostructured iron compounds including cubic Fe3O4 and orthorhombic FeOOH were synthesized via a facile low temperature (in the range of 60-100℃) solution method. In the whole process, the interaction between FeCl2·4H2O and methenamine (C6H12N4) was carried out through a reflux device under different reaction conditions such as temperature, solvent, and duration. The samples were detected by XRD, TEM, SAED, physical property measurement system, and Mssbauer spectroscopy, separately. The experiments showed that magnetic mixture nanoparticles had flake and rod morphologies, and cubic Fe3O4 took on grain nanostructure. Magnetism measurements indicated that the saturated magnetization of the as-obtained magnetic mixture was lower than that of the cubic magnetite. Mssbauer spectroscopy testified the sample consisting of cubic magnetite rather than γ-Fe2O3. In addition, a possible growth mechanism of cubic magnetic nanoparticles under different conditions was discussed.

  9. Temperature and composition dependence of magnetic properties of cobalt-chromium co-substituted magnesium ferrite nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Javed, E-mail: mjiqauchem@yahoo.com [Surface and Solid State Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Zahoor [Surface and Solid State Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Meydan, Turgut; Melikhov, Yevgen [Wolfson Center for Magnetics, School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-15

    The temperature and composition dependence of magnetic properties of Co-Cr co-substituted magnesium ferrite, Mg{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Cr{sub x}Fe{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} (x=0.0-0.5), prepared by novel polyethylene glycol assisted microemulsion method, are studied. The synthesized materials are characterized by the Moessbauer spectrometer and standard magnetic measurements. Major hysteresis loops are measured up to the magnetic field of 50 kOe at 300, 200 and 100 K. The high field regimes of these loops are modeled using the Law of Approach to saturation to determine the first-order cubic anisotropy coefficient and saturation magnetization. Both the saturation magnetization and the anisotropy coefficient are observed to increase with the decrease in temperature for all Co-Cr co-substitution levels. Also, both the saturation magnetization and the anisotropy coefficient achieved maximum value at x=0.3 and x=0.2, respectively. Explanation of the observed behavior is proposed in terms of the site occupancy of the co-substituent, Co{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 3+} in the cubic spinel lattice. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}Cr{sub x}Fe{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} are synthesized by novel PEG assisted microemulsion method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-Cr occupied octahedral site confirmed by the Moessbauer analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High field regime of M-H loops are modeled using the Law of Approach to saturation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The values of M{sub S}, M{sub r}, H{sub C} and K{sub 1} are found to increase with decreasing temperature.

  10. EDITORIAL: Whither nanomaterials? Whither nanomaterials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallouk, Thomas E.; Pinkerton, Fred; Stetson, Ned

    2009-10-01

    As the journal Nanotechnology enters its third decade it is interesting to look back on the field and to think about where it may be headed in the future. The growth of the journal over the past twenty years mirrors that of the field, with exponentially rising numbers of citations and a widening diversity of topics that we identify as nanotechnology. In the early 1990s, Nanotechnology was focused primarily on nanoscale electronics and on scanning probe tools for fabricating and characterizing nanostructures. The synthesis and assembly of nanomaterials was already an active area in chemical research; however, it did not yet intersect strongly with the activities of the physics community, which was interested primarily in new phenomena that emerged on the nanoscale and on the devices that derived from them. In the 1990s there were several key advances that began to bridge this gap. Techniques were developed for making nanocrystals of compound semiconductors, oxides, and metals with very fine control over shape and superstructure. Carbon nanotubes were discovered and their unique electronic properties were demonstrated. Research on the self-assembly of organic molecules on surfaces led to the development of soft lithography and layer-by- layer assembly of materials. The potential to use DNA and then proteins as building blocks of precise assemblies of nanoparticles was explored. These bottom-up structures could not be made by top-down techniques, and their unique properties as components of sensors, electronic devices, biological imaging agents, and drug delivery vehicles began to change the definition of the field. Ten years ago, Inelke Malsch published a study on the scientific trends and organizational dynamics of nanotechology in Europe (1999 Nanotechnology 10 1-7). Scientists from a variety of disciplines were asked which areas of research they would include in the definition of nanotechnology. Although the article concluded with forward-looking thoughts in the

  11. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed. PMID:27013938

  12. Nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchen eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed.

  13. Effects of Eu substitution on luminescent and magnetic properties of BaTiO{sub 3} nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, S., E-mail: sfuentes@ucn.cl [Departamento de Ciencias Farmacéuticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Católica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile); Barraza, N. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Católica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Veloso, E. [Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Departamento de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad Católica del Norte, Antofagasta (Chile); Villarroel, R. [Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile); Llanos, J. [Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Católica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile)

    2013-08-25

    Highlight: •We described a new combined method to obtain Eu{sup 3+}-doped BaTiO{sub 3}. •We report the physical and optical properties of Eu{sup 3+}-doped BaTiO{sub 3}. •The synthesis method improves the stabilization of the tetragonal phase of BaTiO{sub 3}:Eu. •The photoluminescence spectra indicate that the Eu{sup 3+} ions occupy an antisymmetric site. •The as prepared phases could be considered as multifunctional materials. -- Abstract: Eu{sup 3+}-doped BaTiO{sub 3} phases were synthesized by combined sol–gel and hydrothermal methods under an oxygen partial pressure of 60 psi. The crystal phases were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. The Raman spectra as well as the magnetic properties were also investigated. The photoluminescence emission spectra confirm that the samples were efficiently excited by near-UV light. All spectra were dominated by a red emission band due to the electric dipole transition {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 2}. The dependence of the Raman spectra and optical and magnetic properties on the amount of Eu{sup 3+} incorporated into the phases was also investigated. The number of magnetic domains increased with the concentration of Eu{sup 3+} added. The stabilization of the tetragonal phases was also observed in Eu{sup 3+}-doped samples, and their ferroelectric properties were also maintained, making these phases interesting multifunctional materials for applications in device design.

  14. Nanomaterials in preventive dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannig, Matthias; Hannig, Christian

    2010-08-01

    The prevention of tooth decay and the treatment of lesions and cavities are ongoing challenges in dentistry. In recent years, biomimetic approaches have been used to develop nanomaterials for inclusion in a variety of oral health-care products. Examples include liquids and pastes that contain nano-apatites for biofilm management at the tooth surface, and products that contain nanomaterials for the remineralization of early submicrometre-sized enamel lesions. However, the treatment of larger visible cavities with nanomaterials is still at the research stage. Here, we review progress in the development of nanomaterials for different applications in preventive dentistry and research, including clinical trials.

  15. Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Magnetic Nano-Materials and Studying Their Potential Application in Recovery of Metal Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of hazardous pollutants and their dispersion in the environment can cause adverse impacts on both environment and public health. These pollutants are more easily controlled when they are generated than after they are dispersed. Therefore, it is necessity of prime to design treatment processes can remove the contaminants at their source. Recently, many industrial and nuclear activities produce large amounts of wastewaters that contains a variety of contaminants. These contaminants may include toxic metals or radioactive isotopes. The efforts in this work are firstly directed to prepare some materials to be used as sorbents for removal of Sr(II), Cd(II) and Eu(III) radionuclide from waste solutions. The study concerned with the characterization of the prepared sorbents using surface area (BET), FTIR, X-Ray, TG/DTA, SEM and magnetic properties to throw light on its sense when practically used as a decontaminating material in aqueous systems. Also, the work involves the sorption of Sr(II), Cd(II) and Eu(III) ions from aqueous solutions under different experimental conditions to clarify the affinity of these sorbents and to assess main factors affecting the sorption behavior of these species. This is to evaluate the efficiency of these sorbents to be used as decontaminating materials for treatment of hazard wastes and finally to judge the criteria of sorbents selectivity towards the studies solutes.

  16. Electrodynamic Arrays Having Nanomaterial Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigwell, Steven (Inventor); Biris, Alexandru S. (Inventor); Calle, Carlos I. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electrodynamic array of conductive nanomaterial electrodes and a method of making such an electrodynamic array. In one embodiment, a liquid solution containing nanomaterials is deposited as an array of conductive electrodes on a substrate, including rigid or flexible substrates such as fabrics, and opaque or transparent substrates. The nanomaterial electrodes may also be grown in situ. The nanomaterials may include carbon nanomaterials, other organic or inorganic nanomaterials or mixtures.

  17. Application of Ferrite Nanomaterial in RF On-Chip Inductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Lin Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several kinds of ferrite-integrated on-chip inductors are presented. Ferrite nanomaterial applied in RF on-chip inductors is prepared and analyzed to show the properties of high permeability, high ferromagnetic resonance frequency, high resistivity, and low loss, which has the potential that will improve the performance of RF on-chip inductors. Simulations of different coil and ferrite nanomaterial parameters, inductor structures, and surrounding structures are also conducted to achieve the trend of gains of inductance and quality factor of on-chip inductors. By integrating the prepared ferrite magnetic nanomaterial to the on-chip inductors with different structures, the measurement performances show an obvious improvement even in GHz frequency range. In addition, the studies of CMOS compatible process to integrate the nanomaterial promote the widespread application of magnetic nanomaterial in RF on-chip inductors.

  18. Synthesis and Characterisation of Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Saravanan

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Development of synthesis protocols for realising nanomaterials over a range of sizes, shapes,and chemical compositions is an important aspect of nanotechnology. The remarkable size-dependent physico-chemical properties of nanoparticles have fascinated and inspired researchactivity in this direction. This paper describes some aspects on synthesis and characterisationof nanoparticles of metals, metal alloys, and oxides, either in the form of thin films or bulk shapes.A brief discussion on processing of two-phase nanocomposite magnets is also presented.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(4, pp.504-516, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1671

  19. Enzyme mimics of spinel-type CoxNi1−xFe2O4 magnetic nanomaterial for eletroctrocatalytic oxidation of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Spinel-type CoxNi1−xFe2O4 (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) were synthesized. •CoxNi1−xFe2O4 were first employed as novel enzyme mimic sensing materials of H2O2. •Co0.5Ni0.5Fe2O4/CPE showed excellent electrocatalytic activity to H2O2. •Co0.5Ni0.5Fe2O4/CPE was successfully applied to determine H2O2 in toothpastes. -- Abstract: A series of spinel-type CoxNi1−xFe2O4 (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) magnetic nanomaterials were solvothermally synthesized as enzyme mimics for the eletroctrocatalytic oxidation of H2O2. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope were employed to characterize the composition, structure and morphology of the material. The electrochemical properties of spinel-type CoxNi1−xFe2O4 with different (Co/Ni) molar ratio toward H2O2 oxidation were investigated, and the results demonstrated that Co0.5Ni0.5Fe2O4 modified carbon paste electrode (Co0.5Ni0.5Fe2O4/CPE) possessed the best electrocatalytic activity for H2O2 oxidation. Under optimum conditions, the calibration curve for H2O2 determination on Co0.5Ni0.5Fe2O4/CPE was linear in a wide range of 1.0 × 10−8–1.0 × 10−3 M with low detection limit of 3.0 × 10−9 M (S/N = 3). The proposed Co0.5Ni0.5Fe2O4/CPE was also applied to the determination of H2O2 in commercial toothpastes with satisfactory results, indicating that CoxNi1−xFe2O4 is a promising hydrogen peroxidase mimics for the detection of H2O2

  20. Nanomaterials and Nanochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bréchignac, Catherine; Lahmani, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    Nanomaterials are a fast developing field of research and applications lie in many separate domains, such as in hi-tech (optics, electronics, biology, aeronautics), but also in consumer industries (automotive, concrete, surface treatments (including paints), cosmetics, etc.).

  1. Characterization of nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides an overview of the main techniques used for the characterization of nanomaterials. The knowledge of some basic characteristics, inherent morphology, microstructure, the distribution phase and chemical composition, it is essential to evaluate the functional properties of nanomaterials and make predictions about their behavior in operation. For the characterization of nanomaterials can be used in both imaging techniques both analytic techniques. Among the first found wide application optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Among the latter some types of spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). For each type of material to characterize the choice of the most appropriate technique it is based on the type of details that you want to obtain, and on their scale. In this paper are discussed in detail some examples and the main methods used for the characterization of nanomaterials.

  2. Food decontamination using nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research indicates that nanomaterials including nanoemulsions are promising decontamination media for the reduction of food contaminating pathogens. The inhibitory effect of nanoparticles for pathogens could be due to deactivate cellular enzymes and DNA; disrupting of membrane permeability; and/...

  3. Towards Safer Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune; Baun, Anders

    2014-01-01

    As nanomaterials become more widespread in everything from industrial processes to consumer products, concerns about human and environmental safety are being taken increasingly more seriously. In our research we are working with minimizing the impact and risks of engineered nanomaterials by looking...... into how the design of nanomaterials can be optimized to minimize their toxicity while still preserving their beneficial or wanted properties. Current efforts in this field are focusing on identifying design rules or parameters that can be adjusted to obtain a risk reduction, either by reducing the...... hazard or the exposure and optimally both. Examples include the 5 SAFER principles (Morose, 2010) or screenings of early warning signs (Hansen et al., 2013). Taking the full life cycle of nanomaterials into account, the principles of Green chemistry and Green engineering could also prove useful to reduce...

  4. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  5. Safe use of nanomaterials

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanomaterials  is on the increase worldwide, including at CERN. The HSE Unit has established a safety guideline to inform you of the main requirements for the safe handling and disposal of nanomaterials at CERN.   A risk assessment tool has also been developed which guides the user through the process of evaluating the risk for his or her activity. Based on the calculated risk level, the tool provides a list of recommended control measures.   We would therefore like to draw your attention to: Safety Guideline C-0-0-5 - Safe handling and disposal of nanomaterials; and Safety Form C-0-0-2 - Nanomaterial Risk Assessment   You can consult all of CERN’s safety rules and guidelines here. Please contact the HSE Unit for any questions you may have.   The HSE Unit

  6. Production of nanomaterials: physical and chemical technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Are define nanomaterials those materials which have at least one dimension in the range between 1 and 100 nm. By the term nanotechnology refers, instead, to the study of phenomena and manipulation of materials at the atomic and molecular level. The materials brought to the nanometric dimensions take particular chemical-physical properties different from the corresponding conventional macro materials. Speaking about the structure of nanoscale, you can check some basic properties materials (eg. Melting temperature, magnetic and electrical properties) without changing its chemical composition. In this perspective are crucial knowledge and control of production processes in order to design and get the nanomaterial more suitable for a specific application. For this purpose, it describes a series of processes of production of nanomaterials with application examples.

  7. About aerogels based on carbon nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fail Sultanov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review a current trends in development and application of carbon nanomaterials and derivatives based on them are presented. Aerogels based on graphene and other carbon nanomaterials present a class of novel ultralight materials in which a liquid phase is completely substituted by gaseous. In its turn graphene based aerogel was named as the lightest material, thus the record of aerographite, which has retained for a long time was beaten. Aerogels are characterized by low density, high surface area and high index of hydrophobicity. In addition, depending on its application, aerogels based on carbon nanomaterials can be electrically conductive and magnetic, while retaining the flexibility of its 3D structure. Impressive properties of novel material – aerogels causes a huge interest of scientists in order to find their application in various fields, ranging from environment problems to medicine and electronics.

  8. NANOMATERIALS AND COSMETICS

    OpenAIRE

    E. ALĞIN YAPAR1,*, Ö. İNAL2, E. ALĞIN YAPAR1,*, Ö. İNAL2

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARYThis review has overviewed the nanotechnology approaches and safety concerns in cosmetics. Nanotechnology based nanomaterials have been widely use in cosmetics for recent few years such as in sunscreens, hair products, skincare products, etc. However debate on their definition and insufficient quantification methods are major problems still occur in the nanomaterial field. Moreover the frequent use of cosmetics, safety of nanoscale ingredients of them has gain importance mainly by mean...

  9. Inorganic nanomaterials for tumor angiogenesis imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor angiogenesis plays an important role in cancer development and metastasis. Noninvasive detection of angiogenic activities is thus of great importance in cancer diagnosis as well as evaluation of cancer therapeutic responses. Various angiogenesis-related molecular targets have been identified and used in tumor vasculature targeting and imaging. Recently, inorganic nanomaterials with various unique intrinsic physical properties have attracted growing interest in biomedical imaging applications. This article will review current progresses in the applications of inorganic nanoprobes in molecular angiogenesis imaging. Several types of nanomaterials with various optical properties, including semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles, have been used as novel optical probes to image angiogenic events. Besides optical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of angiogenesis using magnetic nanoparticles has also been intensively investigated. Moreover, nanomaterials provide unique platforms for the integration of various imaging modalities together with therapeutic functionalities for multi-modality imaging and therapy. Although the application of inorganic nanomaterials in clinical imaging and diagnosis is still facing many challenges, the unique properties and functions of these novel nanoprobes make them very promising agents in angiogenesis imaging and could bring great opportunities to this fast-growing field. (orig.)

  10. Nanostructure investigation of magnetic nanomaterial Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.3}Cu{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} synthesized by sol-gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pransisco, Prengki, E-mail: prengkipransisco@gmail.com [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Badan Lingkungan Hidup Derah Kabupaten Empat Lawang South of Sumatera (Indonesia); Shafie, Afza, E-mail: afza@petronas.com.my; Guan, Beh Hoe, E-mail: beh.hoeguan@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Magnetic nanomaterial Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.3}Cu{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was successfully prepared by using sol-gel method. Heat treatment on material is always giving defect on properties of material. This paper investigates the effect of heat treatment on nanostructure of magnetic nanomaterial Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.3}Cu{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. According to thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) that after 600°C there is no more weight loss detected and it was decided as minimum calcination temperature. Intensity, crystallite size, structure, lattice parameter and d-spacing of the material were investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD). High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) was used to examine nanostructure, nanosize, shape and distribution particle of magnetic material Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.3}Cu{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and variable pressure field emission scanning electron microscope (VP-FESEM) was used to investigate the surface morphology and topography of the material. The XRD result shows single-phase cubic spinel structure with average crystallite size in the range of 25.6-95.9 nm, the value of the intensity of the material was increased with increasing temperature, and followed by lattice parameter was increased with increasing calcination temperature, value of d-spacing was relatively decreased with accompanied increasing temperature. From HRTEM result the distribution of particles was tend to be agglomerates with particle size of 7.8-17.68 nm. VP-FESEM result shows that grain size of the material increases with increasing calcination temperature and the surface morphology shows that the material is in hexagonal shape and it was also proved by mapping result which showing the presence each of constituents inside the compound.

  11. Biological and Pharmaceutical Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Challa S. S. R.

    2006-01-01

    This first comprehensive yet concise overview of all important classes of biological and pharmaceutical nanomaterials presents in one volume the different kinds of natural biological compounds that form nanomaterials or that may be used to purposefully create them. This unique single source of information brings together the many articles published in specialized journals, which often remain unseen by members of other, related disciplines. Covering pharmaceutical, nucleic acid, peptide and DNA-Chitosan nanoparticles, the book focuses on those innovative materials and technologies needed for the continued growth of medicine, healthcare, pharmaceuticals and human wellness. For chemists, biochemists, cell biologists, materials scientists, biologists, and those working in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries.

  12. Toxicity of nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharifi, Shahriar; Behzadi, Shahed; Laurent, Sophie; Forrest, M. Laird; Stroeve, Pieter; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscience has matured significantly during the last decade as it has transitioned from bench top science to applied technology. Presently, nanomaterials are used in a wide variety of commercial products such as electronic components, sports equipment, sun creams and biomedical applications. There

  13. Nanomaterials for Photocatalytic Reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolcová, Olga; Spáčilová, Lucie; Maléterová, Ywetta; Matějková, Martina; Morozová, Magdalena

    Maribor : Inštitut za okoljevarstvo in senzorje d.o.o, 2013 - (Lobnik, A.; Gutmaher, A.), s. 121 ISBN 978-961-92863-2-6. [International Scientific Conference on Nanomaterials and Applications NANOAPP /1./. Portorož (SI), 22.09.2013-26.09.2013] Grant ostatní: NATO(US) SPS(NUKR.SFPP) 984398 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : photocatalysis * endocrine disruptors * wastewater decontamination Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  14. Nanomaterials in ecotoxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck James; Krogh, Paul Henning; Lead, Jamie M

    2008-01-01

    In ecotoxicology, a problem exists of quantifying real exposure and corresponding effects, especially in complex environments such as the soil. Hence, for a given total soil concentration to which the organism is exposed, the effect level depends on the available fraction and the chemical status ...... ion activity models (FlAM) and biotic ligand models (BLM). Quantification and characterization of actual exposure is also of concern for nanomaterial and nanoparticle (NP) terrestrial ecotoxicology...

  15. Energetics of Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Frances

    2004-12-13

    This project, ''Energetics of Nanomaterials'', represents a three-year collaboration among Alexandra Navrotsky (University of California at Davis), Brian Woodfield and Juliana Boerio-Goates (Brigham Young University) and Frances Hellman (University of California at San Diego). Its purpose has been to explore the differences between bulk materials, nanoparticles, and thin films in terms of their thermodynamic properties, with an emphasis on heat capacities and entropies, as well as enthalpies. We used our combined experimental techniques to address the following questions: How does energy and entropy depend on particle size and crystal structure? Do entropic differences have their origins in changes in vibrational densities of states or configurational (including surface configuration) effects? Do material preparation and sample geometry, i.e., nanoparticles versus thin films, change these quantities? How do the thermodynamics of magnetic and structural transitions change in nanoparticles and thin films? Are different crystal structures stabilized for a given composition at the nanoscale, and are the responsible factors energetic, entropic, or both? How do adsorption energies (for water and other gases) depend on particle size and crystal structure in the nanoregime? What are the energetics of formation and strain energies in artificially layered thin films? Do the differing structures of grain boundaries in films and nanocomposites alter the energetics of nanoscale materials? Of the several directions we first proposed, we initially concentrated on a few systems: TiO(sub 2), CoO, and CoO-MgO. In these systems, we were able to clearly identify particle size-dependent effects on energy and vibrational entropy, and to separate out the effect of particle size and water content on the enthalpy of formation of the various TiO(sub 2) polymorphs. With CoO, we were able to directly compare nanoparticle films and bulk materials; this comparison is

  16. Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The CFN at Brookhaven National Laboratory focuses on understanding the chemical and physical response of nanomaterials to make functional materials such as sensors,...

  17. Electrocatalysis at metal nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lin

    Direct liquid fuel cells, such as direct methanol fuel cells and direct formic acid fuel cells, have attracted much attention in the past decades due to the need of clean and efficient power sources. One of the most critical issues in the development of highly efficient fuel cells is to increase the rates of fuel-cell reactions as a commercial product. As a result, the topic of electrocatalysis plays a significant role in the investigations of fuel cell reactions. For methanol oxidation, platinum based nanomaterials are the most important catalysts. For formic acid oxidation, both platinum and palladium based nanomaterials are widely employed as the catalysts. Recently, shape-control of the nanoparticles has become an imperative task due to the fact that most of the reactions in fuel cells are sensitive to the surface structure of the catalysts. Though numerous studies have been conducted in past to elucidate the catalytic activity on the nanomaterials with different shapes, the results are inconclusive. Herein, systematic comparison of catalytic activity toward methanol and formic acid oxidation on shape-controlled cubic platinum-based alloy nanoparticles with different alloy element are reported in this dissertation. Methanol and formic acid oxidation reactions on spherical and cubic Pt-Cu nanoparticles are also studied. Cu-Pd nanoparticles are synthesized through galvanic redox reactions to provide significantly higher and much more stable formic acid oxidation activities. Interparticle distance effect is investigated on two dimensional nanoparticle array electrodes with controlled particle size, which is ideal model system for exploring the interparticle distance effects on the voltammetric behavior and reaction mechanisms.

  18. Nanomaterials design and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Balbuena, Perla

    2006-01-01

    Over the past few decades, several approaches have been developed for designing nano-structured or molecularly-structured materials. These advances have revolutionized practically all fields of science and engineering, providing an additional design variable, the feature size of the nano-structures, which can be tailored to provide new materials with very special characteristics. Nanomaterials: Design and Simulation explores the role that such advances have made toward a rational design of nanostructures and covers a variety of methods from ab initio electronic structure techniques, ab initio

  19. Thin films and nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this book is to disseminate the most recent research in Thin Films, Nanomaterials, Corrosion and Metallurgy presented at the International Conference on Advanced Materials (ICAM 2011) held in PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore, India during 12-16 December 2011. The book is a compilation of 113 chapters written by active researchers providing information and critical insights into the recent advancements that have taken place. Important new applications are possible today in the fields of microelectronics, opto-electronics, metallurgy and energy by the application of thin films on solid surfaces. Recent progress in high vacuum technology and new materials has a remarkable effect in thin film quality and cost. This has led to the development of new single or multi-layered thin film devices with diverse applications in a multitude of production areas, such as optics, thermal barrier coatings and wear protections, enhancing service life of tools and to protect materials against thermal and atmospheric influence. On the other hand, thin film process techniques and research are strongly related to the basic research activities in nano technology, an increasingly important field with countless opportunities for applications due to the emergence of new properties at the nanoscale level. Materials and structures that are designed and fabricated at the nano scale level, offer the potential to produce new devices and processes that may enhance efficiencies and reduce costs in many areas, as photovoltaic systems, hydrogen storage, fuel cells and solar thermal systems. In the book, the contributed papers are classified under two sections i) thin films and ii) nanomaterials. The thin film section includes single or multi layer conducting, insulating or semiconducting films synthesized by a wide variety of physical or chemical techniques and characterized or analyzed for different applications. The nanomaterials section deals with novel or exciting materials

  20. Introduction to nanoparticles, nanocomposites, nanomaterials an introduction for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    Vollath, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Meeting the demand for a readily understandable introduction to nanomaterials and nanotechnology, this textbook specifically addresses the needs of students - and engineers - who need to get the gist of nanoscale phenomena in materials without having to delve too deeply into the physical and chemical details. The book begins with an overview of the consequences of small particle size, such as the growing importance of surface effects, and covers successful, field-tested synthesis techniques of nanomaterials. The largest part of the book is devoted to the particular magnetic, optical, electrical and mechanical properties of materials at the nanoscale, leading on to emerging and already commercialized applications, such as nanofluids in magnetic resonance imaging, high-performance nanocomposites and carbon nanotube-based electronics. Based on the author's experience in teaching nanomaterials courses and adapted, in style and level, for students with only limited background knowledge, the textbook includes fur...

  1. LCA of metal nanomaterial production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miseljic, Mirko; Diaz, Elsa Gabriela Alvarado; Olsen, Stig Irving

    The use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in commercial product has reached a new stage, where consumers in their daily life are frequently encountered with products containing this new material class. Metal and metal-oxide nanomaterials are among the most commonly used ENMs in products. Potential...

  2. Environmental effects of engineered nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützhøft, Hans-Christian Holten; Hartmann, Nanna B.; Brinch, Anna;

    assessment of the environmental risk of nanomaterials in Denmark. The nine investigated nanomaterials are: Titanium Dioxide, Zinc Oxide, Silver, Carbon Nanotubes, Copper Oxide, Nano Zero Valent Iron, Cerium Dioxide, Quantum Dots and Carbon Black. To support the assessment of the data found in the peer...

  3. Nanomaterials for biosensing applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eHolzinger

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor device is defined by its biological, or bioinspired receptor unit with unique specificities towards corresponding analytes. These analytes are often of biological origin like DNAs or proteins from the immune system (antibodies, antigens of diseases or infections. Such analytes can also be simple molecules like glucose or pollutants when a biological receptor unit with particular specificity is available. One of many other challenges in biosensor development is the efficient signal capture of the biological recognition event (transduction. Such transducers translate the interaction of the analyte with the biological element into electrochemical, electrochemiluminescent, magnetic, gravimetric, or optical signals. In order to increase sensitivities and to lower detection limits down to even individual molecules, nanomaterials are promising candidates due to the possibility to immobilize an enhanced quantity of bioreceptor units at reduced volumes and even to act itself as transduction element. Among such nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles, semi-conductor quantum dots, polymer nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and graphene are intensively studied. Due to the vast evolution of this research field, this review summarizes in a non-exhaustive way the advantages of nanomaterials by focusing on nano-objects which provide further beneficial properties than just an enhanced surface area.

  4. Nanomaterials for biosensing applications: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Michael; Le Goff, Alan; Cosnier, Serge

    2014-08-01

    A biosensor device is defined by its biological, or bioinspired receptor unit with unique specificities towards corresponding analytes. These analytes are often of biological origin like DNAs or proteins from the immune system (antibodies, antigens) of diseases or infections. Such analytes can also be simple molecules like glucose or pollutants when a biological receptor unit with particular specificity is available. One of many other challenges in biosensor development is the efficient signal capture of the biological recognition event (transduction). Such transducers translate the interaction of the analyte with the biological element into electrochemical, electrochemiluminescent, magnetic, gravimetric, or optical signals. In order to increase sensitivities and to lower detection limits down to even individual molecules, nanomaterials are promising candidates due to the possibility to immobilize an enhanced quantity of bioreceptor units at reduced volumes and even to act itself as transduction element. Among such nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles, semi-conductor quantum dots, polymer nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and graphene are intensively studied. Due to the vast evolution of this research field, this review summarizes in a non-exhaustive way the advantages of nanomaterials by focusing on nano-objects which provide further beneficial properties than “just” an enhanced surface area.

  5. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael U. Niemann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials have attracted great interest in recent years because of the unusual mechanical, electrical, electronic, optical, magnetic and surface properties. The high surface/volume ratio of these materials has significant implications with respect to energy storage. Both the high surface area and the opportunity for nanomaterial consolidation are key attributes of this new class of materials for hydrogen storage devices. Nanostructured systems including carbon nanotubes, nano-magnesium based hydrides, complex hydride/carbon nanocomposites, boron nitride nanotubes, TiS2/MoS2 nanotubes, alanates, polymer nanocomposites, and metal organic frameworks are considered to be potential candidates for storing large quantities of hydrogen. Recent investigations have shown that nanoscale materials may offer advantages if certain physical and chemical effects related to the nanoscale can be used efficiently. The present review focuses the application of nanostructured materials for storing atomic or molecular hydrogen. The synergistic effects of nanocrystalinity and nanocatalyst doping on the metal or complex hydrides for improving the thermodynamics and hydrogen reaction kinetics are discussed. In addition, various carbonaceous nanomaterials and novel sorbent systems (e.g. carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, nanofibers, polyaniline nanospheres and metal organic frameworks etc. and their hydrogen storage characteristics are outlined.

  6. Carbon Nanomaterials as Antibacterial Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Maas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials like graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes and the various forms of diamond have attracted great attention for their vast potential regarding applications in electrical engineering and as biomaterials. The study of the antibacterial properties of carbon nanomaterials provides fundamental information on the possible toxicity and environmental impact of these materials. Furthermore, as a result of the increasing prevalence of resistant bacteria strains, the development of novel antibacterial materials is of great importance. This article reviews current research efforts on characterizing the antibacterial activity of carbon nanomaterials from the perspective of colloid and interface science. Building on these fundamental findings, recent functionalization strategies for enhancing the antibacterial effect of carbon nanomaterials are described. The review concludes with a comprehensive outlook that summarizes the most important discoveries and trends regarding antibacterial carbon nanomaterials.

  7. Health effects of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetley, T D

    2007-06-01

    With the rapid growth of nanotechnology and future bulk manufacture of nanomaterials comes the need to determine, understand and counteract any adverse health effects of these materials that may occur during manufacture, during use, or accidentally. Nanotechnology is expanding rapidly and will affect many aspects of everyday life; there are already hundreds of products that utilize nanoparticles. Paradoxically, the unique properties that are being exploited (e.g. high surface reactivity and ability to cross cell membranes) might have negative health impacts. The rapid progress in development and use of nanomaterials is not yet matched by toxicological investigations. Epidemiological studies implicate the ultrafine (nano-sized) fraction of particulate air pollution in the exacerbation of cardiorespiratory disease and increased morbidity. Experimental animal studies suggest that the increased concentration of nanoparticles and higher reactive surface area per unit mass, alongside unique chemistry and functionality, is important in the acute inflammatory and chronic response. Some animal models have shown that nanoparticles which are deposited in one organ (e.g. lung and gut) may access the vasculature and target other organs (e.g. brain and liver). The exact relationship between the physicochemistry of a nanoparticle, its cellular reactivity, and its biological and systemic consequences cannot be predicted. It is important to understand such relationships to enjoy the benefits of nanotechnology without being exposed to the hazards. PMID:17511644

  8. MAPLE deposition of nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caricato, A.P., E-mail: annapaola.caricato@le.infn.it [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Arima, V.; Catalano, M. [National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Cesaria, M. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Cozzoli, P.D. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Martino, M. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Taurino, A.; Rella, R. [Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, IMM-CNR, Via Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Scarfiello, R. [National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Tunno, T. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Zacheo, A. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    The matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) has been recently exploited for depositing films of nanomaterials by combining the advantages of colloidal inorganic nanoparticles and laser-based techniques. MAPLE-deposition of nanomaterials meeting applicative purposes demands their peculiar properties to be taken into account while planning depositions to guarantee a congruent transfer (in terms of crystal structure and geometric features) and explain the deposition outcome. In particular, since nanofluids can enhance thermal conductivity with respect to conventional fluids, laser-induced heating can induce different ablation thermal regimes as compared to the MAPLE-treatment of soft materials. Moreover, nanoparticles exhibit lower melting temperatures and can experience pre-melting phenomena as compared to their bulk counterparts, which could easily induce shape and or crystal phase modification of the material to be deposited even at very low fluences. In this complex scenario, this review paper focuses on examples of MAPLE-depositions of size and shape controlled nanoparticles for different applications highlights advantages and challenges of the MAPLE-technique. The influence of the deposition parameters on the physical mechanisms which govern the deposition process is discussed.

  9. Moessbauer spectroscopy of Fe-based nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two opinions concerning the effect of the nanosized grains on magnetic properties and Moessbauer spectra. One of them testifies that nanomaterials have a grain boundary phase (interface region) which decreases the specific saturation magnetization and leads to the additional sextet in the Moessbauer spectrum. The second one treats the changes in spectra by the impurities. In this work the results on a-Fe, Fe90Ge10 and Fe77,5Al22.5 nanocrystalline alloys are presented. The nanostructured (8 nm) powders of Fe, bcc disordered Fe90Ge10 and Fe77,5Al22.5 were produced by mechanical grinding and alloying. The samples were studied by X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, magnetic measurements and then compared with microstructured ones. With the absence of contamination no changes have been found in the specific saturation magnetization, Curie temperature and hyperfine interaction parameters of the nanomaterials. No additional sextet in the Moessbauer spectra and peculiarities in the temperature dependences of a.c. magnetic susceptibility were found either. We have registered a slight lines broadening (∼ 20%) in Moessbauer spectrum of the nanocrystalline pure Fe. The broadening observed is explained by random in sign and in magnitude anisotropic contribution to the hyperfine magnetic field from the Fe atoms in the interfaces. The conclusion drawn is that the interface of the nanostructure (boundary and close-to-boundary distorted zones) of 1 nm width considerably have the same magnetic properties and hyperfine interaction parameters in comparison with those in the bulk.

  10. Greener production of nanomaterials and their applications in catalysis and environmental remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metal nanomaterials have attracted considerable attention because of their unique magnetic, optical, electrical, and catalytic properties and their potential applications in nanoelectronics. There is great interest in synthesizing metal nanoparticles due to their extraordinary pr...

  11. Nanomaterials for renewable energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With demand for sustainable energy, resource, and environment protection, new material technologies are constantly expanding during the last few couple of decades. An intensive attention has been given by the scientific communities. In particular, nanomaterials are increasingly playing an active role either by increasing the efficiency of the energy storage and conversion processes or by improving the device design and performance. This special issue presents recent research advances in various aspects of energy storage technologies, advanced batteries, fuel cells, solar cell, biofuels, and so on. Design and synthesis of novel materials have demonstrated great impact on the utilization of the sustainable energy, which need to solve the increasing shortage of resource and the issues of environmental pollution

  12. Biofunctionalization of Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Challa S. S. R.

    2005-11-01

    The new book series 'Nanotechnologies for the Life Sciences' is the first comprehensive source on the topics where materials science and life sciences meet on the nanoscale. Each volume provides a concise overview of the underlying nanotechnologies for the design, creation and characterization of biomedical applications, collating the many articles found in the relevant specialized journals but as yet unseen by those working in other disciplines. Written by international experts describing the various facets of nanofabrication, the ten volumes of this single source of information cover the complete range of synthetic methods, tools and techniques being developed towards medical, biological and cybernetic applications. This volume covers the synthetic and materials aspects of instilling biocompatibility into nanomaterials with properties desirable for advanced medical and biological applications. Essential reading for anyone working in the various related disciplines: from medicine and biology through chemistry, materials science and physics to engineering.

  13. Radiation damage tolerant nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.J. Beyerlein

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Designing a material from the atomic level to achieve a tailored response in extreme conditions is a grand challenge in materials research. Nanostructured metals and composites provide a path to this goal because they contain interfaces that attract, absorb and annihilate point and line defects. These interfaces recover and control defects produced in materials subjected to extremes of displacement damage, impurity implantation, stress and temperature. Controlling radiation-induced-defects via interfaces is shown to be the key factor in reducing the damage and imparting stability in certain nanomaterials under conditions where bulk materials exhibit void swelling and/or embrittlement. We review the recovery of radiation-induced point defects at free surfaces and grain boundaries and stabilization of helium bubbles at interphase boundaries and present an approach for processing bulk nanocomposites containing interfaces that are stable under irradiation.

  14. Nanomaterials for Space Exploration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Padraig G.

    2006-01-01

    Nano-engineered materials are multi-functional materials with superior mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Nanomaterials may be used for a variety of space exploration applications, including ultracapacitors, active/passive thermal management materials, and nanofiltration for water recovery. Additional applications include electrical power/energy storage systems, hybrid systems power generation, advanced proton exchange membrane fuel cells, and air revitalization. The need for nanomaterials and their growth, characterization, processing and space exploration applications is discussed. Data is presented for developing solid-supported amine adsorbents based on carbon nanotube materials and functionalization of nanomaterials is examined.

  15. Low Dimension Semiconducting Composite Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mang; CHEN Hong-zheng; SUN Jing-zhi

    2004-01-01

    Recently, low dimension nanostructures have gained considerable attention due to their technological potential as unique types of nanoscale building blocks for future optoelectronic devices and systems. Semiconducting composite nanomaterials, which can combine the advantages of two or more components, have been the focus in the area of nanomaterials synthesis and device application.In this paper, we report our work on the preparation of composite nanomaterials based on CNTs.CNTs were coated by organic or inorganic species via novel and facile methods (Fig. 1 and Fig.2).These functional CNTs based composites show eminent prospects and opportunities for new applications in a wide variation of areas.

  16. Regional Knowledge Production in Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimpe, Christoph; Patuelli, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Nanomaterials are seen as a key technology for the twenty-first century, and much is expected of them in terms of innovation and economic growth. They could open the way to many radically new applications, which would form the basis of innovative products. As nanomaterials are still in their...... distance being detrimental to the extent that spillovers can be realised. Due to the technological complexity, however, proximity could also be less important as relevant nanomaterials research is globally dispersed. Hence in this paper, we analyse the effects of co-location of R&D activities on...... nanomaterial patenting. Based on European Patent Office data at the German district level (NUTS-3), we estimate two negative binomial models in a knowledge production function framework and include a spatial filtering approach to adjust for spatial autocorrelation. Our results indicate that there is a...

  17. Nanomaterials for membranes and catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Nassos, Stylianos

    2005-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a relatively new research topic that attracts increasing interest from scientists and engineers all over the world, due to its novel applications. The use of nanomaterials has extended to a broad range of applications, for example chemical synthesis, microporous media synthesis and catalytic combustion, contributing to achievement of improved or promising results. Microemulsion (ME) is considered a powerful tool for synthesis of nanomaterials, due to its unique properties. T...

  18. Plasma nanofabrication and nanomaterials safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fast advances in nanotechnology have raised increasing concerns related to the safety of nanomaterials when exposed to humans, animals and the environment. However, despite several years of research, the nanomaterials safety field is still in its infancy owing to the complexities of structural and surface properties of these nanomaterials and organism-specific responses to them. Recently, plasma-based technology has been demonstrated as a versatile and effective way for nanofabrication, yet its health and environment-benign nature has not been widely recognized. Here we address the environmental and occupational health and safety effects of various zero- and one-dimensional nanomaterials and elaborate the advantages of using plasmas as a safe nanofabrication tool. These advantages include but are not limited to the production of substrate-bound nanomaterials, the isolation of humans from harmful nanomaterials, and the effective reforming of toxic and flammable gases. It is concluded that plasma nanofabrication can minimize the hazards in the workplace and represents a safe way for future nanofabrication technologies.

  19. Plasma nanofabrication and nanomaterials safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Z. J.; Levchenko, I.; Kumar, S.; Yajadda, M. M. A.; Yick, S.; Seo, D. H.; Martin, P. J.; Peel, S.; Kuncic, Z.; Ostrikov, K.

    2011-05-01

    The fast advances in nanotechnology have raised increasing concerns related to the safety of nanomaterials when exposed to humans, animals and the environment. However, despite several years of research, the nanomaterials safety field is still in its infancy owing to the complexities of structural and surface properties of these nanomaterials and organism-specific responses to them. Recently, plasma-based technology has been demonstrated as a versatile and effective way for nanofabrication, yet its health and environment-benign nature has not been widely recognized. Here we address the environmental and occupational health and safety effects of various zero- and one-dimensional nanomaterials and elaborate the advantages of using plasmas as a safe nanofabrication tool. These advantages include but are not limited to the production of substrate-bound nanomaterials, the isolation of humans from harmful nanomaterials, and the effective reforming of toxic and flammable gases. It is concluded that plasma nanofabrication can minimize the hazards in the workplace and represents a safe way for future nanofabrication technologies.

  20. Crystal phase-controlled synthesis, properties and applications of noble metal nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhanxi; Zhang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The functional properties of noble metal nanomaterials are determined by their size, shape, composition, architecture and crystal structure/phase. In recent years, the crystal phase control of noble metal nanomaterials has emerged as an efficient and versatile strategy to tune their properties. In this tutorial review, we will give an overview of the latest research progress in the crystal phase-controlled synthesis of noble metal nanomaterials. Moreover, the crystal phase-dependent chemical and physical properties (e.g. chemical stability, magnetic, electrical and optical properties) and catalytic applications (e.g. oxygen reduction reaction, and oxidation reactions of formic acid, methanol and carbon monoxide) of noble metal nanomaterials are also briefly introduced. Finally, based on the current research status of the crystal phase-controlled synthesis of noble metal nanomaterials, we will provide some perspectives on the challenges and opportunities in this emerging research field. PMID:26584059

  1. Magnetic silica nanomaterials for solid-phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction of ultra-trace quantities of plasticizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are presenting surface modified magnetic silica nanoparticles (m-Si-NPs) for use in solid-phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME). The m-Si-NPs were surface-functionalized with octadecyl groups to give a material for the extraction of the plasticizers dibutyl phthalate, di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate from water samples. The functionalized m-Si-NPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The results showed that the m-Si-NPs were well functionalized with octadecyl groups. The effects of various experimental variables on the extraction efficiencies were investigated. The analytes were quantified by GC/FID. Under optimal conditions, the calibration plots are linear in the range from 0.01 to 100 μg∙L-1, and very high enrichment factors (mean value ∼20,000) were obtained. As a result of the high enrichment factors, the detection limits are as low as 2–3 ng∙L-1. The method was successfully employed to the extraction of the plasticizers from (spiked) water samples, and recoveries are in the order of 93.9 to 106.7 %. The method is low cost, fast, and very sensitive (author)

  2. Photoinduced toxicity of engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Philip Scott

    Engineered nanomaterials including metal, metal oxide and carbon based nanomaterials are extensively used in a wide variety of applications to the extent that their presence in the environment is expected to increase dramatically over the next century. These nanomaterials may be photodegraded by solar radiation and thereby release metal ions into the environment that can produce cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. Photoinduced toxicity experiments are performed exposing human lung epithelial carcinoma cells [H1650] to engineered semiconductor nanoparticles such as CdSe quantum dots and ZnO nanoparticles after exposure to 3, 6, and 9 hours of solar simulated radiation. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the metal ions are evaluated using ZnSO4 and CdCl2 solutions for the MTT assay and Comet assay respectively. The objective of the dissertation is to obtain quantitative information about the environmental transformation of engineered nanomaterials and their mechanism of toxicity. This information is critical for addressing the environmental health and safety risks of engineered nanomaterials to workers, consumers and the environment.

  3. STEREOLOGY OF NANO-MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Wejrzanowski

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Nano-structured materials attract a growing attention due to their superior mechanical and physical properties. Such properties are inherently related to the unique structure which is controlled at the nano-scale. In the early stage of their development, the structural characterization of nano-materials was limited to the average grain/particle size. However, nano-grains/particles form stochastic populations with diverse size and shape. The recent experimental and theoretical results show that in addition to the average size, size diversity of grains/particles has a significant effect on the properties of nano-materials. This rationalizes more advanced description of the structures of nano-materials. Advanced microscopic methods are now available to image microstructure of nano-materials, e.g., HRSTEM and AFM. The ultra-high resolution images can be efficiently processed to obtain quantitative description of the nano-grains/particles. Examples are shown how such a description can be used for optimizing the microstructures of modern engineering nano-materials.

  4. Applied spectroscopy and the science of nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on several areas of intense topical interest related to applied spectroscopy and the science of nanomaterials. The eleven chapters in the book cover the following areas of interest relating to applied spectroscopy and nanoscience: ·         Raman spectroscopic characterization, modeling and simulation studies of carbon nanotubes, ·         Characterization of plasma discharges using laser optogalvanic spectroscopy, ·         Fluorescence anisotropy in understanding protein conformational disorder and aggregation, ·         Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in nanomedicine, ·         Calculation of Van der Waals interactions at the nanoscale, ·         Theory and simulation associated with adsorption of gases in nanomaterials, ·         Atom-precise metal nanoclusters, ·         Plasmonic properties of metallic nanostructures, two-dimensional materials, and their composites, ·         Applications of graphe...

  5. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-08-19

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  6. Nanomaterials: Regulation and Risk Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Grieger, Khara Deanne; Baun, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The topics of regulation and risk assessment of nanomaterials have never been more relevant and controversial in Europe than they are at this point in time. In this entry, we present and discuss a number of major pieces of legislation relevant for the regulation of nanomaterials, including REACH...... Foods Regulation. Chemical risk assessment provides a fundamental element in support of existing legislation. Risk assessment is normally said to consist of four elements, i.e., hazard identification, dose–response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Each of these four elements......, the Water Framework Directive, pharmaceuticals regulation, and the Novel Foods Regulation. Current regulation of nanomaterials entail three overall challenges: 1) limitations in regard to terminology and definitions of key terms such as a “substance,” “novel food,” etc.; 2) safety assessment...

  7. Carbon nanomaterials for gas adsorption

    CERN Document Server

    Terranova, Maria Letizia

    2012-01-01

    Research in adsorption of gases by carbon nanomaterials has experienced considerable growth in recent years, with increasing interest for practical applications. Many research groups are now producing or using such materials for gas adsorption, storage, purification, and sensing. This book provides a selected overview of some of the most interesting scientific results regarding the outstanding properties of carbon nanomaterials for gas adsorption and of interest both for basic research and technological applications. Topics receiving special attention in this book include storage of H, purific

  8. Exoelectron Emission of a Carbon Nanomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortov, V. S.; Slesarev, A. I.; Tkachev, A. G.

    2008-03-01

    The exoemission properties of a Taunite carbon nanomaterial consisting of nanosized multiwalled nanotubes and nanofibers were investigated by thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE). The TSEE spectra of the carbon nanomaterial differed from the spectra of pressed graphite. It was assumed that defect—adsorbate complexes were emission-active centers on the surface of the nanomaterial

  9. Chemical Design of Functional Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeblad, Kresten

    This thesis deals with a very specific class of functional nanomaterials known as mesoporous zeolites. Zeolites are a class of crystalline aluminosilicate minerals characterized by featuring pores or cavities of molecular dimensions as part of their crystal structure. Mesoporous zeolites are...

  10. Raman spectroscopy for nanomaterials characterization

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    First volume of a 40-volume series on nanoscience and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of nanomaterials. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry.

  11. Computational design of safer nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burello, E.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are expected to find applications in numerous consumer products, posing the challenge to guarantee their safety and environmental sustainability before they can be transferred from research labs to end-consumer products. One emerging solution, called safe design, relies on the implemen

  12. Cellulose nanomaterials in water treatment technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; de Lannoy, Charles-François; Wiesner, Mark R

    2015-05-01

    Cellulose nanomaterials are naturally occurring with unique structural, mechanical and optical properties. While the paper and packaging, automotive, personal care, construction, and textiles industries have recognized cellulose nanomaterials' potential, we suggest cellulose nanomaterials have great untapped potential in water treatment technologies. In this review, we gather evidence of cellulose nanomaterials' beneficial role in environmental remediation and membranes for water filtration, including their high surface area-to-volume ratio, low environmental impact, high strength, functionalizability, and sustainability. We make direct comparison between cellulose nanomaterials and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in terms of physical and chemical properties, production costs, use and disposal in order to show the potential of cellulose nanomaterials as a sustainable replacement for CNTs in water treatment technologies. Finally, we comment on the need for improved communication and collaboration across the myriad industries invested in cellulose nanomaterials production and development to achieve an efficient means to commercialization. PMID:25837659

  13. Introduction to nanoscience and nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Dinesh C

    2013-01-01

    This textbook is aimed primarily at the senior undergraduate and first year graduate students from the various engineering and sciences departments including physics, chemistry, materials engineering, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, bioengineering, and biology. Researchers in the areas of nanomaterials and nanoscience will also find the book useful for building the background necessary to understand the current literature and as a reference book. The text assumes only a basic level of competency in physics, chemistry and mathematics. Some of the background material and introductory matter are included in the first few chapters and as appendices. Although this material may be familiar to some of the students, it is the author's experience after teaching such a course for many years that this can not be taken for granted and moreover, serves as a ready reference to understand the text. As the area of nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanomaterials is a fast developing one, a...

  14. Editorial: Nanomaterials at the Biointerface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Ping (Gordon Xu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioapplication of nanomaterials involves several key processes that occurat the biointerface, such as internalization of nanoparticles by various cells, attachment of nanomaterials onto the bacteria to form granulates, and penetration of nutrient elements on the leaf surface from the nutrient reservoir – nanocrystals. This special issue therefore presents the most recent research development of nanomaterials at the biointerface, as summarized by a multidisciplinary team of international experts in these broad fields. Biomedical applications of various nanomaterials are intensively investigated in the recent decades. For example, many efforts have been made to develop functional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs to enhance the biocompatibility, drug loading efficacy, drug delivery efficiency, drug control releaseproperties and cancer treatment effectiveness. In this issue, Zhang et al. (Tianjin University, China [1]briefly review the recent progresses in this particular area. Another example is utilization of nanoparticles as biomarkers. So this special issue also includes a mini-review paper by Centeno and Xie (University Technology Malaysia [2] thatconcisely presents the principle and simulation results of dye molecules’ fluorescence enhancement by the nearby nanostructured metals through their coupling effect. Nanomaterials can alsobe used as effective antimicrobial agents. For example, Liu et al. (Curtin University of Technology, Australia [3] briefly review the recent progress of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, andin particular, their efforts to modify AgNPs by conjugating antimicrobial cell penetration peptide to selectively bind to microorganism and improve the therapeutic index. More interestingly, nanomaterialsare increasingly investigated as effective foliar fertilizers to provide micronutrient elements for a longer term. This particularly takes the advantage of nanocrystals’sheet-like morphology as sheet-like crystals have the

  15. Nanomaterials – the driving force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Pitkethly

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth in activity surrounding nanomaterials continues unabated as more R&D funds are poured into nanotechnology and companies look to exploit the expanding range of novel properties that are being discovered. Advances in existing production techniques are improving the quality and yields, providing a clear prospect of commercially viable volume production. There is still a wide range of processes being used, and it is clear those that will be commercially successful will be those for which the materials have been developed at the same time as the application. Recent reports from a number of working groups have highlighted the need for increased examination of the health, environmental, and ethical aspects of nanotechnology, and this is an area that the industry will need to understand more fully and take appropriate action on if the benefits of nanomaterials are to be realized.

  16. New nanomaterials for photonic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, Le Quoc; Anh, Tran Kim; Binh, Nguyen Thanh; Mien, Vu Doan

    2012-06-01

    A brief survey of the development of new nanomaterials for photonic application will be presented. Based on the photoresponsive sol gel nanohybrid of polymethamethyl acrylate, silica, and zirconia (ASZ) or titania (AST) have been fabricated some planar light guiding structures and devices. The lanthanide containing nanosphere with core/shell structures have been synthesized in using a modified solgel process. The opal like photonic crystal structures have been fabricated by self assembling technique.

  17. Electrospun nanomaterials for ultrasensitive sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Bin Ding; Moran Wang; Xianfeng Wang; Jianyong Yu; Gang Sun

    2010-01-01

    Increasing demands for ever more sensitive sensors for global environmental monitoring, food inspection and medical diagnostics have led to an upsurge of interests in nanostructured materials such as nanofibers and nanowebs. Electrospinning exhibits the unique ability to produce diverse forms of fibrous assemblies. The remarkable specific surface area and high porosity bring electrospun nanomaterials highly attractive to ultrasensitive sensors and increasing importance in other nanotechnologi...

  18. REACH and nanomaterials: current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New challenges for regulators are emerging about a specific assessment and appropriate management of the potential risks of nanomaterials. In the framework of European legislation on chemicals, Regulation (EC) No. 1907/2006 REACH aims to ensure the safety of human health and the environment through the collection of information on the physico-chemical characteristics of the substances and on their profile (eco) toxicological and the identification of appropriate risk management linked to 'exposure to these substances without impeding scientific progress and the competitiveness of industry. In order to cover the current shortage of information on the safety of nanomaterials and tackle the acknowledged legal vacuum, are being a rich activities, carried out both by regulators both by stake holders, and discussions on the proposals for adapting the European regulatory framework for chemicals . The European Commission is geared to strengthen the REACH Regulation by means of updates of its annexes. The importance of responding to the regulatory requirements has highlighted the need for cooperation between European organizations, scientists and industries to promote and ensure the safe use of nanomaterials.

  19. Cooperative nanomaterials systems for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Ho

    The unique electromagnetic and biologic properties of nanomaterials are being harnessed to build powerful new medical technologies. Particularly, there have been recently increasing interests in cancer nanotechnology, wherein nanomaterials play an important role in ultrasensitive imaging, targeting, and therapy of cancer. However, these nanomaterials typically function as individual units and are designed to independently perform their tasks. In this dissertation, new cooperative nanosystems consisting of two distinct nanomaterials that work together to target, identify, or treat tumors in vivo were studied. In the first two chapters, the synthesis of worm-shaped dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (nanoworms, NW) exhibiting substantial in vivo circulation times and significant tumor targeting when coated with tumor-homing peptides were studied. NWs are also found to display a greater magnetic resonance (MR) response than the spherical nanoparticles. Next, two types of multifunctional nanoparticles were fabricated for simultaneous detection and treatment of cancer. Micellar hybrid nanoparticles (MHN) that contain magnetic nanoparticles, quantum dots, and an anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) within a single PEG-modified phospholipid micelle were first prepared. Simultaneous multimodal imaging (MR and fluorescence) and targeted drug delivery in vitro and in vivo was performed using DOX-incorporated targeted MHN. Secondly, luminescent porous silicon nanoparticles (LPSINP) that were drug-loadable, biodegradable and relatively non-toxic were prepared. In contrast to most inorganic nanomaterials, LPSINP were degraded in vivo in a relatively short time with no noticeable toxicity. The clearance and degradation of intravenously injected LPSINP in the bladder, liver, and spleen were established by whole-body fluorescence imaging. Finally, two types of cooperative nanomaterials systems to amplify targeting and deliver drugs efficiently to regions of tumor invasion were

  20. Toxicity of nanomaterials; an undermined issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogharabi, Mehdi; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are employed in extensive variety of commercial products such as electronic components, cosmetics, food, sports equipment, biomedical applications, and medicine. With the increasing utilization of engineered nanomaterials, the potential exposure of human to nanoparticles is rapidly increasing. Nowadays when new nanomaterials with new applications are introduced, mostly good and positive effects are mentioned whereas possible hazards arising from nanosize of the compounds are undermined. Toxicology studies of nanomaterials demonstrate some adverse effects in some human organs such as central nerve system, immune system, and lung. There is lack of complete information about human toxicity and environmental waste of nanomaterials. We aimed to highlight current toxicological concerns of potentially useful nanomaterials which are now used in pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences. PMID:25123555

  1. Handbook of immunological properties of engineered nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2012-01-01

    The Handbook of Immunological Properties of Engineered Nanomaterials provides a comprehensive overview of the current literature, methodologies, and translational and regulatory considerations in the field of nanoimmunotoxicology. The main subject is the immunological properties of engineered nanomaterials. Focus areas include interactions between engineered nanomaterials and red blood cells, platelets, endothelial cells, professional phagocytes, T cells, B cells, dendritic cells, complement and coagulation systems, and plasma proteins, with discussions on nanoparticle sterility and sterilizat

  2. FORMING AND PRECISION MACHINING TO NANOMATERIALS LUMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan Jie; Zhang Jin; Chen Bingkui; Chen Xiaoan

    2004-01-01

    The technology of forming and machining lump nano-materials has been investigated. Grinding, abrasive machining test has been conducted to Fe, Co, Ni and Al lump nano-materials. Experiments have been done to measure grinding force, grinding thermal, machining roughness and micro-hardness. Image analysis is carried out by metallographic and scanning tunnel microscopic microscope. Researches provide the basis data for forming and machining lump nano-materials.

  3. Toxicity of nanomaterials; an undermined issue

    OpenAIRE

    Mogharabi, Mehdi; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are employed in extensive variety of commercial products such as electronic components, cosmetics, food, sports equipment, biomedical applications, and medicine. With the increasing utilization of engineered nanomaterials, the potential exposure of human to nanoparticles is rapidly increasing. Nowadays when new nanomaterials with new applications are introduced, mostly good and positive effects are mentioned whereas possible hazards arising from nanosize of the compounds are und...

  4. Influence of nanomaterials on cell function

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Furong

    2006-01-01

    The intention of this work was the study of mechanisms of interactions between nanomaterials and cells. The experiments carried out during this thesis focused on two kinds of nanomaterials: single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and nanostructured hydrogels. Chapter 1 provides a general introduction to the field of nanomaterials such as SWCNTs and nanostructured hydrogels. In chapter 2, the effects of SWCNTs on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are investigated via quantitative PCR produ...

  5. Nano-material and method of fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menchhofer, Paul A; Seals, Roland D; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-03

    A fluffy nano-material and method of manufacture are described. At 2000.times. magnification the fluffy nanomaterial has the appearance of raw, uncarded wool, with individual fiber lengths ranging from approximately four microns to twenty microns. Powder-based nanocatalysts are dispersed in the fluffy nanomaterial. The production of fluffy nanomaterial typically involves flowing about 125 cc/min of organic vapor at a pressure of about 400 torr over powder-based nano-catalysts for a period of time that may range from approximately thirty minutes to twenty-four hours.

  6. Adsorption, desorption, and film formation of quinacridone and its thermal cracking product indigo on clean and carbon-covered silicon dioxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherwitzl, Boris; Lassnig, Roman; Truger, Magdalena; Resel, Roland; Leising, Günther; Winkler, Adolf

    2016-09-01

    The evaporation of quinacridone from a stainless steel Knudsen cell leads to the partial decomposition of this molecule in the cell, due to its comparably high sublimation temperature. At least one additional type of molecules, namely indigo, could be detected in the effusion flux. Thermal desorption spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy have been used to study the co-deposition of these molecules on sputter-cleaned and carbon-covered silicon dioxide surfaces. Desorption of indigo appears at temperatures of about 400 K, while quinacridone desorbs at around 510 K. For quinacridone, a desorption energy of 2.1 eV and a frequency factor for desorption of 1 × 10(19) s(-1) were calculated, which in this magnitude is typical for large organic molecules. A fraction of the adsorbed quinacridone molecules (∼5%) decomposes during heating, nearly independent of the adsorbed amount, resulting in a surface composed of small carbon islands. The sticking coefficients of indigo and quinacridone were found to be close to unity on a carbon covered SiO2 surface but significantly smaller on a sputter-cleaned substrate. The reason for the latter can be attributed to insufficient energy dissipation for unfavorably oriented impinging molecules. However, due to adsorption via a hot-precursor state, the sticking probability is increased on the surface covered with carbon islands, which act as accommodation centers. PMID:27609005

  7. Transparent conductors composed of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layani, Michael; Kamyshny, Alexander; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2014-06-01

    This is a review on recent developments in the field of transparent conductive coatings (TCCs) for ITO replacement. The review describes the basic properties of conductive nanomaterials suitable for fabrication of such TCCs (metallic nanoparticles and nanowires, carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets), various methods of patterning the metal nanoparticles with formation of conductive transparent metallic grids, honeycomb structures and 2D arrays of interconnected rings as well as fabrication of TCCs based on graphene and carbon nanotubes. Applications of TCCs in electronic and optoelectronic devices, such as solar cells, electroluminescent and electrochromic devices, touch screens and displays, and transparent EMI shielders, are discussed. PMID:24777332

  8. Focus on the nanomaterial-based biosensor papers in Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry of the year 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xia; MA LiNa; WANG ZhenXin

    2011-01-01

    Because of their unique physical and chemical properties,nanomaterials have been widely used to develop biosensing systems for bioanalytical and biomedical applications.The journal Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry published 35 papers on nanomaterial-based biosensors in 2010,including 5 reviews [1-5] and 29 research articles [6-34].These biosensing systems were fabricated by a broad range of nanomaterials (e.g.,carbon nanotube,gold nanoparticle,magnetic nanoparticle,silica nanoparticle,quantum dot,and so forth,Figure 1),some of them have high quality and get great achievements.

  9. Risk-based classification system of nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various stakeholders are increasingly interested in the potential toxicity and other risks associated with nanomaterials throughout the different stages of a product's life cycle (e.g., development, production, use, disposal). Risk assessment methods and tools developed and applied to chemical and biological materials may not be readily adaptable for nanomaterials because of the current uncertainty in identifying the relevant physico-chemical and biological properties that adequately describe the materials. Such uncertainty is further driven by the substantial variations in the properties of the original material due to variable manufacturing processes employed in nanomaterial production. To guide scientists and engineers in nanomaterial research and application as well as to promote the safe handling and use of these materials, we propose a decision support system for classifying nanomaterials into different risk categories. The classification system is based on a set of performance metrics that measure both the toxicity and physico-chemical characteristics of the original materials, as well as the expected environmental impacts through the product life cycle. Stochastic multicriteria acceptability analysis (SMAA-TRI), a formal decision analysis method, was used as the foundation for this task. This method allowed us to cluster various nanomaterials in different ecological risk categories based on our current knowledge of nanomaterial physico-chemical characteristics, variation in produced material, and best professional judgments. SMAA-TRI uses Monte Carlo simulations to explore all feasible values for weights, criteria measurements, and other model parameters to assess the robustness of nanomaterial grouping for risk management purposes.

  10. Thermal stability of consolidated metallic nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of applications of theoretical kinetic and thermodynamic approaches to estimation of thermal stability of consolidated nanomaterials based on various metals, alloys and refractory compounds are considered. The principal experimental data concerning the stability of the nanomaterials, including radiation stability, abnormal grain growth and oxidation, are analyzed. The bibliography includes 82 references

  11. Environmental fate and behaviour of nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Nanna Isabella Bloch; Skjolding, Lars Michael; Hansen, Steffen Foss;

    In the current report, the existing knowledge on the fate of nanomaterials in the environment is reviewed and the major knowledge gaps are identified.......In the current report, the existing knowledge on the fate of nanomaterials in the environment is reviewed and the major knowledge gaps are identified....

  12. EU and Swiss regulatory action on Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Jost, Dannie

    2012-01-01

    Dannie Jost lectured on EU and Swiss regulatory action on nanomaterials as one of 16 speakers at the interdisciplinary seminar for young scientists was aimed at doctoral students from NRP 62 "Smart Materials" and NRP 64 "Opportunities and Risks of Nanomaterials".

  13. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging. PMID:26757620

  14. Multi-metal oxide ceramic nanomaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Stephen; Liu, Shuangyi; Huang, Limin

    2016-06-07

    A convenient and versatile method for preparing complex metal oxides is disclosed. The method uses a low temperature, environmentally friendly gel-collection method to form a single phase nanomaterial. In one embodiment, the nanomaterial consists of Ba.sub.AMn.sub.BTi.sub.CO.sub.D in a controlled stoichiometry.

  15. Nanomaterial Toxicity Screening in Developing Zebrafish Embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    To assess nanomaterial vertebrate toxicity, a high-content screening assay was created using developing zebrafish, Danio rerio. This included a diverse group of nanomaterials (n=42 total) ranging from metallic (Ag, Au) and metal oxide (CeO2, CuO, TiO2, ZnO) nanoparticles, to non...

  16. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging.

  17. Management of nanomaterials safety in research environment

    OpenAIRE

    Riediker Michael; Magrez Arnaud; Petri-Fink Alke; Groso Amela; Meyer Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Despite numerous discussions, workshops, reviews and reports about responsible development of nanotechnology, information describing health and environmental risk of engineered nanoparticles or nanomaterials is severely lacking and thus insufficient for completing rigorous risk assessment on their use. However, since preliminary scientific evaluations indicate that there are reasonable suspicions that activities involving nanomaterials might have damaging effects on human health; the...

  18. Organic nanomaterials: synthesis, characterization, and device applications

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in nanoscience and nanotechnology have given rise to a new generation of functional organic nanomaterials with controlled morphology and well-defined properties, which enable a broad range of useful applications. This book explores some of the most important of these organic nanomaterials, describing how they are synthesized and characterized. Moreover, the book explains how researchers have incorporated organic nanomaterials into devices for real-world applications.Featuring contributions from an international team of leading nanoscientists, Organic Nanomaterials is divided into five parts:Part One introduces the fundamentals of nanomaterials and self-assembled nanostructuresPart Two examines carbon nanostructures—from fullerenes to carbon nanotubes to graphene—reporting on properties, theoretical studies, and applicationsPart Three investigates key aspects of some inorganic materials, self-assembled monolayers,...

  19. Environmental assessment of nanomaterial use in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølholt, Jesper; Gottschalk, Fadri; Brinch, Anna;

    This is the concluding report of the project "Nanomaterials – occurrence and effects in the Danish environment" (abbreviated NanoDEN), which part the Danish Government's initiative "Better Control of Nanomaterials" (“Bedre styr på nanomaterialer”) which is administered by the Danish Environmental...... Protection Agency. The projects in NanoDEN have aimed to investigate and generate new environmentally relevant knowledge on of nanomaterials on the Danish market and to assess the possible associated risks to the environment. The results from the sub-projects are summarized in the current report and it is...... assessed whether and how nanomaterials may pose a risk for the environment in Denmark. The assessment is based on investigations of nine selected nanomaterials, which are expected to be environmentally relevant based on knowledge of consumption quantities or how they are used. These data contribute to an...

  20. Nanomaterial Based Sensors for NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanofibers (CNFs), graphene and metal nanowires have shown interesting electronic properties and therefore have been pursued for a variety of space applications requiring ultrasensitive and light-weight sensor and electronic devices. We have been pursuing development of chemical and biosensors using carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers for the last several years and this talk will present the benefits of nanomaterials these applications. More recently, printing approaches to manufacturing these devices have been explored as a strategy that is compatible to a microgravity environment. Nanomaterials are either grown in house or purchased and processed as electrical inks. Chemical modification or coatings are added to the nanomaterials to tailor the nanomaterial to the exact application. The development of printed chemical sensors and biosensors will be discussed for applications ranging from crew life support to exploration missions.

  1. Tiny Medicine: Nanomaterial-Based Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Watts

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Tiny medicine refers to the development of small easy to use devices that can help in the early diagnosis and treatment of disease. Early diagnosis is the key to successfully treating many diseases. Nanomaterial-based biosensors utilize the unique properties of biological and physical nanomaterials to recognize a target molecule and effect transduction of an electronic signal. In general, the advantages of nanomaterial-based biosensors are fast response, small size, high sensitivity, and portability compared to existing large electrodes and sensors. Systems integration is the core technology that enables tiny medicine. Integration of nanomaterials, microfluidics, automatic samplers, and transduction devices on a single chip provides many advantages for point of care devices such as biosensors. Biosensors are also being used as new analytical tools to study medicine. Thus this paper reviews how nanomaterials can be used to build biosensors and how these biosensors can help now and in the future to detect disease and monitor therapies.

  2. Carbon Nanomaterials: Efficacy and Safety for Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Tsutsumi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, carbon nanohorns, and carbon nanotubes, are increasingly being used in various fields owing to these materials’ unique, size-dependent functions and physicochemical properties. Recently, because of their high variability and stability, carbon nanomaterials have been explored as a novel tool for the delivery of therapeutic molecules including peptide and nucleic acid cancer drugs. However, insufficient information is available regarding the safety of carbon nanomaterials for human health, even though such information is vital for the development of safe and effective nanomedicine technologies. In this review, we discuss currently available information regarding the safety of carbon nanomaterials in nanomedicine applications, including information obtained from our own studies; and we discuss types of carbon nanomaterials that demonstrate particular promise for safe nanomedicine technologies.

  3. Techniques for Investigating Molecular Toxicology of Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanli; Li, Chenchen; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Lei, Zhendong; Wu, Minghong

    2016-06-01

    Nanotechnology has been a rapidly developing field in the past few decades, resulting in the more and more exposure of nanomaterials to human. The increased applications of nanomaterials for industrial, commercial and life purposes, such as fillers, catalysts, semiconductors, paints, cosmetic additives and drug carriers, have caused both obvious and potential impacts on human health and environment. Nanotoxicology is used to study the safety of nanomaterials and has grown at the historic moment. Molecular toxicology is a new subdiscipline to study the interactions and impacts of materials at the molecular level. To better understand the relationship between the molecular toxicology and nanomaterials, this review summarizes the typical techniques and methods in molecular toxicology which are applied when investigating the toxicology of nanomaterials and include six categories: namely; genetic mutation detection, gene expression analysis, DNA damage detection, chromosomal aberration analysis, proteomics, and metabolomics. Each category involves several experimental techniques and methods. PMID:27319209

  4. Effect of pressure on nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Uma D. [Department of Physics, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar-263145 (India); Kumar, M., E-mail: munish_dixit@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar-263145 (India)

    2010-07-01

    A simple theory is proposed to predict the effect of pressure on nanomaterials, which gets support from the Mie-Gruneisen theory of thermal expansivity as formulated by Born and Huang. We considered LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} to study the effect of pressure in the light of other formulations, viz. Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet and Kumar. The results obtained are found to present a good agreement with the experimental data as well as other formulations. To confirm the validity of the formulation, we applied the method to study the compression behaviour of a number of nanomaterials, viz. CdSe, Rb{sub 3}C{sub 60}, Ni(20 nm), carbon nanotube, {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {epsilon}-Fe (Hexagonal iron), MgO, CuO, {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (67 nm), {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {alpha}-Fe (filled nanotube), TiO{sub 2} (anatase), 3C-SiC (30 nm), TiO{sub 2} (rutile phase), Zr{sub 0.1}Ti{sub 0.9}O{sub 2}, AlN (hexagonal), {gamma}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, Ni-filled MWCNT and Fe-filled MWCNT. The results obtained are compared with the experimental data. A good agreement between theory and experiment demonstrates the validity of the present approach.

  5. Application of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In the present report, we give a brief description of the present state, development, and application of nanotechnologies (NT) and nanomaterials (NM) in some key industries, such as chemical industry and power industry (nanocatalysts, and nanocatalysis, hydrogen storage and fuel cells, artificial photosynthesis and Gratzel's cell, energy efficiency, energy storage); fabrication of consolidated nanostructures (ceramic nano-materials, nanostructured coatings, production of low-combustibility plastics, nanostructured hard materials, nanostructures with colossal magnetoresistance); fabrication of ultra-high strength carbon fibres; nano-technologies for environmental protection (adsorption of heavy metals by self-ordered self-organized nano-structure ensembles, photocatalyric purification of liquids, fabrication of mesoporous materials, application of nanoporous polymers for water purification, nanoparticles and environment); medical applications; military applications and fight against terrorism; household applications; energetic and some other [1-7].; In 2010, the European Union and the governments of the USA and Japan each invested over $ 2 billion in nanoscience, which is ample evidence to substantiate the claim that the 21st century will be the century of nanotechnologies. Some of the optimistic forecasts predict that in 2014 the total revenues from NT will exceed those brought by the information technologies and telecommunications combined. At present, more than 800 companies are involved in R&TD in this field (including giants such as Intel, IBM, Samsung, and Mitsubishi) while more than ten Nobel prizes were awarded for research in nanoscience

  6. Smart Mesoporous Nanomaterials for Antitumor Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Martínez-Carmona

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of nanomaterials for the treatment of solid tumours is receiving increasing attention by the scientific community. Among them, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs exhibit unique features that make them suitable nanocarriers to host, transport and protect drug molecules until the target is reached. It is possible to incorporate different targeting ligands to the outermost surface of MSNs to selectively drive the drugs to the tumour tissues. To prevent the premature release of the cargo entrapped in the mesopores, it is feasible to cap the pore entrances using stimuli-responsive nanogates. Therefore, upon exposure to internal (pH, enzymes, glutathione, etc. or external (temperature, light, magnetic field, etc. stimuli, the pore opening takes place and the release of the entrapped cargo occurs. These smart MSNs are capable of selectively reaching and accumulating at the target tissue and releasing the entrapped drug in a specific and controlled fashion, constituting a promising alternative to conventional chemotherapy, which is typically associated with undesired side effects. In this review, we overview the recent advances reported by the scientific community in developing MSNs for antitumor therapy. We highlight the possibility to design multifunctional nanosystems using different therapeutic approaches aimed at increasing the efficacy of the antitumor treatment.

  7. Nanomaterials driven energy, environmental and biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed state-of-the-art nanomaterials such as nanofibers, nanotubes, nanoparticles, nanocatalysts and nanostructures for clean energy, environmental and biomedical research. Energy can neither be created nor be destroyed, but it can be converted from one form to another. Based on this principle, chemical energy such as hydrogen has been produced from water electrolysis at a much lower voltage using RuO2 nanoparticles on the Si wafer substrate. Once the hydrogen is produced from the clean sources such as solar energy and water, it has to be stored by physisorption or chemisorption processes on to the solid state systems. For the successful physical adsorption of hydrogen molecule, we have developed novel polyaniline nanostructures via chemical templating and electrospinning routes. Chemical or complex hydrides involving nano MgH2 and transition metal nanocatalysts have been synthesized to tailor both the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen (chemi) sorption respectively. Utilization of solar energy (UV-Vis) and a coupling of novel semiconductor oxide nanoparticles have been recently demonstrated with enhancement in photo-oxidation and/or photo-reduction processes for the water/air detoxification and sustainable liquid fuel production respectively. Magnetic nanoparticles such as ZnFe2O4 have been synthesized and optimized for biomedical applications such as targeted drug delivery and tumor diagnostic sensing (MRI)

  8. Nanomaterial Synthesis Using Plasma Generation in Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genki Saito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, the research field of nanomaterials (NMs has developed rapidly because of the unique electrical, optical, magnetic, and catalytic properties of these materials. Among the various methods available today for NM synthesis, techniques for plasma generation in liquid are relatively new. Various types of plasma such as arc discharge and glow discharge can be applied to produce metal, alloy, oxide, inorganic, carbonaceous, and composite NMs. Many experimental setups have been reported, in which various parameters such as the liquid, electrode material, electrode configuration, and electric power source are varied. By examining the various electrode configurations and power sources available in the literature, this review classifies all available plasma in liquid setups into four main groups: (i gas discharge between an electrode and the electrolyte surface, (ii direct discharge between two electrodes, (iii contact discharge between an electrode and the surface of surrounding electrolyte, and (iv radio frequency and microwave plasma in liquid. After discussion of the techniques, NMs of metal, alloy, oxide, silicon, carbon, and composite produced by techniques for plasma generation in liquid are presented, where the source materials, reaction media, and electrode configurations are discussed in detail.

  9. Nanomaterials driven energy, environmental and biomedical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prakash C.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Wilson, Jeremiah F.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed state-of-the-art nanomaterials such as nanofibers, nanotubes, nanoparticles, nanocatalysts and nanostructures for clean energy, environmental and biomedical research. Energy can neither be created nor be destroyed, but it can be converted from one form to another. Based on this principle, chemical energy such as hydrogen has been produced from water electrolysis at a much lower voltage using RuO2 nanoparticles on the Si wafer substrate. Once the hydrogen is produced from the clean sources such as solar energy and water, it has to be stored by physisorption or chemisorption processes on to the solid state systems. For the successful physical adsorption of hydrogen molecule, we have developed novel polyaniline nanostructures via chemical templating and electrospinning routes. Chemical or complex hydrides involving nano MgH2 and transition metal nanocatalysts have been synthesized to tailor both the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen (chemi) sorption respectively. Utilization of solar energy (UV-Vis) and a coupling of novel semiconductor oxide nanoparticles have been recently demonstrated with enhancement in photo-oxidation and/or photo-reduction processes for the water/air detoxification and sustainable liquid fuel production respectively. Magnetic nanoparticles such as ZnFe2O4 have been synthesized and optimized for biomedical applications such as targeted drug delivery and tumor diagnostic sensing (MRI).

  10. Assembly of ordered carbon shells on semiconducting nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2012-10-02

    In some embodiments of the invention, encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described. In certain embodiments the nanostructures described are semiconducting nanomaterials encapsulated with ordered carbon shells. In some aspects a method for producing encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials is disclosed. In some embodiments applications of encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described.

  11. Piezoelectric nanomaterials for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Menciassi, Arianna

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale structures and materials have been explored in many biological applications because of their novel and impressive physical and chemical properties. Such properties allow remarkable opportunities to study and interact with complex biological processes. This book analyses the state of the art of piezoelectric nanomaterials and introduces their applications in the biomedical field. Despite their impressive potentials, piezoelectric materials have not yet received significant attention for bio-applications. This book shows that the exploitation of piezoelectric nanoparticles in nanomedicine is possible and realistic, and their impressive physical properties can be useful for several applications, ranging from sensors and transducers for the detection of biomolecules to “sensible” substrates for tissue engineering or cell stimulation.

  12. Nanomaterials for Electronics and Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Jessica E.; Meyyappan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes(CNTs), graphene, and inorganic nanowires(INWs) have shown interesting electronic, mechanical, optical, thermal, and other properties and therefore have been pursued for a variety of applications by the nanotechnology community ranging from electronics to nanocomposites. While the first two are carbon-based materials, the INWs in the literature include silicon, germanium, III-V, II-VI, a variety of oxides, nitrides, antimonides and others. In this talk, first an overview of growth of these three classes of materials by CVD and PECVD will be presented along with results from characterization. Then applications in development of chemical sensors, biosensors, energy storage devices and novel memory architectures will be discussed.

  13. Carbon Nanomaterials for Road Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaporotskova Irina Vladimirovna

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The requirement of developing and modernizing the roads in Russia and in the Volgograd region in particular, is based on need of expanding the directions of scientific research on road and transport complexes. They have to be aimed at the development of the theory of transport streams, traffic safety increase, and, first of all, at the application of original methods of road development and modernization, introduction of modern technologies and road-building materials.On the basis of the analysis of the plans for transportation sphere development in the Volgograd region assuming the need to apply the new technologies allowing to create qualitative paving, the authors propose the technology of creating a heavy-duty paving with the use of carbon nanomaterial. The knowledge on strengthening the characteristics of carbon nanotubes is a unique material for nanotechnology development which allowed to assume the analysis of general information about asphalt concrete. The analysis showed that carbon nanotubes can be used for improvement of operational characteristics of asphalt concrete, and it is possible to carry out additives of nanotubes in hot as well as in cold bitumen. The article contains the basic principles of creation of the new road material received by means of bitumen reinforcing by carbon nanotubes. The structures received by the offered technique binding on the basis of the bitumens modified by carbon nanomaterial can be used for coverings and bases on highways of all categories in all road and climatic zones of Russia. The technical result consists in increasing the durability and elasticity of the received asphalt covering, and also the increase of water resistance, heat resistance and frost resistance, the expansion of temperature range of its laying in the field of negative temperatures.

  14. Green chemistry of carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiuk, Elena V; Basiuk, Vladimir A

    2014-01-01

    The global trend of looking for more ecologically friendly, "green" techniques manifested itself in the chemistry of carbon nanomaterials. The main principles of green chemistry emphasize how important it is to avoid the use, or at least to reduce the consumption, of organic solvents for a chemical process. And it is precisely this aspect that was systematically addressed and emphasized by our research group since the very beginning of our work on the chemistry of carbon nanomaterials in early 2000s. The present review focuses on the results obtained to date on solvent-free techniques for (mainly covalent) functionalization of fullerene C60, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs, respectively), as well as nanodiamonds (NDs). We designed a series of simple and fast functionalization protocols based on thermally activated reactions with chemical compounds stable and volatile at 150-200 degrees C under reduced pressure, when not only the reactions take place at a high rate, but also excess reagents are spontaneously removed from the functionalized material, thus making its purification unnecessary. The main two classes of reagents are organic amines and thiols, including bifunctional ones, which can be used in conjunction with different forms of nanocarbons. The resulting chemical processes comprise nucleophilic addition of amines and thiols to fullerene C60 and to defect sites of pristine MWNTs, as well as direct amidation of carboxylic groups of oxidized nanotubes (mainly SWNTs) and ND. In the case of bifunctional amines and thiols, reactions of the second functional group can give rise to cross-linking effects, or be employed for further derivatization steps. PMID:24730288

  15. Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanqing

    2014-07-22

    The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

  16. Functional Fe-Pd nanomaterials synthesized by template-assisted methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prida, V.M., E-mail: vmpp@uniovi.es [Depto. de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo, Asturias (Spain); Vega, V.; Garcia, J.; Gonzalez, L.; Rosa, W.O.; Fernandez, A.; Hernando, B. [Depto. de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo, Asturias (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    In this work, we highlight our recent progress in the synthesis and characterization of functional nanomaterials based on Fe-Pd ferromagnetic alloys by means of template-assisted deposition techniques employing highly ordered nanoporous alumina membranes, such as ordered arrays of nanowires and antidots thin films. Special attention is paid on their basic magnetic properties, such as coercivity, remanence and magnetic anisotropy, and their dependence on the microstructure and morphological parameters of the ordered arrays.

  17. Functional Fe–Pd nanomaterials synthesized by template-assisted methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we highlight our recent progress in the synthesis and characterization of functional nanomaterials based on Fe–Pd ferromagnetic alloys by means of template-assisted deposition techniques employing highly ordered nanoporous alumina membranes, such as ordered arrays of nanowires and antidots thin films. Special attention is paid on their basic magnetic properties, such as coercivity, remanence and magnetic anisotropy, and their dependence on the microstructure and morphological parameters of the ordered arrays.

  18. Application of dental nanomaterials: potential toxicity to the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng X

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoli Feng,1 Aijie Chen,1 Yanli Zhang,1 Jianfeng Wang,2 Longquan Shao,1 Limin Wei2 1Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, 2School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Nanomaterials are defined as materials with one or more external dimensions with a size of 1–100 nm. Such materials possess typical nanostructure-dependent properties (eg, chemical, biological, optical, mechanical, and magnetic, which may differ greatly from the properties of their bulk counterparts. In recent years, nanomaterials have been widely used in the production of dental materials, particularly in light polymerization composite resins and bonding systems, coating materials for dental implants, bioceramics, endodontic sealers, and mouthwashes. However, the dental applications of nanomaterials yield not only a significant improvement in clinical treatments but also growing concerns regarding their biosecurity. The brain is well protected by the blood–brain barrier (BBB, which separates the blood from the cerebral parenchyma. However, in recent years, many studies have found that nanoparticles (NPs, including nanocarriers, can transport through the BBB and locate in the central nervous system (CNS. Because the CNS may be a potential target organ of the nanomaterials, it is essential to determine the neurotoxic effects of NPs. In this review, possible dental nanomaterials and their pathways into the CNS are discussed, as well as related neurotoxicity effects underlying the in vitro and in vivo studies. Finally, we analyze the limitations of the current testing methods on the toxicological effects of nanomaterials. This review contributes to a better understanding of the nano-related risks to the CNS as well as the further development of safety assessment systems. Keywords: dental, nanomaterials, central nervous system, toxicity, testing methods, risk assessment

  19. Engineered nanomaterials for solar energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding how to engineer nanomaterials for targeted solar-cell applications is the key to improving their efficiency and could lead to breakthroughs in their design. Proposed mechanisms for the conversion of solar energy to electricity are those exploiting the particle nature of light in conventional photovoltaic cells, and those using the collective electromagnetic nature, where light is captured by antennas and rectified. In both cases, engineered nanomaterials form the crucial components. Examples include arrays of semiconductor nanostructures as an intermediate band (so called intermediate band solar cells), semiconductor nanocrystals for multiple exciton generation, or, in antenna–rectifier cells, nanomaterials for effective optical frequency rectification. Here, we discuss the state of the art in p–n junction, intermediate band, multiple exciton generation, and antenna–rectifier solar cells. We provide a summary of how engineered nanomaterials have been used in these systems and a discussion of the open questions. (topical review)

  20. Recent Applications of Nanomaterials in Prosthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, lots of researches have been launched on nanomaterials for biomedical applications. It has been shown that the performances of many biomaterials used in prosthodontics have been significantly enhanced after their scales were reduced by nanotechnology, from micron-size into nanosize. On the other hand, many nanocomposites composed of nanomaterials and traditional metals, ceramics, resin, or other matrix materials have been widely used in prosthodontics because their properties, such as modulus elasticity, surface hardness, polymerization shrinkage, and filler loading, were significantly increased after the addition of the nanomaterials. In this paper, the latest research progress on the applications of nanometals, nanoceramic materials, nanoresin materials, and other nanomaterials in prosthodontics was reviewed, which not only gives a detailed description of the new related investigations, but also hopefully provides important elicitation for future researches in this field.

  1. Assessing the Environmental Risks of Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara Deanne; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders

    Assessing the environmental risks of engineered nanomaterials (NM) is currently an intensely contested subject among scientists, organizations, governments, and policymakers. The shear number, variety, and market penetration of NM in consumer goods and other applications, including environmental...

  2. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, R

    2012-01-01

    This book covers the use of nanomaterials to prevent corrosion. The first section deals with the fundamentals of corrosion prevention using nanomaterials. Part two includes a series of case studies and applications of nanomaterials for corrosion control.$bCorrosion is an expensive and potentially dangerous problem in many industries. The potential application of different nanostructured materials in corrosion protection, prevention and control is a subject of increasing interest. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials explores the potential use of nanotechnology in corrosion control. The book is divided into two parts. Part one looks at the fundamentals of corrosion behaviour and the manufacture of nanocrystalline materials. Chapters discuss the impact of nanotechnology in reducing corrosion cost, and investigate the influence of various factors including thermodynamics, kinetics and grain size on the corrosion behaviour of nanocrystalline materials. There are also chapters on electrodeposition ...

  3. A global view of regulations affecting nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2010-01-01

    The 2000s have been characterized by an unprecedented exploration into research and development of nanotechnology and nanomaterials. Despite a slow start, new regulatory initiatives are popping up like mushrooms internationally. Many of these initiatives have yet to materialize themselves...

  4. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials.

  5. radiolabeling of metallic and metal oxide nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanobiology, nanomedicine, and naontoxicology are newly developed interdisciplinary research fields accompanied by the development of nanotechnology. Quantitative determination of nanomaterials in vivo is the common problem that is experienced by these disciplines. Radiotracer techniques had the advantage of high sensitivity, good accuracy, simplicity and low interference. This review describes radiolabeling methods of 6 important metallic and metal oxide nanomaterials, such as gold, silver, iron oxide, titanium oxide, and zinc oxide nanoparticles. Advantage, disadvantage, and caution of each method are summarized. (authors)

  6. Systemic Absorption of Nanomaterials by Oral Exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Mona-Lise; Bredsdorff, Lea; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    This report and accompanying database systematically evaluates the reliability and relevance of the existing scientific literature regarding systemic absorption of nanomaterials by oral exposure and makes specific recommendations for future testing approaches.......This report and accompanying database systematically evaluates the reliability and relevance of the existing scientific literature regarding systemic absorption of nanomaterials by oral exposure and makes specific recommendations for future testing approaches....

  7. Nanomaterials for Cardiac Myocyte Tissue Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Rodolfo Amezcua; Ajay Shirolkar; Carolyn Fraze; David A. Stout

    2016-01-01

    Since their synthesizing introduction to the research community, nanomaterials have infiltrated almost every corner of science and engineering. Over the last decade, one such field has begun to look at using nanomaterials for beneficial applications in tissue engineering, specifically, cardiac tissue engineering. During a myocardial infarction, part of the cardiac muscle, or myocardium, is deprived of blood. Therefore, the lack of oxygen destroys cardiomyocytes, leaving dead tissue and possib...

  8. Computational modeling of nanomaterials for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Verkhovtsev, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials, i.e., materials that are manufactured at a very small spatial scale, can possess unique physical and chemical properties and exhibit novel characteristics as compared to the same material without nanoscale features. The reduction of size down to the nanometer scale leads to the abundance of potential applications in different fields of technology. For instance, tailoring the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials for modification of their interaction with a biological envi...

  9. Toxicology of Nanomaterials: Permanent interactive learning

    OpenAIRE

    Castranova Vince; Borm Paul

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Particle and Fibre Toxicology wants to play a decisive role in a time where particle research is challenged and driven by the developments and applications of nanomaterials. This aim is not merely quantitative in publishing a given number of papers on nanomaterials, but also qualitatively since the field of nanotoxicology is rapidly emerging and benchmarks for good science are needed. Since then a number of things have happened that merit further analysis. The interactive learning is...

  10. Recent Applications of Nanomaterials in Prosthodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Wang,; Susan Liao; Yuhe Zhu; Ming Liu; Qian Zhao; Yating Fu

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, lots of researches have been launched on nanomaterials for biomedical applications. It has been shown that the performances of many biomaterials used in prosthodontics have been significantly enhanced after their scales were reduced by nanotechnology, from micron-size into nanosize. On the other hand, many nanocomposites composed of nanomaterials and traditional metals, ceramics, resin, or other matrix materials have been widely used in prosthodontics because their properties...

  11. Nanomaterial Induced Immune Responses and Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ashraf; Suhail, Mohd; Mathew, Shilu; Shah, Muhammad Ali; Harakeh, Steve M; Ahmad, Sultan; Kazmi, Zulqarnain; Alhamdan, Mohammed Abdul Rahman; Chaudhary, Adeel; Damanhouri, Ghazi Abdullah; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are utilized in a wide array of end user products such as pharmaceuticals, electronics, clothes and cosmetic products. Due to its size (< 100 nm), nanoparticles have the propensity to enter through the airway and skin, making its path perilous with the potential to cause damages of varying severity. Once within the body, these particles have unconstrained access to different tissues and organs including the brain, liver, and kidney. As a result, nanomaterials may cause the perturbation of the immune system eliciting an inflammatory response and cytotoxicity. This potential role is dependent on many factors such as the characteristics of the nanomaterials, presence or absence of diseases, and genetic predisposition. Cobalt and nickel nanoparticles, for example, were shown to have inflammogenic properties, while silver nanoparticles were shown to reduce allergic inflammation. Just as asbestos fibers, carbon nanotubes were shown to cause lungs damage. Some nanomaterials were shown, based on animal studies, to result in cell damage, leading to the formation of pre-cancerous lesions. This review highlights the impact of nanomaterials on immune system and its effect on human health with toxicity consideration. It recommends the development of suitable animal models to study the toxicity and bio-clearance of nanomaterials and propose safety guidelines. PMID:27398432

  12. Rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Renyuan; Zhang, Lianbin; Wang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    The ever-increasing human demand for safe and clean water is gradually pushing conventional water treatment technologies to their limits. It is now a popular perception that the solutions to the existing and future water challenges will hinge upon further developments in nanomaterial sciences. The concept of rational design emphasizes on 'design-for-purpose' and it necessitates a scientifically clear problem definition to initiate the nanomaterial design. The field of rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment has experienced a significant growth in the past decade and is poised to make its contribution in creating advanced next-generation water treatment technologies in the years to come. Within the water treatment context, this review offers a comprehensive and in-depth overview of the latest progress in rational design, synthesis and applications of nanomaterials in adsorption, chemical oxidation and reduction reactions, membrane-based separation, oil-water separation, and synergistic multifunctional all-in-one nanomaterials/nanodevices. Special attention is paid to the chemical concepts related to nanomaterial design throughout the review. PMID:26437738

  13. Rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Renyuan

    2015-08-26

    The ever-increasing human demand for safe and clean water is gradually pushing conventional water treatment technologies to their limits and it is now a popular perception that the solutions to the existing and future water challenges will highly hinge upon the further development of nanomaterial sciences. The concept of rational design emphasizes ‘design-for-purpose’ and it necessitates a scientifically clear problem definition to initiate the nanomaterial design. The field of rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment has experienced a significant growth in the past decade and is poised to make its contribution in creating advanced next-generation water treatment technologies in the years to come. Within the water treatment context, this review offers a comprehensive and in-depth overview of the latest progress of the rational design, synthesis and applications of nanomaterials in adsorption, chemical oxidation and reduction reactions, membrane-based separation, oil/water separation, and synergistic multifunctional all-in-one nanomaterials/nanodevices. Special attention is paid on chemical concepts of the nanomaterial designs throughout the review.

  14. Rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Renyuan; Zhang, Lianbin; Wang, Peng

    2015-10-01

    The ever-increasing human demand for safe and clean water is gradually pushing conventional water treatment technologies to their limits. It is now a popular perception that the solutions to the existing and future water challenges will hinge upon further developments in nanomaterial sciences. The concept of rational design emphasizes on `design-for-purpose' and it necessitates a scientifically clear problem definition to initiate the nanomaterial design. The field of rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment has experienced a significant growth in the past decade and is poised to make its contribution in creating advanced next-generation water treatment technologies in the years to come. Within the water treatment context, this review offers a comprehensive and in-depth overview of the latest progress in rational design, synthesis and applications of nanomaterials in adsorption, chemical oxidation and reduction reactions, membrane-based separation, oil-water separation, and synergistic multifunctional all-in-one nanomaterials/nanodevices. Special attention is paid to the chemical concepts related to nanomaterial design throughout the review.

  15. Radiofrequency heating of nanomaterials for cancer treatment: Progress, controversies, and future development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Chen, Hui-jiuan; Chen, Xiaodong; Alfadhl, Yasir; Yu, Junsheng; Wen, Dongsheng

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, the application of nanomaterials to biological and biomedicine areas has attracted intensive interest. One of the hot topics is the nanomaterial mediated radiofrequency (RF) hyperthermia or ablation, i.e., using RF fields/waves to heat tumor tissues treated with nanomaterials to destroy cancerous cells while minimizing the side-heating effect. However, there are currently many contradictive results reported concerning the heating effect of nanomaterials under a RF field. This paper provided a comprehensive review to nanomaterial mediated RF ablation from both experimental and theoretical aspects. Three heating mechanisms were discussed, i.e., laser heating, magnetic field heating, and electric field heating in RF spectrum, with the focus on the last one. The results showed that while diluted pure metallic nanoparticles could be heated significantly by a laser through the surface plasmon resonance, they cannot be easily heated by a RF electric field. Further studies are proposed focusing on nanoparticle structure and morphology, electromagnetic frequency and localized heating effect to pave the way for future development.

  16. Health implications of engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietroiusti, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, a growing number of people are expected to be exposed to its products, the engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Some physico-chemical properties of ENMs, linked to their size in the nanoscale (1-100 nm), make them potentially more reactive, and therefore raise concern about possible adverse effects in humans. In this article, I discuss human diseases which may be predicted after exposure to ENMs, and how their pathogenetic mechanisms may be linked to exposure; in this regard, special emphasis has been given to the triad of oxidative stress/inflammation/genotoxicity and to the interaction of ENMs/proteins in different biological compartments. The analysis of possible adverse effects has been made on an organ-by-organ basis, starting from the skin, respiratory system and gastrointestinal tract. These sites are in fact not only those exposed to the highest amounts of ENMs, but are also the portals of entry to internal organs for possible systemic effects. Although the list and the relevance of possible human disorders linked to ENM exposure are at least as impressive as that of their direct or indirect beneficial effects for human health, we must be clear that ENM-linked diseases belong to the realm of possible risk (i.e. cannot be excluded, but are unlikely), whereas ENMs with proven beneficial effects are on the market. Therefore, the mandatory awareness about possible adverse effects of ENMs should in no way be interpreted as a motivation to disregard the great opportunity represented by nanotechnology.

  17. Hybrid upconversion nanomaterials for optogenetic neuronal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shreyas; Liu, Jing-Jing; Pasquale, Nicholas; Lai, Jinping; McGowan, Heather; Pang, Zhiping P.; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2015-10-01

    Nanotechnology-based approaches offer the chemical control required to develop precision tools suitable for applications in neuroscience. We report a novel approach employing hybrid upconversion nanomaterials, combined with the photoresponsive ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), to achieve near-infrared light (NIR)-mediated optogenetic control of neuronal activity. Current optogenetic methodologies rely on using visible light (e.g. 470 nm blue light), which tends to exhibit high scattering and low tissue penetration, to activate ChR2. In contrast, our approach enables the use of 980 nm NIR light, which addresses the short-comings of visible light as an excitation source. This was facilitated by embedding upconversion nanomaterials, which can convert NIR light to blue luminescence, into polymeric scaffolds. These hybrid nanomaterial scaffolds allowed for NIR-mediated neuronal stimulation, with comparable efficiency as that of 470 nm blue light. Our platform was optimized for NIR-mediated optogenetic control by balancing multiple physicochemical properties of the nanomaterial (e.g. size, morphology, structure, emission spectra, concentration), thus providing an early demonstration of rationally-designing nanomaterial-based strategies for advanced neural applications.Nanotechnology-based approaches offer the chemical control required to develop precision tools suitable for applications in neuroscience. We report a novel approach employing hybrid upconversion nanomaterials, combined with the photoresponsive ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), to achieve near-infrared light (NIR)-mediated optogenetic control of neuronal activity. Current optogenetic methodologies rely on using visible light (e.g. 470 nm blue light), which tends to exhibit high scattering and low tissue penetration, to activate ChR2. In contrast, our approach enables the use of 980 nm NIR light, which addresses the short-comings of visible light as an excitation source. This was facilitated by

  18. Selected manufacturing techniques of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Nowosielski

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Enabling nanofabrication techniques as tools for experiments to understand the underlying scienceand engineering in the nanometer scale are required. This paper is a resume a range of technology andcharacterization tools relevant for nanoeletronics devices.Design/methodology/approach: An overview on bottom – up and bottom – down fabrication techniques arepresented in this paper. As an alternative to the continually increasing cost of nanotechnology for manufacturingelectronic devices, new strategies are examined in research, which are based on basic principles of physics andchemistry. For example, molecular self-organization mechanisms are developed in order to manufacture welldefinednanostructures with desired properties.Findings: This paper includes description of three methods of production nanolayers and monolayers molecularself-organization, Langmuir – Blodget films and Nanoimprint Lithography.Research limitations/implications: The most extreme approach is to build nanostructures atom by atomwith the help of scanning tunneling microscope at low temperatures. This is very slow method to buildnanostructures, usually a couple of hours. An alternative approach for the formation of nanostructures is self– organization of atoms.Practical implications: The greatest advantage of litographic patterning is very large variety of differentstructures which can be defined by lithographic methods, Langmuir – Blodget (LB films is another unpopularmethod to produce nanomaterials.Originality/value: Materials engineering technology stands today at the edge of a huge challenge: produce cheapnanomaterials for nanoelectronics. Building materials from the bottom up requires a multidisciplinary approach.This arena is unquestionably in the nano-dimension, where all fields of science and engineering meet.

  19. Magnetically recoverable nanocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2011-05-11

    A broad overview on magnetically recoverable nanocatalysts is presented and the use of magnetic nanomaterials as catalysts is discussed. Magnetic materials are used as organocatalysts and their applications range to challenging reactions, such as hydroformylation and olefin metathesis. Magnetic nanomaterials are also being used in environmental applications, such as for photo- and biocatalysis and for the adsorption and removal of pollutants from air and water. These materials show great promise as enantioselective catalysts, which are used extensively for the synthesis of medicines, drugs, and other bioactive molecules. By functionalizing these materials using chiral ligands, a series of chiral nanocatalysts can be designed, offering great potential to reuse these otherwise expensive catalyst systems. Characterization of magnetic catalysts is often a challenging task, and NMR characterization of these catalysts is difficult because the magnetic nature of the materials interferes with the magnetic field of the spectrometer.

  20. Nanomaterials for light emitting display and cancer therapy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanomaterials of different compounds have been prepared by the chemical route at low temperature. SnO2, ZnO, APO4 (A = Y, La, Gd), AVO4 and CaMoO4 show luminescence properties in the violet-blue to green region. By changing the particle size, the emission wavelength can be changed. When lanthanide ions (Ln3+) are doped into above host, energy transfer from host/sensitizer to Ln3+ ions takes place and an improvement in the luminescence of lanthanide ions is observed. For application purpose, functionalisation of nanoparticles is required. Such functionalized nanoparticles are useful in many ways such as (a) enhancement of luminescence and (b) homogeneous dispersion in polar solvents which will be useful in fluorescence probe for life-science applications and (c) making thin film for luminescence display devices. For cancer therapy, functionalized Fe3O3 superparamagnetic ferrofluids are used which produce hyperthermia temperature (42-44 ℃ under AC magnetic field. The heat generated is due to Neel's spin relaxation and Brownian particle rotation in liquid medium. In this presentation, we show results on nanomaterial for luminescence and hyperthermia application conducted in our Centre. (author)

  1. Studies and Development of Radiation Processed Nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanotechnology is the emerging technology that deals with processing, manipulating and manufacturing devices and products at the microscopic scale of molecules or atoms with structures smaller than 100 nanometers. Realizing its potential, Government of India spending on R&D in nanotechnology has gone up by an order of magnitude in last 5 years through various national and international programs. High energy gamma radiation and electron beams could be a useful tool to create innovative and newer nano-materials for various applications in medical field for treatment and detection purposes. Considering its certain advantage for producing nano-materials, radiation technology will play a crucial role in development of such materials. Research and development in the area of nano--particles on polymer films, hydrogels, silica particles and their nano-clusters using radiation technology could be a possible route for development of new functional nano-materials. (author)

  2. Nanomaterials Applied in Asphalt Modification: A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changqing Fang; Ruien Yu; Shaolong Liu; Yan Li

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been gradually penetrated into the field of asphalt modification.Seemingly magic effects of nanomaterials have now been brought to improve the performance of asphalt.To demonstrate many of the prospective applications,researchers have conducted a series of positive and effective efforts dealing with the preparation of modified asphalt to demonstrate the mechanism of modification and the resultant improvement in performance.In this review,various nanomaterials used in asphalt modification are initially presented,followed by the methods employed to modify the asphalt with these materials and finally the effects of nanomaterials on the performance of base asphalt are presented and the modification mechanisms are discussed.Based on the current research results,the influence of preparation process parameters on the compatibility of every phase in the modified asphalt and the stability of the modified asphalt system are described.Finally,the development trend of the topic field is projected.

  3. Synthesis of camptothecin-loaded gold nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camptothecin-loaded gold nanomaterials have been synthesized by the sodium borohydride reduction method under a strong basic condition. The obtained gold nanomaterials have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The camptothecin-loaded gold colloidal solution was very stable and can be stored for more than two months at room temperature without obvious changes. The color of the colloidal solution can change from wine red to purple and blue during the acidifying process. It was revealed that the release of camptothecin and the aggregation of gold nanoparticles can be controlled by tuning the solution pH. The present study implied that the gold nanomaterials can be used as the potential carrier for CPT delivery.

  4. 3rd International Conference Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Yatsenko, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    This book presents some of the latest achievements in nanotechnology and nanomaterials from leading researchers in Ukraine, Europe, and beyond. It features contributions from participants in the 3rd International Science and Practice Conference Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials (NANO2015) held in Lviv, Ukraine on August 26-30, 2015. The International Conference was organized jointly by the Institute of Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, University of Tartu (Estonia), Ivan Franko National University of Lviv (Ukraine), University of Turin (Italy), Pierre and Marie Curie University (France), and European Profiles A.E. (Greece). Internationally recognized experts from a wide range of universities and research institutions share their knowledge and key results on topics ranging from nanooptics, nanoplasmonics, and interface studies to energy storage and biomedical applications. Presents cutting-edge advances in nanocomposites and carbon and silicon-based nanomaterials for a wide range of engine...

  5. Development and In Vitro Bioactivity Profiling of Alternative Sustainable Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainable, environmentally benign nanomaterials (NMs) are being designed as alternatives based on functionality to conventional metal-based nanomaterials (NMs) in order to minimize potential risk to human health and the environment. Development of rapid methods to evaluate the ...

  6. Assessing the Implications of Modified Nanomaterials in Bioassay Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    As nanotechnology advances to product development, filling environmental health and safety knowledge gaps is critical. Nanotoxicology is over-generalized, provided the permutations of nanomaterial variants created by the classes of nanomaterials (carbonaceous, metals, quantum dot...

  7. Mapping the Surface Adsorption Forces of Nanomaterials in Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xin R.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Mathur, Sanjay; Song, Xuefeng; Xiao, Lisong; Oldenberg, Steven J.; Fadeel, Bengt; Riviere, Jim E.

    2011-01-01

    The biological surface adsorption index (BSAI) is a novel approach to characterize surface adsorption energy of nanomaterials that is the primary force behind nanoparticle aggregation, protein corona formation, and other complex interactions of nanomaterials within biological systems. Five quantitative nanodescriptors were obtained to represent the surface adsorption forces (hydrophobicity, hydrogen bond, polarity/polarizability, and lone-pair electrons) of the nanomaterial interaction with biological components. We have mapped the surface adsorption forces over 16 different nanomaterials. When the five-dimensional information of the nanodescriptors was reduced to two dimensions, the 16 nanomaterials were classified into distinct clusters according their surface adsorption properties. BSAI nanodescriptors are intrinsic properties of nanomaterials useful for quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) model development. This is the first success in quantitative characterization of the surface adsorption forces of nanomaterials in biological conditions, which could open a quantitative avenue in predictive nanomedicine development, risk assessment, and safety evaluation of nanomaterials. PMID:21999618

  8. The Nanomaterial Registry: facilitating the sharing and analysis of data in the diverse nanomaterial community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostraat ML

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Michele L Ostraat, Karmann C Mills, Kimberly A Guzan, Damaris MurryRTI International, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: The amount of data being generated in the nanotechnology research space is significant, and the coordination, sharing, and downstream analysis of the data is complex and consistently deliberated. The complexities of the data are due in large part to the inherently complicated characteristics of nanomaterials. Also, testing protocols and assays used for nanomaterials are diverse and lacking standardization. The Nanomaterial Registry has been developed to address such challenges as the need for standard methods, data formatting, and controlled vocabularies for data sharing. The Registry is an authoritative, web-based tool whose purpose is to simplify the community's level of effort in assessing nanomaterial data from environmental and biological interaction studies. Because the registry is meant to be an authoritative resource, all data-driven content is systematically archived and reviewed by subject-matter experts. To support and advance nanomaterial research, a set of minimal information about nanomaterials (MIAN has been developed and is foundational to the Registry data model. The MIAN has been used to create evaluation and similarity criteria for nanomaterials that are curated into the Registry. The Registry is a publicly available resource that is being built through collaborations with many stakeholder groups in the nanotechnology community, including industry, regulatory, government, and academia. Features of the Registry website (https://www.nanomaterialregistry.org/ currently include search, browse, side-by-side comparison of nanomaterials, compliance ratings based on the quality and quantity of data, and the ability to search for similar nanomaterials within the Registry. This paper is a modification and extension of a proceedings paper for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.Keywords: nanoinformatics

  9. Overview of Risk Management for Engineered Nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational exposure to engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) is considered a new and challenging occurrence. Preliminary information from laboratory studies indicates that workers exposed to some kinds of ENMs could be at risk of adverse health effects. To protect the nanomaterial workforce, a precautionary risk management approach is warranted and given the newness of ENMs and emergence of nanotechnology, a naturalistic view of risk management is useful. Employers have the primary responsibility for providing a safe and healthy workplace. This is achieved by identifying and managing risks which include recognition of hazards, assessing exposures, characterizing actual risk, and implementing measures to control those risks. Following traditional risk management models for nanomaterials is challenging because of uncertainties about the nature of hazards, issues in exposure assessment, questions about appropriate control methods, and lack of occupational exposure limits (OELs) or nano-specific regulations. In the absence of OELs specific for nanomaterials, a precautionary approach has been recommended in many countries. The precautionary approach entails minimizing exposures by using engineering controls and personal protective equipment (PPE). Generally, risk management utilizes the hierarchy of controls. Ideally, risk management for nanomaterials should be part of an enterprise-wide risk management program or system and this should include both risk control and a medical surveillance program that assesses the frequency of adverse effects among groups of workers exposed to nanomaterials. In some cases, the medical surveillance could include medical screening of individual workers to detect early signs of work-related illnesses. All medical surveillance should be used to assess the effectiveness of risk management; however, medical surveillance should be considered as a second line of defense to ensure that implemented risk management practices are effective.

  10. Thin Films for Coating Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.M.Mukhopadhyay; P.Joshi; R.V.Pulikollu

    2005-01-01

    therefore, effective as an inert layer to passivate nanomaterials.

  11. Terahertz Dynamics in Carbon Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Junichiro

    2012-02-01

    This NSF Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) project supports a unique interdisciplinary and international partnership investigating terahertz (THz) dynamics in nanostructures. The 0.1 to 10 THz frequency range of the electromagnetic spectrum is where electrical transport and optical transitions merge, offering exciting opportunities to study a variety of novel physical phenomena in condensed matter. By combining THz technology and nanotechnology, we can advance our understanding of THz physics while improving and developing THz devices. Specifically, this PIRE research explores THz dynamics of electrons in carbon nanomaterials, namely, nanotubes and graphene --- low-dimensional, sp^2-bonded carbon systems with unique finite-frequency properties. Japan and the U.S. are global leaders in both THz research and carbon research, and stimulating cooperation is critical to further advance THz science and to commercialize products developed in the lab. However, obstacles exist for international collaboration --- primarily linguistic and cultural barriers --- and this PIRE project aims to address these barriers through the integration of our research and education programs. Our strong educational portfolio endeavours to cultivate interest in nanotechnology amongst young U.S. undergraduate students and encourage them to pursue graduate study and academic research in the physical sciences, especially those from underrepresented groups. Our award-winning International Research Experience for Undergraduates Program, NanoJapan, provides structured research internships in Japanese university laboratories with Japanese mentors --- recognized as a model international education program for science and engineering students. The project builds the skill sets of nanoscience researchers and students by cultivating international and inter-cultural awareness, research expertise, and specific academic interests in nanotechnology. U.S. project partners include Rice

  12. Structure and multiscale mechanics of carbon nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book aims at providing a broad overview on the relationship between structure and mechanical properties of carbon nanomaterials from world-leading scientists in the field. The main aim is to get an in-depth understanding of the broad range of mechanical properties of carbon materials based on their unique nanostructure and on defects of several types and at different length scales. Besides experimental work mainly based on the use of (in-situ) Raman and X-ray scattering and on nanoindentation, the book also covers some aspects of multiscale modeling of the mechanics of carbon nanomaterials.

  13. Low-dimensional boron nitride nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Pakdel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this review, a concise research history of low-dimensional boron nitride (BN nanomaterials followed by recent developments in their synthesis, morphology, properties, and applications are presented. Seventeen years after the initial synthesis of BN nanotubes, research on BN nanomaterials has developed far enough to establish them as one of the most promising inorganic nanosystems. In this regard, it is envisaged that the unique properties of low-dimensional BN systems, such as superb mechanical stiffness, high thermal conductivity, wide optical bandgap, strong ultraviolet emission, thermal stability and chemical inertness will play a key role in prospective developments.

  14. Nanomaterials and the interface between nanotechnology and environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A Schulz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials are the main products of nanotechnology. In this paper we describe some of these nanomaterials, particularly Carbon based systems, their properties, manipulation strategies and applications. History of nanoparticles, as well as the comple-xity in defining nanomaterials, necessary for regulation and assessment of impacts on society, are also addressed.

  15. Nanomaterials and the interface between nanotechnology and environment

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Nanomaterials are the main products of nanotechnology. In this paper we describe some of these nanomaterials, particularly Carbon based systems, their properties, manipulation strategies and applications. History of nanoparticles, as well as the comple-xity in defining nanomaterials, necessary for regulation and assessment of impacts on society, are also addressed.

  16. Plasma-Liquid Interaction: a New Way to Synthesize Nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Qiang; Li, Yongfeng; Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Size

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we have summarized the recent advances and present conditions of the nanomaterials synthesis from the plasma-liquid interactions. A theoretical analysis for the nanomaterials synthesis process is presented by analyzing the experimental data. Besides the theoretical analysis, the practical applications in several nanomaterials syntheses of the the plasma-liquid interactions are also presented.

  17. 混合碱媒介法制备磁性铁酸钴纳米粉体%Synthesis of Magnetic Cobalt Ferrite Nanomaterials by Composite-hydroxide-mediate Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张梅梅; 刘宏; 刘建安

    2009-01-01

    Cobalt ferrite magnetic nano-powder was prepared by composite-hydroxide-mediate method, the preparing process was studied. The structure and magnetic properties of the samples are measured and analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The results showed that cobalt ferrite with uniform particle sizes in the range of 10~50 nm can be obtained using nitrates or acetates as raw materials. The synthesized nano-particles are small in sizes with uniform diameter, and have a good disperability. Their magnetic properties are middle saturation magnetization and high coercive force. The cobalt ferrite synthesized shows a better quality.%采用混合碱媒介法制备铁酸钴磁性纳米粉体,探索了制备工艺,利用X射线衍射仪、透射电镜、振动样品磁强计对样品的结构和磁性能进行了研究.结果表明:以硝酸盐或醋酸盐为原料用混合碱法可制得粒度均匀、粒径范围在10~50 nm的铁酸钴纳米粉,所制备的样品具有粒径小、粒度均匀、分散性较好的特点,中等饱和磁化强度、高矫顽力,是性能优良的磁性材料.

  18. Metal-filled carbon nanotubes as a novel class of photothermal nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossella, Francesco; Bellani, Vittorio [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' A. Volta' ' and CNISM, Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Soldano, Caterina [Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Brescia, Via Valotti 9, 25121 Brescia (Italy); Tommasini, Matteo [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica ' ' G. Natta' ' , Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-05-08

    Metal-filled carbon nanotubes represent a novel class of photothermal nanomaterials: when illuminated by visible light they exhibit a strong enhancement of the temperature at the metal sites, due to the enhanced plasmonic light absorption at the metal surface, which behaves as a heat radiator. Potential applications include nanomedicine, heat-assisted magnetic recording, and light-activated thermal gradient-driven devices. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Application of Iron Oxide Nanomaterials for the Removal of Heavy Metals

    OpenAIRE

    Pragnesh N. Dave; Lakhan V. Chopda

    2014-01-01

    In the 21st century water polluted by heavy metal is one of the environment problems. Various methods for removal of the heavy metal ions from the water have extensively been studied. Application of iron oxide nanaparticles based nanomaterials for removal of heavy metals is well-known adsorbents for remediation of water. Due to its important physiochemical property, inexpensive method and easy regeneration in the presence of external magnetic field make them more attractive toward water purif...

  20. Nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yongchen eWang; Liang eGuo

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a h...

  1. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a h...

  2. Applications of Nanomaterials in Electrochemical Enzyme Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodi Yang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor is defined as a kind of analytical device incorporating a biological material, a biologically derived material or a biomimic intimately associated with or integrated within a physicochemical transducer or transducing microsystem. Electrochemical biosensors incorporating enzymes with nanomaterials, which combine the recognition and catalytic properties of enzymes with the electronic properties of various nanomaterials, are new materials with synergistic properties originating from the components of the hybrid composites. Therefore, these systems have excellent prospects for interfacing biological recognition events through electronic signal transduction so as to design a new generation of bioelectronic devices with high sensitivity and stability. In this review, we describe approaches that involve nanomaterials in direct electrochemistry of redox proteins, especially our work on biosensor design immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOD, horseradish peroxidase (HRP, cytochrome P450 (CYP2B6, hemoglobin (Hb, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. The topics of the present review are the different functions of nanomaterials based on modification of electrode materials, as well as applications of electrochemical enzyme biosensors.

  3. Applications of Nanomaterials in Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglan Qi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrogenerated chemiluminescence (also called electrochemiluminescence and abbreviated ECL involves the generation of species at electrode surfaces that then undergo electron-transfer reactions to form excited states that emit light. ECL biosensor, combining advantages offered by the selectivity of the biological recognition elements and the sensitivity of ECL technique, is a powerful device for ultrasensitive biomolecule detection and quantification. Nanomaterials are of considerable interest in the biosensor field owing to their unique physical and chemical properties, which have led to novel biosensors that have exhibited high sensitivity and stability. Nanomaterials including nanoparticles and nanotubes, prepared from metals, semiconductor, carbon or polymeric species, have been widely investigated for their ability to enhance the efficiencies of ECL biosensors, such as taking as modification electrode materials, or as carrier of ECL labels and ECL-emitting species. Particularly useful application of nanomaterials in ECL biosensors with emphasis on the years 2004-2008 is reviewed. Remarks on application of nanomaterials in ECL biosensors are also surveyed.

  4. CLP application to nanomaterials: a specific aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alessandrelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at describing some relevant aspects related to the classification, labelling and packaging of nanomaterials. Concerns have been raised about potential adverse effects to humans or the environment as result of impacts of nanomaterials. The new Regulation (EC no. 1272/2008 on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures (CLP does not contain any specific definition or provision related to nanomaterials nevertheless they are covered by the definition of substance set in the Regulation. It is recognized that different particle sizes or forms of the same substance can have different classification. Thus, if substances are placed on the market both at nanoscale and as bulk, a separate classification and labelling may be required if the available data on the intrinsic properties indicate a difference in hazard class between the two forms. CLP Regulation requires the manufacturer or importer to ensure that the information used to classify relates to the forms or physical states in which the substance is placed on the market and in which it can reasonably be expected to be used. Moreover, CLP demands testing relating to physical hazards to be performed if such information is missing or not adequate to conclude on classification. Further developments of the CLP guidance documents and implementation tools are needed in order to cover nanomaterials more specifically.

  5. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Third volume of a 40volume series on nanoscience and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about Transmission electron microscopy characterization of nanomaterials. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume an essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry.

  6. Modification and characterization of (energetic) nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Peppel, R.J.E. van de; Abadjieva, E.

    2010-01-01

    Nanomaterials are a topic of increased interest, since they have properties which differ from their macroscopic counterparts. Many applications nowadays take advantage of the new functionalities which natural and manufactured nanoparticles possess. Based on these developments, also the research on e

  7. Workplace exposure at nanomaterial production processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhlmann, Carsten; Welter, Johannes; Klenke, Martin; Sander, Jürgen

    2009-05-01

    Typical nanomaterial production processes from daily practice had been performed in order to determine simultaneously the exposure to nanoparticles. They involve mixing of ZnO powder into a liquid, filling and emptying an oven with indium tin oxide (ITO), spraying a suspension of nanoparticles, flame spraying of silanes, and an outside location as comparison.

  8. Nanomaterials and nanofabrication for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chao-Min; Chia-Wen Wu, Kevin

    2013-08-01

    Traditional boundaries between materials science and engineering and life sciences are rapidly disintegrating as interdisciplinary research teams develop new materials-science-based tools for exploring fundamental issues in both medicine and biology. With recent technological advances in multiple research fields such as materials science, cell and molecular biology and micro-/nano-technology, much attention is shifting toward evaluating the functional advantages of nanomaterials and nanofabrication, at the cellular and molecular levels, for specific, biomedically relevant applications. The pursuit of this direction enhances the understanding of the mechanisms of, and therapeutic potentials for, some of the most lethal diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, organ fibrosis and cancers. This interdisciplinary approach has generated great interest among researchers working in a wide variety of communities including industry, universities and research laboratories. The purpose of this focus issue in Science and Technology of Advanced Materials is to bridge nanotechnology and biology with medicine, focusing more on the applications of nanomaterials and nanofabrication in biomedically relevant issues. This focus issue, we believe, will provide a more comprehensive understanding of (i) the preparation of nanomaterials and the underlying mechanisms of nanofabrication, and (ii) the linkage of nanomaterials and nanofabrication with biomedical applications. The multidisciplinary focus issue that we have attempted to organize is of interest to various research fields including biomaterials and tissue engineering, bioengineering, nanotechnology and nanomaterials, i.e. chemistry, physics and engineering. Nanomaterials and nanofabrication topics addressed in this focus issue include sensing and diagnosis (e.g. immunosensing and diagnostic devices for diseases), cellular and molecular biology (e.g. probing cellular behaviors and stem cell differentiation) and drug delivery

  9. Green processes for nanotechnology from inorganic to bioinspired nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Basiuk, Elena

    2015-01-01

    This book provides the state-of-the-art survey of green techniques in preparation of different classes of nanomaterials, with an emphasis on the use of renewable sources. Key topics covered include fabrication of nanomaterials using green techniques as well as their properties and applications, the use of renewable sources to obtain nanomaterials of different classes, from simple metal and metal oxide nanoparticles to complex bioinspired nanomaterials, economic contributions of nanotechnology to green and sustainable growth, and more. This is an ideal book for students, lecturers, researchers and engineers dealing with versatile (mainly chemical, biological, and medical) aspects of nanotechnology, including fabrication of nanomaterials using green techniques and their properties and applications. This book also: Maximizes reader insights into the design and fabrication of bioinspired nanomaterials and the design of complex bio-nanohybrids Covers many different applications for nanomaterials, bioinspired nanom...

  10. Nanomaterial cytotoxicity is composition, size, and cell type dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohaebuddin Syed K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite intensive research efforts, reports of cellular responses to nanomaterials are often inconsistent and even contradictory. Additionally, relationships between the responding cell type and nanomaterial properties are not well understood. Using three model cell lines representing different physiological compartments and nanomaterials of different compositions and sizes, we have systematically investigated the influence of nanomaterial properties on the degrees and pathways of cytotoxicity. In this study, we selected nanomaterials of different compositions (TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles, and multi-wall carbon nanotubes [MWCNTs] with differing size (MWCNTs of different diameters 50 nm; but same length 0.5-2 μm to analyze the effects of composition and size on toxicity to 3T3 fibroblasts, RAW 264.7 macrophages, and telomerase-immortalized (hT bronchiolar epithelial cells. Results Following characterization of nanomaterial properties in PBS and serum containing solutions, cells were exposed to nanomaterials of differing compositions and sizes, with cytotoxicity monitored through reduction in mitochondrial activity. In addition to cytotoxicity, the cellular response to nanomaterials was characterized by quantifying generation of reactive oxygen species, lysosomal membrane destabilization and mitochondrial permeability. The effect of these responses on cellular fate - apoptosis or necrosis - was then analyzed. Nanomaterial toxicity was variable based on exposed cell type and dependent on nanomaterial composition and size. In addition, nanomaterial exposure led to cell type dependent intracellular responses resulting in unique breakdown of cellular functions for each nanomaterial: cell combination. Conclusions Nanomaterials induce cell specific responses resulting in variable toxicity and subsequent cell fate based on the type of exposed cell. Our results indicate that the composition and size of nanomaterials as well as the

  11. Part 1: Synthesis and characterization of magnetic chromium5tellurium nanoparticles Part 2: Local atomic structure studies using theory to simulate polarons in superconducting cuprates and experiment to analyze alternative energy nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martucci, Mary B.

    The field of spintronics, the development of spin-based devices that utilize the spin degree of freedom to increase memory capacity, has emerged as a solution to faster more efficient memory storage for electronic devices. One class of materials that has been extensively studied is the half-metallic ferromagnets, compounds that are 100% spin-polarized at the Fermi level. One material in this group that has been investigated is chromium telluride (Cr 1-xTe), whose family of compounds is known to exhibit a wide range of interesting magnetic and electronic properties. We have developed a hot injection solution synthesis of Cr5Te8 nanoplatlets which show similar magnetic behavior to the bulk material. It has also been shown that selenium and sulfur analogues can be obtained without changing the reaction conditions, making progress toward a better understanding of the reaction as well as an interesting family of compounds. Using real-space simulations, the effect of polarons in the high-Tc superconducting cuprates has been studied. The simulations demonstrate energetically favorable sites for the defects and show evidence of longer-range pairing interactions. Variations of the stripe show similar energetic results. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and neutron scattering have been utilized to examine the local structure of Ni-doped Mg nanoparticles, a hydrogen storage material as well as Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanoparticles, a photovoltaic material. The Mg-Ni material shows much local disorder upon hydrogen cycling. The CZTS data demonstrate a loss of sulfur from around the copper sites upon annealing, helping to explain the changes observed in the optical absorption properties resulting from the annealing process.

  12. Tailor-made nanomaterials for biological and medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tréguer-Delapierre, M.; Rocco, F.; Cardinal, T.; Mornet, S.; Vasseur, S.; Duguet, E.

    2006-02-01

    The possibilities of designing and mastering the new physical and chemical properties of nano-structured materials have been at the center of the large interest they have received in the academic and industrial domains. Confinement effects and the enhanced role of the interface are key parameters. Designing composite materials with controlled nanometric interfacing of different materials is offering new possibilities for developing new structures. Proper design allows to create new properties to meet biological requirements. The purpose of this work is to illustrate the synthesis of various types of nanocrystalline materials that can be used to tackle biological problems inside or outside of living specimens, such as targeted drug delivery, ultra-sensitive disease detection and cell labelling. Two main classes of nanomaterials uses will be discussed. The nanocrystalline materials developed are highly dispersable in water and coated providing biocompatibility. They are elaborated either by precipitation or radiolysis. First, magnetic particles, often called (U)SPIO for (Ultrasmall) SuperParamagnetic Iron Oxide, used as contrast agent for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) will be presented. Their use for magnetic hyperthermia is now envisaged for cancer treatment. Second, a new generation of inorganic luminophors based on metal colloidal particles will be shown. The coupling of plasmon in nearby particles (semiconductor or metal clusters) is used to enhance their oscillator strength and to target the incident energy. The resulting composite nano-objects can be used for making the smallest possible labels with large oscillator strengths. Those objects will greatly expand the accessibility of single molecule methods.

  13. Tailoring thermal interfaces with nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Indira

    conductivity than that obtained using unbranched nanowire fillers. A forty-fold thermal conductivity increase is obtained by in situ welding of silver nanowire fillers inside polydimethylsiloxane using microwaves. Even for ≤ 0.04 filler volume fractions, welding facilitates nanowire networking that counteracts thermal transport bottlenecks associated with the low polymer thermal conductivity and high polymer-filler interface thermal resistances. The transparency of the polymer to microwaves precludes thermal degradation, and the composites retain high mechanical compliance as indicated by storage moduli. These findings would be instrumental for controllably realizing high thermal conductivity conformal polymer composites for thermal interface applications. This thesis further explores the use of external stimuli in the form of magnetic fields to reversibly induce nanoparticle networking and gate heat transport at interfaces, a requirement in many emerging applications. It is demonstrated that magnetic field actuation of ~ 3 - 16 vol. % of magnetite or cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles in a fluid matrix yields ~16 times enhancement of the no field effective thermal conductivity, but only in a gradient magnetic field. Heat transfer modeling shows that the enhancement arises from magnetic field gradient driven bulk convection, rather than the expected nanoparticle network formation.

  14. Surface characterization of nanomaterials and nanoparticles: Important needs and challenging opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review examines characterization challenges inherently associated with understanding nanomaterials and the roles surface and interface characterization methods can play in meeting some of the challenges. In parts of the research community, there is growing recognition that studies and published reports on the properties and behaviors of nanomaterials often have reported inadequate or incomplete characterization. As a consequence, the true value of the data in these reports is, at best, uncertain. With the increasing importance of nanomaterials in fundamental research and technological applications, it is desirable that researchers from the wide variety of disciplines involved recognize the nature of these often unexpected challenges associated with reproducible synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials, including the difficulties of maintaining desired materials properties during handling and processing due to their dynamic nature. It is equally valuable for researchers to understand how characterization approaches (surface and otherwise) can help to minimize synthesis surprises and to determine how (and how quickly) materials and properties change in different environments. Appropriate application of traditional surface sensitive analysis methods (including x-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopies, scanning probe microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy) can provide information that helps address several of the analysis needs. In many circumstances, extensions of traditional data analysis can provide considerably more information than normally obtained from the data collected. Less common or evolving methods with surface selectivity (e.g., some variations of nuclear magnetic resonance, sum frequency generation, and low and medium energy ion scattering) can provide information about surfaces or interfaces in working environments (operando or in situ) or information not provided by more traditional methods. Although these methods may

  15. Surface characterization of nanomaterials and nanoparticles: Important needs and challenging opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Donald R.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia; Lai, Jinfeng; Mueller, Karl; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Wang, Hongfei; Washton, Nancy [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, EMSL, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Elder, Alison; Baisch, Brittany L. [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Karakoti, Ajay; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V. N. T. [Battelle Science and Technology India, Pune, Maharashtra (India); Moon, DaeWon [Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    This review examines characterization challenges inherently associated with understanding nanomaterials and the roles surface and interface characterization methods can play in meeting some of the challenges. In parts of the research community, there is growing recognition that studies and published reports on the properties and behaviors of nanomaterials often have reported inadequate or incomplete characterization. As a consequence, the true value of the data in these reports is, at best, uncertain. With the increasing importance of nanomaterials in fundamental research and technological applications, it is desirable that researchers from the wide variety of disciplines involved recognize the nature of these often unexpected challenges associated with reproducible synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials, including the difficulties of maintaining desired materials properties during handling and processing due to their dynamic nature. It is equally valuable for researchers to understand how characterization approaches (surface and otherwise) can help to minimize synthesis surprises and to determine how (and how quickly) materials and properties change in different environments. Appropriate application of traditional surface sensitive analysis methods (including x-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopies, scanning probe microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy) can provide information that helps address several of the analysis needs. In many circumstances, extensions of traditional data analysis can provide considerably more information than normally obtained from the data collected. Less common or evolving methods with surface selectivity (e.g., some variations of nuclear magnetic resonance, sum frequency generation, and low and medium energy ion scattering) can provide information about surfaces or interfaces in working environments (operando or in situ) or information not provided by more traditional methods. Although these methods may

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  17. “Smart”nanomaterials for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LE; GUYADER; Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Recent development in nanotechnology has provided new tools for cancer therapy and diagnostics.Because of their small size,nanoscale devices readily interact with biomolecules both on the cell surface and inside the cell.Nanomaterials,such as fullerenes and their derivatives,are effective in terms of interactions with the immune system and have great potential as anticancer drugs.Comparatively,other nanomaterials are able to load active drugs to cancer cells by selectively using the unique tumor environment,such as their enhanced permeability,retention effect and the specific acidic microenvironment.Multifunctional and multiplexed nanoparticles,as the next generation of nanoparticles,are now being extensively investigated and are promising tools to achieve personalized and tailored cancer treatments.

  18. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems. (review)

  19. Assessing the protection of the nanomaterial workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Paul A; Iavicoli, Ivo; Rantanen, Jorma H; Dahmann, Dirk; Iavicoli, Sergio; Pipke, Rüdiger; Guseva Canu, Irina; Boccuni, Fabio; Ricci, Maximo; Polci, Maria Letizia; Sabbioni, Enrico; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Mantovani, Elvio

    2016-09-01

    Responsible development of any technology, including nanotechnology, requires protecting workers, the first people to be exposed to the products of the technology. In the case of nanotechnology, this is difficult to achieve because in spite of early evidence raising health and safety concerns, there are uncertainties about hazards and risks. The global response to these concerns has been the issuance by authoritative agencies of precautionary guidance to strictly control exposures to engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). This commentary summarizes discussions at the "Symposium on the Health Protection of Nanomaterial Workers" held in Rome (25 and 26 February 2015). There scientists and practitioners from 11 countries took stock of what is known about hazards and risks resulting from exposure to ENMs, confirmed that uncertainties still exist, and deliberated on what it would take to conduct a global assessment of how well workers are being protected from potentially harmful exposures. PMID:26865347

  20. Nanomaterials and Water Purification: Opportunities and Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in nanoscale science and engineering suggest that many of the current problems involving water quality could be resolved or greatly ameliorated using nanosorbents, nanocatalysts, bioactive nanoparticles, nanostructured catalytic membranes and nanoparticle enhanced filtration among other products and processes resulting from the development of nanotechnology. Innovations in the development of novel technologies to desalinate water are among the most exciting and promising. Additionally, nanotechnology-derived products that reduce the concentrations of toxic compounds to sub-ppb levels can assist in the attainment of water quality standards and health advisories. This article gives an overview of the use of nanomaterials in water purification. We highlight recent advances on the development of novel nanoscale materials and processes for treatment of surface water, groundwater and industrial wastewater contaminated by toxic metal ions, radionuclides, organic and inorganic solutes, bacteria and viruses. In addition, we discuss some challenges associated with the development of cost effective and environmentally acceptable functional nanomaterials for water purification

  1. Toxicology of Nanomaterials: Permanent interactive learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castranova Vince

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Particle and Fibre Toxicology wants to play a decisive role in a time where particle research is challenged and driven by the developments and applications of nanomaterials. This aim is not merely quantitative in publishing a given number of papers on nanomaterials, but also qualitatively since the field of nanotoxicology is rapidly emerging and benchmarks for good science are needed. Since then a number of things have happened that merit further analysis. The interactive learning issue is best shown by report and communications on the toxicology of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT. A special workshop on the CNT has now been organized twice in Nagano (Japan and this editorial contains a summary of the most important outcomes. Finally, we take the opportunity discuss some recent reports from the nanotech literature, and more specifically a Chinese study that claims severe consequences of nanoparticle exposure.

  2. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MaryJoe K Rice

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems.

  3. Biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanodevices

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Biosensors Based on Nanomaterials and Nanodevices links interdisciplinary research from leading experts to provide graduate students, academics, researchers, and industry professionals alike with a comprehensive source for key advancements and future trends in nanostructured biosensor development. It describes the concepts, principles, materials, device fabrications, functions, system integrations, and applications of various types of biosensors based on signal transduction mechanisms, including fluorescence, photonic crystal, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, electrochemistry, electro-lumine

  4. Nanomaterials as Sorbents for Water Treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějková, Martina; Soukup, Karel; Grabowski, J.; Šolcová, Olga

    Maribor : Inštitut za okoljevarstvo in senzorje d.o.o, 2013 - (Lobnik, A.; Gutmaher, A.), P2 ISBN 978-961-92863-2-6. [International Scientific Conference on Nanomaterials and Applications NANOAPP /1./. Portorož (SI), 22.09.2013-26.09.2013] Grant ostatní: RFCS(XE) RFCR-CT-2011-00002 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : sorbents * water treatment * phenols Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  5. NEIMiner: nanomaterial environmental impact data miner

    OpenAIRE

    Tang K.; Liu X; Harper SL; Steevens JA; Xu R

    2013-01-01

    Kaizhi Tang,1 Xiong Liu,1 Stacey L Harper,2 Jeffery A Steevens,3 Roger Xu1 1Intelligent Automation, Inc, Rockville, MD, USA; 2Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; 3US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS, USA Abstract: As more engineered nanomaterials (eNM) are developed for a wide range of applications, it is crucial to minimize any unintended ...

  6. Working safely with nanomaterials in research & development

    OpenAIRE

    Freeland, June; Hulme, John; Kinnison, David; Mitchell, Arthur; Veitch, Paul; Aitken, Rob; HANKIN Steve; Poland, Craig; Bard, Delphine; Gibson, Rosemary; Saunders, John

    2012-01-01

    This guidance has been produced by The UK NanoSafety Partnership Group (UKNSPG) with contributions from the HSE. It provides help to research establishments and academia on how to comply with their occupational health and safety legal obligations; it also provides additional information to help make improvements to health and safety systems when working with nanomaterials. It should be noted that the guidance may go further than the minimum you need to do to comply with the law.

  7. Nanomaterials Engineering and Applications in Catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qiao

    2012-01-01

    Catalysis plays an essential role in industrial applications of direct relevance to many aspects in our daily lives, such as petroleum refining, fine chemical and pharmaceutical production, energy conversion and storage, and automotive emissions control. Design and fabrication of highly active catalysts in an efficient and cost-effective way is thus an important topic. This dissertation discusses our efforts in the engineering and applications of nanomaterials, which could be divided into t...

  8. Developing Korean Standard for Nanomaterial Exposure Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jun Yeob; Yu, Il Je

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is now applied to many industries, resulting in wide range of nanomaterial-containing products, such as electronic components, cosmetic, medicines, vehicles, and home appliances. Nanoparticles can be released throughout the life cycle of nanoproducts, including the manufacture, consumer use, and disposal, thereby involving workers, consumers, and the environment in potential exposure. However, there is no current consensus on the best sampling method for characterizing manufact...

  9. Nanomaterials for electrochemical sensing and biosensing

    CERN Document Server

    Pumera, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Part 1: Nanomaterial-Based ElectrodesCarbon Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Sensors and Biosensors, Martin Pumera, National Institute for Materials Science, JapanElectrochemistry on Single Carbon Nanotube, Pat Collier, Caltech, USATheory of Voltammetry at Nanoparticle-Modified Electrodes, Richard G. Compton, Oxford University, UKMetal Oxide Nanoparticle-Modified Electrodes, Frank Marken, University of Bath, UKSemiconductor Quantum Dots for Electrochemical Bioanalysis, Eugenii Katz, Clarkson University, USAN

  10. Photocatalyst Nanomaterials for Environmental Challenges and Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Koo Y; Collins B; Sankar J; Yun Y

    2012-01-01

    Climate change caused by fossil-fuel use and other natural causes as well as Western and Asian economic growth driven by excessive consumption is among the biggest environmental challenges of the 21st century. Advances in nanotechnology bring a new tool set to remediate environmental challenges such as pollutant removal, anti-terror, air/liquid/soil filtration, and carbon dioxide conversion to hydrocarbons. As innovative engineered nanomaterials emerge, it is ...

  11. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    OpenAIRE

    MaryJoe K Rice; Ruder, Warren C.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic bi...

  12. Problems in Estimating Structure of Nanomaterials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Saxl, Ivan; Ilucová, Lucia; Sklenička, Václav; Svoboda, Milan; Král, Petr

    Praha : JČMF, 2006 - (Antoch, J.; Dohnal, G.), s. 287-296 ISBN 80-7015-073-4. [ROBUST 2006. Lhota pod Rohanovem (CZ), 23.01.2006-27.01.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA201/06/0302 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503; CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : stereology * nanomaterial s * grain size Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  13. Preparation and characterization of nanomaterials based on bifacial carbon nanotubes and iron oxides: Application in catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafour-Hadj-Ziane A.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of magnetic particles technology for the development of new nanomaterials has received considerable attention in recent years. In this context, the objective of this study is firstly, to prepare new catalytic materials that gather the strong adsorption capacities of carbon nanotubes and magnetic properties of iron, it concerns nanocomposites based on a mixture of carbon nanotubes in a very small amounts and iron oxide. Secondly we want to appear their capacities in catalytic oxidation reactions of phenol. Synthesis under the optimal conditions was carried out at different pH. And the characterization of this new nanomaterial reveals a good specific surface area BET, the identification of carbon nanotubes within the matrix was performed by infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The use of this new material as a catalytic support in catalytic oxidation reactions of phenol indicates the high selectivity of this latter and a yield better than this obtained with iron oxide supported by activated carbon. The good catalyst regeneration of the new catalysis and the improvement in their properties are the interesting parameters for the new type nanomaterials.

  14. Analysis of equation of state for nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Uma D., E-mail: uma_sharma18@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar 263145 (India); Kumar, Munish, E-mail: munish_dixit@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar 263145 (India)

    2011-02-15

    An equation of state (EOS) recently proposed for nanomaterials is discussed critically. Different possible forms of the EOS are discussed with their correlations. We have considered 20 nanomaterials for this purpose, viz. CdSe, Rb{sub 3}C{sub 60}, carbon nanotube, {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {epsilon}-Fe (hexagonal iron), MgO, {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (67 nm), {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {alpha}-Fe (filled nanotube), TiO{sub 2} (anatase), 3C-SiC (30 nm), TiO{sub 2} (rutile phase), Zr{sub 0.1}Ti{sub 0.9}O{sub 2}, {gamma}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, Ni-filled MWCNT, Fe-filled MWCNT, CeO{sub 2} (cubic fluorite phase and orthorhombic phase), germanium (49 nm), GaN (wurtzite phase) and SnO{sub 2} (rutile phase) (14 nm). It is found that the change in the form of EOS does not improve the results. This demonstrates the validity of the EOS proposed for nanomaterials. The EOS is also used to study the effect of temperature on compression of Ni (20 nm). It is found that there is small shift in isotherm due to increase in the temperature. The results have been found to present a good agreement with the available experimental data.

  15. Robotized PTA surfacing of nanomaterial layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Klimpel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: of this research was to investigate the influence of heat input in robotized surfacing on quality and properties of nanomaterial layers.Design/methodology/approach: quality of single and multilayer, stringer and weave beads was assessed by abrasion resistance tests according to ASTMG65 standard, erosion resistance tests according to G76 standard, metallographic examinations and hardness tests.Findings: due to the fact that the robotized surfacing stand was used, the analysis of properties of the deposits was performed for single and multilayer, stringer and weave beads.Research limitations/implications: for complete information about tested deposits it is needed to compare deposits properties PTA surfaced with other technologies of nanomaterial layers manufacturing products.Practical implications: Results of this paper is an optimal range of parameters of surfacing of single and multilayer, stringer and weave beads of nanomaterial layers.Originality: tests, abrasion and erosion resistance tests were provided for surfacing of single and multilayer, stringer and weave beads, and the results were compared. The influence of heat input on layers properties and theirs structure was defined.

  16. Characterization of polymeric nanomaterials using analytical ultracentrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Leosveys; Peyrot, Caroline; Wilkinson, Kevin J

    2015-06-16

    The characterization of nanomaterials represents a complex analytical challenge due to their dynamic nature (small size, high reactivity, and instability) and the low concentrations in the environment, often below typical analytical detection limits. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) is especially useful for the characterization of small nanoparticles (1-10 nm), which are often the most problematic for the commonly used techniques such as electron microscopy or dynamic light scattering. In this study, small polymeric nanomaterials (allospheres) that are used commercially to facilitate the distribution of pesticides in agricultural fields were characterized under a number of environmentally relevant conditions. Under most of the studied conditions, the allospheres were shown to have a constant hydrodynamic diameter (dH) of about 7.0 nm. Only small increases in diameter were observed, either at low pH or very high ionic strength or hardness, demonstrating their high physicochemical stability (and thus high mobility in soils). Furthermore, natural organic matter had little effect on the hydrodynamic diameters of the allospheres. The concentration of the nanoparticles was an important parameter influencing their agglomeration-results obtained using dynamic light scattering at high particle concentrations showed large agglomerate sizes and significant particle losses through sedimentation, clearly indicating the importance of characterizing the nanomaterials under environmentally relevant conditions. PMID:25988704

  17. Nanomaterials - What energy landscapes can tell us

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Christian Schön

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials bridge the gaps between crystalline materials, thin films, and molecules, and are of great importance in the design of new classes of materials, since the existence of many modifications of a nano-object for the same overall composition allows us to tune the properties of the nanomaterial. However, the structural analysis of nano-size systems is often difficult and their structural stability is frequently relatively low. Thus, a study of their energy landscape is needed to determine or predict possible structures, and analyse their stability, via the determination of the minima on the landscape and the generalized barriers separating them. In this contribution, we introduce the major concepts of energy landscapes for chemical systems, and present summaries of four applications to nano-materials: a MgO monolayer on a sapphire substrate, possible quasitwo-dimensional carbon-silicon networks, the ab initio energy landscape of Cu4Ag4-clusters, and the possible arrangements of ethane molecules on an ideally smooth substrate.

  18. Effects of nanomaterials on luciferase with significant protection and increased enzyme activity observed for zinc oxide nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, S; Abdelhakiem, M; Ghosh, K; Mitchell, L; Spidle, R; Jacobs, B; Washington, L; Li, J; Wanekaya, A; Glaspell, G; DeLong, R K

    2011-12-01

    This principle goal of this research was to examine the effects of various nanomaterials on the activity and behavior of the firefly enzyme luciferase. Nanomaterials have been found to stabilize, and in some instances, shown to increase the activity of enzymes. In this study gold, manganese oxide (MnO), and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanomaterials were utilized in order to test their effects on enzyme activity. Luciferase was used because its activity is easy to analyze, as it typically produces a large amount of bioluminescence easily detected by a Microtiter plate reader. Following incubation with the various nanomaterials, luciferase was subjected to degradation by several protein denaturing agents, such as heat, SDS, urea, ethanol, protease, hydrogen peroxide, and pH changes. Results indicated that luciferase activity is indeed affected when combined with nanomaterials, accompanied by both increases and decreases in enzyme activity depending on the type of nanomaterial and denaturing agent used. In most of the experiments, when incubated with ZnO nanomaterials, luciferase depicted significant increases in activity and bioluminescence. Additional experiments, in which human A375 cells were treated with luciferase-nanomaterial mixtures, also depicted increased enzyme activity and bioluminescence for luciferase incubated with ZnO nanomaterials. Ultimately, our findings indicated that when luciferase was subjected to multiple types of denaturation, zinc oxide nanomaterials dramatically preserved and increased enzyme activity and bioluminescence. PMID:22408903

  19. Effects of alkaline precipitating agents on synthesis of magnetite nanomaterials by hydrothermal d-glucose method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wei, E-mail: zhangwei.hebut@gmail.com [Hebei University of Technology, Engineering Research Center of Seawater Utilization Technology, Ministry of Education (China); Jia Shaoyi; Wu Songhai [Tianjin University, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology (China); Zhang Shaofeng; Liu Yan [Hebei University of Technology, Engineering Research Center of Seawater Utilization Technology, Ministry of Education (China)

    2013-06-15

    Pure magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles and carbon-coated magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C) nanocomposites were facilely synthesized in a hydrothermal reaction system by changing sodium hydroxide and sodium acetate as the precipitating agents, respectively. The sizes of pure Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C nanocomposites with core-shell structure were varied from 10 to 120 nm, and the magnetic properties of these two samples performed as superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic. A possible formation mechanism for these two types of magnetite nanomaterials was discussed. It was the different alkali environments provided by the precipitating agents that led to the varieties in morphology, structure, and property of the final magnetite nanomaterials.

  20. Effects of alkaline precipitating agents on synthesis of magnetite nanomaterials by hydrothermal d-glucose method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles and carbon-coated magnetite (Fe3O4/C) nanocomposites were facilely synthesized in a hydrothermal reaction system by changing sodium hydroxide and sodium acetate as the precipitating agents, respectively. The sizes of pure Fe3O4 nanoparticles and Fe3O4/C nanocomposites with core–shell structure were varied from 10 to 120 nm, and the magnetic properties of these two samples performed as superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic. A possible formation mechanism for these two types of magnetite nanomaterials was discussed. It was the different alkali environments provided by the precipitating agents that led to the varieties in morphology, structure, and property of the final magnetite nanomaterials.

  1. Safety and toxicity of nanomaterials for ocular drug delivery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Neelesh K; Cai, Defu; Kuo, Lih; Hein, Travis; Palakurthi, Srinath

    2016-09-01

    Multifunctional nanomaterials are rapidly emerging for ophthalmic delivery of therapeutics to facilitate safe and effective targeting with improved patient compliance. Because of their extremely high area to volume ratio, nanomaterials often have physicochemical properties that are different from those of their larger counterparts. There exists a complex relationship between the physicochemical properties (composition, size, shape, charge, roughness, and porosity) of the nanomaterials and their interaction with the biological system. The eye is a very sensitive accessible organ and is subjected to intended and unintended exposure to nanomaterials. Currently, various ophthalmic formulations are available in the market, while some are underway in preclinical and clinical phases. However, the data on safety, efficacy, and toxicology of these advanced nanomaterials for ocular drug delivery are sparse. Focus of the present review is to provide a comprehensive report on the safety, biocompatibility and toxicities of nanomaterials in the eye. PMID:27027670

  2. Nanomaterials-based electrochemical sensors for nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical sensing has been demonstrated to represent an efficient way to quantify nitric oxide (NO) in challenging physiological environments. A sensing interface based on nanomaterials opens up new opportunities and broader prospects for electrochemical NO sensors. This review (with 141 refs.) gives a general view of recent advances in the development of electrochemical sensors based on nanomaterials. It is subdivided into sections on (i) carbon derived nanomaterials (such as carbon nanotubes, graphenes, fullerenes), (ii) metal nanoparticles (including gold, platinum and other metallic nanoparticles); (iii) semiconductor metal oxide nanomaterials (including the oxides of titanium, aluminum, iron, and ruthenium); and finally (iv) nanocomposites (such as those formed from carbon nanomaterials with nanoparticles of gold, platinum, NiO or TiO2). The various strategies are discussed, and the advances of using nanomaterials and the trends in NO sensor technology are outlooked in the final section. (author)

  3. Risk assessment strategies as nanomaterials transition into commercial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercial applications of nanomaterials are rapidly emerging in the marketplace. The environmental and human health risks of many nanomaterials remain unknown, and prioritizing how to efficiently assess their risks is essential. As nanomaterials are incorporated into a broader range of commercial products, their potential for environmental release and human exposure not only increases, but also becomes more difficult to model accurately. Emphasis may first be placed on estimating potential environmental exposure based on pertinent physical properties of the nanomaterials. Given that the greatest potential for global environmental impacts results from nanomaterials that are both persistent and toxic, this paper advocates screening first for persistence since it is easier to assess than toxicity. For materials that show potential for persistence, a higher burden of proof of their non-toxicity is suggested before they enter the commercial marketplace whereas a lower burden of proof may be acceptable for nanomaterials that are less persistent.

  4. Manufacturing and magnetic force microscopy characterization of magnetic nanowires and nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Tabasum, Muhammad Ramzan

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of Nanotechnology that tends to progressively replace present systems with novel miniaturized devices based on nano-objects induces an increasing demand for new types of nanomaterials with different structures and improved physical properties. This leads, along with other conceivable candidates, to the production of magnetic nanowires (NWs) and nanotubes (NTs) with unique magnetic properties. These nanomaterials have potential applications in microwave devices, chemical ...

  5. Management of nanomaterials safety in research environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groso, Amela; Petri-Fink, Alke; Magrez, Arnaud; Riediker, Michael; Meyer, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    Despite numerous discussions, workshops, reviews and reports about responsible development of nanotechnology, information describing health and environmental risk of engineered nanoparticles or nanomaterials is severely lacking and thus insufficient for completing rigorous risk assessment on their use. However, since preliminary scientific evaluations indicate that there are reasonable suspicions that activities involving nanomaterials might have damaging effects on human health; the precautionary principle must be applied. Public and private institutions as well as industries have the duty to adopt preventive and protective measures proportionate to the risk intensity and the desired level of protection. In this work, we present a practical, 'user-friendly' procedure for a university-wide safety and health management of nanomaterials, developed as a multi-stakeholder effort (government, accident insurance, researchers and experts for occupational safety and health). The process starts using a schematic decision tree that allows classifying the nano laboratory into three hazard classes similar to a control banding approach (from Nano 3--highest hazard to Nano1--lowest hazard). Classifying laboratories into risk classes would require considering actual or potential exposure to the nanomaterial as well as statistical data on health effects of exposure. Due to the fact that these data (as well as exposure limits for each individual material) are not available, risk classes could not be determined. For each hazard level we then provide a list of required risk mitigation measures (technical, organizational and personal). The target 'users' of this safety and health methodology are researchers and safety officers. They can rapidly access the precautionary hazard class of their activities and the corresponding adequate safety and health measures. We succeed in convincing scientist dealing with nano-activities that adequate safety measures and management are promoting

  6. Management of nanomaterials safety in research environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riediker Michael

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite numerous discussions, workshops, reviews and reports about responsible development of nanotechnology, information describing health and environmental risk of engineered nanoparticles or nanomaterials is severely lacking and thus insufficient for completing rigorous risk assessment on their use. However, since preliminary scientific evaluations indicate that there are reasonable suspicions that activities involving nanomaterials might have damaging effects on human health; the precautionary principle must be applied. Public and private institutions as well as industries have the duty to adopt preventive and protective measures proportionate to the risk intensity and the desired level of protection. In this work, we present a practical, 'user-friendly' procedure for a university-wide safety and health management of nanomaterials, developed as a multi-stakeholder effort (government, accident insurance, researchers and experts for occupational safety and health. The process starts using a schematic decision tree that allows classifying the nano laboratory into three hazard classes similar to a control banding approach (from Nano 3 - highest hazard to Nano1 - lowest hazard. Classifying laboratories into risk classes would require considering actual or potential exposure to the nanomaterial as well as statistical data on health effects of exposure. Due to the fact that these data (as well as exposure limits for each individual material are not available, risk classes could not be determined. For each hazard level we then provide a list of required risk mitigation measures (technical, organizational and personal. The target 'users' of this safety and health methodology are researchers and safety officers. They can rapidly access the precautionary hazard class of their activities and the corresponding adequate safety and health measures. We succeed in convincing scientist dealing with nano-activities that adequate safety measures and

  7. An Overview of Nanomaterials for Water and Wastewater Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Haijiao; Wang, Jingkang; Stoller, Marco; Wang, Ting; Bao, Ying; Hao, Hongxun

    2016-01-01

    Due to the exceptional characteristics which resulted from nanoscale size, such as improved catalysis and adsorption properties as well as high reactivity, nanomaterials have been the subject of active research and development worldwide in recent years. Numerous studies have shown that nanomaterials can effectively remove various pollutants in water and thus have been successfully applied in water and wastewater treatment. In this paper, the most extensively studied nanomaterials, zero-valent...

  8. Assessment of the toxic potential of graphene family nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoqing Guo; Nan Mei

    2014-01-01

    Graphene, a single-atom-thick carbon nanosheet, has attracted great interest as a promising nanomaterial for a variety of bioapplications because of its extraordinary properties. However, the potential for widespread human exposure raises safety concerns about graphene and its derivatives, referred to as graphene-family nanomaterials. This review summarizes recent findings on the toxicological effects and the potential toxicity mechanisms of graphene-family nanomaterials in bacteria, mammalia...

  9. Earthworm's immunity in the nanomaterial world: new room, future challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Engelmann, Péter

    2013-01-01

    Since the advent of the nanotechnology era, the environmental sink has been continuously receiving engineered nanomaterials as well as their derivatives. Our current understanding of the potential impact of nanomaterials on invertebrate immunity is limited to only a handful of initial studies...... researches in vertebrate models tell us that study of the nanoparticle recognition involved in cellular uptake as well as sub- and inter-cellular events may uncover further intriguing insights into earthworm’s immunity in the nanomaterial world....

  10. Conscripts of the infinite armada: systemic cancer therapy using nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Scheinberg, David A.; Carlos H Villa; Escorcia, Freddy E.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    The field of clinical nanomaterials is enlarging steadily, with more than a billion US dollars of funding allocated to research by US government agencies in the past decade. The first generation of anti-cancer agents using novel nanomaterials has successfully entered widespread use. Newer nanomaterials are garnering increasing interest as potential multifunctional therapeutic agents; these drugs are conferred novel properties, by virtue of their size and shape. The new features of these agent...

  11. Engineering Nanomaterials towards Energy Harvesting and Virological Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Ding

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials, defined as the materials with critical dimensions less than 100 nm, often exhibit unique properties in comparison with their bulk counterparts. The capability to synthesize huge families of nanomaterials provides human being with unprecedented opportunities towards a more glory civilization. Focusing on nanomaterial synthesis and engineering of the nanocrystal-nanocrystal interface, virus-nanocrystal interface, and virus-polymer interface, this dissertation mainly contains thr...

  12. Size effects of latex nanomaterials on lung inflammation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of nano-sized materials (nanomaterials) on sensitive population have not been well elucidated. This study examined the effects of pulmonary exposure to (latex) nanomaterials on lung inflammation related to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or allergen in mice, especially in terms of their size-dependency. In protocol 1, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received a single exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (250 μg/animal) with three sizes (25, 50, and 100 nm), LPS (75 μg/animal), or LPS plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 2, ICR male mice were divided into 8 experimental groups that intratracheally received repeated exposure to vehicle, latex nanomaterials (100 μg/animal), allergen (ovalbumin: OVA; 1 μg/animal), or allergen plus latex nanomaterials. In protocol 1, latex nanomaterials with all sizes exacerbated lung inflammation elicited by LPS, showing an overall trend of amplified lung expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, LPS plus nanomaterials, especially with size less than 50 nm, significantly elevated circulatory levels of fibrinogen, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, and keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant, and von Willebrand factor as compared with LPS alone. The enhancement tended overall to be greater with the smaller nanomaterials than with the larger ones. In protocol 2, latex nanomaterials with all sizes did not significantly enhance the pathophysiology of allergic asthma, characterized by eosinophilic lung inflammation and Igs production, although latex nanomaterials with less than 50 nm significantly induced/enhanced neutrophilic lung inflammation. These results suggest that latex nanomaterials differentially affect two types of (innate and adaptive immunity-dominant) lung inflammation

  13. Grouping nanomaterials to predict their potential to induce pulmonary inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakhuis, Hedwig M; Oomen, Agnes G; Cassee, Flemming R

    2016-05-15

    The rapidly expanding manufacturing, production and use of nanomaterials have raised concerns for both worker and consumer safety. Various studies have been published in which induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation exposure to nanomaterials has been described. Nanomaterials can vary in aspects such as size, shape, charge, crystallinity, chemical composition, and dissolution rate. Currently, efforts are made to increase the knowledge on the characteristics of nanomaterials that can be used to categorise them into hazard groups according to these characteristics. Grouping helps to gather information on nanomaterials in an efficient way with the aim to aid risk assessment. Here, we discuss different ways of grouping nanomaterials for their risk assessment after inhalation. Since the relation between single intrinsic particle characteristics and the severity of pulmonary inflammation is unknown, grouping of nanomaterials by their intrinsic characteristics alone is not sufficient to predict their risk after inhalation. The biokinetics of nanomaterials should be taken into account as that affects the dose present at a target site over time. The parameters determining the kinetic behaviour are not the same as the hazard-determining parameters. Furthermore, characteristics of nanomaterials change in the life-cycle, resulting in human exposure to different forms and doses of these nanomaterials. As information on the biokinetics and in situ characteristics of nanomaterials is essential but often lacking, efforts should be made to include these in testing strategies. Grouping nanomaterials will probably be of the most value to risk assessors when information on intrinsic characteristics, life-cycle, biokinetics and effects are all combined. PMID:26603513

  14. Toxicity and Environmental Risks of Nanomaterials: Challenges and Future Needs

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, Paresh Chandra; Yu, Hongtao; Peter P. Fu

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology has gained a great deal of public interest due to the needs and applications of nanomaterials in many areas of human endeavors including industry, agriculture, business, medicine and public health. Environmental exposure to nanomaterials is inevitable as nanomaterials become part of our daily life, and as a result, nanotoxicity research is gaining attention. This review presents a summary of recent research efforts on fate, behavior and toxicity of different classes of nanomate...

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  17. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  18. Nanomaterials in Lubricants: An Industrial Perspective on Current Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Zhmud

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview on the use of various classes of nanomaterials in lubricant formulations. The following classes of nanomaterials are considered: fullerenes, nanodiamonds, ultradispersed boric acid and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE. Current advances in using nanomaterials in engine oils, industrial lubricants and greases are discussed. Results of numerous studies combined with formulation experience of the authors strongly suggest that nanomaterials do indeed have potential for enhancing certain lubricant properties, yet there is a long way to go before balanced formulations are developed.

  19. 75 FR 49487 - Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... AGENCY Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray AGENCY: Environmental Protection... period for the draft document ``Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray'' (EPA.... ] ADDRESSES: The draft ``Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray'' is...

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  4. NEIMiner: nanomaterial environmental impact data miner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang K

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Kaizhi Tang,1 Xiong Liu,1 Stacey L Harper,2 Jeffery A Steevens,3 Roger Xu1 1Intelligent Automation, Inc, Rockville, MD, USA; 2Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; 3US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS, USA Abstract: As more engineered nanomaterials (eNM are developed for a wide range of applications, it is crucial to minimize any unintended environmental impacts resulting from the application of eNM. To realize this vision, industry and policymakers must base risk management decisions on sound scientific information about the environmental fate of eNM, their availability to receptor organisms (eg, uptake, and any resultant biological effects (eg, toxicity. To address this critical need, we developed a model-driven, data mining system called NEIMiner, to study nanomaterial environmental impact (NEI. NEIMiner consists of four components: NEI modeling framework, data integration, data management and access, and model building. The NEI modeling framework defines the scope of NEI modeling and the strategy of integrating NEI models to form a layered, comprehensive predictability. The data integration layer brings together heterogeneous data sources related to NEI via automatic web services and web scraping technologies. The data management and access layer reuses and extends a popular content management system (CMS, Drupal, and consists of modules that model the complex data structure for NEI-related bibliography and characterization data. The model building layer provides an advanced analysis capability for NEI data. Together, these components provide significant value to the process of aggregating and analyzing large-scale distributed NEI data. A prototype of the NEIMiner system is available at http://neiminer.i-a-i.com/. Keywords: nanomaterial environmental impact, data integration, data management

  5. Effects of Cr-doping on the photoluminescence and ferromagnetism at room temperature in ZnO nanomaterials prepared by soft chemistry route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pure and Cr-doped ZnO nanomaterials were prepared by soft chemistry route. The crystallinity and morphology of as-prepared ZnO nanomaterials were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), which show that Cr-doping could influence crystal and improve the oriented growth of ZnO nanomaterials. The amount of contents and valence state of Cr ions were investigated by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), which demonstrate that the Cr ions are uniformly doped about 2 atm% in each nanowire and are in +3 valence state in doped ZnO nanomaterials. The effect of Cr-doping on the photoluminescence (PL) and magnetic properties of as-prepared ZnO nanomaterials were principally investigated at room temperature. The Cr-doping can adjust the energy level of ZnO nanocrystal and increase the amount of defects and oxygen vacancies, which lead to shift in the emission peak position in ultraviolet (UV) region and enhance the PL performance in visible light (VL) region of ZnO nanomaterials. In addition, the presence of Cr dopant in ZnO structures establishes the room-temperature ferromagnetism, which is possibly related to the existence of defects and oxygen vacancies as well as due to exchange interaction between Cr 3d and O 2p spin moments

  6. Unique Static Magnetic and Dynamic Electromagnetic Behaviors in Titanium Nitride/Carbon Composites Driven by Defect Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Chunhong Gong; Hongjie Meng; Xiaowei Zhao; Xuefeng Zhang; Laigui Yu; Jingwei Zhang; Zhijun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the defect-induced static magnetic behaviours of nanomaterials have been a cutting-edge issue in diluted magnetic semiconductor materials. However, the dynamic magnetic properties of nanomaterials are commonly ignored if their bulk counterparts are non-magnetic. In the present research, titanium nitride-carbon (TiN/C) nanocomposites were found to exhibit both static and dynamic magnetic properties that vary in the opposite trend. Moreover, novel unconventional electromagnetic resona...

  7. Development of nanomaterials for environmental monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Pino, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    El monitoreig ambiental basat en sistemes de biosensors té molta rellevància, no només en el camp de la investigació sinó també en aplicacions reals a nivell industrial. Això és degut als avantatges d'aquestes plataformes analítiques com, especialment, la seva simplicitat i alta rendibilitat pel seu cost. A més, els avenços recents en nanociència i nanotecnologia incrementen donen lloc a nous nanomaterials que tenen propietats elèctriques interessants com ara la seva capacitat de millorar la ...

  8. Development of nanomaterials for environmental monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Pino, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    El monitoreig ambiental basat en sistemes de biosensors té molta rellevància, no només en el camp de la investigació sinó també en aplicacions reals a nivell industrial. Això és degut als avantatges d’aquestes plataformes analítiques com, especialment, la seva simplicitat i alta rendibilitat pel seu cost. A més, els avenços recents en nanociència i nanotecnologia incrementen donen lloc a nous nanomaterials que tenen propietats elèctriques interessants com ara la seva capacitat de millorar...

  9. Nanodevices and Nanomaterials for Ecological Security

    CERN Document Server

    Kiv, Arnold

    2012-01-01

      This book is devoted to a wide range of problems concerning applications of nanomaterials and nanodevices as effective solutions to modern ecological problems. Leading experts in nanoscience and nanotechnology present the key theoretical, experimental and implementation issues related to the creation and utilization of novel nanoscale devices to help ensure ecological security. The authors discuss appropriate nanotechnologies for minimizing various types of risk: to human life, technogenic risk, or indeed terrorist threats. Particular emphasis is placed on defining and studying the required materials properties, and – in the field – on nanoscale devices for sensors and monitoring.

  10. Nanomechanics of Fiber-like Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Property characterization of nanomaterials is challenged by the small size of the structure because of the difficulties in manipulation. Here we demonstrate a novel approach that allows a direct measurement of the mechanical properties of individual nanotube-like structures by in-situ transmission electron microscopy(TEM).The technique is powerful in a way that it can directly correlate the atomic-scale microstructure of the carbon nanotube with its physical properties,providing a one-to-one correspondence in structure-property characterization. Applications of the technique will be demonstrated on mechanical properties, the electron field emission and the ballistic quantum conductance in individual nanotubes.

  11. Applicability of Different Isothermal EOS at Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Deepika P. Joshi; Anjali Senger

    2013-01-01

    The present study explains the behaviour of nanomaterials such as AlN, CdSe, Ge, WC, and Ni- and Fe-filled-MWCNTs under high pressure. Among the number of isothermal EOSs available, we prefer only two parameter-based isothermal equations (i.e., Murnaghan equation, usual Tait's equation, Suzuki equation and Shanker equation). The present work shows the theoretical study of thermo-elastic properties especially relative compression (V/V0), isothermal bulk modulus (KP/K0), and compressibility (αP...

  12. Germanium-Based Nanomaterials for Rechargeable Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songping; Han, Cuiping; Iocozzia, James; Lu, Mingjia; Ge, Rongyun; Xu, Rui; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-07-01

    Germanium-based nanomaterials have emerged as important candidates for next-generation energy-storage devices owing to their unique chemical and physical properties. In this Review, we provide a review of the current state-of-the-art in germanium-based materials design, synthesis, processing, and application in battery technology. The most recent advances in the area of Ge-based nanocomposite electrode materials and electrolytes for solid-state batteries are summarized. The limitations of Ge-based materials for energy-storage applications are discussed, and potential research directions are also presented with an emphasis on commercial products and theoretical investigations. PMID:27281435

  13. Polymer-mediated formation of polyoxomolybdate nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Quan

    A polymer-mediated synthetic pathway to a polyoxomolybdate nanomaterial is investigated in this work. Block copolymers or homopolymers containing poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) are mixed with a MoO2(OH)(OOH) aqueous solution to form a golden gel or viscous solution. As revealed by synchrotron X-ray scattering measurements, electron microscopy, and other characterization techniques, the final dark blue polyoxomolybdate product is a highly ordered simple cubic network similar to certain zeolite structure but with a much larger lattice constant of ˜5.2 nm. The average size of the cube-like single crystals is close to 1 mum. Based on its relatively low density (˜2.2 g/cm3), the nanomaterial can be highly porous if the amount of the residual polymer can be substantially reduced. The valence of molybdenum is ˜5.7 based on cerimetric titration, representing the mixed-valence nature of the polyoxomolybdate structure. The self-assembled structures (if any) of the polymer gel do not have any correlation with the final polyoxomolybdate nanostructure, excluding the possible role of polymers being a structure-directing template. On the other hand, the PEO polymer stabilizes the precursor molybdenum compound through coordination between its ether oxygen atoms and molybdenum atoms, and reduces the molybdenum (VI) precursor compound with its hydroxyl group being a reducing agent. The rare simple cubic ordering necessitates the existence of special affinities among the polyoxomolybdate nanosphere units resulted from the reduction reaction. Our mechanism study shows that the acidified condition is necessary for the synthesis of the mixed-valence polyoxomolybdate clusters, while H2O2 content modulates the rate of the reduction reaction. The polymer degradation is evidenced by the observation of a huge viscosity change, and is likely through a hydrolysis process catalyzed by molybdenum compounds. Cube-like polyoxomolybdate nanocrystals with size of ˜40 nm are obtained by means of

  14. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  15. Recent Development of Nano-Materials Used in DNA Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibin Ying

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available As knowledge of the structure and function of nucleic acid molecules has increased, sequence-specific DNA detection has gained increased importance. DNA biosensors based on nucleic acid hybridization have been actively developed because of their specificity, speed, portability, and low cost. Recently, there has been considerable interest in using nano-materials for DNA biosensors. Because of their high surface-to-volume ratios and excellent biological compatibilities, nano-materials could be used to increase the amount of DNA immobilization; moreover, DNA bound to nano-materials can maintain its biological activity. Alternatively, signal amplification by labeling a targeted analyte with nano-materials has also been reported for DNA biosensors in many papers. This review summarizes the applications of various nano-materials for DNA biosensors during past five years. We found that nano-materials of small sizes were advantageous as substrates for DNA attachment or as labels for signal amplification; and use of two or more types of nano-materials in the biosensors could improve their overall quality and to overcome the deficiencies of the individual nano-components. Most current DNA biosensors require the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR in their protocols. However, further development of nano-materials with smaller size and/or with improved biological and chemical properties would substantially enhance the accuracy, selectivity and sensitivity of DNA biosensors. Thus, DNA biosensors without PCR amplification may become a reality in the foreseeable future.

  16. Influence of carbon nanomaterials on the properties of paint coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanok, S. A.; Krauklis, A. V.; Borisevich, K. O.; Prokopchuk, N. P.; Nikolaichik, A. V.; Stanovoi, P. G.

    2011-11-01

    The conditions for obtaining carbon nanomaterials with the use of a low-temperature plasma are described. The product obtained was analyzed using the electron microscopy and a laser diffraction particle-size analyzer. The influence of the carbon nanomaterials on the physicochemical properties of paint coatings, their adhesion, impact and bending strengths, hardness, and protection characteristics was investigated.

  17. Synthesis, Growth Mechanism, and Applications of Zinc Oxide Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shulin JI; Changhui YE

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews recent progresses in growth mechanism, synthesis, and applications of zinc oxide nanomaterials (mainly focusing on one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials). In the first part of this article, we briefly introduce the importance, the synthesis methods and growth mechanisms, the properties and applications of ZnO 1D nanomaterials. In the second part of this article, the growth mechanisms of ZnO 1D nanomaterials will be discussed in detail in the framework of vapor-liquid-solid (VLS), vapor-solid (VS), and aqueous solution growth (ASG) approaches. Both qualitative and quantitative information will be provided to show how a controlled synthesis of ZnO 1D nanomaterials can be achieved. In the third part of this article, we present recent progresses in our group for the synthesis of ZnO 1D nanomaterials, and the results from other groups will only be mentioned briefly. Especially, experiment designing according to theories will be elaborated to demonstrate the concept of controlled synthesis. In the fourth part of this article, the properties and potential applications of ZnO 1D nanomaterials will be treated. Finally, a summary part will be presented in the fifth section. The future trend of research for ZnO 1D nanomaterials will be pointed out and key issues to be solved will be proposed.

  18. Occurrence and toxicity of nanomaterials and nanostructures in the environment

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchís, Josep Àngel

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology is the multidisciplinary science consisting in modifying the matter at the nanometre scale. Due to the unique properties exhibited by nanomaterials, the number of investigations devoted to obtain new materials and their applications has increased dramatically. However, the potential risk associated to nanomaterials and nanostructures continues being poorly understood. Different gaps of information were identified including their environmental occurrence, fate, behaviour and tox...

  19. Development of a Nanomaterials One-Week Intersession Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Keith A.; Bullen, Heather A.

    2008-01-01

    A novel one-week intersession lecture-lab hybrid course on nanomaterials is presented. The course provided a combination of background theory and hands-on laboratory experiments to educate students about nanomaterials and nanotechnology. The design of the course, subject matter, and laboratory experiments are discussed. Topics and level were…

  20. 78 FR 36784 - Survey of Nanomaterial Risk Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Survey of Nanomaterial Risk Management... of Nanomaterial Risk Management Practices; Notice of Public Meeting and Request for Comments. SUMMARY... establishments, who would be the person best suited to respond to questions addressing risk management...

  1. NanoRisk - A Conceptual Decision Support Tool for Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders; Alstrup Jensen, K.

    2011-01-01

    environmental, health and safety information and known uncertainties. In NanoRiskCat’s simplest form, the final evaluation outcome for a specific nanomaterial in a given application will be communicated in the form of a short title (e.g. TiO2 in sunscreen) describing the use of the nanomaterial. This short...

  2. Nano-materials for consolidation of degraded historic lime mortars

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drdácký, Miloš; Slížková, Zuzana; Ziegenbalg, G.

    - : -, 2008 - (Baxter, D.; Bay, B.). s. 86-86 ISBN N. [IC4N From nanoparticles and nanomaterial s to nanodevices and nanosystems /1./. 16.06.2008-18.06.2008, Halkidiki] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : nanomaterial * consolidation * lime mortar Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering

  3. Single step reconstitution of multifunctional high-density lipoprotein-derived nanomaterials using microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YongTae; Fay, Francois; Cormode, David P; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Tang, Jun; Hennessy, Elizabeth J; Ma, Mingming; Moore, Kathryn; Farokhzad, Omid C; Fisher, Edward Allen; Mulder, Willem J M; Langer, Robert; Fayad, Zahi A

    2013-11-26

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural nanoparticle that transports peripheral cholesterol to the liver. Reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) exhibits antiatherothrombotic properties and is being considered as a natural treatment for cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore, HDL nanoparticle platforms have been created for targeted delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. The current methods for HDL reconstitution involve lengthy procedures that are challenging to scale up. A central need in the synthesis of rHDL, and multifunctional nanomaterials in general, is to establish large-scale production of reproducible and homogeneous batches in a simple and efficient fashion. Here, we present a large-scale microfluidics-based manufacturing method for single-step synthesis of HDL-mimicking nanomaterials (μHDL). μHDL is shown to have the same properties (e.g., size, morphology, bioactivity) as conventionally reconstituted HDL and native HDL. In addition, we were able to incorporate simvastatin (a hydrophobic drug) into μHDL, as well as gold, iron oxide, quantum dot nanocrystals or fluorophores to enable its detection by computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or fluorescence microscopy, respectively. Our approach may contribute to effective development and optimization of lipoprotein-based nanomaterials for medical imaging and drug delivery. PMID:24079940

  4. Impact of organic and inorganic nanomaterials in the soil microbial community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the effect of organic and inorganic nanomaterials (NMs) on the structural diversity of the soil microbial community was investigated by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis, after amplification with universal primers for the bacterial region V6–V8 of 16S rDNA. The polymers of carboxylmethyl-cellulose (CMC), of hydrophobically modified CMC (HM-CMC), and hydrophobically modified polyethylglycol (HM-PEG); the vesicles of sodium dodecyl sulphate/didodecyl dimethylammonium bromide (SDS/DDAB) and of monoolein/sodium oleate (Mo/NaO); titanium oxide (TiO2), titanium silicon oxide (TiSiO4), CdSe/ZnS quantum dots, gold nanorods, and Fe/Co magnetic fluid were the NMs tested. Soil samples were incubated, for a period of 30 days, after being spiked with NM suspensions previously characterized by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) or by an ultrahigh-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM). The analysis of similarities (ANOSIM) of DGGE profiles showed that gold nanorods, TiO2, CMC, HM-CMC, HM-PEG, and SDS/DDAB have significantly affected the structural diversity of the soil bacterial community. - Highlights: ► Organic and inorganic nanomaterials on soil microbial community. ► Structural diversity was investigated by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis. ► All the organic nanomaterials, TiO2 and gold nanorods significantly affected the structural diversity.

  5. Magnetic Nano-Materials: Truly Sustainable Green Chemistry Nano Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    We envisioned a novel nano-catalyst system, which can bridge the homogenous and heterogeneous system, and simultaneously be cheaper, easily accessible (sustainable) and possibly does not require elaborate work-up. Because of its nano-size, i.e. high surface area, the contact betw...

  6. Comparative evaluation of methods to quantify dissolution of nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Nanna B.; Kruse, Susanne; Baun, Anders

    2015-01-01

    dissolved concentration or by the solubility constant (Ksp). For nanomaterials it is essential to also assess solubility kinetics as nanomaterials will often not dissolve instantaneously upon contact with artificial aqueous media or natural waters. Dissolution kinetics will thereby influence their short and......Effects and behaviour of nanomaterials in the environment depends on the materials' specific physical and chemical properties and for certain nanomaterials (e.g., Ag, ZnO and CuO) aqueous solubility is of outmost importance. The solubility of metals salts is normally described as a maximum...... dissolved and non-dissolved fraction of nanomaterials, namely: dialysis membranes (MWCO 8-10 and 50 kD), Diffusive Gradients in Thin films (DGT) and ultracentrifugation. The release of Cu ions from CuO nanoparticles (primary nominal size < 50nm) was used as a case study. Micron sized CuO was used as a "non...

  7. Design of nanomaterial based systems for novel vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Li, Wen; Kirberger, Michael; Liao, Wenzhen; Ren, Jiaoyan

    2016-05-26

    With lower cell toxicity and higher specificity, novel vaccines have been greatly developed and applied to emerging infectious and chronic diseases. However, due to problems associated with low immunogenicity and complicated processing steps, the development of novel vaccines has been limited. With the rapid development of bio-technologies and material sciences, nanomaterials are playing essential roles in novel vaccine design. Incorporation of nanomaterials is expected to improve delivery efficiency, to increase immunogenicity, and to reduce the administration dosage. The purpose of this review is to discuss the employment of nanomaterials, including polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, virus-like particles, peptide amphiphiles micelles, peptide nanofibers and microneedle arrays, in vaccine design. Compared to traditional methods, vaccines made from nanomaterials display many appealing benefits, including precise stimulation of immune responses, effective targeting to certain tissue or cells, and desirable biocompatibility. Current research suggests that nanomaterials may improve our approach to the design and delivery of novel vaccines. PMID:26891972

  8. Orientation of luminescent excitons in layered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Jon A.; Karaveli, Sinan; Schiros, Theanne; He, Keliang; Yang, Shyuan; Kymissis, Ioannis; Shan, Jie; Zia, Rashid

    2013-04-01

    In nanomaterials, optical anisotropies reveal a fundamental relationship between structural and optical properties. Directional optical properties can be exploited to enhance the performance of optoelectronic devices, optomechanical actuators and metamaterials. In layered materials, optical anisotropies may result from in-plane and out-of-plane dipoles associated with intra- and interlayer excitations, respectively. Here, we resolve the orientation of luminescent excitons and isolate photoluminescence signatures arising from distinct intra- and interlayer optical transitions. Combining analytical calculations with energy- and momentum-resolved spectroscopy, we distinguish between in-plane and out-of-plane oriented excitons in materials with weak or strong interlayer coupling--MoS2 and 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA), respectively. We demonstrate that photoluminescence from MoS2 mono-, bi- and trilayers originates solely from in-plane excitons, whereas PTCDA supports distinct in-plane and out-of-plane exciton species with different spectra, dipole strengths and temporal dynamics. The insights provided by this work are important for understanding fundamental excitonic properties in nanomaterials and designing optical systems that efficiently excite and collect light from exciton species with different orientations.

  9. Catalytic applications of bio-inspired nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacardo, Dennis Kien Balaong

    The biomimetic synthesis of Pd nanoparticles was presented using the Pd4 peptide, TSNAVHPTLRHL, isolated from combinatorial phage display library. Using this approach, nearly monodisperse and spherical Pd nanoparticles were generated with an average diameter of 1.9 +/- 0.4 nm. The peptide-based nanocatalyst were employed in the Stille coupling reaction under energy-efficient and environmentally friendly reaction conditions of aqueous solvent, room temperature and very low catalyst loading. To this end, the Pd nanocatalyst generated high turnover frequency (TOF) value and quantitative yields using ≥ 0.005 mol% Pd as well as catalytic activities with different aryl halides containing electron-withdrawing and electron-donating groups. The Pd4-capped Pd nanoparticles followed the atom-leaching mechanism and were found to be selective with respect to substrate identity. On the other hand, the naturally-occurring R5 peptide (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL) was employed in the synthesis of biotemplated Pd nanomaterials which showed morphological changes as a function of Pd:peptide ratio. TOF analysis for hydrogenation of olefinic alcohols showed similar catalytic activity regardless of nanomorphology. Determination of catalytic properties of these bio-inspired nanomaterials are important as they serve as model system for alternative green catalyst with applications in industrially important transformations.

  10. Mechanochemically Driven Syntheses of Boride Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Richard G.

    Solid state metathesis reactions have proven to be a viable route to the production of unfunctionalized nanomaterials. However, current implementations of this approach are limited to self-propagating reactions. We have been investigating mechanically driven metathesis reactions. The use of high-energy ball mills allows control of crystallite sizes without the use of a capping group. Reinforcement materials with crystallite sizes on the order of 5-30 nm can be produced in such a manner. Borides are of particular interest due to their strength, high melting point, and electrical conductivity. The ultimate goal of this work is to prepare oxide and capping group-free nanoparticles suitable for incorporation in thermoelectric, polymer, and ceramic composites. Ultimately this work will facilitate the production of improved thermoelectric materials that will provide robust, deployable, power generation modules to supplement or replace fuel cell, Stirling, and battery-derived power sources. It will also result in scalable, bulk syntheses of tough, refractory, conductive nanomaterials for polymer composites with improved electrical properties, ceramic composites with enhanced fracture toughness, and composites with enhanced neutron reflectance and/or absorbance.

  11. Nanomanufacturing metrology for cellulosic nanomaterials: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postek, Michael T.

    2014-08-01

    The development of the metrology and standards for advanced manufacturing of cellulosic nanomaterials (or basically, wood-based nanotechnology) is imperative to the success of this rising economic sector. Wood-based nanotechnology is a revolutionary technology that will create new jobs and strengthen America's forest-based economy through industrial development and expansion. It allows this, previously perceived, low-tech industry to leap-frog directly into high-tech products and processes and thus improves its current economic slump. Recent global investments in nanotechnology programs have led to a deeper appreciation of the high performance nature of cellulose nanomaterials. Cellulose, manufactured to the smallest possible-size ( 2 nm x 100 nm), is a high-value material that enables products to be lighter and stronger; have less embodied energy; utilize no catalysts in the manufacturing, are biologically compatible and, come from a readily renewable resource. In addition to the potential for a dramatic impact on the national economy - estimated to be as much as $250 billion worldwide by 2020 - cellulose-based nanotechnology creates a pathway for expanded and new markets utilizing these renewable materials. The installed capacity associated with the US pulp and paper industry represents an opportunity, with investment, to rapidly move to large scale production of nano-based materials. However, effective imaging, characterization and fundamental measurement science for process control and characterization are lacking at the present time. This talk will discuss some of these needed measurements and potential solutions.

  12. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  13. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  14. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  16. Reinforcement of cement-based matrices with graphite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Muhammad Maqbool

    Cement-based materials offer a desirable balance of compressive strength, moisture resistance, durability, economy and energy-efficiency; their tensile strength, fracture energy and durability in aggressive environments, however, could benefit from further improvements. An option for realizing some of these improvements involves introduction of discrete fibers into concrete. When compared with today's micro-scale (steel, polypropylene, glass, etc.) fibers, graphite nanomaterials (carbon nanotube, nanofiber and graphite nanoplatelet) offer superior geometric, mechanical and physical characteristics. Graphite nanomaterials would realize their reinforcement potential as far as they are thoroughly dispersed within cement-based matrices, and effectively bond to cement hydrates. The research reported herein developed non-covalent and covalent surface modification techniques to improve the dispersion and interfacial interactions of graphite nanomaterials in cement-based matrices with a dense and well graded micro-structure. The most successful approach involved polymer wrapping of nanomaterials for increasing the density of hydrophilic groups on the nanomaterial surface without causing any damage to the their structure. The nanomaterials were characterized using various spectrometry techniques, and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). The graphite nanomaterials were dispersed via selected sonication procedures in the mixing water of the cement-based matrix; conventional mixing and sample preparation techniques were then employed to prepare the cement-based nanocomposite samples, which were subjected to steam curing. Comprehensive engineering and durability characteristics of cement-based nanocomposites were determined and their chemical composition, microstructure and failure mechanisms were also assessed through various spectrometry, thermogravimetry, electron microscopy and elemental analyses. Both functionalized and non-functionalized nanomaterials as well as different

  17. Clustomesogens: Liquid Crystalline Hybrid Nanomaterials Containing Functional Metal Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molard, Yann

    2016-08-16

    Inorganic phosphorescent octahedral metal nanoclusters fill the gap between metal complexes and nanoparticles. They are finite groups of metal atoms linked by metal-metal bonds, with an exact composition and structure at the nanometer scale. As their phosphorescence internal quantum efficiency can approach 100%, they represent a very attractive class of molecular building blocks to design hybrid nanomaterials dedicated to light energy conversion, optoelectronic, display, lighting, or theragnostic applications. They are obtained as AnM6X(i)8X(a)6 ternary salt powders (A = alkali cation, M = Mo, Re, W, X(i): halogen inner ligand, X(a) = halogen apical ligand) by high temperature solid state synthesis (750-1200 °C). However, their ceramic-like behavior has largely restricted their use as functional components in the past. Since these last two decades, several groups, including ours, started to tackle the challenge of integrating them in easy-to-process materials. Within this context, we have extensively explored the nanocluster ternary salt specificities to develop a new class of self-organized hybrid organic-inorganic nanomaterials known as clustomesogens. These materials, combine the specific properties of nanoclusters (magnetic, electronic, luminescence) with the anisotropy-related properties of liquid crystals (LCs). This Account covers the research and development of clustomesogens starting from the design concepts and synthesis to their introduction in functional devices. We developed three strategies to build such hybrid super- or supramolecules. In the covalent approach, we capitalized on the apical ligand-metal bond iono-covalent character to graft tailor-made organic LC promoters on the {M6X(i)8}(n+) nanocluster cores. The supramolecular approach relies on the host-guest complexation of the ternary cluster salt alkali cations with functional crown ether macrocycles. We showed that the hybrid LC behavior depends on the macrocycles structural features

  18. Knowledge gaps between nanotoxicological research and nanomaterial safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiangang; Li, Dandan; Gao, Yue; Mu, Li; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-09-01

    With the wide research and application of nanomaterials in various fields, the safety of nanomaterials attracts much attention. An increasing number of reports in the literature have shown the adverse effects of nanomaterials, representing the quick development of nanotoxicology. However, many studies in nanotoxicology have not reflected the real nanomaterial safety, and the knowledge gaps between nanotoxicological research and nanomaterial safety remain large. Considering the remarkable influence of biological or environmental matrices (e.g., biological corona) on nanotoxicity, the situation of performing nanotoxicological experiments should be relevant to the environment and humans. Given the possibility of long-term and low-concentration exposure of nanomaterials, the reversibility of and adaptation to nanotoxicity, and the transgenerational effects should not be ignored. Different from common pollutants, the specific analysis methodology for nanotoxicology need development and exploration furthermore. High-throughput assay integrating with omics was highlighted in the present review to globally investigate nanotoxicity. In addition, the biological responses beyond individual levels, special mechanisms and control of nanotoxicity deserve more attention. The progress of nanotoxicology has been reviewed by previous articles. This review focuses on the blind spots in nanotoxicological research and provides insight into what we should do in future work to support the healthy development of nanotechnology and the evaluation of real nanomaterial safety. PMID:27203780

  19. Carbon Nanomaterials Interfacing with Neurons: An In vivo Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldrighi, Michele; Trusel, Massimo; Tonini, Raffaella; Giordani, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Developing new tools that outperform current state of the art technologies for imaging, drug delivery or electrical sensing in neuronal tissues is one of the great challenges in neurosciences. Investigations into the potential use of carbon nanomaterials for such applications started about two decades ago. Since then, numerous in vitro studies have examined interactions between these nanomaterials and neurons, either by evaluating their compatibility, as vectors for drug delivery, or for their potential use in electric activity sensing and manipulation. The results obtained indicate that carbon nanomaterials may be suitable for medical therapies. However, a relatively small number of in vivo studies have been carried out to date. In order to facilitate the transformation of carbon nanomaterial into practical neurobiomedical applications, it is essential to identify and highlight in the existing literature the strengths and weakness that different carbon nanomaterials have displayed when probed in vivo. Unfortunately the current literature is sometimes sparse and confusing. To offer a clearer picture of the in vivo studies on carbon nanomaterials in the central nervous system, we provide a systematic and critical review. Hereby we identify properties and behavior of carbon nanomaterials in vivo inside the neural tissues, and we examine key achievements and potentially problematic toxicological issues. PMID:27375413

  20. Comparative assessment of nanomaterial definitions and safety evaluation considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boverhof, Darrell R; Bramante, Christina M; Butala, John H; Clancy, Shaun F; Lafranconi, Mark; West, Jay; Gordon, Steve C

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials continue to bring promising advances to science and technology. In concert have come calls for increased regulatory oversight to ensure their appropriate identification and evaluation, which has led to extensive discussions about nanomaterial definitions. Numerous nanomaterial definitions have been proposed by government, industry, and standards organizations. We conducted a comprehensive comparative assessment of existing nanomaterial definitions put forward by governments to highlight their similarities and differences. We found that the size limits used in different definitions were inconsistent, as were considerations of other elements, including agglomerates and aggregates, distributional thresholds, novel properties, and solubility. Other important differences included consideration of number size distributions versus weight distributions and natural versus intentionally-manufactured materials. Overall, the definitions we compared were not in alignment, which may lead to inconsistent identification and evaluation of nanomaterials and could have adverse impacts on commerce and public perceptions of nanotechnology. We recommend a set of considerations that future discussions of nanomaterial definitions should consider for describing materials and assessing their potential for health and environmental impacts using risk-based approaches within existing assessment frameworks. Our intent is to initiate a dialogue aimed at achieving greater clarity in identifying those nanomaterials that may require additional evaluation, not to propose a formal definition. PMID:26111608

  1. Autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stern Stephan T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study of the potential risks associated with the manufacture, use, and disposal of nanoscale materials, and their mechanisms of toxicity, is important for the continued advancement of nanotechnology. Currently, the most widely accepted paradigms of nanomaterial toxicity are oxidative stress and inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. This review will highlight the significance of autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity. Most endocytic routes of nanomaterial cell uptake converge upon the lysosome, making the lysosomal compartment the most common intracellular site of nanoparticle sequestration and degradation. In addition to the endo-lysosomal pathway, recent evidence suggests that some nanomaterials can also induce autophagy. Among the many physiological functions, the lysosome, by way of the autophagy (macroautophagy pathway, degrades intracellular pathogens, and damaged organelles and proteins. Thus, autophagy induction by nanoparticles may be an attempt to degrade what is perceived by the cell as foreign or aberrant. While the autophagy and endo-lysosomal pathways have the potential to influence the disposition of nanomaterials, there is also a growing body of literature suggesting that biopersistent nanomaterials can, in turn, negatively impact these pathways. Indeed, there is ample evidence that biopersistent nanomaterials can cause autophagy and lysosomal dysfunctions resulting in toxicological consequences.

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  4. Nanomaterials application in electrochemical detection of heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We review the recent trends in the application of nanomaterials for electrochemical detection of heavy metals. ► Different types of nanomaterials including metal nanoparticles, different carbon nanomaterials or nanochannels have been applied on the electrochemical analysis of heavy metals in various sensing formats/configurations. ► The great properties of nanomaterials allow the new devices to show advantages in terms of sensing performance (i.e. increase the sensitivity, decrease the detection limits and improve the stability). ► Between the various electrochemical techniques, voltammetric and potentiometric based ones are particularly taking interesting advantages by the incorporation of new nanomaterials due to the improved electrocatalytic properties beside the increase of the sensor's transducing area. - Abstract: Recent trends in the application of nanomaterials for electrochemical detection of heavy metals are shown. Various nanomaterials such as nanoparticles, nanowires, nanotubes, nanochannels, graphene, etc. have been explored either as modifiers of electrodes or as new electrode materials with interest to be applied in electrochemical stripping analysis, ion-selective detection, field-effect transistors or other indirect heavy metals (bio)detection alternatives. The developed devices have shown increased sensitivity and decreased detection limits between other improvements of analytical performance data. The phenomena behind nanomaterials responses are also discussed and some typical responses data of the developed systems either in standard solutions or in real samples are given. The developed nanomaterials based electrochemical systems are giving new inputs to the existing devices or leading to the development of novel heavy metal detection tools with interest for applications in field such as diagnostics, environmental and safety and security controls or other industries.

  5. Supramolecular self-assemblies as functional nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busseron, Eric; Ruff, Yves; Moulin, Emilie; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we survey the diversity of structures and functions which are encountered in advanced self-assembled nanomaterials. We highlight their flourishing implementations in three active domains of applications: biomedical sciences, information technologies, and environmental sciences. Our main objective is to provide the reader with a concise and straightforward entry to this broad field by selecting the most recent and important research articles, supported by some more comprehensive reviews to introduce each topic. Overall, this compilation illustrates how, based on the rules of supramolecular chemistry, the bottom-up approach to design functional objects at the nanoscale is currently producing highly sophisticated materials oriented towards a growing number of applications with high societal impact.

  6. Modification of conductive polyaniline with carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghat, Sajjad; Alavijeh, Mahdi Soleimani

    2014-08-01

    The synthesis of polyaniline/single-wall nanotube, polyaniline/multi-wall nanotube and polyaniline/single-wall nanotube/graphen nanosheets nanocomposites by in situ polymerization are reported in this study. The substrates were treated with a mixture of concentrated sulfuric acid and concentrated nitric acid before usage to functionalize with carboxylic and hydroxyl groups. Aniline monomers are adsorbed and polymerized on the surface of these fillers. Structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy showed that nanomaterials dispersed into polymer matrix and made tubular structures with diameters several tens to hundreds nanometers depending on the polyaniline content. These nanocomposites can be used for production of excellent electrode materials applications in high-performance supercapacitors.

  7. Nanomaterials and nanoparticles : Sources and toxicity

    CERN Document Server

    Buzea, Cristina; Robbie, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    This review is written with the goal of informing public health concerns related to nanoscience, while raising awareness of nanomaterials toxicity among scientists and manufacturers handling them. We show that humans have always been exposed to nanoparticles and dust from natural sources and human activities, the recent development of industry and combustion-based engine transportation profoundly increasing anthropogenic nanoparticulate pollution. The key to understanding the toxicity of nanoparticles is that their minute size, smaller than cells and cellular organelles, allows them to penetrate these basic biological structures, disrupting their normal function. Among diseases associated with nanoparticles are asthma, bronchitis, lung cancer, neurodegenerative diseases (such as Parkinson`s and Alzheimer`s diseases), Crohn`s disease, colon cancer. Nanoparticles that enter the circulatory system are related to occurrence of arteriosclerosis, and blood clots, arrhythmia, heart diseases, and ultimately cardiac d...

  8. Evaluation Tools of nanomaterials environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanotechnology show an increasing spread thanks to the special properties of nanomaterials (NM). Knowledge of the NM behavior and interactions with the environment and human health is still insufficient to assess the impact of the NM. A multidisciplinary, multidimensional and systemic such as that of the life cycle (Life Cycle Thinking - LCT), applied through the tool Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), is essential in environmental sustainability assessment of technologies, with some limitations that can be overcome through integration with other instruments such as, for example, non-linear models, analysis of flows of material, Risk Assessment (RA). This article offers a detailed analysis of the state and the main problems related to the application of LCA and RA to NM both separately and in combined use; They will then discuss the strategies and integrations needed to overcome the limitations of both methods and obtain robust assessments of the impacts on health and the environment

  9. Redefining risk research priorities for nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara Deanne; Baun, Anders; Owen, R.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical-based risk assessment underpins the current approach to responsible development of nanomaterials (NM). It is now recognised, however, that this process may take decades, leaving decision makers with little support in the near term. Despite this, current and near future research efforts...... are largely directed at establishing (eco)toxicological and exposure data for NM, and comparatively little research has been undertaken on tools or approaches that may facilitate near-term decisions, some of which we briefly outline in this analysis. We propose a reprioritisation of NM risk research efforts...... to redress this imbalance, including the development of more adaptive risk governance frameworks, alternative/complementary tools to risk assessment, and health and environment surveillance....

  10. Nanomaterial-based x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew T.; Parmee, R. J.; Milne, William I.

    2016-02-01

    Following the recent global excitement and investment in the emerging, and rapidly growing, classes of one and two-dimensional nanomaterials, we here present a perspective on one of the viable applications of such materials: field electron emission based x-ray sources. These devices, which have a notable history in medicine, security, industry and research, to date have almost exclusively incorporated thermionic electron sources. Since the middle of the last century, field emission based cathodes were demonstrated, but it is only recently that they have become practicable. We outline some of the technological achievements of the past two decades, and describe a number of the seminal contributions. We explore the foremost market hurdles hindering their roll-out and broader industrial adoption and summarise the recent progress in miniaturised, pulsed and multi-source devices.

  11. Nanomaterials based biosensors for cancer biomarker detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Bansi D.; Kumar, Saurabh; Mouli Pandey, Chandra

    2016-04-01

    Biosensors have enormous potential to contribute to the evolution of new molecular diagnostic techniques for patients suffering with cancerous diseases. A major obstacle preventing faster development of biosensors pertains to the fact that cancer is a highly complex set of diseases. The oncologists currently rely on a few biomarkers and histological characterization of tumors. Some of the signatures include epigenetic and genetic markers, protein profiles, changes in gene expression, and post-translational modifications of proteins. These molecular signatures offer new opportunities for development of biosensors for cancer detection. In this context, conducting paper has recently been found to play an important role towards the fabrication of a biosensor for cancer biomarker detection. In this paper we will focus on results of some of the recent studies obtained in our laboratories relating to fabrication and application of nanomaterial modified paper based biosensors for cancer biomarker detection.

  12. Nanomaterial-based x-ray sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew T; Parmee, R J; Milne, William I

    2016-02-26

    Following the recent global excitement and investment in the emerging, and rapidly growing, classes of one and two-dimensional nanomaterials, we here present a perspective on one of the viable applications of such materials: field electron emission based x-ray sources. These devices, which have a notable history in medicine, security, industry and research, to date have almost exclusively incorporated thermionic electron sources. Since the middle of the last century, field emission based cathodes were demonstrated, but it is only recently that they have become practicable. We outline some of the technological achievements of the past two decades, and describe a number of the seminal contributions. We explore the foremost market hurdles hindering their roll-out and broader industrial adoption and summarise the recent progress in miniaturised, pulsed and multi-source devices. PMID:26807781

  13. PREFACE: Ultrafast and nonlinear optics in carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Junichiro

    2013-02-01

    Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter staff for their help, patience and professionalism. Since this is a fast-moving field, there is absolutely no way of presenting definitive answers to all open questions, but we hope that this special section will provide an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding this topic. Furthermore, we hope that the exciting science and technology described in this section will attract and inspire other researchers and students working in related fields to enter into the study of ultrafast and nonlinear optical phenomena in carbon-based nanostructures. Ultrafast and nonlinear optics in carbon nanomaterials contents Ultrafast and nonlinear optics in carbon nanomaterialsJunichiro Kono The impact of pump fluence on carrier relaxation dynamics in optically excited grapheneT Winzer and E Malic Time-resolved spectroscopy on epitaxial graphene in the infrared spectral range: relaxation dynamics and saturation behaviorS Winnerl, F Göttfert, M Mittendorff, H Schneider, M Helm, T Winzer, E Malic, A Knorr, M Orlita, M Potemski, M Sprinkle, C Berger and W A de Heer Nonlinear optics of graphene in a strong magnetic fieldXianghan Yao and Alexey Belyanin Theory of coherent phonons in carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbonsG D Sanders, A R T Nugraha, K Sato, J-H Kim3, J Kono3, R Saito and C J Stanton Non-perturbative effects of laser illumination on the electrical properties of graphene nanoribbons Hernán L Calvo, Pablo M Perez-Piskunow, Horacio M Pastawski, Stephan Roche and Luis E F Foa Torres Transient absorption microscopy studies of energy relaxation in graphene oxide thin film Sean Murphy and Libai Huang Femtosecond dynamics of exciton localization: self-trapping from the small to the large polaron limit F X Morrissey, J G Mance, A D Van Pelt and S L Dexheimer

  14. Enzyme-catalyzed degradation of carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchey, Gregg P.

    Carbon nanotubes and graphene, the nanoscale sp 2 allotropes of carbon, have garnered widespread attention as a result of their remarkable electrical, mechanical, and optical properties and the promise of new technologies that harness these properties. Consequently, these carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) have been employed for diverse applications such as electronics, sensors, composite materials, energy conversion devices, and nanomedicine. The manufacture and eventual disposal of these products may result in the release of CNMs into the environment and subsequent exposure to humans, animals, and vegetation. Given the possible pro-inflammatory and toxic effects of CNMs, much attention has been focused on the distribution, toxicity, and persistence of CNMs both in living systems and the environment. This dissertation will guide the reader though recent studies aimed at elucidating fundamental insight into the persistence of CNMs such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene derivatives (i.e., graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide). In particular, in-testtube oxidation/degradation of CNMs catalyzed by peroxidase enzymes will be examined, and the current understanding of the mechanisms underlying these processes will be discussed. Finally, an outlook of the current field including in vitro and in vivo biodegradation experiments, which have benefits in terms of human health and environmental safety, and future directions that could have implications for nanomedical applications such as imaging and drug delivery will be presented. Armed with an understanding of how and why CNMs undergo enzyme-catalyzed oxidation/biodegradation, researchers can tailor the structure of CNMs to either promote or inhibit these processes. For example, in nanomedical applications such as drug delivery, the incorporation of carboxylate functional groups could facilitate biodegradation of the nanomaterial after delivery of the cargo. Also, the incorporation of CNMs with defect sites in consumer

  15. Functionalization of nanomaterials with aryldiazonium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ahmed A; Salmi, Zakaria; Dahoumane, Si Amar; Mekki, Ahmed; Carbonnier, Benjamin; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2015-11-01

    This paper reviews the surface modification strategies of a wide range of nanomaterials using aryldiazonium salts. After a brief history of diazonium salts since their discovery by Peter Griess in 1858, we will tackle the surface chemistry using these compounds since the first trials in the 1950s. We will then focus on the modern surface chemistry of aryldiazonium salts for the modification of materials, particularly metallic, semiconductors, metal oxide nanoparticles, carbon-based nanostructures, diamond and clays. The successful modification of sp(2) carbon materials and metals by aryldiazonium salts paved the way to innovative strategies for the attachment of aryl layers to metal oxide nanoparticles and nanodiamonds, and intercalation of clays. Interestingly, diazotized surfaces can easily trap nanoparticles and nanotubes while diazotized nanoparticles can be (electro)chemically reduced on electrode/materials surfaces as molecular compounds. Both strategies provided organized 2D surface assembled nanoparticles. In this review, aryldiazonium salts are highlighted as efficient coupling agents for many types of molecular, macromolecular and nanoparticulate species, therefore ensuring stability to colloids on the one hand, and the construction of composite materials and hybrid systems with robust and durable interfaces/interphases, on the other hand. The last section is dedicated to a selection of patents and industrial products based on aryldiazonium-modified nanomaterials. After nearly 160 years of organic chemistry, diazonium salts have entered a new, long and thriving era for the benefit of materials, colloids, and surface scientists. This tempts us to introduce the terminology of "diazonics" we define as the science and technology of aryldiazonium salt-derived materials. PMID:26299313

  16. Structural and Optical Properties and Emerging Applications of Metal Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tammy Y.Olson; Jin Z.Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess intriguing optical properties that depend sensitively on size, shape, and material content of the structures. Controlling such structural characteristics of the nanostructures allows the tailoring of their physical and chemical properties, e.9. optical, electronic, and catalytic, to achieve what is desired for specific applications of interest. This review will cover the development of various shapes for silver and gold nanomaterials with emphasis on their relation to optical properties. Examples of various modern synthetic methods and characterization techniques are highlighted. The influence of the metal nanomaterial's shape and optical absorption on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and a final note on new emerging applications of metal nanostructures are also discussed.

  17. Categorization framework to aid hazard identification of nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Olsen, Stig Irving;

    2007-01-01

    The physical, chemical and biological properties of various nanomaterials differ substantially - as do the potential risks they pose. We argue that nanomaterials must be categorized based on the location of the nanoscale structure in the system/material before their hazards can be assessed and...... propose a categorization framework that enables scientists and regulators to identify the categories of nanomaterials systematically. The framework is applied to a suggested hazard identification approach aimed at identifying causality between inherent physical and chemical properties and observed adverse...

  18. Carbon nanomaterial based electrochemical sensors for biogenic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review describes recent advances in the use of carbon nanomaterials for electroanalytical detection of biogenic amines (BAs). It starts with a short introduction into carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, nanodiamonds, carbon nanofibers, fullerenes, and their composites. Next, electrochemical sensing schemes are discussed for various BAs including dopamine, serotonin, epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyramine, histamine and putrescine. Examples are then given for methods for simultaneous detection of various BAs. Finally, we discuss the current and future challenges of carbon nanomaterial-based electrochemical sensors for BAs. The review contains 175 references. (author)

  19. Nanomaterials for regulating cancer and stem cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Birju P.

    The realm of nanomedicine has grown exponentially over the past few decades. However, there are several obstacles that need to be overcome, prior to the wide-spread clinical applications of these nanoparticles, such as (i) developing well-defined nanoparticles of varying size, morphology and composition to enable various clinical applications; (ii) overcome various physiological barriers encountered in order to deliver the therapeutics to the target location; and (iii) real-time monitoring of the nano-therapeutics within the human body for tracking their uptake, localization and effect. Hence, this dissertation focuses on developing multimodal nanotechnology-based approaches to overcome the above-mentioned challenges and thus enable regulation of cancer and stem cell fate. The initial part of this dissertation describes the development of multimodal magnetic core-shell nanoparticles (MCNPs), comprised of a highly magnetic core surrounded by a thin gold shell, thus combining magnetic and plasmonic properties. These nanoparticles were utilized for mainly two applications: (i) Magnetically-facilitated delivery of siRNA and plasmid DNA for effective stem cell differentiation and imaging and (ii) Combined hyperthermia and targeted delivery of a mitochondria-targeting peptide for enhancing apoptosis in cancer cells. The following part of this dissertation presents the generation of a multi-functional cyclodextrin-conjugated polymeric delivery platform (known as DexAMs), for co-delivery of anticancer drugs and siRNAs in a target-specific manner to brain tumor cells. This combined delivery of chemotherapeutics and siRNA resulted in a synergistic effect on the apoptosis of brain tumor cells, as compared to the individual treatments. The final part of this thesis presents development of stimuli-responsive uorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based mesoporous silica nanoparticles for real-time monitoring of drug release in cells. The stimuli-responsive behavior of

  20. Balanced improvement of high performance concrete material properties with modified graphite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyvandi, Amirpasha

    Graphite nanomaterials offer distinct features for effective reinforcement of cementitious matrices in the pre-crack and post-crack ranges of behavior. Thoroughly dispersed and well-bonded nanomaterials provide for effective control of the size and propagation of defects (microcracks) in matrix, and also act as closely spaced barriers against diffusion of moisture and aggressive solutions into concrete. Modified graphite nanomaterials can play multi-faceted roles towards enhancing the mechanical, physical and functional attributes of concrete materials. Graphite nanoplatelets (GP) and carbon nanofibers (CNF) were chosen for use in cementitious materials. Experimental results highlighted the balanced gains in diverse engineering properties of high-performance concrete realized by introduction of graphite nanomaterials. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used in order to gain further insight into the effects of nanomaterials on the hydration process and structure of cement hydrates. NMR exploits the magnetic properties of certain atomic nuclei, and the sensitivity of these properties to local environments to generate data which enables determination of the internal structure, reaction state, and chemical environment of molecules and bulk materials. 27 Al and 29Si NMR spectroscopy techniques were employed in order to evaluate the effects of graphite nanoplatelets on the structure of cement hydrates, and their resistance to alkali-silica reaction (ASR), chloride ion diffusion, and sulfate attack. Results of 29Si NMR spectroscopy indicated that the percent condensation of C-S-H in cementitious paste was lowered in the presence of nanoplatelets at the same age. The extent of chloride diffusion was assessed indirectly by detecting Friedel's salt as a reaction product of chloride ions with aluminum-bearing cement hydrates. Graphite nanoplatelets were found to significantly reduce the concentration of Friedel's salt at different depths after various periods

  1. Biomimetic magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Klem

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles are of considerable interest because of their potential use in high-density memory devices, spintronics, and applications in diagnostic medicine. The conditions for synthesis of these materials are often complicated by their high reaction temperatures, costly reagents, and post-processing requirements. Practical applications of magnetic nanoparticles will require the development of alternate synthetic strategies that can overcome these impediments. Biomimetic approaches to materials chemistry have provided a new avenue for the synthesis and assembly of magnetic nanomaterials that has great potential for overcoming these obstacles.

  2. RADIO SHIELDING PROPERTIES OF CONCRETE BASED ON SHUNGITE NANOMATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    BELOUSOVA Elena Sergeevna; LYNKOV Leonid Mihailovich; MAHMOOD Mohammed Shakir; NASONOVA Natalia Viktorovna

    2013-01-01

    Modifications of shielding construction materials based on Portland cement with the addition of powder nanomaterial shungite were developed. Attenuation and re­flection of electromagnetic radiation for obtained materials were studied. Recommen­dations for using are given.

  3. The challenges of ecotox testing of nanomaterials and the BPR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2015-01-01

    The European Biocidal Product Regulation (BPR) requires dedicated risk assessment of nanomaterials. When it comes to ecotoxicological testing of nanomaterials, meeting these requirements is especially challenging. Overall, these challenges fall into four overall categories: 1) materials...... characterization, 2) exposure preparation, 3) monitoring stability and 4) monitoring time. In this paper, the challenges are presented and discussed. There is no easy manner in which to deal with the challenges related to ecotoxicological testing of nanomaterials in the light of the BPR requirements. It short the...... current answer seems to be describe, characterize and document. Characterization is vitally important and has to be done using multiple methods on the nanomaterials as received, in the test media with and without the organisms....

  4. Investigating the Toxicity and Environmental Fate of Graphene Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hersam Laboratory at Northwestern University works with the Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology and the United States Environmental Protection Agency to study the toxicity and environmental fate of emergent nanomaterials, specifically carbon-based nanomate...

  5. Ecotoxicology of nanomaterials: the role of invertebrate testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AG Cattaneo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Engineered nanomaterials represent a new and expanding class of chemicals whose environmental hazard is actually poorly determined. The peculiar behavior of nanomaterials makes them much more similar to new chemicals than to the corresponding bulk materials; this feature imposes reliable and standardized evaluation protocols for toxicity and ecotoxicity assessments. General rules for assessing nanotoxicity and the state of the art are periodically published in reports by control agencies. This review highlights the role of invertebrates as valuable and validated test organisms for assessing ecotoxicity of new and/or untested chemicals. The general scarcity of experimental data, their unequal distribution among the different nanomaterials and environmental conditions, the difficulties in manipulating nanomaterials and obtaining stable and homogeneous suspensions, the confusion arising from a not well defined metrics are discussed

  6. Environmental behavior of engineered nanomaterials in porous media: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang Min; Chu, Kyoung Hoon; Heo, Jiyong; Her, Namguk; Jang, Min; Son, Ahjeong; Yoon, Yeomin

    2016-05-15

    A pronounced increase in the use of nanotechnology has resulted in nanomaterials being released into the environment. Environmental exposure to the most common engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), such as carbon-based and metal-based nanomaterials, can occur directly via intentional injection for remediation purposes, release during the use of nanomaterial-containing consumer goods, or indirectly via different routes. Recent reviews have outlined potential risks assessments, toxicity, and life cycle analyses regarding ENM emission. In this review, inevitable release of ENMs and their environmental behaviors in aqueous porous media are discussed with an emphasis on influencing factors, including the physicochemical properties of ENMs, solution chemistry, soil hydraulic properties, and soil matrices. Major findings of laboratory column studies and numerical approaches for the transport of ENMs are addressed, and studies on the interaction between ENMs and heavy metal ions in aqueous soil environments are examined. Future research is also presented with specific research directions and outlooks. PMID:26882524

  7. Assessment of the toxic potential of graphene family nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Guo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Graphene, a single-atom-thick carbon nanosheet, has attracted great interest as a promising nanomaterial for a variety of bioapplications because of its extraordinary properties. However, the potential for widespread human exposure raises safety concerns about graphene and its derivatives, referred to as graphene-family nanomaterials. This review summarizes recent findings on the toxicological effects and the potential toxicity mechanisms of graphene-family nanomaterials in bacteria, mammalian cells, and animal models. Graphene, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide elicit toxic effects both in vitro and in vivo, whereas surface modifications can significantly reduce their toxic interactions with living systems. Standardization of terminology and the fabrication methods of graphene-family nanomaterials are warranted for further investigations designed to decrease their adverse effects and explore their biomedical applications.

  8. Proposals for risk management in environments with activities involving nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Renato Balbão Andrade

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The handling of nanomaterials presents enormous challenges for risk management in research and production of new materials. However, data on the impacts of these new materials on human health and the environment need to be expanded. Several efforts have been made to mitigate the hardships and offer guidelines for the management of risks associated with nanomaterials. This article aims to provide a broad and comparing view of the main proposals in the literature. The methodology was systematic analysis encompassing 17 proposed risk management with nanomaterials. The results indicate that, although there is no consensus on the metrics used to characterize the risks of na-nomaterials, the adoption of the Precautionary Principle, the control banding approach and stakeholder involvement stands out among the documents analyzed.

  9. Impact of size and temperature on thermal expansion of nanomaterials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madan Singh; Mahipal Singh

    2015-04-01

    A theoretical method has been discussed to study the size dependency of thermal expansion of nanomaterials at higher temperature by considering the surface effect. A thermodynamical analysis of the equation of state (EoS) is studied from the knowledge of thermal expansion of nano-materials based on theoretical thermodynamical relations. It is observed that thermal expansion coefficient increases with decrease in grain size whereas, /0 increases with increase in temperature for nanomaterials of different grain sizes. We have studied the size and temperature dependence of thermal expansion of Cu, Ag, Ni, Sn, Se and Zn nanomaterials in different shapes (spherical, nanowire and nanofilm). The available experimental data confirm these theoretical predictions that demonstrate the validity of our work.

  10. An Overview of Nanomaterials for Water and Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijiao Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the exceptional characteristics which resulted from nanoscale size, such as improved catalysis and adsorption properties as well as high reactivity, nanomaterials have been the subject of active research and development worldwide in recent years. Numerous studies have shown that nanomaterials can effectively remove various pollutants in water and thus have been successfully applied in water and wastewater treatment. In this paper, the most extensively studied nanomaterials, zero-valent metal nanoparticles (Ag, Fe, and Zn, metal oxide nanoparticles (TiO2, ZnO, and iron oxides, carbon nanotubes (CNTs, and nanocomposites are discussed and highlighted in detail. Besides, future aspects of nanomaterials in water and wastewater treatment are discussed.

  11. Characterization of Carbon Onion Nanomaterials for Environmental Remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The unique properties of carbonaceous nanomaterials, including small particle size, high surface area, and manipulatable surface chemistry, provide high potential for their application to environmental remediation. While research has devoted to develop nanotechnology for environm...

  12. Predictive modeling of nanomaterial exposure effects in biological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu X

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Xiong Liu,1 Kaizhi Tang,1 Stacey Harper,2 Bryan Harper,2 Jeffery A Steevens,3 Roger Xu1 1Intelligent Automation, Inc., Rockville, MD, USA; 2Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; 3ERDC Environmental Laboratory, Vicksburg, MS, USA Background: Predictive modeling of the biological effects of nanomaterials is critical for industry and policymakers to assess the potential hazards resulting from the application of engineered nanomaterials. Methods: We generated an experimental dataset on the toxic effects experienced by embryonic zebrafish due to exposure to nanomaterials. Several nanomaterials were studied, such as metal nanoparticles, dendrimer, metal oxide, and polymeric materials. The embryonic zebrafish metric (EZ Metric was used as a screening-level measurement representative of adverse effects. Using the dataset, we developed a data mining approach to model the toxic endpoints and the overall biological impact of nanomaterials. Data mining techniques, such as numerical prediction, can assist analysts in developing risk assessment models for nanomaterials. Results: We found several important attributes that contribute to the 24 hours post-fertilization (hpf mortality, such as dosage concentration, shell composition, and surface charge. These findings concur with previous studies on nanomaterial toxicity using embryonic zebrafish. We conducted case studies on modeling the overall effect/impact of nanomaterials and the specific toxic endpoints such as mortality, delayed development, and morphological malformations. The results show that we can achieve high prediction accuracy for certain biological effects, such as 24 hpf mortality, 120 hpf mortality, and 120 hpf heart malformation. The results also show that the weighting scheme for individual biological effects has a significant influence on modeling the overall impact of

  13. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  14. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  16. Titania Nanomaterials for Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavan, Ladislav

    Košice: UPJŠ Košice, 2015. [International Conference on Nanomaterials: Fundamentals and Applications /2./. 26.10.2015-28.10.2015, Košice] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-07724S Grant ostatní: COST(XE) CM1104 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : titania nanomaterials * electrochemistry * titanium dioxide Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  17. Perspectives on the design of safer nanomaterials and manufacturing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concerted effort is being made to insert Prevention through Design principles into discussions of sustainability, occupational safety and health, and green chemistry related to nanotechnology. Prevention through Design is a set of principles, which includes solutions to design out potential hazards in nanomanufacturing including the design of nanomaterials, and strategies to eliminate exposures and minimize risks that may be related to the manufacturing processes and equipment at various stages of the lifecycle of an engineered nanomaterial

  18. Advanced nanomaterials and their applications in renewable energy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jingbo Louise

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Nanomaterials and Their Applications in Renewable Energy presents timely topics related to nanomaterials' feasible synthesis and characterization, and their application in the energy fields. In addition, the book provides insights and scientific discoveries in toxicity study, with information that is easily understood by a wide audience. Advanced energy materials are important in designing materials that have greater physical, electronic, and optical properties. This book emphasizes the fundamental physics and chemistry underlying the techniques used to develop solar and fuel cell

  19. Green solvent-based approaches for synthesis of nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The use of green solvents (including supercritical fluids and ionic liquids) in the synthesis of nanomaterials is highlighted. The methods described can not only reduce or eliminate the use or generation of substances hazardous to health and the environment, but can also be used to efficiently prepare nanomaterials with high performances. The unique characteristics of green solvents are responsible for the green features and unusual advantages of these approaches.

  20. Removal of Engineered Nanomaterials Through Conventional Water Treatment Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Honda, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The overall aim of this PhD research was to identify mechanisms involved in the removal of nanomaterials in conventional water treatment. This project was developed based upon the need for assessing current water treatment infrastructure, and its capacity of effectiveness in removing nanomaterials. The bulk of this dissertation investigated "primary treatment" steps of coagulation, flocculation, and sedimentation, simulated by full-scale and micro-scale jar tests. The remainder of the diss...

  1. Development of nanomaterial based sensors for the detection of explosives

    OpenAIRE

    Peveler, W. J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of low levels of illicit materials, such as explosives, is a key challenge for security and environmental monitoring. Recent advances in highly sensitive molecular-recognition techniques utilising nanomaterials may pro- vide a wealth of useful tools for this purpose. In this thesis two classes of nanomaterials are applied to explosives sensing. The first is a range of novel gold nanoparticles, produced via the facile reduction of chloroauric acid with mono- and di-ketones. The mecha...

  2. Current Studies into the Genotoxic Effects of Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Teng Ng; Li, Jasmine J.; Boon-Huat Bay; Lin-Yue Lanry Yung

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has created opportunities for engineers to manufacture superior and more efficient devices and products. Nanomaterials (NMs) are now widely used in consumer products as well as for research applications. However, while the lists of known toxic effects of nanomaterials and nanoparticles (NPs) continue to grow, there is still a vast gap in our knowledge about the genotoxicity of NMs. In this paper, we highlight some NMs of interest and discuss the current in vivo and in vitro stu...

  3. Perspectives on the design of safer nanomaterials and manufacturing processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraci, Charles [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (United States); Heidel, Donna [Bureau Veritas North America, Inc. (United States); Sayes, Christie [Baylor University (United States); Hodson, Laura, E-mail: lhodson@cdc.gov; Schulte, Paul; Eastlake, Adrienne [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (United States); Brenner, Sara [Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at State University of New York Polytechnic Institute, (SUNY Poly) (United States)

    2015-09-15

    A concerted effort is being made to insert Prevention through Design principles into discussions of sustainability, occupational safety and health, and green chemistry related to nanotechnology. Prevention through Design is a set of principles, which includes solutions to design out potential hazards in nanomanufacturing including the design of nanomaterials, and strategies to eliminate exposures and minimize risks that may be related to the manufacturing processes and equipment at various stages of the lifecycle of an engineered nanomaterial.

  4. (Q)SAR Modelling of Nanomaterial Toxicity - A Critical Review

    OpenAIRE

    Oksel, C; Ma, CY; Liu, JJ; Wilkins, T; Wang, XZ

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing recognition that nanomaterials pose a risk to human health, and that the novel engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in the nanotechnology industry and their increasing industrial usage poses the most immediate problem for hazard assessment, as many of them remain untested. The large number of materials and their variants (different sizes and coatings for instance) that require testing and ethical pressure towards non-animal testing means that expensive animal bioassay is pre...

  5. A functional assay-based strategy for nanomaterial risk forecasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendren, Christine Ogilvie; Lowry, Gregory V; Unrine, Jason M; Wiesner, Mark R

    2015-12-01

    The study of nanomaterial impacts on environment, health and safety (nanoEHS) has been largely predicated on the assumption that exposure and hazard can be predicted from physical-chemical properties of nanomaterials. This approach is rooted in the view that nanoöbjects essentially resemble chemicals with additional particle-based attributes that must be included among their intrinsic physical-chemical descriptors. With the exception of the trivial case of nanomaterials made from toxic or highly reactive materials, this approach has yielded few actionable guidelines for predicting nanomaterial risk. This article addresses inherent problems in structuring a nanoEHS research strategy based on the goal of predicting outcomes directly from nanomaterial properties, and proposes a framework for organizing data and designing integrated experiments based on functional assays (FAs). FAs are intermediary, semi-empirical measures of processes or functions within a specified system that bridge the gap between nanomaterial properties and potential outcomes in complex systems. The three components of a functional assay are standardized protocols for parameter determination and reporting, a theoretical context for parameter application and reference systems. We propose the identification and adoption of reference systems where FAs may be applied to provide parameter estimates for environmental fate and effects models, as well as benchmarks for comparing the results of FAs and experiments conducted in more complex and varied systems. Surface affinity and dissolution rate are identified as two critical FAs for characterizing nanomaterial behavior in a variety of important systems. The use of these FAs to predict bioaccumulation and toxicity for initial and aged nanomaterials is illustrated for the case of silver nanoparticles and Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:26188653

  6. Nanomaterials in consumer's goods: the problems of risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmoshinski, I. V.; Khotimchenko, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    Nanotechnology and engineered nanomaterials are currently used in wide variety of cosmetic products, while their use in food industry, packaging materials, household chemicals etc. still includes a limited number of items and does not show a significant upward trend. However, the problem of priority nanomaterials associated risks is relevant due to their high production volumes and an constantly growing burden on the environment and population. In accordance with the frequency of use in mass-produced consumer goods, leading priority nanomaterials are silver nanoparticles (NPs) and (by a wide margin) NPs of gold, platinum, and titanium dioxide. Frequency of nanosized silica introduction into food products as a food additive, at the moment, seems to be underestimated, since the use of this nanomaterial is not declared by manufacturers of products and objective control of its content is difficult. Analysis of literature data on toxicological properties of nanomaterials shows that currently accumulated amount of information is sufficient to establish the safe doses of nanosized silver, gold and titanium dioxide. Data have been provided in a series of studies concerning the effect of oral intake of nanosized silica on the condition of laboratory animals, including on the performance of the immune system. The article examines the existing approaches to the assessment of population exposure to priority nanomaterials, characteristics of existing problems and risk management.

  7. Nanomaterials and Autophagy: New Insights in Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autophagy represents a cell’s response to stress. It is an evolutionarily conserved process with diversified roles. Indeed, it controls intracellular homeostasis by degradation and/or recycling intracellular metabolic material, supplies energy, provides nutrients, eliminates cytotoxic materials and damaged proteins and organelles. Moreover, autophagy is involved in several diseases. Recent evidences support a relationship between several classes of nanomaterials and autophagy perturbation, both induction and blockade, in many biological models. In fact, the autophagic mechanism represents a common cellular response to nanomaterials. On the other hand, the dynamic nature of autophagy in cancer biology is an intriguing approach for cancer therapeutics, since during tumour development and therapy, autophagy has been reported to trigger both an early cell survival and a late cell death. The use of nanomaterials in cancer treatment to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs and target tumours is well known. Recently, autophagy modulation mediated by nanomaterials has become an appealing notion in nanomedicine therapeutics, since it can be exploited as adjuvant in chemotherapy or in the development of cancer vaccines or as a potential anti-cancer agent. Herein, we summarize the effects of nanomaterials on autophagic processes in cancer, also considering the therapeutic outcome of synergism between nanomaterials and autophagy to improve existing cancer therapies

  8. Nanomaterials and Autophagy: New Insights in Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panzarini, Elisa; Inguscio, Valentina; Tenuzzo, Bernardetta Anna; Carata, Elisabetta; Dini, Luciana, E-mail: luciana.dini@unisalento.it [Department of Biological and Environmental Science and Technology (Di.S.Te.B.A.), University of Salento, Lecce 73100 (Italy)

    2013-03-21

    Autophagy represents a cell’s response to stress. It is an evolutionarily conserved process with diversified roles. Indeed, it controls intracellular homeostasis by degradation and/or recycling intracellular metabolic material, supplies energy, provides nutrients, eliminates cytotoxic materials and damaged proteins and organelles. Moreover, autophagy is involved in several diseases. Recent evidences support a relationship between several classes of nanomaterials and autophagy perturbation, both induction and blockade, in many biological models. In fact, the autophagic mechanism represents a common cellular response to nanomaterials. On the other hand, the dynamic nature of autophagy in cancer biology is an intriguing approach for cancer therapeutics, since during tumour development and therapy, autophagy has been reported to trigger both an early cell survival and a late cell death. The use of nanomaterials in cancer treatment to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs and target tumours is well known. Recently, autophagy modulation mediated by nanomaterials has become an appealing notion in nanomedicine therapeutics, since it can be exploited as adjuvant in chemotherapy or in the development of cancer vaccines or as a potential anti-cancer agent. Herein, we summarize the effects of nanomaterials on autophagic processes in cancer, also considering the therapeutic outcome of synergism between nanomaterials and autophagy to improve existing cancer therapies.

  9. Sustainable nanomaterials? – How to apply “early warning signs” to screen nanomaterials for harmful properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Anders; Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2014-01-01

    endeavors. This presentation explores how the first lesson – “Acknowledge and respond to ignorance, uncertainty and risk in technology appraisal” could be applied to screen nanomaterials. In cases of ignorance, uncertainty and risk, the EEA recommends paying particular attention to important warning signs...... such as novelty, persistency, whether materials are readily dispersed in the environment, and whether they bioaccumulate or lead to potentially irreversible action. Through an analysis of these criteria using five well‐known nanomaterials (titanium dioxide, carbon nanotubes, liposomes, poly...... how these warning signs can be used by different stakeholders such as nanomaterial researchers and developers, companies and regulators to design benign nanomaterials, communicate what is known about nano‐risks and decide on whether to implement precautionary regulatory measures....

  10. Novel Metal Nanomaterials and Their Catalytic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaqing; Gu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    In the rapidly developing areas of nanotechnology, nano-scale materials as heterogeneous catalysts in the synthesis of organic molecules have gotten more and more attention. In this review, we will summarize the synthesis of several new types of noble metal nanostructures (FePt@Cu nanowires, Pt@Fe₂O₃ nanowires and bimetallic Pt@Ir nanocomplexes; Pt-Au heterostructures, Au-Pt bimetallic nanocomplexes and Pt/Pd bimetallic nanodendrites; Au nanowires, CuO@Ag nanowires and a series of Pd nanocatalysts) and their new catalytic applications in our group, to establish heterogeneous catalytic system in "green" environments. Further study shows that these materials have a higher catalytic activity and selectivity than previously reported nanocrystal catalysts in organic reactions, or show a superior electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol. The whole process might have a great impact to resolve the energy crisis and the environmental crisis that were caused by traditional chemical engineering. Furthermore, we hope that this article will provide a reference point for the noble metal nanomaterials' development that leads to new opportunities in nanocatalysis. PMID:26393550

  11. Engineering noble metal nanomaterials for environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingguo; Zhao, Tingting; Chen, Tiankai; Liu, Yanbiao; Ong, Choon Nam; Xie, Jianping

    2015-04-01

    Besides being valuable assets in our daily lives, noble metals (namely, gold, silver, and platinum) also feature many intriguing physical and chemical properties when their sizes are reduced to the nano- or even subnano-scale; such assets may significantly increase the values of the noble metals as functional materials for tackling important societal issues related to human health and the environment. Among which, designing/engineering of noble metal nanomaterials (NMNs) to address challenging issues in the environment has attracted recent interest in the community. In general, the use of NMNs for environmental applications is highly dependent on the physical and chemical properties of NMNs. Such properties can be readily controlled by tailoring the attributes of NMNs, including their size, shape, composition, and surface. In this feature article, we discuss recent progress in the rational design and engineering of NMNs with particular focus on their applications in the field of environmental sensing and catalysis. The development of functional NMNs for environmental applications is highly interdisciplinary, which requires concerted efforts from the communities of materials science, chemistry, engineering, and environmental science.

  12. Carbon Nanomaterials in Agriculture: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Majumdar, Sanghamitra; Servin, Alia D; Pagano, Luca; Dhankher, Om Parkash; White, Jason C

    2016-01-01

    There has been great interest in the use of carbon nano-materials (CNMs) in agriculture. However, the existing literature reveals mixed effects from CNM exposure on plants, ranging from enhanced crop yield to acute cytotoxicity and genetic alteration. These seemingly inconsistent research-outcomes, taken with the current technological limitations for in situ CNM detection, present significant hurdles to the wide scale use of CNMs in agriculture. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current literature, including studies with both positive and negative effects of different CNMs (e.g., carbon nano-tubes, fullerenes, carbon nanoparticles, and carbon nano-horns, among others) on terrestrial plants and associated soil-dwelling microbes. The effects of CNMs on the uptake of various co-contaminants will also be discussed. Last, we highlight critical knowledge gaps, including the need for more soil-based investigations under environmentally relevant conditions. In addition, efforts need to be focused on better understanding of the underlying mechanism of CNM-plant interactions. PMID:26941751

  13. CARBON NANOMATERIALS IN AGRICULTURE: A CRITICAL REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab eMukherjee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThere has been great interest in the use of carbon nano-materials (CNMs in agriculture. However, the existing literature reveals mixed effects from CNM exposure on plants, ranging from enhanced crop yield to acute cytotoxicity and genetic alteration. These seemingly inconsistent research-outcomes, taken with the current technological limitations for in situ CNM detection, present significant hurdles to the wide scale use of CNMs in agriculture. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current literature, including studies with both positive and negative effects of different CNMs (e.g., carbon nano-tubes, fullerenes, carbon nanoparticles, and carbon nano-horns, among others on terrestrial plants and associated soil-dwelling microbes. The effects of CNMs on the uptake of various co-contaminants will also be discussed. Last, we highlight critical knowledge gaps, including the need for more soil-based investigations under environmentally relevant conditions. In addition, efforts need to be focused on better understanding of the underlying mechanism of CNM-plant interactions.

  14. Optical Characterization of Natural Nontoxic Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Devulapalli; Yelleswarapu, Chandra

    2013-03-01

    Synthetic nanomaterials - carbon nanotubes, semiconductor nanoparticles, nanowires and nanorods, metal clusters in polymer films - are extensively studied for potential photonic applications. Naturally occurring halloysite nanotubes offer additional advantages of high tensile strength, nontoxcity and biocompatibility. Halloysite is receiving lot of attention for application as low cost nanoscale container for encapsulation of biologically active molecules, drugs, and anticorrosion agents. We studied the optical properties of halloysite nanotube samples of length ~1000 nm with 50 nm external diameter and 15 nm internal diameter. The hollysite sample was provided by Prof. Yuri Lvov, Institute for Micromanufacturing, Louisiana Tech. The sample suspended in water at a concentration 2.5 mg/ml exhibits a broad optical absorption band in the visible region with a peak ~600 nm. Z-scan studies are carried out, with 3 nsec laser pulses of frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, using 1 mm glass cell containing the sample suspended in acetone at a concentration 0.66 mg/ml. Open aperture z-scan measurements indicate two-photon absorption. Closed aperture z-scan measurements exhibit a positive nonlinear refractive index. Results of photoacoustic z-scan currently in progress will also be presented.

  15. Carbon Nanomaterials in Agriculture: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arnab; Majumdar, Sanghamitra; Servin, Alia D.; Pagano, Luca; Dhankher, Om Parkash; White, Jason C.

    2016-01-01

    There has been great interest in the use of carbon nano-materials (CNMs) in agriculture. However, the existing literature reveals mixed effects from CNM exposure on plants, ranging from enhanced crop yield to acute cytotoxicity and genetic alteration. These seemingly inconsistent research-outcomes, taken with the current technological limitations for in situ CNM detection, present significant hurdles to the wide scale use of CNMs in agriculture. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current literature, including studies with both positive and negative effects of different CNMs (e.g., carbon nano-tubes, fullerenes, carbon nanoparticles, and carbon nano-horns, among others) on terrestrial plants and associated soil-dwelling microbes. The effects of CNMs on the uptake of various co-contaminants will also be discussed. Last, we highlight critical knowledge gaps, including the need for more soil-based investigations under environmentally relevant conditions. In addition, efforts need to be focused on better understanding of the underlying mechanism of CNM-plant interactions. PMID:26941751

  16. A functional assay-based strategy for nanomaterial risk forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendren, Christine Ogilvie, E-mail: christine.hendren@duke.edu [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Lowry, Gregory V., E-mail: glowry@andrew.cmu.edu [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 119 Porter Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Unrine, Jason M., E-mail: jason.unrine@uky.edu [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, Agricultural Science Center, Lexington, KY 40546 (United States); Wiesner, Mark R., E-mail: wiesner@duke.edu [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, 121 Hudson Hall PO Box 90287, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The study of nanomaterial impacts on environment, health and safety (nanoEHS) has been largely predicated on the assumption that exposure and hazard can be predicted from physical–chemical properties of nanomaterials. This approach is rooted in the view that nanoöbjects essentially resemble chemicals with additional particle-based attributes that must be included among their intrinsic physical–chemical descriptors. With the exception of the trivial case of nanomaterials made from toxic or highly reactive materials, this approach has yielded few actionable guidelines for predicting nanomaterial risk. This article addresses inherent problems in structuring a nanoEHS research strategy based on the goal of predicting outcomes directly from nanomaterial properties, and proposes a framework for organizing data and designing integrated experiments based on functional assays (FAs). FAs are intermediary, semi-empirical measures of processes or functions within a specified system that bridge the gap between nanomaterial properties and potential outcomes in complex systems. The three components of a functional assay are standardized protocols for parameter determination and reporting, a theoretical context for parameter application and reference systems. We propose the identification and adoption of reference systems where FAs may be applied to provide parameter estimates for environmental fate and effects models, as well as benchmarks for comparing the results of FAs and experiments conducted in more complex and varied systems. Surface affinity and dissolution rate are identified as two critical FAs for characterizing nanomaterial behavior in a variety of important systems. The use of these FAs to predict bioaccumulation and toxicity for initial and aged nanomaterials is illustrated for the case of silver nanoparticles and Caenorhabditis elegans. - Highlights: • Approaches to predict risk directly from nanomaterial (NM) properties are problematic. • We propose

  17. A functional assay-based strategy for nanomaterial risk forecasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of nanomaterial impacts on environment, health and safety (nanoEHS) has been largely predicated on the assumption that exposure and hazard can be predicted from physical–chemical properties of nanomaterials. This approach is rooted in the view that nanoöbjects essentially resemble chemicals with additional particle-based attributes that must be included among their intrinsic physical–chemical descriptors. With the exception of the trivial case of nanomaterials made from toxic or highly reactive materials, this approach has yielded few actionable guidelines for predicting nanomaterial risk. This article addresses inherent problems in structuring a nanoEHS research strategy based on the goal of predicting outcomes directly from nanomaterial properties, and proposes a framework for organizing data and designing integrated experiments based on functional assays (FAs). FAs are intermediary, semi-empirical measures of processes or functions within a specified system that bridge the gap between nanomaterial properties and potential outcomes in complex systems. The three components of a functional assay are standardized protocols for parameter determination and reporting, a theoretical context for parameter application and reference systems. We propose the identification and adoption of reference systems where FAs may be applied to provide parameter estimates for environmental fate and effects models, as well as benchmarks for comparing the results of FAs and experiments conducted in more complex and varied systems. Surface affinity and dissolution rate are identified as two critical FAs for characterizing nanomaterial behavior in a variety of important systems. The use of these FAs to predict bioaccumulation and toxicity for initial and aged nanomaterials is illustrated for the case of silver nanoparticles and Caenorhabditis elegans. - Highlights: • Approaches to predict risk directly from nanomaterial (NM) properties are problematic. • We propose

  18. Exploring release and recovery of nanomaterials from commercial polymeric nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Much concern has been raised about the risks associated with the broad use of polymers containing nanomaterials. Much is known about degradation and aging of polymers and nanomaterials independently, but very few studies have been done in order to understand degradation of polymeric nanocomposites containing nanomaterials and the fate of these nanomaterials, which may occur in suffering many processes such as migration, release and physicochemical modifications. Throughout the UE funded FP7 project NANOPOLYTOX, studies on the migration, release and alteration of mechanical properties of commercial nanocomposites due to ageing and weathering have been performed along with studies on the feasibility of recovery and recycling of the nanomaterials. The project includes the use as model nanocomposites of Polyamide-6 (PA), Polypropylene (PP) and Ethyl Vinyl Acetate (EVA) as polymeric matrix filled with a 3% in mass of a set of selected broadly used nanomaterials; from inorganic metal oxides nanoparticles (SiO2, TiO2 and ZnO) to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and Nanoclays. These model nanocomposites were then treated under accelerated ageing conditions in climatic chamber. To determine the degree of degradation of the whole nanocomposite and possible processes of migration, release and modification of the nanofillers, nanocomposites were characterized by different techniques. Additionally, recovery of the nanomaterials fro m the polymeric matrix was addressed, being successfully achieved for PA and PP based nanocomposites. In the case of PA, dissolution of the polymeric matrix using formic acid and further centrifugation steps was the chosen approach, while for PP based nanocomposites calcination was performed.

  19. Engineered Nanomaterials, Sexy New Technology and Potential Hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaulieu, R A

    2009-05-04

    Engineered nanomaterials enhance exciting new applications that can greatly benefit society in areas of cancer treatments, solar energy, energy storage, and water purification. While nanotechnology shows incredible promise in these and other areas by exploiting nanomaterials unique properties, these same properties can potentially cause adverse health effects to workers who may be exposed during work. Dispersed nanoparticles in air can cause adverse health effects to animals not merely due to their chemical properties but due to their size, structure, shape, surface chemistry, solubility, carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity, mutagenicity, dermal toxicity, and parent material toxicity. Nanoparticles have a greater likelihood of lung deposition and blood absorption than larger particles due to their size. Nanomaterials can also pose physical hazards due to their unusually high reactivity, which makes them useful as catalysts, but has the potential to cause fires and explosions. Characterization of the hazards (and potential for exposures) associated with nanomaterial development and incorporation in other products is an essential step in the development of nanotechnologies. Developing controls for these hazards are equally important. Engineered controls should be integrated into nanomaterial manufacturing process design according to 10CFR851, DOE Policy 456.1, and DOE Notice 456.1 as safety-related hardware or administrative controls for worker safety. Nanomaterial hazards in a nuclear facility must also meet control requirements per DOE standards 3009, 1189, and 1186. Integration of safe designs into manufacturing processes for new applications concurrent with the developing technology is essential for worker safety. This paper presents a discussion of nanotechnology, nanomaterial properties/hazards and controls.

  20. Challenges for In vitro to in Vivo Extrapolation of Nanomaterial Dosimetry for Human Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jordan N.

    2013-11-01

    The proliferation in types and uses of nanomaterials in consumer products has led to rapid application of conventional in vitro approaches for hazard identification. Unfortunately, assumptions pertaining to experimental design and interpretation for studies with chemicals are not generally appropriate for nanomaterials. The fate of nanomaterials in cell culture media, cellular dose to nanomaterials, cellular dose to nanomaterial byproducts, and intracellular fate of nanomaterials at the target site of toxicity all must be considered in order to accurately extrapolate in vitro results to reliable predictions of human risk.

  1. Effects of nanomaterials on marine invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canesi, Laura; Corsi, Ilaria

    2016-09-15

    The development of nanotechnology will inevitably lead to the release of consistent amounts of nanomaterials (NMs) and nanoparticles (NPs) into marine ecosystems. Ecotoxicological studies have been carried out to identify potential biological targets of NPs, and suitable models for predicting their impact on the health of the marine environment. Recent studies in invertebrates mainly focused on NP accumulation and sub-lethal effects, rather than acute toxicity. Among marine invertebrates, bivalves represent by large the most studied group, with polychaetes and echinoderms also emerging as significant targets of NPs. However, major scientific gaps still need to be filled. In this work, factors affecting the fate of NPs in the marine environment, and their consequent uptake/accumulation/toxicity in marine invertebrates will be summarized. The results show that in different model species, NP accumulation mainly occurs in digestive tract and gills. Data on sub-lethal effects and modes of action of different types of NPs (mainly metal oxides and metal based NPs) in marine invertebrates will be reviewed, in particular on immune function, oxidative stress and embryo development. Moreover, the possibility that such effects may be influenced by NP interactions with biomolecules in both external and internal environment will be introduced. In natural environmental media, NP interactions with polysaccharides, proteins and colloids may affect their agglomeration/aggregation and consequent bioavailability. Moreover, once within the organism, NPs are known to interact with plasma proteins, forming a protein corona that can affect particle uptake and toxicity in target cells in a physiological environment. These interactions, leading to the formation of eco-bio-coronas, may be crucial in determining particle behavior and effects also in marine biota. In order to classify NPs into groups and predict the implications of their release into the marine environment, information on

  2. Global life cycle releases of engineered nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are now becoming a significant fraction of the material flows in the global economy. We are already reaping the benefits of improved energy efficiency, material use reduction, and better performance in many existing and new applications that have been enabled by these technological advances. As ENMs pervade the global economy, however, it becomes important to understand their environmental implications. As a first step, we combined ENM market information and material flow modeling to produce the first global assessment of the likely ENM emissions to the environment and landfills. The top ten most produced ENMs by mass were analyzed in a dozen major applications. Emissions during the manufacturing, use, and disposal stages were estimated, including intermediate steps through wastewater treatment plants and waste incineration plants. In 2010, silica, titania, alumina, and iron and zinc oxides dominate the ENM market in terms of mass flow through the global economy, used mostly in coatings/paints/pigments, electronics and optics, cosmetics, energy and environmental applications, and as catalysts. We estimate that 63–91 % of over 260,000–309,000 metric tons of global ENM production in 2010 ended up in landfills, with the balance released into soils (8–28 %), water bodies (0.4–7 %), and atmosphere (0.1–1.5 %). While there are considerable uncertainties in the estimates, the framework for estimating emissions can be easily improved as better data become available. The material flow estimates can be used to quantify emissions at the local level, as inputs for fate and transport models to estimate concentrations in different environmental compartments.

  3. Global life cycle releases of engineered nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Arturo A., E-mail: keller@bren.ucsb.edu; McFerran, Suzanne; Lazareva, Anastasiya; Suh, Sangwon [University of California, Santa Barbara, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are now becoming a significant fraction of the material flows in the global economy. We are already reaping the benefits of improved energy efficiency, material use reduction, and better performance in many existing and new applications that have been enabled by these technological advances. As ENMs pervade the global economy, however, it becomes important to understand their environmental implications. As a first step, we combined ENM market information and material flow modeling to produce the first global assessment of the likely ENM emissions to the environment and landfills. The top ten most produced ENMs by mass were analyzed in a dozen major applications. Emissions during the manufacturing, use, and disposal stages were estimated, including intermediate steps through wastewater treatment plants and waste incineration plants. In 2010, silica, titania, alumina, and iron and zinc oxides dominate the ENM market in terms of mass flow through the global economy, used mostly in coatings/paints/pigments, electronics and optics, cosmetics, energy and environmental applications, and as catalysts. We estimate that 63-91 % of over 260,000-309,000 metric tons of global ENM production in 2010 ended up in landfills, with the balance released into soils (8-28 %), water bodies (0.4-7 %), and atmosphere (0.1-1.5 %). While there are considerable uncertainties in the estimates, the framework for estimating emissions can be easily improved as better data become available. The material flow estimates can be used to quantify emissions at the local level, as inputs for fate and transport models to estimate concentrations in different environmental compartments.

  4. Fabrication of functional nanomaterials using flame assisted spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purwanto, Agus, E-mail: aguspur@uns.ac.id [Chemical Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta 632112 (Indonesia)

    2014-02-24

    Flame assisted spray pyrolysis (FASP) is a class of synthesis method for nanomaterials fabrication. The ability to control nanomaterials characteristics and easy to be-scaled up are the main features of FASP. The crystallinity and particles size of the prepared nanomaterials can be easily controlled by variation of fuel flow rate. The precursor concentration, carrier gas flow rate, and carrier gas can be also used to control the prepared nanomaterials. Energy related nanomaterials preparation uses as the example case in FASP application. These material are yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce) and tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}). It needs strategies to produce these materials into nano-sized order. YAG:Ce nanoparticles only can be synthesized by FASP using the urea addition. The decomposition of urea under high temperature of flame promotes the breakage of YAG:Ce particles into nanoparticles. In the preparation of WO{sub 3}, the high temperature flame can be used to gasify WO{sub 3} solid material. As a result, WO{sub 3} nanoparticles can be prepared easily. Generally, to produce nanoparticles via FASP method, the boiling point of the material is important to determine the strategy which will be used.

  5. Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Immunosensors for Clinically Significant Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niina J. Ronkainen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has played a crucial role in the development of biosensors over the past decade. The development, testing, optimization, and validation of new biosensors has become a highly interdisciplinary effort involving experts in chemistry, biology, physics, engineering, and medicine. The sensitivity, the specificity and the reproducibility of biosensors have improved tremendously as a result of incorporating nanomaterials in their design. In general, nanomaterials-based electrochemical immunosensors amplify the sensitivity by facilitating greater loading of the larger sensing surface with biorecognition molecules as well as improving the electrochemical properties of the transducer. The most common types of nanomaterials and their properties will be described. In addition, the utilization of nanomaterials in immunosensors for biomarker detection will be discussed since these biosensors have enormous potential for a myriad of clinical uses. Electrochemical immunosensors provide a specific and simple analytical alternative as evidenced by their brief analysis times, inexpensive instrumentation, lower assay cost as well as good portability and amenability to miniaturization. The role nanomaterials play in biosensors, their ability to improve detection capabilities in low concentration analytes yielding clinically useful data and their impact on other biosensor performance properties will be discussed. Finally, the most common types of electroanalytical detection methods will be briefly touched upon.

  6. Autophagy as a Possible Underlying Mechanism of Nanomaterial Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cohignac

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of nanotechnologies is raising safety concerns because of the potential effects of engineered nanomaterials on human health, particularly at the respiratory level. Since the last decades, many in vivo studies have been interested in the pulmonary effects of different classes of nanomaterials. It has been shown that some of them can induce toxic effects, essentially depending on their physico-chemical characteristics, but other studies did not identify such effects. Inflammation and oxidative stress are currently the two main mechanisms described to explain the observed toxicity. However, the exact underlying mechanism(s still remain(s unknown and autophagy could represent an interesting candidate. Autophagy is a physiological process in which cytoplasmic components are digested via a lysosomal pathway. It has been shown that autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis and the progression of human diseases, and is able to modulate the oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory responses. A growing amount of literature suggests that a link between nanomaterial toxicity and autophagy impairment could exist. In this review, we will first summarize what is known about the respiratory effects of nanomaterials and we will then discuss the possible involvement of autophagy in this toxicity. This review should help understand why autophagy impairment could be taken as a promising candidate to fully understand nanomaterials toxicity.

  7. Perspectives on the Emerging Applications of Multifaceted Biomedical Polymeric Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mohammed Gumel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradable and biocompatible polymeric nanomaterials, serving as biomedical devices have garnered significant attention as a promising solution to therapeutic management of many chronic diseases. Despite their potentials, majority of the synthetic nanomaterials used in biomedical applications lack crucial properties, for example, ligand binding sites, responsiveness, and switchability to efficiently deliver intended drugs to the target site. Advancements in manipulating nanoscale geometry have incurred the incorporation of triggered release mechanism within the nanomaterials design. This expanded their potential applications beyond nanocarriers to theranostics exhibiting both tandem drug delivery and diagnostic capabilities. Additionally, it highlights possibilities to design nanomaterials that could translate chemical response(s to photometric display, thus making affordable biosensors and actuators readily available for biomedical exploitation. It is anticipated that, in the near future, these implementations could be made to access some of the most difficult therapy locations, for example, blood brain barrier to provide efficient management of Alzheimer, Huntington, and other neurodegenerative diseases. This review aims to serve as a reference platform by providing the readers with the overview of the recent advancements and cutting-edge techniques employed in the production and instrumentation of such nanomaterials.

  8. Deformable devices with integrated functional nanomaterials for wearable electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaemin; Lee, Jongsu; Son, Donghee; Choi, Moon Kee; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-03-01

    As the market and related industry for wearable electronics dramatically expands, there are continuous and strong demands for flexible and stretchable devices to be seamlessly integrated with soft and curvilinear human skin or clothes. However, the mechanical mismatch between the rigid conventional electronics and the soft human body causes many problems. Therefore, various prospective nanomaterials that possess a much lower flexural rigidity than their bulk counterparts have rapidly established themselves as promising electronic materials replacing rigid silicon and/or compound semiconductors in next-generation wearable devices. Many hybrid structures of multiple nanomaterials have been also developed to pursue both high performance and multifunctionality. Here, we provide an overview of state-of-the-art wearable devices based on one- or two-dimensional nanomaterials (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene, single-crystal silicon and oxide nanomembranes, organic nanomaterials and their hybrids) in combination with zero-dimensional functional nanomaterials (e.g., metal/oxide nanoparticles and quantum dots). Starting from an introduction of materials strategies, we describe device designs and the roles of individual ones in integrated systems. Detailed application examples of wearable sensors/actuators, memories, energy devices, and displays are also presented.

  9. The Nanopharmacology and Nanotoxicology of Nanomaterials: New Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radomska, Anna; Leszczyszyn, Jarosław; Radomski, Marek W

    2016-01-01

    The very dynamic growth of nanotechnology, nanomaterials (sized 1-100 nm) and their medical applications over the past 10 years has promised to add a new impetus to the diagnostics and therapeutics of a wide range of human pathologies, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diseases of the central nervous system. This growth in nanomedicine also fuels advances in bioengineering, regenerative medicine and the development of medical devices. However, as with all new pharmaceuticals and medical devices, new opportunities are inherently accompanied by new challenges due to the ability of nanomaterials to interact with the body on the cellular, subcellular and molecular levels. This article reviews some of the most compelling problems related to the nanopharmacology and nanotoxicology of nanomaterials. The overview focuses on opportunities emerging from the development of multifunctional nanomaterials and nanotheranostics for the diagnostics and therapy of both major and rare diseases. Challenges related to the hemocompatibility of nanomaterials are also discussed. PMID:26935510

  10. Particle length-dependent titanium dioxide nanomaterials toxicity and bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buford Mary

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanomaterials have considerable beneficial uses as photocatalysts and solar cells. It has been established for many years that pigment-grade TiO2 (200 nm sphere is relatively inert when internalized into a biological model system (in vivo or in vitro. For this reason, TiO2 nanomaterials are considered an attractive alternative in applications where biological exposures will occur. Unfortunately, metal oxides on the nanoscale (one dimension Results TiO2 nanospheres, short ( 15 μm nanobelts were synthesized, characterized and tested for biological activity using primary murine alveolar macrophages and in vivo in mice. This study demonstrates that alteration of anatase TiO2 nanomaterial into a fibre structure of greater than 15 μm creates a highly toxic particle and initiates an inflammatory response by alveolar macrophages. These fibre-shaped nanomaterials induced inflammasome activation and release of inflammatory cytokines through a cathepsin B-mediated mechanism. Consequently, long TiO2 nanobelts interact with lung macrophages in a manner very similar to asbestos or silica. Conclusions These observations suggest that any modification of a nanomaterial, resulting in a wire, fibre, belt or tube, be tested for pathogenic potential. As this study demonstrates, toxicity and pathogenic potential change dramatically as the shape of the material is altered into one that a phagocytic cell has difficulty processing, resulting in lysosomal disruption.

  11. Dendritic surface functionalization of nanomaterials: controlling properties and functions for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nazemi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide variety of nanomaterials have demonstrated promise in medical applications such as drug delivery and imaging. In these applications, the surface chemistry of the materials is critical as it plays an important role in determining the toxicity and biodistribution behavior of the material. We review here the functionalization of nanomaterials with dendrons as an efficient method to alter the surface chemistry of the materials, introducing new properties and functions. Described here is the functionalization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO with dendritic guanidines to enhance their transport into cells for magnetic resonance imaging applications. The introduction of dendrons bearing peripheral hydroxyls, amines, guanidines, carbohydrates and Gd(III chelates to polymer vesicles (polymersomes is also described. These dendritic moieties allow for modulation of toxicity, cell uptake, protein binding, and contrast agent efficiency, while at the same time allowing the stabilities of the polymersomes to be maintained. Thus, this approach holds promise for the development of a wide range of multifunctional materials for pharmaceutical applications.

  12. Monitoring migration and transformation of nanomaterials in polymeric composites during accelerated aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incorporation of small amounts of nanoadditives in polymeric compounds can introduce new mechanical, physical, electrical, magnetic, thermal and/or optical properties. The properties of these advanced materials have enabled new applications in several industrial sectors (electronics, automotive, textile...). In particular, for the nanomaterials (NM) described in this work, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and silicon dioxide nanoparticles (SiO2 NP), the following properties have been described: MWCNT act as nucleating agents in thermoplastics, and change viscosity, affecting dispersion, orientation, and therefore mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties; and SiO2 NP act as flame retardant and display improved electrical and mechanical properties. The work described here is focused on the evaluation of the migration and transformation of NM included in polymer nanocomposites (NC) during accelerated climatic ageing. To this aim, we generated polyamide 6 (PA6) NC with different degree of compatibility between the NM and the polymeric matrix. These NC were submitted to accelerated aging conditions to simulate outdoor conditions (simulation of the use phase of the polymeric NC). The NC contain as nanofillers MWCNT and SiO2 NP with different surface properties to influence the compatibility with the polymeric matrix. The generated NC were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), thermogravimetry (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) before and after the aging process, to monitor the compatibility of the NM with the matrix: dispersion within the matrix, migration during aging, and modification of the polymer properties. The dispersion of SiO2 NP in the NC depended on their compatibility with the matrix. However, independently of their compatibility with the matrix, SiO2 NP were aggregated at the end of the accelerated aging process. In addition

  13. Monitoring migration and transformation of nanomaterials in polymeric composites during accelerated aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, G.; Fernández-Rosas, E.; Puntes, V.; Jamier, V.; Aubouy, L.; Vázquez-Campos, S.

    2013-04-01

    The incorporation of small amounts of nanoadditives in polymeric compounds can introduce new mechanical, physical, electrical, magnetic, thermal and/or optical properties. The properties of these advanced materials have enabled new applications in several industrial sectors (electronics, automotive, textile...). In particular, for the nanomaterials (NM) described in this work, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and silicon dioxide nanoparticles (SiO2 NP), the following properties have been described: MWCNT act as nucleating agents in thermoplastics, and change viscosity, affecting dispersion, orientation, and therefore mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties; and SiO2 NP act as flame retardant and display improved electrical and mechanical properties. The work described here is focused on the evaluation of the migration and transformation of NM included in polymer nanocomposites (NC) during accelerated climatic ageing. To this aim, we generated polyamide 6 (PA6) NC with different degree of compatibility between the NM and the polymeric matrix. These NC were submitted to accelerated aging conditions to simulate outdoor conditions (simulation of the use phase of the polymeric NC). The NC contain as nanofillers MWCNT and SiO2 NP with different surface properties to influence the compatibility with the polymeric matrix. The generated NC were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), thermogravimetry (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) before and after the aging process, to monitor the compatibility of the NM with the matrix: dispersion within the matrix, migration during aging, and modification of the polymer properties. The dispersion of SiO2 NP in the NC depended on their compatibility with the matrix. However, independently of their compatibility with the matrix, SiO2 NP were aggregated at the end of the accelerated aging process. In addition

  14. Nanomaterial-Enabled Dry Electrodes for Electrophysiological Sensing: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shanshan; Zhu, Yong

    2016-04-01

    Long-term, continuous, and unsupervised tracking of physiological data is becoming increasingly attractive for health/wellness monitoring and ailment treatment. Nanomaterials have recently attracted extensive attention as building blocks for flexible/stretchable conductors and are thus promising candidates for electrophysiological electrodes. Here we provide a review on nanomaterial-enabled dry electrodes for electrophysiological sensing, focusing on electrocardiography (ECG). The dry electrodes can be classified into contact surface electrodes, contact-penetrating electrodes, and noncontact capacitive electrodes. Different types of electrodes including their corresponding equivalent electrode-skin interface models and the sources of the noise are first introduced, followed by a review on recent developments of dry ECG electrodes based on various nanomaterials, including metallic nanowires, metallic nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene. Their fabrication processes and performances in terms of electrode-skin impedance, signal-to-noise ratio, resistance to motion artifacts, skin compatibility, and long-term stability are discussed.

  15. Comparison of occupational exposure assessment tools and concepts for nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liguori, Biase; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders;

    for Nanomaterials”; “NanoSafer vs. 1.1 – A web-based precautionary risk assessment tool for manufactured nanomaterials using first order modeling” Based on the literature information we have analyzed these tools and discussed elements regarding: the domain of application and whether it accounts for...... the exposure; whether the final output is qualitative or semi-quantitative or quantitative. We observed that the tools were developed based on different needs, but that the domain of application is not always well defined. Moreover, derived exposure potentials or exposure levels are usually based on......The development, production and application of engineered nanomaterials have been growing in different fields. This leads to a consequent increased potential of exposure to nanomaterials in the working environment. However to determine the potential exposure risk is a challenging task for risk...

  16. Recent developments in 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials for sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Padmanathan Karthick; Late, Dattatray J.; Morgan, Hywel; Rout, Chandra Sekhar

    2015-08-01

    Two dimensional layered inorganic nanomaterials (2D-LINs) have recently attracted huge interest because of their unique thickness dependent physical and chemical properties and potential technological applications. The properties of these layered materials can be tuned via both physical and chemical processes. Some 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials like MoS2, WS2 and SnS2 have been recently developed and employed in various applications, including new sensors because of their layer-dependent electrical properties. This article presents a comprehensive overview of recent developments in the application of 2D layered inorganic nanomaterials as sensors. Some of the salient features of 2D materials for different sensing applications are discussed, including gas sensing, electrochemical sensing, SERS and biosensing, SERS sensing and photodetection. The working principles of the sensors are also discussed together with examples.

  17. Current Trends in Nanomaterial-Based Amperometric Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtar Hayat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed an intensive research effort in the field of electrochemical sensors, with a particular focus on the design of amperometric biosensors for diverse analytical applications. In this context, nanomaterial integration in the construction of amperometric biosensors may constitute one of the most exciting approaches. The attractive properties of nanomaterials have paved the way for the design of a wide variety of biosensors based on various electrochemical detection methods to enhance the analytical characteristics. However, most of these nanostructured materials are not explored in the design of amperometric biosensors. This review aims to provide insight into the diverse properties of nanomaterials that can be possibly explored in the construction of amperometric biosensors.

  18. Sunlight-induced Transformations of Graphene-based Nanomaterials in Aquatic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graphene-based nanomaterials and other related carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) can be released from products during their life cycles. Upon entry into aquatic environments, they are potentially transformed by photochemical reactions, oxidation reactions and biological processes, all ...

  19. Physics of magnetic nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    This book discusses how the important properties of materials such as the cohesive energy, and the electronic and vibrational structures are affected when materials have at least one length in the nanometer range. The author uses relatively simple models of the solid state to explain why these changes in the size and dimension in the nanometer regime occur. The text also reviews the physics of magnetism and experimental methods of measuring magnetic properties necessary to understanding how nanosizing affects magnetism. Various kinds of magnetic structures are presented by the author in order to explain how nanosizing influences their magnetic properties. The book also presents potential and actual applications of nanomaterials in the fields of medicine and computer data storage.

  20. Flows of engineered nanomaterials through the recycling process in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Recycling is one of the likely end-of-life fates of nanoproducts. • We assessed the material flows of four nanomaterials in the Swiss recycling system. • After recycling, most nanomaterials will flow to landfills or incineration plants. • Recycled construction waste, plastics and textiles may contain nanomaterials. - Abstract: The use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in diverse applications has increased during the last years and this will likely continue in the near future. As the number of applications increase, more and more waste with nanomaterials will be generated. A portion of this waste will enter the recycling system, for example, in electronic products, textiles and construction materials. The fate of these materials during and after the waste management and recycling operations is poorly understood. The aim of this work is to model the flows of nano-TiO2, nano-ZnO, nano-Ag and CNT in the recycling system in Switzerland. The basis for this study is published information on the ENMs flows on the Swiss system. We developed a method to assess their flow after recycling. To incorporate the uncertainties inherent to the limited information available, we applied a probabilistic material flow analysis approach. The results show that the recycling processes does not result in significant further propagation of nanomaterials into new products. Instead, the largest proportion will flow as waste that can subsequently be properly handled in incineration plants or landfills. Smaller fractions of ENMs will be eliminated or end up in materials that are sent abroad to undergo further recovery processes. Only a reduced amount of ENMs will flow back to the productive process of the economy in a limited number of sectors. Overall, the results suggest that risk assessment during recycling should focus on occupational exposure, release of ENMs in landfills and incineration plants, and toxicity assessment in a small number of recycled inputs

  1. Flows of engineered nanomaterials through the recycling process in Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero-Guzman, Alejandro; Sun, Tianyin; Nowack, Bernd, E-mail: nowack@empa.ch

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Recycling is one of the likely end-of-life fates of nanoproducts. • We assessed the material flows of four nanomaterials in the Swiss recycling system. • After recycling, most nanomaterials will flow to landfills or incineration plants. • Recycled construction waste, plastics and textiles may contain nanomaterials. - Abstract: The use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in diverse applications has increased during the last years and this will likely continue in the near future. As the number of applications increase, more and more waste with nanomaterials will be generated. A portion of this waste will enter the recycling system, for example, in electronic products, textiles and construction materials. The fate of these materials during and after the waste management and recycling operations is poorly understood. The aim of this work is to model the flows of nano-TiO{sub 2}, nano-ZnO, nano-Ag and CNT in the recycling system in Switzerland. The basis for this study is published information on the ENMs flows on the Swiss system. We developed a method to assess their flow after recycling. To incorporate the uncertainties inherent to the limited information available, we applied a probabilistic material flow analysis approach. The results show that the recycling processes does not result in significant further propagation of nanomaterials into new products. Instead, the largest proportion will flow as waste that can subsequently be properly handled in incineration plants or landfills. Smaller fractions of ENMs will be eliminated or end up in materials that are sent abroad to undergo further recovery processes. Only a reduced amount of ENMs will flow back to the productive process of the economy in a limited number of sectors. Overall, the results suggest that risk assessment during recycling should focus on occupational exposure, release of ENMs in landfills and incineration plants, and toxicity assessment in a small number of recycled inputs.

  2. Non-metallic nanomaterials in cancer theranostics: a review of silica- and carbon-based drug delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Cheng Chen, Xin-Chun Huang, Yun-Ling Luo, Yung-Chen Chang, You-Zung Hsieh and Hsin-Yun Hsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development in nanomaterials has brought great opportunities to cancer theranostics, which aims to combine diagnostics and therapy for cancer treatment and thereby improve the healthcare of patients. In this review we focus on the recent progress of several cancer theranostic strategies using mesoporous silica nanoparticles and carbon-based nanomaterials. Silicon and carbon are both group IV elements; they have been the most abundant and significant non-metallic substances in human life. Their intrinsic physical/chemical properties are of critical importance in the fabrication of multifunctional drug delivery systems. Responsive nanocarriers constructed using these nanomaterials have been promising in cancer-specific theranostics during the past decade. In all cases, either a controlled texture or the chemical functionalization is coupled with adaptive properties, such as pH-, light-, redox- and magnetic field- triggered responses. Several studies in cells and mice models have implied their underlying therapeutic efficacy; however, detailed and long-term in vivo clinical evaluations are certainly required to make these bench-made materials compatible in real bedside circumstances.

  3. Exploration on the safety assessment of nanomaterials in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xin-Li; Wang, Qiangbin; Hu, Kun; Wang, Xiu-Mei

    2012-06-01

    More and more applications of nanomaterials have been achieved in the biomedicine field. Numerous nanomedical devices, such as bone grafts with nano-hydroxyapatite and the silver-based anti-bacteria products, have been developed and have been trying to enter into the Chinese market. The State Food and Drug Administration of China (SFDA) is facing a critical challenge of how to explore and supervise the safety assessment of the nanomedical products. This paper briefly introduces the approval status of nanomedical products and the current advances of the safety assessment of nanomaterials in China. PMID:23741614

  4. Optical characterization of ZnO nanomaterial with praseodymium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Y. K.; Pal, Sudha; Goyal, Priyanka; Bind, Umesh Chandra

    2016-05-01

    ZnO nanomaterial with praseodymium ions was prepared by chemical synthesis method. The ZnO nanomaterial was characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM. Their absorption in UV-VIS/NIR regions was measured at room temperature. The experimental oscillator strengths were calculated from the areas under the absorption bands. Eight absorption bands have been observed. From these spectral data various energy interaction parameters like Slater-Condon, Lande, Racah, Nephelauxetic ratio and bonding parameters have been computed. Judd-Ofelt analysis has been carried out using the absorption spectra to evaluate the radiative properties for luminescent levels of the praseodymium ion and discussed. The observed nano particle size is 2nm.

  5. Study of mechanical properties of nanomaterials under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jyoti; Kaur, Namrat; Srivastava, A. K.

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, the study of physical properties and behaviour of nanomaterials i.e. n-γ- Al2O3and n-Si3C4 under high pressure is done. For this purpose Murnaghan equation of state is used. The applicability of Murnaghan equation of state is fully tested by calculating mechanical properties of nano materials i.e. volume compression (V/Vo), bulk modulus (KT) and relative isothermal compression coefficient (α(P)/α0) at different pressures. The present calculated values of compression curve for the cited nanomaterials come out to be in reasonable good agreement with the available experimental data.

  6. Palladium based nanomaterials for enhanced hydrogen spillover and storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh K. Konda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen storage remains one of the most challenging prerequisites to overcome toward the realization of a hydrogen based economy. The use of hydrogen as an energy carrier for fuel cell applications has been limited by the lack of safe and effective hydrogen storage materials. Palladium has high affinity for hydrogen sorption and has been extensively studied, both in the gas phase and under electrochemical conditions. In this review, recent advancements are highlighted and discussed in regard to palladium based nanomaterials for hydrogen storage, as well as the effects of hydrogen spillover on various adsorbents including carbons, metal organic frameworks, covalent organic frameworks, and other nanomaterials.

  7. Characterization of nanomaterials in food by electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dudkiewicz, Agnieszka; Tiede, Karen; Löschner, Katrin;

    2011-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are increasingly being used in the food industry. In order to assess the efficacy and the risks of these materials, it is essential to have access to methods that not only detect the nanomaterials, but also provide information on the characteristics of the materials...... (e.g., size and shape).This review presents an overview of electron microscopy (EM)-based methods that have been, or have the potential to be, applied to imaging ENMs in foodstuffs. We provide an overview of approaches to sample preparation, including drying, chemical treatment, fixation...

  8. Enzyme-responsive nanomaterials for controlled drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Quanyin; Katti, Prateek S.; Gu, Zhen

    2014-10-01

    Enzymes underpin physiological function and exhibit dysregulation in many disease-associated microenvironments and aberrant cell processes. Exploiting altered enzyme activity and expression for diagnostics, drug targeting, and drug release is tremendously promising. When combined with booming research in nanobiotechnology, enzyme-responsive nanomaterials used for controlled drug release have achieved significant development and have been studied as an important class of drug delivery strategies in nanomedicine. In this review, we describe enzymes such as proteases, phospholipases and oxidoreductases that serve as delivery triggers. Subsequently, we explore recently developed enzyme-responsive nanomaterials with versatile applications for extracellular and intracellular drug delivery. We conclude by discussing future opportunities and challenges in this area.

  9. State of the safety assessment and current use of nanomaterials in food and food production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, H.; Brandhoff, P.N.; Marvin, H.J.P.; Weigel, S.; Peters, R.J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are developed for and applied in food, food additives, supplements and food contact materials. In an inventory of internet databases 140 products in the food and food-related sectors were identified that claim to contain nanomaterials. A great diversity of nanomaterials is applied, ran

  10. 77 FR 24722 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Safety of Nanomaterials in Cosmetic Products; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Safety of Nanomaterials in... ``Guidance for Industry: Safety of Nanomaterials in Cosmetic Products.'' The draft guidance, when finalized, will represent FDA's current thinking on the safety assessment of nanomaterials in cosmetic...

  11. Sameness: The regulatory crux with nanomaterial identity and grouping schemes for hazard assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Tobias; Studer, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    Regulators and industry need clear rules for identification and grouping of nanomaterials for a streamlined quantitative hazard evaluation. Therefore, we provide convincing reasons for (i) why to introduce pragmatic definition of identities for nanomaterials, (ii) how to combine them into entities, and ultimately (iii) how the entities might be evaluated with testing strategies based on clouds of similar nanomaterials. PMID:26049104

  12. Application of Iron Oxide Nanomaterials for the Removal of Heavy Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragnesh N. Dave

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 21st century water polluted by heavy metal is one of the environment problems. Various methods for removal of the heavy metal ions from the water have extensively been studied. Application of iron oxide nanaparticles based nanomaterials for removal of heavy metals is well-known adsorbents for remediation of water. Due to its important physiochemical property, inexpensive method and easy regeneration in the presence of external magnetic field make them more attractive toward water purification. Surface modification strategy of iron oxide nanoparticles is also used for the remediation of water increases the efficiency of iron oxide for the removal of the heavy metal ions from the aqueous system.

  13. Novel 3D Tissue Engineered Bone Model, Biomimetic Nanomaterials, and Cold Atmospheric Plasma Technique for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian

    This thesis research is consist of four chapters, including biomimetic three-dimensional tissue engineered nanostructured bone model for breast cancer bone metastasis study (Chapter one), cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer (Chapter two), design of biomimetic and bioactive cold plasma modified nanostructured scaffolds for enhanced osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (Chapter three), and enhanced osteoblast and mesenchymal stem cell functions on titanium with hydrothermally treated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite/magnetically treated carbon nanotubes for orthopedic applications (Chapter four). All the thesis research is focused on nanomaterials and the use of cold plasma technique for various biomedical applications.

  14. SURFACE MODIFITED MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLES FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Yu. Vasyukov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Unique physicochemical properties of nanomaterials arouse a great interest of specialists of various fields. Materials based on nanostructures purchase new mechanical, optical, and electrical properties. Great practical importance is the magnetic properties of materials, structural elements which lie at the nanoscale. Nanomaterials with magnetic properties have been used in drug delivery, magnetic hyperthermia, magnetic separation, and magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic properties of nanoparticles depend on many factors, such as particle size and shape, chemical properties and lattice type. Magnetic characteristics can be changed by the interaction of particles with the surrounding matrix and neighboring particles.Unfortunately, many studies show that a great disadvantage of the unmodified nanoparticles is their non-specific interaction with the cells, which leads to their accumulation outside the target organs, also to­xicity of nanomaterials and their low colloidal stability. Surface modification of nanoparticles can solve this problem. Development of nanostructures based on magnetic nanoparticles and functionalized by biocompatible agents is one of the main targets of nanobiotechnology.

  15. Lanthanide-doped luminescent nanomaterials. From fundamentals to bioapplications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covers the frontiers in chemistry, physics and bioapplications of lanthanide-doped luminescent nanomaterials. Presents new insights into the optical behaviors of lanthanide in nanomaterials. Systematically reviews in-vitro biodetection and bioimaging based on lanthanide-doped inorganic nanocrystals. Lanthanide-Doped Luminescent Nanomaterials reviews the latest advances in the development of lanthanide-doped luminescent inorganic nanoparticles for potential bioapplications. This book covers the chemical and physical fundamentals of these nanoparticles, such as the controlled synthesis methodology, surface modification chemistry, optical physics, and their promising applications in diverse bioassays, with an emphasis on heterogeneous and homogeneous in-vitro biodetection of tumor biomarkers. This book is intended for those readers who are interested in systematically understanding the materials design strategy, optical behavior of lanthanide ions, and practical bioapplications of lanthanide nanoparticles. It primarily focuses on the interdisciplinary frontiers in chemistry, physics and biological aspects of luminescent nanomaterials. All chapters were written by scientists active in this field and for a broad audience, providing both beginners and advanced researchers with comprehensive information on the subject.

  16. TOXICITY EVALUATION OF NEW ENGINEERED NANOMATERIALS IN ZEBRAFISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Violetta Brundo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the nanoparticles on the marine organisms, depends on their size, chemical composition, surface structure, solubility and shape.In order to take advantage from their activity, preserving the surrounding environment from a possible pollution, we are trying to trap the nanoparticles into new nanomaterials. The nanomaterials tested were synthesized proposing a ground-breaking approach by an upside-down vision of the Au/TiO2nano-system to avoid the release of nanoparticles. The system was synthesized by wrapping Au nanoparticles with a thin layer of TiO2. The non-toxicity of the nano-system was established by testing the effect of the material on zebrafish larvae. Danio rerio o zebrafish was considered a excellent model for the environmental biomonitoring of aquatic environments and the Zebrafish Embryo Toxicity Test is considered an alternative method of animal test. For this reason zebrafish larvae were exposed to different concentrations of nanoparticles of TiO2 and Au and new nanomaterials. As biomarkers of exposure, we evaluated the expression of metallothioneins by immunohistochemistry analysis and western blotting analysis also. The results obtained by toxicity test showed that neither mortality as well as sublethal effects were induced by the different nanomaterials and nanoparticles tested. Only zebrafish larvae exposed to free Au nanoparticles showed a different response to anti-MT antibody. In fact, the immunolocalization analysis highlighted an increase of the metallothioneins synthesis.

  17. Toxicity Evaluation of New Engineered Nanomaterials in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundo, Maria V; Pecoraro, Roberta; Marino, Fabio; Salvaggio, Antonio; Tibullo, Daniele; Saccone, Salvatore; Bramanti, Vincenzo; Buccheri, Maria A; Impellizzeri, Giuliana; Scuderi, Viviana; Zimbone, Massimo; Privitera, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the nanoparticles on the marine organisms, depends on their size, chemical composition, surface structure, solubility and shape. In order to take advantage from their activity, preserving the surrounding environment from a possible pollution, we are trying to trap the nanoparticles into new nanomaterials. The nanomaterials tested were synthesized proposing a ground-breaking approach by an upside-down vision of the Au/TiO2 nano-system to avoid the release of nanoparticles. The system was synthesized by wrapping Au nanoparticles with a thin layer of TiO2. The non-toxicity of the nano-system was established by testing the effect of the material on zebrafish larvae. Danio rerio o zebrafish was considered an excellent model for the environmental biomonitoring of aquatic environments and the Zebrafish Embryo Toxicity Test (ZFET) is considered an alternative method of animal test. For this reason zebrafish larvae were exposed to different concentrations of nanoparticles of TiO2 and Au and new nanomaterials. As biomarkers of exposure, we evaluated the expression of metallothioneins by immunohistochemistry analysis and western blotting analysis also. The results obtained by toxicity test showed that neither mortality as well as sublethal effects were induced by the different nanomaterials and nanoparticles tested. Only zebrafish larvae exposed to free Au nanoparticles showed a different response to anti-MT antibody. In fact, the immunolocalization analysis highlighted an increase of the metallothioneins synthesis. PMID:27148069

  18. Interpretation and implications of the European Commission's definition on nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.A.J. Bleeker; F.R. Cassee; R.E. Geertsma; W.H. de Jong; E.H.W. Heugens; M. Koers-Jacquemijns; D. van de Meent; A.G. Oomen; J. Popma; A.G. Rietveld; S.W.P. Wijnhoven

    2012-01-01

    In October 2011, the European Commission published the Recommendation on the Definition of Nanomaterial. RIVM considers this definition to be a good basis for further discussion that should focus on two aspects of the definition: the proposed size limits for nanoparticles (1 to 100 nanometres); and

  19. RADIO SHIELDING PROPERTIES OF CONCRETE BASED ON SHUNGITE NANOMATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BELOUSOVA Elena Sergeevna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Modifications of shielding construction materials based on Portland cement with the addition of powder nanomaterial shungite were developed. Attenuation and re­flection of electromagnetic radiation for obtained materials were studied. Recommen­dations for using are given.

  20. Engineered nanomaterial risk. Lessons learnt from completed nanotoxicology studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnston, Helinor; Pojana, Giulio; Zuin, Stefano;

    2013-01-01

    PARTICLE_RISK was one of the first multidisciplinary projects funded by the European Commission's Framework Programme that was responsible for evaluating the implications of nanomaterial (NM) exposure on human health. This project was the basis for this review which identifies the challenges that...

  1. Layered bismuth oxyhalide nanomaterials for highly efficient tumor photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu; Shi, Zhenzhi; Zhang, Ling'e.; Brown, Eric Michael Bratsolias; Wu, Aiguo

    2016-06-01

    Layered bismuth oxyhalide nanomaterials have received much more interest as promising photocatalysts because of their unique layered structures and high photocatalytic performance, which can be used as potential inorganic photosensitizers in tumor photodynamic therapy (PDT). In recent years, photocatalytic materials have been widely used in PDT and photothermal therapy (PTT) as inorganic photosensitizers. This investigation focuses on applying layered bismuth oxyhalide nanomaterials toward cancer PDT, an application that has never been reported so far. The results of our study indicate that the efficiency of UV-triggered PDT was highest when using BiOCl nanoplates followed by BiOCl nanosheets, and then TiO2. Of particular interest is the fact that layered BiOCl nanomaterials showed excellent PDT effects under low nanomaterial dose (20 μg mL-1) and low UV dose (2.2 mW cm-2 for 10 min) conditions, while TiO2 showed almost no therapeutic effect under the same parameters. BiOCl nanoplates and nanosheets have shown excellent performance and an extensive range of applications in PDT.

  2. Controlled Growth of One-Dimensional Oxide Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaosheng FANG; Lide ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the recent developments in the controlled growth of one-dimensional (1D) oxide nanomaterials, including ZnO, SnO2, In2O3, Ga2O3, SiOx, MgO, and Al2O3. The growth of 1D oxide nanomaterials was carried out in a simple chemical vapor transport and condensation system. This article will begin with a survey of nanotechnology and 1D nanomaterials achieved by many researchers, and then mainly discuss on the controlled growth of 1D oxide nanomaterials with their morphologies, sizes, compositions, and microstructures controlled by altering experimental parameters, such as the temperature at the source material and the substrate, temperature gradient in the tube furnace, the total reaction time, the heating rate of the furnace, the gas flow rate, and the starting material. Their roles in the formation of various morphologies are analyzed and discussed. Finally, this review will be concluded with personal perspectives on the future research directions of this area.

  3. Integrating Transition Metals into Nanomaterials: Strategies and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Fhayli, Karim

    2016-04-14

    Transition metals complexes have been involved in various catalytic, biomedical and industrial applications, but only lately they have been associated with nanomaterials to produce innovative and well-defined new hybrid systems. The introduction of transition metals into nanomaterials is important to bear the advantages of metals to nanoscale and also to raise the stability of nanomaterials. In this dissertation, we study two approaches of associating transition metals into nanomaterials. The first approach is via spontaneous self-organization based assembly of small molecule amphiphiles and bulky hydrophilic polymers to produce organic-inorganic hybrid materials that have nanoscale features and can be precisely controlled depending on the experimental conditions used. These hybrid materials can successfully act as templates to design new porous material with interesting architecture. The second approach studied is via electroless reduction of transition metals on the surface of nanocarbons (nanotubes and nanodiamonds) without using any reducing agents or catalysts. The synthesis of these systems is highly efficient and facile resulting in stable and mechanically robust new materials with promising applications in catalysis.

  4. Some biomedical applications of chitosan-based hybrid nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Being naturally abundant resources and having many interesting physicochemical and biological properties, chitin/chitosan have been found to be useful in many fields, especially biomedical ones. This paper describes the strategy to design multifunctional, hybrid chitosan-based nanomaterials and test them in some typical biomedical applications

  5. Lanthanide-doped luminescent nanomaterials. From fundamentals to bioapplications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xueyuan; Tu, Datao; Liu, Yongsheng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou (China). Fujian Inst. of Research on the Structure of Matter

    2014-07-01

    Covers the frontiers in chemistry, physics and bioapplications of lanthanide-doped luminescent nanomaterials. Presents new insights into the optical behaviors of lanthanide in nanomaterials. Systematically reviews in-vitro biodetection and bioimaging based on lanthanide-doped inorganic nanocrystals. Lanthanide-Doped Luminescent Nanomaterials reviews the latest advances in the development of lanthanide-doped luminescent inorganic nanoparticles for potential bioapplications. This book covers the chemical and physical fundamentals of these nanoparticles, such as the controlled synthesis methodology, surface modification chemistry, optical physics, and their promising applications in diverse bioassays, with an emphasis on heterogeneous and homogeneous in-vitro biodetection of tumor biomarkers. This book is intended for those readers who are interested in systematically understanding the materials design strategy, optical behavior of lanthanide ions, and practical bioapplications of lanthanide nanoparticles. It primarily focuses on the interdisciplinary frontiers in chemistry, physics and biological aspects of luminescent nanomaterials. All chapters were written by scientists active in this field and for a broad audience, providing both beginners and advanced researchers with comprehensive information on the subject.

  6. Interaction of engineered nanomaterials with hydrophobic organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    As nanomaterials become an increasing part of everyday consumer products, it is imperative to monitor their potential release during production, use and disposal, and to assess their impact on the health of humans and the ecosystem. This necessitates research to better understand...

  7. Investigations into polymer and carbon nanomaterial separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Cherie Nicole

    utilize as novel UTLC substrates. Additionally, aligned electrospun UTLC (AE-UTLC) substrates were developed to compare to the randomly oriented electrospun (E-UTLC) devices. The PHB plates were compared to commercially available substrates for the separation of biological samples: nucleotides and steroids. The electrospun substrates show lower band broadening and higher reproducibility in a smaller development distance than commercially available TLC plates, conserving both resources and time. The AE-UTLC plates provided further enhancement of reproducibility and development time compared to E-UTLC plates. Thus, the P3HB E-UTLC phases are an excellent sustainable option for TLC as they are biodegradable and perform better than commercial phases. A third topic of interest is the study of ordered carbon nanomaterials. The typical amorphous carbon used as a stationary phase in Hypercarb ® is known to consist of basal- and edge-plane oriented sites. This heterogeneity of the stationary phase can lead to peak broadening that may be improved by using homogeneous carbon throughout. Amorphous, basal-plane, and edge-plane carbons were produced in-house through membrane template synthesis. Amorphous, basal-plane, and edge-plane carbons were then used separately as chromatographic phases in capillary electrochomatography (CEC). Differences in chromatographic performance between these species were assessed by modeling retention data for test solutes to determine Linear Solvation Energy Relationships (LSER). The LSER study for the three carbon phases indicates that the main difference is in the polarizability, and hydrogen bonding character of the surface leading to unique solute interactions. These results highlight the possible usefulness of using these phases independently.

  8. The effects of nanomaterials on microstructures of sludge ash cement paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Deng-Fong; Tsai, Min-Chin

    2006-08-01

    To broaden the beneficial reuse of sewage sludge, small amounts of nanomaterial were considered as additives to evaluate influences of nanomaterials on microstructures of sludge cement paste. Paste specimens were manufactured using different mix designs and cured for various ages. Tests such as scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, and mercury intrusion porosimetry were then performed. Results obtained indicated that the quantities of crystallization in hydrates rose with the increased amounts of nanomaterial added. Moreover, nanomaterial additives could make crystallizations denser, pore sizes smaller, and the number of pores decreased. Consequently, the strength of sludge cement paste became better as more amounts of nanomaterial were added. PMID:16933647

  9. Soft surfaces of nanomaterials enable strong phonon interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozyigit, Deniz; Yazdani, Nuri; Yarema, Maksym; Yarema, Olesya; Lin, Weyde Matteo Mario; Volk, Sebastian; Vuttivorakulchai, Kantawong; Luisier, Mathieu; Juranyi, Fanni; Wood, Vanessa

    2016-03-01

    Phonons and their interactions with other phonons, electrons or photons drive energy gain, loss and transport in materials. Although the phonon density of states has been measured and calculated in bulk crystalline semiconductors, phonons remain poorly understood in nanomaterials, despite the increasing prevalence of bottom-up fabrication of semiconductors from nanomaterials and the integration of nanometre-sized components into devices. Here we quantify the phononic properties of bottom-up fabricated semiconductors as a function of crystallite size using inelastic neutron scattering measurements and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. We show that, unlike in microcrystalline semiconductors, the phonon modes of semiconductors with nanocrystalline domains exhibit both reduced symmetry and low energy owing to mechanical softness at the surface of those domains. These properties become important when phonons couple to electrons in semiconductor devices. Although it was initially believed that the coupling between electrons and phonons is suppressed in nanocrystalline materials owing to the scarcity of electronic states and their large energy separation, it has since been shown that the electron–phonon coupling is large and allows high energy-dissipation rates exceeding one electronvolt per picosecond (refs 10, 11, 12, 13). Despite detailed investigations into the role of phonons in exciton dynamics, leading to a variety of suggestions as to the origins of these fast transition rates and including attempts to numerically calculate them, fundamental questions surrounding electron–phonon interactions in nanomaterials remain unresolved. By combining the microscopic and thermodynamic theories of phonons and our findings on the phononic properties of nanomaterials, we are able to explain and then experimentally confirm the strong electron–phonon coupling and fast multi-phonon transition rates of charge carriers to trap states. This improved understanding of

  10. Artifacts by marker enzyme adsorption on nanomaterials in cytotoxicity assays with tissue cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlleben, Wendel; Kolle, Susanne N.; Hasenkamp, Laura-Carolin; Böser, Alexander; Vogel, Sandra; von Vacano, Bernhard; van Ravenzwaay, Ben; Landsiedel, Robert

    2011-07-01

    We used precision cut lung slices (PCLS) to study the cytotoxicity of cobalt ferrite nanomaterials with and without bovine serum albumin (BSA) stabilization. Using mitochondrial activity as an indicator of cytotoxicity (WST-1 assay) increasing concentrations of cobalt ferrite nanomaterial caused increasing levels of cytotoxicity in PCLS irrespective of BSA stabilization. However, there was no increase in released lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels caused by BSA stabilized nanomaterial indicating concentration depended cytotoxictiy. Moreover, non-stabilized nanomaterial caused a decrease of background LDH levels in the PCLS culture supernatant confirmed by complementary methods. Direct characterization of the protein corona of extracted nanomaterial shows that the LDH decrease is due to adsorption of LDH onto the surface of the non-stabilized nanomaterial, correlated with strong agglomeration. Preincubation with serum protein blocks the adsorption of LDH and stabilizes the nanomaterial at low agglomeration. We have thus demonstrated the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials in PCLS does not correlate with disrupted membrane integrity followed by LDH release. Furthermore, we found that intracellular enzymes such as the marker enzyme LDH are able to bind onto surfaces of nanomaterial and thereby adulterate the detection of toxic effects. A replacement of BSA by LDH or a secondary LDH-on-BSA-corona were not observed, confirming earlier indications that the protein corona exchange rate are slow or vanishing on inorganic nanomaterial. Thus, the method(s) to assess nanomaterial-mediated effects have to be carefully chosen based on the cellular effect and possible nano-specific artifacts.

  11. The potential of protein-nanomaterial interaction for advanced drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Qiang; Mu, Huiling

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials, like nanoparticles, micelles, nano-sheets, nanotubes and quantum dots, have great potentials in biomedical fields. However, their delivery is highly limited by the formation of protein corona upon interaction with endogenous proteins. This new identity, instead of nanomaterial itself......, would be the real substance the organs and cells firstly encounter. Consequently, the behavior of nanomaterials in vivo is uncontrollable and some undesired effects may occur, like rapid clearance from blood stream; risk of capillary blockage; loss of targeting capacity; and potential toxicity....... Therefore, protein-nanomaterial interaction is a great challenge for nanomaterial systems and should be inhibited. However, this interaction can also be used to functionalize nanomaterials by forming a selected protein corona. Unlike other decoration using exogenous molecules, nanomaterials functionalized...

  12. Computational Studies about the Interactions of Nanomaterials with Proteins and their Impacts

    CERN Document Server

    An, Deyi; Li, Chunhua; Li, Jingyuan

    2015-01-01

    Intensive concerns about the biosafety of nanomaterials demand the systematic study of the mechanisms about their biological effects. Many biological effects can be attributed to the interaction of nanomaterials with protein and their impacts on protein function. On the other hand, nanomaterials exhibit the potential in a variety of biomedical applications, many of which also involve the direct interaction with protein. In this paper, we review some recent computational studies about this subject, especially the interaction of carbon and gold nanomaterials. Besides the hydrophobic and {\\pi}-stacking interactions, the interaction mode of carbon nanomaterials can be regulated by their functional groups. And the coating of gold nanomaterials also adjusts their interaction mode, in addition to the coordination interaction with cysteine's sulfur group and histidine's imidazole group. Moreover, nanomaterials can interact with multiple proteins and the impacts on protein activity are attributed to a wide spectrum of...

  13. Exploiting polymer single crystals to assemble and functionalize nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing

    Nanomaterials are fundamental building blocks for nanoscience and nanotechnology. They can generally be categorized into three classes: zero-dimensional (0D) (e.g. nanoparticles), one-dimensional (1D) (e.g. carbon nanotubes) and two-dimensional (2D) (e.g. thin films) nanomaterials. Assembly of nanomaterials is the key step to transfer their fascinating mechanical, electronic and optical properties from nano- to micro- or macro-scale. Among all types of assemblies, assembling across different nanomaterial classes is of particular interest. For example, assembling 0D nanoparticles with 1D nanotubes or 2D thin films. These assembled structures have the advantage of possessing properties from both classes of nanomaterials. Functionalization of nanomaterials is important from both scientific and technological points of view. A newly developed field of functionalization is called "patchy particles". Multiple types of functional molecules form different domains on particle surface. Each domain contains only one type of functional molecules. These domains are called patches. These patchy particles are advanced building blocks, which may assemble into useful complex structures. In this thesis, polymer single crystals are exploited to assemble and functionalize nanomaterials. Polymer single crystals have a lamellar structure. Since the thickness of these lamellae is ˜10 nm, polymer single crystals are introduced as a new type of 2D nanomaterials. Different from the traditional 2D nanomaterials such as Langmuir-Blodgett films, self-assembled monolayers and thin films made by Layer-by-Layer technique, these polymer single crystals are free-standing, which means no substrate is needed. Furthermore, the surface of these polymer single crystals can be readily functionalized by crystallizing end-functionalized polymers. Based on the studied polymers, this thesis is divided into two parts. The first part is focused on single crystals of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). Thiol

  14. Understanding the biological and environmental implications of nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sijie

    The last two decades have witnessed the discovery, development, and large-scale manufacturing of novel nanomaterials. While nanomaterials bring in exciting and extraordinary properties in all areas of materials, electronics, mechanics, and medicine, they also could generate potential adverse effects in biological systems and in the environment. The currently limited application of nanomaterials in biological and ecological systems results from the insufficient and often controversial data on describing the complex behaviors of nanomaterials in living systems. The purpose of this dissertation intends to fill such a knowledge void with methodologies from the disciplines of biophysics, biology, and materials science and engineering. Chapter 1 of this dissertation provides a comprehensive review on the structures and properties of carbon nanomaterials (CBNMs), metal oxides, and quantum dots (QDs). This chapter also details the state-of-the-art on the biological applications, ecological applications, and toxicity of nanomaterials. With Chapter 1 serving as a background, Chapters 2-5 present my PhD research, an inquiry on the fate of nanomaterials in biological and ecological systems, on the whole organism and cellular levels. Specifically, CBNMs are introduced to rice plant seedlings and the uptake, translocation and generational transfer of fullerene C70 in the plant compartments are imaged and characterized. The interactions between CBNMs and rice plants on the whole organism level are initiated by the binding between CBNMs and natural organic matter (NOM), driven by the transpiration of water from the roots to the leaves of the plants and mediated by both the physiochemical properties of the CBNMs and plant physiology. In Chapter 3, semiconducting nanocrystals quantum dots (QDs) are introduced to green algae Chlamydomonas to probe the interactions of nanomaterials with ecological systems on the cellular level. The adsorption of QDs onto the algal cell wall is

  15. A thick hierarchical rutile TiO2 nanomaterial with multilayered structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We synthesized a new rutile TiO2 nanomaterial with a hierarchical nanostructure. ► The nano architecture structure consist of nanorods and nanoflower arrays. ► The rutile TiO2 nanomaterial is thick in size (several 10 μm). ► The TiO2 nanomaterials present a multilayer structure. - Abstract: In the present paper, we synthesized a new type of rutile TiO2 nanomaterial with a hierarchical nanostructure using a novel method, which combined dealloying process with chemical synthesis. The structure characters were examined using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The rutile TiO2 nanomaterial is thick in size (several 10 μm). The hierarchical structure of the rutile TiO2 nanomaterial consists of large quantities nanorods and nanoflower arrays. The nanoflowers consist of serveral nanopetals with diameter of 100–200 nm. The cross section of TiO2 nanomaterials presents a multilayer structure with the layer thickness of about 3–5 μm. The rutile TiO2 nanomaterial has high specific surface area. The formation mechanism of the rutile TiO2 nanomaterial was discussed according to the experimental results. The rutile TiO2 nanomaterial has potential applications in catalysis, photocatalysis and solar cells

  16. Influence of Nanomaterial Compatibilization Strategies on Polyamide Nanocomposites Properties and Nanomaterial Release during the Use Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rosas, Elisabet; Vilar, Gemma; Janer, Gemma; González-Gálvez, David; Puntes, Victor; Jamier, Vincent; Aubouy, Laurent; Vázquez-Campos, Socorro

    2016-03-01

    The incorporation of small amounts of nanofillers in polymeric matrices has enabled new applications in several industrial sectors. The nanofiller dispersion can be improved by modifying the nanomaterial (NM) surface or predispersing the NMs to enhance compatibility. This study evaluates the effect of these compatibilization strategies on migration/release of the nanofiller and transformation of polyamide-6 (PA6), a thermoplastic polymer widely used in industry during simulated outdoors use. Two nanocomposites (NCs) containing SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) with different surface properties and two multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) NCs obtained by different addition methods were produced and characterized, before and after accelerated wet aging conditions. Octyl-modified SiO2 NPs, though initially more aggregated than uncoated SiO2 NPs, reduced PA6 hydrolysis and, consequently, NM release. Although no clear differences in dispersion were observed between the two types of MWCNT NCs (masterbatch vs direct addition) after manufacture, the use of the MWCNT masterbatch reduced PA6 degradation during aging, preventing MWCNT accumulation on the surface and further release or potential exposure by direct contact. The amounts of NM released were lower for MWCNTs (36 and 108 mg/m(2)) than for SiO2 NPs (167 and 730 mg/m(2)), being lower in those samples where the NC was designed to improve the nanofiller-matrix interaction. Hence, this study shows that optimal compatibilization between NM and matrix can improve NC performance, reducing polymer degradation and exposure and/or release of the nanofiller. PMID:26830469

  17. EDITORIAL: Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-08-01

    A little stress or strain has been known to improve the performance of athletes, actors and of course nanomaterials alike. In fact strain in silicon is now a major engineering tool for improving the performance of devices, and is ubiquitously used in device design and fabrication. Strain engineering alters a material's band structure, a model of electron behaviour that describes how as atoms come together in a solid, their discrete electron orbitals overlap to ultimately give rise to bands of allowed energy levels. In a strained crystal lattice of silicon or silicon germanium the distance between atoms in the lattice is greater than usual and the bands of allowed energy levels change. This July marks 100 years since Bohr submitted his paper 'On the constitution of atoms and molecules' [1] where he describes the structure of the atom in terms of discrete allowed energy levels. The paper was a seminal contribution to the development of quantum mechanics and laid the initial theoretical precepts for band gap engineering in devices. In this issue Nrauda and a collaboration of researchers in Europe and Australia study the growth of defect-free SiGe islands on pre-patterned silicon [2]. They analyse the strain in the islands and determine at what point lattice dislocations set in with a view to informing implementation of strain engineering in devices. The effects of strain on band structure in silicon and germanium were already studied and reported in the 1950s [3, 4]. Since then the increasing focus on nanoscale materials and the hunger for control of electronic properties has prompted further study of strain effects. The increased surface area to volume ratio in nanostructures changes the strain behaviour with respect to bulk materials, and this can also be exploited for handling and fine tuning strain to manipulate material properties. It is perhaps no surprise that graphene, one of the most high-profile materials in current nanotechnology research, has attracted

  18. Modeling of nanotoxicity molecular interactions of nanomaterials with bionanomachines

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the fundamentals of nanotoxicity modeling and its implications for the development of novel nanomedicines. It lays out the fundamentals of nanotoxicity modeling for an array of nanomaterial systems, ranging from carbon-based nanoparticles to noble metals, metal oxides, and quantum dots. The author illustrates how molecular (classical mechanics) and atomic (quantum mechanics) modeling approaches can be applied to bolster our understanding of many important aspects of this critical nanotoxicity issue. Each chapter is organized by types of nanomaterials for practicality, making this an ideal book for senior undergraduate students, graduate students, and researchers in nanotechnology, chemistry, physics, molecular biology, and computer science. It is also of interest to academic and industry professionals who work on nanodrug delivery and related biomedical applications, and aids readers in their biocompatibility assessment efforts in the coming age of nanotechnology...

  19. Frameworks and tools for risk assessment of manufactured nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hristozov, Danail; Gottardo, Stefania; Semenzin, Elena;

    2016-01-01

    Commercialization of nanotechnologies entails a regulatory requirement for understanding their environmental, health and safety (EHS) risks. Today we face challenges to assess these risks, which emerge from uncertainties around the interactions of manufactured nanomaterials (MNs) with humans and ...... order to facilitate this process, it is important to transform the current efforts on developing databases and computational models into creating an integrated data and tools infrastructure to support the risk assessment and management of MNs.......Commercialization of nanotechnologies entails a regulatory requirement for understanding their environmental, health and safety (EHS) risks. Today we face challenges to assess these risks, which emerge from uncertainties around the interactions of manufactured nanomaterials (MNs) with humans and...... the environment. In order to reduce these uncertainties, it is necessary to generate sound scientific data on hazard and exposure by means of relevant frameworks and tools. The development of such approaches to facilitate the risk assessment (RA) of MNs has become a dynamic area of research. The aim...

  20. Electrode materials for microbial fuel cells: nanomaterial approach

    KAUST Repository

    Mustakeem, Mustakeem

    2015-11-05

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has the potential to become a major renewable energy resource by degrading organic pollutants in wastewater. The performance of MFC directly depends on the kinetics of the electrode reactions within the fuel cell, with the performance of the electrodes heavily influenced by the materials they are made from. A wide range of materials have been tested to improve the performance of MFCs. In the past decade, carbon-based nanomaterials have emerged as promising materials for both anode and cathode construction. Composite materials have also shown to have the potential to become materials of choice for electrode manufacture. Various transition metal oxides have been investigated as alternatives to conventional expensive metals like platinum for oxygen reduction reaction. In this review, different carbon-based nanomaterials and composite materials are discussed for their potential use as MFC electrodes.

  1. Lanthanide-doped luminescent nanomaterials from fundamentals to bioapplications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xueyuan; Tu, Datao

    2014-01-01

    Lanthanide-Doped Luminescent Nanomaterials reviews the latest advances in the development of lanthanide-doped luminescent inorganic nanoparticles for potential bioapplications. This book covers the chemical and physical fundamentals of these nanoparticles, such as the controlled synthesis methodology, surface modification chemistry, optical physics, and their promising applications in diverse bioassays, with an emphasis on heterogeneous and homogeneous in-vitro biodetection of tumor biomarkers. This book is intended for those readers who are interested in systematically understanding the materials design strategy, optical behavior of lanthanide ions, and practical bioapplications of lanthanide nanoparticles. It primarily focuses on the interdisciplinary frontiers in chemistry, physics and biological aspects of luminescent nanomaterials. All chapters were written by scientists active in this field and for a broad audience, providing both beginners and advanced researchers with comprehensive information on the ...

  2. Combustion process for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials from liquid hydrocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Michael D.; Alford, J. Michael; Nabity, James; Hitch, Bradley D.

    2007-01-02

    The present invention provides a combustion apparatus for the production of carbon nanomaterials including fullerenes and fullerenic soot. Most generally the combustion apparatus comprises one or more inlets for introducing an oxygen-containing gas and a hydrocarbon fuel gas in the combustion system such that a flame can be established from the mixed gases, a droplet delivery apparatus for introducing droplets of a liquid hydrocarbon feedstock into the flame, and a collector apparatus for collecting condensable products containing carbon nanomaterials that are generated in the combustion system. The combustion system optionally has a reaction zone downstream of the flame. If this reaction zone is present the hydrocarbon feedstock can be introduced into the flame, the reaction zone or both.

  3. Geometrical assembly of ultrastable protein templates for nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Dominic J.; Giger, Lars; Kim, Steve S.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2016-06-01

    The fabrication of nanoscale devices requires architectural templates on which to position functional molecules in complex arrangements. Protein scaffolds are particularly promising templates for nanomaterials due to inherent molecular recognition and self-assembly capabilities combined with genetically encoded functionalities. However, difficulties in engineering protein quaternary structure into stable and well-ordered shapes have hampered progress. Here we report the development of an ultrastable biomolecular construction kit for the assembly of filamentous proteins into geometrically defined templates of controllable size and symmetry. The strategy combines redesign of protein-protein interaction specificity with the creation of tunable connector proteins that govern the assembly and projection angles of the filaments. The functionality of these nanoarchitectures is illustrated by incorporation of nanoparticles at specific locations and orientations to create hybrid materials such as conductive nanowires. These new structural components facilitate the manufacturing of nanomaterials with diverse shapes and functional properties over a wide range of processing conditions.

  4. Graphene and Other Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Aptasensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veli Cengiz Ozalp

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical aptasensors, which are based on the specificity of aptamer-target recognition, with electrochemical transduction for analytical purposes have received particular attention due to their high sensitivity and selectivity, simple instrumentation, as well as low production cost. Aptamers are functional nucleic acids with specific and high affinity to their targets, similar to antibodies. However, they are completely selected in vitro in contrast to antibodies. Due to their stability, easy chemical modifications and proneness to nanostructured device construction, aptamer-based sensors have been incorporated in a variety of applications including electrochemical sensing devices. In recent years, the performance of aptasensors has been augmented by incorporating novel nanomaterials in the preparation of better electrochemical sensors. In this review, we summarize the recent trends in the use of nanomaterials for developing electrochemical aptasensors.

  5. Enrichment and characterization of ferritin for nanomaterial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Mutskova, Radina; Schwartz, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin is a ubiquitous iron storage protein utilized as a nanomaterial for labeling biomolecules and nanoparticle construction. Commercially available preparations of horse spleen ferritin, widely used as a starting material, contain a distribution of ferritins with different iron loads. We describe a detailed approach to the enrichment of differentially loaded ferritin molecules by common biophysical techniques such as size exclusion chromatography and preparative ultracentrifugation, and characterize these preparations by dynamic light scattering, and analytical ultracentrifugation. We demonstrate a combination of methods to standardize an approach for determining the chemical load of nearly any particle, including nanoparticles and metal colloids. Purification and characterization of iron content in monodisperse ferritin species is particularly critical for several applications in nanomaterial science.

  6. 2nd international conference on advanced nanomaterials and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Goswami, D; Perumal, A

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale science and technology have occupied centre stage globally in modern scientific research and discourses in the early twenty first century. The enabling nature of the technology makes it important in modern electronics, computing, materials, healthcare, energy and the environment. This volume contains selected articles presented (as Invited/Oral/Poster presentations) at the 2nd international conference on advanced materials and nanotechnology (ICANN-2011) held recently at the Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, during Dec 8-10, 2011. The list of topics covered in this proceedings include: Synthesis and self assembly of nanomaterials Nanoscale characterisation Nanophotonics & Nanoelectronics Nanobiotechnology Nanocomposites  F   Nanomagnetism Nanomaterials for Enery Computational Nanotechnology Commercialization of Nanotechnology The conference was represented by around 400 participants from several countries including delegates invited from USA, Germany, Japan, UK, Taiwan, Italy, Singapor...

  7. Current Trends in Sensors Based on Conducting Polymer Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeonseok Yoon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Conducting polymers represent an important class of functional organic materials for next-generation electronic and optical devices. Advances in nanotechnology allow for the fabrication of various conducting polymer nanomaterials through synthesis methods such as solid-phase template synthesis, molecular template synthesis, and template-free synthesis. Nanostructured conducting polymers featuring high surface area, small dimensions, and unique physical properties have been widely used to build various sensor devices. Many remarkable examples have been reported over the past decade. The enhanced sensitivity of conducting polymer nanomaterials toward various chemical/biological species and external stimuli has made them ideal candidates for incorporation into the design of sensors. However, the selectivity and stability still leave room for improvement.

  8. Nanomaterials Nexus in Environmental, Human Health, and Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseashta, A.

    Three interconnected and underpinning aspects of nanotechnology viz.: environment, human health, and sustainability are discussed. Sustainable development using nanomaterials by employing responsible manufacturing, principles of “green chemistry” by drastically reducing waste discharge and emission by-products; generation and storage of energy; development of lightweight yet mechanically strong components; development of bio-degradable goods — for medicine, waste disposal, containers, etc. and to monitor, detect, and remediate the environmental pollution are discussed. A brief discussion of fate and transport of nanomaterials in air, water, and soil; life-cycle analysis, and methodologies to conduct risk-assessment in the context of source reduction and conservation is introduced. It is expected that such emerging and potentially transformative studies will make a major contribution to improving the quality of the life of citizens worldwide, in particular in sectors such as environment and health care.

  9. Predictive modeling of nanomaterial exposure effects in biological systems

    OpenAIRE

    Liu X; Tang K.; Harper S.; Harper B; Steevens JA; Xu R

    2013-01-01

    Xiong Liu,1 Kaizhi Tang,1 Stacey Harper,2 Bryan Harper,2 Jeffery A Steevens,3 Roger Xu1 1Intelligent Automation, Inc., Rockville, MD, USA; 2Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; 3ERDC Environmental Laboratory, Vicksburg, MS, USA Background: Predictive modeling of the biological effects of nanomaterials is critical for industry and policymakers to assess the potential ha...

  10. Epidemiological study of health hazards among workers handling engineered nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to establish and identify the health effect markers of workers with potential exposure to nanoparticles (20–100 nm) during manufacturing and/or application of nanomaterials. For this cross-sectional study, we recruited 227 workers who handled nanomaterials and 137 workers for comparison who did not from 14 plants in Taiwan. A questionnaire was used to collect data on exposure status, demographics, and potential confounders. The health effect markers were measured in the medical laboratory. Control banding from the Nanotool Risk Level Matrix was used to categorize the exposure risk levels of the workers. The results showed that the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD) in risk level 1 (RL1) and risk level 2 (RL2) workers was significantly (p RL1 > RL2). Another antioxidant, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), was significantly lower only in RL1 workers than in the control workers. The cardiovascular markers, fibrinogen and ICAM (intercellular adhesion molecule), were significantly higher in RL2 workers than in controls and a significant dose–response with an increasing trend was found for these two cardiovascular markers. Another cardiovascular marker, interleukin-6, was significantly increased among RL1 workers, but not among RL2 workers. The accuracy rate for remembering 7-digits and reciting them backwards was significantly lower in RL2 workers (OR = 0.48) than in controls and a significantly reversed gradient was also found for the correct rate of backward memory (OR = 0.90 for RL1, OR = 0.48 for RL2, p < 0.05 in test for trend). Depression of antioxidant enzymes and increased expression of cardiovascular markers were found among workers handling nanomaterials. Antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD and GPX, and cardiovascular markers, such as fibrinogen, ICAM, and interluekin-6, are possible biomarkers for medical surveillance of workers handling engineered nanomaterials.

  11. Hollow micro/nanomaterials as nanoreactors for photocatalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaobo Li; Jian Liu; Masters, Anthony F; Vishnu K. Pareek; Thomas Maschmeyer

    2013-01-01

    Learning from nature, one of the most prominent goals of photocatalysis is to assemble multifunctional photocatalytic units in an integrated, high performance device that is capable of using solar energy to produce “solar hydrogen” from aqueous media. By analogy with natural systems it is clear that scaffolds with multi-scale structural architectures are necessary. In this perspective, recent progress related to the use of hollow micro/nanomaterials as nanoreactors for photocatalysis is discu...

  12. Environmental release, fate and ecotoxicological effects of manufactured ceria nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Collin, Blanche; Auffan, Melanie; Johnson, Andrew C.; Kaur, Inder; Arturo A Keller; Lazareva, Anastasiya; Lead, Jamie R.; Ma, Xingmao; Merrifield, Ruth C.; Svendsen, Claus; White, Jason C.; Jason M Unrine

    2014-01-01

    Recent interest in the environmental fate and effects of manufactured CeO2 nanomaterials (nanoceria) has stemmed from its expanded use for a variety of applications including fuel additives, catalytic converters, chemical and mechanical planarization media and other uses. This has led to a wave of publications on the toxicological effects of nanoceria in ecological receptor species, but only limited information is available on possible environmental releases, concentrations in ...

  13. Impacts of Nanomaterials on Microbial Communities in Engineered Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    The overall goal of this dissertation was to determine the effects of an emerging contaminant, nanomaterials, on microbial communities in engineered systems. Specifically, communities within a simulated human colon and model septic system were studied. Microbial communities in their natural environments represent realistic scenarios for toxicity testing versus assays with enriched growth media and single cell cultures; the two engineered systems used in this work approach “real” scenarios com...

  14. Experimental investigation of interactions between proteins and carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Bishwambhar

    The global market for nanomaterials based products is forecasted to reach $1 trillion per annum per annum for 2015. Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) exhibit unique physicochemical properties with potential to impact diverse aspects of society through applications in electronics, renewable energy, and medicine. While the research and proposed applications of ENMs continue to grow rapidly, the health and safety of ENMs still remains a major concern to the public as well as to policy makers and funding agencies. It is now widely accepted that focused efforts are needed for identifying the list of physicochemical descriptors of ENM before they can be evaluated for nanotoxicity and biological response. This task is surprisingly challenging, as many physicochemical properties of ENMs are closely inter related and cannot be varied independently (e.g. increasing the size of an ENM can introduce additional defects). For example, varying toxic response may ensue due to different methods of nanomaterial preparation, dissimilar impurities and defects. Furthermore, the inadvertent coating of proteins on ENM surface in any biological milieu results in the formation of the so-called "protein/bio-corona" which can in turn alter the fate of ENMs and their biological response. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide are widely used ENMs. It is now known that defects in CNMs play an important role not only in materials properties but also in the determination of how materials interact at the nano-bio interface. In this regard, this work investigates the influence of defect-induced hydrophilicity on the bio-corona formation using micro Raman, photoluminescence, infrared spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that the interaction of proteins (albumin and fibrinogen) with CNMs is strongly influenced by charge transfer between them, inducing protein unfolding which enhances conformational entropy and

  15. Structural Stability and Optical Properties of Nanomaterials with Reconstructed Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puzder, A; Williamson, A; Reboredo, F; Galli, G

    2003-10-24

    The authors present density functional and quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the stability and optical properties of semiconductor nanomaterials with reconstructed surfaces. they predict the relative stability of silicon nanostructures with reconstructed and unreconstructed surfaces, and show that surface step geometries unique to highly curved surfaces dramatically reduce the optical gaps and decrease excitonic lifetimes. These predictions provide an explanation of both the variations in the photoluminescence spectra of colloidally synthesized nanoparticles and observed deep gap levels in porous silicon.

  16. The eNanoMapper database for nanomaterial safety information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Jeliazkova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The NanoSafety Cluster, a cluster of projects funded by the European Commision, identified the need for a computational infrastructure for toxicological data management of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs. Ontologies, open standards, and interoperable designs were envisioned to empower a harmonized approach to European research in nanotechnology. This setting provides a number of opportunities and challenges in the representation of nanomaterials data and the integration of ENM information originating from diverse systems. Within this cluster, eNanoMapper works towards supporting the collaborative safety assessment for ENMs by creating a modular and extensible infrastructure for data sharing, data analysis, and building computational toxicology models for ENMs.Results: The eNanoMapper database solution builds on the previous experience of the consortium partners in supporting diverse data through flexible data storage, open source components and web services. We have recently described the design of the eNanoMapper prototype database along with a summary of challenges in the representation of ENM data and an extensive review of existing nano-related data models, databases, and nanomaterials-related entries in chemical and toxicogenomic databases. This paper continues with a focus on the database functionality exposed through its application programming interface (API, and its use in visualisation and modelling. Considering the preferred community practice of using spreadsheet templates, we developed a configurable spreadsheet parser facilitating user friendly data preparation and data upload. We further present a web application able to retrieve the experimental data via the API and analyze it with multiple data preprocessing and machine learning algorithms.Conclusion: We demonstrate how the eNanoMapper database is used to import and publish online ENM and assay data from several data sources, how the “representational state

  17. Exploring Carbon Nanomaterial Diversity for Nucleation of Protein Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Lata Govada; Hannah S. Leese; Emmanuel Saridakis; Sean Kassen; Benny Chain; Sahir Khurshid; Robert Menzel; Sheng Hu; Shaffer, Milo S. P.; Chayen, Naomi E.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling crystal nucleation is a crucial step in obtaining high quality protein crystals for structure determination by X-ray crystallography. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) including carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, and carbon black provide a range of surface topographies, porosities and length scales; functionalisation with two different approaches, gas phase radical grafting and liquid phase reductive grafting, provide routes to a range of oligomer functionalised products. These grafted m...

  18. Deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in human upper airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei-Chung; Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene nanomaterials have attracted wide attention in recent years on their application to state-of-the-art technology due to their outstanding physical properties. On the other hand, the nanotoxicity of graphene materials also has rapidly become a serious concern especially in occupational health. Graphene naomaterials inevitably could become airborne in the workplace during manufacturing processes. The inhalation and subsequent deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in the human respiratory tract could potentially result in adverse health effects to exposed workers. Therefore, investigating the deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in the human airways is an indispensable component of an integral approach to graphene occupational health. For this reason, this study carried out a series of airway replica deposition experiments to obtain original experimental data for graphene aerosol airway deposition. In this study, graphene aerosols were generated, size classified, and delivered into human airway replicas (nasal and oral-to-lung airways). The deposition fraction and deposition efficiency of graphene aerosol in the airway replicas were obtained by a novel experimental approach. The experimental results acquired showed that the fractional deposition of graphene aerosols in airway sections studied were all less than 4%, and the deposition efficiency in each airway section was generally lower than 0.03. These results indicate that the majority of the graphene nanomaterial aerosols inhaled into the human respiratory tract could easily penetrate through the head airways as well as the upper part of the tracheobronchial airways and then transit down to the lower lung airways, where undesired biological responses might be induced. PMID:26317666

  19. Applications and toxicity of graphene family nanomaterials and their composites

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Z

    2016-01-01

    Zorawar Singh Department of Zoology, Khalsa College, Amritsar, Punjab, India Abstract: Graphene has attracted much attention of scientific community due to its enormous potential in different fields, including medical sciences, agriculture, food safety, cancer research, and tissue engineering. The potential for widespread human exposure raises safety concerns about graphene and its derivatives, referred to as graphene family nanomaterials (GFNs). Due to their unique chemical and physical pro...

  20. Ranking the in vivo toxicity of nanomaterials in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchio, G.; Galeone, A.; Malvindi, M. A. [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Center for Bio-Molecular Nanotechnologies-UniLe (Italy); Cingolani, R. [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Central Research Laboratories (Italy); Pompa, P. P., E-mail: pierpaolo.pompa@iit.it [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Center for Bio-Molecular Nanotechnologies-UniLe (Italy)

    2013-09-15

    In this work, we propose a quantitative assessment of nanoparticles toxicity in vivo. We show a quantitative ranking of several types of nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs, cadmium-based QDs, cadmium-free QDs, and iron oxide NPs, with different coating and/or surface chemistries), providing a categorization of their toxicity outcomes. This strategy may offer an innovative high-throughput screening tool of nanomaterials, of potential and broad interest to the nanoscience community.

  1. Ranking the in vivo toxicity of nanomaterials in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we propose a quantitative assessment of nanoparticles toxicity in vivo. We show a quantitative ranking of several types of nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs, cadmium-based QDs, cadmium-free QDs, and iron oxide NPs, with different coating and/or surface chemistries), providing a categorization of their toxicity outcomes. This strategy may offer an innovative high-throughput screening tool of nanomaterials, of potential and broad interest to the nanoscience community

  2. Silica Microspheres Functionalized  with Self-assembled Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Kandas, Ishac Lamei Nagiub

    2013-01-01

    A major limitation of silica-based high-Q microcavities is the lack of functionalities such as gain, plasmonic resonance, and second-order nonlinearity. Silica possesses third order nonlinearity but cannot produce second order nonlinearity, plasmonic resonances, or fluorescence emission. The key to overcome this deficiency is to develop versatile methods that can functionalize the surface of a silica microsphere with appropriate nanomaterials. The goal of this thesis is to present and charact...

  3. Toxicological effect of engineered nanomaterials on the liver

    OpenAIRE

    Kermanizadeh, A; Gaiser, B K; Johnston, H.; Brown, D M; Stone, V.

    2014-01-01

    The liver has a crucial role in metabolic homeostasis, as it is responsible for the storage, synthesis, metabolism and redistribution of carbohydrates, fats and vitamins, and numerous essential proteins. It is also the principal detoxification centre of the body, removing xenobiotics and waste products by metabolism or biliary excretion. An increasing number of studies have shown that some nanomaterials (NMs) are capable of distributing from the site of exposure (e.g. lungs, gut) to a number ...

  4. Adsorption of DDT and PCB by Nanomaterials from Residual Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Taha, Mohd Raihan; Mobasser, Shariat

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a study on adsorption of dichlorodiphenythreechloroethen (DDT) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on three nanomaterials including Multi walled Carbon Nanotube (MWNT), nano-clay and nano-alumina. DDT and PCBs are of significant concern due their high toxicity and long environmental half-lives. Experiments were conducted using batch adsorption procedures at different DDT and PCBs concentrations, from 10 to 60 mg/L. The amounts of MWNT, nano-clay and Nano-a...

  5. Green chemical synthesis of silver nanomaterials with maltodextrin.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallant, David Robert; Lu, Ping; Lambert, Timothy N.; Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2010-11-01

    Silver nanomaterials have significant application resulting from their optical properties related to surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, high electrical conductivity, and anti-microbial impact. A 'green chemistry' synthetic approach for silver nanomaterials minimizes the environmental impact of silver synthesis, as well as lowers the toxicity of the reactive agents. Biopolymers have long been used for stabilization of silver nanomaterials during synthesis, and include gum Arabic, heparin, and common starch. Maltodextrin is a processed derivative of starch with lower molecular weight and an increase in the number of reactive reducing aldehyde groups, and serves as a suitable single reactant for the formation of metallic silver. Silver nanomaterials can be formed under either a thermal route at neutral pH in water or by reaction at room temperature under more alkaline conditions. Deposited silver materials are formed on substrates from near neutral pH solutions at low temperatures near 50 C. Experimental conditions based on material concentrations, pH and reaction time are investigated for development of deposited films. Deposit morphology and optical properties are characterized using SEM and UV-vis techniques. Silver nanoparticles are generated under alkaline conditions by a dissolution-reduction method from precipitated silver (II) oxide. Synthesis conditions were explored for the rapid development of stable silver nanoparticle dispersions. UV-vis absorption spectra, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to characterize the nanoparticle formation kinetics and the influence of reaction conditions. The adsorbed content of the maltodextrin was characterized using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  6. Biological and Environmental Transformations of Copper-Based Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhongying; von dem Bussche, Annette; Kabadi, Pranita K.; Kane, Agnes B.; Hurt, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Copper-based nanoparticles are an important class of materials with applications as catalysts, conductive inks, and antimicrobial agents. Environmental and safety issues are particularly important for copper-based nanomaterials because of their potential large-scale use and their high redox activity and toxicity reported from in vitro studies. Elemental nanocopper oxidizes readily upon atmospheric exposure during storage and use, so copper oxides are highly relevant phases to consider in stud...

  7. Engineered nanomaterials: toward effective safety management in research laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Groso, Amela; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Hofmann, Heinrich; De Meyer, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Background It is still unknown which types of nanomaterials and associated doses represent an actual danger to humans and environment. Meanwhile, there is consensus on applying the precautionary principle to these novel materials until more information is available. To deal with the rapid evolution of research, including the fast turnover of collaborators, a user-friendly and easy-to-apply risk assessment tool offering adequate preventive and protective measures has to be provided. Results Ba...

  8. [Transport behaviors of metal oxide nanomaterials in various soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing; Yu, Bo-Yang

    2013-10-01

    Transport behaviors of nano-CeO2, nano-TiO2 and nano-Al2O3 materials in various soils were investigated by column leaching experiment. The relationship between transportability of nanomaterials and soil properties was analyzed and potential transport distances of nanomaterials in soils were estimated by applying the colloid migration dynamic model. The result shows that both nano-CeO2 and nano-TiO2 have strong mobility in most of tested soils. While nano-Al2O3 is almost completely retained in most of tested soils except acidic soil, in which nano-Al2O3 shows relatively strong transportability. The transport mechanisms of nanomaterials in soils are very complicated. Among electrostatic interaction, soil surface charge heterogeneities, aggregation, straining and ripening, each of them plays an important role in the transport of nanomaterials. The transportability of nano-CeO2 is negatively correlated with soil Zeta potential, while that of nano-TiO2 is negatively correlated with soil clay content, and positively correlated with soil permeability coefficients. The transportability of nano-Al2O3 is negatively correlated with soil pH, and positively correlated with soil permeability coefficients. The estimated maximum transport distances of nano-CeO2, nano-TiO2 and nano-Al2O3 materials in soils were 526,9043 cm, 31-332 cm and soils are far more than the surface soil depth of 30 cm, indicating severe risks to deeper soil layers would potentially occur in these soils. PMID:24364330

  9. Engineered Nanomaterials: An Emerging Class of Novel Endocrine Disruptors1

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, Jeremy K; Carvan, Michael J.; Hutz, Reinhold J.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) have garnered great attention for their potentially beneficial applications in medicine, industry, and consumer products due to their advantageous physicochemical properties and inherent size. However, studies have shown that these sophisticated molecules can initiate toxicity at the subcellular, cellular, and/or tissue/organ level in diverse experimental models. Investigators have also demonstrated that, upon exposure to ENMs, the physico...

  10. UV-VIS and photoluminescence spectroscopy for nanomaterials characterization

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Second volume of a 40-volume series on nanoscience and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about UV-visible and photoluminescence spectroscopy for the characterization of nanomaterials. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry in the related fields.

  11. Nanomaterials in consumer products: a challenging analytical problem

    OpenAIRE

    Contado, Catia

    2015-01-01

    Many products used in everyday life are made with the assistance of nanotechnologies. Cosmetic, pharmaceuticals, sunscreen, powdered food are only few examples of end products containing nano-sized particles (NPs), generally added to improve the product quality. To evaluate correctly benefits vs. risks of engineered nanomaterials and consequently to legislate in favor of consumer's protection, it is necessary to know the hazards connected with the exposure levels. This information implies tra...

  12. New Hybrid Nanomaterial Based on Self-Assembly of Cyclodextrins and Cobalt Prussian Blue Analogue Nanocubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio L. C. Carvalho

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Supramolecular self-assembly has been demonstrated to be a useful approach to developing new functional nanomaterials. In this work, we used a cobalt Prussian blue analogue (PBA, Co3[Co(CN6]2 compound and a β-cyclodextrin (CD macrocycle to develop a novel host-guest PBA-CD nanomaterial. The preparation of the functional magnetic material involved the self-assembly of CD molecules onto a PBA surface by a co-precipitation method. According to transmission electronic microscopy results, PBA-CD exhibited a polydisperse structure composed of 3D nanocubes with a mean edge length of 85 nm, which became shorter after CD incorporation. The supramolecular arrangement and structural, crystalline and thermal properties of the hybrid material were studied in detail by vibrational and electronic spectroscopies and X-ray diffraction. The cyclic voltammogram of the hybrid material in a 0.1 mol·L−1 NaCl supporting electrolyte exhibited a quasi-reversible redox process, attributed to Co2+/Co3+ conversion, with an E1/2 value of 0.46 V (vs. SCE, with higher reversibility observed for the system in the presence of CD. The standard rate constants for PBA and PBA-CD were determined to be 0.07 and 0.13 s−1, respectively, which suggests that the interaction between the nanocubes and CD at the supramolecular level improves electron transfer. We expect that the properties observed for the hybrid material make it a potential candidate for (biosensing designs with a desirable capability for drug delivery.

  13. Engineered Carbon-Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Jitendra N; Vij, Varun; Kemp, K Christian; Kim, Kwang S

    2016-01-26

    The study of electrochemical behavior of bioactive molecules has become one of the most rapidly developing scientific fields. Biotechnology and biomedical engineering fields have a vested interest in constructing more precise and accurate voltammetric/amperometric biosensors. One rapidly growing area of biosensor design involves incorporation of carbon-based nanomaterials in working electrodes, such as one-dimensional carbon nanotubes, two-dimensional graphene, and graphene oxide. In this review article, we give a brief overview describing the voltammetric techniques and how these techniques are applied in biosensing, as well as the details surrounding important biosensing concepts of sensitivity and limits of detection. Building on these important concepts, we show how the sensitivity and limit of detection can be tuned by including carbon-based nanomaterials in the fabrication of biosensors. The sensing of biomolecules including glucose, dopamine, proteins, enzymes, uric acid, DNA, RNA, and H2O2 traditionally employs enzymes in detection; however, these enzymes denature easily, and as such, enzymeless methods are highly desired. Here we draw an important distinction between enzymeless and enzyme-containing carbon-nanomaterial-based biosensors. The review ends with an outlook of future concepts that can be employed in biosensor fabrication, as well as limitations of already proposed materials and how such sensing can be enhanced. As such, this review can act as a roadmap to guide researchers toward concepts that can be employed in the design of next generation biosensors, while also highlighting the current advancements in the field. PMID:26579616

  14. Predictive tests to evaluate oxidative potential of engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiazza, Mara; Carella, Emanuele; Oliaro-Bosso, Simonetta; Corazzari, Ingrid; Viola, Franca; Fenoglio, Ivana

    2013-04-01

    Oxidative stress constitutes one of the principal injury mechanisms through which particulate toxicants (asbestos, crystalline silica, hard metals) and engineered nanomaterials can induce adverse health effects. ROS may be generated indirectly by activated cells and/or directly at the surface of the material. The occurrence of these processes depends upon the type of material. Many authors have recently demonstrated that metal oxides and carbon-based nanoparticles may influence (increasing or decreasing) the generation of oxygen radicals in a cell environment. Metal oxide, such as iron oxides, crystalline silica, and titanium dioxide are able to generate free radicals via different mechanisms causing an imbalance within oxidant species. The increase of ROS species may lead to inflammatory responses and in some cases to the development of cancer. On the other hand carbon-based nanomaterials, such as fullerene, carbon nanotubes, carbon black as well as cerium dioxide are able to scavenge the free radicals generated acting as antioxidant. The high numbers of new-engineered nanomaterials, which are introduced in the market, are exponentially increasing. Therefore the definition of toxicological strategies is urgently needed. The development of acellular screening tests will make possible the reduction of the number of in vitro and in vivo tests to be performed. An integrated protocol that may be used to predict the oxidant/antioxidant potential of engineered nanoparticles will be here presented.

  15. Engineered nanomaterial uptake and tissue distribution: from cell to organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kettiger H

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Helene Kettiger,1,* Angela Schipanski,2,* Peter Wick,2 Jörg Huwyler1 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 2Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Materials-Biology Interactions, St Gallen, Switzerland *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Improved understanding of interactions between nanoparticles and biological systems is needed to develop safety standards and to design new generations of nanomaterials. This article reviews the molecular mechanisms of cellular uptake of engineered nanoparticles, their intracellular fate, and their distribution within an organism. We have reviewed the available literature on the uptake and disposition of engineered nanoparticles. Special emphasis was placed on the analysis of experimental systems and their limitations with respect to their usefulness to predict the in vivo situation. The available literature confirms the need to study particle characteristics in an environment that simulates the situation encountered in biological systems. Phenomena such as protein binding and opsonization are of prime importance since they may have a strong impact on cellular internalization, biodistribution, and immunogenicity of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. Extrapolation from in vitro results to the in vivo situation in the whole organism remains a challenge. However, improved understanding of physicochemical properties of engineered nanoparticles and their influence on biological systems facilitates the design of nanomaterials that are safe, well tolerated, and suitable for diagnostic or therapeutic use in humans. Keywords: biodistribution, cellular transport, cellular uptake, endocytosis, engineered nanomaterials, nanosafety

  16. Phase conversion in silicon and carbon nanomaterials at extreme pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Matthew; Smith, Bennett; Abramson, Evan; Pauzauskie, Peter

    The high pressures and temperatures accessible in laser-heated diamond anvil cells (LH-DAC) have produced fundamental insights by identifying metastable states with extraordinary properties. However, the actual conditions necessary to access a metastable state depend on the kinetics of phase transformation. The explosion of research in nanomaterials has generated interest in exploring how phase transformations occur in materials with high radii of curvature, and how we can leverage these effects. We present work investigating phase transformations in Si- and C-based nanomaterials with high radii of curvature. We have loaded a LH-DAC with Si nanowires (NWs) and examined the phase at a range of pressures to discover a recoverable phase transition to a wurtzite crystal structure. For C materials, we have synthesized a pyrolyzed carbon aerogel, an amorphous carbon sol gel with size features of ~10 nm and incredibly low density and thermal conductivity (~10-2 W/m-K). We investigate spatial resolution of heating under pressure and the effect of temperature on resulting material electronic structure. Finally, we model heating with Mie theory to provide insights into the phase transformations of nanomaterials.

  17. Probing mechanical principles of cell-nanomaterial interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huajian

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, various types of nanoparticles, nanowires, nanofibers, nanotubes, and atomically thin plates and sheets have emerged as candidates for an ever increasing list of potential applications for next generation electronics, microchips, composites, barrier coatings, biosensors, drug delivery, and energy harvesting and conversion systems. There is now an urgent societal need to understand both beneficial and hazardous effects of nanotechnology which is projected to produce and release thousands of tons of nanomaterials into the environment in the coming decades. This paper aims to present an overview of some recent studies conducted at Brown University on the mechanics of cell-nanomaterial interactions, including the modeling of nanoparticles entering cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticles interacting with cell membranes. The discussions will be organized around the following questions: Why and how does cellular uptake of nanoparticles depend on particle size, shape, elasticity and surface structure? In particular, we will discuss the effect of nanoparticle size on receptor-mediated endocytosis, the effect of elastic stiffness on cell-particle interactions, how high aspect ratio nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and graphenes enter cells and how different geometrical patterns of ligands on a nanoparticle can be designed to control the rate of particle uptake.

  18. Bio-inspired flow sensors using carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Erin; Darge, Abenazer; Philen, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Fish utilize neuromasts to help them detect changes in water flow, which is essential for swimming, tracking prey, and performing synchronized swimming maneuvers. The neuromasts contain a staircase of hair cells that perform this task by transforming mechanical stimulation from the flowing water to electrical impulses that ultimately are transported to the brain. Inspired by the physical structure of the hairs, flow sensors are fabricated using carbonaceous nanomaterials partially embedded in a polydimethylsiloxan (PDMS) polymer substrate, which leaves part of the nanomaterial exposed to the fluid flow. This is an effective means of sensor fabrication that prevents the carbon nanomaterial from being washed away by the flowing liquid. Different carbon materials such as long and short single walled carbon nanotubes, carbon nanohorns, peapods, and multi walled carbon nanotubes are investigated in this research. All sensors from these carbon materials performed well when fabricated using this method. Future focus of this research is to maximize electrical response by implementing different techniques, aimed at improving hydrophilicity by introducing a functional group such as siloxane (SiOH) to the sensing surface and increasing the surface area in contact between the electrodes and the sensing surface.

  19. Recent trends in nanomaterials applications in environmental monitoring and remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sumistha; Sen, Biswarup; Debnath, Nitai

    2015-12-01

    Environmental pollution is one of the greatest problems that the world is facing today, and it is increasing with every passing year and causing grave and irreparable damage to the earth. Nanomaterials, because of their novel physical and chemical characteristics, have great promise to combat environment pollution. Nanotechnology is being used to devise pollution sensor. A variety of materials in their nano form like iron, titanium dioxide, silica, zinc oxide, carbon nanotube, dendrimers, polymers, etc. are increasingly being used to make the air clean, to purify water, and to decontaminate soil. Nanotechnology is also being used to make renewable energy cheaper and more efficient. The use of nanotechnology in agriculture sector will reduce the indiscriminate use of agrochemicals and thus will reduce the load of chemical pollutant. While remediating environment pollution with nanomaterials, it should also be monitored that these materials do not contribute further degradation of the environment. This review will focus broadly on the applications of nanotechnology in the sustainable development with particular emphasis on renewable energy, air-, water-, and soil-remediation. Besides, the review highlights the recent developments in various types of nanomaterials and nanodevices oriented toward pollution monitoring and remediation. PMID:26490920

  20. A quantitative measure for reconciling partial representations of nanomaterial structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlinar, Vladan

    2015-03-01

    To facilitate the design and optimization of nanomaterials for a given application it is necessary to understand the relationship between structure and physical properties. For large nanomaterials, there is imprecise structural information so the full structure is only resolved at the level of partial representations. Here, I will show how to reconcile partial structural representations by employing Dempster-Shafer evidence theory. By constructing a so-called evidence structure using all the data we have from structural characterization measurements and theory, I resolve level of support and conflict between evidence from experiment and theory, and then apply a quantitative measure to determine which range of structural parameters acceptable by both experiment and theory. This further enables us to determine a range of structure parameter space where predictive theory can be used to design and optimize the structure. Using an example of variation of chemical composition profile across the interface of two nanomaterials, I will demonstrate how, given experimental and theoretical constraints, to find a region of structure-parameter space within which computationally explored partial representations of the full structure will have observable real-world counterparts. Supported by NASA EPSCoR.

  1. Metal Oxide Nanomaterial QNAR Models: Available Structural Descriptors and Understanding of Toxicity Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Ying

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide nanomaterials are widely used in various areas; however, the divergent published toxicology data makes it difficult to determine whether there is a risk associated with exposure to metal oxide nanomaterials. The application of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR modeling in metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity studies can reduce the need for time-consuming and resource-intensive nanotoxicity tests. The nanostructure and inorganic composition of metal oxide nanomaterials makes this approach different from classical QSAR study; this review lists and classifies some structural descriptors, such as size, cation charge, and band gap energy, in recent metal oxide nanomaterials quantitative nanostructure activity relationship (QNAR studies and discusses the mechanism of metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity based on these descriptors and traditional nanotoxicity tests.

  2. Sensors for breath testing: from nanomaterials to comprehensive disease detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konvalina, Gady; Haick, Hossam

    2014-01-21

    The analysis of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath samples represents a new frontier in medical diagnostics because it is a noninvasive and potentially inexpensive way to detect illnesses. Clinical trials with spectrometry and spectroscopy techniques, the standard volatile-compound detection methods, have shown the potential for diagnosing illnesses including cancer, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, tuberculosis, diabetes, and more via breath tests. Unfortunately, this approach requires expensive equipment and high levels of expertise to operate the necessary instruments, and the tests must be done quickly and use preconcentration techniques, all of which impede its adoption. Sensing matrices based on nanomaterials are likely to become a clinical and laboratory diagnostic tool because they are significantly smaller, easier-to-use, and less expensive than spectrometry or spectroscopy. An ideal nanomaterial-based sensor for breath testing should be sensitive at very low concentrations of volatile organic compounds, even in the presence of environmental or physiological confounding factors. It should also respond rapidly and proportionately to small changes in concentration and provide a consistent output that is specific to a given volatile organic compound. When not in contact with the volatile organic compounds, the sensor should quickly return to its baseline state or be simple and inexpensive enough to be disposable. Several reviews have focused on the methodological, biochemical, and clinical aspects of breath analysis in attempts to bring breath testing closer to practice for comprehensive disease detection. This Account pays particular attention to the technological gaps and confounding factors that impede nanomaterial-sensor-based breath testing, in the hope of directing future research and development efforts towards the best possible approaches to overcome these obstacles. We discuss breath testing as a complex process involving numerous

  3. Mechanical characterization of low dimensional nanomaterials and polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongsheng

    This research was aimed to characterize the mechanical properties of low dimensional nanomaterials and polymer nanocomposites, and to study the reinforcing mechanisms of nanoscale reinforcements. The nanomaterials studied were zero-dimensional nanomaterial--cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanocubes, one-dimensional nanomaterials--silver nanowires and silicon oxide (SiO2) nanowires, and two-dimensional nanomaterial--nanometer-thick montmorillonite clay platelets. The hardness and elastic moduli of solid Cu 2O nanocubes and silver nanowires were measured by directly indenting individual cubes/wires using a nanoindenter. The elastic modulus of amorphous SiO2 nanowires was measured by performing three-point bending on suspended wires with an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The elastic modulus of the nanometer-thick clay platelets was assessed by the modulus mapping technique. An array of nanoscale indents was successfully made on a nanowire. The nanowires were cut to the length as needed. The nanoindentation approach permits the direct machining of individual nanowires without complications of conventional lithography. The nanomechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-reinforced epoxy composites with varying nanotube concentrations were measured by nanoindentation/nanoscratch techniques. Hardness and elastic modulus were measured using a nanoindenter. Viscoelastic properties of the nanocomposites were measured using nanoindentation dynamic mechanical analysis tests. The SWCNT reinforcing mechanisms were further studied by both Halpin-Tsai and Mori-Tanaka theories, which were found applicable to SWCNT-reinforced, amorphous-polymer composites. The possible reinforcing mechanisms that work in polymer-SWCNT composites and reasons responsible for SWCNTs' low mechanical reinforcement were analyzed. Nanoclay-reinforced agarose nanocomposites with varying clay concentrations were structurally and mechanically characterized. Structural characterization was carried

  4. Nanomaterial-based biosensors for food toxin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Bansi D; Srivastava, Saurabh; Ali, Md Azahar; Singh, Chandan

    2014-10-01

    There is an increased interest toward the development of bioelectronic devices for food toxin (mycotoxins) detection. Mycotoxins are highly toxic secondary metabolites produced by fungi like Fusarium, Aspergillus, and Penicillium that are frequently found in crops or during storage of food including cereals, nuts, fruits, etc. The contamination of food by mycotoxins has become a matter of increasing concern. High levels of mycotoxins in the diet can cause adverse, acute, and chronic effects on human health and a variety of animal species. Side effects may particularly affect the liver, kidney, nervous system, endocrine system, and immune system. Among 300 mycotoxins known till date, there are a few that are considered to play an important part in food safety, and for these, a range of analytical methods have been developed. Some of the important mycotoxins include aflatoxins, ochratoxins, fumonisins, citreoviridin, patulin, citrinin, and zearalenon. The conventional methods of analysis of mycotoxins normally require sophisticated instrumentation, e.g., liquid chromatography with fluorescence or mass detectors, combined with extraction procedures for sample preparation. Hence, new analysis tools are necessary to attain more sensitive, specific, rapid, and reliable information about the desired toxin. For the last about two decades, the research and development of simpler and faster analytical procedures based on affinity biosensors has aroused much interest due to their simplicity and sensitivity. The nanomaterials have recently had a great impact on the development of biosensors. The functionalized nanomaterials are used as catalytic tools, immobilization platforms, or as optical or electroactive labels to improve the biosensing performance to obtain higher sensitivity, stability, and selectivity. Nanomaterials, such as carbon nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes and graphene), metal nanoparticles, nanowires, nanocomposites, and nanostructured metal oxide nanoparticles

  5. Genotoxicity of metal oxide nanomaterials: review of recent data and discussion of possible mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbamaki, Nazanin; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cassano, Antonio; Marchese Robinson, Richard L.; Benfenati, Emilio; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Cronin, Mark T. D.

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has rapidly entered into human society, revolutionized many areas, including technology, medicine and cosmetics. This progress is due to the many valuable and unique properties that nanomaterials possess. In turn, these properties might become an issue of concern when considering potentially uncontrolled release to the environment. The rapid development of new nanomaterials thus raises questions about their impact on the environment and human health. This review focuses on the potential of nanomaterials to cause genotoxicity and summarizes recent genotoxicity studies on metal oxide/silica nanomaterials. Though the number of genotoxicity studies on metal oxide/silica nanomaterials is still limited, this endpoint has recently received more attention for nanomaterials, and the number of related publications has increased. An analysis of these peer reviewed publications over nearly two decades shows that the test most employed to evaluate the genotoxicity of these nanomaterials is the comet assay, followed by micronucleus, Ames and chromosome aberration tests. Based on the data studied, we concluded that in the majority of the publications analysed in this review, the metal oxide (or silica) nanoparticles of the same core chemical composition did not show different genotoxicity study calls (i.e. positive or negative) in the same test, although some results are inconsistent and need to be confirmed by additional experiments. Where the results are conflicting, it may be due to the following reasons: (1) variation in size of the nanoparticles; (2) variations in size distribution; (3) various purities of nanomaterials; (4) variation in surface areas for nanomaterials with the same average size; (5) differences in coatings; (6) differences in crystal structures of the same types of nanomaterials; (7) differences in size of aggregates in solution/media; (8) differences in assays; (9) different concentrations of nanomaterials in assay tests. Indeed, due to the

  6. Dimensionality of carbon nanomaterial impacting on the modulation of amyloid peptide assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Zhu, Z.; Bortolini, C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Amari, A.; Zhang, H. X.; Liu, L.; Dong, M. D.

    2016-07-01

    A wide variety of inorganic nanomaterials have been exploited so far for their great potential for biological applications. Some of these materials could be valid candidates to modulate the assembly of amyloid peptides, which is relevant to amyloid-related diseases. In this work, we reveal that a carbon nanomaterial can indeed modulate the assembly of amyloid peptides and, additionally, we show that this modulating effect is closely related to the dimensionality of the nanomaterials.

  7. The Fifth International conference Deformation and fracture of materials and nanomaterials DFMN-2013. Conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reports of the Fifth International Conference Deformation and fracture of materials and nanomaterials DFMN -2013, Moscow, 26-29 November 2013 are presented. The results of studies in the field of strength, deformation and fracture of materials and nanomaterials are discussed at the conference. Seminars and exhibition acquainting the participants and guests of the conference with the latest models of equipment for the study of the structure, the processes of deformation and fracture of materials and nanomaterials were conducted

  8. Environmental hazard of selected TiO 2 nanomaterials under consideration of relevant exposure scenarios

    OpenAIRE

    Wyrwoll, Anne

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades the production and use of nanomaterials, such as titanium dioxide nanomaterials (nano-TiO2), increased extensively. To support a sustainable nanotechnology, it is essential to investigate the environmental risks of nanomaterials. However, it remains unclear whether in the context of the European Chemical Regulation Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) the nano and bulk form of a substance have to be registered separately or not, ...

  9. Bayesian Methods in the Quantitative Risk Assessment and Toxicity Profiling of Engineered Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Trina Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, very little research has been conducted to assess the potential human health hazards associated with engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). In-vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays for the assessment of engineered nanomaterials provide new opportunities to learn how these particles interact at the cellular level, and may aid in reducing the demand for in-vivo testing. The large number of potential factors that could link nanomaterials to adverse human health impacts, create a...

  10. Multitasking mesoporous nanomaterials for biorefinery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Kapil

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have attracted great interest for last two decades due to their unique and advantageous structural properties, such as high surface area, pore volume, stable mesostructure, tunable pore size and controllable particle morphology. The robust silica framework provides sites for organic modifications, making MSNs ideal platforms for adsorbents and supported organocatalysts. In addition, the pores of MSNs provide cavities/ channels for incorporation of metal and metal oxide nanoparticle catalysts. These supported metal nanoparticle catalysts benefit from confined local environments to enhance their activity and selectivity for various reactions. Biomass is considered as a sustainable feedstock with potential to replace diminishing fossil fuels for the production of biofuels. Among several strategies, one of the promising methods of biofuel production from biomass is to reduce the oxygen content of the feedstock in order to improve the energy density. This can be achieved by creating C-C bonds between biomass derived intermediates to increase the molecular weight of the final hydrocarbon molecules. In this context, pore size and organic functionality of MSNs are varied to obtain the ideal catalyst for a C-C bond forming reaction: the aldol condensation. The mechanistic aspects of this reaction in supported heterogeneous catalysts are explored. The modification of supported organocatalyst and the effect of solvent on the reaction are rationalized. The significance of two functional surfaces of MSNs is exploited by enzyme immobilization on the external surface and organo catalyst functionalization on the internal surface. Using this bifunctional catalyst, the tandem conversion of small chain alcohols into longer chain hydrocarbon molecules is demonstrated. The ability to incorporate metal and metal oxide nanoparticles in the pores and subsequent functionalization led to develop organic modified magnetic MSNs (OM-MSNs) for applications

  11. Multitasking mesoporous nanomaterials for biorefinery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandel, Kapil [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have attracted great interest for last two decades due to their unique and advantageous structural properties, such as high surface area, pore volume, stable mesostructure, tunable pore size and controllable particle morphology. The robust silica framework provides sites for organic modifications, making MSNs ideal platforms for adsorbents and supported organocatalysts. In addition, the pores of MSNs provide cavities/ channels for incorporation of metal and metal oxide nanoparticle catalysts. These supported metal nanoparticle catalysts benefit from confined local environments to enhance their activity and selectivity for various reactions. Biomass is considered as a sustainable feedstock with potential to replace diminishing fossil fuels for the production of biofuels. Among several strategies, one of the promising methods of biofuel production from biomass is to reduce the oxygen content of the feedstock in order to improve the energy density. This can be achieved by creating C-C bonds between biomass derived intermediates to increase the molecular weight of the final hydrocarbon molecules. In this context, pore size and organic functionality of MSNs are varied to obtain the ideal catalyst for a C-C bond forming reaction: the aldol condensation. The mechanistic aspects of this reaction in supported heterogeneous catalysts are explored. The modification of supported organocatalyst and the effect of solvent on the reaction are rationalized. The significance of two functional surfaces of MSNs is exploited by enzyme immobilization on the external surface and organo catalyst functionalization on the internal surface. Using this bifunctional catalyst, the tandem conversion of small chain alcohols into longer chain hydrocarbon molecules is demonstrated. The ability to incorporate metal and metal oxide nanoparticles in the pores and subsequent functionalization led to develop organic modified magnetic MSNs (OM-MSNs) for applications

  12. Imaging and therapy with radionuclide labeled magnetic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Perihan Ünak

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles offer exciting new opportunities including the improvement of the quality of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermic treatment for malignant cells, site-specific drug delivery and also the recent research interest of manipulating cell membranes. The biological applications of these nanomaterials require these nanoparticles to have high magnetization values, size smaller than 20 nm, narrow particle size distribution and a special surface coating for both avoiding ...

  13. Computational studies on the interactions of nanomaterials with proteins and their impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, De-Yi; Su, Ji-Guo; Li, Chun-Hua; Li, Jing-Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The intensive concern over the biosafety of nanomaterials demands the systematic study of the mechanisms underlying their biological effects. Many of the effects of nanomaterials can be attributed to their interactions with proteins and their impacts on protein function. On the other hand, nanomaterials show potential for a variety of biomedical applications, many of which also involve direct interactions with proteins. In this paper, we review some recent computational studies on this subject, especially those investigating the interactions of carbon and gold nanomaterials. Beside hydrophobic and π-stacking interactions, the mode of interaction of carbon nanomaterials can also be regulated by their functional groups. The coatings of gold nanomaterials similarly adjust their mode of interaction, in addition to coordination interactions with the sulfur groups of cysteine residues and the imidazole groups of histidine residues. Nanomaterials can interact with multiple proteins and their impacts on protein activity are attributed to a wide spectrum of mechanisms. These findings on the mechanisms of nanomaterial-protein interactions can further guide the design and development of nanomaterials to realize their application in disease diagnosis and treatment. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21273240, 11204267, and 11474013).

  14. Synthesis, Characterization, and Application of 1-D Cerium Oxide Nanomaterials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuen-Song Lin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work provides a comprehensive overview of the recent progress of research work toward developing new one dimensional (1-D ceria (CeO2 nanomaterials. The review has been classified into three parts: the preparation procedures with identification of the existing different dimensional ceria nanomaterials, the formation mechanisms, and an analysis of their applications. From literature survey, it is inaugurated that the fundamental structures of the ceria nanomaterials constructively dominate their properties and applications. In addition, this work will also provide a perspective on the future technical trends for the development of different dimensional CeO2 nanomaterials.

  15. Dermal Absorption of Nanomaterials Titanium Dioxide and Zinc Oxide Based Sunscreen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Christiane; Dokkedahl, Karin Stenderup; Wang, Jing;

    of nanomaterials in products on the Danish market and their consequences on consumers and the environment. Furthermore, the aim is to clarify possible risks that might be associated with nanomaterials for consumers and the environment. The current project ’Dermal Absorption of Nanomaterials Titanium...... Dioxide and Zinc Oxide in Sunscreen’ is part of this ”Better control of nano” initiative and was started in March 2014 and ended in June 2015. The aim of this project was to generate new knowledge on physicochemical properties that may influence dermal absorption of nanomaterials. The project was carried...

  16. Mobility of coated and uncoated TiO2 nanomaterials in soil columns--Applicability of the tests methods of OECD TG 312 and 106 for nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Carmen; Gabsch, Stephan; Hellack, Bryan; Nogowski, Andre; Babick, Frank; Stintz, Michael; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A J

    2015-07-01

    Nanomaterials are commonly used in everyday life products and during their life cycle they can be released into the environment. Soils and sediments are estimated as significant sinks for those nanomaterials. To investigate and assess the behaviour of nanomaterials in soils and sediments standardized test methods are needed. In this study the applicability of two existing international standardized test guidelines for the testing of nanomaterials, OECD TG 106 "Adsorption/Desorption using a Bath Equilibrium Method" and the OECD TG 312 "Leaching in Soil Columns", were investigated. For the study one coated and two uncoated TiO2 nanomaterials were used, respectively. The results indicate that the OECD TG 106 is not applicable for nanomaterials. However, the test method according to OECD TG 312 was found to be applicable if nano-specific adaptations are applied. The mobility investigations of the OECD TG 312 indicated a material-dependent mobility of the nanomaterials, which in some cases may lead to an accumulation in the upper soil layers. Whereas no significant transport was observed for the uncoated materials for the double-coated material (coating with dimethicone and aluminiumoxide) a significant transport was detected and attributed to the coating. PMID:25910977

  17. Nanocrystalline and Nanocomposite Magnetic Materials and Their Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert D Shull

    2007-01-01

    Nanocrystalline materials can possess bulk properties quite different from those commonly associated with conventional large-grained materials. Nanocomposites, a subset of nanocrystalline materials, in addition have been found to possess magnetic properties which are similar to, but different from, the properties of the individual constituents. New magnetic phenomena, unusual property combinations, and both enhanced and diminished magnetic property values are just some of the changes observed in magnetic nanocomposites from conventional magnetic materials. Here, a description will be presented of some of the exciting new properties discovered in nanomaterials and the magnetic applications envisioned for them.

  18. Functionalization of ZnO nanorods with γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles: Layer-by-layer synthesis, optical and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bifunctional magnetic-optical ZnO-γ-Fe2O3 hybrid nanomaterials have been synthesized via a layer-by-layer assembly technique on ZnO nanorod templates. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, field emission scanning electron microscope, high-resolution transmission electron microscope and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have been used to characterize the as-synthesized products. The photoluminescence spectra indicate that ZnO-γ-Fe2O3 hybrid nanomaterials exhibit enhanced UV emission and passivated defect emission. The magnetic property investigation reveals that ZnO-γ-Fe2O3 hybrid nanomaterials exhibit a superparamagnetic behavior.

  19. Magnetic Properties of Strontium Hexaferrite Nanostructures Measured with Magnetic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Song, Jie; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Besenbacher, Flemming; Christensen, Mogens; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic property is one of the important properties of nanomaterials. Direct investigation of the magnetic property on the nanoscale is however challenging. Herein we present a quantitative measurement of the magnetic properties including the magnitude and the orientation of the magnetic moment of strontium hexaferrite (SrFe12O19) nanostructures using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with nanoscale spatial resolution. The measured magnetic moments of the as-synthesized individual SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets are on the order of ~10(-16) emu. The MFM measurements further confirm that the magnetic moment of SrFe12O19 nanoplatelets increases with increasing thickness of the nanoplatelet. In addition, the magnetization directions of nanoplatelets can be identified by the contrast of MFM frequency shift. Moreover, MFM frequency imaging clearly reveals the tiny magnetic structures of a compacted SrFe12O19 pellet. This work demonstrates the mesoscopic investigation of the intrinsic magnetic properties of materials has a potential in development of new magnetic nanomaterials in electrical and medical applications. PMID:27174466

  20. Interaction of engineered nanomaterials with hydrophobic organic pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahle-Demessie, E.; Han, Changseok; Zhao, Amy; Hahn, Bill; Grecsek, Heidi

    2016-07-01

    As nanomaterials become an increasing part of everyday consumer products, it is imperative to monitor their potential release during production, use and disposal, and to assess their impact on the health of humans and the ecosystem. This necessitates research to better understand how the properties of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) lead to their accumulation and redistribution in the environment, and to assess whether they could become novel pollutants or if they can affect the mobility and bioavailability of other toxins. This study focuses on understanding the influence of nanostructured-TiO2 and the interaction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with organic pollutants in water. We studied the adsorption and water phase dispersion of model pollutants with relatively small water solubility (i.e., two- and three-ring polyaromatic hydrocarbons and insecticides) with respect to ENMs. The sorption of pollutants was measured based on water phase analysis, and by separating suspended particles from the water phase and analyzing dried samples using integrated thermal–chromatographic–mass spectroscopic (TGA/GC/MS) techniques. Solid phase analysis using a combination of TGA/GC/MS is a novel technique that can provide real-time quantitative analysis and which helps to understand the interaction of hydrophobic organic pollutants and ENMs. The adsorption of these contaminants to nanomaterials increased the concentration of the contaminants in the aqueous phase as compared to the ‘real’ partitioning due to the octanol–water partitioning. The study showed that ENMs can significantly influence the adsorption and dispersion of hydrophobic/low water soluble contaminants. The type of ENM, the exposure to light, and the water pH have a significant influence on the partitioning of pollutants.

  1. Multifunctional nanomaterials for advanced molecular imaging and cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Prasad

    Nanotechnology offers tremendous potential for use in biomedical applications, including cancer and stem cell imaging, disease diagnosis and drug delivery. The development of nanosystems has aided in understanding the molecular mechanisms of many diseases and permitted the controlled nanoscale manipulation of biological phenomena. In recent years, many studies have focused on the use of several kinds of nanomaterials for cancer and stem cell imaging and also for the delivery of anticancer therapeutics to tumor cells. However, the proper diagnosis and treatment of aggressive tumors such as brain and breast cancer requires highly sensitive diagnostic agents, in addition to the ability to deliver multiple therapeutics using a single platform to the target cells. Addressing these challenges, novel multifunctional nanomaterial-based platforms that incorporate multiple therapeutic and diagnostic agents, with superior molecular imaging and targeting capabilities, has been presented in this work. The initial part of this work presents the development of novel nanomaterials with superior optical properties for efficiently delivering soluble cues such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) into brain cancer cells with minimal toxicity. Specifically, this section details the development of non-toxic quantums dots for the imaging and delivery of siRNA into brain cancer and mesenchymal stem cells, with the hope of using these quantum dots as multiplexed imaging and delivery vehicles. The use of these quantum dots could overcome the toxicity issues associated with the use of conventional quantum dots, enabled the imaging of brain cancer and stem cells with high efficiency and allowed for the delivery of siRNA to knockdown the target oncogene in brain cancer cells. The latter part of this thesis details the development of nanomaterial-based drug delivery platforms for the co-delivery of multiple anticancer drugs to brain tumor cells. In particular, this part of the thesis focuses on

  2. LAYERED DOUBLE HYDROXIDES: NANOMATERIALS FOR APPLICATIONS IN AGRICULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luíz Paulo Figueredo Benício

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The current research aims to introduce Layered Double Hydroxides (LDH as nanomaterials to be used in agriculture, with particular reference to its use as storage and slow release matrix of nutrients and agrochemicals for plant growing. Structural characteristics, main properties, synthesis methods and characterization of LDH were covered in this study. Moreover, some literature data have been reported to demonstrate their potential for storage and slow release of nitrate, phosphate, agrochemicals, besides as being used as adsorbent for the wastewater treatment. This research aims to expand, in near future, the investigation field on these materials, with application in agriculture, increasing the interface between chemistry and agronomy.

  3. Multi-functional carbon nanomaterials: Tailoring morphology for multidisciplinary applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dervishi, Enkeleda [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-05-14

    Carbon based nanomaterials are being developed to have many new properties and applications. Graphene, is a mono-layer 2D atomic thick structure formed from hexagons of carbon atoms bound together by sp^2hybrid bonds. A carbon nanotube (CNT) can be viewed as a sheet of graphene rolled up into a cylinder, usually 1-2 nanometers in diameter and a few microns thick. A few applications of graphene and carbon nanotubes include the development of Nanoelectronics, nanocomposite materials, Hydrogen storage and Li⁺ battery, etc.

  4. Environmental risk analysis for nanomaterials: Review and evaluation of frameworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara Deanne; Linkov, Igor; Hansen, Steffen Foss;

    2012-01-01

    In response to the challenges of conducting traditional human health and ecological risk assessment for nanomaterials (NM), a number of alternative frameworks have been proposed for NM risk analysis. This paper evaluates various risk analysis frameworks proposed for NM based on a number of criteria...... to occupational settings with minor environmental considerations, and most have not been thoroughly tested on a wide range of NM. Care should also be taken when selecting the most appropriate risk analysis strategy for a given risk context. Given this, we recommend a multi-faceted approach to assess...... the environmental risks of NM as well as increased applications and testing of the proposed frameworks for different NM....

  5. Structural simulations of nanomaterials self-assembled from ionic macrocycles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Swol, Frank B.; Medforth, Craig John (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-01

    Recent research at Sandia has discovered a new class of organic binary ionic solids with tunable optical, electronic, and photochemical properties. These nanomaterials, consisting of a novel class of organic binary ionic solids, are currently being developed at Sandia for applications in batteries, supercapacitors, and solar energy technologies. They are composed of self-assembled oligomeric arrays of very large anions and large cations, but their crucial internal arrangement is thus far unknown. This report describes (a) the development of a relevant model of nonconvex particles decorated with ions interacting through short-ranged Yukawa potentials, and (b) the results of initial Monte Carlo simulations of the self-assembly binary ionic solids.

  6. The intense slow positron beam facility at the PULSTAR reactor and applications in nano-materials study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intense slow positron beam has been established at the PULSTAR nuclear research reactor of North Carolina State University. The slow positrons are generated by pair production in a tungsten moderator from gammarays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium. The moderated positrons are electrostatically extracted and magnetically guided out of the region near the core. Subsequently, the positrons are used in two spectrometers that are capable of performing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to probe the defect and free volume properties of materials. One of the spectrometers (e+-PALS) utilizes an rf buncher to produce a pulsed beam and has a timing resolution of 277 ps. The second spectrometer (Ps-PALS) uses a secondary electron timing technique and is dedicated to positronium lifetime measurements with an approximately 1 ns timing resolution. PALS measurements have been conducted in the e+-PALS spectrometer on a series of nano-materials including organic photovoltaic thin films, membranes for filtration, and polymeric fibers. These studies have resulted in understanding some critical issues related to the development of the examined nano-materials.

  7. Proteome Profiling of BEAS-2B Cells Treated with Titanium Dioxide Reveals Potential Toxicity of and Detoxification Pathways for Nanomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress is known to play important roles in nanomaterial-induced toxicities. However, the proteins and signaling pathways associated with nanomaterial-mediated oxidative stress and toxicity are largely unknown. To identify oxidative stress-responding toxicity pathways an...

  8. 基于纳米材料电化学生物传感器的研究进展%Development of Electrochemical Biosensors Based on Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宗花; 郭新美; 夏建飞; 张菲菲; 夏延致; 李延辉

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, it is of great theoretical and practical value to make a research on electrochemical biosensors. People are paying more and more attention to the preparation of biosensors based on nanomaterials, and the nano-technology has provided infinite imagination space for the development of electrochemical biosensors. Nanomaterials not only have the excellent physical, chemical and electrocatalytic properties, but also show the quantum size effect and surface effect, which can improve the electrochemical biosensors obviously to a new and high level. Therefore, the electrochemical biosensors based on nanomateirals show many excellent performances, such as smaller volume, faster speed, higher sensitivity and better stability, etc. According to their structures, the nanomaterials can be divided into three categories, e. G. Zero-dimentional, one-dimensional and two-dimensional nanomaterials. In this article, the development and application of electrochemical biosensors based on following nanomaterials, zero-dimensional nanoparticles(such as metal nanoparti-cles, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles, etc.), one-dimensional nanomaterials ( nanotubes, nanowires and nanorodes) and two-dimensional nanostructured thin films (like graphene) were reviewed. 78 related references were cited in this review.%近年来,纳米材料在电化学生物传感器领域的研究已成为前沿性的内容.纳米材料具备优异的物理、化学、电催化等性能,加之其量子尺寸效应和表面效应,可将传感器的性能提高到一个新的水平.基于纳米材料的电化学生物传感器呈现出体积更小、速度更快、检测灵敏度更高和可靠性更好等优异性能.该文按照纳米结构的分类,综述了近几年基于以下纳米材料在电化学生物传感器领域的最新发展和应用:零维纳米材料——纳米微粒;一维纳米材料——纳米管、纳米线和纳米棒;二维纳米材料——纳

  9. Rational engineering of physicochemical properties of nanomaterials for biomedical applications with nanotoxicological perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navya, P. N.; Daima, Hemant Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Innovative engineered nanomaterials are at the leading edge of rapidly emerging fields of nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine. Meticulous synthesis, unique physicochemical properties, manifestation of chemical or biological moieties on the surface of materials make engineered nanostructures suitable for a variety of biomedical applications. Besides, tailored nanomaterials exhibit entirely novel therapeutic applications with better functionality, sensitivity, efficiency and specificity due to their customized unique physicochemical and surface properties. Additionally, such designer made nanomaterials has potential to generate series of interactions with various biological entities including DNA, proteins, membranes, cells and organelles at nano-bio interface. These nano-bio interactions are driven by colloidal forces and predominantly depend on the dynamic physicochemical and surface properties of nanomaterials. Nevertheless, recent development and atomic scale tailoring of various physical, chemical and surface properties of nanomaterials is promising to dictate their interaction in anticipated manner with biological entities for biomedical applications. As a result, rationally designed nanomaterials are in extensive demand for bio-molecular detection and diagnostics, therapeutics, drug and gene delivery, fluorescent labelling, tissue engineering, biochemical sensing and other pharmaceuticals applications. However, toxicity and risk associated with engineered nanomaterials is rather unclear or not well understood; which is gaining considerable attention and the field of nanotoxicology is evolving promptly. Therefore, this review explores current knowledge of articulate engineering of nanomaterials for biomedical applications with special attention on potential toxicological perspectives.

  10. Exposure to Titanium Dioxide Nanomaterials Provokes Inflammation of an in Vitro Human Immune Construct

    OpenAIRE

    Schanen, Brian C.; Ajay S Karakoti; Seal, Sudipta; Drake, Donald R.; Warren, William L.; Self, William T.

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticle technology is undergoing significant expansion largely because of the potential of nanoparticles as biomaterials, drug delivery vehicles, cancer therapeutics, and immunopotentiators. Incorporation of nanoparticle technologies for in vivo applications increases the urgency to characterize nanomaterial immunogenicity. This study explores titanium dioxide, one of the most widely manufactured nanomaterials, synthesized into its three most common nanoarchitectures: anatase (7–10 nm), ...

  11. Aggregation, Deposition and Release of Graphene Oxide Nanomaterials in the Aquatic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graphene is an atomically thin two dimensional carbon-based nanomaterial that is composed of a single layer of sp2 – hybridized carbon atoms as found in graphite.1, 2 Usage of graphene-based nanomaterials is increasing rapidly and these materials are predicted to be the most abun...

  12. Nanomanufacturing Portfolio: Manufacturing Processes and Applications to Accelerate Commercial Use of Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Industrial Technologies Program

    2011-01-05

    This brochure describes the 31 R&D projects that AMO supports to accelerate the commercial manufacture and use of nanomaterials for enhanced energy efficiency. These cost-shared projects seek to exploit the unique properties of nanomaterials to improve the functionality of industrial processes and products.

  13. The potential of protein-nanomaterial interaction for advanced drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qiang; Mu, Huiling

    2016-03-10

    Nanomaterials, like nanoparticles, micelles, nano-sheets, nanotubes and quantum dots, have great potentials in biomedical fields. However, their delivery is highly limited by the formation of protein corona upon interaction with endogenous proteins. This new identity, instead of nanomaterial itself, would be the real substance the organs and cells firstly encounter. Consequently, the behavior of nanomaterials in vivo is uncontrollable and some undesired effects may occur, like rapid clearance from blood stream; risk of capillary blockage; loss of targeting capacity; and potential toxicity. Therefore, protein-nanomaterial interaction is a great challenge for nanomaterial systems and should be inhibited. However, this interaction can also be used to functionalize nanomaterials by forming a selected protein corona. Unlike other decoration using exogenous molecules, nanomaterials functionalized by selected protein corona using endogenous proteins would have greater promise for clinical use. In this review, we aim to provide a comprehensive understanding of protein-nanomaterial interaction. Importantly, a discussion about how to use such interaction is launched and some possible applications of such interaction for advanced drug delivery are presented. PMID:26812004

  14. NanoSafer vs. 1.1 - Nanomaterial risk assessment using first order modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Keld A.; Saber, Anne T.; Kristensen, Henrik V.;

    2013-01-01

    Currently, there are no nanospecific safety data sheets (SDS) fo r manufactured nanomaterials (MN) and there is only limited data available on nanomaterial exposure levels. We have established an advanced control banding tool, NanoSafer, which enables alternative risk assessm ent and guidance for...

  15. Survey on basic knowledge about exposure and potential environmental and health risks for selected nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Sonja Hagen; Hansen, Erik; Christensen, Trine Boe;

    Based on a literature review this report provides a general description as well as an environmental and health profile of 7 nanomaterials. The examined nanomaterials are selected because of expected high use or specific environmental and health properties. Fullerenes, iron, silver, nanoclay...

  16. European regulation affecting nanomaterials – review of limitations and future recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders

    2012-01-01

    After learning about the potential risks associated with various specific nanomaterials, concerns have been raised about adequacy of existing regulation in Europe and what should be done to address any potential regulatory gaps related to nanomaterials. Understanding the limitations of the curren...

  17. Categorization framework to aid exposure assessment of nanomaterials in consumer products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Michelson, Evan S.; Kamper, Anja;

    2008-01-01

    Exposure assessment is crucial for risk assessment for nanomaterials. We propose a framework to aid exposure assessment in consumer products. We determined the location of the nanomaterials and the chemical identify of the 580 products listed in the inventory maintained by the Woodrow Wilson...

  18. Specific Advice on Fulfilling Information Requirements for Nanomaterials under REACH (RIP-oN 2) – Final Project Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hankin, S. M.; Peters, S. A. K.; Poland, C. A.; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Holmqvist, J.; Ross, B. L.; Varet, J.; Aitken, R. J.

    The European Commission (EC) began in 2009 a Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) Implementation Project on Nanomaterials (RIPoN), which it intended to provide advice on key aspects of the implementation of REACH with regard to nanomaterials.......The European Commission (EC) began in 2009 a Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) Implementation Project on Nanomaterials (RIPoN), which it intended to provide advice on key aspects of the implementation of REACH with regard to nanomaterials....

  19. The current state of engineered nanomaterials in consumer goods and waste streams: the need to develop nanoproperty-quantifiable sensors for monitoring engineered nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Brasuel, Murphy

    2011-01-01

    Kelsey Wise, Murphy BrasuelDepartment of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO, USAAbstract: As nanomaterials are harnessed for medicine and other technological advances, an understanding of the toxicology of these new materials is required to inform our use. This toxicological knowledge will be required to establish the medical and environmental regulations required to protect consumers and those involved in nanomaterial manufacturing. Nanoparticles of titanium o...

  20. Uncertainties of size measurements in electron microscopy characterization of nanomaterials in foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dudkiewicz, Agnieszka; Boxall, Alistair B. A.; Chaudhry, Qasim;

    2015-01-01

    Electron microscopy is a recognized standard tool for nanomaterial characterization, and recommended by the European Food Safety Authority for the size measurement of nanomaterials in food. Despite this, little data have been published assessing the reliability of the method, especially for size...... measurement of nanomaterials characterized by a broad size distribution and/or added to food matrices. This study is a thorough investigation of the measurement uncertainty when applying electron microscopy for size measurement of engineered nanomaterials in foods. Our results show that the number of measured...... particles was only a minor source of measurement uncertainty for nanomaterials in food, compared to the combined influence of sampling, sample preparation prior to imaging and the image analysis. The main conclusion is that to improve the measurement reliability, care should be taken to consider...