WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon-covered magnetic nanomaterials

  1. Carbon-covered magnetic nanomaterials and their application for the thermolysis of cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Yang Xu1, Meena Mahmood1, Ashley Fejleh1, Zhongrui Li1, Fumiya Watanabe1, Steve Trigwell2, Reginald B Little3, Vasyl P Kunets4, Enkeleda Dervishi1, Alexandru R Biris5, Gregory J Salamo4, Alexandru S Biris11Nanotechnology Center and Applied Science Department, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, AR, USA; 2Applied Science and Technology, ASRC Aerospace, NASA Kennedy Space Center, FL, USA; 3Department of Chemistry, Elizabeth City State University, Elizabeth City, NC, USA; 4Physics Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 5National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj Napoca, RomaniaAbstract: Three types of graphitic shelled-magnetic core (Fe, Fe/Co, and Co nanoparticles (named as C-Fe, C-Fe/Co, and C-Co NPs were synthesized by radio frequency-catalytic chemical vapor deposition (RF-cCVD. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis revealed that the cores inside the carbon shells of these NPs were preserved in their metallic states. Fluorescence microscopy images indicated effective penetrations of the NPs through the cellular membranes of cultured cancer HeLa cells, both inside the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Low RF radiation of 350 kHz induced localized heating of the magnetic NPs, which triggered cell death. Apoptosis inducement was found to be dependent on the RF irradiation time and NP concentration. It was showed that the Fe-C NPs had a much higher ability of killing the cancer cells (over 99% compared with the other types of NPs (C-Co or C-Fe/Co, even at a very low concentration of 0.83 μg/mL. The localized heating of NPs inside the cancer cells comes from the hysteresis heating and resistive heating through eddy currents generated under the RF radiation. The RF thermal ablation properties of the magnetic NPs were correlated with the analysis provided by a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID.Keywords: graphitic shelled, magnetic

  2. Magnetic Nanomaterials and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurii K. Gun'ko

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This Special Issue of Nanomaterials is dedicated to the development of new magnetic nanomaterials and their applications in biomedicine, catalysis, spintronics and other areas. The publications in this Issue demonstrate that the interest in magnetic nanomaterials is continuously growing and their realm is expanding rapidly. Some highlights of the publications in this issue are discussed below. [...

  3. [Modern toxicology of magnetic nanomaterials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cywińska, Monika A; Grudziński, Ireneusz P

    2012-01-01

    Current advances in nanobiotechnology have led to the development of new field of nanomedicine, which includes many applications of nano(bio)materials for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes (theranostics). Major expectations and challenges are on bioengineered magnetic nanoparticles when their come to delivering drug compounds, especially to targeting anticancer drugs to specific molecular endpoints in cancer therapy. The unique physicochemical properties of these nanoparticles offer great promise in modern cancer nanomedicine to provide new technological breakthroughs, such as guided drug and gene delivery, magnetic hyperthermia cancer therapy, tissue engineering, cancer cell tracking and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. Along with the expanding interest in bio-engineered magnetic nanoproducts their potential toxicity has become one of the major concerns. To date, a number of recent scientific evidences suggest that certain properties of magnetic nanoparticles (e.g., enhanced reactive area, ability to cross cell membranes, resistance to biodegradation) may amplify their cytotoxic potential relative to bulk non-nanoscale counterparts. In other words, safety assessment developed for ordinary magnetic materials may be of limited use in determining the health and environmental risks of the novel bio-engineered magnetic nanoproducts. In the present paper we discuss the main directions of research conducted to assess the toxicity of magnetic nanocompounds in experimental in vitro and in vivo models, pointing to the key issues concerning the toxicological analysis of magnetic nanomaterials. In addition new research directions of nanotoxicological studies elucidating the importance of developing alternative methods for testing magnetic nano(bio)products are also presented.

  4. Nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Vollath, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    This full-colored introduction to nanomaterials and nanotechnology in particular addresses the needs of engineers who need to know the special phenomena and potentials, without getting bogged down in the scientific detail of the physics and chemistry involved. Based on the author's own courses, this textbook shows how to produce nanomaterials and use them in engineering applications for novel products. Following an introduction, the text goes on to treat synthesis, characterization techniques, thermal, optical, magnetic and electronic properties, processing and, finally, emerging applications. A sound overview of the "nano world" from an application-oriented perspective.

  5. Functional Nanomaterials Useful for Magnetic Refrigeration Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Amir

    Magnetic refrigeration is an emerging energy efficient and environmentally friendly refrigeration technology. The principle of magnetic refrigeration is based on the effect of varying a magnetic field on the temperature change of a magnetocaloric material (refrigerant). By applying a magnetic field, the magnetic moments of a magnetic material tend to align parallel to it, and the thermal energy released in this process heats the material. Reversibly, the magnetic moments become randomly oriented when the magnetic field is removed, and the material cools down. The heating and the cooling of a refrigerant in response to a changing magnetic field is similar to the heating and the cooling of a gaseous medium in response to an adiabatic compression and expansion in a conventional refrigeration system. One requirement to make a practical magnetic refrigerator is to have a large temperature change per unit of applied magnetic field, with sufficiently wide operating temperature. So far, no commercially viable magnetic refrigerator has been built primarily due to the low temperature change of bulk refrigerants, the added burden of hysteresis, and the system's low cooling capacity. The purpose of this dissertation is to explore magnetic refrigeration system. First, the Active Magnetic Regenerator (AMR) system built by Shir et al at the GWU's Institute for Magnetics Research (IMR) is optimized by tuning the heat transfer medium parameters and system's operating conditions. Next, by reviewing literature and works done so far on refrigerants, a number of materials that may be suitable to be used in magnetic refrigeration technology were identified. Theoretical work by Bennett et al showed an enhancement in magnetocaloric effect of magnetic nanoparticles. Research was performed on functional magnetic nanoparticles and their use in magnetic refrigeration technology. Different aspects such as the size, shape, chemical composition, structure and interaction of the nanoparticle with

  6. Hybrid nanomaterials: anchoring magnetic molecules on naked gold nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Rebecca J; Hutchings, Amy-Jayne; Habib, Fatemah; Korobkov, Ilia; Scaiano, Juan C; Murugesu, Muralee

    2013-12-16

    The pairing of molecular magnets and nanomaterials couples top-down and bottom-up approaches to nanotechnology; facilitating a unique methodology to the controlled study of interfacial magnetic properties. Attaching Single-Molecule Magnets (SMMs) to "naked" gold nanoparticles is a novel method of exploring various avenues of magnetic nanotechnology, such as drug delivery, information storage, catalysis, and assembly of magnetic-nanostructural motifs. Herein we report the successful capping of laser ablation synthesized "naked" gold nanoparticles with a dinuclear dysprosium complex, while introducing new information regarding the changes in molecular magnetic properties upon surface attachment. We anticipate that this methodology in producing these magneto-plasmonic nanostructures not only provides answers to fundamental questions but also has the potential to provide new avenues to applications including information storage, multimodal imaging, biomedicine, and optoelectronics.

  7. Optimizing Energy Conversion: Magnetic Nano-materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Dylan; Dann, Martin; Ilie, Carolina C.

    2015-03-01

    We present herein the work started at SUNY Oswego as a part of a SUNY 4E grant. The SUNY 4E Network of Excellence has awarded SUNY Oswego and collaborators a grant to carry out extensive studies on magnetic nanoparticles. The focus of the study is to develop cost effective rare-earth-free magnetic materials that will enhance energy transmission performance of various electrical devices (solar cells, electric cars, hard drives, etc.). The SUNY Oswego team has started the preliminary work for the project and graduate students from the rest of the SUNY 4E team (UB, Alfred College, Albany) will continue the project. The preliminary work concentrates on analyzing the properties of magnetic nanoparticle candidates, calculating molecular orbitals and band gap, and the fabrication of thin films. SUNY 4E Network of Excellence Grant.

  8. Shape matters: synthesis and biomedical applications of high aspect ratio magnetic nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Raluca M Fratila; Rivera-Fernández, Sara; Fuente, Jesús M. de la

    2015-01-01

    High aspect ratio magnetic nanomaterials possess anisotropic properties that make them attractive for biological applications. Their elongated shape enables multivalent interactions with receptors through the introduction of multiple targeting units on their surface, thus enhancing cell internalization. Moreover, due to their magnetic anisotropy, high aspect ratio nanomaterials can outperform their spherical analogues as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications. In th...

  9. Shape matters: synthesis and biomedical applications of high aspect ratio magnetic nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratila, Raluca M; Rivera-Fernández, Sara; de la Fuente, Jesús M

    2015-05-14

    High aspect ratio magnetic nanomaterials possess anisotropic properties that make them attractive for biological applications. Their elongated shape enables multivalent interactions with receptors through the introduction of multiple targeting units on their surface, thus enhancing cell internalization. Moreover, due to their magnetic anisotropy, high aspect ratio nanomaterials can outperform their spherical analogues as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications. In this review, we first describe the two main synthetic routes for the preparation of anisotropic magnetic nanomaterials: (i) direct synthesis (in which the anisotropic growth is directed by tuning the reaction conditions or by using templates) and (ii) assembly methods (in which the high aspect ratio is achieved by assembly from individual building blocks). We then provide an overview of the biomedical applications of anisotropic magnetic nanomaterials: magnetic separation and detection, targeted delivery and magnetic resonance imaging.

  10. Shape matters: synthesis and biomedical applications of high aspect ratio magnetic nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratila, Raluca M.; Rivera-Fernández, Sara; de La Fuente, Jesús M.

    2015-04-01

    High aspect ratio magnetic nanomaterials possess anisotropic properties that make them attractive for biological applications. Their elongated shape enables multivalent interactions with receptors through the introduction of multiple targeting units on their surface, thus enhancing cell internalization. Moreover, due to their magnetic anisotropy, high aspect ratio nanomaterials can outperform their spherical analogues as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications. In this review, we first describe the two main synthetic routes for the preparation of anisotropic magnetic nanomaterials: (i) direct synthesis (in which the anisotropic growth is directed by tuning the reaction conditions or by using templates) and (ii) assembly methods (in which the high aspect ratio is achieved by assembly from individual building blocks). We then provide an overview of the biomedical applications of anisotropic magnetic nanomaterials: magnetic separation and detection, targeted delivery and magnetic resonance imaging.

  11. Glucose Sensors Based on Core@Shell Magnetic Nanomaterials and Their Application in Diabetes Management: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Lv, Hongying; Teng, Zhenyuan; Wang, Chengyin; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-01-01

    This review presents a comprehensive attempt to conclude and discuss various glucose biosensors based on core@shell magnetic nanomaterials. Owing to good biocompatibility and stability, the core@shell magnetic nanomaterials have found widespread applications in many fields and draw extensive attention. Most magnetic nanoparticles possess an intrinsic enzyme mimetic activity like natural peroxidases, which invests magnetic nanomaterials with great potential in the construction of glucose sensors. We summarize the synthesis of core@shell magnetic nanomaterials, fundamental theory of glucose sensor and the advances in glucose sensors based on core@shell magnetic nanomaterials. The aim of the review is to provide an overview of the exploitation of the core@shell magnetic nanomaterials for glucose sensors construction.

  12. Novel magnetic nanomaterials: Synthesis, characterization and study of their catalytic application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judy Azar, Amir Reza; Mohebbi, Sajjad, E-mail: smohebbi@uok.ac.ir

    2015-11-15

    A simple chemical process has been successfully developed to synthesize some N{sub 2}O{sub 2} Schiff base metal complexes as an organic shell on an inorganic support. Schiff base complexes of Ni(II), Cu(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) were immobilized on modified magnetic support. The magnetic support was modified using tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and then functionalized with Schiff base complexes of transition metals ions. The synthesized nanocatalysts show high catalytic activity and selectivity in the oxidation of sulfide compounds to corresponding sulfoxides. The hybrid nanomaterials were fully characterized with different physicochemical techniques including Fourier transform Infrared, X-ray diffraction analysis, thermal gravimeter, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Also, magnetic properties of hybrid nanomaterials were measured by Alternative Gradient Field Magnetometer. Magnetic measurements showed that the coating of nanomaterials reduces the magnetization indicating modification of NPs with Schiff base complexes. - Highlights: • Designing an easy procedure for synthesis of magnetic heterogeneous catalysts. • Anchoring of variety of Lewis acids on magnetic support. • Synthesis of materials as environmentally friendly systems for catalytic reaction. • Novel high-yield and selective catalysts for oxidation reaction. • Recyclable catalysts with excellent reusability.

  13. Magnetic mesoporous organic-inorganic NiCo2O4 hybrid nanomaterials for electrochemical immunosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qunfang; Zeng, Lingxing; Wang, Jinchao; Tang, Dianping; Liu, Bingqian; Chen, Guonan; Wei, Mingdeng

    2011-04-01

    This study demonstrates a facile and feasible strategy toward the development of advanced electrochemical immunosensors based on chemically functionalized magnetic mesoporous organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials, and the preparation, characterization, and measurement of relevant properties of the immunosensor for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, as a model analyte) in clinical immunoassays. The as-prepared nanomaterials composed of a magnetic mesoporous NiCo(2)O(4) nanosheet, an interlayer of Nafion/thionine organic molecules and a nanogold layer show good adsorption properties for the attachment of horseradish peroxidase-labeled secondary anti-CEA antibody (HRP-anti-CEA). With a sandwich-type immunoassay format, the functional bionanomaterials present good analytical properties to facilitate and modulate the way it was integrated onto the electrochemical immunosensors, and allows the detection of CEA at a concentration as low as 0.5 pg/mL. Significantly, the immunosensor could be easily regenerated by only using an external magnet without the need of any dissociated reagents. Importantly, the as-synthesized magnetic mesoporous NiCo(2)O(4) nanomaterials could be further extended for detection of other biomarkers or biocompounds.

  14. Nanomaterial-assisted PCR based on thermal generation from magnetic nanoparticles under high-frequency AC magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Toshiaki; Minegishi, Hiroaki; Echigo, Akinobu; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Fukuda, Takahiro; Usami, Ron; Maekawa, Toru; Hanajiri, Tatsuro

    2015-08-01

    Here the authors present a nanomaterial-assisted PCR technique based on the use of thermal generation from magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) under AC magnetic fields. In this approach, MNPs work as internal nano thermal generators to realize PCR thermal cycling. In order to suppress the non-specific absorption of DNA synthetic enzymes, MNPs are decorated with bovine serum albumin (BSA), forming BSA/MNP complexes. Under high-frequency AC magnetic fields, these complexes work as internal nano thermal generators, thereby producing the typical temperature required for PCR thermal cycling, and perform all the reaction processes of PCR amplification in the place of conventional PCR thermal cyclers.

  15. Modeling of the magnetic properties of nanomaterials with different crystalline structure

    CERN Document Server

    Kirienko, Yury

    2012-01-01

    We propose a method for modeling the magnetic properties of nanomaterials with different structures. The method is based on the Ising model and the approximation of the random field interaction. It is shown that in this approximation, the magnetization of the nanocrystal depends only on the number of nearest neighbors of the lattice atoms and the values of exchange integrals between them. This gives a good algorithmic problem of calculating the magnetization of any nano-object, whether it is ultrathin film or nanoparticle of any shape and structure, managing only a rule of selection of nearest neighbors. By setting different values of exchange integrals, it is easy to describe ferromagnets, antiferromagnets, and ferrimagnets in a unified formalism. Having obtained the magnetization curve of the sample it is possible to find the Curie temperature as a function of, for example, the thickness of ultrathin film. Afterwards one can obtain the numerical values for critical exponents of the phase transition "ferroma...

  16. The Contribution of 57Fe Mössbauer Spectrometry to Investigate Magnetic Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greneche, Jean-Marc

    Fe containing nanomaterials and nanoparticles are quite important because their unusual physical properties make them excellent candidates for different applications. 57Fe Mössbauer spectrometry appears as an excellent tool to provide structural and magnetic data through the hyperfine parameters. After a short definition of nanostructures and their main characteristics originated from confinement effects, we established the relevant features to understand nanoscale magnetism. Some examples have been thus selected to illustrate first how Mössbauer spectrometry contributes to understand the chemical, structural and magnetic nature of nanostructures and the role of surface and grain boundaries. Then, they also demonstrate also how the fitting procedure remains a delicate task to model the hyperfine structure and does require on the one hand large experimental data basis obtained from different techniques including structural, morphological and magnetic parameters and on the other hand materials with high knowledge and control of synthesis conditions.

  17. Different magnetic properties of rhombohedral and cubic Ni2+ doped indium oxide nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingbo Sun

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ions doped indium oxide nanomaterials were potentially used as a kind of diluted magnetic semiconductors in transparent spintronic devices. In this paper, the influences of Ni2+ doped contents and rhombohedral or cubic crystalline structures of indium oxide on magnetic properties were investigated. We found that the magnetic properties of Ni2+ doped indium oxide could be transferred from room temperature ferromagnetisms to paramagnetic properties with increments of doped contents. Moreover, the different crystalline structures of indium oxide also greatly affected the room temperature ferromagnetisms due to different lattice constants and almost had no effects on their paramagnetic properties. In addition, both the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic properties were demonstrated to be intrinsic and not caused by impurities.

  18. New advances in electrochemical biosensors for the detection of toxins: Nanomaterials, magnetic beads and microfluidics systems. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reverté, Laia [IRTA, Carretera Poble Nou km. 5.5, 43540 Sant Carles de la Ràpita, Tarragona (Spain); Prieto-Simón, Beatriz [ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia, SA 5095 (Australia); Campàs, Mònica, E-mail: monica.campas@irta.cat [IRTA, Carretera Poble Nou km. 5.5, 43540 Sant Carles de la Ràpita, Tarragona (Spain)

    2016-02-18

    The use of nanotechnology in bioanalytical devices has special advantages in the detection of toxins of interest in food safety and environmental applications. The low levels to be detected and the small size of toxins justify the increasing number of publications dealing with electrochemical biosensors, due to their high sensitivity and design versatility. The incorporation of nanomaterials in their development has been exploited to further increase their sensitivity, providing simple and fast devices, with multiplexed capabilities. This paper gives an overview of the electrochemical biosensors that have incorporated carbon and metal nanomaterials in their configurations for the detection of toxins. Biosensing systems based on magnetic beads or integrated into microfluidics systems have also been considered because of their contribution to the development of compact analytical devices. The roles of these materials, the methods used for their incorporation in the biosensor configurations as well as the advantages they provide to the analyses are summarised. - Highlights: • Nanomaterials improve the performance of electrochemical biosensors. • Carbon nanomaterials can act as electrocatalysts or label supports in biosensors. • Metal nanomaterials can act as nanostructured supports or labels in biosensors. • Magnetic beads are exploited as immobilisation supports and/or label carriers.

  19. Synthesis of Photoswitchable Magnetic Au–Fullerosome Hybrid Nanomaterials for Permittivity Enhancement Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We designed and synthesized several nanomaterials 3 of three-layered core-shell (γ-FeOx@AuNP@[C60(>DPAF-C91or2]n nanoparticles (NPs. These NPs having e−-polarizable fullerosome structures located at the outer layer were fabricated from highly magnetic core-shell γ-FeOx@AuNPs. Fullerosomic polarization of 3 was found to be capable of causing a large amplification of material permittivity that is also associated with the photoswitching effect in the frequency range of 0.5‒4.0 GHz. Multilayered synthetic construction allows Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET of photoinduced accumulative surface plasmon resonance (SPR energy in the gold layer to the partially bilayered C60(>DPAF-C91or2-derived fullerosome membrane shell layer in a near-field of direct contact without producing radiation heat, which is commonly associated with SPR.

  20. MoS2-Gd Chelate Magnetic Nanomaterials with Core-Shell Structure Used as Contrast Agents in in Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbazhagan, Rajeshkumar; Su, Yu-An; Tsai, Hsieh-Chih; Jeng, Ru-Jong

    2016-01-27

    Despite their frequent usages as contrast agents for in vivo MRI imaging, paramagnetic molecules continue to suffer from low resolution, physicochemical instability, and high toxicity. Herein, we present a molybdenum disulfide and gadolinium complex, as an alternative core-shell magnetic nanomaterial that exhibits enhanced paramagnetic property; 4.5-times longer water proton spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) when compared to commercial gadolinium contrast agents; as well as lowered toxicity, extended blood circulation time, increased stability, and desirable excretion characteristic. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed smooth core-shell nanoparticles 100 nm in size with a shell width of approximately 10 nm. These findings suggest that the synthesized nanomaterial possesses high potential as a positive contrast agent for the enhancement of MRI imaging.

  1. Purifying Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor); Hurst, Janet (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of purifying a nanomaterial and the resultant purified nanomaterial in which a salt, such as ferric chloride, at or near its liquid phase temperature, is used to penetrate and wet the internal surfaces of a nanomaterial to dissolve impurities that may be present, for example, from processes used in the manufacture of the nanomaterial.

  2. Spectroscopic studies of silica nanoparticles: Magnetic resonance and nanomaterial-biological interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Sean E.

    Primarily concerned with manipulation and study of matter at the nanoscale, the concept of nanoscience encompasses ideas such as nanomaterial synthesis, characterization, and applications to modern scientific and societal problems. These problems encompass a broad range of issues such as energy storage and conversion, medical diagnostics and treatment, environmental remediation and detection, carbon economy and as well as many others. Silica nanoparticles of porous morphology have broad application to many of these issues. In particular, the utility of silica nanoparticles is facilitated by their large intrinsic surface area, tunable surface chemistry, and synthetic variability in both their size and morphology. This facilitates applications to these problems. However, extensive characterization and deeper understanding is needed before full implementation in key applications can be realized. The work described in this thesis aims to explore fundamental and applied characterization of silica nanoparticles that might be used in biomedical and environmental applications. Fundamental studies of functionalized nanomaterials using NMR spectroscopy reveal complex, dynamic phenomena related to-and ultimately deriving from-the intrinsic and/or modified surface chemistry. Applied studies of nanomaterial-biological interfaces demonstrate free radical chemistry as dominating the toxic response of the materials when exposed to biological systems of interest. Characterization of protein adsorbed on the interface reinforces the ubiquitous nature of protein adsorption on nanomaterial surface in biological and environmental media. Overall, this work illuminates and highlights complex changes that take place in aqueous solution for silica nanoparticles of varied morphology and surface chemistry.

  3. Nanomaterial Registry

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nanomaterial Registry compiles data from multiple databases into a single resource. The goal of this resource is to establish a curated nanomaterial registry,...

  4. Influence of Cd substitution on structural, electrical and magnetic properties of M-type barium hexaferrites co-precipitated nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Din, Muhammad F.; Ahmad, Ishtiaq; Ahmad, Mukhtar; Farid, M.T. [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); Asif Iqbal, M. [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); NUST College of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, Islamabad (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, G.C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Akhtar, Majid Niaz [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Shakir, Imran [Deanship of Scientific Research, College of Engineering, PO Box 800, King Saud University, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia); Warsi, Muhammad Farooq [Department of Chemistry, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur 63100 (Pakistan); Khan, Muhammad Azhar, E-mail: azhar_manais@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur 63100 (Pakistan)

    2014-01-25

    Graphical abstract: Nanocrystalline M-type hexagonal ferrites (Ba{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5−x}Cd{sub x}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 19}) prepared by co-precipitation route exhibited the increased % porosity and decreased crystallite size from 47 to 26 nm upon the substitution of Co with Cd. The dc-electrical resistivity and magnetic parameters (M{sub s} and H{sub c}) were also greatly influenced by increased Cd contents, which clearly suggested the possible utilization of these nanomaterials for recording media and high frequency devices fabrications. Highlights: • Ba{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5−x}Cd{sub x}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanocrystalline are synthesized by co-precipitation route. • Effect of cadmium substitution on various properties has been studied. • Optimum electromagnetic properties have been observed for Ba{sub 0.5}Cd{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 19} samples. • The DC electrical resistivity lies in the range 2.31 × 10{sup 9} to 6.42 × 10{sup 9} Ω cm. • Cd incorporation increases coercivity from 155 to 1852 Oe. -- Abstract: Nanocrystalline M-type hexagonal ferrites with the nominal chemical composition Ba{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.5−x}Cd{sub x}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 19} (where x = 0–0.5) have been synthesized by the co-precipitation method and sintered at high annealing temperature (1250 °C) to study their structural, electrical and magnetic properties. The aim of the present work is to increase the DC electrical resistivity and coercivity of these M-type hexaferrites nanomaterials by the substitution of cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}) ions at Co{sup 2+} site. The analysis of X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns indicates single M-type hexaferrite phase. The parameters such as lattice constants (a and c), cell volume (V), X-xay density (D{sub x}), bulk density (D{sub b}), crystallite size (D) and percentage porosity (%P) were calculated from XRD data. The crystallite size is found in the range of 26–47 nm and this size is small enough to obtain a suitable signal-to-noise ratio for application in

  5. Bioengineered nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Many varieties of new, complex diseases are constantly being discovered, which leaves scientists with little choice but to embrace innovative methods for controlling the invasion of life-threatening problems. The use of nanotechnology has given scientists an opportunity to create nanomaterials that could help medical professionals in diagnosing and treating problems quickly and effectively. Bioengineered Nanomaterials presents in-depth information on bioengineered nanomaterials currently being developed in leading research laboratories around the world. In particular, the book focuses on nanom

  6. Nanomaterials handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2006-01-01

    Even before it was identified as a science and given a name,  nanotechnology was the province of the most innovative inventors. In medieval times, craftsmen, ingeniously employing nanometer-sized gold particles, created the enchanting red hues found in the gold ruby glass of cathedral windows. Today, nanomaterials are being just as creatively used to improve old products, as well as usher in new ones. From tires to CRTs to sunscreens, nanomaterials are becoming a part of every industry. The Nanomaterials Handbook provides a comprehensive overview of the current state of nanomaterials. Employ

  7. The magnetic properties of diluted CoFe2O4 nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. Masrour; M. Hamedoun; A. Benvoussef

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic properties of (CoxFe1 -x)A (Zn1 -xFe1+x)BO4 are studied using mean-field theory and the probability distribution law to obtain the saturation magnetization,the coercive field,the critical temperature,and the exchange interactions with different values of D (nm) and x.High-temperature series expansions (HTSEs) combined with the Padé approximant are used to calculate the critical temperature of (CoxFe1-x)A(Zn1-xFe1+x)BO4,and the critical exponent associated with magnetic susceptibility is obtained.

  8. Synthesis of high saturation magnetic iron oxide nanomaterials via low temperature hydrothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavani, P.; Rajababu, C. H.; Arif, M. D.; Reddy, I. Venkata Subba; Reddy, N. Ramamanohar

    2017-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) were synthesized through a simple low temperature hydrothermal approach to obtain with high saturation magnetization properties. Two series of iron precursors (sulfates and chlorides) were used in synthesis process by varying the reaction temperature at a constant pH. The X-ray diffraction pattern indicates the inverse spinel structure of the synthesized IONPs. The Field emission scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the particles prepared using iron sulfate were consisting a mixer of spherical (16-40 nm) and rod (diameter 20-25 nm, length distributed spherical shapes with size range 5-20 nm. On other hand, the IONPs synthesized at reaction temperature of 190 °C has spherical (16-46 nm) morphology in both series. The band gap values of IONPs were calculated from the obtained optical absorption spectra of the samples. The IONPs synthesized using iron sulfate at temperature of 130 °C exhibited high saturation magnetization (MS) of 103.017 emu/g and low remanant magnetization (Mr) of 0.22 emu/g with coercivity (Hc) of 70.9 Oe, which may be attributed to the smaller magnetic domains (dm) and dead magnetic layer thickness (t).

  9. Magnetic Control of Fe3O4 Nanomaterial for Fat Ablation in Microchannel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Chang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, surface modification of iron (II, III oxide Fe3O4 nanoparticles by oleic acid (OA coating is investigated for the microablation of fat in a microchannel. The nanoparticles are synthesized by the co-precipitation method and then dispersed in organic solvent prior to mixing with the OA. The magnetization, agglomeration, and particle size distribution properties of the OA-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles are characterized. The surface modification of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles reveals that upon injection into a microchannel, the lipophilicity of the OA coating influences the movement of the nanoparticles across an oil-phase barrier. The motion of the nanoparticles is controlled using an AC magnetic field to induce magnetic torque and a static gradient field to control linear translation. The fat microablation process in a microchannel is demonstrated using an oscillating driving field of less than 1200 Am−1.

  10. Selective adsorption of protein by a high-efficiency Cu(2+) -cooperated magnetic imprinted nanomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lu; Tang, Yuhai; Hao, Yi; He, Gaiyan; Gao, Ruixia; Tang, Xiaoshuang

    2016-07-01

    We report a core-shell magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer with high affinity through a facile sol-gel method for the selective adsorption of bovine hemoglobin from real bovine blood. Copper ions grafted on the surface of the matrix could immobilize template protein through chelation, which greatly enhances the orderliness of imprinted cavities and affinity of polymers. The obtained products exhibit a desired level of magnetic susceptibility, resulting in the highly efficient adsorption process. The results of adsorption experiments show that the saturation adsorption capacity of imprinted products could reach 116.3 mg/g within 30 min. Meanwhile, the specific binding experiment demonstrates the high selectivity of polymers for bovine hemoglobin. Furthermore, satisfactory reusability is demonstrated by ten adsorption-desorption cycles with no obvious deterioration in binding capacity. Electrophoretic analysis suggests the polymer could be used successfully in separation and enrichment of bovine hemoglobin from the bovine blood sample, which exhibits potential application in pretreatment of proteomics.

  11. Structure, magnetism, and electron-transport properties of Mn2CrGa-based nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyong Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mn2CrGa in the disordered cubic structure has been synthesized using rapid quenching and subsequent annealing. The cubic phase transforms to a stable tetragonal phase when a fraction of Cr or Ga is replaced by Pt or Al, respectively. All samples are ferrimagnetic with high Curie temperatures (Tc; Mn2CrGa exhibits the highest Tc of about 813 K. The tetragonal samples have appreciable values of magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy, which leads to an increase in coercivity (Hc that approaches about 10 kOe in the Pt-doped sample. The Hc linearly increases with a decrease of temperature, concomitant with the anisotropy change with temperature. All samples are metallic and show negative magnetoresistance with room-temperature resistivities on the order of 1 mΩcm. The magnetic properties including high Tc and low magnetic moment suggest that these tetragonal materials have potential for spin-transfer-torque-based devices.

  12. Applications of nanomaterials in sensors and diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuantranont, Adisorn (ed.) [National Electronics and Computer Technology Center (NECTEC), Pathumthani (Thailand). Nanoelectronics and MEMS Laboratory

    2013-11-01

    Recent progress in the synthesis of nanomaterials and our fundamental understanding of their properties has led to significant advances in nanomaterial-based gas, chemical and biological sensors. Leading experts around the world highlight the latest findings on a wide range of nanomaterials including nanoparticles, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, molecularly imprinted nanostructures or plastibodies, nanometals, DNA-based structures, smart nanomaterials, nanoprobes, magnetic nanomaterials, organic molecules like phthalocyanines and porphyrins, and the most amazing novel nanomaterial, called graphene. Various sensing techniques such as nanoscaled electrochemical detection, functional nanomaterial-amplified optical assays, colorimetry, fluorescence and electrochemiluminescence, as well as biomedical diagnosis applications, e.g. for cancer and bone disease, are thoroughly reviewed and explained in detail. This volume will provide an invaluable source of information for scientists working in the field of nanomaterial-based technology as well as for advanced students in analytical chemistry, biochemistry, electrochemistry, material science, micro- and nanotechnology.

  13. Magnetic fields-directed self-assembly of soft nanomaterials for energy harvesting and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Pawel; Gopinadhan, Manesh; Pelligra, Candice; Osuji, Chinedum

    2013-03-01

    We utilize magnetic fields to impose long range order in self-assembled soft materials including block copolymers, polymer-nanowire composites, and surfactant mesophases. Due to the space-pervasive nature of magnetic fields, this method can be utilized to produce arbitrarily large volumes of highly anisotropic materials with a quality of the alignment frequently approaching that of single crystals as assessed by X-ray scattering. The high fidelity of the alignment allows us to systematically explore and characterize the anisotropy of the charge transport in these materials. We present the results for improving charge transfer in cobalt doped ZnO nanowire-polythiophene composites for photovoltaic applications by the alignment of the nanowires. In block copolymers, we focus on enhancing Li-ion transport in membranes by the alignment of the Li-conducting PEO domains. We compare the magnitude of anisotropy and temperature dependence of ionic conductivity to the data obtained for non-polymeric surfactant-water systems. This work is funded by the NSF under DMR-0847534 and DMR-0934520

  14. Nanomaterial Registry

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — By leveraging and developing a set of Minimal Information About Nanomaterials (MIAN), ontology and standards through a community effort, it has developed a data...

  15. Nano-biomedical approaches of cancer therapy using carbon based and magnetic nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Alokita

    Since the inception of nanoparticles, they have affected almost each and every field of modern science and technology both in terms of research and application. Due to its subcellular level size and ease of modification for biological and medical purposes, nanoparticles have contributed greatly in various field of biomedical reaserch including cancer research. In this dissertation, emphasis has been given on an important area of research of a multi-modal anticancer therapeutic approach using carbon-based and magnetic inorganic nanoparticles. Ethylenediamine functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been used to deliver a functional copy of p53 gene in a plasmid construct, to human breast cancer cell line MCF-7, in order to restore the activity of p53 protein, which in this case is extremely short-lived. The attachment of the plasmid on the SWNTs was determined by atomic force microscopy. The nanutobe has successfully delivered the plasmid into the MCF-7 cell which follows the expression of the p53 protein into the cell as evidenced by the expression of Green fluorescence protein which was tagged to p53 plasmid. Upon expression, the functional activity of the p53 protein was found to be significantly restored as after 72 hours of incubation ~40% of cancer cells were apoptotic. Apoptosis was further determined by caspase assay. In chapter 3, we have used SWNTs to accomplish the targeted delivery by functionalizing it with human epidermal growth factor (EGF). As EGF receptor is over expressed in many of the cancer cells, it is possible to deliver any chemotherapeutic agents selectively to those cancer cells. We used EGF conjugated to SWNTs for targeted delivery to PANC-1 cells. Results indicate EGF-functionalized SWNTs accumulate more into PANC-1 cells compared to only SWNTs only. Upon targeting, Raman spectroscopy and ELIZA assay were used to determine the association and dissociation pattern of the targeted SWCNTs. 2D-Raman mapping was used to show

  16. Biosensor nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Songjun; Li, He; Banerjee, Ipsita A

    2011-01-01

    Focusing on the materials suitable for biosensor applications, such as nanoparticles, quantum dots, meso- and nanoporous materials and nanotubes, this text enables the reader to prepare the respective nanomaterials for use in actual devices by appropriate functionalization, surface processing or directed self-assembly. The main detection methods used are electrochemical, optical, and mechanical, providing solutions to challenging tasks.The result is a reference for researchers and developers, disseminating first-hand information on which nanomaterial is best suited to a particular applicat

  17. Role of Zr–Co substitution at iron site on structural, magnetic and electrical properties of Sr-hexaferrites nanomaterials synthesized by the sol–gel combustion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naeem Ashiq, Muhammad, E-mail: naeemashiqqau@yahoo.com [Institute of Chemical Sciences, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); Fahad Ehsan, Muhammad [Institute of Chemical Sciences, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); Javed Iqbal, Muhammad [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Najam-ul-Haq, Muhammad [Institute of Chemical Sciences, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan)

    2013-04-15

    The sol–gel auto-combustion technique has been employed to synthesize the M-type Sr-hexaferrites nanomaterials substituted with binary mixture of zirconium and cobalt at the iron site. The phase purity of the samples is confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis and the crystallite size is found in the range of 31–45 nm. The scanning electron microscopic analysis also confirms that the particles are in nanosize (25–50 nm). The magnetic parameters like saturation magnetization, remanence, squareness ratio and the coercivity are calculated from the hysteresis loops. The values of saturation magnetization and remanence increase with the increase in Zr–Co content up to x=0.4 while the coercivity decreases continuously with the substituents. The squareness ratio is above 0.5 which indicates that the samples are in single magnetic domain. The room temperature DC electrical resistivity is measured by the two point probe method and is found to increase with Zr–Co content up to the substitution level of x=0.6. These materials can be used in microwave devices as these devices require highly resistive materials with low eddy current losses. - Highlights: ► The particle size is found to be 25–50 nm using the simple and economic synthesis method. ► We are able to improve the saturation magnetization, remanence and DC resistivity. ► The synthesized materials are beneficial for recording media and microwave devices.

  18. Synthesis, photophysical analysis, and in vitro cytotoxicity assessment of the multifunctional (magnetic and luminescent) core@shell nanomaterial based on lanthanide-doped orthovanadates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szczeszak, Agata [Adam Mickiewicz University, Department of Rare Earths, Faculty of Chemistry (Poland); Ekner-Grzyb, Anna [Adam Mickiewicz University, Department of Behavioural Ecology, Faculty of Biology (Poland); Runowski, Marcin [Adam Mickiewicz University, Department of Rare Earths, Faculty of Chemistry (Poland); Mrówczyńska, Lucyna [Adam Mickiewicz University, Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Biology (Poland); Grzyb, Tomasz; Lis, Stefan, E-mail: blis@amu.edu.pl [Adam Mickiewicz University, Department of Rare Earths, Faculty of Chemistry (Poland)

    2015-03-15

    Rare earths orthovanadates (REVO{sub 4}) doped with luminescent lanthanide ions (Ln{sup 3+}) play an important role as promising light-emitting materials. Gadolinium orthovanadate exhibits strong absorption of ultraviolet radiation and as a matrix doped with Eu{sup 3+} ions is well known for its efficient and intense red emission, induced by energy transfer from the VO{sub 4}{sup 3−} groups to Eu{sup 3+} ions. In the presented study, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}@GdVO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} 5 % nanomaterial was investigated. The core@shell structures demonstrate attractive properties, such as higher thermal stability, enhanced water solubility, increased optical response, higher luminescence, longer decay times, and magnetic properties. Silica coating may protect nanocrystals from the surrounding environment. Therefore, such silica-covered nanoparticles (NPs) are successfully utilized in biomedical research. Multifunctional magnetic nanophosphors are very interesting due to their potential biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, hyperthermic treatment, and drug delivery. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate photophysical, chemical, and biological properties of multifunctional REVO{sub 4} doped with Ln{sup 3+}. Moreover, the studied NPs did not affect erythrocyte sedimentation rate, cell membrane permeability, and morphology of human red blood cells.

  19. Mutagenicity of carbon nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallin, Håkan; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; White, Paul A;

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such carbon nanotubes, graphene and fullerenes are some the most promising nanomaterials. Although carbon nanomaterials have been reported to possess genotoxic potential, it is imperitive to analyse the data on the genotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials in vivo and in vitro...

  20. Advances in nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Zishan

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a review of the latest research findings and key applications in the field of nanomaterials. The book contains twelve chapters on different aspects of nanomaterials. It begins with key fundamental concepts to aid readers new to the discipline of nanomaterials, and then moves to the different types of nanomaterials studied. The book includes chapters based on the applications of nanomaterials for nano-biotechnology and solar energy. Overall, the book comprises chapters on a variety of topics on nanomaterials from expert authors across the globe. This book will appeal to researchers and professional alike, and may also be used as a reference for courses in nanomaterials.

  1. Planar graphene oxide-based magnetic ionic liquid nanomaterial for extraction of chlorophenols from environmental water samples coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mei-Qiang; Su, Jie; Hu, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Qian; Dong, Chun-Ying; Pan, Sheng-Dong; Jin, Mi-Cong

    2016-08-12

    A planar graphene oxide-based magnetic ionic liquid nanomaterial (PGO-MILN) was synthesized. The prepared PGO-MILN was characterized by transmission electronmicroscopy (TEM) and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). The results of adsorption experiments showed that the PGO-MILN had great adsorption capacity for 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol (2,3,4,6-TeCP) and pentachlorophenol (PCP). Based on the adsorption experimental data, a sensitive magnetic method for determination of the five CPs in environmental water samples was developed by an effective magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) procedure coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The effects of main MSPE parameters including the solution pH, extraction time, desorption time, and volume of desorption solution on the extraction efficiencies had been investigated in detail. The recoveries ranged from 85.3 to 99.3% with correlation coefficients (r) higher than 0.9994 and the linear ranges were between 10 and 500ngL(-1). The limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) of the five CPs ranged from 0.2 to 2.6ngL(-1) and 0.6 to 8.7ngL(-1), respectively. The intra- and inter- day relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range from 0.6% to 7.4% and from 0.7% to 8.4%, respectively. It was confirmed that the PGO-MILN was a kind of highly effective MSPE materials used for enrichment of trace CPs in the environmental water.

  2. Synthesis of magnetic γ-Fe2O3-based nanomaterial for ultrasonic assisted dyes adsorption: Modeling and optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asfaram, Arash; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Hajati, Shaaker; Goudarzi, Alireza

    2016-09-01

    γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized and loaded on activated carbon. The prepared nanomaterial was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticle-loaded activated carbon (γ-Fe2O3-NPs-AC) was used as novel adsorbent for the ultrasonic-assisted removal of methylene blue (MB) and malachite green (MG). Response surface methodology and artificial neural network were applied to model and optimize the adsorption of the MB and MG in their individual and binary solutions followed by the investigation on adsorption isotherm and kinetics. The individual effects of parameters such as pH, mass of adsorbent, ultrasonication time as well as MB and MG concentrations in addition to the effects of their possible interactions on the adsorption process were investigated. The numerical optimization revealed that the optimum adsorption (>99.5% for each dye) is obtained at 0.02g, 15mgL(-1), 4min and 7.0 corresponding to the adsorbent mass, each dye concentration, sonication time and pH, respectively. The Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms were studied. The Langmuir was found to be most applicable isotherm which predicted maximum monolayer adsorption capacities of 195.55 and 207.04mgg(-1) for the adsorption of MB and MG, respectively. The pseudo-second order model was found to be applicable for the adsorption kinetics. Blank experiments (without any adsorbent) were run to investigate the possible degradation of the dyes studied in presence of ultrasonication. No dyes degradation was observed.

  3. 磁性纳米材料热疗胶质瘤%Magnetic nano-materials in glioma thermotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁平; 易国庆; 杨天明

    2009-01-01

    随着纳米技术的发展,理论上可利用交变磁场下磁纳米粒子产热这一原理而杀伤胶质瘤肿瘤细胞.磁性微粒因磁损耗而发热产生热疗作用,对肿瘤加热均匀,可实现组织内靶向热疗,同时也不受肿瘤体积和部位的影响,在热疗领域具有良好的应用前景.%With the development of nanotechnology, magnetic nano-particles can generate heat under an alternative magnetic field to kill glioma cells theoretically. Magnetic particles have thermotherapy role for its magnetic loss-resulted heat. Magnetic nano-partieles heating is homogeneous and tissue-targeted,and is not in-fluenced by tumor volume and location. It has a good application prospect in thermotherapy.

  4. A simple solution route to control synthesis of Fe3O4 nanomaterials at low temperature and their magnetic properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A series of nanostructured iron compounds including cubic Fe3O4 and orthorhombic FeOOH were synthesized via a facile low temperature (in the range of 60-100℃) solution method. In the whole process, the interaction between FeCl2·4H2O and methenamine (C6H12N4) was carried out through a reflux device under different reaction conditions such as temperature, solvent, and duration. The samples were detected by XRD, TEM, SAED, physical property measurement system, and Mssbauer spectroscopy, separately. The experiments showed that magnetic mixture nanoparticles had flake and rod morphologies, and cubic Fe3O4 took on grain nanostructure. Magnetism measurements indicated that the saturated magnetization of the as-obtained magnetic mixture was lower than that of the cubic magnetite. Mssbauer spectroscopy testified the sample consisting of cubic magnetite rather than γ-Fe2O3. In addition, a possible growth mechanism of cubic magnetic nanoparticles under different conditions was discussed.

  5. A simple solution route to control synthesis of Fe304 nanomaterials at low temperature and their magnetic properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi; CHEN Yun; ZENG YuPing; WANG ShiLong

    2009-01-01

    A series of nanostructured iron compounds including cubic Fe304 and orthorhombic FeOOH were synthesized via a facile low temperature (in the range of 60-100℃) solution method.In the whole process,the interaction between FeCl2.4H2O and methenamine (CeH12N4) was carried out through a reflux device under different reaction conditions such as temperature,solvent,and duration.The samples were detected by XRD,TEM,SAED,physical property measurement system,and M(o)ssbauer spectroscopy,separately.The experiments showed that magnetic mixture nanoparticles had flake and rod morphologies,and cubic Fe304 took on grain nanostructure.Magnetism measurements indicated that the saturated magnetization of the as-obtained magnetic mixture was lower than that of the cubic magnetite.M6ssbauer spectroscopy testified the sample consisting of cubic magnetite rather than y-Fe2O3.In addition,a possible growth mechanism of cubic magnetic nanoparUcles under different conditions was discussed.

  6. Stimuli responsive nanomaterials for controlled release applications

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Song

    2012-01-01

    The controlled release of therapeutics has been one of the major challenges for scientists and engineers during the past three decades. Coupled with excellent biocompatibility profiles, various nanomaterials have showed great promise for biomedical applications. Stimuli-responsive nanomaterials guarantee the controlled release of cargo to a given location, at a specific time, and with an accurate amount. In this review, we have combined the major stimuli that are currently used to achieve the ultimate goal of controlled and targeted release by "smart" nanomaterials. The most heavily explored strategies include (1) pH, (2) enzymes, (3) redox, (4) magnetic, and (5) light-triggered release.

  7. Preparation and Properties of Magnetic Fluorescent Nanomaterials%磁性荧光纳米材料的制备与性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈顺; 张俊俊; 唐琪; 魏战勇; 熊传溪; 董丽杰

    2013-01-01

    采用表面活性剂3-氨丙基三乙氧基硅烷(APTES)修饰Fe3O4磁性纳米粒子,经质子化后,Fe3O4磁性纳米粒子表面披覆大量的正电荷,与表面带负电荷的巯基丙酸(MPA)修饰的核壳CdSe/CdS/ZnS量子点(QDs)通过强烈的静电作用而发生组装,得到兼具磁性和荧光性能的磁性荧光纳米材料.利用透射电子显微镜(TEM)、傅里叶变换红外光谱仪(FTIR)、X射线衍射仪(XRD)、荧光分光光度计和振动样品磁强计(VSM)等测试手段对磁性荧光纳米材料进行表征.研究表明,由两种粒子组装的核壳结构复合粒子拥有良好的磁性能和荧光性能.%Nanostructure acquiring multiple functionalities is emerging as a promising example for future functional materials. Magnetofluorescent nanomaterials with rapid magnetic response and highly efficient luminescence reveal a great potential in practical applications, such as susceptive biosensor and targeted optical imaging. Taking the best use of magnetic properties and fluorescent properties of nanoparticles, a kind of nanocomposites was devised through assembling magnetic nanoparticles with fluorescent nanoparticles. To date, some strategies have been developed to build various hierarchical magnetofluorescent nanostructure by assembling quantum dots (QDs) and magnetic nanocrystals, such as encapsulation and one-pot synthesis. Herein, we prepared a kind of magnetofluorescent nanocomposites by a new method based on electrostatic interactions. On the basis of previous works, Fe3O4 nanoparticles performed good magnetic properties and the multishell quantum dots (CdSe/CdS/ZnS) showed excellent fluorescent properties. In our work, Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were prepared through a high-temperature pyrolysis method and modified by coupling agent 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES). After process of protonation, the surface of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles was covered with a large number of positive charges. And the multishell quantum

  8. Handbook of nanomaterials properties

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Dan; Schricker, Scott R; Sigmund, Wolfgang; Zauscher, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials attract tremendous attention in recent researches. Although extensive research has been done in this field it still lacks a comprehensive reference work that presents data on properties of different Nanomaterials. This Handbook of Nanomaterials Properties will be the first single reference work that brings together the various properties with wide breadth and scope.

  9. Contributions to the Monte Carlo study of the magnetic properties of nanomaterials such as graphyne and graphone

    OpenAIRE

    Sanae, Zriouel

    2016-01-01

    Attracted by the importance of new materials in nanotechnology area, this thesis develops this research field while deepening results. We started by introducing the more sophisticated simulation and calculation methods, such as the Monte Carlo method, the mean field theory, the effectif field theory and the transfer matrix. Subsequently, we studied the magnetic and hysteretic properties of the materials. Then we have detailed some of our contributions related to the materials based on graphen...

  10. Nanomaterials for photohyperthermia: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jonathan; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2013-01-01

    The unique properties of nanomaterials have propelled the field of nanomedicine. Nanomaterials have been used as drug delivery, imaging, and photothermal agents for diagnosis and therapy of diseases. Recently, photohyperthermia has attracted great interest from researchers and is actively being investigated as an alternative method of therapy for cancer and even bacteria. Photohyperthermia, or photothermal therapy, is the process of a photothermal agent absorbing light and converting it into heat for the destruction of malignant cells, which is due to elevated temperatures. This technique is non-invasive, can target specific diseased cells for minimal adverse side effects, and can be used in conjunction with other cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy. In this review, we will discuss different nanomaterials that have been implemented as photothermal agents for the treatment of various cancer and bacterial cells. The review will mainly focus on gold nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes. However, other nanomaterials, such as semiconductor nanoparticles and polymer composites, will be briefly discussed. In addition, the photothermal mechanism, current developments, dual imaging and therapy, and future perspectives of nanoparticle-based photohyperthermia will be presented.

  11. Effects of Eu substitution on luminescent and magnetic properties of BaTiO{sub 3} nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, S., E-mail: sfuentes@ucn.cl [Departamento de Ciencias Farmacéuticas, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Católica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile); Barraza, N. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Católica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Veloso, E. [Laboratorio de Magnetismo, Departamento de Ciencias Geológicas, Universidad Católica del Norte, Antofagasta (Chile); Villarroel, R. [Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile); Llanos, J. [Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Católica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile)

    2013-08-25

    Highlight: •We described a new combined method to obtain Eu{sup 3+}-doped BaTiO{sub 3}. •We report the physical and optical properties of Eu{sup 3+}-doped BaTiO{sub 3}. •The synthesis method improves the stabilization of the tetragonal phase of BaTiO{sub 3}:Eu. •The photoluminescence spectra indicate that the Eu{sup 3+} ions occupy an antisymmetric site. •The as prepared phases could be considered as multifunctional materials. -- Abstract: Eu{sup 3+}-doped BaTiO{sub 3} phases were synthesized by combined sol–gel and hydrothermal methods under an oxygen partial pressure of 60 psi. The crystal phases were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. The Raman spectra as well as the magnetic properties were also investigated. The photoluminescence emission spectra confirm that the samples were efficiently excited by near-UV light. All spectra were dominated by a red emission band due to the electric dipole transition {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 2}. The dependence of the Raman spectra and optical and magnetic properties on the amount of Eu{sup 3+} incorporated into the phases was also investigated. The number of magnetic domains increased with the concentration of Eu{sup 3+} added. The stabilization of the tetragonal phases was also observed in Eu{sup 3+}-doped samples, and their ferroelectric properties were also maintained, making these phases interesting multifunctional materials for applications in device design.

  12. EDITORIAL: Whither nanomaterials? Whither nanomaterials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallouk, Thomas E.; Pinkerton, Fred; Stetson, Ned

    2009-10-01

    As the journal Nanotechnology enters its third decade it is interesting to look back on the field and to think about where it may be headed in the future. The growth of the journal over the past twenty years mirrors that of the field, with exponentially rising numbers of citations and a widening diversity of topics that we identify as nanotechnology. In the early 1990s, Nanotechnology was focused primarily on nanoscale electronics and on scanning probe tools for fabricating and characterizing nanostructures. The synthesis and assembly of nanomaterials was already an active area in chemical research; however, it did not yet intersect strongly with the activities of the physics community, which was interested primarily in new phenomena that emerged on the nanoscale and on the devices that derived from them. In the 1990s there were several key advances that began to bridge this gap. Techniques were developed for making nanocrystals of compound semiconductors, oxides, and metals with very fine control over shape and superstructure. Carbon nanotubes were discovered and their unique electronic properties were demonstrated. Research on the self-assembly of organic molecules on surfaces led to the development of soft lithography and layer-by- layer assembly of materials. The potential to use DNA and then proteins as building blocks of precise assemblies of nanoparticles was explored. These bottom-up structures could not be made by top-down techniques, and their unique properties as components of sensors, electronic devices, biological imaging agents, and drug delivery vehicles began to change the definition of the field. Ten years ago, Inelke Malsch published a study on the scientific trends and organizational dynamics of nanotechology in Europe (1999 Nanotechnology 10 1-7). Scientists from a variety of disciplines were asked which areas of research they would include in the definition of nanotechnology. Although the article concluded with forward-looking thoughts in the

  13. Late Riphean age of the crystalline basement of the carbonate cover of the Dzabkhan microcontinent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozakov, I. K.; Kirnozova, T. I.; Kovach, V. P.; Terent'eva, L. B.; Tolmacheva, E. V.; Fugzan, M. M.; Erdenezhargal, Ch.

    2015-05-01

    The Dzabkhan microcontinent was earlier considered as a fragment of an ancient craton in the structure of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. Deposits of the Tsagaan Oloom Formation were included in the shelf zone, under the assumption that they were related to the regional unconformity between the Early-Late Precambrian crystal formations. The carbonate sequence of the Tsagaan Oloom Formation overlaps crystalline rocks only in the eastern part of the Dzabkhan microcontinent, where dolomites lie unconformably on high-grade metamorphic rocks intruded by granitoids of the Bogdyngol massif. The latter were included in the composition of both the Early Precambrian basement and the Middle Riphean intrusive complex. We have determined the U-Pb zircon age of these granitoids at 717 ± 5 Ma and the Nd model ages of granitoids and gneisses of the basement of the Tsagaan Oloom Formation at 2.0-1.9 Ga at ɛNd = -10.0...-6.6. Recent geochronological and Nd and Pb-Pb isotopic and geochemical data indicate that intrusive and high-grade metamorphic complexes are absent in the crystalline basement of the Dzabkhan microcontinent, similar to those in ancient cratons. One can assume that the Late Riphean carbonate cover (Tsagaan Oloom Formation) deposited on the Late Precambrian continental block.

  14. Nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchen eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed.

  15. Nanomaterial-Enabled Neural Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongchen; Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed.

  16. Nanomaterials in preventive dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannig, Matthias; Hannig, Christian

    2010-08-01

    The prevention of tooth decay and the treatment of lesions and cavities are ongoing challenges in dentistry. In recent years, biomimetic approaches have been used to develop nanomaterials for inclusion in a variety of oral health-care products. Examples include liquids and pastes that contain nano-apatites for biofilm management at the tooth surface, and products that contain nanomaterials for the remineralization of early submicrometre-sized enamel lesions. However, the treatment of larger visible cavities with nanomaterials is still at the research stage. Here, we review progress in the development of nanomaterials for different applications in preventive dentistry and research, including clinical trials.

  17. Nanomaterials meet microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumera, Martin

    2011-05-28

    Nanomaterials and lab-on-a-chip platforms have undergone enormous development during the past decade. Here, we present an overview of how microfluidics benefited from the use of nanomaterials for the enhanced separation and detection of analytes. We also discuss how nanomaterials benefit from microfluidics in terms of synthesis and in terms of the simulation of environments for nanomotors and nanorobots. In our opinion, the "marriage" of nanomaterials and microfluidics is highly beneficial and is expected to solve vital challenges in related fields.

  18. Electrodynamic Arrays Having Nanomaterial Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigwell, Steven (Inventor); Biris, Alexandru S. (Inventor); Calle, Carlos I. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electrodynamic array of conductive nanomaterial electrodes and a method of making such an electrodynamic array. In one embodiment, a liquid solution containing nanomaterials is deposited as an array of conductive electrodes on a substrate, including rigid or flexible substrates such as fabrics, and opaque or transparent substrates. The nanomaterial electrodes may also be grown in situ. The nanomaterials may include carbon nanomaterials, other organic or inorganic nanomaterials or mixtures.

  19. Genotoxicity investigations on nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesch, Franz; Landsiedel, Robert

    2012-07-01

    This review is based on the lecture presented at the April 2010 nanomaterials safety assessment Postsatellite to the 2009 EUROTOX Meeting and summarizes genotoxicity investigations on nanomaterials published in the open scientific literature (up to 2008). Special attention is paid to the relationship between particle size and positive versus negative outcome, as well as the dependence of the outcome on the test used. Salient conclusions and outstanding recommendations emerging from the information summarized in this review are as follows: recognize that nanomaterials are not all the same; therefore know and document what nanomaterial has been tested and in what form; take nanomaterials specific properties into account; in order to make your results comparable with those of others and on other nanomaterials: use or at least include in your studies standardized methods; use in vivo studies to put in vitro results into perspective; take uptake and distribution of the nanomaterial into account; and in order to become able to make extrapolations to risk for human: learn about the mechanism of nanomaterials genotoxic effects. Past experience with standard non-nanosubstances already had shown that mechanisms of genotoxic effects can be complex and their elucidation can be demanding, while there often is an immediate need to assess the genotoxic hazard. Thus, a practical and pragmatic approach to genotoxicity investigations of novel nanomaterials is the use of a battery of standard genotoxicity testing methods covering a wide range of mechanisms. Application of these standard methods to nanomaterials demands, however, adaptations, and the interpretation of results from the genotoxicity testing of nanomaterials needs additional considerations exceeding those used for standard size materials.

  20. Application of Ferrite Nanomaterial in RF On-Chip Inductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Lin Cai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Several kinds of ferrite-integrated on-chip inductors are presented. Ferrite nanomaterial applied in RF on-chip inductors is prepared and analyzed to show the properties of high permeability, high ferromagnetic resonance frequency, high resistivity, and low loss, which has the potential that will improve the performance of RF on-chip inductors. Simulations of different coil and ferrite nanomaterial parameters, inductor structures, and surrounding structures are also conducted to achieve the trend of gains of inductance and quality factor of on-chip inductors. By integrating the prepared ferrite magnetic nanomaterial to the on-chip inductors with different structures, the measurement performances show an obvious improvement even in GHz frequency range. In addition, the studies of CMOS compatible process to integrate the nanomaterial promote the widespread application of magnetic nanomaterial in RF on-chip inductors.

  1. Molecular toxicity of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xue-Ling; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Xing, Gengmei

    2014-10-01

    With the rapid developments in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnlogy, more and more nanomaterials and their based consumer products have been used into our daily life. The safety concerns of nanomaterials have been well recognized by the scientific community and the public. Molecular mechanism of interactions between nanomaterials and biosystems is the most essential topic and final core of the biosafety. In the last two decades, nanotoxicology developed very fast and toxicity phenomena of nanomaterials have been reported. To achieve better understanding and detoxication of nanomaterials, thorough studies of nanotoxicity at molecular level are important. The interactions between nanomaterials and biomolecules have been widely investigated as the first step toward the molecular nanotoxicology. The consequences of such interactions have been discussed in the literature. Besides this, the chemical mechanism of nanotoxicology is gaining more attention, which would lead to a better design of nontoxic nanomaterials. In this review, we focus on the molecular nanotoxicology and explore the toxicity of nanomaterials at molecular level. The molecular level studies of nanotoxicology are summarized and the published nanotoxicological data are revisited.

  2. Nanomaterials and Retinal Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The neuroretina should be considered as a potential site of nanomaterial toxicity. Engineered nanomaterials may reach the retina through three potential routes of exposure including; intra­ vitreal injection of therapeutics; blood-borne delivery in the retinal vasculature an...

  3. About aerogels based on carbon nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fail Sultanov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review a current trends in development and application of carbon nanomaterials and derivatives based on them are presented. Aerogels based on graphene and other carbon nanomaterials present a class of novel ultralight materials in which a liquid phase is completely substituted by gaseous. In its turn graphene based aerogel was named as the lightest material, thus the record of aerographite, which has retained for a long time was beaten. Aerogels are characterized by low density, high surface area and high index of hydrophobicity. In addition, depending on its application, aerogels based on carbon nanomaterials can be electrically conductive and magnetic, while retaining the flexibility of its 3D structure. Impressive properties of novel material – aerogels causes a huge interest of scientists in order to find their application in various fields, ranging from environment problems to medicine and electronics.

  4. Nanomaterials as Analytical Tools for Genosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anees Ahmad Ansari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials are being increasingly used for the development of electrochemical DNA biosensors, due to the unique electrocatalytic properties found in nanoscale materials. They offer excellent prospects for interfacing biological recognition events with electronic signal transduction and for designing a new generation of bioelectronic devices exhibiting novel functions. In particular, nanomaterials such as noble metal nanoparticles (Au, Pt, carbon nanotubes (CNTs, magnetic nanoparticles, quantum dots and metal oxide nanoparticles have been actively investigated for their applications in DNA biosensors, which have become a new interdisciplinary frontier between biological detection and material science. In this article, we address some of the main advances in this field over the past few years, discussing the issues and challenges with the aim of stimulating a broader interest in developing nanomaterial-based biosensors and improving their applications in disease diagnosis and food safety examination.

  5. Potential risks of nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalova, Totka; Louda, Petr

    2014-05-01

    Nanotechnology is the design and manipulation of materials at the nanometer scale such that novel or enhanced properties emerge. It is a new area of knowledge that promises a dazzling array of opportunities in areas as diverse as manufacturing, energy, health care, and waste treatment. But while the ability to develop nanomaterials and incorporate them into products is advancing rapidly, our understanding of the potential environmental, health, and safety effects of nanomaterials — and of the most effective ways to manage such effects — has proceeded at a much slower pace. Because of the novel properties that emerge at the nano scale, nanomaterials may require more and different information than called for under traditional risk management systems. And given the enormous commercial and societal benefits that may potentially come from this technology, it is likely that nanomaterials, and the products and other applications containing them, will be widely produced and used. Therefore it is especially important to understand and minimize the potential risks.

  6. Nanomaterials and Nanochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bréchignac, Catherine; Lahmani, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    Nanomaterials are a fast developing field of research and applications lie in many separate domains, such as in hi-tech (optics, electronics, biology, aeronautics), but also in consumer industries (automotive, concrete, surface treatments (including paints), cosmetics, etc.).

  7. Towards Safer Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune; Baun, Anders

    2014-01-01

    As nanomaterials become more widespread in everything from industrial processes to consumer products, concerns about human and environmental safety are being taken increasingly more seriously. In our research we are working with minimizing the impact and risks of engineered nanomaterials by looking...... into how the design of nanomaterials can be optimized to minimize their toxicity while still preserving their beneficial or wanted properties. Current efforts in this field are focusing on identifying design rules or parameters that can be adjusted to obtain a risk reduction, either by reducing the hazard...... or the exposure and optimally both. Examples include the 5 SAFER principles (Morose, 2010) or screenings of early warning signs (Hansen et al., 2013). Taking the full life cycle of nanomaterials into account, the principles of Green chemistry and Green engineering could also prove useful to reduce...

  8. Safe use of nanomaterials

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanomaterials  is on the increase worldwide, including at CERN. The HSE Unit has established a safety guideline to inform you of the main requirements for the safe handling and disposal of nanomaterials at CERN.   A risk assessment tool has also been developed which guides the user through the process of evaluating the risk for his or her activity. Based on the calculated risk level, the tool provides a list of recommended control measures.   We would therefore like to draw your attention to: Safety Guideline C-0-0-5 - Safe handling and disposal of nanomaterials; and Safety Form C-0-0-2 - Nanomaterial Risk Assessment   You can consult all of CERN’s safety rules and guidelines here. Please contact the HSE Unit for any questions you may have.   The HSE Unit

  9. Food decontamination using nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research indicates that nanomaterials including nanoemulsions are promising decontamination media for the reduction of food contaminating pathogens. The inhibitory effect of nanoparticles for pathogens could be due to deactivate cellular enzymes and DNA; disrupting of membrane permeability; and/...

  10. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  11. Nanostructure investigation of magnetic nanomaterial Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.3}Cu{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} synthesized by sol-gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pransisco, Prengki, E-mail: prengkipransisco@gmail.com [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Badan Lingkungan Hidup Derah Kabupaten Empat Lawang South of Sumatera (Indonesia); Shafie, Afza, E-mail: afza@petronas.com.my; Guan, Beh Hoe, E-mail: beh.hoeguan@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Magnetic nanomaterial Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.3}Cu{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was successfully prepared by using sol-gel method. Heat treatment on material is always giving defect on properties of material. This paper investigates the effect of heat treatment on nanostructure of magnetic nanomaterial Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.3}Cu{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. According to thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) that after 600°C there is no more weight loss detected and it was decided as minimum calcination temperature. Intensity, crystallite size, structure, lattice parameter and d-spacing of the material were investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD). High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) was used to examine nanostructure, nanosize, shape and distribution particle of magnetic material Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.3}Cu{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and variable pressure field emission scanning electron microscope (VP-FESEM) was used to investigate the surface morphology and topography of the material. The XRD result shows single-phase cubic spinel structure with average crystallite size in the range of 25.6-95.9 nm, the value of the intensity of the material was increased with increasing temperature, and followed by lattice parameter was increased with increasing calcination temperature, value of d-spacing was relatively decreased with accompanied increasing temperature. From HRTEM result the distribution of particles was tend to be agglomerates with particle size of 7.8-17.68 nm. VP-FESEM result shows that grain size of the material increases with increasing calcination temperature and the surface morphology shows that the material is in hexagonal shape and it was also proved by mapping result which showing the presence each of constituents inside the compound.

  12. Recent advances in nanomaterial-based biosensors for antibiotics detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Lingyi; Yao, Yao; Ping, Jianfeng; Ying, Yibin

    2017-05-15

    Antibiotics are able to be accumulated in human body by food chain and may induce severe influence to human health and safety. Hence, the development of sensitive and simple methods for rapid evaluation of antibiotic levels is highly desirable. Nanomaterials with excellent electronic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties have been recognized as one of the most promising materials for opening new gates in the development of next-generation biosensors. This review highlights the current advances in the nanomaterial-based biosensors for antibiotics detection. Different kinds of nanomaterials including carbon nanomaterials, metal nanomaterials, magnetic nanoparticles, up-conversion nanoparticles, and quantum dots have been applied to the construction of biosensors with two main signal-transducing mechanisms, i.e. optical and electrochemical. Furthermore, the current challenges and future prospects in this field are also included to provide an overview for future research directions.

  13. Nanomaterials for Defense Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turaga, Uday; Singh, Vinitkumar; Lalagiri, Muralidhar; Kiekens, Paul; Ramkumar, Seshadri S.

    Nanotechnology has found a number of applications in electronics and healthcare. Within the textile field, applications of nanotechnology have been limited to filters, protective liners for chemical and biological clothing and nanocoatings. This chapter presents an overview of the applications of nanomaterials such as nanofibers and nanoparticles that are of use to military and industrial sectors. An effort has been made to categorize nanofibers based on the method of production. This chapter particularly focuses on a few latest developments that have taken place with regard to the application of nanomaterials such as metal oxides in the defense arena.

  14. Biological and Pharmaceutical Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Challa S. S. R.

    2006-01-01

    This first comprehensive yet concise overview of all important classes of biological and pharmaceutical nanomaterials presents in one volume the different kinds of natural biological compounds that form nanomaterials or that may be used to purposefully create them. This unique single source of information brings together the many articles published in specialized journals, which often remain unseen by members of other, related disciplines. Covering pharmaceutical, nucleic acid, peptide and DNA-Chitosan nanoparticles, the book focuses on those innovative materials and technologies needed for the continued growth of medicine, healthcare, pharmaceuticals and human wellness. For chemists, biochemists, cell biologists, materials scientists, biologists, and those working in the pharmaceutical and chemical industries.

  15. Intracellular signal modulation by nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Salik; Garantziotis, Stavros; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle; Boland, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the interactions of nanomaterials with biological systems and the resulting activation of signal transduction pathways is essential for the development of safe and consumer friendly nanotechnology. Here we present an overview of signaling pathways induced by nanomaterial exposures and describe the possible correlation of their physicochemical characteristics with biological outcomes. In addition to the hierarchical oxidative stress model and a review of the intrinsic and cell-mediated mechanisms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating capacities of nanomaterials, we also discuss other oxidative stress dependent and independent cellular signaling pathways. Induction of the inflammasome, calcium signaling, and endoplasmic reticulum stress are reviewed. Furthermore, the uptake mechanisms can be of crucial importance for the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials and membrane-dependent signaling pathways have also been shown to be responsible for cellular effects of nanomaterials. Epigenetic regulation by nanomaterials, effects of nanoparticle-protein interactions on cell signaling pathways, and the induction of various cell death modalities by nanomaterials are described. We describe the common trigger mechanisms shared by various nanomaterials to induce cell death pathways and describe the interplay of different modalities in orchestrating the final outcome after nanomaterial exposures. A better understanding of signal modulations induced by nanomaterials is not only essential for the synthesis and design of safer nanomaterials but will also help to discover potential nanomedical applications of these materials. Several biomedical applications based on the different signaling pathways induced by nanomaterials are already proposed and will certainly gain a great deal of attraction in the near future.

  16. DNA-incorporating nanomaterials in biotechnological applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadler, A.; van der Lelie, D.; Chi, C.; Gang, O.

    2010-02-01

    The recently developed ability to controllably connect biological and inorganic objects on a molecular scale opens a new page in biomimetic methods with potential applications in biodetection, tissue engineering, targeted therapeutics and drug/gene delivery. Particularly in the biodetection arena, a rapid development of new platforms has largely been stimulated by a spectrum of novel nanomaterials with physical properties that offer efficient, sensitive and inexpensive molecular sensing. Recently, DNA-functionalized nano-objects have emerged as a new class of nanomaterials that can be controllably assembled in predesigned structures. Such DNA-based nanoscale structures might provide a new detection paradigm due to their regulated optical, electrical and magnetic responses, chemical heterogeneity and high local biomolecular concentration. The specific biorecognition DNA and its physical-chemical characteristics allows for an exploitation of DNA-functionalized nanomaterials for sensing of nucleic acids, while a broad tunability of DNA interactions permits extending their use for detection of proteins, small molecules and ions. We discuss the progress that was achieved in the last decade in the exploration of new detection methods based on DNA-incorporating nanomaterials as well as their applications to gene delivery. The comparison between various detection platforms, their sensitivity and selectivity, and specific applications are reviewed.

  17. Toxicity of nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharifi, Shahriar; Behzadi, Shahed; Laurent, Sophie; Forrest, M. Laird; Stroeve, Pieter; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscience has matured significantly during the last decade as it has transitioned from bench top science to applied technology. Presently, nanomaterials are used in a wide variety of commercial products such as electronic components, sports equipment, sun creams and biomedical applications. There

  18. Nanomaterials for reducing amyloid cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Mao, Xiaobo; Yu, Yue; Wang, Chen-Xuan; Yang, Yan-Lian; Wang, Chen

    2013-07-26

    This review is intended to reflect the recent progress on therapeutic applications of nanomaterials in amyloid diseases. The progress on anti-amyloid functions of various nanomaterials including inorganic nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials and biomolecular aggregates, is reviewed and discussed. The main functionalization strategies for general nanoparticle modifications are reviewed for potential applications of targeted therapeutics. The interaction mechanisms between amyloid peptides and nanomaterials are discussed from the perspectives of dominant interactions and kinetics. The encapsulation of anti-amyloid drugs, targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release and drug delivery crossing blood brain barrier by application of nanomaterials would also improve the therapeutics of amyloid diseases.

  19. Surface engineering of graphene-based nanomaterials for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Sixiang; Chen, Feng; Ehlerding, Emily B; Cai, Weibo

    2014-09-17

    Graphene-based nanomaterials have attracted tremendous interest over the past decade due to their unique electronic, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties. However, the biomedical applications of these intriguing nanomaterials are still limited due to their suboptimal solubility/biocompatibility, potential toxicity, and difficulties in achieving active tumor targeting, just to name a few. In this Topical Review, we will discuss in detail the important role of surface engineering (i.e., bioconjugation) in improving the in vitro/in vivo stability and enriching the functionality of graphene-based nanomaterials, which can enable single/multimodality imaging (e.g., optical imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and therapy (e.g., photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapy, and drug/gene delivery) of cancer. Current challenges and future research directions are also discussed and we believe that graphene-based nanomaterials are attractive nanoplatforms for a broad array of future biomedical applications.

  20. One-dimensional nanomaterials: Synthesis and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Bo

    My research mainly covers three types of one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials: metal oxide nanowires, transition metal oxide core-shell nanowires and single-walled carbon nanotubes. This new class of nanomaterials has generated significant impact in multiple fields including electronics, medicine, computing and energy. Their peculiar, fascinating properties are promising for unique applications on electronics, spintronics, optical and chemical/biological sensing. This dissertation will summarize my research work on these three 1D nanomaterials and propose some ideas that may lead to further development. Chapter 1 will give a brief introduction of nanotechnology journey and 1D nanomaterials. Chapter 2 and 3 will discuss indium oxide nanowires, as the representative of metal oxide nanwires. More specifically, chapter 2 is focused on the synthesis, material characterization, transport studies and doping control of indium oxide nanowires; Chapter 3 will give a comprehensive review of our systematic studies on molecular memory applications based on molecule/indium oxide nanowire heterostructures. Chapter 4 will introduce another 1D nanomaterial-transition metal oxide (TMO) core-shell nanowires. The discuss will focus on the synthesis of TMO nanowires, material analysis and their electronic properties as a function of temperature and magnetic field. Chapter 5 is dedicated to aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on synthesis with rational control of position and orientation, detailed characterization and construction of scaled top-gated transistors. This chapter presents a way to produce the p- and n-type nanotube transistors based on gate voltage polarity control during electrical breakdown. Finally, chapter 6 summarizes the above discussions and proposes some suggestions for future studies.

  1. Soft bioelectronics using nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunjae; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-09-01

    Recently, soft bioelectronics has attracted significant attention because of its potential applications in biointegrated healthcare devices and minimally invasive surgical tools. Mechanical mismatch between conventional electronic/optoelectronic devices and soft human tissues/organs, however, causes many challenges in materials and device designs of bio-integrated devices. Intrinsically soft hybrid materials comprising twodimensional nanomaterials are utilized to solve these issues. In this paper, we describe soft bioelectronic devices based on graphene synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition process. These devices have unique advantages over rigid electronics, particularly in biomedical applications. The functionalized graphene is hybridized with other nanomaterials and fabricated into high-performance sensors and actuators toward wearable and minimally invasive healthcare devices. Integrated bioelectronic systems constructed using these devices solve pending issues in clinical medicine while providing new opportunities in personalized healthcare.

  2. Nanomaterials in ecotoxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck James; Krogh, Paul Henning; Lead, Jamie M

    2008-01-01

    In ecotoxicology, a problem exists of quantifying real exposure and corresponding effects, especially in complex environments such as the soil. Hence, for a given total soil concentration to which the organism is exposed, the effect level depends on the available fraction and the chemical status ...... ion activity models (FlAM) and biotic ligand models (BLM). Quantification and characterization of actual exposure is also of concern for nanomaterial and nanoparticle (NP) terrestrial ecotoxicology...

  3. Nanomaterials in Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    of the polymer. 46. C. R. Martin, D. T. Mitchell, and J. C. Hulteen, Anal. Chem., Submitted. 47. D. Linden , Handbook of Batteries t2ndV New York...nanoparticles of Li+-intercalation materials for possible use as electrodes in Li-ion batteries . 14. Subject terms: Nanomaterials, electrochemistry...for possible use as electrodes in Li+ batteries . II. Ensembles of Nanoscopic Electrodes. Electrochemistry at electrodes with nanoscopic dimensions

  4. Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The CFN at Brookhaven National Laboratory focuses on understanding the chemical and physical response of nanomaterials to make functional materials such as sensors,...

  5. Carbon covered alumina prepared by the pyrolysis of sucrose: A promising support material for the supported Pt-Sn-bimetallic dehydrogenation catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, S.; He, S.; Li, X.R.; Seshan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Sucrose was pyrolyzed on gamma alumina surface to prepare carbon covered alumina (CCA) material. Alumina and CCA supported Pt–Sn catalysts were prepared by the complex impregnation method under vacuum. Dehydrogenation of n-octadecane was performed to study the effect of carbon addition, Pt loading a

  6. Introduction to nanoparticles, nanocomposites, nanomaterials an introduction for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    Vollath, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Meeting the demand for a readily understandable introduction to nanomaterials and nanotechnology, this textbook specifically addresses the needs of students - and engineers - who need to get the gist of nanoscale phenomena in materials without having to delve too deeply into the physical and chemical details. The book begins with an overview of the consequences of small particle size, such as the growing importance of surface effects, and covers successful, field-tested synthesis techniques of nanomaterials. The largest part of the book is devoted to the particular magnetic, optical, electrical and mechanical properties of materials at the nanoscale, leading on to emerging and already commercialized applications, such as nanofluids in magnetic resonance imaging, high-performance nanocomposites and carbon nanotube-based electronics. Based on the author's experience in teaching nanomaterials courses and adapted, in style and level, for students with only limited background knowledge, the textbook includes fur...

  7. Superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugon, Katarzyna

    The purpose of this thesis is to explain the phenomenon of superconductivity in carbon nanomaterials such as graphene, fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. In the introductory chapter, there is a description of superconductivity and how it occurs at critical temperature (Tc) that is characteristic and different to every superconducting material. The discovery of superconductivity in mercury in 1911 by Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes is also mentioned. Different types of superconductors, type I and type II, low and high temperatures superconductors, as well as the BCS theory that was developed in 1957 by Bardeen, Cooper, and Schrieffer, are also described in detail. The BCS theory explains how Cooper's pairs are formed and how they are responsible for the superconducting properties of many materials. The following chapters explain superconductivity in doped fullerenes, graphene and carbon nanotubes, respectively. There is a thorough explanation followed by many examples of different types of carbon nanomaterials in which small changes in chemical structure cause significant changes in superconducting properties. The goal of this research was not only to take into consideration well known carbon based superconductors but also to search for the newest available materials such as the fullerene nanowhiskers discovered quite recently. There is also a presentation of fairly new ideas about inducing superconductivity in a monolayer of graphene which is more challenging than inducing superconductivity in graphite by simply intercalating metal atoms between its graphene sheets. An effort has been taken to look for any available information about carbon nanomaterials that have the potential to superconduct at room temperature, mainly because discovery of such materials would be a real revolution in the modern world, although no such materials have been discovered yet.

  8. Electrocatalysis at metal nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lin

    Direct liquid fuel cells, such as direct methanol fuel cells and direct formic acid fuel cells, have attracted much attention in the past decades due to the need of clean and efficient power sources. One of the most critical issues in the development of highly efficient fuel cells is to increase the rates of fuel-cell reactions as a commercial product. As a result, the topic of electrocatalysis plays a significant role in the investigations of fuel cell reactions. For methanol oxidation, platinum based nanomaterials are the most important catalysts. For formic acid oxidation, both platinum and palladium based nanomaterials are widely employed as the catalysts. Recently, shape-control of the nanoparticles has become an imperative task due to the fact that most of the reactions in fuel cells are sensitive to the surface structure of the catalysts. Though numerous studies have been conducted in past to elucidate the catalytic activity on the nanomaterials with different shapes, the results are inconclusive. Herein, systematic comparison of catalytic activity toward methanol and formic acid oxidation on shape-controlled cubic platinum-based alloy nanoparticles with different alloy element are reported in this dissertation. Methanol and formic acid oxidation reactions on spherical and cubic Pt-Cu nanoparticles are also studied. Cu-Pd nanoparticles are synthesized through galvanic redox reactions to provide significantly higher and much more stable formic acid oxidation activities. Interparticle distance effect is investigated on two dimensional nanoparticle array electrodes with controlled particle size, which is ideal model system for exploring the interparticle distance effects on the voltammetric behavior and reaction mechanisms.

  9. Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Biosensors and Bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guodong; Mao, Xun; Gurung, Anant; Baloda, Meenu; Lin, Yuehe; He, Yuqing

    2010-08-31

    This book chapter summarizes the recent advance in nanomaterials for electrochemical biosensors and bioassays. Biofunctionalization of nanomaterials for biosensors fabrication and their biomedical applications are discussed.

  10. Nanomaterials design and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Balbuena, Perla

    2006-01-01

    Over the past few decades, several approaches have been developed for designing nano-structured or molecularly-structured materials. These advances have revolutionized practically all fields of science and engineering, providing an additional design variable, the feature size of the nano-structures, which can be tailored to provide new materials with very special characteristics. Nanomaterials: Design and Simulation explores the role that such advances have made toward a rational design of nanostructures and covers a variety of methods from ab initio electronic structure techniques, ab initio

  11. Nanomaterials in catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Serp, Philippe; Somorjai, Gabor A; Chaudret, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Nanocatalysis has emerged as a field at the interface between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis and offers unique solutions to the demanding requirements for catalyst improvement. Heterogeneous catalysis represents one of the oldest commercial applications of nanoscience and nanoparticles of metals, semiconductors, oxides, and other compounds have been widely used for important chemical reactions. The main focus of this fi eld is the development of well-defined catalysts, which may include both metal nanoparticles and a nanomaterial as the support. These nanocatalysts should display the

  12. Nanomaterials for biosensing applications: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Michael; Le Goff, Alan; Cosnier, Serge

    2014-08-01

    A biosensor device is defined by its biological, or bioinspired receptor unit with unique specificities towards corresponding analytes. These analytes are often of biological origin like DNAs or proteins from the immune system (antibodies, antigens) of diseases or infections. Such analytes can also be simple molecules like glucose or pollutants when a biological receptor unit with particular specificity is available. One of many other challenges in biosensor development is the efficient signal capture of the biological recognition event (transduction). Such transducers translate the interaction of the analyte with the biological element into electrochemical, electrochemiluminescent, magnetic, gravimetric, or optical signals. In order to increase sensitivities and to lower detection limits down to even individual molecules, nanomaterials are promising candidates due to the possibility to immobilize an enhanced quantity of bioreceptor units at reduced volumes and even to act itself as transduction element. Among such nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles, semi-conductor quantum dots, polymer nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and graphene are intensively studied. Due to the vast evolution of this research field, this review summarizes in a non-exhaustive way the advantages of nanomaterials by focusing on nano-objects which provide further beneficial properties than “just” an enhanced surface area.

  13. Nanomaterials for biosensing applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eHolzinger

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor device is defined by its biological, or bioinspired receptor unit with unique specificities towards corresponding analytes. These analytes are often of biological origin like DNAs or proteins from the immune system (antibodies, antigens of diseases or infections. Such analytes can also be simple molecules like glucose or pollutants when a biological receptor unit with particular specificity is available. One of many other challenges in biosensor development is the efficient signal capture of the biological recognition event (transduction. Such transducers translate the interaction of the analyte with the biological element into electrochemical, electrochemiluminescent, magnetic, gravimetric, or optical signals. In order to increase sensitivities and to lower detection limits down to even individual molecules, nanomaterials are promising candidates due to the possibility to immobilize an enhanced quantity of bioreceptor units at reduced volumes and even to act itself as transduction element. Among such nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles, semi-conductor quantum dots, polymer nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and graphene are intensively studied. Due to the vast evolution of this research field, this review summarizes in a non-exhaustive way the advantages of nanomaterials by focusing on nano-objects which provide further beneficial properties than just an enhanced surface area.

  14. Nanomaterials for Hydrogen Storage Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael U. Niemann

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials have attracted great interest in recent years because of the unusual mechanical, electrical, electronic, optical, magnetic and surface properties. The high surface/volume ratio of these materials has significant implications with respect to energy storage. Both the high surface area and the opportunity for nanomaterial consolidation are key attributes of this new class of materials for hydrogen storage devices. Nanostructured systems including carbon nanotubes, nano-magnesium based hydrides, complex hydride/carbon nanocomposites, boron nitride nanotubes, TiS2/MoS2 nanotubes, alanates, polymer nanocomposites, and metal organic frameworks are considered to be potential candidates for storing large quantities of hydrogen. Recent investigations have shown that nanoscale materials may offer advantages if certain physical and chemical effects related to the nanoscale can be used efficiently. The present review focuses the application of nanostructured materials for storing atomic or molecular hydrogen. The synergistic effects of nanocrystalinity and nanocatalyst doping on the metal or complex hydrides for improving the thermodynamics and hydrogen reaction kinetics are discussed. In addition, various carbonaceous nanomaterials and novel sorbent systems (e.g. carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, nanofibers, polyaniline nanospheres and metal organic frameworks etc. and their hydrogen storage characteristics are outlined.

  15. Environmental effects of engineered nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützhøft, Hans-Christian Holten; Hartmann, Nanna B.; Brinch, Anna

    assessment of the environmental risk of nanomaterials in Denmark. The nine investigated nanomaterials are: Titanium Dioxide, Zinc Oxide, Silver, Carbon Nanotubes, Copper Oxide, Nano Zero Valent Iron, Cerium Dioxide, Quantum Dots and Carbon Black. To support the assessment of the data found in the peer...

  16. Greener production of nanomaterials and their applications in catalysis and environmental remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metal nanomaterials have attracted considerable attention because of their unique magnetic, optical, electrical, and catalytic properties and their potential applications in nanoelectronics. There is great interest in synthesizing metal nanoparticles due to their extraordinary pr...

  17. Carbon Nanomaterials as Antibacterial Colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Maas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials like graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes and the various forms of diamond have attracted great attention for their vast potential regarding applications in electrical engineering and as biomaterials. The study of the antibacterial properties of carbon nanomaterials provides fundamental information on the possible toxicity and environmental impact of these materials. Furthermore, as a result of the increasing prevalence of resistant bacteria strains, the development of novel antibacterial materials is of great importance. This article reviews current research efforts on characterizing the antibacterial activity of carbon nanomaterials from the perspective of colloid and interface science. Building on these fundamental findings, recent functionalization strategies for enhancing the antibacterial effect of carbon nanomaterials are described. The review concludes with a comprehensive outlook that summarizes the most important discoveries and trends regarding antibacterial carbon nanomaterials.

  18. Nanomaterials promise better bone repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifei Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials mimicking the nano-features of bones and offering unique smart functions are promising for better bone fracture repair. This review provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art research in developing and using nanomaterials for better bone fracture repair. This review begins with a brief introduction of bone fracture repair processes, then discusses the importance of vascularization, the role of growth factors in bone fracture repair, and the failure of bone fracture repair. Next, the review discusses the applications of nanomaterials for bone fracture repair, with a focus on the recent breakthroughs such as nanomaterials leading to precise immobilization of growth factors at the molecular level, promoting vascularization without the use of growth factors, and re-loading therapeutic agents after implantation. The review concludes with perspectives on challenges and future directions for developing nanomaterials for improved bone fracture repair.

  19. MAPLE deposition of nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caricato, A.P., E-mail: annapaola.caricato@le.infn.it [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Arima, V.; Catalano, M. [National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Cesaria, M. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Cozzoli, P.D. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Martino, M. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Taurino, A.; Rella, R. [Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, IMM-CNR, Via Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Scarfiello, R. [National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Tunno, T. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Zacheo, A. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, Via Arnesano n. 16, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    The matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) has been recently exploited for depositing films of nanomaterials by combining the advantages of colloidal inorganic nanoparticles and laser-based techniques. MAPLE-deposition of nanomaterials meeting applicative purposes demands their peculiar properties to be taken into account while planning depositions to guarantee a congruent transfer (in terms of crystal structure and geometric features) and explain the deposition outcome. In particular, since nanofluids can enhance thermal conductivity with respect to conventional fluids, laser-induced heating can induce different ablation thermal regimes as compared to the MAPLE-treatment of soft materials. Moreover, nanoparticles exhibit lower melting temperatures and can experience pre-melting phenomena as compared to their bulk counterparts, which could easily induce shape and or crystal phase modification of the material to be deposited even at very low fluences. In this complex scenario, this review paper focuses on examples of MAPLE-depositions of size and shape controlled nanoparticles for different applications highlights advantages and challenges of the MAPLE-technique. The influence of the deposition parameters on the physical mechanisms which govern the deposition process is discussed.

  20. Enzyme-functionalized gold-coated magnetite nanoparticles as novel hybrid nanomaterials: synthesis, purification and control of enzyme function by low-frequency magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majouga, Alexander; Sokolsky-Papkov, Marina; Kuznetsov, Artem; Lebedev, Dmitry; Efremova, Maria; Beloglazkina, Elena; Rudakovskaya, Polina; Veselov, Maxim; Zyk, Nikolay; Golovin, Yuri; Klyachko, Natalia; Kabanov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of remotely inducing a defined effect on NPs by means of electromagnetic radiation appears attractive. From a practical point of view, this effect opens horizons for remote control of drug release systems, as well as modulation of biochemical functions in cells. Gold-coated magnetite nanoparticles are perfect candidates for such application. Herein, we have successfully synthesized core-shell NPs having magnetite cores and gold shells modified with various sulphur containing ligands and developed a new, simple and robust procedure for the purification of the resulting nanoparticles. The carboxylic groups displayed at the surface of the NPs were utilized for NP conjugation with a model enzyme (ChT). In the present study, we report the effect of the low-frequency AC magnetic field on the catalytic activity of the immobilized ChT. We show that the enzyme activity decreases upon exposure of the NPs to the field.

  1. (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4})-graphene oxide as a novel magnetic nanomaterial for non-enzymatic determination of phenylalanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omidinia, Eskandar, E-mail: skandar@pasteur.ac.ir [Enzyme Technology Lab., Biochemistry Department, Genetic and Metabolism Group, Pasteur Institute of Iran, P.O. Box 13164, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shadjou, Nasrin [Enzyme Technology Lab., Biochemistry Department, Genetic and Metabolism Group, Pasteur Institute of Iran, P.O. Box 13164, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hasanzadeh, Mohammad, E-mail: mhmmd_hasanzadeh@yahoo.com [Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51664 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-01

    Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-graphene oxide (GO) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode was used as a new magnetic nanosensor for determination of phenylalanine (Phe). It was found that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-GO has been stably absorbed on GC electrode modified by simple technique. The cyclic voltammograms of the modified electrode in an aqueous solution displayed a pair of well-defined, stable and irreversible reductive/oxidation redox systems. The apparent electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) and transfer coefficient (α) were determined by cyclic voltammetry and were approximately 9.3 s{sup −1} and 0.67, respectively. The modified electrode showed excellent catalytic activity towards the oxidation of Phe at an unusually positive potential in buffer solution. This nanosensor also displayed fast response time, high sensitivity, low detection limit and had a remarkably positive potential oxidation of Phe that decreased the effect of interferences in analysis. - Graphical abstract: A new magnetic electrochemical sensor based on Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-graphene oxide was constructed and applied the direct determination of phenylalanine (Phe). Cyclic voltammetric study indicated that the oxidation process is irreversible and diffusion controlled. The results show that by using the proposed method, Phe can be determined with a detection limit of 14.5 nM. - Highlights: • Electrooxidation of phenylalanine was performed using Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}-GO. • Excellent electrocatalytic activity was obtained for phenylalanine oxidation. • The response of the biosensor is linear over the entire 100–1000 nM.

  2. Radiation damage tolerant nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.J. Beyerlein

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Designing a material from the atomic level to achieve a tailored response in extreme conditions is a grand challenge in materials research. Nanostructured metals and composites provide a path to this goal because they contain interfaces that attract, absorb and annihilate point and line defects. These interfaces recover and control defects produced in materials subjected to extremes of displacement damage, impurity implantation, stress and temperature. Controlling radiation-induced-defects via interfaces is shown to be the key factor in reducing the damage and imparting stability in certain nanomaterials under conditions where bulk materials exhibit void swelling and/or embrittlement. We review the recovery of radiation-induced point defects at free surfaces and grain boundaries and stabilization of helium bubbles at interphase boundaries and present an approach for processing bulk nanocomposites containing interfaces that are stable under irradiation.

  3. Characterization Challenges for Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Donald R.; Amonette, James E.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Nurmi, James; Qiang, You; Sarathy, Vaishnavi; Seal, Sudipta; Sharma, Amit M.; Tratnyek, P. G.; Wang, Chong M.

    2008-03-10

    Nanostructured materials are increasingly subject to nearly every type of chemical and physical analysis possible. Because of their small feature size there is a significant focus on tools with high spatial resolution. Because of their high surface area, it is also natural to characterize nanomaterials using tools designed to analyze surfaces. Regardless of the approach, nanostructured materials present a variety of obstacles to adequate, useful and needed analysis. This paper provides short overviews to some of the issues and complications including: particle stability, environmental effects, specimen handling, surface coating, contamination and time. Some specific examples are provided from a our work focused on ceria nanoparticles and iron metal-core/oxide-shell nanoparticles in which we use a combination of tools for routine analysis including XPS, TEM, and XRD and apply other methods as needed to obtain essential information.

  4. Low Dimension Semiconducting Composite Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mang; CHEN Hong-zheng; SUN Jing-zhi

    2004-01-01

    Recently, low dimension nanostructures have gained considerable attention due to their technological potential as unique types of nanoscale building blocks for future optoelectronic devices and systems. Semiconducting composite nanomaterials, which can combine the advantages of two or more components, have been the focus in the area of nanomaterials synthesis and device application.In this paper, we report our work on the preparation of composite nanomaterials based on CNTs.CNTs were coated by organic or inorganic species via novel and facile methods (Fig. 1 and Fig.2).These functional CNTs based composites show eminent prospects and opportunities for new applications in a wide variation of areas.

  5. Nanomaterials for Space Exploration Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Padraig G.

    2006-01-01

    Nano-engineered materials are multi-functional materials with superior mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Nanomaterials may be used for a variety of space exploration applications, including ultracapacitors, active/passive thermal management materials, and nanofiltration for water recovery. Additional applications include electrical power/energy storage systems, hybrid systems power generation, advanced proton exchange membrane fuel cells, and air revitalization. The need for nanomaterials and their growth, characterization, processing and space exploration applications is discussed. Data is presented for developing solid-supported amine adsorbents based on carbon nanotube materials and functionalization of nanomaterials is examined.

  6. Luminescent lanthanide nanomaterials: an emerging tool for theranostic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Shashi; Jayakumar, Muthu Kumara Gnanasammandhan; Zhang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    Lanthanide materials have been gaining popularity for use in various theranostic applications, primarily due to their unique optical properties such as narrow emission bands, multiple emission wavelengths, emission tunability, long fluorescence lifetime and large Stokes shift. Apart from these, some lanthanide materials also exhibit magnetic and light-up conversion properties. Such nanomaterials have been used for a wide range of applications ranging from detection of biomarkers, in vitro and in vivo imaging to therapeutic applications. Recently, combined modalities of lanthanide nanomaterials for simultaneous detection/imaging and delivery of therapeutic agents (termed 'theranostics') have been explored. The various advantages and disadvantages of using lanthanide nanomaterials as theranostic agents and potential areas for future development have been discussed in this review.

  7. Carbon nanomaterials in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu Chun Ke [Laboratory of Single-Molecule Biophysics and Polymer Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Qiao Rui [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2007-09-19

    This paper intends to reflect, from the biophysical viewpoint, our current understanding on interfacing nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes and fullerenes, with biological systems. Strategies for improving the solubility, and therefore, the bioavailability of nanomaterials in aqueous solutions are summarized. In particular, the underlining mechanisms of attaching biomacromolecules (DNA, RNA, proteins) and lysophospholipids onto carbon nanotubes and gallic acids onto fullerenes are analyzed. The diffusion and the cellular delivery of RNA-coated carbon nanotubes are characterized using fluorescence microscopy. The translocation of fullerenes across cell membranes is simulated using molecular dynamics to offer new insight into the complex issue of nanotoxicity. To assess the fate of nanomaterials in the environment, the biomodification of lipid-coated carbon nanotubes by the aquatic organism Daphnia magna is discussed. The aim of this paper is to illuminate the need for adopting multidisciplinary approaches in the field study of nanomaterials in biological systems and in the environment. (topical review)

  8. Regional Knowledge Production in Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimpe, Christoph; Patuelli, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Nanomaterials are seen as a key technology for the twenty-first century, and much is expected of them in terms of innovation and economic growth. They could open the way to many radically new applications, which would form the basis of innovative products. As nanomaterials are still...... distance being detrimental to the extent that spillovers can be realised. Due to the technological complexity, however, proximity could also be less important as relevant nanomaterials research is globally dispersed. Hence in this paper, we analyse the effects of co-location of R&D activities...... on nanomaterial patenting. Based on European Patent Office data at the German district level (NUTS-3), we estimate two negative binomial models in a knowledge production function framework and include a spatial filtering approach to adjust for spatial autocorrelation. Our results indicate...

  9. Nanomaterials for membranes and catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Nassos, Stylianos

    2005-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a relatively new research topic that attracts increasing interest from scientists and engineers all over the world, due to its novel applications. The use of nanomaterials has extended to a broad range of applications, for example chemical synthesis, microporous media synthesis and catalytic combustion, contributing to achievement of improved or promising results. Microemulsion (ME) is considered a powerful tool for synthesis of nanomaterials, due to its unique properties. T...

  10. Nanomaterials promise better bone repair

    OpenAIRE

    Qifei Wang; Jianhua Yan; Junlin Yang; Bingyun Li

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials mimicking the nano-features of bones and offering unique smart functions are promising for better bone fracture repair. This review provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art research in developing and using nanomaterials for better bone fracture repair. This review begins with a brief introduction of bone fracture repair processes, then discusses the importance of vascularization, the role of growth factors in bone fracture repair, and the failure of bone fracture rep...

  11. Applied spectroscopy and the science of nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on several areas of intense topical interest related to applied spectroscopy and the science of nanomaterials. The eleven chapters in the book cover the following areas of interest relating to applied spectroscopy and nanoscience: ·         Raman spectroscopic characterization, modeling and simulation studies of carbon nanotubes, ·         Characterization of plasma discharges using laser optogalvanic spectroscopy, ·         Fluorescence anisotropy in understanding protein conformational disorder and aggregation, ·         Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in nanomedicine, ·         Calculation of Van der Waals interactions at the nanoscale, ·         Theory and simulation associated with adsorption of gases in nanomaterials, ·         Atom-precise metal nanoclusters, ·         Plasmonic properties of metallic nanostructures, two-dimensional materials, and their composites, ·         Applications of graphe...

  12. Nanomaterials for optical data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Min; Zhang, Qiming; Lamon, Simone

    2016-12-01

    The growing amount of data that is generated every year creates an urgent need for new and improved data storage methods. Nanomaterials, which have unique mechanical, electronic and optical properties owing to the strong confinement of electrons, photons and phonons at the nanoscale, are enabling the development of disruptive methods for optical data storage with ultra-high capacity, ultra-long lifetime and ultra-low energy consumption. In this Review, we survey recent advancements in nanomaterials technology towards the next generation of optical data storage systems, focusing on metallic nanoparticles, graphene and graphene oxide, semiconductor quantum dots and rare-earth-doped nanocrystals. We conclude by discussing the use of nanomaterials in data storage systems that do not rely on optical mechanisms and by surveying the future prospects for the field.

  13. Nanomaterials: Regulation and Risk Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Grieger, Khara Deanne; Baun, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The topics of regulation and risk assessment of nanomaterials have never been more relevant and controversial in Europe than they are at this point in time. In this entry, we present and discuss a number of major pieces of legislation relevant for the regulation of nanomaterials, including REACH...... Regulation. Chemical risk assessment provides a fundamental element in support of existing legislation. Risk assessment is normally said to consist of four elements, i.e., hazard identification, dose–response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Each of these four elements hold......, the Water Framework Directive, pharmaceuticals regulation, and the Novel Foods Regulation. Current regulation of nanomaterials entail three overall challenges: 1) limitations in regard to terminology and definitions of key terms such as a “substance,” “novel food,” etc.; 2) safety assessment requirements...

  14. Nanomaterials, Autophagy, and Lupus Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Alberto; Muller, Sylviane

    2016-01-19

    Nanoscale materials hold great promise in the therapeutic field. In particular, as carriers or vectors, they help bioactive molecules reach their primary targets. Furthermore, by themselves, certain nanomaterials-regarded as protective-can modulate particular metabolic pathways that are deregulated in pathological situations. They can also synergistically improve the effects of a payload drug. These properties are the basis of their appeal. However, nanoscale materials can also have intrinsic properties that limit their use, and this is the case for certain types of nanomaterials that influence autophagy. This property can be beneficial in some pathological settings, but in others, if the autophagic flux is already accelerated, it can be deleterious. This is notably the case for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other chronic inflammatory diseases, including certain neurological diseases. The nanomaterial-autophagy interaction therefore must be treated with caution for therapeutic molecules and peptides that require vectorization for their administration.

  15. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-08-19

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  16. The nanomaterial toolkit for neuroengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shreyas

    2016-10-01

    There is a growing interest in developing effective tools to better probe the central nervous system (CNS), to understand how it works and to treat neural diseases, injuries and cancer. The intrinsic complexity of the CNS has made this a challenging task for decades. Yet, with the extraordinary recent advances in nanotechnology and nanoscience, there is a general consensus on the immense value and potential of nanoscale tools for engineering neural systems. In this review, an overview of specialized nanomaterials which have proven to be the most effective tools in neuroscience is provided. After a brief background on the prominent challenges in the field, a variety of organic and inorganic-based nanomaterials are described, with particular emphasis on the distinctive properties that make them versatile and highly suitable in the context of the CNS. Building on this robust nano-inspired foundation, the rational design and application of nanomaterials can enable the generation of new methodologies to greatly advance the neuroscience frontier.

  17. Engineered Nanomaterials Elicit Cellular Stress Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineered nanomaterials are being developed continuously and incorporated into consumer products, resulting in increased human exposures. The study of engineered nanomaterials has focused largely on toxicity endpoints without further investigating potential mechanisms or pathway...

  18. Environmental assessment of nanomaterial use in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjølholt, Jesper; Gottschalk, Fadri; Brinch, Anna

    This is the concluding report of the project "Nanomaterials – occurrence and effects in the Danish environment" (abbreviated NanoDEN), which part the Danish Government's initiative "Better Control of Nanomaterials" (“Bedre styr på nanomaterialer”) which is administered by the Danish Environmental...... to an overall assessment of nanomaterials risk to the environment in Denmark. The nine investigated nanomaterials are: Titanium Dioxide, Zinc Oxide, Silver, Carbon Nanotubes, Copper Oxide, Zero Valent Iron, Cerium Dioxide, Quantum Dots and Carbon Black....

  19. Carbon nanomaterials for gas adsorption

    CERN Document Server

    Terranova, Maria Letizia

    2012-01-01

    Research in adsorption of gases by carbon nanomaterials has experienced considerable growth in recent years, with increasing interest for practical applications. Many research groups are now producing or using such materials for gas adsorption, storage, purification, and sensing. This book provides a selected overview of some of the most interesting scientific results regarding the outstanding properties of carbon nanomaterials for gas adsorption and of interest both for basic research and technological applications. Topics receiving special attention in this book include storage of H, purific

  20. Nanomaterials under high-pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2006-10-01

    The use of high-pressure for the study and elaboration of homogeneous nanostructures is critically reviewed. Size effects, the interaction between nanostructures and guest species or the interaction of the nanosystem with the pressure transmitting medium are emphasized. Phase diagrams and the possibilities opened by the combination of pressure and temperature for the elaboration of new nanomaterials is underlined through the examination of three different systems: nanocrystals, nano-cage materials which include fullerites and group-14 clathrates, and single wall nanotubes. This tutorial review is addressed to scientist seeking an introduction or a panoramic view of the study of nanomaterials under high-pressure.

  1. Adsorption, desorption, and film formation of quinacridone and its thermal cracking product indigo on clean and carbon-covered silicon dioxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherwitzl, Boris; Lassnig, Roman; Truger, Magdalena; Resel, Roland; Leising, Günther; Winkler, Adolf

    2016-09-01

    The evaporation of quinacridone from a stainless steel Knudsen cell leads to the partial decomposition of this molecule in the cell, due to its comparably high sublimation temperature. At least one additional type of molecules, namely indigo, could be detected in the effusion flux. Thermal desorption spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy have been used to study the co-deposition of these molecules on sputter-cleaned and carbon-covered silicon dioxide surfaces. Desorption of indigo appears at temperatures of about 400 K, while quinacridone desorbs at around 510 K. For quinacridone, a desorption energy of 2.1 eV and a frequency factor for desorption of 1 × 1019 s-1 were calculated, which in this magnitude is typical for large organic molecules. A fraction of the adsorbed quinacridone molecules (˜5%) decomposes during heating, nearly independent of the adsorbed amount, resulting in a surface composed of small carbon islands. The sticking coefficients of indigo and quinacridone were found to be close to unity on a carbon covered SiO2 surface but significantly smaller on a sputter-cleaned substrate. The reason for the latter can be attributed to insufficient energy dissipation for unfavorably oriented impinging molecules. However, due to adsorption via a hot-precursor state, the sticking probability is increased on the surface covered with carbon islands, which act as accommodation centers.

  2. TiO2 Nanocatalysts Supported on a Hybrid Carbon-Covered Alumina Support: Comparison between Visible Light and UV Light Degradation of Rhodamine B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mphilisi M. Mahlambi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Titania nanoparticles were successfully supported on carbon-covered alumina (CCA supports via the impregnation method to form carbon-covered alumna titania (CCA/TiO2. The CCA supports were synthesised through an equilibrium adsorption of toluene 2,4-diisocyante where the N=C=O irreversibly adsorbs on the alumina and pyrolysis at 700°C affords CCA supports. These CCA/TiO2 nanocatalysts were tested for their photocatalytic activity both under UV and visible light using Rhodamine B as a model pollutant. The reaction rate constant of the CCA/TiO2 was found to be higher than that of unsupported titania and the reaction kinetics were found to follow an apparent first-order rate law. The CCA/TiO2 nanocatalysts had a much larger surface area than the unsupported titania and they exhibited overall higher photodegradation efficiency under both UV and visible light than unsupported TiO2.

  3. Lanthanide-doped hollow nanomaterials as theranostic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xiaojiao; Li, Chunxia; Cheng, Ziyong; Ma, Ping'an; Hou, Zhiyao; Lin, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The field of theranostics has sprung up to achieve personalized medicine. The theranostics fuses diagnostic and therapeutic functions, empowering early diagnosis, targeted drug delivery, and real-time monitoring of treatment effect into one step. One particularly attractive class of nanomaterials for theranostic application is lanthanide-doped hollow nanomaterials (LDHNs). Because of the existence of lanthanide ions, LDHNs show outstanding fluorescent and paramagnetic properties, enabling them to be used as multimodal bioimaging agents. Synchronously, the huge interior cavities of LDHNs are able to be applied as efficacious tools for storage and delivery of therapeutic agents. The LDHNs can be divided into two types based on difference of component: single-phase lanthanide-doped hollow nanomaterials and lanthanide-doped hollow nanocomposites. We describe the synthesis of first kind of nanomaterials by use of hard template, soft template, template-free, and self-sacrificing template method. For lanthanide-doped hollow nanocomposites, we divide the preparation strategies into three kinds (one-step, two-step, and multistep method) according to the synthetic procedures. Furthermore, we also illustrate the potential bioapplications of these LDHNs, including biodetection, imaging (fluorescent imaging and magnetic resonance imaging), drug/gene delivery, and other therapeutic applications.

  4. Raman spectroscopy for nanomaterials characterization

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    First volume of a 40-volume series on nanoscience and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of nanomaterials. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry.

  5. Computational design of safer nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burello, E.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are expected to find applications in numerous consumer products, posing the challenge to guarantee their safety and environmental sustainability before they can be transferred from research labs to end-consumer products. One emerging solution, called safe design, relies on the implemen

  6. Mechanical-Electric-Magnetic-Thermal-Fluid Coupling Behavior and Device Principle of Low-Dimensional Functional Nanomaterials%低维纳米功能材料力-电-磁-热-流耦合特性与器件原理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭万林; 王琴

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale materials and devices are distinctly different in both properties and functions from their macroscopic counterparts. Having an insight into their exceptional properties and functions are crucial for innovative nanotechnology. In this paper, based on our experience for ten years physical mechanics study on the coupling between external fields and the intrinsic local fields of low-dimensional functional nanomaterials, we review the advance in our understanding of the mechanical-electric-magnetic-thermal-fluid coupling and physical mechanical behaviors in functional nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, boron nitride and ZnO nanostructures and so on. A brief perspective on the development and potential applications of functional nanomaterials and devices is finally provided.%在纳尺度,材料和器件具有与宏观材料和器件迥然不同的奇异特性,掌握其规律是实现纳米技术创新的关键.本文结合近十年关于低维纳米功能材料局域场与外场耦合和物理力学行为的研究,介绍评述碳纳米管、石墨烯、氮化硼、氧化锌等低维纳米功能材料的力-电-磁-热-流耦合特性和物理力学行为的研究进展,并展望基于这类特殊性能的新型纳米器件的发展前景.

  7. Engineering Nanomaterial Surfaces for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Li-Hong; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials, possessing unique physical and chemical properties, have attracted much interest and generated wide varieties of applications. Recent investigations of functionalized nanomaterials have expanded into the biological area, providing a versatile platform in biomedical applications such as biomolecular sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and disease therapy. Bio-functions and bio-compatibility of nanomaterials are realized by introducing synthetic ligands or natural biomolecules onto nanomaterials, and combining ligand-receptor biological interactions with intrinsic nanomaterial properties. Common strategies of engineering nanomaterial surfaces involve physisorption or chemisorption of desired ligands. We developed a photochemically initiated surface coupling chemistry, bringing versatility and simplicity to nanomaterial functionalization. The method was applied to attach underivatized carbohydrates efficiently on gold and iron oxide nanoparticles, and the resulting glyconanoparticles were successfully used as a sensitive biosensing system probing specific interactions between carbohydrates and proteins as well as bacteria. PMID:19596820

  8. Cellulose nanomaterials in water treatment technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; de Lannoy, Charles-François; Wiesner, Mark R

    2015-05-05

    Cellulose nanomaterials are naturally occurring with unique structural, mechanical and optical properties. While the paper and packaging, automotive, personal care, construction, and textiles industries have recognized cellulose nanomaterials' potential, we suggest cellulose nanomaterials have great untapped potential in water treatment technologies. In this review, we gather evidence of cellulose nanomaterials' beneficial role in environmental remediation and membranes for water filtration, including their high surface area-to-volume ratio, low environmental impact, high strength, functionalizability, and sustainability. We make direct comparison between cellulose nanomaterials and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in terms of physical and chemical properties, production costs, use and disposal in order to show the potential of cellulose nanomaterials as a sustainable replacement for CNTs in water treatment technologies. Finally, we comment on the need for improved communication and collaboration across the myriad industries invested in cellulose nanomaterials production and development to achieve an efficient means to commercialization.

  9. Engineering nanomaterial surfaces for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Liu, Li-Hong; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2009-10-01

    Nanomaterials, possessing unique physical and chemical properties, have attracted much interest and generated wide varieties of applications. Recent investigations of functionalized nanomaterials have expanded into the biological area, providing a versatile platform in biomedical applications such as biomolecular sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and disease therapy. Bio-functions and bio-compatibility of nanomaterials are realized by introducing synthetic ligands or natural biomolecules onto nanomaterials, and combining ligand-receptor biological interactions with intrinsic nanomaterial properties. Common strategies of engineering nanomaterial surfaces involve physisorption or chemisorption of desired ligands. We developed a photochemically initiated surface coupling chemistry, bringing versatility and simplicity to nanomaterial functionalization. The method was applied to attach underivatized carbohydrates efficiently on gold and iron oxide nanoparticles, and the resulting glyconanoparticles were successfully used as a sensitive biosensing system probing specific interactions between carbohydrates and proteins as well as bacteria.

  10. Theranostic applications of carbon nanomaterials in cancer: Focus on imaging and cargo delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daiqin; Dougherty, Casey A; Zhu, Kaicheng; Hong, Hao

    2015-07-28

    Carbon based nanomaterials have attracted significant attention over the past decades due to their unique physical properties, versatile functionalization chemistry, and biological compatibility. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art applications of carbon nanomaterials in cancer imaging and drug delivery/therapy. The carbon nanomaterials will be categorized into fullerenes, nanotubes, nanohorns, nanodiamonds, nanodots and graphene derivatives based on their morphologies. The chemical conjugation/functionalization strategies of each category will be introduced before focusing on their applications in cancer imaging (fluorescence/bioluminescence, magnetic resonance (MR), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), photoacoustic, Raman imaging, etc.) and cargo (chemo/gene/therapy) delivery. The advantages and limitations of each category and the potential clinical utilization of these carbon nanomaterials will be discussed. Multifunctional carbon nanoplatforms have the potential to serve as optimal candidates for image-guided delivery vectors for cancer.

  11. Electrospun nanomaterials for ultrasensitive sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Ding

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demands for ever more sensitive sensors for global environmental monitoring, food inspection and medical diagnostics have led to an upsurge of interests in nanostructured materials such as nanofibers and nanowebs. Electrospinning exhibits the unique ability to produce diverse forms of fibrous assemblies. The remarkable specific surface area and high porosity bring electrospun nanomaterials highly attractive to ultrasensitive sensors and increasing importance in other nanotechnological applications. In this review, we summarize recent progress in developments of the electrospun nanomaterials with applications in some predominant sensing approaches such as acoustic wave, resistive, photoelectric, optical, amperometric, and so on, illustrate with examples how they work, and discuss their intrinsic fundamentals and optimization designs. We are expecting the review to pave the way for developing more sensitive and selective nanosensors.

  12. Editorial: Nanomaterials at the Biointerface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Ping (Gordon Xu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bioapplication of nanomaterials involves several key processes that occurat the biointerface, such as internalization of nanoparticles by various cells, attachment of nanomaterials onto the bacteria to form granulates, and penetration of nutrient elements on the leaf surface from the nutrient reservoir – nanocrystals. This special issue therefore presents the most recent research development of nanomaterials at the biointerface, as summarized by a multidisciplinary team of international experts in these broad fields. Biomedical applications of various nanomaterials are intensively investigated in the recent decades. For example, many efforts have been made to develop functional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs to enhance the biocompatibility, drug loading efficacy, drug delivery efficiency, drug control releaseproperties and cancer treatment effectiveness. In this issue, Zhang et al. (Tianjin University, China [1]briefly review the recent progresses in this particular area. Another example is utilization of nanoparticles as biomarkers. So this special issue also includes a mini-review paper by Centeno and Xie (University Technology Malaysia [2] thatconcisely presents the principle and simulation results of dye molecules’ fluorescence enhancement by the nearby nanostructured metals through their coupling effect. Nanomaterials can alsobe used as effective antimicrobial agents. For example, Liu et al. (Curtin University of Technology, Australia [3] briefly review the recent progress of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, andin particular, their efforts to modify AgNPs by conjugating antimicrobial cell penetration peptide to selectively bind to microorganism and improve the therapeutic index. More interestingly, nanomaterialsare increasingly investigated as effective foliar fertilizers to provide micronutrient elements for a longer term. This particularly takes the advantage of nanocrystals’sheet-like morphology as sheet-like crystals have the

  13. Final Report: "Energetics of Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navrotsky, Alexandra [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Ross, Nancy [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Woodfield, Brian [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    2015-02-14

    Nanomaterials, solids with very small particle size, form the basis of new technologies that are revolutionizing fields such as energy, lighting, electronics, medical diagnostics, and drug delivery. These nanoparticles are different from conventional bulk materials in many ways we do not yet fully understand. This project focused on their structure and thermodynamics and emphasized the role of water in nanoparticle surfaces. Using a unique and synergistic combination of high-tech techniques—namely oxide melt solution calorimetry, cryogenic heat capacity measurements, and inelastic neutron scattering—this work has identified differences in structure, thermodynamic stability, and water behavior on nanoparticles as a function of composition and particle size. The systematics obtained increase the fundamental understanding needed to synthesize, retain, and apply these technologically important nanomaterials and to predict and tailor new materials for enhanced functionality, eventually leading to a more sustainable way of life.

  14. Introduction to nanoscience and nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Dinesh C

    2013-01-01

    This textbook is aimed primarily at the senior undergraduate and first year graduate students from the various engineering and sciences departments including physics, chemistry, materials engineering, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, bioengineering, and biology. Researchers in the areas of nanomaterials and nanoscience will also find the book useful for building the background necessary to understand the current literature and as a reference book. The text assumes only a basic level of competency in physics, chemistry and mathematics. Some of the background material and introductory matter are included in the first few chapters and as appendices. Although this material may be familiar to some of the students, it is the author's experience after teaching such a course for many years that this can not be taken for granted and moreover, serves as a ready reference to understand the text. As the area of nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanomaterials is a fast developing one, a...

  15. Pathophysiologic mechanisms of biomedical nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liming; Chen, Chunying

    2016-05-15

    Nanomaterials (NMs) have been widespread used in biomedical fields, daily consuming, and even food industry. It is crucial to understand the safety and biomedical efficacy of NMs. In this review, we summarized the recent progress about the physiological and pathological effects of NMs from several levels: protein-nano interface, NM-subcellular structures, and cell-cell interaction. We focused on the detailed information of nano-bio interaction, especially about protein adsorption, intracellular trafficking, biological barriers, and signaling pathways as well as the associated mechanism mediated by nanomaterials. We also introduced related analytical methods that are meaningful and helpful for biomedical effect studies in the future. We believe that knowledge about pathophysiologic effects of NMs is not only significant for rational design of medical NMs but also helps predict their safety and further improve their applications in the future.

  16. Final Report: "Energetics of Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navrotsky, Alexandra [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Ross, Nancy [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Woodfield, Brian [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    2015-02-14

    Nanomaterials, solids with very small particle size, form the basis of new technologies that are revolutionizing fields such as energy, lighting, electronics, medical diagnostics, and drug delivery. These nanoparticles are different from conventional bulk materials in many ways we do not yet fully understand. This project focused on their structure and thermodynamics and emphasized the role of water in nanoparticle surfaces. Using a unique and synergistic combination of high-tech techniques—namely oxide melt solution calorimetry, cryogenic heat capacity measurements, and inelastic neutron scattering—this work has identified differences in structure, thermodynamic stability, and water behavior on nanoparticles as a function of composition and particle size. The systematics obtained increase the fundamental understanding needed to synthesize, retain, and apply these technologically important nanomaterials and to predict and tailor new materials for enhanced functionality, eventually leading to a more sustainable way of life. Highlights are reported on the following topics: surface energies, thermochemistry of nanoparticles, and changes in stability at the nanoscale; heat capacity models and the gapped phonon spectrum; control of pore structure, acid sites, and thermal stability in synthetic γ-aluminas; the lattice contribution is the same for bulk and nanomaterials; and inelastic neutron scattering studies of water on nanoparticle surfaces.

  17. Ecofriendly Application of Nanomaterials: Nanobioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rizwan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials exhibit unique physical and chemical properties and, hence, they have received much attention from scientists and researchers in different areas of environmental sciences, specifically in bioremediation. Bioremediation provides a good clean-up strategy for some types of waste, but as it is expected, it will not be useful for all. For example, bioremediation may not provide a feasible strategy at sites with high concentrations of chemicals that are toxic to most microorganisms. These include heavy metals and salt. Further, the advancement in science and technology has increased standard of living which directly or indirectly contributes to the increase in waste and toxic material. Therefore, the remediation of contaminants by use of existing technology is not effective and efficient in cleaning up the environment. Hence, nanomaterials may be applied for bioremediation, which will not only have less toxic effect on microorganisms, but will also improve the microbial activity of the specific waste and toxic material which will reduce the overall time consumption as well as reduce the overall cost. In this paper we have briefly summarized the major types of nanomaterials that have been used so far in bioremediation of waste and toxic materials.

  18. Stabilization of Soft Soil Using Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid Hameed Majeed

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tests were conducted to investigate the influence of using nanomaterials in the modification and stabilization of soft soil. The soft soils were collected from two sites and treated with three nanomaterial types (nano-copper, nano-clay and nano-magnesium. Nanomaterials were added in small amount (≤1.0% by dry weight of the soil. Laboratory tests to determine the Atterberg limits, linear shrinkage, compaction characteristics and unconfined compressive strength were performed. Results of the investigation showed significant improvement in maximum dry density, plasticity index, linear shrinkage and unconfined compressive strength. The improvement is dependent on the type of nanomaterials. The unconfined compressive strength and maximum dry density increased as the nanomaterials content increased until reach a percentage after which the strength will be decrease. Thus, the addition of finer particles such as nanomaterials, even at low doses, could enhance the properties of soil.

  19. Toxicity of nanomaterials; an undermined issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogharabi, Mehdi; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali

    2014-08-15

    Nanomaterials are employed in extensive variety of commercial products such as electronic components, cosmetics, food, sports equipment, biomedical applications, and medicine. With the increasing utilization of engineered nanomaterials, the potential exposure of human to nanoparticles is rapidly increasing. Nowadays when new nanomaterials with new applications are introduced, mostly good and positive effects are mentioned whereas possible hazards arising from nanosize of the compounds are undermined. Toxicology studies of nanomaterials demonstrate some adverse effects in some human organs such as central nerve system, immune system, and lung. There is lack of complete information about human toxicity and environmental waste of nanomaterials. We aimed to highlight current toxicological concerns of potentially useful nanomaterials which are now used in pharmaceutical and biomedical sciences.

  20. Stabilization of Soft Soil Using Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Zaid Hameed Majeed; Mohd Raihan Taha; Ibtehaj Taha Jawad

    2014-01-01

    Tests were conducted to investigate the influence of using nanomaterials in the modification and stabilization of soft soil. The soft soils were collected from two sites and treated with three nanomaterial types (nano-copper, nano-clay and nano-magnesium). Nanomaterials were added in small amount (≤1.0%) by dry weight of the soil. Laboratory tests to determine the Atterberg limits, linear shrinkage, compaction characteristics and unconfined compressive strength were performed. Results of the ...

  1. FORMING AND PRECISION MACHINING TO NANOMATERIALS LUMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan Jie; Zhang Jin; Chen Bingkui; Chen Xiaoan

    2004-01-01

    The technology of forming and machining lump nano-materials has been investigated. Grinding, abrasive machining test has been conducted to Fe, Co, Ni and Al lump nano-materials. Experiments have been done to measure grinding force, grinding thermal, machining roughness and micro-hardness. Image analysis is carried out by metallographic and scanning tunnel microscopic microscope. Researches provide the basis data for forming and machining lump nano-materials.

  2. Nano-material and method of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchhofer, Paul A; Seals, Roland D; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-02-03

    A fluffy nano-material and method of manufacture are described. At 2000.times. magnification the fluffy nanomaterial has the appearance of raw, uncarded wool, with individual fiber lengths ranging from approximately four microns to twenty microns. Powder-based nanocatalysts are dispersed in the fluffy nanomaterial. The production of fluffy nanomaterial typically involves flowing about 125 cc/min of organic vapor at a pressure of about 400 torr over powder-based nano-catalysts for a period of time that may range from approximately thirty minutes to twenty-four hours.

  3. 78 FR 36784 - Survey of Nanomaterial Risk Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-19

    ... practices for safe handling of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in the workplace. Information collected from... Safe Nanotechnology: Managing the Health and Safety Concerns Associated with Engineered Nanomaterials... With Engineered Nanomaterials in Research Laboratories'' (...

  4. Insights into biogenic and chemical production of inorganic nanomaterials and nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Sadighi, Armin

    2013-03-01

    The synthesis of inorganic nanomaterials and nanostructures by the means of diverse physical, chemical, and biological principles has been developed in recent decades. The nanoscale materials and structures creation continue to be an active area of researches due to the exciting properties of the resulting nanomaterials and their innovative applications. Despite physical and chemical approaches which have been used for a long time to produce nanomaterials, biological resources as green candidates that can replace old production methods have been focused in recent years to generate various inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) or other nanoscale structures. Cost-effective, eco-friendly, energy efficient, and nontoxic produced nanomaterials using diverse biological entities have been received increasing attention in the last two decades in contrast to physical and chemical methods owe using toxic solvents, generate unwanted by-products, and high energy consumption which restrict the popularity of these ways employed in nanometric science and engineering. In this review, the biosynthesis of gold, silver, gold-silver alloy, magnetic, semiconductor nanocrystals, silica, zirconia, titania, palladium, bismuth, selenium, antimony sulfide, and platinum NPs, using bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi, yeasts, plant extracts and also informational bio-macromolecules including proteins, polypeptides, DNA, and RNA have been reported extensively to mention the current status of the biological inorganic nanomaterial production. In other hand, two well-known wet chemical techniques, namely chemical reduction and sol-gel methods, used to produce various types of nanocrystalline powders, metal oxides, and hybrid organic-inorganic nanomaterials have presented.

  5. Application of dental nanomaterials: potential toxicity to the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoli; Chen, Aijie; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Jianfeng; Shao, Longquan; Wei, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are defined as materials with one or more external dimensions with a size of 1-100 nm. Such materials possess typical nanostructure-dependent properties (eg, chemical, biological, optical, mechanical, and magnetic), which may differ greatly from the properties of their bulk counterparts. In recent years, nanomaterials have been widely used in the production of dental materials, particularly in light polymerization composite resins and bonding systems, coating materials for dental implants, bioceramics, endodontic sealers, and mouthwashes. However, the dental applications of nanomaterials yield not only a significant improvement in clinical treatments but also growing concerns regarding their biosecurity. The brain is well protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which separates the blood from the cerebral parenchyma. However, in recent years, many studies have found that nanoparticles (NPs), including nanocarriers, can transport through the BBB and locate in the central nervous system (CNS). Because the CNS may be a potential target organ of the nanomaterials, it is essential to determine the neurotoxic effects of NPs. In this review, possible dental nanomaterials and their pathways into the CNS are discussed, as well as related neurotoxicity effects underlying the in vitro and in vivo studies. Finally, we analyze the limitations of the current testing methods on the toxicological effects of nanomaterials. This review contributes to a better understanding of the nano-related risks to the CNS as well as the further development of safety assessment systems.

  6. Focus on the nanomaterial-based biosensor papers in Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry of the year 2010

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xia; MA LiNa; WANG ZhenXin

    2011-01-01

    Because of their unique physical and chemical properties,nanomaterials have been widely used to develop biosensing systems for bioanalytical and biomedical applications.The journal Chinese Journal of Analytical Chemistry published 35 papers on nanomaterial-based biosensors in 2010,including 5 reviews [1-5] and 29 research articles [6-34].These biosensing systems were fabricated by a broad range of nanomaterials (e.g.,carbon nanotube,gold nanoparticle,magnetic nanoparticle,silica nanoparticle,quantum dot,and so forth,Figure 1),some of them have high quality and get great achievements.

  7. Recent advances in exploitation of nanomaterial for arsenic removal from water: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, WeiWen; Wong, H. Y.; Badruzzaman, A. Borhan M.; Goh, H. H.; Zaman, Mukter

    2017-01-01

    (III), at 378.79 mg g-1 and 643.84 mg g-1 respectively. By combining desired properties of different nanomaterials, composite nanomaterials can be made that have superior potential as efficient arsenic removal agents. Particularly, magnetic composite nanomaterials are interesting because the super-paramagnetic property, which allows efficient separation of nano-adsorbents in water, and high adsorption capacities, could be achieved simultaneously. For instance, Fe-Mn binary oxide nanowires have shown promising As(III) adsorption capacity at 171 mg g-1. Generally, nanomaterials used for arsenic removal face severe degradation in performance in the presence of competing ions in water, especially phosphate ions. This study will contribute to future research in developing nanomaterials used for arsenic removal that are highly efficient, environmentally friendly and cost-effective by providing a thorough, structured and detailed review on various nanomaterial candidates that have promising potential.

  8. Cellulose Nanomaterials in Water Treatment Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; de Lannoy, Charles François; Mark R. Wiesner

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose nanomaterials are naturally occurring with unique structural, mechanical and optical properties. While the paper and packaging, automotive, personal care, construction, and textiles industries have recognized cellulose nanomaterials’ potential, we suggest cellulose nanomaterials have great untapped potential in water treatment technologies. In this review, we gather evidence of cellulose nanomaterials’ beneficial role in environmental remediation and membranes for water filtration, ...

  9. Environmental fate and behaviour of nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Nanna Isabella Bloch; Skjolding, Lars Michael; Hansen, Steffen Foss;

    In the current report, the existing knowledge on the fate of nanomaterials in the environment is reviewed and the major knowledge gaps are identified.......In the current report, the existing knowledge on the fate of nanomaterials in the environment is reviewed and the major knowledge gaps are identified....

  10. Multi-metal oxide ceramic nanomaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Stephen; Liu, Shuangyi; Huang, Limin

    2016-06-07

    A convenient and versatile method for preparing complex metal oxides is disclosed. The method uses a low temperature, environmentally friendly gel-collection method to form a single phase nanomaterial. In one embodiment, the nanomaterial consists of Ba.sub.AMn.sub.BTi.sub.CO.sub.D in a controlled stoichiometry.

  11. Self-assembled nanomaterials for photoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Yang, Pei-Pei; Zhao, Xiao-Xiao; Wang, Hao

    2016-02-07

    In recent years, extensive endeavors have been paid to construct functional self-assembled nanomaterials for various applications such as catalysis, separation, energy and biomedicines. To date, different strategies have been developed for preparing nanomaterials with diversified structures and functionalities via fine tuning of self-assembled building blocks. In terms of biomedical applications, bioimaging technologies are urgently calling for high-efficient probes/contrast agents for high-performance bioimaging. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging whole-body imaging modality offering high spatial resolution, deep penetration and high contrast in vivo. The self-assembled nanomaterials show high stability in vivo, specific tolerance to sterilization and prolonged half-life stability and desirable targeting properties, which is a kind of promising PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. Herein, we focus on summarizing recent advances in smart self-assembled nanomaterials with NIR absorption as PA contrast agents for biomedical imaging. According to the preparation strategy of the contrast agents, the self-assembled nanomaterials are categorized into two groups, i.e., the ex situ and in situ self-assembled nanomaterials. The driving forces, assembly modes and regulation of PA properties of self-assembled nanomaterials and their applications for long-term imaging, enzyme activity detection and aggregation-induced retention (AIR) effect for diagnosis and therapy are emphasized. Finally, we conclude with an outlook towards future developments of self-assembled nanomaterials for PA imaging.

  12. Antimicrobial and biocompatible properties of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul-Islam, M; Shehzad, A; Khan, S; Khattak, W A; Ullah, M W; Park, J K

    2014-01-01

    The rapid development of drug-resistant characteristics in pathogenic viral, bacterial, and fungal species and the consequent spread of infectious diseases are currently receiving serious attention. Indeed, there is a pressing demand to explore novel materials and develop new strategies that can address these issues of serious concern. Nanomaterials are currently proving to be the most capable therapeutic agents to cope with such hazards. The exceptional physiochemical properties and impressive antimicrobial capabilities of nanoparticles have provoked their utilization in biomedical fields. Nanomaterials of both organic and inorganic nature have shown the capabilities of disrupting microbial cells through different mechanisms. Along with the direct influence on the microbial cell membrane, DNA and proteins, these nanomaterials produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damage cell components and viruses. Currently, a serious hazard associated with these antimicrobial nanomaterials is their toxicity to human and animal cells. Extensive studies have reported the dose, time, and cell-dependent toxicology of various nanomaterials, and some have shown excellent biocompatible properties. Nevertheless, there is still debate regarding the use of nanomaterials for medical applications. Therefore, in this review, the antimicrobial activities of various nanomaterials with details of their acting mechanisms were compiled. The relative toxic and biocompatible behavior of nanomaterials emphasized in this study provides information pertaining to their practical applicability in medical fields.

  13. Tiny Medicine: Nanomaterial-Based Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Watts

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Tiny medicine refers to the development of small easy to use devices that can help in the early diagnosis and treatment of disease. Early diagnosis is the key to successfully treating many diseases. Nanomaterial-based biosensors utilize the unique properties of biological and physical nanomaterials to recognize a target molecule and effect transduction of an electronic signal. In general, the advantages of nanomaterial-based biosensors are fast response, small size, high sensitivity, and portability compared to existing large electrodes and sensors. Systems integration is the core technology that enables tiny medicine. Integration of nanomaterials, microfluidics, automatic samplers, and transduction devices on a single chip provides many advantages for point of care devices such as biosensors. Biosensors are also being used as new analytical tools to study medicine. Thus this paper reviews how nanomaterials can be used to build biosensors and how these biosensors can help now and in the future to detect disease and monitor therapies.

  14. Nanomaterial Based Sensors for NASA Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Jessica E.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon nanofibers (CNFs), graphene and metal nanowires have shown interesting electronic properties and therefore have been pursued for a variety of space applications requiring ultrasensitive and light-weight sensor and electronic devices. We have been pursuing development of chemical and biosensors using carbon nanotubes and carbon nanofibers for the last several years and this talk will present the benefits of nanomaterials these applications. More recently, printing approaches to manufacturing these devices have been explored as a strategy that is compatible to a microgravity environment. Nanomaterials are either grown in house or purchased and processed as electrical inks. Chemical modification or coatings are added to the nanomaterials to tailor the nanomaterial to the exact application. The development of printed chemical sensors and biosensors will be discussed for applications ranging from crew life support to exploration missions.

  15. Microwave chemistry for inorganic nanomaterials synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilecka, Idalia; Niederberger, Markus

    2010-08-01

    This Feature Article gives an overview of microwave-assisted liquid phase routes to inorganic nanomaterials. Whereas microwave chemistry is a well-established technique in organic synthesis, its use in inorganic nanomaterials' synthesis is still at the beginning and far away from having reached its full potential. However, the rapidly growing number of publications in this field suggests that microwave chemistry will play an outstanding role in the broad field of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. This article is not meant to give an exhaustive overview of all nanomaterials synthesized by the microwave technique, but to discuss the new opportunities that arise as a result of the unique features of microwave chemistry. Principles, advantages and limitations of microwave chemistry are introduced, its application in the synthesis of different classes of functional nanomaterials is discussed, and finally expected benefits for nanomaterials' synthesis are elaborated.

  16. Carbon Nanomaterials: Efficacy and Safety for Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Tsutsumi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, carbon nanohorns, and carbon nanotubes, are increasingly being used in various fields owing to these materials’ unique, size-dependent functions and physicochemical properties. Recently, because of their high variability and stability, carbon nanomaterials have been explored as a novel tool for the delivery of therapeutic molecules including peptide and nucleic acid cancer drugs. However, insufficient information is available regarding the safety of carbon nanomaterials for human health, even though such information is vital for the development of safe and effective nanomedicine technologies. In this review, we discuss currently available information regarding the safety of carbon nanomaterials in nanomedicine applications, including information obtained from our own studies; and we discuss types of carbon nanomaterials that demonstrate particular promise for safe nanomedicine technologies.

  17. Auxetic nanomaterials: Recent progress and future development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin-Wu; Kim, Sung Youb; Park, Harold S.

    2016-12-01

    Auxetic materials (materials with negative Poisson's ratio) and nanomaterials have independently been, for many years, two of the most active research fields in material science. Recently, these formerly independent fields have begun to intersect in new and interesting ways due to the recent discovery of auxeticity in nanomaterials like graphene, metal nanoplates, black phosphorus, and others. Here, we review the research emerging at the intersection of auxeticity and nanomaterials. We first survey the atomistic mechanisms, both intrinsic and extrinsic, that have been found, primarily through atomistic simulations, to cause auxeticity in nanomaterials. We then outline the available experimental evidence for auxetic nanomaterials. In order to lay the groundwork for future work in this exciting area, we close by discussing several future prospects as well as the current challenges in this field.

  18. Organic nanomaterials: synthesis, characterization, and device applications

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in nanoscience and nanotechnology have given rise to a new generation of functional organic nanomaterials with controlled morphology and well-defined properties, which enable a broad range of useful applications. This book explores some of the most important of these organic nanomaterials, describing how they are synthesized and characterized. Moreover, the book explains how researchers have incorporated organic nanomaterials into devices for real-world applications.Featuring contributions from an international team of leading nanoscientists, Organic Nanomaterials is divided into five parts:Part One introduces the fundamentals of nanomaterials and self-assembled nanostructuresPart Two examines carbon nanostructures—from fullerenes to carbon nanotubes to graphene—reporting on properties, theoretical studies, and applicationsPart Three investigates key aspects of some inorganic materials, self-assembled monolayers,...

  19. Techniques for Investigating Molecular Toxicology of Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanli; Li, Chenchen; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Lei, Zhendong; Wu, Minghong

    2016-06-01

    Nanotechnology has been a rapidly developing field in the past few decades, resulting in the more and more exposure of nanomaterials to human. The increased applications of nanomaterials for industrial, commercial and life purposes, such as fillers, catalysts, semiconductors, paints, cosmetic additives and drug carriers, have caused both obvious and potential impacts on human health and environment. Nanotoxicology is used to study the safety of nanomaterials and has grown at the historic moment. Molecular toxicology is a new subdiscipline to study the interactions and impacts of materials at the molecular level. To better understand the relationship between the molecular toxicology and nanomaterials, this review summarizes the typical techniques and methods in molecular toxicology which are applied when investigating the toxicology of nanomaterials and include six categories: namely; genetic mutation detection, gene expression analysis, DNA damage detection, chromosomal aberration analysis, proteomics, and metabolomics. Each category involves several experimental techniques and methods.

  20. Nanomaterials for Cardiac Myocyte Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Amezcua

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Since their synthesizing introduction to the research community, nanomaterials have infiltrated almost every corner of science and engineering. Over the last decade, one such field has begun to look at using nanomaterials for beneficial applications in tissue engineering, specifically, cardiac tissue engineering. During a myocardial infarction, part of the cardiac muscle, or myocardium, is deprived of blood. Therefore, the lack of oxygen destroys cardiomyocytes, leaving dead tissue and possibly resulting in the development of arrhythmia, ventricular remodeling, and eventual heart failure. Scarred cardiac muscle results in heart failure for millions of heart attack survivors worldwide. Modern cardiac tissue engineering research has developed nanomaterial applications to combat heart failure, preserve normal heart tissue, and grow healthy myocardium around the infarcted area. This review will discuss the recent progress of nanomaterials for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications through three main nanomaterial approaches: scaffold designs, patches, and injectable materials.

  1. Nanochemistry and nanomaterials for photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guanying; Seo, Jangwon; Yang, Chunhui; Prasad, Paras N

    2013-11-01

    Nanochemistry and nanomaterials provide numerous opportunities for a new generation of photovoltaics with high solar energy conversion efficiencies at low fabrication cost. Quantum-confined nanomaterials and polymer-inorganic nanocomposites can be tailored to harvest sun light over a broad range of the spectrum, while plasmonic structures offer effective ways to reduce the thickness of light-absorbing layers. Multiple exciton generation, singlet exciton fission, photon down-conversion, and photon up-conversion realized in nanostructures, create significant interest for harvesting underutilized ultraviolet and currently unutilized infrared photons. Nanochemical interface engineering of nanoparticle surfaces and junction-interfaces enable enhanced charge separation and collection. In this review, we survey these recent advances employed to introduce new concepts for improving the solar energy conversion efficiency, and reduce the device fabrication cost in photovoltaic technologies. The review concludes with a summary of contributions already made by nanochemistry. It then describes the challenges and opportunities in photovoltaics where the chemical community can play a vital role.

  2. Effect of pressure on nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Uma D. [Department of Physics, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar-263145 (India); Kumar, M., E-mail: munish_dixit@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar-263145 (India)

    2010-07-01

    A simple theory is proposed to predict the effect of pressure on nanomaterials, which gets support from the Mie-Gruneisen theory of thermal expansivity as formulated by Born and Huang. We considered LiAlSi{sub 2}O{sub 6} to study the effect of pressure in the light of other formulations, viz. Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet and Kumar. The results obtained are found to present a good agreement with the experimental data as well as other formulations. To confirm the validity of the formulation, we applied the method to study the compression behaviour of a number of nanomaterials, viz. CdSe, Rb{sub 3}C{sub 60}, Ni(20 nm), carbon nanotube, {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {epsilon}-Fe (Hexagonal iron), MgO, CuO, {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (67 nm), {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {alpha}-Fe (filled nanotube), TiO{sub 2} (anatase), 3C-SiC (30 nm), TiO{sub 2} (rutile phase), Zr{sub 0.1}Ti{sub 0.9}O{sub 2}, AlN (hexagonal), {gamma}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, Ni-filled MWCNT and Fe-filled MWCNT. The results obtained are compared with the experimental data. A good agreement between theory and experiment demonstrates the validity of the present approach.

  3. Nanomaterials driven energy, environmental and biomedical research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Prakash C.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Wilson, Jeremiah F. [Department of Physics, College of Arts and Sciences, Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL 36088 (United States)

    2014-03-31

    We have developed state-of-the-art nanomaterials such as nanofibers, nanotubes, nanoparticles, nanocatalysts and nanostructures for clean energy, environmental and biomedical research. Energy can neither be created nor be destroyed, but it can be converted from one form to another. Based on this principle, chemical energy such as hydrogen has been produced from water electrolysis at a much lower voltage using RuO{sub 2} nanoparticles on the Si wafer substrate. Once the hydrogen is produced from the clean sources such as solar energy and water, it has to be stored by physisorption or chemisorption processes on to the solid state systems. For the successful physical adsorption of hydrogen molecule, we have developed novel polyaniline nanostructures via chemical templating and electrospinning routes. Chemical or complex hydrides involving nano MgH{sub 2} and transition metal nanocatalysts have been synthesized to tailor both the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen (chemi) sorption respectively. Utilization of solar energy (UV-Vis) and a coupling of novel semiconductor oxide nanoparticles have been recently demonstrated with enhancement in photo-oxidation and/or photo-reduction processes for the water/air detoxification and sustainable liquid fuel production respectively. Magnetic nanoparticles such as ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} have been synthesized and optimized for biomedical applications such as targeted drug delivery and tumor diagnostic sensing (MRI)

  4. Nanomaterials driven energy, environmental and biomedical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prakash C.; Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Wilson, Jeremiah F.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed state-of-the-art nanomaterials such as nanofibers, nanotubes, nanoparticles, nanocatalysts and nanostructures for clean energy, environmental and biomedical research. Energy can neither be created nor be destroyed, but it can be converted from one form to another. Based on this principle, chemical energy such as hydrogen has been produced from water electrolysis at a much lower voltage using RuO2 nanoparticles on the Si wafer substrate. Once the hydrogen is produced from the clean sources such as solar energy and water, it has to be stored by physisorption or chemisorption processes on to the solid state systems. For the successful physical adsorption of hydrogen molecule, we have developed novel polyaniline nanostructures via chemical templating and electrospinning routes. Chemical or complex hydrides involving nano MgH2 and transition metal nanocatalysts have been synthesized to tailor both the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen (chemi) sorption respectively. Utilization of solar energy (UV-Vis) and a coupling of novel semiconductor oxide nanoparticles have been recently demonstrated with enhancement in photo-oxidation and/or photo-reduction processes for the water/air detoxification and sustainable liquid fuel production respectively. Magnetic nanoparticles such as ZnFe2O4 have been synthesized and optimized for biomedical applications such as targeted drug delivery and tumor diagnostic sensing (MRI).

  5. Nanomaterial Synthesis Using Plasma Generation in Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genki Saito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, the research field of nanomaterials (NMs has developed rapidly because of the unique electrical, optical, magnetic, and catalytic properties of these materials. Among the various methods available today for NM synthesis, techniques for plasma generation in liquid are relatively new. Various types of plasma such as arc discharge and glow discharge can be applied to produce metal, alloy, oxide, inorganic, carbonaceous, and composite NMs. Many experimental setups have been reported, in which various parameters such as the liquid, electrode material, electrode configuration, and electric power source are varied. By examining the various electrode configurations and power sources available in the literature, this review classifies all available plasma in liquid setups into four main groups: (i gas discharge between an electrode and the electrolyte surface, (ii direct discharge between two electrodes, (iii contact discharge between an electrode and the surface of surrounding electrolyte, and (iv radio frequency and microwave plasma in liquid. After discussion of the techniques, NMs of metal, alloy, oxide, silicon, carbon, and composite produced by techniques for plasma generation in liquid are presented, where the source materials, reaction media, and electrode configurations are discussed in detail.

  6. Smart Mesoporous Nanomaterials for Antitumor Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Martínez-Carmona

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of nanomaterials for the treatment of solid tumours is receiving increasing attention by the scientific community. Among them, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs exhibit unique features that make them suitable nanocarriers to host, transport and protect drug molecules until the target is reached. It is possible to incorporate different targeting ligands to the outermost surface of MSNs to selectively drive the drugs to the tumour tissues. To prevent the premature release of the cargo entrapped in the mesopores, it is feasible to cap the pore entrances using stimuli-responsive nanogates. Therefore, upon exposure to internal (pH, enzymes, glutathione, etc. or external (temperature, light, magnetic field, etc. stimuli, the pore opening takes place and the release of the entrapped cargo occurs. These smart MSNs are capable of selectively reaching and accumulating at the target tissue and releasing the entrapped drug in a specific and controlled fashion, constituting a promising alternative to conventional chemotherapy, which is typically associated with undesired side effects. In this review, we overview the recent advances reported by the scientific community in developing MSNs for antitumor therapy. We highlight the possibility to design multifunctional nanosystems using different therapeutic approaches aimed at increasing the efficacy of the antitumor treatment.

  7. Fe3O4@TiO2核壳磁性纳米材料的制备及表征%Preparation and characterization of Fe3O4@TiO2 core-shell magnetic nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    辛铁军; 张和鹏; 马明亮; 刘梦姣; 周轮伟; 张秋禹

    2014-01-01

    Core-shell magnetic Fe3O4@TiO2 nanomaterials with different morphologies have been obtained by combining the sol-gel method and solvothermal method.The monodisperse Fe3 O 4 core was synthesized by sol-vothermal reaction,and the TiO 2 shell was derived using solvothermal reaction and sol-gel method with tetra-butyl titanate as the precursor.The morphology,structure and magnetic properties of Fe3 O 4 @TiO 2 nanomate-rials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),transmission electron microscopy (TEM),X-ray diffraction (XRD),thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM).The re-sults showed that Fe3 O 4 nanoparticles were coated by TiO 2 ,and Fe3 O 4 @TiO 2 exhibited high degree of crystal-linity,regular crystalline morphologies and excellent magnetism.These integrated features would make the Fe3 O 4 @TiO 2 materials have attractive applications in areas of environmental purification,biomedical field,en-ergy conversion and storage.In addition,the formation mechanism of TiO 2 shell was also proposed.%利用溶剂热法制备了单分散 Fe3 O 4纳米粒子,以钛酸四丁酯(TBOT)为前驱体,采用溶胶-凝胶与溶剂热两步法制备了3种不同形貌的磁性核壳材料Fe3 O 4@ TiO 2.通过扫描电镜(SEM)、透射电镜(TEM)、X 射线衍射仪(XRD)、热重分析(TGA)及振动样品磁强计(VSM)对材料的形貌、结构、磁学性能等进行了分析表征.结果表明,TiO 2在 Fe3 O 4颗粒表面形成很好的包覆层,产物结晶度高、形态规则、磁性能优良,为其在环境净化、生物医学、能源转换与存储等领域的潜在应用提供了有利条件.此外,还对 TiO 2壳层的包覆机理做了初步的研究.

  8. Nanomaterials in Space: is the Future Granted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mircea, Chipara

    The quantum effects of this confinement resulted in new or modified physical properties. Actually, these studies are extended from confined and patterned materials at the nanometer scale, to metamaterials (a new class of engineered nanocomposites) in which the role of interfaces, at nanometer scale, has a particular relevance. These researches resulted not only in new materials, but also in new devices and technologies. Smaller, lighter, better, and more efficient, are the blueprints of these new devices and technologies. Such features are of particular importance for space applications. patterned at nanometer scale and metamaterials) in space environments, by identifying several groups of problems: a). Dosimetry. The models for the range and deposited energy in a target assume that the target is infinite. The effect of the confinement at the nanometer scale is not considered. Accordingly, microdosimetry concepts have to be developed and tested at such scales. Physicists faced analogous problems at the transition from macroscopic to microscopic properties, as for example in the case of magnetic calculations. The usual macroscopic approaches failed to give an accurate representation of magnetic properties in the case of nanowires, magnetic nanoclusters, ultrathin films and multilayers, and patterned magnetic materials at nanometer scale, resulting in the development of a new theoretical approach (micromagnetic calculations and modeling [1, 2]). The linear approximation (single event), frequently used to explain and model the effect of ionizing radiation on materials would become obsolete. There are several factors that would enhance the contribution of higher order effects. The first is due to the fact that the energy released by the incident particle within the target is delocalised over an area of 102 to 104 nm2. This is actually the size of the latent track within the target. For a nanopatterned structure this area is larger than the size of the feature. As a

  9. Functional Fe-Pd nanomaterials synthesized by template-assisted methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prida, V.M., E-mail: vmpp@uniovi.es [Depto. de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo, Asturias (Spain); Vega, V.; Garcia, J.; Gonzalez, L.; Rosa, W.O.; Fernandez, A.; Hernando, B. [Depto. de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo, Asturias (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    In this work, we highlight our recent progress in the synthesis and characterization of functional nanomaterials based on Fe-Pd ferromagnetic alloys by means of template-assisted deposition techniques employing highly ordered nanoporous alumina membranes, such as ordered arrays of nanowires and antidots thin films. Special attention is paid on their basic magnetic properties, such as coercivity, remanence and magnetic anisotropy, and their dependence on the microstructure and morphological parameters of the ordered arrays.

  10. Nanomaterials for Engineering Stem Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerativitayanan, Punyavee; Carrow, James K; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K

    2015-08-05

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has stimulated the development of multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. Synergistic interactions between nanomaterials and stem cell engineering offer numerous possibilities to address some of the daunting challenges in regenerative medicine, such as controlling trigger differentiation, immune reactions, limited supply of stem cells, and engineering complex tissue structures. Specifically, the interactions between stem cells and their microenvironment play key roles in controlling stem cell fate, which underlines therapeutic success. However, the interactions between nanomaterials and stem cells are not well understood, and the effects of the nanomaterials shape, surface morphology, and chemical functionality on cellular processes need critical evaluation. In this Review, focus is put on recent development in nanomaterial-stem cell interactions, with specific emphasis on their application in regenerative medicine. Further, the emerging technologies based on nanomaterials developed over the past decade for stem cell engineering are reviewed, as well as the potential applications of these nanomaterials in tissue regeneration, stem cell isolation, and drug/gene delivery. It is anticipated that the enhanced understanding of nanomaterial-stem cell interactions will facilitate improved biomaterial design for a range of biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  11. Assembly of ordered carbon shells on semiconducting nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2012-10-02

    In some embodiments of the invention, encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described. In certain embodiments the nanostructures described are semiconducting nanomaterials encapsulated with ordered carbon shells. In some aspects a method for producing encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials is disclosed. In some embodiments applications of encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described.

  12. Assembly of ordered carbon shells on semiconducting nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2010-05-11

    In some embodiments of the invention, encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described. In certain embodiments the nanostructures described are semiconducting nanomaterials encapsulated with ordered carbon shells. In some aspects a method for producing encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials is disclosed. In some embodiments applications of encapsulated semiconducting nanomaterials are described.

  13. Piezoelectric nanomaterials for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Menciassi, Arianna

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale structures and materials have been explored in many biological applications because of their novel and impressive physical and chemical properties. Such properties allow remarkable opportunities to study and interact with complex biological processes. This book analyses the state of the art of piezoelectric nanomaterials and introduces their applications in the biomedical field. Despite their impressive potentials, piezoelectric materials have not yet received significant attention for bio-applications. This book shows that the exploitation of piezoelectric nanoparticles in nanomedicine is possible and realistic, and their impressive physical properties can be useful for several applications, ranging from sensors and transducers for the detection of biomolecules to “sensible” substrates for tissue engineering or cell stimulation.

  14. Chemical Design of Functional Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeblad, Kresten

    zeolites behave like molecular sieves capable of separating molecules by their size. This property in combination with acidic properties resulting from hydroxyl groups bridging silicon and aluminum ions in the zeolite framework make zeolites interesting as shapeselective solid acid catalysts. Unfortunately......This thesis deals with a very specific class of functional nanomaterials known as mesoporous zeolites. Zeolites are a class of crystalline aluminosilicate minerals characterized by featuring pores or cavities of molecular dimensions as part of their crystal structure. Mesoporous zeolites...... and the meso-/macropores. The main methods for preparing mesoporous zeolite single crystals are by crystallization of the zeolite in the presence of carbon which is subsequently removed by combustion or by subjecting normal purely microporous zeolites to alkaline treatments resulting in mesopore formation...

  15. Nanomaterials for Electronics and Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehne, Jessica E.; Meyyappan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes(CNTs), graphene, and inorganic nanowires(INWs) have shown interesting electronic, mechanical, optical, thermal, and other properties and therefore have been pursued for a variety of applications by the nanotechnology community ranging from electronics to nanocomposites. While the first two are carbon-based materials, the INWs in the literature include silicon, germanium, III-V, II-VI, a variety of oxides, nitrides, antimonides and others. In this talk, first an overview of growth of these three classes of materials by CVD and PECVD will be presented along with results from characterization. Then applications in development of chemical sensors, biosensors, energy storage devices and novel memory architectures will be discussed.

  16. Green chemistry of carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiuk, Elena V; Basiuk, Vladimir A

    2014-01-01

    The global trend of looking for more ecologically friendly, "green" techniques manifested itself in the chemistry of carbon nanomaterials. The main principles of green chemistry emphasize how important it is to avoid the use, or at least to reduce the consumption, of organic solvents for a chemical process. And it is precisely this aspect that was systematically addressed and emphasized by our research group since the very beginning of our work on the chemistry of carbon nanomaterials in early 2000s. The present review focuses on the results obtained to date on solvent-free techniques for (mainly covalent) functionalization of fullerene C60, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs, respectively), as well as nanodiamonds (NDs). We designed a series of simple and fast functionalization protocols based on thermally activated reactions with chemical compounds stable and volatile at 150-200 degrees C under reduced pressure, when not only the reactions take place at a high rate, but also excess reagents are spontaneously removed from the functionalized material, thus making its purification unnecessary. The main two classes of reagents are organic amines and thiols, including bifunctional ones, which can be used in conjunction with different forms of nanocarbons. The resulting chemical processes comprise nucleophilic addition of amines and thiols to fullerene C60 and to defect sites of pristine MWNTs, as well as direct amidation of carboxylic groups of oxidized nanotubes (mainly SWNTs) and ND. In the case of bifunctional amines and thiols, reactions of the second functional group can give rise to cross-linking effects, or be employed for further derivatization steps.

  17. Carbon Nanomaterials for Road Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaporotskova Irina Vladimirovna

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The requirement of developing and modernizing the roads in Russia and in the Volgograd region in particular, is based on need of expanding the directions of scientific research on road and transport complexes. They have to be aimed at the development of the theory of transport streams, traffic safety increase, and, first of all, at the application of original methods of road development and modernization, introduction of modern technologies and road-building materials.On the basis of the analysis of the plans for transportation sphere development in the Volgograd region assuming the need to apply the new technologies allowing to create qualitative paving, the authors propose the technology of creating a heavy-duty paving with the use of carbon nanomaterial. The knowledge on strengthening the characteristics of carbon nanotubes is a unique material for nanotechnology development which allowed to assume the analysis of general information about asphalt concrete. The analysis showed that carbon nanotubes can be used for improvement of operational characteristics of asphalt concrete, and it is possible to carry out additives of nanotubes in hot as well as in cold bitumen. The article contains the basic principles of creation of the new road material received by means of bitumen reinforcing by carbon nanotubes. The structures received by the offered technique binding on the basis of the bitumens modified by carbon nanomaterial can be used for coverings and bases on highways of all categories in all road and climatic zones of Russia. The technical result consists in increasing the durability and elasticity of the received asphalt covering, and also the increase of water resistance, heat resistance and frost resistance, the expansion of temperature range of its laying in the field of negative temperatures.

  18. Magnetically recoverable nanocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2011-05-11

    A broad overview on magnetically recoverable nanocatalysts is presented and the use of magnetic nanomaterials as catalysts is discussed. Magnetic materials are used as organocatalysts and their applications range to challenging reactions, such as hydroformylation and olefin metathesis. Magnetic nanomaterials are also being used in environmental applications, such as for photo- and biocatalysis and for the adsorption and removal of pollutants from air and water. These materials show great promise as enantioselective catalysts, which are used extensively for the synthesis of medicines, drugs, and other bioactive molecules. By functionalizing these materials using chiral ligands, a series of chiral nanocatalysts can be designed, offering great potential to reuse these otherwise expensive catalyst systems. Characterization of magnetic catalysts is often a challenging task, and NMR characterization of these catalysts is difficult because the magnetic nature of the materials interferes with the magnetic field of the spectrometer.

  19. Performance Enhancement of Carbon Nanomaterials for Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin M. Saleem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanofibers, and graphene are exploited extensively due to their unique electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties and recently investigated for energy storage application (supercapacitor due to additional high specific surface area and chemical inertness properties. The supercapacitor is an energy storage device which, in addition to long cycle life (one million, can give energy density higher than parallel plate capacitor and power density higher than battery. In this paper, carbon nanomaterials and their composites are reviewed for prospective use as electrodes for supercapacitor. Moreover, different physical and chemical treatments on these nanomaterials which can potentially enhance the capacitance are also reviewed.

  20. Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fanqing

    2014-07-22

    The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

  1. Graphene-based nanomaterials and their electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumera, Martin

    2010-11-01

    Graphene-based nanomaterials are in the forefront of chemical research. This tutorial review provides an introduction to their electrochemistry, its fundamentals and applications. Selected examples of applications in energy storage and sensing are presented. The synthetic methods for preparing graphenes as well as their materials chemistry are thoroughly discussed, as they have a profound influence on the electronic and electrochemical behavior of graphene-related nanomaterials. Inherent electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry of graphene nanomaterials is discussed thoroughly. Important application in sensing and energy storage areas are highlighted.

  2. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-05-01

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials.

  3. Application of dental nanomaterials: potential toxicity to the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng X

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoli Feng,1 Aijie Chen,1 Yanli Zhang,1 Jianfeng Wang,2 Longquan Shao,1 Limin Wei2 1Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, 2School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Nanomaterials are defined as materials with one or more external dimensions with a size of 1–100 nm. Such materials possess typical nanostructure-dependent properties (eg, chemical, biological, optical, mechanical, and magnetic, which may differ greatly from the properties of their bulk counterparts. In recent years, nanomaterials have been widely used in the production of dental materials, particularly in light polymerization composite resins and bonding systems, coating materials for dental implants, bioceramics, endodontic sealers, and mouthwashes. However, the dental applications of nanomaterials yield not only a significant improvement in clinical treatments but also growing concerns regarding their biosecurity. The brain is well protected by the blood–brain barrier (BBB, which separates the blood from the cerebral parenchyma. However, in recent years, many studies have found that nanoparticles (NPs, including nanocarriers, can transport through the BBB and locate in the central nervous system (CNS. Because the CNS may be a potential target organ of the nanomaterials, it is essential to determine the neurotoxic effects of NPs. In this review, possible dental nanomaterials and their pathways into the CNS are discussed, as well as related neurotoxicity effects underlying the in vitro and in vivo studies. Finally, we analyze the limitations of the current testing methods on the toxicological effects of nanomaterials. This review contributes to a better understanding of the nano-related risks to the CNS as well as the further development of safety assessment systems. Keywords: dental, nanomaterials, central nervous system, toxicity, testing methods, risk assessment

  4. Applied Research of Nanomaterials in Photo-thermal Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sun Hang; Zuo Xuejun; Liang Gang

    2015-01-01

    In the applied research of nanomaterials in photo-thermal therapy and based on the understanding of the principle of photo-thermal therapy and its medical equipment, this paper analyzes nanomaterials used for photo-thermal therapy, establishes model by the use of comprehensive evaluation method and selects nano-materials that are suiTable for photo-thermal therapy, namely, carbon nanomaterials and precious metal nano-materials. In addition, this paper analyzes the importance of human surgical...

  5. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, R

    2012-01-01

    This book covers the use of nanomaterials to prevent corrosion. The first section deals with the fundamentals of corrosion prevention using nanomaterials. Part two includes a series of case studies and applications of nanomaterials for corrosion control.$bCorrosion is an expensive and potentially dangerous problem in many industries. The potential application of different nanostructured materials in corrosion protection, prevention and control is a subject of increasing interest. Corrosion protection and control using nanomaterials explores the potential use of nanotechnology in corrosion control. The book is divided into two parts. Part one looks at the fundamentals of corrosion behaviour and the manufacture of nanocrystalline materials. Chapters discuss the impact of nanotechnology in reducing corrosion cost, and investigate the influence of various factors including thermodynamics, kinetics and grain size on the corrosion behaviour of nanocrystalline materials. There are also chapters on electrodeposition ...

  6. A global view of regulations affecting nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2010-01-01

    The 2000s have been characterized by an unprecedented exploration into research and development of nanotechnology and nanomaterials. Despite a slow start, new regulatory initiatives are popping up like mushrooms internationally. Many of these initiatives have yet to materialize themselves...

  7. Method to synthesize metal chalcogenide monolayer nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2016-12-13

    Metal chalcogenide monolayer nanomaterials can be synthesized from metal alkoxide precursors by solution precipitation or solvothermal processing. The synthesis routes are more scalable, less complex and easier to implement than other synthesis routes.

  8. Assessing the Environmental Safety of Engineered Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanotechnology research in the United States is coordinated under the National Nano-technology Initiative with the goal of fostering development and implementation of nanomaterials and products that incorporate them and assuring that they are environmentally safe. The environmen...

  9. Systemic Absorption of Nanomaterials by Oral Exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binderup, Mona-Lise; Bredsdorff, Lea; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    This report and accompanying database systematically evaluates the reliability and relevance of the existing scientific literature regarding systemic absorption of nanomaterials by oral exposure and makes specific recommendations for future testing approaches.......This report and accompanying database systematically evaluates the reliability and relevance of the existing scientific literature regarding systemic absorption of nanomaterials by oral exposure and makes specific recommendations for future testing approaches....

  10. Anisotropic nanomaterials: structure, growth, assembly, and functions

    OpenAIRE

    Panikkanvalappil R. Sajanlal; Theruvakkattil S. Sreeprasad; Samal, Akshaya K.; Thalappil Pradeep

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge over the shape of nanomaterials is a critical factor in designing devices with desired functions. Due to this reason, systematic efforts have been made to synthesize materials of diverse shape in the nanoscale regime. Anisotropic nanomaterials are a class of materials in which their properties are direction-dependent and more than one structural parameter is needed to describe them. Their unique and fine-tuned physical and chemical properties make them ideal candidates...

  11. Nanomaterial Induced Immune Responses and Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ashraf; Suhail, Mohd; Mathew, Shilu; Shah, Muhammad Ali; Harakeh, Steve M; Ahmad, Sultan; Kazmi, Zulqarnain; Alhamdan, Mohammed Abdul Rahman; Chaudhary, Adeel; Damanhouri, Ghazi Abdullah; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are utilized in a wide array of end user products such as pharmaceuticals, electronics, clothes and cosmetic products. Due to its size (< 100 nm), nanoparticles have the propensity to enter through the airway and skin, making its path perilous with the potential to cause damages of varying severity. Once within the body, these particles have unconstrained access to different tissues and organs including the brain, liver, and kidney. As a result, nanomaterials may cause the perturbation of the immune system eliciting an inflammatory response and cytotoxicity. This potential role is dependent on many factors such as the characteristics of the nanomaterials, presence or absence of diseases, and genetic predisposition. Cobalt and nickel nanoparticles, for example, were shown to have inflammogenic properties, while silver nanoparticles were shown to reduce allergic inflammation. Just as asbestos fibers, carbon nanotubes were shown to cause lungs damage. Some nanomaterials were shown, based on animal studies, to result in cell damage, leading to the formation of pre-cancerous lesions. This review highlights the impact of nanomaterials on immune system and its effect on human health with toxicity consideration. It recommends the development of suitable animal models to study the toxicity and bio-clearance of nanomaterials and propose safety guidelines.

  12. Rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Renyuan; Zhang, Lianbin; Wang, Peng

    2015-10-01

    The ever-increasing human demand for safe and clean water is gradually pushing conventional water treatment technologies to their limits. It is now a popular perception that the solutions to the existing and future water challenges will hinge upon further developments in nanomaterial sciences. The concept of rational design emphasizes on `design-for-purpose' and it necessitates a scientifically clear problem definition to initiate the nanomaterial design. The field of rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment has experienced a significant growth in the past decade and is poised to make its contribution in creating advanced next-generation water treatment technologies in the years to come. Within the water treatment context, this review offers a comprehensive and in-depth overview of the latest progress in rational design, synthesis and applications of nanomaterials in adsorption, chemical oxidation and reduction reactions, membrane-based separation, oil-water separation, and synergistic multifunctional all-in-one nanomaterials/nanodevices. Special attention is paid to the chemical concepts related to nanomaterial design throughout the review.

  13. Rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Renyuan

    2015-08-26

    The ever-increasing human demand for safe and clean water is gradually pushing conventional water treatment technologies to their limits and it is now a popular perception that the solutions to the existing and future water challenges will highly hinge upon the further development of nanomaterial sciences. The concept of rational design emphasizes ‘design-for-purpose’ and it necessitates a scientifically clear problem definition to initiate the nanomaterial design. The field of rational design of nanomaterials for water treatment has experienced a significant growth in the past decade and is poised to make its contribution in creating advanced next-generation water treatment technologies in the years to come. Within the water treatment context, this review offers a comprehensive and in-depth overview of the latest progress of the rational design, synthesis and applications of nanomaterials in adsorption, chemical oxidation and reduction reactions, membrane-based separation, oil/water separation, and synergistic multifunctional all-in-one nanomaterials/nanodevices. Special attention is paid on chemical concepts of the nanomaterial designs throughout the review.

  14. Biodegradable Porous Silicon Nanomaterials for Imaging and Treatment of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Luo

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death, claiming ˜0.56 million lives in the U.S. every year following heart diseases (˜0.62 million). From 1991 to 2007, mortality associated with heart diseases decreased 39%; by contrast, the death rate of cancer only decreased by 17% in spite of intensive research and improved therapeutics. The stagnation of conventional medicine and the complexity of cancer demand new therapeutic strategies. As an emerging approach, the use of nanomaterials as cancer diagnostic and therapeutic agents has shown promising results due to their unique physical and chemical properties. To date, more than two dozen nanoparticle-based products have been approved for clinical use and they show advantages over conventional therapeutics. However, translation of many other nanomaterials has been impeded due to concerns over toxicity and biodegradability. This dissertation presents the development of biodegradable luminescent porous silicon nanomaterials and their potential applications for imaging and treatment of cancer. After a brief introduction to nanomedicine and the biomedical applications of porous silicon, Chapter 2 presents a method of making silicon nanoparticles with porous structure and intrinsic luminescence (LPSiNPs). The low toxicity and biodegradability of LPSiNPs are demonstrated in vitro with human cancer cells and in vivo with mouse model. The in vivo clearance of intravenously injected LPSiNPs is studied by tracking the emission of the nanoparticles with fluorescence imaging. Chapter 3 presents a diagnostic application of LPSiNPs. Time-gated fluorescence imaging of tumors using LPSiNPs with long emission lifetime is developed. This technique can effectively eliminate interference from short-lived tissue autofluorescence and improve the detection sensitivity. Chapter 4--6 demonstrate the therapeutic applications of porous silicon nanomaterials. In Chapter 4, magnetically-guided delivery of anticancer drug to cancer cells in vitro

  15. Chemical synthesis and modification of target phases of chalcogenide nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sines, Ian T.

    Inorganic nanoparticles have been at the forefront of materials research in recent years due to their utility in modern technological processes. Chalcogenide nanomaterials are of particular interest because of their wide range of desirable properties for semiconductors, magnetic devices, and energy industries. Primary factors that dictate the properties of the material are the elemental composition, crystal structure, stoichiometry, crystallite size, and particle morphology. One of the most common approaches to synthesize these materials is through solution mediated routes. This approach offers unique advantages in controlling the morphology and particle size that other methods lack. This dissertation describes our recent work on exploiting solution chemical routes to control the crystal structure and composition of chalcogenide nanomaterials. We will start by discussing solution chemistry routes to synthesize non-equilibrium phases of chaclogenide nanomaterials. By using low-temperature bottom-up techniques it is possible to trap kinetically stable phases that cannot be accessed using traditional high-temperature techniques. We used solution chemistry to synthesize and characterize, for the first time, wurtzite-type MnSe. Wurtzite-type MnSe is the end-member of the highly investigated ZnxMn1-xSe solid solution, a classic magnetic semiconductor system. We will then discuss PbO-type FeS, another non-equilibrium phase that is isostructural with the superconducting phase of FeSe. We synthesized phase-pure PbO-type FeS using a low-temperature solvothermal route. We will then discuss the post-synthetic modification of chalcogenides nanomaterials. By exploiting the solubility of Se and S in tri-n-octylphosphine we can selectively extract the chalcogen from preformed chalcogenide nanomaterials. This gives chemists a technique for purification and phase-targeting of particular chalcogenide phases. This method can be modified to facilitate anion exchange. When Te is

  16. Hybrid upconversion nanomaterials for optogenetic neuronal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shreyas; Liu, Jing-Jing; Pasquale, Nicholas; Lai, Jinping; McGowan, Heather; Pang, Zhiping P.; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2015-10-01

    Nanotechnology-based approaches offer the chemical control required to develop precision tools suitable for applications in neuroscience. We report a novel approach employing hybrid upconversion nanomaterials, combined with the photoresponsive ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), to achieve near-infrared light (NIR)-mediated optogenetic control of neuronal activity. Current optogenetic methodologies rely on using visible light (e.g. 470 nm blue light), which tends to exhibit high scattering and low tissue penetration, to activate ChR2. In contrast, our approach enables the use of 980 nm NIR light, which addresses the short-comings of visible light as an excitation source. This was facilitated by embedding upconversion nanomaterials, which can convert NIR light to blue luminescence, into polymeric scaffolds. These hybrid nanomaterial scaffolds allowed for NIR-mediated neuronal stimulation, with comparable efficiency as that of 470 nm blue light. Our platform was optimized for NIR-mediated optogenetic control by balancing multiple physicochemical properties of the nanomaterial (e.g. size, morphology, structure, emission spectra, concentration), thus providing an early demonstration of rationally-designing nanomaterial-based strategies for advanced neural applications.Nanotechnology-based approaches offer the chemical control required to develop precision tools suitable for applications in neuroscience. We report a novel approach employing hybrid upconversion nanomaterials, combined with the photoresponsive ion channel channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), to achieve near-infrared light (NIR)-mediated optogenetic control of neuronal activity. Current optogenetic methodologies rely on using visible light (e.g. 470 nm blue light), which tends to exhibit high scattering and low tissue penetration, to activate ChR2. In contrast, our approach enables the use of 980 nm NIR light, which addresses the short-comings of visible light as an excitation source. This was facilitated by

  17. Health implications of engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietroiusti, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, a growing number of people are expected to be exposed to its products, the engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Some physico-chemical properties of ENMs, linked to their size in the nanoscale (1-100 nm), make them potentially more reactive, and therefore raise concern about possible adverse effects in humans. In this article, I discuss human diseases which may be predicted after exposure to ENMs, and how their pathogenetic mechanisms may be linked to exposure; in this regard, special emphasis has been given to the triad of oxidative stress/inflammation/genotoxicity and to the interaction of ENMs/proteins in different biological compartments. The analysis of possible adverse effects has been made on an organ-by-organ basis, starting from the skin, respiratory system and gastrointestinal tract. These sites are in fact not only those exposed to the highest amounts of ENMs, but are also the portals of entry to internal organs for possible systemic effects. Although the list and the relevance of possible human disorders linked to ENM exposure are at least as impressive as that of their direct or indirect beneficial effects for human health, we must be clear that ENM-linked diseases belong to the realm of possible risk (i.e. cannot be excluded, but are unlikely), whereas ENMs with proven beneficial effects are on the market. Therefore, the mandatory awareness about possible adverse effects of ENMs should in no way be interpreted as a motivation to disregard the great opportunity represented by nanotechnology.

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  19. Synthesis and application of one-dimensional nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Daihua

    My research has been focused on the synthesis, characterization and application of three types of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures, including metal oxide nanowires, transition metal oxide core-shell nanocables, and carbon nanotubes. They represent a new class of materials that have attracted steadily growing interest due to their peculiar properties and unique applications complementary to bulk materials. This dissertation will summarize my studies on these three 1D nanomaterials, as well as propose future research work that may lead to further development of this field. Following a brief introduction to 1D nanomaterials in Chapter 1, Chapter 2 will focus on the first material - metal oxide nanowires. The discussion starts from the synthesis approach and material characterization of metal oxide nanowires, and then shifts to the electron transport properties and potential applications. A series of functional devices based on In2O 3 and SnO2 nanowires will be demonstrated and evaluated, which range from field effect transistors (FETs), nonvolatile memories, to photo-detecting devices and chemical sensors. Chapter 3 will discuss the fabrication of transition metal oxide (TMO) core-shell nanocables and their electron transport properties as a function of temperature and external magnetic field. The discussion will primarily focus on one of the TMO materials---magnetite (Fe3O 4) core-shell nanowires and nanotubes. Chapter 4 focuses on the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in macroelectronics and explores the feasibility of using CNT films as transparent electrodes for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Chapter 5, in the end, summarizes the above discussions and proposes future research directions in 1D nanomaterials.

  20. 混合碱媒介法制备磁性铁酸钴纳米粉体%Synthesis of Magnetic Cobalt Ferrite Nanomaterials by Composite-hydroxide-mediate Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张梅梅; 刘宏; 刘建安

    2009-01-01

    Cobalt ferrite magnetic nano-powder was prepared by composite-hydroxide-mediate method, the preparing process was studied. The structure and magnetic properties of the samples are measured and analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The results showed that cobalt ferrite with uniform particle sizes in the range of 10~50 nm can be obtained using nitrates or acetates as raw materials. The synthesized nano-particles are small in sizes with uniform diameter, and have a good disperability. Their magnetic properties are middle saturation magnetization and high coercive force. The cobalt ferrite synthesized shows a better quality.%采用混合碱媒介法制备铁酸钴磁性纳米粉体,探索了制备工艺,利用X射线衍射仪、透射电镜、振动样品磁强计对样品的结构和磁性能进行了研究.结果表明:以硝酸盐或醋酸盐为原料用混合碱法可制得粒度均匀、粒径范围在10~50 nm的铁酸钴纳米粉,所制备的样品具有粒径小、粒度均匀、分散性较好的特点,中等饱和磁化强度、高矫顽力,是性能优良的磁性材料.

  1. Characterization of nanomaterials with transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Anjum, Dalaver H.

    2016-08-01

    The field of nanotechnology is about research and development on materials whose at least one dimension is in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. In recent years, the research activity for developing nano-materials has grown exponentially owing to the fact that they offer better solutions to the challenges faced by various fields such as energy, food, and environment. In this paper, the importance of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) based techniques is demonstrated for investigating the properties of nano-materials. Specifically the nano-materials that are investigated in this report include gold nano-particles (Au-NPs), silver atom-clusters (Ag-ACs), tantalum single-atoms (Ta-SAs), carbon materials functionalized with iron cobalt (Fe-Co) NPs and titania (TiO2) NPs, and platinum loaded Ceria (Pt-CeO2) Nano composite. TEM techniques that are employed to investigate nano-materials include aberration corrected bright-field TEM (BF-TEM), high-angle dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and BF-TEM electron tomography (ET). With the help presented of results in this report, it is proved herein that as many TEM techniques as available in a given instrument are essential for a comprehensive nano-scale analysis of nanomaterials.

  2. Applications of nanomaterials as vaccine adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Motao; Wang, Rongfu; Nie, Guangjun

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine adjuvants are applied to amplify the recipient's specific immune responses against pathogen infection or malignancy. A new generation of adjuvants is being developed to meet the demands for more potent antigen-specific responses, specific types of immune responses, and a high margin of safety. Nanotechnology provides a multifunctional stage for the integration of desired adjuvant activities performed by the building blocks of tailor-designed nanoparticles. Using nanomaterials for antigen delivery can provide high bioavailability, sustained and controlled release profiles, and targeting and imaging properties resulting from manipulation of the nanomaterials' physicochemical properties. Moreover, the inherent immune-regulating activity of particular nanomaterials can further promote and shape the cellular and humoral immune responses toward desired types. The combination of both the delivery function and immunomodulatory effect of nanomaterials as adjuvants is thought to largely benefit the immune outcomes of vaccination. In this review, we will address the current achievements of nanotechnology in the development of novel adjuvants. The potential mechanisms by which nanomaterials impact the immune responses to a vaccine and how physicochemical properties, including size, surface charge and surface modification, impact their resulting immunological outcomes will be discussed. This review aims to provide concentrated information to promote new insights for the development of novel vaccine adjuvants.

  3. Applications of Nanomaterials in Food Packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbudsanpharoke, Nattinee; Choi, Jungwook; Ko, Seonghyuk

    2015-09-01

    Nanomaterials have drawn great interest in recent years due to their extraordinary properties that make them advantageous in food packaging applications. Specifically, nanoparticles can impart significant barrier properties, as well as mechanical, optical, catalytic, and antimicrobial properties into packaging. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and nanoclay account for the majority of the nano-enabled food packaging on the market, while others, such as nano-zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium, share less of the current market. In current food packaging, these nanomaterials are primarily used to impart antimicrobial function and to improve barrier properties, thereby extending the shelf life and freshness of packaged food. On the other hand, there is growing concern about the migration of nanomaterials from food contact materials to foodstuffs and its associated potential risks. Indeed, insufficient data about environmental and human safety assessments of migration and exposure of nanomaterials are hindering their market growth. To overcome this barrier, the public believes that legislation from government agencies is critical. This review provides an overview of the characteristics and functions of major nanomaterials that are commonly applied to food packaging, including available and near- future products. Migration research, safety issues, and public concerns are also discussed.

  4. Nanomaterials-based enzyme electrochemical biosensors operating through inhibition for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanoglu, Sevinc; Ozkan, Sibel A; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-03-15

    In recent years great progress has been made in applying nanomaterials to design novel biosensors. Use of nanomaterials offers to biosensing platforms exceptional optical, electronic and magnetic properties. Nanomaterials can increase the surface of the transducing area of the sensors that in turn bring an increase in catalytic behaviors. They have large surface-to-volume ratio, controlled morphology and structure that also favor miniaturization, an interesting advantage when the sample volume is a critical issue. Biosensors have great potential for achieving detect-to-protect devices: devices that can be used in detections of pollutants and other treating compounds/analytes (drugs) protecting citizens' life. After a long term focused scientific and financial efforts/supports biosensors are expected now to fulfill their promise such as being able to perform sampling and analysis of complex samples with interest for clinical or environment fields. Among all types of biosensors, enzymatic biosensors, the most explored biosensing devices, have an interesting property, the inherent inhibition phenomena given the enzyme-substrate complex formation. The exploration of such phenomena is making remarkably important their application as research and applied tools in diagnostics. Different inhibition biosensor systems based on nanomaterials modification has been proposed and applied. The role of nanomaterials in inhibition-based biosensors for the analyses of different groups of drugs as well as contaminants such as pesticides, phenolic compounds and others, are discussed in this review. This deep analysis of inhibition-based biosensors that employ nanomaterials will serve researchers as a guideline for further improvements and approaching of these devices to real sample applications so as to reach society needs and such biosensor market demands.

  5. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  6. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  8. 3rd International Conference Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Yatsenko, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    This book presents some of the latest achievements in nanotechnology and nanomaterials from leading researchers in Ukraine, Europe, and beyond. It features contributions from participants in the 3rd International Science and Practice Conference Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials (NANO2015) held in Lviv, Ukraine on August 26-30, 2015. The International Conference was organized jointly by the Institute of Physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, University of Tartu (Estonia), Ivan Franko National University of Lviv (Ukraine), University of Turin (Italy), Pierre and Marie Curie University (France), and European Profiles A.E. (Greece). Internationally recognized experts from a wide range of universities and research institutions share their knowledge and key results on topics ranging from nanooptics, nanoplasmonics, and interface studies to energy storage and biomedical applications. Presents cutting-edge advances in nanocomposites and carbon and silicon-based nanomaterials for a wide range of engine...

  9. Specific heat and thermal conductivity of nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Sandhya; Kumar, Raghuvesh; Kumar, Munish

    2017-01-01

    A model is proposed to study the size and shape effects on specific heat and thermal conductivity of nanomaterials. The formulation developed for specific heat is based on the basic concept of cohesive energy and melting temperature. The specific heat of Ag and Au nanoparticles is reported and the effect of size and shape has been studied. We observed that specific heat increases with the reduction of particle size having maximum shape effect for spherical nanoparticle. To provide a more critical test, we extended our model to study the thermal conductivity and used it for the study of Si, diamond, Cu, Ni, Ar, ZrO2, BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 nanomaterials. A significant reduction is found in the thermal conductivity for nanomaterials by decreasing the size. The model predictions are consistent with the available experimental and simulation results. This demonstrates the suitability of the model proposed in this paper.

  10. Nanomaterials Applied in Asphalt Modification: A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changqing Fang; Ruien Yu; Shaolong Liu; Yan Li

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been gradually penetrated into the field of asphalt modification.Seemingly magic effects of nanomaterials have now been brought to improve the performance of asphalt.To demonstrate many of the prospective applications,researchers have conducted a series of positive and effective efforts dealing with the preparation of modified asphalt to demonstrate the mechanism of modification and the resultant improvement in performance.In this review,various nanomaterials used in asphalt modification are initially presented,followed by the methods employed to modify the asphalt with these materials and finally the effects of nanomaterials on the performance of base asphalt are presented and the modification mechanisms are discussed.Based on the current research results,the influence of preparation process parameters on the compatibility of every phase in the modified asphalt and the stability of the modified asphalt system are described.Finally,the development trend of the topic field is projected.

  11. Applicability of Different Isothermal EOS at Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika P. Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study explains the behaviour of nanomaterials such as AlN, CdSe, Ge, WC, and Ni- and Fe-filled-MWCNTs under high pressure. Among the number of isothermal EOSs available, we prefer only two parameter-based isothermal equations (i.e., Murnaghan equation, usual Tait's equation, Suzuki equation and Shanker equation. The present work shows the theoretical study of thermo-elastic properties especially relative compression (V/V0, isothermal bulk modulus (KP/K0, and compressibility (αP/α0 of nanomaterials. After comparing all formulations with available experimental data, we conclude that pressure dependence of relative compression (V/V0 for the nanomaterials, are in good agreement for all the equations at lower pressure range. At higher pressure range, Suzuki and Shanker formulations show some deviation from experimental values.

  12. Nanomaterial-based drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Tao

    2017-01-01

    This brief summarizes different types of organic and inorganic nanomaterials for drug delivery in cancer therapy. It highlights that precisely designed nanomaterials will be the next-generation therapeutic agents for cancer treatment.

  13. Development and In Vitro Bioactivity Profiling of Alternative Sustainable Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sustainable, environmentally benign nanomaterials (NMs) are being designed as alternatives based on functionality to conventional metal-based nanomaterials (NMs) in order to minimize potential risk to human health and the environment. Development of rapid methods to evaluate the ...

  14. The Nanomaterial Registry: facilitating the sharing and analysis of data in the diverse nanomaterial community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostraat ML

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Michele L Ostraat, Karmann C Mills, Kimberly A Guzan, Damaris MurryRTI International, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: The amount of data being generated in the nanotechnology research space is significant, and the coordination, sharing, and downstream analysis of the data is complex and consistently deliberated. The complexities of the data are due in large part to the inherently complicated characteristics of nanomaterials. Also, testing protocols and assays used for nanomaterials are diverse and lacking standardization. The Nanomaterial Registry has been developed to address such challenges as the need for standard methods, data formatting, and controlled vocabularies for data sharing. The Registry is an authoritative, web-based tool whose purpose is to simplify the community's level of effort in assessing nanomaterial data from environmental and biological interaction studies. Because the registry is meant to be an authoritative resource, all data-driven content is systematically archived and reviewed by subject-matter experts. To support and advance nanomaterial research, a set of minimal information about nanomaterials (MIAN has been developed and is foundational to the Registry data model. The MIAN has been used to create evaluation and similarity criteria for nanomaterials that are curated into the Registry. The Registry is a publicly available resource that is being built through collaborations with many stakeholder groups in the nanotechnology community, including industry, regulatory, government, and academia. Features of the Registry website (https://www.nanomaterialregistry.org/ currently include search, browse, side-by-side comparison of nanomaterials, compliance ratings based on the quality and quantity of data, and the ability to search for similar nanomaterials within the Registry. This paper is a modification and extension of a proceedings paper for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.Keywords: nanoinformatics

  15. Functional nanomaterials can optimize the efficacy of vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ye; Xu, Yingying; Tian, Yue; Chen, Chunying; Wang, Chen; Jiang, Xingyu

    2014-11-01

    Nanoscale materials can improve the efficacy of vaccines. Herein we review latest developments that use nanomaterials for vaccines. By highlighting the relationships between the nanoscale physicochemical characteristics and working mechanisms of nanomaterials, this paper shows the current status of the developments where researchers employ functional nanomaterials as vector and/or immunoregulators for vaccines. It also provides us some clues for improving the design and application of nanomaterials to optimize the efficacy of vaccines.

  16. Nanomaterials and Optical Diagnosis of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Alireza

    2016-09-01

    The investigators had previously shown that the risk of AIDS/HIV-related illness and transmission reduced (by 96%) with early antiretroviral treatment. Nanomaterials could be applied in early diagnosis of HIV by improving the ability to detect serum biomarkers of the blood-borne infectious diseases, with low sample volume, rapidity, and more sensitivity than currently available FDA-approved methods such as ELISA, particle agglutination assay, and Western Blotting assay. We have demonstrated several experimental studies for optical HIV diagnosis based on nanomaterials in three categories (e.g., the fluorescence-, the SPR-, and the SERS- based biosensors), and have explained each assay.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of WO3 nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, N K; Tiwari, Karunesh; Roy, Akash

    2011-02-01

    This work reports a simple, quick and economical method to prepare WO3 nanomaterials. Prepared tungsten trioxide materials have been sintered at 700 degrees C for three hours. The material has been studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Crystallite size of the WO3 nanostructures obtained by Shearer's formula are between 12 and 72 nm and their grain size by SEM are from 20 to 105 nm. The humidity-sensitive electrical properties of the WO3 nanomaterial have been studied using d.c. measurements.

  18. Structure and multiscale mechanics of carbon nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book aims at providing a broad overview on the relationship between structure and mechanical properties of carbon nanomaterials from world-leading scientists in the field. The main aim is to get an in-depth understanding of the broad range of mechanical properties of carbon materials based on their unique nanostructure and on defects of several types and at different length scales. Besides experimental work mainly based on the use of (in-situ) Raman and X-ray scattering and on nanoindentation, the book also covers some aspects of multiscale modeling of the mechanics of carbon nanomaterials.

  19. Thin Films for Coating Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.M.Mukhopadhyay; P.Joshi; R.V.Pulikollu

    2005-01-01

    therefore, effective as an inert layer to passivate nanomaterials.

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  4. Metal-filled carbon nanotubes as a novel class of photothermal nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossella, Francesco; Bellani, Vittorio [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' A. Volta' ' and CNISM, Universita degli Studi di Pavia, Via Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Soldano, Caterina [Dipartimento di Chimica e Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Brescia, Via Valotti 9, 25121 Brescia (Italy); Tommasini, Matteo [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica ' ' G. Natta' ' , Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-05-08

    Metal-filled carbon nanotubes represent a novel class of photothermal nanomaterials: when illuminated by visible light they exhibit a strong enhancement of the temperature at the metal sites, due to the enhanced plasmonic light absorption at the metal surface, which behaves as a heat radiator. Potential applications include nanomedicine, heat-assisted magnetic recording, and light-activated thermal gradient-driven devices. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Plasma-Liquid Interaction: a New Way to Synthesize Nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Qiang; Li, Yongfeng; Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Size

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we have summarized the recent advances and present conditions of the nanomaterials synthesis from the plasma-liquid interactions. A theoretical analysis for the nanomaterials synthesis process is presented by analyzing the experimental data. Besides the theoretical analysis, the practical applications in several nanomaterials syntheses of the the plasma-liquid interactions are also presented.

  6. Grouping nanomaterials to predict their potential to induce pulmonary inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakhuis, Hedwig M; Oomen, Agnes G; Cassee, Flemming R

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly expanding manufacturing, production and use of nanomaterials have raised concerns for both worker and consumer safety. Various studies have been published in which induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation exposure to nanomaterials has been described. Nanomaterials can vary in

  7. Grouping nanomaterials to predict their potential to induce pulmonary inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakhuis, Hedwig M; Oomen, Agnes G; Cassee, Flemming R

    2016-05-15

    The rapidly expanding manufacturing, production and use of nanomaterials have raised concerns for both worker and consumer safety. Various studies have been published in which induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation exposure to nanomaterials has been described. Nanomaterials can vary in aspects such as size, shape, charge, crystallinity, chemical composition, and dissolution rate. Currently, efforts are made to increase the knowledge on the characteristics of nanomaterials that can be used to categorise them into hazard groups according to these characteristics. Grouping helps to gather information on nanomaterials in an efficient way with the aim to aid risk assessment. Here, we discuss different ways of grouping nanomaterials for their risk assessment after inhalation. Since the relation between single intrinsic particle characteristics and the severity of pulmonary inflammation is unknown, grouping of nanomaterials by their intrinsic characteristics alone is not sufficient to predict their risk after inhalation. The biokinetics of nanomaterials should be taken into account as that affects the dose present at a target site over time. The parameters determining the kinetic behaviour are not the same as the hazard-determining parameters. Furthermore, characteristics of nanomaterials change in the life-cycle, resulting in human exposure to different forms and doses of these nanomaterials. As information on the biokinetics and in situ characteristics of nanomaterials is essential but often lacking, efforts should be made to include these in testing strategies. Grouping nanomaterials will probably be of the most value to risk assessors when information on intrinsic characteristics, life-cycle, biokinetics and effects are all combined.

  8. Magnet-in-the-Semiconductor Nanomaterials: High Electron Mobility in All-Inorganic Arrays of FePt/CdSe and FePt/CdS Core-Shell Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong-Soo; Shevchenko, Elena V; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2013-06-06

    We report a colloidal synthesis and electrical and magnetotransport properties of multifunctional "magnet-in-the-semiconductor" nanostructures composed of FePt core and CdSe or CdS shell. Thin films of all-inorganic FePt/CdSe and FePt/CdS core-shell nanostructures capped with In2Se4(2-) molecular chalcogenide (MCC) ligands exhibited n-type charge transport with high field-effect electron mobility of 3.4 and 0.02 cm(2)/V·s, respectively. These nanostructures also showed a negative magnetoresistance characteristic for spin-dependent tunneling. We discuss the mechanism of charge transport and gating in the arrays of metal/semiconductor core-shell nanostructures.

  9. MAGNETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  11. The Nanomaterial Registry: facilitating the sharing and analysis of data in the diverse nanomaterial community

    OpenAIRE

    Ostraat ML; Mills KC; Guzan KA; Murry D

    2013-01-01

    Michele L Ostraat, Karmann C Mills, Kimberly A Guzan, Damaris MurryRTI International, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: The amount of data being generated in the nanotechnology research space is significant, and the coordination, sharing, and downstream analysis of the data is complex and consistently deliberated. The complexities of the data are due in large part to the inherently complicated characteristics of nanomaterials. Also, testing protocols and assays used for nanomaterials are diverse and l...

  12. Growth of Magnetite Nanoparticles Under Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang J.; Peng Z.M.; Chen Q.W.

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Over the past several years, the preparation and characterization ofnanoscale magnetic materials, especially one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure, have attracted much attention as the nanomaterials would allow investigating the fundamental aspects of magnetic-ordering phenomena in magnetic materials with reduced dimensions and could lead to new potential applications such as data storage technology[1-6].

  13. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    Third volume of a 40volume series on nanoscience and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about Transmission electron microscopy characterization of nanomaterials. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume an essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry.

  14. Risk-based classification system of nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tervonen, Tommi; Linkov, Igor; Figueira, Jose Rui; Steevens, Jeffery; Chappell, Mark; Merad, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    Various stakeholders are increasingly interested in the potential toxicity and other risks associated with nanomaterials throughout the different stages of a product's life cycle (e.g., development, production, use, disposal). Risk assessment methods and tools developed and applied to chemical and b

  15. Modification and characterization of (energetic) nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Peppel, R.J.E. van de; Abadjieva, E.

    2010-01-01

    Nanomaterials are a topic of increased interest, since they have properties which differ from their macroscopic counterparts. Many applications nowadays take advantage of the new functionalities which natural and manufactured nanoparticles possess. Based on these developments, also the research on e

  16. Managing the Life Cycle Risks of Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    International Center for Scholars Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies (PEN) consumer products inventory, 16 is found in wound dressings, socks, and soap...acceptance authority. 8. Track hazards, their closures , and residual mishap risk throughout the system life cycle. When properly applied, the...Risks of Nanomaterials Report consumption, land use, ozone depletion, global warming, acidification, eutrophication, tropospheric ozone formation

  17. CLP application to nanomaterials: a specific aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alessandrelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at describing some relevant aspects related to the classification, labelling and packaging of nanomaterials. Concerns have been raised about potential adverse effects to humans or the environment as result of impacts of nanomaterials. The new Regulation (EC no. 1272/2008 on classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures (CLP does not contain any specific definition or provision related to nanomaterials nevertheless they are covered by the definition of substance set in the Regulation. It is recognized that different particle sizes or forms of the same substance can have different classification. Thus, if substances are placed on the market both at nanoscale and as bulk, a separate classification and labelling may be required if the available data on the intrinsic properties indicate a difference in hazard class between the two forms. CLP Regulation requires the manufacturer or importer to ensure that the information used to classify relates to the forms or physical states in which the substance is placed on the market and in which it can reasonably be expected to be used. Moreover, CLP demands testing relating to physical hazards to be performed if such information is missing or not adequate to conclude on classification. Further developments of the CLP guidance documents and implementation tools are needed in order to cover nanomaterials more specifically.

  18. Redefining risk research priorities for nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara Deanne; Baun, Anders; Owen, R.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical-based risk assessment underpins the current approach to responsible development of nanomaterials (NM). It is now recognised, however, that this process may take decades, leaving decision makers with little support in the near term. Despite this, current and near future research efforts...

  19. Applications of Nanomaterials in Electrochemical Enzyme Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodi Yang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor is defined as a kind of analytical device incorporating a biological material, a biologically derived material or a biomimic intimately associated with or integrated within a physicochemical transducer or transducing microsystem. Electrochemical biosensors incorporating enzymes with nanomaterials, which combine the recognition and catalytic properties of enzymes with the electronic properties of various nanomaterials, are new materials with synergistic properties originating from the components of the hybrid composites. Therefore, these systems have excellent prospects for interfacing biological recognition events through electronic signal transduction so as to design a new generation of bioelectronic devices with high sensitivity and stability. In this review, we describe approaches that involve nanomaterials in direct electrochemistry of redox proteins, especially our work on biosensor design immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOD, horseradish peroxidase (HRP, cytochrome P450 (CYP2B6, hemoglobin (Hb, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. The topics of the present review are the different functions of nanomaterials based on modification of electrode materials, as well as applications of electrochemical enzyme biosensors.

  20. Anisotropic nanomaterials: structure, growth, assembly, and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajanlal, Panikkanvalappil R; Sreeprasad, Theruvakkattil S; Samal, Akshaya K; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge over the shape of nanomaterials is a critical factor in designing devices with desired functions. Due to this reason, systematic efforts have been made to synthesize materials of diverse shape in the nanoscale regime. Anisotropic nanomaterials are a class of materials in which their properties are direction-dependent and more than one structural parameter is needed to describe them. Their unique and fine-tuned physical and chemical properties make them ideal candidates for devising new applications. In addition, the assembly of ordered one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) arrays of anisotropic nanoparticles brings novel properties into the resulting system, which would be entirely different from the properties of individual nanoparticles. This review presents an overview of current research in the area of anisotropic nanomaterials in general and noble metal nanoparticles in particular. We begin with an introduction to the advancements in this area followed by general aspects of the growth of anisotropic nanoparticles. Then we describe several important synthetic protocols for making anisotropic nanomaterials, followed by a summary of their assemblies, and conclude with major applications.

  1. Anisotropic nanomaterials: structure, growth, assembly, and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panikkanvalappil R. Sajanlal

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive knowledge over the shape of nanomaterials is a critical factor in designing devices with desired functions. Due to this reason, systematic efforts have been made to synthesize materials of diverse shape in the nanoscale regime. Anisotropic nanomaterials are a class of materials in which their properties are direction-dependent and more than one structural parameter is needed to describe them. Their unique and fine-tuned physical and chemical properties make them ideal candidates for devising new applications. In addition, the assembly of ordered one-dimensional (1D, two-dimensional (2D, and three-dimensional (3D arrays of anisotropic nanoparticles brings novel properties into the resulting system, which would be entirely different from the properties of individual nanoparticles. This review presents an overview of current research in the area of anisotropic nanomaterials in general and noble metal nanoparticles in particular. We begin with an introduction to the advancements in this area followed by general aspects of the growth of anisotropic nanoparticles. Then we describe several important synthetic protocols for making anisotropic nanomaterials, followed by a summary of their assemblies, and conclude with major applications.

  2. Nanomaterials and nanofabrication for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chao-Min; Chia-Wen Wu, Kevin

    2013-08-01

    Traditional boundaries between materials science and engineering and life sciences are rapidly disintegrating as interdisciplinary research teams develop new materials-science-based tools for exploring fundamental issues in both medicine and biology. With recent technological advances in multiple research fields such as materials science, cell and molecular biology and micro-/nano-technology, much attention is shifting toward evaluating the functional advantages of nanomaterials and nanofabrication, at the cellular and molecular levels, for specific, biomedically relevant applications. The pursuit of this direction enhances the understanding of the mechanisms of, and therapeutic potentials for, some of the most lethal diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, organ fibrosis and cancers. This interdisciplinary approach has generated great interest among researchers working in a wide variety of communities including industry, universities and research laboratories. The purpose of this focus issue in Science and Technology of Advanced Materials is to bridge nanotechnology and biology with medicine, focusing more on the applications of nanomaterials and nanofabrication in biomedically relevant issues. This focus issue, we believe, will provide a more comprehensive understanding of (i) the preparation of nanomaterials and the underlying mechanisms of nanofabrication, and (ii) the linkage of nanomaterials and nanofabrication with biomedical applications. The multidisciplinary focus issue that we have attempted to organize is of interest to various research fields including biomaterials and tissue engineering, bioengineering, nanotechnology and nanomaterials, i.e. chemistry, physics and engineering. Nanomaterials and nanofabrication topics addressed in this focus issue include sensing and diagnosis (e.g. immunosensing and diagnostic devices for diseases), cellular and molecular biology (e.g. probing cellular behaviors and stem cell differentiation) and drug delivery

  3. Graphene-based nanomaterials for nanobiotechnology and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, K Vijaya; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Verma, Sandeep; Bianco, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Graphene family nanomaterials are currently being extensively explored for applications in the field of nanotechnology. The unique intrinsic properties treasured in their simple molecular design and their ability to work in coherence with other existing nanomaterials make graphene family nanomaterials the most promising candidates for different types of applications. This review highlights the scope and utility of these multifaceted nanomaterials in nanobiotechnology and biomedicine. In a tandem approach, this review presents the smooth inclusion of these nanomaterials into existing designs for creating efficient working models at the nanoscale level as well as discussing their broad future possibilities.

  4. Green processes for nanotechnology from inorganic to bioinspired nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Basiuk, Elena

    2015-01-01

    This book provides the state-of-the-art survey of green techniques in preparation of different classes of nanomaterials, with an emphasis on the use of renewable sources. Key topics covered include fabrication of nanomaterials using green techniques as well as their properties and applications, the use of renewable sources to obtain nanomaterials of different classes, from simple metal and metal oxide nanoparticles to complex bioinspired nanomaterials, economic contributions of nanotechnology to green and sustainable growth, and more. This is an ideal book for students, lecturers, researchers and engineers dealing with versatile (mainly chemical, biological, and medical) aspects of nanotechnology, including fabrication of nanomaterials using green techniques and their properties and applications. This book also: Maximizes reader insights into the design and fabrication of bioinspired nanomaterials and the design of complex bio-nanohybrids Covers many different applications for nanomaterials, bioinspired nanom...

  5. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  6. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  9. Nanomaterial cytotoxicity is composition, size, and cell type dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohaebuddin Syed K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite intensive research efforts, reports of cellular responses to nanomaterials are often inconsistent and even contradictory. Additionally, relationships between the responding cell type and nanomaterial properties are not well understood. Using three model cell lines representing different physiological compartments and nanomaterials of different compositions and sizes, we have systematically investigated the influence of nanomaterial properties on the degrees and pathways of cytotoxicity. In this study, we selected nanomaterials of different compositions (TiO2 and SiO2 nanoparticles, and multi-wall carbon nanotubes [MWCNTs] with differing size (MWCNTs of different diameters 50 nm; but same length 0.5-2 μm to analyze the effects of composition and size on toxicity to 3T3 fibroblasts, RAW 264.7 macrophages, and telomerase-immortalized (hT bronchiolar epithelial cells. Results Following characterization of nanomaterial properties in PBS and serum containing solutions, cells were exposed to nanomaterials of differing compositions and sizes, with cytotoxicity monitored through reduction in mitochondrial activity. In addition to cytotoxicity, the cellular response to nanomaterials was characterized by quantifying generation of reactive oxygen species, lysosomal membrane destabilization and mitochondrial permeability. The effect of these responses on cellular fate - apoptosis or necrosis - was then analyzed. Nanomaterial toxicity was variable based on exposed cell type and dependent on nanomaterial composition and size. In addition, nanomaterial exposure led to cell type dependent intracellular responses resulting in unique breakdown of cellular functions for each nanomaterial: cell combination. Conclusions Nanomaterials induce cell specific responses resulting in variable toxicity and subsequent cell fate based on the type of exposed cell. Our results indicate that the composition and size of nanomaterials as well as the

  10. National Survey of Workplaces Handling and Manufacturing Nanomaterials, Exposure to and Health Effects of Nanomaterials, and Evaluation of Nanomaterial Safety Data Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongho; Yu, Il Je

    2016-01-01

    A national survey on workplace environment nanomaterial handling and manufacturing was conducted in 2014. Workplaces relevant to nanomaterials were in the order of TiO2 (91), SiO2 (88), carbon black (84), Ag (35), Al2O3 (35), ZnO (34), Pb (33), and CeO2 (31). The survey results indicated that the number of workplaces handling or manufacturing nanomaterials was 340 (0.27% of total 126,846) workplaces. The number of nanomaterials used and products was 546 (1.60 per company) and 583 (1.71 per company), respectively. For most workplaces, the results on exposure to hazardous particulate materials, including nanomaterials, were below current OELs, yet a few workplaces were above the action level. As regards the health status of workers, 9 workers were diagnosed with a suspected respiratory occupational disease, where 7 were recommended for regular follow-up health monitoring. 125 safety data sheets (SDSs) were collected from the nanomaterial-relevant workplaces and evaluated for their completeness and reliability. Only 4 CNT SDSs (3.2%) included the term nanomaterial, while most nanomaterial SDSs were not regularly updated and lacked hazard information. When taken together, the current analysis provides valuable national-level information on the exposure and health status of workers that can guide the next policy steps for nanomaterial management in the workplace.

  11. National Survey of Workplaces Handling and Manufacturing Nanomaterials, Exposure to and Health Effects of Nanomaterials, and Evaluation of Nanomaterial Safety Data Sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongho Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A national survey on workplace environment nanomaterial handling and manufacturing was conducted in 2014. Workplaces relevant to nanomaterials were in the order of TiO2 (91, SiO2 (88, carbon black (84, Ag (35, Al2O3 (35, ZnO (34, Pb (33, and CeO2 (31. The survey results indicated that the number of workplaces handling or manufacturing nanomaterials was 340 (0.27% of total 126,846 workplaces. The number of nanomaterials used and products was 546 (1.60 per company and 583 (1.71 per company, respectively. For most workplaces, the results on exposure to hazardous particulate materials, including nanomaterials, were below current OELs, yet a few workplaces were above the action level. As regards the health status of workers, 9 workers were diagnosed with a suspected respiratory occupational disease, where 7 were recommended for regular follow-up health monitoring. 125 safety data sheets (SDSs were collected from the nanomaterial-relevant workplaces and evaluated for their completeness and reliability. Only 4 CNT SDSs (3.2% included the term nanomaterial, while most nanomaterial SDSs were not regularly updated and lacked hazard information. When taken together, the current analysis provides valuable national-level information on the exposure and health status of workers that can guide the next policy steps for nanomaterial management in the workplace.

  12. Functional DNA-containing nanomaterials: cellular applications in biosensing, imaging, and targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hao; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Lv, Yifan; Gong, Liang; Wang, Ruowen; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Ronghua; Tan, Weihong

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA performs a vital function as a carrier of genetic code, but in the field of nanotechnology, DNA molecules can catalyze chemical reactions in the cell, that is, DNAzymes, or bind with target-specific ligands, that is, aptamers. These functional DNAs with different modifications have been developed for sensing, imaging, and therapeutic systems. Thus, functional DNAs hold great promise for future applications in nanotechnology and bioanalysis. However, these functional DNAs face challenges, especially in the field of biomedicine. For example, functional DNAs typically require the use of cationic transfection reagents to realize cellular uptake. Such reagents enter the cells, increasing the difficulty of performing bioassays in vivo and potentially damaging the cell's nucleus. To address this obstacle, nanomaterials, such as metallic, carbon, silica, or magnetic materials, have been utilized as DNA carriers or assistants. In this Account, we describe selected examples of functional DNA-containing nanomaterials and their applications from our recent research and those of others. As models, we have chosen to highlight DNA/nanomaterial complexes consisting of gold nanoparticles, graphene oxides, and aptamer-micelles, and we illustrate the potential of such complexes in biosensing, imaging, and medical diagnostics. Under proper conditions, multiple ligand-receptor interactions, decreased steric hindrance, and increased surface roughness can be achieved from a high density of DNA that is bound to the surface of nanomaterials, resulting in a higher affinity for complementary DNA and other targets. In addition, this high density of DNA causes a high local salt concentration and negative charge density, which can prevent DNA degradation. For example, DNAzymes assembled on gold nanoparticles can effectively catalyze chemical reactions even in living cells. And it has been confirmed that DNA-nanomaterial complexes can enter cells more easily than free single

  13. Multimedia Environmental Distribution of Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haoyang Haven

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), which may be released to the environment due to human-related activities, can move across environmental phase boundaries and be found in most media. Given the rapid development and growing applications of nanotechnology, there is concern and thus the need to assess the potential environmental impact associated with ENMs. Accordingly, a modeling platform was developed to enable evaluation of the dynamic multimedia environmental distribution of ENMs (MendNano) and the range of potential exposure concentrations of ENMs. The MendNano was based on a dynamic multimedia compartmental modeling approach that was guided by detailed analysis of the agglomeration of ENMs, life-cycle analysis based estimates of their potential release to the environment, and incorporation of mechanistic sub-models of various intermedia transport processes. Model simulations for various environmental scenarios indicated that ENM accumulation in the sediment increased significantly with increased ENMs attachment to suspended solids in water. Atmospheric dry and wet depositions can be important pathways for ENMs input to the terrestrial environment in the absence of direct and distributed ENM release to soil. Increased ENM concentration in water due to atmospheric deposition (wet and dry) is expected as direct ENM release to water diminishes. However, for soluble ENMs dissolution can be the dominant pathway for suspended ENM removal from water even compared to advective transport. For example, simulations for Los Angeles showed that dry deposition, rain scavenging, and wind dilution can remove 90% of ENMs from the atmospheric airshed in ~100-230 days, ~2-6 hrs, and ~0.5-2 days, respectively. For the evaluated ENMs (metal, metal oxides, carbon nanotubes (CNT), nanoclays), mass accumulation in the multimedia environment was mostly in the soil and sediment. Additionally, simulation results for TiO2 in Los Angeles demonstrates that the ENM concentrations in air and

  14. EDDY CURRENT CHARACTERIZATION OF NANOMATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A YOUNES

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available NDT Magnetic measurements as impedance in Eddy currents, corecitif and residual field in hysteresis loop are used to study the different stages of mechanical alloying in the Fe–Co system. In this paper, we changed the electromagnetic properties of Fe-Co, by developing their metallurgical parameters such as grain size. For this we are used a planetary ball mill, we are milled the FeCo alloy for different milling times until to obtain nanostructure, the lamellar structure with some small particles embedded in them was observed during the first stage of mechanical alloying. XRD patterns show after 10 h of milling the formation of a disordered solid solution having a body-centered cubic (bcc structure. After 40h of milling, morphological studies indicated that the average crystallites size is around 15 nm.

  15. Tailoring thermal interfaces with nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Indira

    mobility via pre-cure gelation, and hinder crosslinking. This thesis also demonstrates novel techniques to create tailored nanowires and networks for high k nanocomposites. Branched Ag nanowires are synthesized via controlled interruptions to microwave-stimulated polyvinylpyrrolidone-directed polyol-reduction of silver nitrate. Microwave exposure results in micrometer-long nanowires passivated with polyvinylpyrrolidone. Cooling the reaction mixture by interrupting microwave exposure promotes nanocrystal nucleation at low-surfactant coverage sites. The nascent nuclei grow into nanowire branches upon further microwave exposure. Dispersions of low fractions of the branched nanowires in polydimethylsiloxane yield up to 60 % higher thermal conductivity than that obtained using unbranched nanowire fillers. A forty-fold thermal conductivity increase is obtained by in situ welding of silver nanowire fillers inside polydimethylsiloxane using microwaves. Even for ≤ 0.04 filler volume fractions, welding facilitates nanowire networking that counteracts thermal transport bottlenecks associated with the low polymer thermal conductivity and high polymer-filler interface thermal resistances. The transparency of the polymer to microwaves precludes thermal degradation, and the composites retain high mechanical compliance as indicated by thesis further explores the use of external stimuli in the form of magnetic fields to reversibly induce nanoparticle networking and gate heat transport at interfaces, a requirement in many emerging applications. It is demonstrated that magnetic field actuation of ~ 3 - 16 vol. % of magnetite or cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles in a fluid matrix yields ~16 times enhancement of the no field effective thermal conductivity, but only in a gradient magnetic field. Heat transfer modeling shows that the enhancement arises from magnetic field gradient driven bulk convection, rather than the expected nanoparticle network formation.

  16. Surface characterization of nanomaterials and nanoparticles: Important needs and challenging opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Donald R.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Johnson, Grant E.; Laskin, Julia; Lai, Jinfeng; Mueller, Karl; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Wang, Hongfei; Washton, Nancy [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, EMSL, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Elder, Alison; Baisch, Brittany L. [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Karakoti, Ajay; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V. N. T. [Battelle Science and Technology India, Pune, Maharashtra (India); Moon, DaeWon [Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    This review examines characterization challenges inherently associated with understanding nanomaterials and the roles surface and interface characterization methods can play in meeting some of the challenges. In parts of the research community, there is growing recognition that studies and published reports on the properties and behaviors of nanomaterials often have reported inadequate or incomplete characterization. As a consequence, the true value of the data in these reports is, at best, uncertain. With the increasing importance of nanomaterials in fundamental research and technological applications, it is desirable that researchers from the wide variety of disciplines involved recognize the nature of these often unexpected challenges associated with reproducible synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials, including the difficulties of maintaining desired materials properties during handling and processing due to their dynamic nature. It is equally valuable for researchers to understand how characterization approaches (surface and otherwise) can help to minimize synthesis surprises and to determine how (and how quickly) materials and properties change in different environments. Appropriate application of traditional surface sensitive analysis methods (including x-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopies, scanning probe microscopy, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy) can provide information that helps address several of the analysis needs. In many circumstances, extensions of traditional data analysis can provide considerably more information than normally obtained from the data collected. Less common or evolving methods with surface selectivity (e.g., some variations of nuclear magnetic resonance, sum frequency generation, and low and medium energy ion scattering) can provide information about surfaces or interfaces in working environments (operando or in situ) or information not provided by more traditional methods. Although these methods may

  17. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  19. Controllable synthesis and biomedical applications of silver nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhihai; Jiang, Xiaoli; Guo, Dawei; Gu, Ning

    2011-11-01

    Silver nanomaterials have lots of peculiar and exciting physical and chemical properties that are different from massive silver, so the synthesis and applications of silver nanomaterials have attracted a great deal of attention in the last decade. Currently, all kinds of silver nanomaterials having different shapes and sizes have been synthesized by many ingenious methods, and silver nanomaterials have exhibited extensive application prospects in many fields especially in biomedical aspect. In this article, the controllable synthesis of silver nanomaterials including nanorods, nanowires, nanotubes, nanoprisms, nanoplates, nanodisks, nanospheres, and nanopolyhedrons, etc. are reviewed. Silver nanomaterials are most utilized in the form of nanoparticles, so the main biomedical applications of silver nanoparticles, such as antibacterial and antiviral applications, antitumor applications, biosensors and biological labels, optical imaging and imaging intensifier, are discussed. Although antibacterial applications are still the most important aspects of silver nanomaterials at present, antitumor, optical sensors and imaging applications of silver nanomaterials have also shown good potential perspectives. More biomedical applications of silver nanomaterials still need to be exploited for the future, and the biological safety of silver nanomaterials also should be paid enough attention before their practical applications.

  20. Characterisation of nanomaterial hydrophobicity using engineered surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, Cloé; Valsesia, Andrea; Oddo, Arianna; Ceccone, Giacomo; Spampinato, Valentina; Rossi, François; Colpo, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    Characterisation of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) is of outmost importance for the assessment of the potential risks arising from their extensive use. NMs display indeed a large variety of physico-chemical properties that drastically affect their interaction with biological systems. Among them, hydrophobicity is an important property that is nevertheless only slightly covered by the current physico-chemical characterisation techniques. In this work, we developed a method for the direct characterisation of NM hydrophobicity. The determination of the nanomaterial hydrophobic character is carried out by the direct measurement of the affinity of the NMs for different collectors. Each collector is an engineered surface designed in order to present specific surface charge and hydrophobicity degrees. Being thus characterised by a combination of surface energy components, the collectors enable the NM immobilisation with surface coverage in relation to their hydrophobicity. The experimental results are explained by using the extended DLVO theory, which takes into account the hydrophobic forces acting between NMs and collectors.

  1. Assessing the protection of the nanomaterial workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Paul A; Iavicoli, Ivo; Rantanen, Jorma H; Dahmann, Dirk; Iavicoli, Sergio; Pipke, Rüdiger; Guseva Canu, Irina; Boccuni, Fabio; Ricci, Maximo; Polci, Maria Letizia; Sabbioni, Enrico; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Mantovani, Elvio

    2016-09-01

    Responsible development of any technology, including nanotechnology, requires protecting workers, the first people to be exposed to the products of the technology. In the case of nanotechnology, this is difficult to achieve because in spite of early evidence raising health and safety concerns, there are uncertainties about hazards and risks. The global response to these concerns has been the issuance by authoritative agencies of precautionary guidance to strictly control exposures to engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). This commentary summarizes discussions at the "Symposium on the Health Protection of Nanomaterial Workers" held in Rome (25 and 26 February 2015). There scientists and practitioners from 11 countries took stock of what is known about hazards and risks resulting from exposure to ENMs, confirmed that uncertainties still exist, and deliberated on what it would take to conduct a global assessment of how well workers are being protected from potentially harmful exposures.

  2. Carbon Nanomaterials as Reinforcements for Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials including fellerenes, nanotubes (CNT) and nanofibers have been proposed for many applications. One of applications is to use the carbon nanomaterials as reinforcements for composites, especially for polymer matrices. Carbon nanotubes is a good reinforcement for lightweight composite applications due to its low mass density and high Young's modulus. Two obscures need to overcome for carbon nanotubes as reinforcements in composites, which are large quantity production and functioning the nanotubes. This presentation will discuss the carbon nanotube growth by chemical vapor deposition. In order to reduce the cost of producing carbon nanotubes as well as preventing the sliding problems, carbon nanotubes were also synthesized on carbon fibers. The synthesis process and characterization results of nanotubes and nanotubes/fibers will be discussed in the presentation.

  3. “Smart”nanomaterials for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LE; GUYADER; Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Recent development in nanotechnology has provided new tools for cancer therapy and diagnostics.Because of their small size,nanoscale devices readily interact with biomolecules both on the cell surface and inside the cell.Nanomaterials,such as fullerenes and their derivatives,are effective in terms of interactions with the immune system and have great potential as anticancer drugs.Comparatively,other nanomaterials are able to load active drugs to cancer cells by selectively using the unique tumor environment,such as their enhanced permeability,retention effect and the specific acidic microenvironment.Multifunctional and multiplexed nanoparticles,as the next generation of nanoparticles,are now being extensively investigated and are promising tools to achieve personalized and tailored cancer treatments.

  4. Toxicology of Nanomaterials: Permanent interactive learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castranova Vince

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Particle and Fibre Toxicology wants to play a decisive role in a time where particle research is challenged and driven by the developments and applications of nanomaterials. This aim is not merely quantitative in publishing a given number of papers on nanomaterials, but also qualitatively since the field of nanotoxicology is rapidly emerging and benchmarks for good science are needed. Since then a number of things have happened that merit further analysis. The interactive learning issue is best shown by report and communications on the toxicology of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT. A special workshop on the CNT has now been organized twice in Nagano (Japan and this editorial contains a summary of the most important outcomes. Finally, we take the opportunity discuss some recent reports from the nanotech literature, and more specifically a Chinese study that claims severe consequences of nanoparticle exposure.

  5. Characterization of Nanomaterials by Physical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, C. N. R.; Biswas, Kanishka

    2009-07-01

    Much progress in nanoscience and nanotechnology has been made in the past few years thanks to the increased availability of sophisticated physical methods to characterize nanomaterials. These techniques include electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopies, in addition to standard techniques such as X-ray and neutron diffraction, X-ray scattering, and various spectroscopies. Characterization of nanomaterials includes the determination not only of size and shape, but also of the atomic and electronic structures and other important properties. In this article we describe some of the important methods employed for characterization of nanostructures, describing a few case studies for illustrative purposes. These case studies include characterizations of Au, ReO3, and GaN nanocrystals; ZnO, Ni, and Co nanowires; inorganic and carbon nanotubes; and two-dimensional graphene.

  6. Advances in Multiferroic Nanomaterials Assembled with Clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifeng Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As an entirely new perspective of multifunctional materials, multiferroics have attracted a great deal of attention. With the rapidly developing micro- and nano-electro-mechanical system (MEMS&NEMS, the new kinds of micro- and nanodevices and functionalities aroused extensive research activity in the area of multiferroics. As an ideal building block to assemble the nanostructure, cluster exhibits particular physical properties related to the cluster size at nanoscale, which is efficient in controlling the multiferroic properties for nanomaterials. This review focuses on our recent advances in multiferroic nanomaterials assembled with clusters. In particular, the single phase multiferroic films and compound heterostructured multiferroic films assembled with clusters were introduced detailedly. This technique presents a new and efficient method to produce the nanostructured multiferroic materials for their potential application in NEMS devices.

  7. Nanomaterials and preservation mechanisms of architecture monuments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Rodica-Mariana; Radu, Adrian; Teodorescu, Sofia; Fierǎscu, Irina; Fierǎscu, Radu-Claudiu; Ştirbescu, Raluca-Maria; Dulamǎ, Ioana Daniela; Şuicǎ-Bunghez, Ioana-Raluca; Bucuricǎ, Ioan Alin; Ion, Mihaela-Lucia

    2016-12-01

    Knowledge of the chemical composition of the building materials of the monuments may help us to preserve and protect them from the pollution of our cities. The aim of this work is to characterize the materials of the walls from ancient buildings, the decay products that could be appear due to the action of pollution and a new method based on nanomaterials (hydroxyapatite -HAp) for a conservative preservation of the treated walls. Some analytical techniques have been used, as follow: X-ray fluorescence energy dispersive (EDXRF) (for the relative abundance of major, minor and trace elements), FTIR and Raman spectroscopy (for stratigraphic study of cross-sections of multi-layered materials found in wall paintings), Optical microscopy (OM), (for morphology of the wall samples). The nanomaterial suspension HAp applied on the sample surface by spraying, decreased the capillary water uptake, do not modify significantly the color of the samples and induced a reduced mass loss for the treated samples.

  8. Biological Surface Adsorption Index of Nanomaterials: Modelling Surface Interactions of Nanomaterials with Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ran; Riviere, Jim E

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the interactions between nanomaterials and their surrounding environment is crucial for safety evaluation in the application of nanotechnology as well as its development and standardization. In this chapter, we demonstrate the importance of the adsorption of surrounding molecules onto the surface of nanomaterials by forming biocorona and thus impact the bio-identity and fate of those materials. We illustrate the key factors including various physical forces in determining the interaction happening at bio-nano interfaces. We further discuss the mathematical endeavors in explaining and predicting the adsorption phenomena, and propose a new statistics-based surface adsorption model, the Biological Surface Adsorption Index (BSAI), to quantitatively analyze the interaction profile of surface adsorption of a large group of small organic molecules onto nanomaterials with varying surface physicochemical properties, first employing five descriptors representing the surface energy profile of the nanomaterials, then further incorporating traditional semi-empirical adsorption models to address concentration effects of solutes. These Advancements in surface adsorption modelling showed a promising development in the application of quantitative predictive models in biological applications, nanomedicine, and environmental safety assessment of nanomaterials.

  9. Nanomaterials for electrochemical sensing and biosensing

    CERN Document Server

    Pumera, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Part 1: Nanomaterial-Based ElectrodesCarbon Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Sensors and Biosensors, Martin Pumera, National Institute for Materials Science, JapanElectrochemistry on Single Carbon Nanotube, Pat Collier, Caltech, USATheory of Voltammetry at Nanoparticle-Modified Electrodes, Richard G. Compton, Oxford University, UKMetal Oxide Nanoparticle-Modified Electrodes, Frank Marken, University of Bath, UKSemiconductor Quantum Dots for Electrochemical Bioanalysis, Eugenii Katz, Clarkson University, USAN

  10. Biokinetics and Biodynamics of Nanomaterial Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-30

    al., 2003), multi- walled carbon nanotubes (Monteiro-Riviere et al., 2005), 6-aminohexanoic acid- functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (Zhang...fullerene-based amino acid (Rouse et al., 2006), functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) (Zhang et al., 2007), QD (Ryman-Rasmussen et al...Wang, X., Pei , R., Yan, T., Zhoa, Y., Guo, X. 2005. Cytotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials: single-wall nanotube , multi-wall nanotube , and fullerene

  11. Biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanodevices

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Biosensors Based on Nanomaterials and Nanodevices links interdisciplinary research from leading experts to provide graduate students, academics, researchers, and industry professionals alike with a comprehensive source for key advancements and future trends in nanostructured biosensor development. It describes the concepts, principles, materials, device fabrications, functions, system integrations, and applications of various types of biosensors based on signal transduction mechanisms, including fluorescence, photonic crystal, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, electrochemistry, electro-lumine

  12. The European commission tries to define nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidén, Göran

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, the European Commission held a short consultation on a proposed definition for nanomaterials, to be used in European Union legislation and programmes. This was in response to a European Parliament resolution, and the definition followed a proposal by one of the Commission's scientific committees. The definition has three parts: on size distribution, size of internal structural elements, and surface area; a material caught by any of these parts meets the definition. There are a number of problems. The definition seems to be written with engineered nanomaterials in mind but as written applies to non-supplied materials, such as smokes. The structural element component seems to capture items such as sunscreen and tennis rackets, which include nanomaterials. Use of the definition will require some international standards, which have yet to be written and which will involve some difficult decisions. It is understandable why there are both size and surface area requirements, but they are not wholly consistent. The Commission plans a further consultation in 2012, but it might be better to delay this until after the standardisation work.

  13. Nanomaterials Enabled Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Pei

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs), as the third generation of solar cells, have attracted tremendous attention for their unique properties. The semi-transparent nature, low-cost, environmental friendliness, and convenient manufacturing conditions of this generation of solar cells are promising aspects of DSCs that make them competitive in their future applications. However, much improvement in many aspects of DSCs' is required for the realization of its full potential. In this thesis, various nanomaterials, such as graphene, multi wall carbon nanotubes, vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes, hybrid structures and etc, have been used to improve the performance of DSCs. First, the application of graphene covered metal grids as transparent conductive electrodes in DSCs is explored. It is demonstrated that the mechanical properties of these flexible hybrid transparent electrodes, in both bending and stretching tests, are better than their oxide-based counter parts. Moreover, different kinds of carbon nanotubes, for instance vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes, have been used as a replacement for traditional platinum counter electrodes, in both iodine electrolyte, and sulfide-electrolyte. Further, a flexible, seamlessly connected, 3-dimensional vertically-aligned few wall carbon nanotubes graphene hybrid structures on Ni foil as DSCs' counter electrodes improve their efficiency significantly. All these nanomaterials enabled DSCs architectures achieve a comparable or better performance than standard brittle platinum/fluorine doped tin oxide combination. The large surface area of such nanomaterials in addition to the high electrical conductivity and their mechanical robustness provides a platform for significant enhancements in DSCs' performance.

  14. Nanomaterials - What energy landscapes can tell us

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Christian Schön

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials bridge the gaps between crystalline materials, thin films, and molecules, and are of great importance in the design of new classes of materials, since the existence of many modifications of a nano-object for the same overall composition allows us to tune the properties of the nanomaterial. However, the structural analysis of nano-size systems is often difficult and their structural stability is frequently relatively low. Thus, a study of their energy landscape is needed to determine or predict possible structures, and analyse their stability, via the determination of the minima on the landscape and the generalized barriers separating them. In this contribution, we introduce the major concepts of energy landscapes for chemical systems, and present summaries of four applications to nano-materials: a MgO monolayer on a sapphire substrate, possible quasitwo-dimensional carbon-silicon networks, the ab initio energy landscape of Cu4Ag4-clusters, and the possible arrangements of ethane molecules on an ideally smooth substrate.

  15. The applicability of chemical alternatives assessment for engineered nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Rune; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Jacobs, Molly;

    2017-01-01

    The use of alternatives assessment to substitute hazardous chemicals with inherently safer options is gaining momentum worldwide as a legislative and corporate strategy to minimize consumer, occupational, and environmental risks. Engineered nanomaterials represent an interesting case for alternat......The use of alternatives assessment to substitute hazardous chemicals with inherently safer options is gaining momentum worldwide as a legislative and corporate strategy to minimize consumer, occupational, and environmental risks. Engineered nanomaterials represent an interesting case...... for alternatives assessment approaches as they can be considered both emerging “chemicals” of concern, as well as potentially safer alternatives to hazardous chemicals. However, comparing the hazards of nanomaterials to traditional chemicals or to other nanomaterials is challenging and critical elements...... in chemical hazard and exposure assessment may have to be fundamentally altered to sufficiently address nanomaterials. The aim of this paper is to assess the overall applicability of alternatives assessment methods for nanomaterials and outline recommendations to enhance their use in this context. This paper...

  16. Management of nanomaterials safety in research environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riediker Michael

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite numerous discussions, workshops, reviews and reports about responsible development of nanotechnology, information describing health and environmental risk of engineered nanoparticles or nanomaterials is severely lacking and thus insufficient for completing rigorous risk assessment on their use. However, since preliminary scientific evaluations indicate that there are reasonable suspicions that activities involving nanomaterials might have damaging effects on human health; the precautionary principle must be applied. Public and private institutions as well as industries have the duty to adopt preventive and protective measures proportionate to the risk intensity and the desired level of protection. In this work, we present a practical, 'user-friendly' procedure for a university-wide safety and health management of nanomaterials, developed as a multi-stakeholder effort (government, accident insurance, researchers and experts for occupational safety and health. The process starts using a schematic decision tree that allows classifying the nano laboratory into three hazard classes similar to a control banding approach (from Nano 3 - highest hazard to Nano1 - lowest hazard. Classifying laboratories into risk classes would require considering actual or potential exposure to the nanomaterial as well as statistical data on health effects of exposure. Due to the fact that these data (as well as exposure limits for each individual material are not available, risk classes could not be determined. For each hazard level we then provide a list of required risk mitigation measures (technical, organizational and personal. The target 'users' of this safety and health methodology are researchers and safety officers. They can rapidly access the precautionary hazard class of their activities and the corresponding adequate safety and health measures. We succeed in convincing scientist dealing with nano-activities that adequate safety measures and

  17. Effects of Engineered Nanomaterials on Plants Growth: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Farzad Aslani; Samira Bagheri; Nurhidayatullaili Muhd Julkapli; Abdul Shukor Juraimi; Farahnaz Sadat Golestan Hashemi; Ali Baghdadi

    2014-01-01

    Rapid development and wide applications of nanotechnology brought about a significant increment on the number of engineered nanomaterials (ENs) inevitably entering our living system. Plants comprise of a very important living component of the terrestrial ecosystem. Studies on the influence of engineered nanomaterials (carbon and metal/metal oxides based) on plant growth indicated that in the excess content, engineered nanomaterials influences seed germination. It assessed the shoot-to-root ra...

  18. Functionalization of Semiconductor Nanomaterials for Optoelectronic Devices And Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-04

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0069 FUNCTIONALIZATIONS OF SEMICONDUCTOR NANOMATERIALS FOR OPTOELECTROINC DEVEICE AND Omar Manasreh UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS Final...Functionalization of semiconductor nanomaterials for optoelectronic devices and components 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0136 5c. PROGRAM...Distribution A 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES None 14. ABSTRACT Various semiconductor nanomaterials were functionalized for optoelectronic devices, such

  19. The applicability of chemical alternatives assessment for engineered nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Rune; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Jacobs, Molly; Tickner, Joel; Ellenbecker, Michael; Baun, Anders

    2017-01-01

    The use of alternatives assessment to substitute hazardous chemicals with inherently safer options is gaining momentum worldwide as a legislative and corporate strategy to minimize consumer, occupational, and environmental risks. Engineered nanomaterials represent an interesting case for alternatives assessment approaches, because they can be considered both emerging "chemicals" of concern, as well as potentially safer alternatives to hazardous chemicals. However, comparing the hazards of nanomaterials to traditional chemicals or to other nanomaterials is challenging, and critical elements in chemical hazard and exposure assessment may have to be fundamentally altered to sufficiently address nanomaterials. The aim of this paper is to assess the overall applicability of alternatives assessment methods for nanomaterials and to outline recommendations to enhance their use in this context. The present paper focuses on the adaptability of existing hazard and exposure assessment approaches to engineered nanomaterials as well as strategies to design inherently safer nanomaterials. We argue that alternatives assessment for nanomaterials is complicated by the sheer number of nanomaterials possible. As a result, the inclusion of new data tools that can efficiently and effectively evaluate nanomaterials as substitutes is needed to strengthen the alternatives assessment process. However, we conclude that with additional tools to enhance traditional hazard and exposure assessment modules of alternatives assessment, such as the use of mechanistic toxicity screens and control banding tools, alternatives assessment can be adapted to evaluate engineered nanomaterials as potential substitutes for chemicals of concern and to ensure safer nanomaterials are incorporated in the design of new products. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2017;13:177-187. © 2016 SETAC.

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  3. Nanomaterials in Lubricants: An Industrial Perspective on Current Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Zhmud

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview on the use of various classes of nanomaterials in lubricant formulations. The following classes of nanomaterials are considered: fullerenes, nanodiamonds, ultradispersed boric acid and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE. Current advances in using nanomaterials in engine oils, industrial lubricants and greases are discussed. Results of numerous studies combined with formulation experience of the authors strongly suggest that nanomaterials do indeed have potential for enhancing certain lubricant properties, yet there is a long way to go before balanced formulations are developed.

  4. Exploring the possibilities and limitations of a nanomaterials genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Chenxi; Siler, Todd; Ozin, Geoffrey A

    2015-01-07

    What are we going to do with the cornucopia of nanomaterials appearing in the open and patent literature, every day? Imagine the benefits of an intelligent and convenient means of categorizing, organizing, sifting, sorting, connecting, and utilizing this information in scientifically and technologically innovative ways by building a Nanomaterials Genome founded upon an all-purpose Periodic Table of Nanomaterials. In this Concept article, inspired by work on the Human Genome project, which began in 1989 together with motivation from the recent emergence of the Materials Genome project initiated in 2011 and the Nanoinformatics Roadmap 2020 instigated in 2010, we envision the development of a Nanomaterials Genome (NMG) database with the most advanced data-mining tools that leverage inference engines to help connect and interpret patterns of nanomaterials information. It will be equipped with state-of-the-art visualization techniques that rapidly organize and picture, categorize and interrelate the inherited behavior of complex nanomatter from the information programmed in its constituent nanomaterials building blocks. A Nanomaterials Genome Initiative (NMGI) of the type imagined herein has the potential to serve the global nanoscience community with an opportunity to speed up the development continuum of nanomaterials through the innovation process steps of discovery, structure determination and property optimization, functionality elucidation, system design and integration, certification and manufacturing to deployment in technologies that apply these versatile nanomaterials in environmentally responsible ways. The possibilities and limitations of this concept are critically evaluated in this article.

  5. Magnetic Nano-Materials: Truly Sustainable Green Chemistry Nano Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    We envisioned a novel nano-catalyst system, which can bridge the homogenous and heterogeneous system, and simultaneously be cheaper, easily accessible (sustainable) and possibly does not require elaborate work-up. Because of its nano-size, i.e. high surface area, the contact betw...

  6. Development of Magnetic Nanomaterials and Devices for Biological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-30

    suitably encapsulated , a drug or specific specie of interest can be directed to the appropriate site. Because of their small size nanoparticles can...luminescence properties of the encapsulated semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots) remained largely unchanged with minimal increase in peak width...intraperitoneal injection (30 mg/kg body weight in 45% cyclodextrin in saline) two hours prior to light stimulation, rats were exposed to five hours of

  7. Biomimetic magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Klem

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles are of considerable interest because of their potential use in high-density memory devices, spintronics, and applications in diagnostic medicine. The conditions for synthesis of these materials are often complicated by their high reaction temperatures, costly reagents, and post-processing requirements. Practical applications of magnetic nanoparticles will require the development of alternate synthetic strategies that can overcome these impediments. Biomimetic approaches to materials chemistry have provided a new avenue for the synthesis and assembly of magnetic nanomaterials that has great potential for overcoming these obstacles.

  8. NEIMiner: nanomaterial environmental impact data miner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang K

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Kaizhi Tang,1 Xiong Liu,1 Stacey L Harper,2 Jeffery A Steevens,3 Roger Xu1 1Intelligent Automation, Inc, Rockville, MD, USA; 2Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; 3US Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS, USA Abstract: As more engineered nanomaterials (eNM are developed for a wide range of applications, it is crucial to minimize any unintended environmental impacts resulting from the application of eNM. To realize this vision, industry and policymakers must base risk management decisions on sound scientific information about the environmental fate of eNM, their availability to receptor organisms (eg, uptake, and any resultant biological effects (eg, toxicity. To address this critical need, we developed a model-driven, data mining system called NEIMiner, to study nanomaterial environmental impact (NEI. NEIMiner consists of four components: NEI modeling framework, data integration, data management and access, and model building. The NEI modeling framework defines the scope of NEI modeling and the strategy of integrating NEI models to form a layered, comprehensive predictability. The data integration layer brings together heterogeneous data sources related to NEI via automatic web services and web scraping technologies. The data management and access layer reuses and extends a popular content management system (CMS, Drupal, and consists of modules that model the complex data structure for NEI-related bibliography and characterization data. The model building layer provides an advanced analysis capability for NEI data. Together, these components provide significant value to the process of aggregating and analyzing large-scale distributed NEI data. A prototype of the NEIMiner system is available at http://neiminer.i-a-i.com/. Keywords: nanomaterial environmental impact, data integration, data management

  9. Nanomechanics of Fiber-like Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Property characterization of nanomaterials is challenged by the small size of the structure because of the difficulties in manipulation. Here we demonstrate a novel approach that allows a direct measurement of the mechanical properties of individual nanotube-like structures by in-situ transmission electron microscopy(TEM).The technique is powerful in a way that it can directly correlate the atomic-scale microstructure of the carbon nanotube with its physical properties,providing a one-to-one correspondence in structure-property characterization. Applications of the technique will be demonstrated on mechanical properties, the electron field emission and the ballistic quantum conductance in individual nanotubes.

  10. Nanomaterials Meet Li-ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Nam Hee; Brog, Jean-Pierre; Maharajan, Sivarajakumar; Crochet, Aurélien; Fromm, Katharina M

    2015-01-01

    Li-ion batteries are used in many applications in everyday life: cell phones, laser pointers, laptops, cordless drillers or saws, bikes and even cars. Yet, there is room for improvement in order to make the batteries smaller and last longer. The Fromm group contributes to this research focusing mainly on nanoscale lithium ion cathode materials. This contribution gives an overview over our current activities in the field of batteries. After an introduction on the nano-materials of LiCoO(2) and LiMnPO(4), the studies of our cathode composition and preparation will be presented.

  11. Advanced Functional Nanomaterials for Biological Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    phantom and in animal mode. The expected outcome—the assessment of a patient’s entire blood volume (in adults 5 L)—will provide a significant (100...formation. We hypothesized that such a study could result in a possible vaccine for osteoporosis . 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 Control SW 20 SW40 SWCPE...GCNFs) were produced by a single-step reduction process and used for the growth and differentiation of human adult stem cells. The nanomaterials were

  12. Development of nanomaterials for environmental monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    El monitoreig ambiental basat en sistemes de biosensors té molta rellevància, no només en el camp de la investigació sinó també en aplicacions reals a nivell industrial. Això és degut als avantatges d'aquestes plataformes analítiques com, especialment, la seva simplicitat i alta rendibilitat pel seu cost. A més, els avenços recents en nanociència i nanotecnologia incrementen donen lloc a nous nanomaterials que tenen propietats elèctriques interessants com ara la seva capacitat de millorar la ...

  13. Programming structure into 3D nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara Van Gough

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Programming three dimensional nanostructures into materials is becoming increasingly important given the need for ever more highly functional solids. Applications for materials with complex programmed structures include solar energy harvesting, energy storage, molecular separation, sensors, pharmaceutical agent delivery, nanoreactors and advanced optical devices. Here we discuss examples of molecular and optical routes to program the structure of three-dimensional nanomaterials with exquisite control over nanomorphology and the resultant properties and conclude with a discussion of the opportunities and challenges of such an approach.

  14. Polymer-mediated formation of polyoxomolybdate nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Quan

    A polymer-mediated synthetic pathway to a polyoxomolybdate nanomaterial is investigated in this work. Block copolymers or homopolymers containing poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) are mixed with a MoO2(OH)(OOH) aqueous solution to form a golden gel or viscous solution. As revealed by synchrotron X-ray scattering measurements, electron microscopy, and other characterization techniques, the final dark blue polyoxomolybdate product is a highly ordered simple cubic network similar to certain zeolite structure but with a much larger lattice constant of ˜5.2 nm. The average size of the cube-like single crystals is close to 1 mum. Based on its relatively low density (˜2.2 g/cm3), the nanomaterial can be highly porous if the amount of the residual polymer can be substantially reduced. The valence of molybdenum is ˜5.7 based on cerimetric titration, representing the mixed-valence nature of the polyoxomolybdate structure. The self-assembled structures (if any) of the polymer gel do not have any correlation with the final polyoxomolybdate nanostructure, excluding the possible role of polymers being a structure-directing template. On the other hand, the PEO polymer stabilizes the precursor molybdenum compound through coordination between its ether oxygen atoms and molybdenum atoms, and reduces the molybdenum (VI) precursor compound with its hydroxyl group being a reducing agent. The rare simple cubic ordering necessitates the existence of special affinities among the polyoxomolybdate nanosphere units resulted from the reduction reaction. Our mechanism study shows that the acidified condition is necessary for the synthesis of the mixed-valence polyoxomolybdate clusters, while H2O2 content modulates the rate of the reduction reaction. The polymer degradation is evidenced by the observation of a huge viscosity change, and is likely through a hydrolysis process catalyzed by molybdenum compounds. Cube-like polyoxomolybdate nanocrystals with size of ˜40 nm are obtained by means of

  15. Nanodevices and Nanomaterials for Ecological Security

    CERN Document Server

    Kiv, Arnold

    2012-01-01

      This book is devoted to a wide range of problems concerning applications of nanomaterials and nanodevices as effective solutions to modern ecological problems. Leading experts in nanoscience and nanotechnology present the key theoretical, experimental and implementation issues related to the creation and utilization of novel nanoscale devices to help ensure ecological security. The authors discuss appropriate nanotechnologies for minimizing various types of risk: to human life, technogenic risk, or indeed terrorist threats. Particular emphasis is placed on defining and studying the required materials properties, and – in the field – on nanoscale devices for sensors and monitoring.

  16. Single step reconstitution of multifunctional high-density lipoprotein-derived nanomaterials using microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YongTae; Fay, Francois; Cormode, David P; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Tang, Jun; Hennessy, Elizabeth J; Ma, Mingming; Moore, Kathryn; Farokhzad, Omid C; Fisher, Edward Allen; Mulder, Willem J M; Langer, Robert; Fayad, Zahi A

    2013-11-26

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural nanoparticle that transports peripheral cholesterol to the liver. Reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) exhibits antiatherothrombotic properties and is being considered as a natural treatment for cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore, HDL nanoparticle platforms have been created for targeted delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. The current methods for HDL reconstitution involve lengthy procedures that are challenging to scale up. A central need in the synthesis of rHDL, and multifunctional nanomaterials in general, is to establish large-scale production of reproducible and homogeneous batches in a simple and efficient fashion. Here, we present a large-scale microfluidics-based manufacturing method for single-step synthesis of HDL-mimicking nanomaterials (μHDL). μHDL is shown to have the same properties (e.g., size, morphology, bioactivity) as conventionally reconstituted HDL and native HDL. In addition, we were able to incorporate simvastatin (a hydrophobic drug) into μHDL, as well as gold, iron oxide, quantum dot nanocrystals or fluorophores to enable its detection by computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or fluorescence microscopy, respectively. Our approach may contribute to effective development and optimization of lipoprotein-based nanomaterials for medical imaging and drug delivery.

  17. Impact of organic and inorganic nanomaterials in the soil microbial community structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Veronica; Lopes, Isabel [Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, P-3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM (Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies), University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Rocha-Santos, Teresa [ISEIT/Viseu, Instituto Piaget, Estrada do Alto do Gaio, Galifonge, 3515-776 Lordosa, Viseu (Portugal); Santos, Ana L. [Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, P-3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM (Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies), University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Rasteiro, Graca M.; Antunes, Filipe [CIEPQPF, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Polo II, University of Coimbra, 3030-290 Coimbra (Portugal); Goncalves, Fernando; Soares, Amadeu M.V.M.; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide [Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, P-3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM (Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies), University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Gomes, Newton N.C.M., E-mail: gomesncm@ua.pt [Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, P-3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM (Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies), University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Pereira, Ruth [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); CESAM (Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies), University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2012-05-01

    In this study the effect of organic and inorganic nanomaterials (NMs) on the structural diversity of the soil microbial community was investigated by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis, after amplification with universal primers for the bacterial region V6-V8 of 16S rDNA. The polymers of carboxylmethyl-cellulose (CMC), of hydrophobically modified CMC (HM-CMC), and hydrophobically modified polyethylglycol (HM-PEG); the vesicles of sodium dodecyl sulphate/didodecyl dimethylammonium bromide (SDS/DDAB) and of monoolein/sodium oleate (Mo/NaO); titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}), titanium silicon oxide (TiSiO{sub 4}), CdSe/ZnS quantum dots, gold nanorods, and Fe/Co magnetic fluid were the NMs tested. Soil samples were incubated, for a period of 30 days, after being spiked with NM suspensions previously characterized by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) or by an ultrahigh-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM). The analysis of similarities (ANOSIM) of DGGE profiles showed that gold nanorods, TiO{sub 2}, CMC, HM-CMC, HM-PEG, and SDS/DDAB have significantly affected the structural diversity of the soil bacterial community. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic and inorganic nanomaterials on soil microbial community. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural diversity was investigated by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All the organic nanomaterials, TiO{sub 2} and gold nanorods significantly affected the structural diversity.

  18. Recent Development of Nano-Materials Used in DNA Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibin Ying

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available As knowledge of the structure and function of nucleic acid molecules has increased, sequence-specific DNA detection has gained increased importance. DNA biosensors based on nucleic acid hybridization have been actively developed because of their specificity, speed, portability, and low cost. Recently, there has been considerable interest in using nano-materials for DNA biosensors. Because of their high surface-to-volume ratios and excellent biological compatibilities, nano-materials could be used to increase the amount of DNA immobilization; moreover, DNA bound to nano-materials can maintain its biological activity. Alternatively, signal amplification by labeling a targeted analyte with nano-materials has also been reported for DNA biosensors in many papers. This review summarizes the applications of various nano-materials for DNA biosensors during past five years. We found that nano-materials of small sizes were advantageous as substrates for DNA attachment or as labels for signal amplification; and use of two or more types of nano-materials in the biosensors could improve their overall quality and to overcome the deficiencies of the individual nano-components. Most current DNA biosensors require the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR in their protocols. However, further development of nano-materials with smaller size and/or with improved biological and chemical properties would substantially enhance the accuracy, selectivity and sensitivity of DNA biosensors. Thus, DNA biosensors without PCR amplification may become a reality in the foreseeable future.

  19. Synthesis, Growth Mechanism, and Applications of Zinc Oxide Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shulin JI; Changhui YE

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews recent progresses in growth mechanism, synthesis, and applications of zinc oxide nanomaterials (mainly focusing on one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials). In the first part of this article, we briefly introduce the importance, the synthesis methods and growth mechanisms, the properties and applications of ZnO 1D nanomaterials. In the second part of this article, the growth mechanisms of ZnO 1D nanomaterials will be discussed in detail in the framework of vapor-liquid-solid (VLS), vapor-solid (VS), and aqueous solution growth (ASG) approaches. Both qualitative and quantitative information will be provided to show how a controlled synthesis of ZnO 1D nanomaterials can be achieved. In the third part of this article, we present recent progresses in our group for the synthesis of ZnO 1D nanomaterials, and the results from other groups will only be mentioned briefly. Especially, experiment designing according to theories will be elaborated to demonstrate the concept of controlled synthesis. In the fourth part of this article, the properties and potential applications of ZnO 1D nanomaterials will be treated. Finally, a summary part will be presented in the fifth section. The future trend of research for ZnO 1D nanomaterials will be pointed out and key issues to be solved will be proposed.

  20. Nanomaterials for membrane fouling control: accomplishments and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Mi, Baoxia

    2013-11-01

    We report a review of recent research efforts on incorporating nanomaterials-including metal/metal oxide nanoparticles, carbon-based nanomaterials, and polymeric nanomaterials-into/onto membranes to improve membrane antifouling properties in biomedical or potentially medical-related applications. In general, nanomaterials can be incorporated into/onto a membrane by blending them into membrane fabricating materials or by attaching them to membrane surfaces via physical or chemical approaches. Overall, the fascinating, multifaceted properties (eg, high hydrophilicity, superparamagnetic properties, antibacterial properties, amenable functionality, strong hydration capability) of nanomaterials provide numerous novel strategies and unprecedented opportunities to fully mitigate membrane fouling. However, there are still challenges in achieving a broader adoption of nanomaterials in the membrane processes used for biomedical applications. Most of these challenges arise from the concerns over their long-term antifouling performance, hemocompatibility, and toxicity toward humans. Therefore, rigorous investigation is still needed before the adoption of some of these nanomaterials in biomedical applications, especially for those nanomaterials proposed to be used in the human body or in contact with living tissue/body fluids for a long period of time. Nevertheless, it is reasonable to predict that the service lifetime of membrane-based biomedical devices and implants will be prolonged significantly with the adoption of appropriate fouling control strategies.

  1. Development of a Nanomaterials One-Week Intersession Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Keith A.; Bullen, Heather A.

    2008-01-01

    A novel one-week intersession lecture-lab hybrid course on nanomaterials is presented. The course provided a combination of background theory and hands-on laboratory experiments to educate students about nanomaterials and nanotechnology. The design of the course, subject matter, and laboratory experiments are discussed. Topics and level were…

  2. Effects of engineered nanomaterials on plants growth: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Farzad; Bagheri, Samira; Muhd Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Hashemi, Farahnaz Sadat Golestan; Baghdadi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Rapid development and wide applications of nanotechnology brought about a significant increment on the number of engineered nanomaterials (ENs) inevitably entering our living system. Plants comprise of a very important living component of the terrestrial ecosystem. Studies on the influence of engineered nanomaterials (carbon and metal/metal oxides based) on plant growth indicated that in the excess content, engineered nanomaterials influences seed germination. It assessed the shoot-to-root ratio and the growth of the seedlings. From the toxicological studies to date, certain types of engineered nanomaterials can be toxic once they are not bound to a substrate or if they are freely circulating in living systems. It is assumed that the different types of engineered nanomaterials affect the different routes, behavior, and the capability of the plants. Furthermore, different, or even opposing conclusions, have been drawn from most studies on the interactions between engineered nanomaterials with plants. Therefore, this paper comprehensively reviews the studies on the different types of engineered nanomaterials and their interactions with different plant species, including the phytotoxicity, uptakes, and translocation of engineered nanomaterials by the plant at the whole plant and cellular level.

  3. Biophysical responses upon the interaction of nanomaterials with cellular interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun-Long; Putcha, Nirupama; Ng, Kee Woei; Leong, David Tai; Lim, Chwee Teck; Loo, Say Chye Joachim; Chen, Xiaodong

    2013-03-19

    The explosion of study of nanomaterials in biological applications (the nano-bio interface) can be ascribed to nanomaterials' growing importance in diagnostics, therapeutics, theranostics (therapeutic diagnostics), and targeted modulation of cellular processes. However, a growing number of critics have raised concerns over the potential risks of nanomaterials to human health and safety. It is essential to understand nanomaterials' potential toxicity before they are tested in humans. These risks are complicated to unravel, however, because of the complexity of cells and their nanoscale macromolecular components, which enable cells to sense and respond to environmental cues, including nanomaterials. In this Account, we explore these risks from the perspective of the biophysical interactions between nanomaterials and cells. Biophysical responses to the uptake of nanomaterials can include conformational changes in biomolecules like DNA and proteins, and changes to the cellular membrane and the cytoskeleton. Changes to the latter two, in particular, can induce changes in cell elasticity, morphology, motility, adhesion, and invasion. This Account reviews what is known about cells' biophysical responses to the uptake of the most widely studied and used nanoparticles, such as carbon-based, metal, metal-oxide, and semiconductor nanomaterials. We postulate that the biophysical structure impairment induced by nanomaterials is one of the key causes of nanotoxicity. The disruption of cellular structures is affected by the size, shape, and chemical composition of nanomaterials, which are also determining factors of nanotoxicity. Currently, popular nanotoxicity characterizations, such as the MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays, only provide end-point results through chemical reactions. Focusing on biophysical structural changes induced by nanomaterials, possibly in real-time, could deepen our understanding of the normal and altered states of subcellular structures and

  4. Design of nanomaterial based systems for novel vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Li, Wen; Kirberger, Michael; Liao, Wenzhen; Ren, Jiaoyan

    2016-05-26

    With lower cell toxicity and higher specificity, novel vaccines have been greatly developed and applied to emerging infectious and chronic diseases. However, due to problems associated with low immunogenicity and complicated processing steps, the development of novel vaccines has been limited. With the rapid development of bio-technologies and material sciences, nanomaterials are playing essential roles in novel vaccine design. Incorporation of nanomaterials is expected to improve delivery efficiency, to increase immunogenicity, and to reduce the administration dosage. The purpose of this review is to discuss the employment of nanomaterials, including polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, virus-like particles, peptide amphiphiles micelles, peptide nanofibers and microneedle arrays, in vaccine design. Compared to traditional methods, vaccines made from nanomaterials display many appealing benefits, including precise stimulation of immune responses, effective targeting to certain tissue or cells, and desirable biocompatibility. Current research suggests that nanomaterials may improve our approach to the design and delivery of novel vaccines.

  5. Occupational Exposure Assessment of Nanomaterials using Control Banding Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liguori, Biase

    Nanotechnology can be termed as the “new industrial revolution”. A broad range of potential benefits in various applications for the environment and everyday life of humans can be related to the use of nanotechnology. Nanomaterials are used in a large variety of products already in the market...... assessment to nanomaterials is still a promising route. A few years ago a new conceptual model for the assessment of inhalation exposure to nanomaterials was developed. As illustrated in this thesis, this new model includes considerations on nanoparticles behaviour and physical and chemical properties...... to pursue the development of an advanced CB tool for occupational exposure assessment to nanomaterials. Such as model could be a suitable strategic component for a first exposure assessment and may also improve the risk communication between stakeholders involved in risk assessment of nanomaterials...

  6. The Nanopharmacology and Nanotoxicology of Nanomaterials: New Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radomska, Anna; Leszczyszyn, Jarosław; Radomski, Marek W

    2016-01-01

    The very dynamic growth of nanotechnology, nanomaterials (sized 1-100 nm) and their medical applications over the past 10 years has promised to add a new impetus to the diagnostics and therapeutics of a wide range of human pathologies, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diseases of the central nervous system. This growth in nanomedicine also fuels advances in bioengineering, regenerative medicine and the development of medical devices. However, as with all new pharmaceuticals and medical devices, new opportunities are inherently accompanied by new challenges due to the ability of nanomaterials to interact with the body on the cellular, subcellular and molecular levels. This article reviews some of the most compelling problems related to the nanopharmacology and nanotoxicology of nanomaterials. The overview focuses on opportunities emerging from the development of multifunctional nanomaterials and nanotheranostics for the diagnostics and therapy of both major and rare diseases. Challenges related to the hemocompatibility of nanomaterials are also discussed.

  7. Applied Research of Nanomaterials in Photo-thermal Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Hang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the applied research of nanomaterials in photo-thermal therapy and based on the understanding of the principle of photo-thermal therapy and its medical equipment, this paper analyzes nanomaterials used for photo-thermal therapy, establishes model by the use of comprehensive evaluation method and selects nano-materials that are suiTable for photo-thermal therapy, namely, carbon nanomaterials and precious metal nano-materials. In addition, this paper analyzes the importance of human surgical health by the use of photo-thermal therapy and gives considerations from three aspects, that is, the surgical equipment health, the operating room hygiene and the medical health. This paper also establishes a mathematical model through correlation analysis and credibility analysis, thus emphasizing the necessity of surgical health.

  8. Comparative evaluation of methods to quantify dissolution of nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Nanna B.; Kruse, Susanne; Baun, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Effects and behaviour of nanomaterials in the environment depends on the materials' specific physical and chemical properties and for certain nanomaterials (e.g., Ag, ZnO and CuO) aqueous solubility is of outmost importance. The solubility of metals salts is normally described as a maximum...... dissolved concentration or by the solubility constant (Ksp). For nanomaterials it is essential to also assess solubility kinetics as nanomaterials will often not dissolve instantaneously upon contact with artificial aqueous media or natural waters. Dissolution kinetics will thereby influence their short...... and long-term environmental fate as well as laboratory test results. This highlights the need to evaluate and improve the reliability of methods applied to assess the solubility kinetics of nanomaterials. Based on existing OECD guidelines and guidance documents on aqueous dissolution of metals and metal...

  9. NanoRisk - A Conceptual Decision Support Tool for Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders; Alstrup Jensen, K.

    2011-01-01

    Only a few risk assessment methodologies and approaches are useful for assessing the risk for professional end-users, consumers and the environment. We have developed a generic framework (NanoRiskCat) that can be used by companies and risk assessors to categorize nanomaterials considering existing...... environmental, health and safety information and known uncertainties. In NanoRiskCat’s simplest form, the final evaluation outcome for a specific nanomaterial in a given application will be communicated in the form of a short title (e.g. TiO2 in sunscreen) describing the use of the nanomaterial. This short...... to the exposure and hazard potential are green , yellow corresponding to none, possible, expected and unknown, respectively. The exposure potential was evaluated based on 1) the location of the nanomaterial and 2) a judgment of the potential of nanomaterial exposure based on the description and explanation...

  10. A practical approach to determine dose metrics for nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmaar, Christiaan J E; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M; Oomen, Agnes G; Chen, Jingwen; de Jong, Wim H; Sips, Adriënne J A M; Wang, Zhuang; Park, Margriet V D Z

    2015-05-01

    Traditionally, administered mass is used to describe doses of conventional chemical substances in toxicity studies. For deriving toxic doses of nanomaterials, mass and chemical composition alone may not adequately describe the dose, because particles with the same chemical composition can have completely different toxic mass doses depending on properties such as particle size. Other dose metrics such as particle number, volume, or surface area have been suggested, but consensus is lacking. The discussion regarding the most adequate dose metric for nanomaterials clearly needs a systematic, unbiased approach to determine the most appropriate dose metric for nanomaterials. In the present study, the authors propose such an approach and apply it to results from in vitro and in vivo experiments with silver and silica nanomaterials. The proposed approach is shown to provide a convenient tool to systematically investigate and interpret dose metrics of nanomaterials. Recommendations for study designs aimed at investigating dose metrics are provided.

  11. Aptamer-assembled nanomaterials for fluorescent sensing and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Danqing; He, Lei; Zhang, Ge; Lv, Aiping; Wang, Ruowen; Zhang, Xiaobing; Tan, Weihong

    2017-01-01

    Aptamers, which are selected in vitro by a technology known as the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), represent a crucial recognition element in molecular sensing. With advantages such as good biocompatibility, facile functionalization, and special optical and physical properties, various nanomaterials can protect aptamers from enzymatic degradation and nonspecific binding in living systems and thus provide a preeminent platform for biochemical applications. Coupling aptamers with various nanomaterials offers many opportunities for developing highly sensitive and selective sensing systems. Here, we focus on the recent applications of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials in fluorescent sensing and imaging. Different types of nanomaterials are examined along with their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, we look toward the future of aptamer-assembled nanomaterials.

  12. NEIMiner: nanomaterial environmental impact data miner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kaizhi; Liu, Xiong; Harper, Stacey L; Steevens, Jeffery A; Xu, Roger

    2013-01-01

    As more engineered nanomaterials (eNM) are developed for a wide range of applications, it is crucial to minimize any unintended environmental impacts resulting from the application of eNM. To realize this vision, industry and policymakers must base risk management decisions on sound scientific information about the environmental fate of eNM, their availability to receptor organisms (eg, uptake), and any resultant biological effects (eg, toxicity). To address this critical need, we developed a model-driven, data mining system called NEIMiner, to study nanomaterial environmental impact (NEI). NEIMiner consists of four components: NEI modeling framework, data integration, data management and access, and model building. The NEI modeling framework defines the scope of NEI modeling and the strategy of integrating NEI models to form a layered, comprehensive predictability. The data integration layer brings together heterogeneous data sources related to NEI via automatic web services and web scraping technologies. The data management and access layer reuses and extends a popular content management system (CMS), Drupal, and consists of modules that model the complex data structure for NEI-related bibliography and characterization data. The model building layer provides an advanced analysis capability for NEI data. Together, these components provide significant value to the process of aggregating and analyzing large-scale distributed NEI data. A prototype of the NEIMiner system is available at http://neiminer.i-a-i.com/.

  13. Design of nanomaterial synthesis by aerosol processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesser, Beat; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2012-01-01

    Aerosol synthesis of materials is a vibrant field of particle technology and chemical reaction engineering. Examples include the manufacture of carbon blacks, fumed SiO(2), pigmentary TiO(2), ZnO vulcanizing catalysts, filamentary Ni, and optical fibers, materials that impact transportation, construction, pharmaceuticals, energy, and communications. Parallel to this, development of novel, scalable aerosol processes has enabled synthesis of new functional nanomaterials (e.g., catalysts, biomaterials, electroceramics) and devices (e.g., gas sensors). This review provides an access point for engineers to the multiscale design of aerosol reactors for the synthesis of nanomaterials using continuum, mesoscale, molecular dynamics, and quantum mechanics models spanning 10 and 15 orders of magnitude in length and time, respectively. Key design features are the rapid chemistry; the high particle concentrations but low volume fractions; the attainment of a self-preserving particle size distribution by coagulation; the ratio of the characteristic times of coagulation and sintering, which controls the extent of particle aggregation; and the narrowing of the aggregate primary particle size distribution by sintering.

  14. Nanomanufacturing metrology for cellulosic nanomaterials: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postek, Michael T.

    2014-08-01

    The development of the metrology and standards for advanced manufacturing of cellulosic nanomaterials (or basically, wood-based nanotechnology) is imperative to the success of this rising economic sector. Wood-based nanotechnology is a revolutionary technology that will create new jobs and strengthen America's forest-based economy through industrial development and expansion. It allows this, previously perceived, low-tech industry to leap-frog directly into high-tech products and processes and thus improves its current economic slump. Recent global investments in nanotechnology programs have led to a deeper appreciation of the high performance nature of cellulose nanomaterials. Cellulose, manufactured to the smallest possible-size ( 2 nm x 100 nm), is a high-value material that enables products to be lighter and stronger; have less embodied energy; utilize no catalysts in the manufacturing, are biologically compatible and, come from a readily renewable resource. In addition to the potential for a dramatic impact on the national economy - estimated to be as much as $250 billion worldwide by 2020 - cellulose-based nanotechnology creates a pathway for expanded and new markets utilizing these renewable materials. The installed capacity associated with the US pulp and paper industry represents an opportunity, with investment, to rapidly move to large scale production of nano-based materials. However, effective imaging, characterization and fundamental measurement science for process control and characterization are lacking at the present time. This talk will discuss some of these needed measurements and potential solutions.

  15. Health impact and safety of engineered nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teow, Yiwei; Asharani, P V; Hande, M Prakash; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2011-07-07

    Many engineered nanomaterials (NMs) are being synthesized and explored for potential use in consumer and medical products. Already, nanoparticles (NPs) of titanium dioxide (TiO(2)), zinc oxide (ZnO), silver (Ag) and other metals or their oxides are present in commercial products such as sunscreens, cosmetics, wound dressings, surgical tools, detergents, automotive paints and tires. More recent and advanced FDA-approved use of NMs includes quantum dots (QDs) in live cell imaging, zirconium oxides in bone replacement and prosthetic devices and nanocarriers in drug delivery. The benefits from nanotechnology are aplenty, comprising antimicrobial activities, scratch- and water-resistance, long-lasting shine, improved processor speeds and better display resolution, to name a few. While developers of these products often focus on the exciting beneficial aspects of their products, safety and toxicity issues are often not discussed in detail. Long-term effects such as chronic exposure and environmental pollution are even less documented. Along with widespread manufacture and use of NMs, concerns for occupational hazards, proper handling, disposal, storage, shipping and clean up are expected to rise. This review focus on the possible biological impact of engineered NPs, serving as a reminder that nanomaterials can become a double-edged sword if not properly handled.

  16. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This draft document presents two case studies of nanoscale titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) used (1) to remove arsenic from drinking water and (2) as an active ingredient in topical sunscreen. The draft case studies are organized around a comprehensive environmental assessment approach that combines a product life cycle framework with the risk assessment paradigm. The document does not draw conclusions about potential risks. Rather, the case studies are intended to help identify what needs to be known in order to conduct a comprehensive environmental assessment of the potential risks related to nano-TiO2. This draft document is part of a process that will inform the development of EPA’s research strategy to support nanomaterial risk assessments. The complex properties of various nanomaterials make evaluating them in the abstract or with generalizations difficult if not impossible. Thus, this document focuses on two specific uses of nano-TiO2, as a drinking water treatment and as topical sunscreen. These case studies do not represent completed or even preliminary assessments; rather, they present the structure for identifying and prioritizing research needed to support future assessments.

  17. Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, Nanomaterial Case Studies: Nanoscale Titanium Dioxide in Water Treatment and in Topical Sunscreen. This report is a starting point to determine what is known and what needs to be known about selected nanomaterials as part of a process to identify and prioritize research to inform future assessments of the potential ecological and health implications of these materials. Two specific applications of nanoscale titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) are considered: (1) as an agent for removing arsenic from drinking water; and (2) as an active ingredient in topical sunscreen. These case studies are organized around a comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) framework that combines a product life cycle perspective with the risk assessment paradigm. They are intended to help identify what may need to be known in order to conduct a comprehensive environmental assessment of the potential risks related to nano-TiO2. These “case studies” do not represent completed or even preliminary assessments, nor are they intended to serve as a basis for risk management decisions in the near term on these specific uses of nano TiO2. Rather, the intent is to use this document in developing the scientific and technical information needed for future assessment efforts.

  18. Reinforcement of cement-based matrices with graphite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq, Muhammad Maqbool

    Cement-based materials offer a desirable balance of compressive strength, moisture resistance, durability, economy and energy-efficiency; their tensile strength, fracture energy and durability in aggressive environments, however, could benefit from further improvements. An option for realizing some of these improvements involves introduction of discrete fibers into concrete. When compared with today's micro-scale (steel, polypropylene, glass, etc.) fibers, graphite nanomaterials (carbon nanotube, nanofiber and graphite nanoplatelet) offer superior geometric, mechanical and physical characteristics. Graphite nanomaterials would realize their reinforcement potential as far as they are thoroughly dispersed within cement-based matrices, and effectively bond to cement hydrates. The research reported herein developed non-covalent and covalent surface modification techniques to improve the dispersion and interfacial interactions of graphite nanomaterials in cement-based matrices with a dense and well graded micro-structure. The most successful approach involved polymer wrapping of nanomaterials for increasing the density of hydrophilic groups on the nanomaterial surface without causing any damage to the their structure. The nanomaterials were characterized using various spectrometry techniques, and SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy). The graphite nanomaterials were dispersed via selected sonication procedures in the mixing water of the cement-based matrix; conventional mixing and sample preparation techniques were then employed to prepare the cement-based nanocomposite samples, which were subjected to steam curing. Comprehensive engineering and durability characteristics of cement-based nanocomposites were determined and their chemical composition, microstructure and failure mechanisms were also assessed through various spectrometry, thermogravimetry, electron microscopy and elemental analyses. Both functionalized and non-functionalized nanomaterials as well as different

  19. Clustomesogens: Liquid Crystalline Hybrid Nanomaterials Containing Functional Metal Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molard, Yann

    2016-08-16

    Inorganic phosphorescent octahedral metal nanoclusters fill the gap between metal complexes and nanoparticles. They are finite groups of metal atoms linked by metal-metal bonds, with an exact composition and structure at the nanometer scale. As their phosphorescence internal quantum efficiency can approach 100%, they represent a very attractive class of molecular building blocks to design hybrid nanomaterials dedicated to light energy conversion, optoelectronic, display, lighting, or theragnostic applications. They are obtained as AnM6X(i)8X(a)6 ternary salt powders (A = alkali cation, M = Mo, Re, W, X(i): halogen inner ligand, X(a) = halogen apical ligand) by high temperature solid state synthesis (750-1200 °C). However, their ceramic-like behavior has largely restricted their use as functional components in the past. Since these last two decades, several groups, including ours, started to tackle the challenge of integrating them in easy-to-process materials. Within this context, we have extensively explored the nanocluster ternary salt specificities to develop a new class of self-organized hybrid organic-inorganic nanomaterials known as clustomesogens. These materials, combine the specific properties of nanoclusters (magnetic, electronic, luminescence) with the anisotropy-related properties of liquid crystals (LCs). This Account covers the research and development of clustomesogens starting from the design concepts and synthesis to their introduction in functional devices. We developed three strategies to build such hybrid super- or supramolecules. In the covalent approach, we capitalized on the apical ligand-metal bond iono-covalent character to graft tailor-made organic LC promoters on the {M6X(i)8}(n+) nanocluster cores. The supramolecular approach relies on the host-guest complexation of the ternary cluster salt alkali cations with functional crown ether macrocycles. We showed that the hybrid LC behavior depends on the macrocycles structural features

  20. Modified iron oxide nanomaterials: Functionalization and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Samira; Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili Muhd

    2016-10-01

    Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles have aroused the interest of researchers of materials' chemistry due to its exceptional properties such as decent magnetic, electric, catalytic, biocompatibility, and low toxicity. However, these magnetic nanoparticles are predisposed towards aggregation and forming larger particles, due to its strong anisotropic dipolar interactions, particularly in the aqueous phase, consequently depriving them of dispersibility and particular properties, ultimately degrading their performance. Hence, this review focuses on modified magnetic nanoparticles that are stable, easily synthesized, possess a high surface area and could be facile-separated via magnetic forces, and are of low toxicity and costs for applications such as catalyst/catalyst support, food security, biomedical, and pollutant remediation.

  1. Autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stern Stephan T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study of the potential risks associated with the manufacture, use, and disposal of nanoscale materials, and their mechanisms of toxicity, is important for the continued advancement of nanotechnology. Currently, the most widely accepted paradigms of nanomaterial toxicity are oxidative stress and inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. This review will highlight the significance of autophagy and lysosomal dysfunction as emerging mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity. Most endocytic routes of nanomaterial cell uptake converge upon the lysosome, making the lysosomal compartment the most common intracellular site of nanoparticle sequestration and degradation. In addition to the endo-lysosomal pathway, recent evidence suggests that some nanomaterials can also induce autophagy. Among the many physiological functions, the lysosome, by way of the autophagy (macroautophagy pathway, degrades intracellular pathogens, and damaged organelles and proteins. Thus, autophagy induction by nanoparticles may be an attempt to degrade what is perceived by the cell as foreign or aberrant. While the autophagy and endo-lysosomal pathways have the potential to influence the disposition of nanomaterials, there is also a growing body of literature suggesting that biopersistent nanomaterials can, in turn, negatively impact these pathways. Indeed, there is ample evidence that biopersistent nanomaterials can cause autophagy and lysosomal dysfunctions resulting in toxicological consequences.

  2. Knowledge gaps between nanotoxicological research and nanomaterial safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiangang; Li, Dandan; Gao, Yue; Mu, Li; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-09-01

    With the wide research and application of nanomaterials in various fields, the safety of nanomaterials attracts much attention. An increasing number of reports in the literature have shown the adverse effects of nanomaterials, representing the quick development of nanotoxicology. However, many studies in nanotoxicology have not reflected the real nanomaterial safety, and the knowledge gaps between nanotoxicological research and nanomaterial safety remain large. Considering the remarkable influence of biological or environmental matrices (e.g., biological corona) on nanotoxicity, the situation of performing nanotoxicological experiments should be relevant to the environment and humans. Given the possibility of long-term and low-concentration exposure of nanomaterials, the reversibility of and adaptation to nanotoxicity, and the transgenerational effects should not be ignored. Different from common pollutants, the specific analysis methodology for nanotoxicology need development and exploration furthermore. High-throughput assay integrating with omics was highlighted in the present review to globally investigate nanotoxicity. In addition, the biological responses beyond individual levels, special mechanisms and control of nanotoxicity deserve more attention. The progress of nanotoxicology has been reviewed by previous articles. This review focuses on the blind spots in nanotoxicological research and provides insight into what we should do in future work to support the healthy development of nanotechnology and the evaluation of real nanomaterial safety.

  3. Comparative assessment of nanomaterial definitions and safety evaluation considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boverhof, Darrell R; Bramante, Christina M; Butala, John H; Clancy, Shaun F; Lafranconi, Mark; West, Jay; Gordon, Steve C

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials continue to bring promising advances to science and technology. In concert have come calls for increased regulatory oversight to ensure their appropriate identification and evaluation, which has led to extensive discussions about nanomaterial definitions. Numerous nanomaterial definitions have been proposed by government, industry, and standards organizations. We conducted a comprehensive comparative assessment of existing nanomaterial definitions put forward by governments to highlight their similarities and differences. We found that the size limits used in different definitions were inconsistent, as were considerations of other elements, including agglomerates and aggregates, distributional thresholds, novel properties, and solubility. Other important differences included consideration of number size distributions versus weight distributions and natural versus intentionally-manufactured materials. Overall, the definitions we compared were not in alignment, which may lead to inconsistent identification and evaluation of nanomaterials and could have adverse impacts on commerce and public perceptions of nanotechnology. We recommend a set of considerations that future discussions of nanomaterial definitions should consider for describing materials and assessing their potential for health and environmental impacts using risk-based approaches within existing assessment frameworks. Our intent is to initiate a dialogue aimed at achieving greater clarity in identifying those nanomaterials that may require additional evaluation, not to propose a formal definition.

  4. [Nanomaterials in cosmetics--present situation and future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, Takuji

    2014-01-01

    Cosmetics are consumer products intended to contribute to increasing quality of life and designed for long-term daily use. Due to such features of cosmetics, they are required to ensure quality and safety at a high level, as well as to perform well, in response to consumers' demands. Recently, the technology associated with nanomaterials has progressed rapidly and has been applied to various products, including cosmetics. For example, nano-sized titanium dioxide has been formulated in sunscreen products in pursuit of improving its performance. As some researchers and media have expressed concerns about the safety of nanomaterials, a vague feeling of anxiety has been raised in society. In response to this concern, the Japan Cosmetic Industry Association (JCIA) has begun original research related to the safety assurance of nanomaterials formulated in cosmetics, to allow consumers to use cosmetics without such concerns. This paper describes the activities of the JCIA regarding safety research on nanomaterials, including a survey of the actual usage of nanomaterials in cosmetics, analysis of the existence of nanomaterials on the skin, and assessment of skin carcinogenicity of nano-sized titanium dioxide. It also describes the international status of safety assurance and regulation regarding nanomaterials in cosmetics.

  5. Nano-QSPR Modelling of Carbon-Based Nanomaterials Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salahinejad, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of chemical and physical properties of nanomaterials is of critical importance in a broad variety of nanotechnology researches. There is an increasing interest in computational methods capable of predicting properties of new and modified nanomaterials in the absence of time-consuming and costly experimental studies. Quantitative Structure- Property Relationship (QSPR) approaches are progressive tools in modelling and prediction of many physicochemical properties of nanomaterials, which are also known as nano-QSPR. This review provides insight into the concepts, challenges and applications of QSPR modelling of carbon-based nanomaterials. First, we try to provide a general overview of QSPR implications, by focusing on the difficulties and limitations on each step of the QSPR modelling of nanomaterials. Then follows with the most significant achievements of QSPR methods in modelling of carbon-based nanomaterials properties and their recent applications to generate predictive models. This review specifically addresses the QSPR modelling of physicochemical properties of carbon-based nanomaterials including fullerenes, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT), multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) and graphene.

  6. Versatile in situ gas analysis apparatus for nanomaterials reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meysami, Seyyed Shayan; Snoek, Lavina C; Grobert, Nicole

    2014-09-02

    We report a newly developed technique for the in situ real-time gas analysis of reactors commonly used for the production of nanomaterials, by showing case-study results obtained using a dedicated apparatus for measuring the gas composition in reactors operating at high temperature (nanomaterials with tailored properties. Our studies demonstrate that the composition of the precursors dynamically changes as they travel inside of the reactor, causing a nonuniform growth of nanomaterials. Moreover, mapping of the nanomaterials reactor using quantitative gas analysis revealed the actual contribution of thermocatalytic cracking and a quantification of individual precursor fragments. This information is particularly important for quality control of the produced nanomaterials and for the recycling of exhaust residues, ultimately leading toward a more cost-effective continuous production of nanomaterials in large quantities. Our case study of multiwall carbon nanotube synthesis was conducted using the probe in conjunction with chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. Given the similarities of this particular CVD setup to other CVD reactors and high-temperature setups generally used for nanomaterials synthesis, the concept and methodology of in situ gas analysis presented here does also apply to other systems, making it a versatile and widely applicable method across a wide range of materials/manufacturing methods, catalysis, as well as reactor design and engineering.

  7. Granular biodurable nanomaterials: No convincing evidence for systemic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Horn, Marcus; Gebel, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Nanomaterials are usually defined by primary particle diameters ranging from 1 to 100 nm. The scope of this review is an evaluation of experimental animal studies dealing with the systemic levels and putative systemic effects induced by nanoparticles which can be characterized as being granular biodurable particles without known specific toxicity (GBP). Relevant examples of such materials comprise nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO2) and carbon black. The question was raised whether GBP nanomaterials systemically accumulate and may possess a relevant systemic toxicity. With few exceptions, the 56 publications reviewed were not performed using established standard protocols, for example, OECD guidelines but used non-standard study designs. The studies including kinetic investigations indicated that GBP nanomaterials were absorbed and systemically distributed to rather low portions only. There was no valid indication that GPB nanomaterials possess novel toxicological hazard properties. In addition, no convincing evidence for a relevant specific systemic toxicity of GBP nanomaterials could be identified. The minority of the papers reviewed (15/56) investigated both nanosized and microsized GBP materials in parallel. A relevant different translocation of GBP nanomaterials in contrast to GBP micromaterials was not observed in these studies. There was no evidence that GPB nanomaterials possess toxicological properties other than their micromaterial counterparts.

  8. Characterization of airborne particles during production of carbonaceous nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeganeh, Behnoush; Kull, Christy M; Hull, Matthew S; Marr, Linsey C

    2008-06-15

    Despite the rapid growth in nanotechnology, very little is known about the unintended health or environmental effects of manufactured nanomaterials. The development of nanotechnology risk assessments and regulations requires quantitative information on the potential for exposure to nanomaterials. The objective of this research isto characterize airborne particle concentrations during the production of carbonaceous nanomaterials, such as fullerenes and carbon nanotubes, in a commercial nanotechnology facility. We measured fine particle mass concentrations (PM2.5), submicrometer size distributions, and photoionization potential, an indicator of the particles' carbonaceous content, at three locations inside the facility: inside the fume hood where nanomaterials were produced, just outside the fume hood, and in the background. The measurements were not selective for engineered nanomaterials and may have included both engineered nanomaterials and naturally occurring or incidental particles. Average PM2.5 and particle number concentrations were not significantly different inside the facility versus outdoors. However, large, short-term increases in PM2.5 and particle number concentrations were associated with physical handling of nanomaterials and other production activities. In many cases, an increase in the number of sub-100 nm particles accounted for the majority of the increase in total number concentrations. Photoionization results indicate that the particles suspended during nanomaterial handling inside the fume hood were carbonaceous and therefore likely to include engineered nanoparticles, whereas those suspended by other production activities taking place outside the fume hood were not. Based on the measurements in this study, the engineering controls at the facility appear to be effective at limiting exposure to nanomaterials.

  9. Nanomaterials for renewable energy production and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaobo; Li, Can; Grätzel, Michaël; Kostecki, Robert; Mao, Samuel S

    2012-12-07

    Over the past decades, there have been many projections on the future depletion of the fossil fuel reserves on earth as well as the rapid increase in green-house gas emissions. There is clearly an urgent need for the development of renewable energy technologies. On a different frontier, growth and manipulation of materials on the nanometer scale have progressed at a fast pace. Selected recent and significant advances in the development of nanomaterials for renewable energy applications are reviewed here, and special emphases are given to the studies of solar-driven photocatalytic hydrogen production, electricity generation with dye-sensitized solar cells, solid-state hydrogen storage, and electric energy storage with lithium ion rechargeable batteries.

  10. Films of Carbon Nanomaterials for Transparent Conductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wei

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The demand for transparent conductors is expected to grow rapidly as electronic devices, such as touch screens, displays, solid state lighting and photovoltaics become ubiquitous in our lives. Doped metal oxides, especially indium tin oxide, are the commonly used materials for transparent conductors. As there are some drawbacks to this class of materials, exploration of alternative materials has been conducted. There is an interest in films of carbon nanomaterials such as, carbon nanotubes and graphene as they exhibit outstanding properties. This article reviews the synthesis and assembly of these films and their post-treatment. These processes determine the film performance and understanding of this platform will be useful for future work to improve the film performance.

  11. Modification of conductive polyaniline with carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghat, Sajjad; Alavijeh, Mahdi Soleimani

    2014-08-01

    The synthesis of polyaniline/single-wall nanotube, polyaniline/multi-wall nanotube and polyaniline/single-wall nanotube/graphen nanosheets nanocomposites by in situ polymerization are reported in this study. The substrates were treated with a mixture of concentrated sulfuric acid and concentrated nitric acid before usage to functionalize with carboxylic and hydroxyl groups. Aniline monomers are adsorbed and polymerized on the surface of these fillers. Structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy showed that nanomaterials dispersed into polymer matrix and made tubular structures with diameters several tens to hundreds nanometers depending on the polyaniline content. These nanocomposites can be used for production of excellent electrode materials applications in high-performance supercapacitors.

  12. Assessing the Environmental Risks of Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara Deanne; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Baun, Anders

    Assessing the environmental risks of engineered nanomaterials (NM) is currently an intensely contested subject among scientists, organizations, governments, and policymakers. The shear number, variety, and market penetration of NM in consumer goods and other applications, including environmental...... to a wide range of technical limitations. For instance, serious knowledge gaps remain within e.g. the detection of NM in the environment, developing adequate testing equipment and protocols, and toxicity endpoints (Grieger et al., 2009). In the past few years, many scientists and organizations have...... of uncertainty, degree of precaution, inclusion of quantitative or qualitative data, inclusion of life-cycle perspective, iterative and/or adaptive, ensuring timely decision making, and degree of transparency. This analysis can ultimately assist scientists, government agencies, organizations, and other...

  13. Nanomaterial-based x-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Matthew T.; Parmee, R. J.; Milne, William I.

    2016-02-01

    Following the recent global excitement and investment in the emerging, and rapidly growing, classes of one and two-dimensional nanomaterials, we here present a perspective on one of the viable applications of such materials: field electron emission based x-ray sources. These devices, which have a notable history in medicine, security, industry and research, to date have almost exclusively incorporated thermionic electron sources. Since the middle of the last century, field emission based cathodes were demonstrated, but it is only recently that they have become practicable. We outline some of the technological achievements of the past two decades, and describe a number of the seminal contributions. We explore the foremost market hurdles hindering their roll-out and broader industrial adoption and summarise the recent progress in miniaturised, pulsed and multi-source devices.

  14. Functionalized carbon nanomaterials derived from carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesan, Dinesh; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy

    2010-02-01

    A tremendous growth in the field of carbon nanomaterials has led to the emergence of carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, mesoporous carbon and more recently graphene. Some of these materials have found applications in electronics, sensors, catalysis, drug delivery, composites, and so forth. The high temperatures and hydrocarbon precursors involved in their synthesis usually yield highly inert graphitic surfaces. As some of the applications require functionalization of their inert graphitic surface with groups like -COOH, -OH, and -NH(2), treatment of these materials in oxidizing agents and concentrated acids become inevitable. More recent works have involved using precursors like carbohydrates to produce carbon nanostructures rich in functional groups in a single-step under hydrothermal conditions. These carbon nanostructures have already found many applications in composites, drug delivery, materials synthesis, and Li ion batteries. The review aims to highlight some of the recent developments in the application of carbohydrate derived carbon nanostructures and also provide an outlook of their future prospects.

  15. Nanomaterials and nanoparticles : Sources and toxicity

    CERN Document Server

    Buzea, Cristina; Robbie, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    This review is written with the goal of informing public health concerns related to nanoscience, while raising awareness of nanomaterials toxicity among scientists and manufacturers handling them. We show that humans have always been exposed to nanoparticles and dust from natural sources and human activities, the recent development of industry and combustion-based engine transportation profoundly increasing anthropogenic nanoparticulate pollution. The key to understanding the toxicity of nanoparticles is that their minute size, smaller than cells and cellular organelles, allows them to penetrate these basic biological structures, disrupting their normal function. Among diseases associated with nanoparticles are asthma, bronchitis, lung cancer, neurodegenerative diseases (such as Parkinson`s and Alzheimer`s diseases), Crohn`s disease, colon cancer. Nanoparticles that enter the circulatory system are related to occurrence of arteriosclerosis, and blood clots, arrhythmia, heart diseases, and ultimately cardiac d...

  16. Structural and Optical Properties and Emerging Applications of Metal Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tammy Y.Olson; Jin Z.Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess intriguing optical properties that depend sensitively on size, shape, and material content of the structures. Controlling such structural characteristics of the nanostructures allows the tailoring of their physical and chemical properties, e.9. optical, electronic, and catalytic, to achieve what is desired for specific applications of interest. This review will cover the development of various shapes for silver and gold nanomaterials with emphasis on their relation to optical properties. Examples of various modern synthetic methods and characterization techniques are highlighted. The influence of the metal nanomaterial's shape and optical absorption on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and a final note on new emerging applications of metal nanostructures are also discussed.

  17. Nanomaterials for fresh-keeping and sterilization in food preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongfang; Gu, Ning

    2009-06-01

    Food sterilizing and antistaling technologies are very important to the public's health and safety and have been attracting more and more attentions. In the past several years, new development chance was created by the introduction of nanomaterials to this critical field. Nanomaterials possess lots of outstanding properties, such as unique quantum size effect, large surface area and catalytic properties, which jointly facilitate high effective fresh-keeping, and thus were considered as promising materials in food sterilization and antistale. This review article focuses on the patented applications of nanomaterials as food biocidal agents, bacteriostatic agents, catalysts and carriers for antistaling agents.

  18. Categorization framework to aid hazard identification of nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss; Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Olsen, Stig Irving;

    2007-01-01

    The physical, chemical and biological properties of various nanomaterials differ substantially - as do the potential risks they pose. We argue that nanomaterials must be categorized based on the location of the nanoscale structure in the system/material before their hazards can be assessed...... and propose a categorization framework that enables scientists and regulators to identify the categories of nanomaterials systematically. The framework is applied to a suggested hazard identification approach aimed at identifying causality between inherent physical and chemical properties and observed adverse...

  19. Silicon nanomaterials platform for bioimaging, biosensing, and cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fei; Su, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Yiling; Fan, Chunhai; Lee, Shuit-Tong; He, Yao

    2014-02-18

    Silicon nanomaterials are an important class of nanomaterials with great potential for technologies including energy, catalysis, and biotechnology, because of their many unique properties, including biocompatibility, abundance, and unique electronic, optical, and mechanical properties, among others. Silicon nanomaterials are known to have little or no toxicity due to favorable biocompatibility of silicon, which is an important precondition for biological and biomedical applications. In addition, huge surface-to-volume ratios of silicon nanomaterials are responsible for their unique optical, mechanical, or electronic properties, which offer exciting opportunities for design of high-performance silicon-based functional nanoprobes, nanosensors, and nanoagents for biological analysis and detection and disease treatment. Moreover, silicon is the second most abundant element (after oxygen) on earth, providing plentiful and inexpensive resources for large-scale and low-cost preparation of silicon nanomaterials for practical applications. Because of these attractive traits, and in parallel with a growing interest in their design and synthesis, silicon nanomaterials are extensively investigated for wide-ranging applications, including energy, catalysis, optoelectronics, and biology. Among them, bioapplications of silicon nanomaterials are of particular interest. In the past decade, scientists have made an extensive effort to construct a silicon nanomaterials platform for various biological and biomedical applications, such as biosensors, bioimaging, and cancer treatment, as new and powerful tools for disease diagnosis and therapy. Nonetheless, there are few review articles covering these important and promising achievements to promote the awareness of development of silicon nanobiotechnology. In this Account, we summarize recent representative works to highlight the recent developments of silicon functional nanomaterials for a new, powerful platform for biological and

  20. Physics of magnetic nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Frank J

    2015-01-01

    This book discusses how the important properties of materials such as the cohesive energy, and the electronic and vibrational structures are affected when materials have at least one length in the nanometer range. The author uses relatively simple models of the solid state to explain why these changes in the size and dimension in the nanometer regime occur. The text also reviews the physics of magnetism and experimental methods of measuring magnetic properties necessary to understanding how nanosizing affects magnetism. Various kinds of magnetic structures are presented by the author in order to explain how nanosizing influences their magnetic properties. The book also presents potential and actual applications of nanomaterials in the fields of medicine and computer data storage.

  1. Boron-Based (Nano-Materials: Fundamentals and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit B. Demirci

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The boron (Z = 5 element is unique. Boron-based (nano-materials are equally unique. Accordingly, the present special issue is dedicated to crystalline boron-based (nano-materials and gathers a series of nine review and research articles dealing with different boron-based compounds. Boranes, borohydrides, polyhedral boranes and carboranes, boronate anions/ligands, boron nitride (hexagonal structure, and elemental boron are considered. Importantly, large sections are dedicated to fundamentals, with a special focus on crystal structures. The application potentials are widely discussed on the basis of the materials’ physical and chemical properties. It stands out that crystalline boron-based (nano-materials have many technological opportunities in fields such as energy storage, gas sorption (depollution, medicine, and optical and electronic devices. The present special issue is further evidence of the wealth of boron science, especially in terms of crystalline (nano-materials.

  2. Frameworks and tools for risk assessment of manufactured nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hristozov, Danail; Gottardo, Stefania; Semenzin, Elena;

    2016-01-01

    Commercialization of nanotechnologies entails a regulatory requirement for understanding their environmental, health and safety (EHS) risks. Today we face challenges to assess these risks, which emerge from uncertainties around the interactions of manufactured nanomaterials (MNs) with humans...

  3. RADIO SHIELDING PROPERTIES OF CONCRETE BASED ON SHUNGITE NANOMATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    BELOUSOVA Elena Sergeevna; LYNKOV Leonid Mihailovich; MAHMOOD Mohammed Shakir; NASONOVA Natalia Viktorovna

    2013-01-01

    Modifications of shielding construction materials based on Portland cement with the addition of powder nanomaterial shungite were developed. Attenuation and re­flection of electromagnetic radiation for obtained materials were studied. Recommen­dations for using are given.

  4. Investigating the Toxicity and Environmental Fate of Graphene Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hersam Laboratory at Northwestern University works with the Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology and the United States Environmental Protection Agency to study the toxicity and environmental fate of emergent nanomaterials, specifically carbon-based nanomate...

  5. Ecotoxicology of nanomaterials: the role of invertebrate testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AG Cattaneo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Engineered nanomaterials represent a new and expanding class of chemicals whose environmental hazard is actually poorly determined. The peculiar behavior of nanomaterials makes them much more similar to new chemicals than to the corresponding bulk materials; this feature imposes reliable and standardized evaluation protocols for toxicity and ecotoxicity assessments. General rules for assessing nanotoxicity and the state of the art are periodically published in reports by control agencies. This review highlights the role of invertebrates as valuable and validated test organisms for assessing ecotoxicity of new and/or untested chemicals. The general scarcity of experimental data, their unequal distribution among the different nanomaterials and environmental conditions, the difficulties in manipulating nanomaterials and obtaining stable and homogeneous suspensions, the confusion arising from a not well defined metrics are discussed

  6. The retina as a potential site of nanomaterial phototoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manufactured nanomaterials are designed for their unique properties, one of which is to be photoreactive. Photocatalysts are desirable in many applications including self-cleaning surfaces, sterilization and decontamination of polluted media, and photovoltaic devices. Photo-catal...

  7. In Situ Formation of Carbon Nanomaterials on Bulk Metallic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Y. Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials were synthesized in situ on bulk 316L stainless steel, pure cobalt, and pure nickel by hybrid surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT. The microstructures of the treated samples and the resulted carbon nanomaterials were investigated by SEM and TEM characterizations. Different substrates resulted in different morphologies of products. The diameter of carbon nanomaterials is related to the size of the nanograins on the surface layer of substrates. The possible growth mechanism was discussed. Effects of the main parameters of the synthesis, including the carbon source and gas reactant composition, hydrogen, and the reaction temperature, were studied. Using hybrid SMAT is proved to be an effective way to synthesize carbon nanomaterials in situ on surfaces of metallic materials.

  8. Emerging roles of engineered nanomaterials in the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, V J

    2011-10-01

    Nanoscience is the study of phenomena and the manipulation of materials at the atomic or molecular level. Nanotechnology involves the design, production and use of structures through control of the size and shape of the materials at the nanometre scale. Nanotechnology in the food sector is an emerging area with considerable research and potential products. There is particular interest in the definition and regulation of engineered nanomaterials. This term covers three classes of nanomaterials: natural and processed nanostructures in foods; particulate nanomaterials metabolized or excreted on digestion; and particulate nanomaterials not broken down on digestion, which accumulate in the body. This review describes examples of these classes and their likely status in the food industry.

  9. An Overview of Nanomaterials for Water and Wastewater Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijiao Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the exceptional characteristics which resulted from nanoscale size, such as improved catalysis and adsorption properties as well as high reactivity, nanomaterials have been the subject of active research and development worldwide in recent years. Numerous studies have shown that nanomaterials can effectively remove various pollutants in water and thus have been successfully applied in water and wastewater treatment. In this paper, the most extensively studied nanomaterials, zero-valent metal nanoparticles (Ag, Fe, and Zn, metal oxide nanoparticles (TiO2, ZnO, and iron oxides, carbon nanotubes (CNTs, and nanocomposites are discussed and highlighted in detail. Besides, future aspects of nanomaterials in water and wastewater treatment are discussed.

  10. Proposals for risk management in environments with activities involving nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Renato Balbão Andrade

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The handling of nanomaterials presents enormous challenges for risk management in research and production of new materials. However, data on the impacts of these new materials on human health and the environment need to be expanded. Several efforts have been made to mitigate the hardships and offer guidelines for the management of risks associated with nanomaterials. This article aims to provide a broad and comparing view of the main proposals in the literature. The methodology was systematic analysis encompassing 17 proposed risk management with nanomaterials. The results indicate that, although there is no consensus on the metrics used to characterize the risks of na-nomaterials, the adoption of the Precautionary Principle, the control banding approach and stakeholder involvement stands out among the documents analyzed.

  11. The challenges of ecotox testing of nanomaterials and the BPR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2015-01-01

    The European Biocidal Product Regulation (BPR) requires dedicated risk assessment of nanomaterials. When it comes to ecotoxicological testing of nanomaterials, meeting these requirements is especially challenging. Overall, these challenges fall into four overall categories: 1) materials...... characterization, 2) exposure preparation, 3) monitoring stability and 4) monitoring time. In this paper, the challenges are presented and discussed. There is no easy manner in which to deal with the challenges related to ecotoxicological testing of nanomaterials in the light of the BPR requirements. It short...... the current answer seems to be describe, characterize and document. Characterization is vitally important and has to be done using multiple methods on the nanomaterials as received, in the test media with and without the organisms....

  12. Impact of size and temperature on thermal expansion of nanomaterials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madan Singh; Mahipal Singh

    2015-04-01

    A theoretical method has been discussed to study the size dependency of thermal expansion of nanomaterials at higher temperature by considering the surface effect. A thermodynamical analysis of the equation of state (EoS) is studied from the knowledge of thermal expansion of nano-materials based on theoretical thermodynamical relations. It is observed that thermal expansion coefficient increases with decrease in grain size whereas, /0 increases with increase in temperature for nanomaterials of different grain sizes. We have studied the size and temperature dependence of thermal expansion of Cu, Ag, Ni, Sn, Se and Zn nanomaterials in different shapes (spherical, nanowire and nanofilm). The available experimental data confirm these theoretical predictions that demonstrate the validity of our work.

  13. A Decision Support Framework for Evaluation of Engineered Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) are currently being developed and applied at rates that far exceed our ability to evaluate their potential for environmental or human health risks. The gap between material development and capacity for assessment grows wider every day. Transforma...

  14. Nanomaterials for enhanced immunity as an innovative paradigm in nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Anushree; Oh, Doo-Byoung; Lim, Yong Taik

    2015-01-01

    Since the advent of nanoparticle technology, novel and versatile properties of nanomaterials have been introduced, which has constantly expanded their applications in therapeutics. Introduction of nanomaterials for immunomodulation has opened up new avenues with tremendous potential. Interesting properties of nanoparticles, such as adjuvanticity, capability to enhance cross-presentation, polyvalent presentation, siRNA delivery for silencing of immunesuppressive gene, targeting and imaging of immune cells have been known to have immense utility in vaccination and immunotherapy. A thorough understanding of the merits associated with nanomaterials is crucial for designing of modular and versatile nanovaccines, for improved immune response. With the emerging prerequisites of vaccination, nanomaterial-based immune stimulation, seems to be capable of taking the field of immunization to a next higher level.

  15. Predictive modeling of nanomaterial exposure effects in biological systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu X

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Xiong Liu,1 Kaizhi Tang,1 Stacey Harper,2 Bryan Harper,2 Jeffery A Steevens,3 Roger Xu1 1Intelligent Automation, Inc., Rockville, MD, USA; 2Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; 3ERDC Environmental Laboratory, Vicksburg, MS, USA Background: Predictive modeling of the biological effects of nanomaterials is critical for industry and policymakers to assess the potential hazards resulting from the application of engineered nanomaterials. Methods: We generated an experimental dataset on the toxic effects experienced by embryonic zebrafish due to exposure to nanomaterials. Several nanomaterials were studied, such as metal nanoparticles, dendrimer, metal oxide, and polymeric materials. The embryonic zebrafish metric (EZ Metric was used as a screening-level measurement representative of adverse effects. Using the dataset, we developed a data mining approach to model the toxic endpoints and the overall biological impact of nanomaterials. Data mining techniques, such as numerical prediction, can assist analysts in developing risk assessment models for nanomaterials. Results: We found several important attributes that contribute to the 24 hours post-fertilization (hpf mortality, such as dosage concentration, shell composition, and surface charge. These findings concur with previous studies on nanomaterial toxicity using embryonic zebrafish. We conducted case studies on modeling the overall effect/impact of nanomaterials and the specific toxic endpoints such as mortality, delayed development, and morphological malformations. The results show that we can achieve high prediction accuracy for certain biological effects, such as 24 hpf mortality, 120 hpf mortality, and 120 hpf heart malformation. The results also show that the weighting scheme for individual biological effects has a significant influence on modeling the overall impact of

  16. Perspectives on the design of safer nanomaterials and manufacturing processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraci, Charles [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (United States); Heidel, Donna [Bureau Veritas North America, Inc. (United States); Sayes, Christie [Baylor University (United States); Hodson, Laura, E-mail: lhodson@cdc.gov; Schulte, Paul; Eastlake, Adrienne [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (United States); Brenner, Sara [Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at State University of New York Polytechnic Institute, (SUNY Poly) (United States)

    2015-09-15

    A concerted effort is being made to insert Prevention through Design principles into discussions of sustainability, occupational safety and health, and green chemistry related to nanotechnology. Prevention through Design is a set of principles, which includes solutions to design out potential hazards in nanomanufacturing including the design of nanomaterials, and strategies to eliminate exposures and minimize risks that may be related to the manufacturing processes and equipment at various stages of the lifecycle of an engineered nanomaterial.

  17. Advanced nanomaterials and their applications in renewable energy

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jingbo Louise

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Nanomaterials and Their Applications in Renewable Energy presents timely topics related to nanomaterials' feasible synthesis and characterization, and their application in the energy fields. In addition, the book provides insights and scientific discoveries in toxicity study, with information that is easily understood by a wide audience. Advanced energy materials are important in designing materials that have greater physical, electronic, and optical properties. This book emphasizes the fundamental physics and chemistry underlying the techniques used to develop solar and fuel cell

  18. The eNanoMapper database for nanomaterial safety information

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: The NanoSafety Cluster, a cluster of projects funded by the European Commision, identified the need for a computational infrastructure for toxicological data management of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). Ontologies, open standards, and interoperable designs were envisioned to empower a harmonized approach to European research in nanotechnology. This setting provides a number of opportunities and challenges in the representation of nanomaterials data and the integration of ENM inf...

  19. Electrically tunable functional nanomaterials for actuation and photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Li-Hua

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials with tunable electronic structure exploit the large specific surface area of metal nanostructures along with the strategy of tuning the surface properties through the controlled introduction of space-charge regions. Then, materials with tunable macroscopic properties can be created. The present thesis work achieved a successful synthesis of metallic and carbon-based tunable nanomaterials and demonstrated novel functional behavior in two fields of application: actuation and photo...

  20. Green solvent-based approaches for synthesis of nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The use of green solvents (including supercritical fluids and ionic liquids) in the synthesis of nanomaterials is highlighted. The methods described can not only reduce or eliminate the use or generation of substances hazardous to health and the environment, but can also be used to efficiently prepare nanomaterials with high performances. The unique characteristics of green solvents are responsible for the green features and unusual advantages of these approaches.

  1. [International trend of guidance for nanomaterial risk assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    In the past few years, several kinds of opinions or recommendations on the nanomaterial safety assessment have been published from international or national bodies. Among the reports, the first practical guidance of risk assessment from the regulatory body was published from the European Food Safety Authorities in May 2011, which included the determination of exposure scenario and toxicity testing strategy. In October 2011, European Commission (EC) adopted the definition of "nanomaterial" for regulation. And more recently, Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety of EC released guidance for assessment of nanomaterials in cosmetics in June 2012. A series of activities in EU marks an important step towards realistic safety assessment of nanomaterials. On the other hand, the US FDA announced a draft guidance for industry in June 2011, and then published draft guidance documents for both "Cosmetic Products" and "Food Ingredients and Food Contact Substances" in April 2012. These draft documents do not restrictedly define the physical properties of nanomaterials, but when manufacturing changes alter the dimensions, properties, or effects of an FDA-regulated product, the products are treated as new products. Such international movements indicate that most of nanomaterials with any new properties would be assessed or regulated as new products by most of national authorities in near future, although the approaches are still case by case basis. We will introduce such current international activities and consideration points for regulatory risk assessment.

  2. Nanomaterials and Autophagy: New Insights in Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panzarini, Elisa; Inguscio, Valentina; Tenuzzo, Bernardetta Anna; Carata, Elisabetta; Dini, Luciana, E-mail: luciana.dini@unisalento.it [Department of Biological and Environmental Science and Technology (Di.S.Te.B.A.), University of Salento, Lecce 73100 (Italy)

    2013-03-21

    Autophagy represents a cell’s response to stress. It is an evolutionarily conserved process with diversified roles. Indeed, it controls intracellular homeostasis by degradation and/or recycling intracellular metabolic material, supplies energy, provides nutrients, eliminates cytotoxic materials and damaged proteins and organelles. Moreover, autophagy is involved in several diseases. Recent evidences support a relationship between several classes of nanomaterials and autophagy perturbation, both induction and blockade, in many biological models. In fact, the autophagic mechanism represents a common cellular response to nanomaterials. On the other hand, the dynamic nature of autophagy in cancer biology is an intriguing approach for cancer therapeutics, since during tumour development and therapy, autophagy has been reported to trigger both an early cell survival and a late cell death. The use of nanomaterials in cancer treatment to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs and target tumours is well known. Recently, autophagy modulation mediated by nanomaterials has become an appealing notion in nanomedicine therapeutics, since it can be exploited as adjuvant in chemotherapy or in the development of cancer vaccines or as a potential anti-cancer agent. Herein, we summarize the effects of nanomaterials on autophagic processes in cancer, also considering the therapeutic outcome of synergism between nanomaterials and autophagy to improve existing cancer therapies.

  3. Mechanism of hard-nanomaterial clearance by the liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoi, Kim M.; Macparland, Sonya A.; Ma, Xue-Zhong; Spetzler, Vinzent N.; Echeverri, Juan; Ouyang, Ben; Fadel, Saleh M.; Sykes, Edward A.; Goldaracena, Nicolas; Kaths, Johann M.; Conneely, John B.; Alman, Benjamin A.; Selzner, Markus; Ostrowski, Mario A.; Adeyi, Oyedele A.; Zilman, Anton; McGilvray, Ian D.; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-11-01

    The liver and spleen are major biological barriers to translating nanomedicines because they sequester the majority of administered nanomaterials and prevent delivery to diseased tissue. Here we examined the blood clearance mechanism of administered hard nanomaterials in relation to blood flow dynamics, organ microarchitecture and cellular phenotype. We found that nanomaterial velocity reduces 1,000-fold as they enter and traverse the liver, leading to 7.5 times more nanomaterial interaction with hepatic cells relative to peripheral cells. In the liver, Kupffer cells (84.8 +/- 6.4%), hepatic B cells (81.5 +/- 9.3%) and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (64.6 +/- 13.7%) interacted with administered PEGylated quantum dots, but splenic macrophages took up less material (25.4 +/- 10.1%) due to differences in phenotype. The uptake patterns were similar for two other nanomaterial types and five different surface chemistries. Potential new strategies to overcome off-target nanomaterial accumulation may involve manipulating intra-organ flow dynamics and modulating the cellular phenotype to alter hepatic cell interactions.

  4. Recent trends in nanomaterials immobilised enzymes for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Madan L; Puri, Munish; Barrow, Colin J

    2016-01-01

    Application of nanomaterials as novel supporting materials for enzyme immobilisation has generated incredible interest in the biotechnology community. These robust nanostructured forms, such as nanoparticles, nanofibres, nanotubes, nanoporous, nanosheets, and nanocomposites, possess a high surface area to volume ratios that can cause a high enzyme loading and facilitate reaction kinetics, thus improving biocatalytic efficiency for industrial applications. In this article, we discuss research opportunities of nanoscale materials in enzyme biotechnology and highlight recent developments in biofuel production using advanced material supports for enzyme immobilisation and stabilisation. Synthesis and functionalisation of nanomaterial forms using different methods are highlighted. Various simple and effective strategies designed to result in a stable, as well as functional protein-nanomaterial conjugates are also discussed. Analytical techniques confirming enzyme loading on nanomaterials and assessing post-immobilisation changes are discussed. The current status of versatile nanomaterial support for biofuel production employing cellulases and lipases is described in details. This report concludes with a discussion on the likely outcome that nanomaterials will become an integral part of sustainable bioenergy production.

  5. Nanomaterials in consumer's goods: the problems of risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmoshinski, I. V.; Khotimchenko, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    Nanotechnology and engineered nanomaterials are currently used in wide variety of cosmetic products, while their use in food industry, packaging materials, household chemicals etc. still includes a limited number of items and does not show a significant upward trend. However, the problem of priority nanomaterials associated risks is relevant due to their high production volumes and an constantly growing burden on the environment and population. In accordance with the frequency of use in mass-produced consumer goods, leading priority nanomaterials are silver nanoparticles (NPs) and (by a wide margin) NPs of gold, platinum, and titanium dioxide. Frequency of nanosized silica introduction into food products as a food additive, at the moment, seems to be underestimated, since the use of this nanomaterial is not declared by manufacturers of products and objective control of its content is difficult. Analysis of literature data on toxicological properties of nanomaterials shows that currently accumulated amount of information is sufficient to establish the safe doses of nanosized silver, gold and titanium dioxide. Data have been provided in a series of studies concerning the effect of oral intake of nanosized silica on the condition of laboratory animals, including on the performance of the immune system. The article examines the existing approaches to the assessment of population exposure to priority nanomaterials, characteristics of existing problems and risk management.

  6. Recent developments of phototherapy based on graphene family nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baomei; Wang, Yang; Liu, Jiyong; Zhai, Guangxi

    2016-10-19

    Graphene-based nanomaterials have drawn abundant interest in various fields such as biomedicine in recent years, thanks to their unique physico-chemical properties. Due to the ultra-high surface area of single-layered graphene, higher molecular loading is obtained. In addition, easy modifications are acquired because of its ample oxygen-content functional groups. Based on the above talking advantages, graphene-based nanomaterials have been widely explored as novel nano-vectors for disease theranostics. In this article, we give a comprehensive review about graphene-based nanomaterials, including introduction about different members of graphene family nanomaterials (GFNs), various modifications, toxicity and biomedical applications of graphene-based derivatives. More attentions are given to phototherapy application in this paper. The mechanisms of photothermal and photodynamic therapy are also offered. Finally, the prospects and challenges of the graphene-based nanomaterials are discussed in this review. That this review article will provide a comprehensive understanding of graphene-based nanomaterials is the pursuit.

  7. Characterization Techniques for Aggregated Nanomaterials in Biological and Environmental Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seongho

    Nanoparticles, which are defined as objects with characteristic lengths in the 10--9 -- 10--7 m (nanoscale) size range, are used with increasing frequency in a wide of applications, leading to increases in nanomaterial interactions with biological and environmental systems. There is therefore considerable interest in studying the influence nanomaterials can have when inside the human body or dispersed in the ambient environment. However, nanoparticles persist as homo aggregates or heterogeneous mixtures with organic matters, such as proteins, in biological and environmental systems. A large and growing body of research confirm that nanomaterial morphology as well as the degree of aggregation between nanomaterials influences nanomaterial interactions with their surroundings. Specifically, the structures/morphologies of nanoparticles determine their overall surface areas and corresponding surface reactivity (e.g. their catalytic activity). Nanoparticle transport properties (e.g. diffusion coefficient and extent of cellular uptake) are also determined by both their structures and surface properties. Unfortunately, techniques to characterize nanomaterial size and shape quantitatively, when nanomaterials have complex geometries or persist as aggregates, are lacking. Hydrodynamic sizes of nanoparticles and their aggregates can be inferred by dynamic light scattering (DLS) or nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). However, since these techniques are relied on the scattering light intensity properties, sizes of polydisperse sub 30 nm particles cannot be effectively measured in those techniques. For structure inference of aggregated nanomaterials, microscopy images have been used for qualitative visual analysis, but the quantitative morphology analysis technique is yet to be developed. Five studies in this dissertation are hence aimed to develop new techniques to provide improved morphology characterization of aggregated nanomaterials in various biological and environmental

  8. A functional assay-based strategy for nanomaterial risk forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendren, Christine Ogilvie, E-mail: christine.hendren@duke.edu [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Lowry, Gregory V., E-mail: glowry@andrew.cmu.edu [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 119 Porter Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Unrine, Jason M., E-mail: jason.unrine@uky.edu [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, Agricultural Science Center, Lexington, KY 40546 (United States); Wiesner, Mark R., E-mail: wiesner@duke.edu [Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, 121 Hudson Hall PO Box 90287, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The study of nanomaterial impacts on environment, health and safety (nanoEHS) has been largely predicated on the assumption that exposure and hazard can be predicted from physical–chemical properties of nanomaterials. This approach is rooted in the view that nanoöbjects essentially resemble chemicals with additional particle-based attributes that must be included among their intrinsic physical–chemical descriptors. With the exception of the trivial case of nanomaterials made from toxic or highly reactive materials, this approach has yielded few actionable guidelines for predicting nanomaterial risk. This article addresses inherent problems in structuring a nanoEHS research strategy based on the goal of predicting outcomes directly from nanomaterial properties, and proposes a framework for organizing data and designing integrated experiments based on functional assays (FAs). FAs are intermediary, semi-empirical measures of processes or functions within a specified system that bridge the gap between nanomaterial properties and potential outcomes in complex systems. The three components of a functional assay are standardized protocols for parameter determination and reporting, a theoretical context for parameter application and reference systems. We propose the identification and adoption of reference systems where FAs may be applied to provide parameter estimates for environmental fate and effects models, as well as benchmarks for comparing the results of FAs and experiments conducted in more complex and varied systems. Surface affinity and dissolution rate are identified as two critical FAs for characterizing nanomaterial behavior in a variety of important systems. The use of these FAs to predict bioaccumulation and toxicity for initial and aged nanomaterials is illustrated for the case of silver nanoparticles and Caenorhabditis elegans. - Highlights: • Approaches to predict risk directly from nanomaterial (NM) properties are problematic. • We propose

  9. Optical Characterization of Natural Nontoxic Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Devulapalli; Yelleswarapu, Chandra

    2013-03-01

    Synthetic nanomaterials - carbon nanotubes, semiconductor nanoparticles, nanowires and nanorods, metal clusters in polymer films - are extensively studied for potential photonic applications. Naturally occurring halloysite nanotubes offer additional advantages of high tensile strength, nontoxcity and biocompatibility. Halloysite is receiving lot of attention for application as low cost nanoscale container for encapsulation of biologically active molecules, drugs, and anticorrosion agents. We studied the optical properties of halloysite nanotube samples of length ~1000 nm with 50 nm external diameter and 15 nm internal diameter. The hollysite sample was provided by Prof. Yuri Lvov, Institute for Micromanufacturing, Louisiana Tech. The sample suspended in water at a concentration 2.5 mg/ml exhibits a broad optical absorption band in the visible region with a peak ~600 nm. Z-scan studies are carried out, with 3 nsec laser pulses of frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, using 1 mm glass cell containing the sample suspended in acetone at a concentration 0.66 mg/ml. Open aperture z-scan measurements indicate two-photon absorption. Closed aperture z-scan measurements exhibit a positive nonlinear refractive index. Results of photoacoustic z-scan currently in progress will also be presented.

  10. Carbon nanomaterials-based electrochemical aptasensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zonghua; Yu, Jianbo; Gui, Rijun; Jin, Hui; Xia, Yanzhi

    2016-05-15

    Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) have attracted increasing attention due to their unique electrical, optical, thermal, mechanical and chemical properties. CNMs are extensively applied in electronic, optoelectronic, photovoltaic and sensing devices fields, especially in bioassay technology. These excellent properties significantly depend on not only the functional atomic structures of CNMs, but also the interactions with other materials, such as gold nanoparticles, SiO2, chitosan, etc. This review systematically summarizes applications of CNMs in electrochemical aptasensors (ECASs). Firstly, definition and development of ECASs are introduced. Secondly, different ways of ECASs about working principles, classification and construction of CNMs are illustrated. Thirdly, the applications of different CNMs used in ECASs are discussed. In this review, different types of CNMs are involved such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, graphene oxide, etc. Besides, the newly emerging CNMs and CNMs-based composites are also discoursed. Finally, we demonstrate the future prospects of CNMs-based ECASs, and some suggestions about the near future development of CNMs-based ECASs are highlighted.

  11. Nanomaterial Case Study: A Comparison of Multiwalled ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The draft document is intended to be used as part of a process to identify what is known and, more importantly, what is not yet known that could be of value in assessing the broad implications of specific nanomaterials. Like previous case studies (see History/ Chronology below), this draft case study on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is based on the comprehensive environmental assessment (CEA) approach, which consists of both a framework and a process. Unlike previous case studies this case study incorporates information about a traditional (i.e., “non-nano-enabled”) product, against which the MWCNT flame-retardant coating applied to upholstery textiles (i.e., the “nano-enabled” product) can be compared. The comparative element serves dual-purposes: 1) to provide a more robust database that facilitates identification of data gaps related to the nano-enabled product and 2) to provide a context for identifying key factors and data gaps for future efforts to evaluate risk-related trade-offs between a nano-enabled and non-nano-enabled product. This draft case study does not represent a completed or even a preliminary assessment of MWCNTs; rather, it uses the CEA framework to structure information from available literature and other resources (e.g., government reports) on the product life cycle, fate and transport processes in various environmental media, exposure-dose characterization, and impacts in human, ecological, and environmental receptors.

  12. Nanomaterials to Combat NO(x) Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbuena, J; Cruz-Yusta, M; Sánchez, L

    2015-09-01

    The presence of NO9x) gases (NO+NO2) in the atmosphere is a major concern of society because of their associated adverse and harmful effects. In order to remove the NO(x) gases from the air, photocatalysis arises as an innovative and promising technique. Through the use of photochemical oxidation processes the NO and NO2 gases are oxidised to NO3- form and thus removed from the air. In recent years new nanomaterials are being developed by researchers with the aim to enhance their photocatalytic activity to combat the NO(x) pollution. The main focus is devoted to preparing new TiO2 based compounds with the highest specific surface area (SSA), different morphology and chemical modifications. In order to increase the SSA, different substrates were used to disperse the TiO2 nanoparticles: organic and carbon fibres, mesoporous materials, clays composites and nanoporous microparticles. In the other hand, high photocatalytic performances were obtained with nanotubes, self-orderer nano-tubular films and nanoparticles with the lowest size. Conversely, when TiO2 is doped with ions the oxide exhibited a better photocatalytic performance under visible light, which is related to the creation of intermediate energy states between the conduction band and the valence band. Alternatively, visible light photocatalysts different from titanium oxide have been studied, which exhibit a good De-NO(x) efficiency working under λ > 400 nm visible light irradiation.

  13. Glyconanoparticles: multifunctional nanomaterials for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Isabel; Marradi, Marco; Penadés, Soledad

    2010-07-01

    Metal-based glyconanoparticles (GNPs) are biofunctional nanomaterials that combine the unique physical, chemical and optical properties of the metallic nucleus with the characteristics of the carbohydrate coating. The latter characteristics comprise a series of advantages that range from ensuring water solubility, biocompatibility and stability to targeting properties. The selection of suitable carbohydrates for specifically targeting biomarkers opens up the possibility to employ metallic GNPs in diagnostics and/or therapy. Within the vast nanoscience field, this review intends to focus on the advances of multifunctional and multimodal GNPs, which make use of the 'glycocode' to specifically address pathogens or pathological-related biomedical problems. Examples of their potential application in antiadhesion therapy and diagnosis are highlighted. From the ex vivo diagnostic perspective, it can be predicted that GNPs will soon be used clinically. However, the in vivo application of metallic GNPs in humans will probably need more time. In particular, major concerns regarding nanotoxicity need to be exhaustively addressed. However, it is expected that the sugar shell of GNPs will lower the intrinsic toxicity of metal nanoclusters better than other non-natural coatings.

  14. Multimedia environmental distribution of engineered nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haoyang Haven; Cohen, Yoram

    2014-03-18

    A compartmental multimedia model was developed to enable evaluation of the dynamic environmental multimedia mass distribution and concentrations of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). The approach considers the environment as a collection of compartments, linked via fundamental environmental intermedia transport processes. Model simulations for various environmental scenarios indicated that ENM accumulation in the sediment increased significantly with increased ENMs attachment to suspended solids in water. Atmospheric dry and wet depositions can be important pathways for ENMs input to the terrestrial environment in the absence of direct and distributed ENM release to soil. Increased ENM concentration in water due to atmospheric deposition (wet and dry) is expected as direct ENM release to water diminishes. However, for soluble ENMs dissolution can be the dominant pathway for suspended ENM removal from water even compared to advection. Mass accumulation in the multimedia environment for the evaluated ENMs (metal, metal oxides, carbon nanotubes (CNT), nanoclays) was mostly in the soil and sediment. The present modeling approach, as illustrated via different test cases, is suited for "what if" first tier analyses to assess the multimedia mass distribution of ENMs and associated potential exposure concentrations.

  15. SURFACE MODIFITED MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLES FOR BIOMEDICAL APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Yu. Vasyukov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Unique physicochemical properties of nanomaterials arouse a great interest of specialists of various fields. Materials based on nanostructures purchase new mechanical, optical, and electrical properties. Great practical importance is the magnetic properties of materials, structural elements which lie at the nanoscale. Nanomaterials with magnetic properties have been used in drug delivery, magnetic hyperthermia, magnetic separation, and magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic properties of nanoparticles depend on many factors, such as particle size and shape, chemical properties and lattice type. Magnetic characteristics can be changed by the interaction of particles with the surrounding matrix and neighboring particles.Unfortunately, many studies show that a great disadvantage of the unmodified nanoparticles is their non-specific interaction with the cells, which leads to their accumulation outside the target organs, also to­xicity of nanomaterials and their low colloidal stability. Surface modification of nanoparticles can solve this problem. Development of nanostructures based on magnetic nanoparticles and functionalized by biocompatible agents is one of the main targets of nanobiotechnology.

  16. Quantitative Evaluation of the Total Magnetic Moments of Colloidal Magnetic Nanoparticles: A Kinetics-based Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyi; Sun, Jianfei; Wang, Haoyao; Wang, Peng; Song, Lina; Li, Yang; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Ning

    2015-06-08

    A kinetics-based method is proposed to quantitatively characterize the collective magnetization of colloidal magnetic nanoparticles. The method is based on the relationship between the magnetic force on a colloidal droplet and the movement of the droplet under a gradient magnetic field. Through computational analysis of the kinetic parameters, such as displacement, velocity, and acceleration, the magnetization of colloidal magnetic nanoparticles can be calculated. In our experiments, the values measured by using our method exhibited a better linear correlation with magnetothermal heating, than those obtained by using a vibrating sample magnetometer and magnetic balance. This finding indicates that this method may be more suitable to evaluate the collective magnetism of colloidal magnetic nanoparticles under low magnetic fields than the commonly used methods. Accurate evaluation of the magnetic properties of colloidal nanoparticles is of great importance for the standardization of magnetic nanomaterials and for their practical application in biomedicine.

  17. Biomedical Platforms Based on Composite Nanomaterials and Cellular Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, Stefano [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Bergamaschi, A [Department of Environmental, Occupational and Social Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Bottini, M [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Magrini, A [Department of Environmental, Occupational and Social Medicine, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via Montpellier 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Mustelin, T [Burnham Institute for Medical Research, 10901 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Carbon nanotubes possess unique chemical, physical, optical, and magnetic properties, which make them suitable for many uses in industrial products and in the field of nanotechnology, including nanomedicine. We describe fluorescent nanocomposites for use in biosensors or nanoelectronics. Then we describe recent results on the issue of cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes obtained in our labs. Silica nanoparticles have been widely used for biosensing and catalytic applications due to their large surface area-to-volume ratio, straightforward manufacture, and the compatibility of silica chemistry with covalent coupling of biomolecules. Carbon nanotubes-composite materials, such as those based on Carbon nanotubes bound to nanoparticles, are suitable, in order to tailor Carbon nanotubes properties for specific applications. We present a tunable synthesis of Multi Wall Carbon nanotubes-Silica nanoparticles. The control of the nanotube morphology and the bead size, coupled with the versatility of silica chemistry, makes these structures an excellent platform for the development of biosensors (optical, magnetic and catalytic applications). We describe the construction and characterization of supramolecular nanostructures consisting of ruthenium-complex luminophores, directly grafted onto short oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes or physically entrapped in silica nanobeads, which had been covalently linked to short oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes or hydrophobically adsorbed onto full-length multi-walled carbon nanotubes. These structures have been evaluated as potential electron-acceptor complexes for use in the fabrication of photovoltaic devices, and for their properties as fluorescent nanocomposites for use in biosensors or nanoelectronics. Finally, we compare the toxicity of pristine and oxidized Multi Walled Carbon nanotubes on human T cells - which would be among the first exposed cell types upon intravenous administration of Carbon nanotubes in therapeutic

  18. Engineered Nanomaterials, Sexy New Technology and Potential Hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaulieu, R A

    2009-05-04

    Engineered nanomaterials enhance exciting new applications that can greatly benefit society in areas of cancer treatments, solar energy, energy storage, and water purification. While nanotechnology shows incredible promise in these and other areas by exploiting nanomaterials unique properties, these same properties can potentially cause adverse health effects to workers who may be exposed during work. Dispersed nanoparticles in air can cause adverse health effects to animals not merely due to their chemical properties but due to their size, structure, shape, surface chemistry, solubility, carcinogenicity, reproductive toxicity, mutagenicity, dermal toxicity, and parent material toxicity. Nanoparticles have a greater likelihood of lung deposition and blood absorption than larger particles due to their size. Nanomaterials can also pose physical hazards due to their unusually high reactivity, which makes them useful as catalysts, but has the potential to cause fires and explosions. Characterization of the hazards (and potential for exposures) associated with nanomaterial development and incorporation in other products is an essential step in the development of nanotechnologies. Developing controls for these hazards are equally important. Engineered controls should be integrated into nanomaterial manufacturing process design according to 10CFR851, DOE Policy 456.1, and DOE Notice 456.1 as safety-related hardware or administrative controls for worker safety. Nanomaterial hazards in a nuclear facility must also meet control requirements per DOE standards 3009, 1189, and 1186. Integration of safe designs into manufacturing processes for new applications concurrent with the developing technology is essential for worker safety. This paper presents a discussion of nanotechnology, nanomaterial properties/hazards and controls.

  19. Culture medium-associated physicochemical insights on the cytotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Huating; Wang, Lihua; Zhu, Ying; Huang, Qing; Fan, Chunhai

    2015-03-16

    Carbon nanomaterials are the most studied materials in nanotechnology. There have been numerous studies on cytotoxicity assessments of carbon nanomaterials, which, however, often lead to controversy. It is generally considered that chemical and physical properties of carbon nanomaterials should have specific biological outcomes. More recent studies have identified the significance of environmental factors surrounding nanomaterial-treated cells. In this perspective, we mainly review culture medium-associated physicochemical insights on the cytotoxicity of carbon nanomaterials, which are largely based on studies in our laboratory. These studies established the close relationship and interplay among the physicochemical properties of the nanomaterials, culture medium, and their toxicological responses.

  20. The Nanomaterial Data Curation Initiative: A Collaborative Approach to Assessing, Evaluating, and Advancing the State of the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nanomaterial Data Curation Initiative (NDCI) explores the critical aspect of data curation within the development of informatics approaches to understanding nanomaterial behavior. Data repositories and tools for integrating and interrogating complex nanomaterial datasets are...

  1. Magnetism in undoped ZnS nanotetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Aixian; Liu, Wei; Wang, Rongming; Chen, Chinping

    2013-02-21

    The magnetism of undoped ZnS nanotetrapods, synthesized by a solvothermal method, has been investigated by magnetization measurements and first principle numerical calculations. The background magnetic impurity concentrations of Fe, Co and Ni were determined at ppm level by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Hysteresis loops of weak ferromagnetism were observed, attributable to the magnetic impurities. However, the total magnetic moments analyzed from the paramagnetism are far beyond the explanations from the presence of these magnetic impurities, by about two orders of magnitude larger. It implies a different origin of the magnetic moments. Electron microscopy analysis reveals that there are defects in the sample. Numerical simulations indicate that the excessive magnetic moments might arise from the local band structure of polarized electrons associated with the defects of cation deficiency. This study elaborates on the understanding of magnetic properties in the non-magnetic II-VI semiconductor nanomaterials.

  2. Global life cycle releases of engineered nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Arturo A., E-mail: keller@bren.ucsb.edu; McFerran, Suzanne; Lazareva, Anastasiya; Suh, Sangwon [University of California, Santa Barbara, Bren School of Environmental Science and Management (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are now becoming a significant fraction of the material flows in the global economy. We are already reaping the benefits of improved energy efficiency, material use reduction, and better performance in many existing and new applications that have been enabled by these technological advances. As ENMs pervade the global economy, however, it becomes important to understand their environmental implications. As a first step, we combined ENM market information and material flow modeling to produce the first global assessment of the likely ENM emissions to the environment and landfills. The top ten most produced ENMs by mass were analyzed in a dozen major applications. Emissions during the manufacturing, use, and disposal stages were estimated, including intermediate steps through wastewater treatment plants and waste incineration plants. In 2010, silica, titania, alumina, and iron and zinc oxides dominate the ENM market in terms of mass flow through the global economy, used mostly in coatings/paints/pigments, electronics and optics, cosmetics, energy and environmental applications, and as catalysts. We estimate that 63-91 % of over 260,000-309,000 metric tons of global ENM production in 2010 ended up in landfills, with the balance released into soils (8-28 %), water bodies (0.4-7 %), and atmosphere (0.1-1.5 %). While there are considerable uncertainties in the estimates, the framework for estimating emissions can be easily improved as better data become available. The material flow estimates can be used to quantify emissions at the local level, as inputs for fate and transport models to estimate concentrations in different environmental compartments.

  3. Developmental toxicity of engineered nanomaterials in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ema, Makoto; Gamo, Masashi; Honda, Kazumasa

    2016-05-15

    We summarized significant effects reported in the literature on the developmental toxicity of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in rodents. The developmental toxicity of ENMs included not only structural abnormalities, but also death, growth retardation, and behavioral and functional abnormalities. Most studies were performed on mice using an injection route of exposure. Teratogenic effects were indicated when multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and TiO2-nanoparticles were administered to mice during early gestation. Reactive oxygen species levels were increased in placentas and malformed fetuses and their placentas after prenatal exposure to MWCNTs and SWCNTs, respectively. The pre- and postnatal mortalities and growth retardation in offspring increased after prenatal exposure to ENMs. Histopathological and functional abnormalities were also induced in placentas after prenatal exposure to ENMs. Maternal exposure to ENMs induced behavioral alterations, histopathological and biochemical changes in the central nervous system, increased susceptibility to allergy, transplacental genotoxicity, and vascular, immunological, and reproductive effects in offspring. The size- and developmental stage-dependent placental transfer of ENMs was noted after maternal exposure. Silver accumulated in the visceral yolk sac after being injected with Ag-NPs during early gestation. Although currently available data has provided initial information on the potential developmental toxicity of ENMs, that on the developmental toxicity of ENMs is still very limited. Further studies using well-characterized ENMs, state-of the-art study protocols, and appropriate routes of exposure are required in order to clarify these developmental effects and provide information suitable for risk assessments of ENMs.

  4. Synthesis and device applications of graphitic nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umair, Ahmad

    This thesis is focused on two topics: (i) synthesis and characterization of bilayer graphene and pyrolytic carbon by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition, and (ii) application of graphene in the fabrication of a buckyball memory device. Monolayer and bilayer graphene are semi-metal with zero bandgap. One can induce a bandgap in bilayer graphene by applying a gate voltage in the stacking direction. Thus, bandgap and Fermi level in bilayer graphene can be controlled simultaneously with a double-gate device, making it a useful material for future semiconducting applications. Controlled synthesis of bilayer graphene would be the first step to fabricate bilayer graphene based devices. In this context, we report a uniform and low-defect synthesis of bilayer graphene on evaporated nickel films. Ultra-fast cooling is employed to control the number of layers and sample uniformity. The process is self-limiting, which leads to bilayer graphene synthesis over a wide range of growth-time and precursor flow-rate. Pryolytic carbon is another important carbon nanomaterial, due to its diverse applications in electronic and biomedicalengineering. We employ chemical vapor deposition with ultra-fast cooling technique to synthesize pyrolytic carbon. Furthermore, we elucidate a method to calculate the in-plane crystal size by using Raman spectroscopy. Finally, the use of bilayer graphene in a write-once read-many memory device has been demonstrated. The device showed irreversible switching from low-resistance to high-resistance state, with hysteresis in the transport characteristics. The control sample showed random switching and hysteresis due to electromigration of metal atoms into the active material of the device. We attribute the reliability and performance of the reported device to the ultra-smooth graphene contacts, which additionally inhibits electromigration from the underlying metallic film. Moreover, the memory device showed excellent endurance and retention

  5. Global life cycle releases of engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Arturo A.; McFerran, Suzanne; Lazareva, Anastasiya; Suh, Sangwon

    2013-06-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are now becoming a significant fraction of the material flows in the global economy. We are already reaping the benefits of improved energy efficiency, material use reduction, and better performance in many existing and new applications that have been enabled by these technological advances. As ENMs pervade the global economy, however, it becomes important to understand their environmental implications. As a first step, we combined ENM market information and material flow modeling to produce the first global assessment of the likely ENM emissions to the environment and landfills. The top ten most produced ENMs by mass were analyzed in a dozen major applications. Emissions during the manufacturing, use, and disposal stages were estimated, including intermediate steps through wastewater treatment plants and waste incineration plants. In 2010, silica, titania, alumina, and iron and zinc oxides dominate the ENM market in terms of mass flow through the global economy, used mostly in coatings/paints/pigments, electronics and optics, cosmetics, energy and environmental applications, and as catalysts. We estimate that 63-91 % of over 260,000-309,000 metric tons of global ENM production in 2010 ended up in landfills, with the balance released into soils (8-28 %), water bodies (0.4-7 %), and atmosphere (0.1-1.5 %). While there are considerable uncertainties in the estimates, the framework for estimating emissions can be easily improved as better data become available. The material flow estimates can be used to quantify emissions at the local level, as inputs for fate and transport models to estimate concentrations in different environmental compartments.

  6. Fabrication and Design of Optical Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Mark D.

    Over the past several decades, advances in nanometer scale fabrication has sparked interes in applications that take advantage of materials that are structured at these small length scales. Specifically, metallic optical nanomaterials have emerged as a new way to control light at length scales that are smaller than the wavelength of light and have optical properties that are distinctly different from their macroscale counterparts. Although there have been may advances in nanofabrication, the performance and widespread use of optical nanomaterials is still limited by fabrication and design challenges. This dissertation describes advances in the fabrication, characterization, and design of optical nanomaterials. First we demonstrate how a portable and compact photolithography system can be made using a light source composed of UV LEDs. Our solid-state photolithography (SSP) system brings the capabilities of one of the most important yet workhorse tools of micro- and nanotechnology--the mask aligner--to the benchtop. The two main highlights of chapter 2 include: (i) portable, low-cost photolithography and (ii) high quality patterning. We replace the mask aligner with a system composed of UV LEDs and a diffuser that can be built for as little as $30. The design of the SSP system alleviates the need for dedicated power supplies, vacuum lines and cooling systems, which makes it a true benchtop photolithography system. We further show that sub-wavelength features can be fabricated across 4-in wafers and that these patterns are of high quality such that they can be easily transferred into functional materials. Chapter 3 describes a parallel method to create nanometer scale textures over large areas with unprecedented control over wrinkle wavelength. The main points of this chapter include: (i) a new material system for nanowrinkles, (ii) wrinkles with tunable wavelengths, and (iii) a method for measuring the skin thickness. First, we show that RIE treatment of PS with

  7. Allergic Responses Induced by the Immunomodulatory Effects of Nanomaterials upon Skin Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Yasuo; Kuroda, Etsushi; Hirai, Toshiro; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Ishii, Ken J.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, a vast array of nanomaterials has been created through the development of nanotechnology. With the increasing application of these nanomaterials in various fields, such as foods, cosmetics, and medicines, there has been concern about their safety, that is, nanotoxicity. Therefore, there is an urgent need to collect information about the biological effects of nanomaterials so that we can exploit their potential benefits and design safer nanomaterials, while avoiding nanotoxicity as a result of inhalation or skin exposure. In particular, the immunomodulating effect of nanomaterials is one of most interesting aspects of nanotoxicity. However, the immunomodulating effects of nanomaterials through skin exposure have not been adequately discussed compared with the effects of inhalation exposure, because skin penetration by nanomaterials is thought to be extremely low under normal conditions. On the other hand, the immunomodulatory effects of nanomaterials via skin may cause severe problems for people with impaired skin barrier function, because some nanomaterials could penetrate the deep layers of their allergic or damaged skin. In addition, some studies, including ours, have shown that nanomaterials could exhibit significant immunomodulating effects even if they do not penetrate the skin. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the allergic responses induced by nanomaterials upon skin exposure. First, we discuss nanomaterial penetration of the intact or impaired skin barrier. Next, we describe the immunomodulating effects of nanomaterials, focusing on the sensitization potential of nanomaterials and the effects of co-exposure of nanomaterials with substances such as chemical sensitizers or allergens, on the onset of allergy, following skin exposure. Finally, we discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the immunomodulating effects of nanomaterials by describing the involvement of the protein corona in the interaction of

  8. Autophagy as a Possible Underlying Mechanism of Nanomaterial Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cohignac

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of nanotechnologies is raising safety concerns because of the potential effects of engineered nanomaterials on human health, particularly at the respiratory level. Since the last decades, many in vivo studies have been interested in the pulmonary effects of different classes of nanomaterials. It has been shown that some of them can induce toxic effects, essentially depending on their physico-chemical characteristics, but other studies did not identify such effects. Inflammation and oxidative stress are currently the two main mechanisms described to explain the observed toxicity. However, the exact underlying mechanism(s still remain(s unknown and autophagy could represent an interesting candidate. Autophagy is a physiological process in which cytoplasmic components are digested via a lysosomal pathway. It has been shown that autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis and the progression of human diseases, and is able to modulate the oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory responses. A growing amount of literature suggests that a link between nanomaterial toxicity and autophagy impairment could exist. In this review, we will first summarize what is known about the respiratory effects of nanomaterials and we will then discuss the possible involvement of autophagy in this toxicity. This review should help understand why autophagy impairment could be taken as a promising candidate to fully understand nanomaterials toxicity.

  9. 2D nanomaterials based electrochemical biosensors for cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Xiong, Qirong; Xiao, Fei; Duan, Hongwei

    2017-03-15

    Cancer is a leading cause of death in the world. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that early diagnosis holds the key towards effective treatment outcome. Cancer biomarkers are extensively used in oncology for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Electrochemical sensors play key roles in current laboratory and clinical analysis of diverse chemical and biological targets. Recent development of functional nanomaterials offers new possibilities of improving the performance of electrochemical sensors. In particular, 2D nanomaterials have stimulated intense research due to their unique array of structural and chemical properties. The 2D materials of interest cover broadly across graphene, graphene derivatives (i.e., graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide), and graphene-like nanomaterials (i.e., 2D layered transition metal dichalcogenides, graphite carbon nitride and boron nitride nanomaterials). In this review, we summarize recent advances in the synthesis of 2D nanomaterials and their applications in electrochemical biosensing of cancer biomarkers (nucleic acids, proteins and some small molecules), and present a personal perspective on the future direction of this area.

  10. Deformable devices with integrated functional nanomaterials for wearable electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaemin; Lee, Jongsu; Son, Donghee; Choi, Moon Kee; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    As the market and related industry for wearable electronics dramatically expands, there are continuous and strong demands for flexible and stretchable devices to be seamlessly integrated with soft and curvilinear human skin or clothes. However, the mechanical mismatch between the rigid conventional electronics and the soft human body causes many problems. Therefore, various prospective nanomaterials that possess a much lower flexural rigidity than their bulk counterparts have rapidly established themselves as promising electronic materials replacing rigid silicon and/or compound semiconductors in next-generation wearable devices. Many hybrid structures of multiple nanomaterials have been also developed to pursue both high performance and multifunctionality. Here, we provide an overview of state-of-the-art wearable devices based on one- or two-dimensional nanomaterials (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene, single-crystal silicon and oxide nanomembranes, organic nanomaterials and their hybrids) in combination with zero-dimensional functional nanomaterials (e.g., metal/oxide nanoparticles and quantum dots). Starting from an introduction of materials strategies, we describe device designs and the roles of individual ones in integrated systems. Detailed application examples of wearable sensors/actuators, memories, energy devices, and displays are also presented.

  11. Deformable devices with integrated functional nanomaterials for wearable electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaemin; Lee, Jongsu; Son, Donghee; Choi, Moon Kee; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2016-03-01

    As the market and related industry for wearable electronics dramatically expands, there are continuous and strong demands for flexible and stretchable devices to be seamlessly integrated with soft and curvilinear human skin or clothes. However, the mechanical mismatch between the rigid conventional electronics and the soft human body causes many problems. Therefore, various prospective nanomaterials that possess a much lower flexural rigidity than their bulk counterparts have rapidly established themselves as promising electronic materials replacing rigid silicon and/or compound semiconductors in next-generation wearable devices. Many hybrid structures of multiple nanomaterials have been also developed to pursue both high performance and multifunctionality. Here, we provide an overview of state-of-the-art wearable devices based on one- or two-dimensional nanomaterials (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene, single-crystal silicon and oxide nanomembranes, organic nanomaterials and their hybrids) in combination with zero-dimensional functional nanomaterials (e.g., metal/oxide nanoparticles and quantum dots). Starting from an introduction of materials strategies, we describe device designs and the roles of individual ones in integrated systems. Detailed application examples of wearable sensors/actuators, memories, energy devices, and displays are also presented.

  12. Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Immunosensors for Clinically Significant Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niina J. Ronkainen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology has played a crucial role in the development of biosensors over the past decade. The development, testing, optimization, and validation of new biosensors has become a highly interdisciplinary effort involving experts in chemistry, biology, physics, engineering, and medicine. The sensitivity, the specificity and the reproducibility of biosensors have improved tremendously as a result of incorporating nanomaterials in their design. In general, nanomaterials-based electrochemical immunosensors amplify the sensitivity by facilitating greater loading of the larger sensing surface with biorecognition molecules as well as improving the electrochemical properties of the transducer. The most common types of nanomaterials and their properties will be described. In addition, the utilization of nanomaterials in immunosensors for biomarker detection will be discussed since these biosensors have enormous potential for a myriad of clinical uses. Electrochemical immunosensors provide a specific and simple analytical alternative as evidenced by their brief analysis times, inexpensive instrumentation, lower assay cost as well as good portability and amenability to miniaturization. The role nanomaterials play in biosensors, their ability to improve detection capabilities in low concentration analytes yielding clinically useful data and their impact on other biosensor performance properties will be discussed. Finally, the most common types of electroanalytical detection methods will be briefly touched upon.

  13. Particle length-dependent titanium dioxide nanomaterials toxicity and bioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buford Mary

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanomaterials have considerable beneficial uses as photocatalysts and solar cells. It has been established for many years that pigment-grade TiO2 (200 nm sphere is relatively inert when internalized into a biological model system (in vivo or in vitro. For this reason, TiO2 nanomaterials are considered an attractive alternative in applications where biological exposures will occur. Unfortunately, metal oxides on the nanoscale (one dimension Results TiO2 nanospheres, short ( 15 μm nanobelts were synthesized, characterized and tested for biological activity using primary murine alveolar macrophages and in vivo in mice. This study demonstrates that alteration of anatase TiO2 nanomaterial into a fibre structure of greater than 15 μm creates a highly toxic particle and initiates an inflammatory response by alveolar macrophages. These fibre-shaped nanomaterials induced inflammasome activation and release of inflammatory cytokines through a cathepsin B-mediated mechanism. Consequently, long TiO2 nanobelts interact with lung macrophages in a manner very similar to asbestos or silica. Conclusions These observations suggest that any modification of a nanomaterial, resulting in a wire, fibre, belt or tube, be tested for pathogenic potential. As this study demonstrates, toxicity and pathogenic potential change dramatically as the shape of the material is altered into one that a phagocytic cell has difficulty processing, resulting in lysosomal disruption.

  14. Dendritic surface functionalization of nanomaterials: controlling properties and functions for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nazemi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide variety of nanomaterials have demonstrated promise in medical applications such as drug delivery and imaging. In these applications, the surface chemistry of the materials is critical as it plays an important role in determining the toxicity and biodistribution behavior of the material. We review here the functionalization of nanomaterials with dendrons as an efficient method to alter the surface chemistry of the materials, introducing new properties and functions. Described here is the functionalization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO with dendritic guanidines to enhance their transport into cells for magnetic resonance imaging applications. The introduction of dendrons bearing peripheral hydroxyls, amines, guanidines, carbohydrates and Gd(III chelates to polymer vesicles (polymersomes is also described. These dendritic moieties allow for modulation of toxicity, cell uptake, protein binding, and contrast agent efficiency, while at the same time allowing the stabilities of the polymersomes to be maintained. Thus, this approach holds promise for the development of a wide range of multifunctional materials for pharmaceutical applications.

  15. Multidimensional nanomaterials for the control of stem cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueng, Sy-Tsong Dean; Yang, Letao; Zhang, Yixiao; Lee, Ki-Bum

    2016-09-01

    Current stem cell therapy suffers low efficiency in giving rise to differentiated cell lineages, which can replace the original damaged cells. Nanomaterials, on the other hand, provide unique physical size, surface chemistry, conductivity, and topographical microenvironment to regulate stem cell differentiation through multidimensional approaches to facilitate gene delivery, cell-cell, and cell-ECM interactions. In this review, nanomaterials are demonstrated to work both alone and synergistically to guide selective stem cell differentiation. From three different nanotechnology families, three approaches are shown: (1) soluble microenvironmental factors; (2) insoluble physical microenvironment; and (3) nano-topographical features. As regenerative medicine is heavily invested in effective stem cell therapy, this review is inspired to generate discussions in the potential clinical applications of multi-dimensional nanomaterials.

  16. Advances in biodegradable nanomaterials for photothermal therapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao-Feng; Wang, Shun-Hao; Yu, Ying-Jie; Shen, He-Yun; Zhao, Yan; Gao, Hui-Ling; Wang, Hai; Li, Lin-Lin; Liu, Hui-Yu

    2016-09-01

    Photothermal cancer therapy is an alternative to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. With the development of nanophotothermal agents, this therapy holds immense potential in clinical translation. However, the toxicity issues derived from the fact that nanomaterials are trapped and retained in the reticuloendothelial systems limit their biomedical application. Developing biodegradable photothermal agents is the most practical route to address these concerns. In addition to the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials, various internal and external stimuli play key roles on nanomaterials uptake, transport, and clearance. In this review, we summarized novel nanoplatforms for photothermal therapy; these nanoplatforms can elicit stimuli-triggered degradation. We focused on the recent innovative designs endowed with biodegradable photothermal agents under different stimuli, including enzyme, pH, and near-infrared (NIR) laser.

  17. Advances in biodegradable nanomaterials for photothermal therapy of cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-Feng He; Shun-Hao Wang; Ying-Jie Yu; He-Yun Shen; Yan Zhao; Hui-Ling Gao; Hai Wang; Lin-Lin Li; Hui-Yu Liu

    2016-01-01

    Photothermal cancer therapy is an alternative to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. With the development of nanophotothermal agents, this therapy holds immense potential in clinical translation. However, the toxicity issues derived from the fact that nanomaterials are trapped and retained in the reticuloendothelial systems limit their biomedical application. Developing biodegradable photothermal agents is the most practical route to address these concerns. In addition to the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials, various internal and external stimuli play key roles on nanomaterials uptake, transport, and clearance. In this review, we summarized novel nanoplatforms for photothermal therapy; these nanoplatforms can elicit stimuli-triggered degradation. We focused on the recent innovative designs endowed with biodegradable photothermal agents under different stimuli, including enzyme, pH, and near-infrared (NIR) laser.

  18. Calculating the electromagnetic characteristics of bifacial optical nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Grahn, P; Kaivola, M

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a formalism that describes the interaction of light with bifacial optical nanomaterials. They are artificial noncentrosymmetric materials in which counter-propagating waves behave differently. We derive electromagnetic material parameters for uniaxial crystalline media in terms of the complex transmission and reflection coefficients of a single layer of the constituent nanoscatterers, which makes the numerical evaluation of these parameters very efficient. In addition, we present generalized Fresnel coefficients for such bifacial nanomaterials and investigate the fundamental role of higher-order electromagnetic multipoles on the bifaciality. We find that two counter-propagating waves in the material must experience the same refractive index, but they can have dramatically different wave impedances. The use of our model in practice is demonstrated with a particular example of a bifacial nanomaterial that exhibits a directional impedance matching to the surrounding medium.

  19. Nanomaterial-Enabled Dry Electrodes for Electrophysiological Sensing: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shanshan; Zhu, Yong

    2016-04-01

    Long-term, continuous, and unsupervised tracking of physiological data is becoming increasingly attractive for health/wellness monitoring and ailment treatment. Nanomaterials have recently attracted extensive attention as building blocks for flexible/stretchable conductors and are thus promising candidates for electrophysiological electrodes. Here we provide a review on nanomaterial-enabled dry electrodes for electrophysiological sensing, focusing on electrocardiography (ECG). The dry electrodes can be classified into contact surface electrodes, contact-penetrating electrodes, and noncontact capacitive electrodes. Different types of electrodes including their corresponding equivalent electrode-skin interface models and the sources of the noise are first introduced, followed by a review on recent developments of dry ECG electrodes based on various nanomaterials, including metallic nanowires, metallic nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene. Their fabrication processes and performances in terms of electrode-skin impedance, signal-to-noise ratio, resistance to motion artifacts, skin compatibility, and long-term stability are discussed.

  20. Review of Research on Template Methods in Preparation of Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadian Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanomaterials have been widely used in various fields, such as photonics, catalysis, and adsorption, because of their unique physical and chemical properties. Therefore, their production methods are of utmost importance. Compared with traditional synthetic methods, the template method can effectively control the morphology, particle size, and structure during the preparation of nanomaterials, which is an effective method for their synthesis. The key for the template method is to choose different templates, which are divided into hard template and soft template according to their different structures. In this paper, the effects of different types of templates on the morphology of nanomaterials during their preparation are investigated from two aspects: hard template and soft template, combined with the mechanism of action.

  1. Nanomaterials in Targeting Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weiwei; Huang, Guan; Chen, Zuanguang; Zhang, Yuanqing

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in almost all cancers and give rise to metastases and can also act as a reservoir of cancer cells that may cause a relapse after surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. Thus they are obvious targets in therapeutic approaches and also a great challenge in cancer treatment. The threat presented by CSCs lies in their unlimited proliferative ability and multidrug resistance. These findings have necessitated an effective novel strategy to target CSCs for cancer treatment. Nanomaterials are on the route to providing novel methods in cancer therapies. Although, there have been a large number of excellent work in the field of targeted cancer therapy, it remains an open question how nanomaterials can meet future demands for targeting and eradicating of CSCs. In this review, we summarized recent and highlighted future prospects for targeting CSCs for cancer therapies by using a variety of nanomaterials.

  2. Current Trends in Nanomaterial-Based Amperometric Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtar Hayat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed an intensive research effort in the field of electrochemical sensors, with a particular focus on the design of amperometric biosensors for diverse analytical applications. In this context, nanomaterial integration in the construction of amperometric biosensors may constitute one of the most exciting approaches. The attractive properties of nanomaterials have paved the way for the design of a wide variety of biosensors based on various electrochemical detection methods to enhance the analytical characteristics. However, most of these nanostructured materials are not explored in the design of amperometric biosensors. This review aims to provide insight into the diverse properties of nanomaterials that can be possibly explored in the construction of amperometric biosensors.

  3. Noble Metal-Iron Oxide Hybrid Nanomaterials: Emerging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ken Cham-Fai; Xuan, Shouhu

    2016-02-01

    This account provides an overview of current research activities that focus on the synthesis and applications of nanomaterials from noble metal (e.g., Au, Ag, Pd) and iron oxide (Fe3O4) hybrids. An introduction to the synthetic strategies that have been developed for generating M-Fe3O4 nanomaterials with different novel structures is presented. Surface functionalization and bioconjugation of these hybrid nanoparticles and nanocomposites are also reviewed. The utilization of the advantageous properties of both noble metals and iron oxide for a variety of applications, such as theranostics, gene delivery, biosensing, cell sorting, bioseparation, and catalysis, is discussed and highlighted. Finally, future trends and perspectives of these sophisticated nanocomposites are outlined. The fundamental requirements underpinning the effective preparation of M-Fex Oy hybrid nanomaterials shed light on the future development of heterogeneous catalysts, nanotheranostics, nanomedicines, and other chemical technologies.

  4. Sunlight-induced Transformations of Graphene-based Nanomaterials in Aquatic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graphene-based nanomaterials and other related carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) can be released from products during their life cycles. Upon entry into aquatic environments, they are potentially transformed by photochemical reactions, oxidation reactions and biological processes, all ...

  5. Flows of engineered nanomaterials through the recycling process in Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero-Guzman, Alejandro; Sun, Tianyin; Nowack, Bernd, E-mail: nowack@empa.ch

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Recycling is one of the likely end-of-life fates of nanoproducts. • We assessed the material flows of four nanomaterials in the Swiss recycling system. • After recycling, most nanomaterials will flow to landfills or incineration plants. • Recycled construction waste, plastics and textiles may contain nanomaterials. - Abstract: The use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in diverse applications has increased during the last years and this will likely continue in the near future. As the number of applications increase, more and more waste with nanomaterials will be generated. A portion of this waste will enter the recycling system, for example, in electronic products, textiles and construction materials. The fate of these materials during and after the waste management and recycling operations is poorly understood. The aim of this work is to model the flows of nano-TiO{sub 2}, nano-ZnO, nano-Ag and CNT in the recycling system in Switzerland. The basis for this study is published information on the ENMs flows on the Swiss system. We developed a method to assess their flow after recycling. To incorporate the uncertainties inherent to the limited information available, we applied a probabilistic material flow analysis approach. The results show that the recycling processes does not result in significant further propagation of nanomaterials into new products. Instead, the largest proportion will flow as waste that can subsequently be properly handled in incineration plants or landfills. Smaller fractions of ENMs will be eliminated or end up in materials that are sent abroad to undergo further recovery processes. Only a reduced amount of ENMs will flow back to the productive process of the economy in a limited number of sectors. Overall, the results suggest that risk assessment during recycling should focus on occupational exposure, release of ENMs in landfills and incineration plants, and toxicity assessment in a small number of recycled inputs.

  6. Prospects of Emerging Engineered oxide nanomaterials and their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Gangwar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This review article mainly focused on the recent progress on the synthesis and characterization of emerging artificially engineered nanostructures of oxide materials as well as their potential applications. A fundamental understanding about the state-of-the-art of the synthesis for different size, shape and morphology, which can be tuned to the desired properties of oxide nanomaterials have discussed in details in this review. The present review covers the a wide range of artificially engineered oxide nanomaterials such as cadmium-, cupric-, nickel-, magnesium-, zinc-, titanium-, tin-, aluminium-, and vanadium-oxides and their useful applications in sensors, optical displays, nanofluids and defence.

  7. Optical characterization of ZnO nanomaterial with praseodymium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Y. K.; Pal, Sudha; Goyal, Priyanka; Bind, Umesh Chandra

    2016-05-01

    ZnO nanomaterial with praseodymium ions was prepared by chemical synthesis method. The ZnO nanomaterial was characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM. Their absorption in UV-VIS/NIR regions was measured at room temperature. The experimental oscillator strengths were calculated from the areas under the absorption bands. Eight absorption bands have been observed. From these spectral data various energy interaction parameters like Slater-Condon, Lande, Racah, Nephelauxetic ratio and bonding parameters have been computed. Judd-Ofelt analysis has been carried out using the absorption spectra to evaluate the radiative properties for luminescent levels of the praseodymium ion and discussed. The observed nano particle size is 2nm.

  8. Palladium based nanomaterials for enhanced hydrogen spillover and storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh K. Konda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen storage remains one of the most challenging prerequisites to overcome toward the realization of a hydrogen based economy. The use of hydrogen as an energy carrier for fuel cell applications has been limited by the lack of safe and effective hydrogen storage materials. Palladium has high affinity for hydrogen sorption and has been extensively studied, both in the gas phase and under electrochemical conditions. In this review, recent advancements are highlighted and discussed in regard to palladium based nanomaterials for hydrogen storage, as well as the effects of hydrogen spillover on various adsorbents including carbons, metal organic frameworks, covalent organic frameworks, and other nanomaterials.

  9. Carbon-based nanomaterials: multifunctional materials for biomedical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chaenyung; Shin, Su Ryon; Annabi, Nasim; Dokmeci, Mehmet R; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-04-23

    Functional carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) have become important due to their unique combinations of chemical and physical properties (i.e., thermal and electrical conductivity, high mechanical strength, and optical properties), and extensive research efforts are being made to utilize these materials for various industrial applications, such as high-strength materials and electronics. These advantageous properties of CBNs are also actively investigated in several areas of biomedical engineering. This Perspective highlights different types of carbon-based nanomaterials currently used in biomedical applications.

  10. Potential space applications of nanomaterials and standartization issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, Ekaterina; Novikov, Lev

    Nanomaterials surpass traditional materials for space applications in many aspects due to their unique properties associated with nanoscale size of their constituents. This superiority in mechanical, thermal, electrical and optical properties will evidently inspire a wide range of applications in the next generation spacecraft intended for the long-term (~15-20 years) operation in near-Earth orbits and the automatic and manned interplanetary missions as well as in the construction of inhabited bases on the Moon. Nanocomposites with nanoclays, carbon nanotubes and various nanoparticles as fillers are one of the most promising materials for space applications. They may be used as light-weighted and strong structural materials as well as functional and smart materials of general and specific applications, e.g. thermal stabilization, radiation shielding, electrostatic charge mitigation, protection of atomic oxygen influence and space debris impact, etc. Currently, ISO activity on developing standards concerning different issues of nanomaterials manufacturing and applications is high enough. In this presentation, a brief review of existing standards and standards under development in this field is given. Most such standards are related to nanoparticles and nanotube production and characterization, thus the next important step in this activity is the creation of standards on nanomaterial properties and their behavior in different environmental conditions, including extreme environments. The near-Earth’s space is described as an extreme environment for materials due to high vacuum, space radiation, hot and cold plasma, micrometeoroids and space debris, temperature differences, etc. Existing experimental and theoretical data demonstrate that nanomaterials response to various space environment effects may differ substantially from the one of conventional bulk spacecraft materials. Therefore, it is necessary to determine the space environment components, critical for

  11. Quantification of carbon nanomaterials in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifang; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Cao, Aoneng; Liu, Yuanfang

    2013-03-19

    A diverse array of carbon nanomaterials (NMs), including fullerene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, nanodiamonds, and carbon nanoparticles, have been discovered and widely applied in a variety of industries. Carbon NMs have been detected in the environment and have a strong possibility of entering the human body. The safety of carbon NMs has thus become a serious concern in academia and society. To achieve strict biosafety assessments, researchers need to fully understand the effects and fates of NMs in the human body, including information about absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADME/T). To acquire the ADME data, researchers must quantify NMs, but carbon NMs are very difficult to quantify in vivo. The carbon background in a typical biological system is high, particularly compared with the much lower concentration of carbon NMs. Moreover, carbon NMs lack a specific detection signal. Therefore, isotopic labeling, with its high sensitivity and specificity, is the first choice to quantify carbon NMs in vivo. Previously, researchers have used many isotopes, including ¹³C, ¹⁴C, ¹²⁵I, ¹³¹I, ³H, ⁶⁴Cu, ¹¹¹In, ⁸⁶Y, 99mTc, and ⁶⁷Ga, to label carbon NMs. We used these isotopic labeling methods to study the ADME of carbon NMs via different exposure pathways in animal models. Except for the metabolism of carbon NMs, which has seldom been investigated, significant amounts of data have been reported on the in vivo absorption, distribution, excretion, and toxicity of carbon NMs, which have revealed characteristic behaviors of carbon NMs, such as reticuloendothelial system (RES) capture. However, the complexity of the biological systems and diverse preparation and functionalization of the same carbon NMs have led to inconsistent results across different studies. Therefore, the data obtained so far have not provided a compatible and systematic profile of biosafety. Further efforts are needed to address these problems. In

  12. 75 FR 49487 - Nanomaterial Case Study: Nanoscale Silver in Disinfectant Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... environmental assessments of selected nanomaterials. It does not attempt to draw conclusions regarding potential... INFORMATION: I. Information About the Project/Document Engineered nanoscale materials (nanomaterials) have..., nanomaterials offer the potential for both benefits and risks. The assessment of such risks and...

  13. Survey on basic knowledge about exposure and potential environmental and health risks for selected nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Sonja Hagen; Hansen, Erik; Christensen, Trine Boe

    Based on a literature review this report provides a general description as well as an environmental and health profile of 7 nanomaterials. The examined nanomaterials are selected because of expected high use or specific environmental and health properties. Fullerenes, iron, silver, nanoclay...... other nanomaterials were identified, there are areas where there may be reason for attention and thus need for more knowledge....

  14. Dermal Absorption of Nanomaterials Titanium Dioxide and Zinc Oxide Based Sunscreen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Christiane; Dokkedahl, Karin Stenderup; Wang, Jing

    of nanomaterials in products on the Danish market and their consequences on consumers and the environment. Furthermore, the aim is to clarify possible risks that might be associated with nanomaterials for consumers and the environment. The current project ’Dermal Absorption of Nanomaterials Titanium Dioxide...

  15. 77 FR 24722 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Safety of Nanomaterials in Cosmetic Products; Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry: Safety of Nanomaterials in... ``Guidance for Industry: Safety of Nanomaterials in Cosmetic Products.'' The draft guidance, when finalized, will represent FDA's current thinking on the safety assessment of nanomaterials in cosmetic...

  16. Applications of nanomaterials in liquid chromatography: opportunities for separation with high efficiency and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengxiang; Wang, Zhiyong; Liao, Yiping; Liu, Huwei

    2006-08-01

    During recent decades, great efforts have been made to improve the chemical stability, selectivity, and separation efficiency of stationary phases in liquid chromatography. Significant progress has been achieved, especially after the introduction of nanomaterials into separation science. This review covers the applications of nanomaterials playing various roles in liquid chromatography. Future possibilities for developing nanomaterial-based stationary phases are also discussed.

  17. Investigating the relationship between nanomaterial hazard and physicochemical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnston, Helinor; Brown, David; Kermanizadeh, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) have the potential to improve the treatment and diagnosis of disease as they are suitable candidates for a number of diagnostic and therapeutic applications. On entering the body via a variety of exposure routes, and during their translocation to secondary target sites it is i...

  18. X-ray and neutron techniques for nanomaterials characterization

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Fifth volume of a 40 volume series on nanoscience and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about X-ray and Neutron Techniques for Nanomaterials Characterization. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume an essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry.

  19. Development of a Control Banding Tool for Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Riediker

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Control banding (CB can be a useful tool for managing the potential risks of nanomaterials. The here proposed CB, which should be part of an overall risk control strategy, groups materials by hazard and emission potential. The resulting decision matrix proposes control bands adapted to the risk potential levels and helps define an action plan. If this plan is not practical and financially feasible, a full risk assessment is launched. The hazard banding combines key concepts of nanomaterial toxicology: translocation across biological barriers, fibrous nature, solubility, and reactivity. Already existing classifications specific to the nanomaterial can be used “as is.” Otherwise, the toxicity of bulk or analogous substances gives an initial hazard band, which is increased if the substance is not easily soluble or if it has a higher reactivity than the substance. The emission potential bands are defined by the nanomaterials' physical form and process characteristics. Quantities, frequencies, and existing control measures are taken into account during the definition of the action plan. Control strategies range from room ventilation to full containment with expert advice. This CB approach, once validated, can be easily embedded in risk management systems. It allows integrating new toxicity data and needs no exposure data.

  20. Integrating Transition Metals into Nanomaterials: Strategies and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Fhayli, Karim

    2016-04-14

    Transition metals complexes have been involved in various catalytic, biomedical and industrial applications, but only lately they have been associated with nanomaterials to produce innovative and well-defined new hybrid systems. The introduction of transition metals into nanomaterials is important to bear the advantages of metals to nanoscale and also to raise the stability of nanomaterials. In this dissertation, we study two approaches of associating transition metals into nanomaterials. The first approach is via spontaneous self-organization based assembly of small molecule amphiphiles and bulky hydrophilic polymers to produce organic-inorganic hybrid materials that have nanoscale features and can be precisely controlled depending on the experimental conditions used. These hybrid materials can successfully act as templates to design new porous material with interesting architecture. The second approach studied is via electroless reduction of transition metals on the surface of nanocarbons (nanotubes and nanodiamonds) without using any reducing agents or catalysts. The synthesis of these systems is highly efficient and facile resulting in stable and mechanically robust new materials with promising applications in catalysis.

  1. Irradiation-enhanced reactivity of multilayer Al/Ni nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukyan, Khachatur V; Tan, Wanpeng; deBoer, Richard J; Stech, Edward J; Aprahamian, Ani; Wiescher, Michael; Rouvimov, Sergei; Overdeep, Kyle R; Shuck, Christopher E; Weihs, Timothy P; Mukasyan, Alexander S

    2015-06-03

    We have investigated the effect of accelerated ion beam irradiation on the structure and reactivity of multilayer sputter deposited Al/Ni nanomaterials. Carbon and aluminum ion beams with different charge states and intensities were used to irradiate the multilayer materials. The conditions for the irradiation-assisted self-ignition of the reactive materials and corresponding ignition thresholds for the beam intensities were determined. We discovered that relatively short (40 min or less) ion irradiations enhance the reactivity of the Al/Ni nanomaterials, that is, significantly decrease the thermal ignition temperatures (Tig) and ignition delay times (τig). We also show that irradiation leads to atomic mixing at the Al/Ni interfaces with the formation of an amorphous interlayer, in addition to the nucleation of small (2-3 nm) Al3Ni crystals within the amorphous regions. The amorphous interlayer is thought to enhance the reactivity of the multilayer energetic nanomaterial by increasing the heat of the reaction and by speeding the intermixing of the Ni and the Al. The small Al3Ni crystals may also enhance reactivity by facilitating the growth of this Al-Ni intermetallic phase. In contrast, longer irradiations decrease reactivity with higher ignition temperatures and longer ignition delay times. Such changes are also associated with growth of the Al3Ni intermetallic and decreases in the heat of reaction. Drawing on this data set, we suggest that ion irradiation can be used to fine-tune the structure and reactivity of energetic nanomaterials.

  2. A Tractable Method for Measuring Nanomaterial Risk Using Bayesian Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murphy, Finbarr; Sheehan, Barry; Mullins, Martin; Bouwmeester, Hans; Marvin, Hans J.P.; Bouzembrak, Yamine; Costa, Anna L.; Das, Rasel; Stone, Vicki; Tofail, Syed A.M.

    2016-01-01

    While control banding has been identified as a suitable framework for the evaluation and the determination of potential human health risks associated with exposure to nanomaterials (NMs), the approach currently lacks any implementation that enjoys widespread support. Large inconsistencies in char

  3. RADIO SHIELDING PROPERTIES OF CONCRETE BASED ON SHUNGITE NANOMATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BELOUSOVA Elena Sergeevna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Modifications of shielding construction materials based on Portland cement with the addition of powder nanomaterial shungite were developed. Attenuation and re­flection of electromagnetic radiation for obtained materials were studied. Recommen­dations for using are given.

  4. Environmental risk analysis for nanomaterials: Review and evaluation of frameworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara Deanne; Linkov, Igor; Hansen, Steffen Foss

    2012-01-01

    In response to the challenges of conducting traditional human health and ecological risk assessment for nanomaterials (NM), a number of alternative frameworks have been proposed for NM risk analysis. This paper evaluates various risk analysis frameworks proposed for NM based on a number of criter...

  5. Nanomaterials for products and application in agriculture, feed and food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Ruud J.B.; Bouwmeester, Hans; Gottardo, Stefania; Amenta, Valeria; Arena, Maria; Brandhoff, Puck; Marvin, Hans J.P.; Mech, Agnieszka; Moniz, Filipa Botelho; Pesudo, Laia Quiros; Rauscher, Hubert; Schoonjans, Reinhilde; Undas, Anna K.; Vettori, Maria Vittoria; Weigel, Stefan; Aschberger, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nanotechnology applications can be found in agricultural production, animal feed, food processing, food additives and food contact materials (hereinafter referred to as agri/feed/food). A great diversity of nanomaterials is reported to be currently used in various applications, while

  6. Modeling nanomaterial fate and uptake in the environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baalousha, M.; Cornelis, G.; Kuhlbusch, T.A.J.; Lynch, I.; Nickel, C.; Peijnenburg, W.; Brink, Van Den N.W.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling the environmental fate of nanomaterials (NMs) and their uptake by cells and organisms in the environment is essential to underpin experimental research, develop overarching theories, improve our fundamental understanding of NM exposure and hazard, and thus enable risk assessment of NMs.

  7. Lanthanide-doped luminescent nanomaterials. From fundamentals to bioapplications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xueyuan; Tu, Datao; Liu, Yongsheng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou (China). Fujian Inst. of Research on the Structure of Matter

    2014-07-01

    Covers the frontiers in chemistry, physics and bioapplications of lanthanide-doped luminescent nanomaterials. Presents new insights into the optical behaviors of lanthanide in nanomaterials. Systematically reviews in-vitro biodetection and bioimaging based on lanthanide-doped inorganic nanocrystals. Lanthanide-Doped Luminescent Nanomaterials reviews the latest advances in the development of lanthanide-doped luminescent inorganic nanoparticles for potential bioapplications. This book covers the chemical and physical fundamentals of these nanoparticles, such as the controlled synthesis methodology, surface modification chemistry, optical physics, and their promising applications in diverse bioassays, with an emphasis on heterogeneous and homogeneous in-vitro biodetection of tumor biomarkers. This book is intended for those readers who are interested in systematically understanding the materials design strategy, optical behavior of lanthanide ions, and practical bioapplications of lanthanide nanoparticles. It primarily focuses on the interdisciplinary frontiers in chemistry, physics and biological aspects of luminescent nanomaterials. All chapters were written by scientists active in this field and for a broad audience, providing both beginners and advanced researchers with comprehensive information on the subject.

  8. Nanotechnologies, engineered nanomaterials and occupational health and safety - A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savolainen, K.; Pylkkänen, L.; Norppa, H.; Falck, G.; Lindberg, H.; Tuomi, T.; Vippola, M.; Alenius, H.; Hämeri, K.; Koivisto, J.; Brouwer, D.; Mark, D.; Bard, D.; Berges, M.; Jankowska, E.; Posniak, M.; Farmer, P.; Singh, R.; Krombach, F.; Bihari, P.; Kasper, G.; Seipenbusch, M.

    2010-01-01

    The significance of engineered nanomaterials (ENM) and nanotechnologies grows rapidly. Nanotechnology applications may have a positive marked impact on many aspects of on human every day life, for example by providing means for the production of clean energy and pure drinking water. Hundreds of cons

  9. Interpretation and implications of the European Commission's definition on nanomaterials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, E.A.J.; Cassee, F.R.; Geertsma, R.E.; de Jong, W.H.; Heugens, E.H.W.; Koers-Jacquemijns, M.; van de Meent, D.; Oomen, A.G.; Popma, J.; Rietveld, A.G.; Wijnhoven, S.W.P.

    2012-01-01

    In October 2011, the European Commission published the Recommendation on the Definition of Nanomaterial. RIVM considers this definition to be a good basis for further discussion that should focus on two aspects of the definition: the proposed size limits for nanoparticles (1 to 100 nanometres); and

  10. TOXICITY EVALUATION OF NEW ENGINEERED NANOMATERIALS IN ZEBRAFISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Violetta Brundo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the nanoparticles on the marine organisms, depends on their size, chemical composition, surface structure, solubility and shape.In order to take advantage from their activity, preserving the surrounding environment from a possible pollution, we are trying to trap the nanoparticles into new nanomaterials. The nanomaterials tested were synthesized proposing a ground-breaking approach by an upside-down vision of the Au/TiO2nano-system to avoid the release of nanoparticles. The system was synthesized by wrapping Au nanoparticles with a thin layer of TiO2. The non-toxicity of the nano-system was established by testing the effect of the material on zebrafish larvae. Danio rerio o zebrafish was considered a excellent model for the environmental biomonitoring of aquatic environments and the Zebrafish Embryo Toxicity Test is considered an alternative method of animal test. For this reason zebrafish larvae were exposed to different concentrations of nanoparticles of TiO2 and Au and new nanomaterials. As biomarkers of exposure, we evaluated the expression of metallothioneins by immunohistochemistry analysis and western blotting analysis also. The results obtained by toxicity test showed that neither mortality as well as sublethal effects were induced by the different nanomaterials and nanoparticles tested. Only zebrafish larvae exposed to free Au nanoparticles showed a different response to anti-MT antibody. In fact, the immunolocalization analysis highlighted an increase of the metallothioneins synthesis.

  11. International Implications of Labeling Foods Containing Engineered Nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara D.; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Mortensen, Ninell P.;

    2016-01-01

    To provide greater transparency and comprehensive information to consumers regarding their purchase choices, the European Parliament and the Council have mandated via Regulation 1169/2011 that foods containing engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) be labeled. This review covers the main concerns related...

  12. Controlled Growth of One-Dimensional Oxide Nanomaterials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaosheng FANG; Lide ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the recent developments in the controlled growth of one-dimensional (1D) oxide nanomaterials, including ZnO, SnO2, In2O3, Ga2O3, SiOx, MgO, and Al2O3. The growth of 1D oxide nanomaterials was carried out in a simple chemical vapor transport and condensation system. This article will begin with a survey of nanotechnology and 1D nanomaterials achieved by many researchers, and then mainly discuss on the controlled growth of 1D oxide nanomaterials with their morphologies, sizes, compositions, and microstructures controlled by altering experimental parameters, such as the temperature at the source material and the substrate, temperature gradient in the tube furnace, the total reaction time, the heating rate of the furnace, the gas flow rate, and the starting material. Their roles in the formation of various morphologies are analyzed and discussed. Finally, this review will be concluded with personal perspectives on the future research directions of this area.

  13. Nanomaterials incorporated ultrasound contrast agents for cancer theranostics

    OpenAIRE

    FU, LEI; Ke, Heng-Te

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology provides various nanomaterials with tremendous functionalities for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Recently, theranostics has been developed as an alternative strategy for efficient cancer treatment through combination of imaging diagnosis and therapeutic interventions under the guidance of diagnostic results. Ultrasound (US) imaging shows unique advantages with excellent features of real-time imaging, low cost, high safety and portability, making US contrast agents (UCAs)...

  14. Interaction of engineered nanomaterials with hydrophobic organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    As nanomaterials become an increasing part of everyday consumer products, it is imperative to monitor their potential release during production, use and disposal, and to assess their impact on the health of humans and the ecosystem. This necessitates research to better understand...

  15. Investigations into polymer and carbon nanomaterial separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Cherie Nicole

    utilize as novel UTLC substrates. Additionally, aligned electrospun UTLC (AE-UTLC) substrates were developed to compare to the randomly oriented electrospun (E-UTLC) devices. The PHB plates were compared to commercially available substrates for the separation of biological samples: nucleotides and steroids. The electrospun substrates show lower band broadening and higher reproducibility in a smaller development distance than commercially available TLC plates, conserving both resources and time. The AE-UTLC plates provided further enhancement of reproducibility and development time compared to E-UTLC plates. Thus, the P3HB E-UTLC phases are an excellent sustainable option for TLC as they are biodegradable and perform better than commercial phases. A third topic of interest is the study of ordered carbon nanomaterials. The typical amorphous carbon used as a stationary phase in Hypercarb ® is known to consist of basal- and edge-plane oriented sites. This heterogeneity of the stationary phase can lead to peak broadening that may be improved by using homogeneous carbon throughout. Amorphous, basal-plane, and edge-plane carbons were produced in-house through membrane template synthesis. Amorphous, basal-plane, and edge-plane carbons were then used separately as chromatographic phases in capillary electrochomatography (CEC). Differences in chromatographic performance between these species were assessed by modeling retention data for test solutes to determine Linear Solvation Energy Relationships (LSER). The LSER study for the three carbon phases indicates that the main difference is in the polarizability, and hydrogen bonding character of the surface leading to unique solute interactions. These results highlight the possible usefulness of using these phases independently.

  16. Design and characterization of nanomaterial-biomolecule conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Tae-Jin

    In the field of nanobiotechnology, nanoscale dimensions result in physical properties that differ from more conventional bulk material state. The integration of nanomaterials with biomolecules has begun to be used for unique physical properties, and for biological specific recognition, thereby leading to novel nanomaterial-biomolecule conjugates. The direction of this dissertation is to develop biocatalytic nanomaterial-biomolecule conjugates and to characterize them. For this, biological catalysts are employed to combine with nanomaterials. Two large parts include functional ization of nanomaterials with biomolecules and assembly of nanomaterials using a biological catalyst. First part of this thesis work is the exploration of the biocatalytic properties of nanomaterial-biomolecule conjugates. Si nanocolumns have higher surface area which leads more amount of biocatalytis immobilization than flat Si wafer with the same projected area. The enhanced activity of soybean peroxidase (SBP) immobilized onto Si nanocolumns as novel nanostructured supports is focused. Next, the catalytic activity of immobilized DNAzyme onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) is compared to that in solution phase, and multiple turnovers are examined. The relationship between hybridization efficiency and activity is investigated as a function of surface density of DNAzyme on MWNTs. Then, cellular delivery of silica nanoparticle-protein conjugates is visually confirmed and therefore the intracellular function of a protein delivered by silica nanoparticle-protein conjugates is proved. For one example of the intracellular function, stable SBP immobilized onto silica nanoparticles to activate a prodrug is demonstrated. Second part of this thesis work is the formation of nanostructured materials through the enzymatic assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Enzymatic polymerization of a phenol compound is applied to the bridging of two or more SWNTs functionalized with phenol

  17. Nanomaterial-based approaches for the detection and speciation of mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohan; Li, Yu-Feng; Zhao, Jiating; Li, Yunyun; Lin, Jing; Li, Bai; Gao, Yuxi; Chen, Chunying

    2015-12-01

    Mercury is toxic with widespread contamination. Highly sensitive and selective approaches for mercury analysis are desired. Although conventional techniques are accurate and sensitive in the determination of mercury, these procedures are time-consuming, labor-intensive and dependent heavily on expensive instrumentation. In recent years, nanomaterial-based approaches have been proved to be effective alternatives in the detection and speciation of mercury. In this review, the development of different nanomaterial-based approaches was summarized, as well as their utilization for the detection of mercury in environmental and biological samples, such as gold nanomaterials, carbon nanomaterials, quantum dots and so on. Moreover, the speciation of mercury using nanomaterials was also reviewed.

  18. Design of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles for controlled release of doxorubicin under an alternative magnetic field in athermal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffete, N.; Fresnais, J.; Espinosa, A.; Wilhelm, C.; Bée, A.; Ménager, C.

    2015-11-01

    An innovative magnetic delivery nanomaterial for triggered cancer therapy showing active control over drug release by using an alternative magnetic field is proposed. In vitro and In vivo release of doxorubicin (DOX) were investigated and showed a massive DOX release under an alternative magnetic field without temperature elevation of the medium.An innovative magnetic delivery nanomaterial for triggered cancer therapy showing active control over drug release by using an alternative magnetic field is proposed. In vitro and In vivo release of doxorubicin (DOX) were investigated and showed a massive DOX release under an alternative magnetic field without temperature elevation of the medium. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06133d

  19. Nanocrystalline and Nanocomposite Magnetic Materials and Their Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert D Shull

    2007-01-01

    Nanocrystalline materials can possess bulk properties quite different from those commonly associated with conventional large-grained materials. Nanocomposites, a subset of nanocrystalline materials, in addition have been found to possess magnetic properties which are similar to, but different from, the properties of the individual constituents. New magnetic phenomena, unusual property combinations, and both enhanced and diminished magnetic property values are just some of the changes observed in magnetic nanocomposites from conventional magnetic materials. Here, a description will be presented of some of the exciting new properties discovered in nanomaterials and the magnetic applications envisioned for them.

  20. Artifacts by marker enzyme adsorption on nanomaterials in cytotoxicity assays with tissue cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlleben, Wendel; Kolle, Susanne N.; Hasenkamp, Laura-Carolin; Böser, Alexander; Vogel, Sandra; von Vacano, Bernhard; van Ravenzwaay, Ben; Landsiedel, Robert

    2011-07-01

    We used precision cut lung slices (PCLS) to study the cytotoxicity of cobalt ferrite nanomaterials with and without bovine serum albumin (BSA) stabilization. Using mitochondrial activity as an indicator of cytotoxicity (WST-1 assay) increasing concentrations of cobalt ferrite nanomaterial caused increasing levels of cytotoxicity in PCLS irrespective of BSA stabilization. However, there was no increase in released lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels caused by BSA stabilized nanomaterial indicating concentration depended cytotoxictiy. Moreover, non-stabilized nanomaterial caused a decrease of background LDH levels in the PCLS culture supernatant confirmed by complementary methods. Direct characterization of the protein corona of extracted nanomaterial shows that the LDH decrease is due to adsorption of LDH onto the surface of the non-stabilized nanomaterial, correlated with strong agglomeration. Preincubation with serum protein blocks the adsorption of LDH and stabilizes the nanomaterial at low agglomeration. We have thus demonstrated the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials in PCLS does not correlate with disrupted membrane integrity followed by LDH release. Furthermore, we found that intracellular enzymes such as the marker enzyme LDH are able to bind onto surfaces of nanomaterial and thereby adulterate the detection of toxic effects. A replacement of BSA by LDH or a secondary LDH-on-BSA-corona were not observed, confirming earlier indications that the protein corona exchange rate are slow or vanishing on inorganic nanomaterial. Thus, the method(s) to assess nanomaterial-mediated effects have to be carefully chosen based on the cellular effect and possible nano-specific artifacts.

  1. Computational Studies about the Interactions of Nanomaterials with Proteins and their Impacts

    CERN Document Server

    An, Deyi; Li, Chunhua; Li, Jingyuan

    2015-01-01

    Intensive concerns about the biosafety of nanomaterials demand the systematic study of the mechanisms about their biological effects. Many biological effects can be attributed to the interaction of nanomaterials with protein and their impacts on protein function. On the other hand, nanomaterials exhibit the potential in a variety of biomedical applications, many of which also involve the direct interaction with protein. In this paper, we review some recent computational studies about this subject, especially the interaction of carbon and gold nanomaterials. Besides the hydrophobic and {\\pi}-stacking interactions, the interaction mode of carbon nanomaterials can be regulated by their functional groups. And the coating of gold nanomaterials also adjusts their interaction mode, in addition to the coordination interaction with cysteine's sulfur group and histidine's imidazole group. Moreover, nanomaterials can interact with multiple proteins and the impacts on protein activity are attributed to a wide spectrum of...

  2. Nano-materials for adhesive-free adsorbers for bakable extreme high vacuum cryopump surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutzman, Marcy; Jordan, Kevin; Whitney, Roy R.

    2016-10-11

    A cryosorber panel having nanomaterials used for the cryosorption material, with nanomaterial either grown directly on the cryopanel or freestanding nanomaterials attached to the cryopanel mechanically without the use of adhesives. Such nanomaterial cryosorber materials can be used in place of conventional charcoals that are attached to cryosorber panels with special low outgassing, low temperature capable adhesives. Carbon nanotubes and other nanomaterials could serve the same purpose as conventional charcoal cryosorbers, providing a large surface area for cryosorption without the need for adhesive since the nanomaterials can be grown directly on a metallic substrate or mechanically attached. The nanomaterials would be capable of being fully baked by heating above 100.degree. C., thereby eliminating water vapor from the system, eliminating adhesives from the system, and allowing a full bake of the system to reduce hydrogen outgassing, with the goal of obtaining extreme high vacuum where the pump can produce pressures below 1.times.10.sup.-12 Torr.

  3. Eating nanomaterials: cruelty-free and safe? the EFSA guidance on risk assessment of nanomaterials in food and feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Ursula G

    2011-12-01

    Nanomaterials are increasingly being added to food handling and packaging materials, or directly, to human food and animal feed. To ensure the safety of such engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), in May 2011, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) published a guidance document on Risk assessment of the application of nanoscience and nanotechnologies in the food and feed chain. It states that risk assessment should be performed by following a step-wise procedure. Whenever human or animal exposure to nanomaterials is expected, the general hazard characterisation scheme requests information from in vitro genotoxicity, toxicokinetic and repeated dose 90-day oral toxicity studies in rodents. Numerous prevailing uncertainties with regard to nanomaterial characterisation and their hazard and risk assessment are addressed in the guidance document. This article discusses the impact of these knowledge gaps on meeting the goal of ensuring human safety. The EFSA's guidance on the risk assessment of ENMs in food and animal feed is taken as an example for discussion, from the point of view of animal welfare, on what level of uncertainty should be considered acceptable for human safety assessment of products with non-medical applications, and whether animal testing should be considered ethically acceptable for such products.

  4. Suzuki cross-coupling reactions on the surface of carbon-coated cobalt: expanding the applicability of core-shell nano-magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chun Ghee; Grass, Robert N

    2008-09-28

    To develop magnetic nanomaterials applicable to organic synthesis, the Suzuki cross-coupling method was adapted to attach a range of functional groups to carbon-coated core-shell materials via commercially-available substituted arylboronic acids.

  5. In Situ Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticle Embedded Hybrid Soft Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, Kizhmuri P; Miroshnikov, Mikhail; Dutta, Debjit; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Ajayan, Pulickel M; John, George

    2016-09-20

    The allure of integrating the tunable properties of soft nanomaterials with the unique optical and electronic properties of metal nanoparticles has led to the development of organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials. A promising method for the synthesis of such organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials is afforded by the in situ generation of metal nanoparticles within a host organic template. Due to their tunable surface morphology and porosity, soft organic materials such as gels, liquid crystals, and polymers that are derived from various synthetic or natural compounds can act as templates for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles of different shapes and sizes. This method provides stabilization to the metal nanoparticles by the organic soft material and advantageously precludes the use of external reducing or capping agents in many instances. In this Account, we exemplify the green chemistry approach for synthesizing these materials, both in the choice of gelators as soft material frameworks and in the reduction mechanisms that generate the metal nanoparticles. Established herein is the core design principle centered on conceiving multifaceted amphiphilic soft materials that possess the ability to self-assemble and reduce metal ions into nanoparticles. Furthermore, these soft materials stabilize the in situ generated metal nanoparticles and retain their self-assembly ability to generate metal nanoparticle embedded homogeneous organic-inorganic hybrid materials. We discuss a remarkable example of vegetable-based drying oils as host templates for metal ions, resulting in the synthesis of novel hybrid nanomaterials. The synthesis of metal nanoparticles via polymers and self-assembled materials fabricated via cardanol (a bioorganic monomer derived from cashew nut shell liquid) are also explored in this Account. The organic-inorganic hybrid structures were characterized by several techniques such as UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and

  6. Core-Shell γ-Fe2O3/SiO2/PCA/Ag-NPs Hybrid Nanomaterials as a New Candidate for Future Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleyman, R.; Pourjavadi, A.; Masoud, N.; Varamesh, A.

    2014-04-01

    In the current study, γ-Fe2O3/SiO2/PCA/Ag-NPs hybrid nanomaterials were successfully synthesized and characterized. At first, prepared γ-Fe2O3 core nanoparticles were modified by SiO2 layer. Then they were covered by poly citric acid (PCA) via melting esterification method as well. PCA shell acts as an effective linker, and provides vacancies for conveying drugs. Moreover, this shell as an effective capping agent directs synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) via in situ photo-reduction of silver ions by sunlight-UV irradiation. This system has several benefits as a suitable cancer therapy nanomaterial. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) can guide Ag-NPs and drugs to cancer cells and then Ag-NPs can affect those cells via Ag-NPs anti-angiogenesis effect. Size and structure of the prepared magnetic hybrid nanomaterials were characterized using FTIR and UV-Vis spectra, AFM and TEM pictures and XRD data.

  7. Understanding the biological and environmental implications of nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sijie

    The last two decades have witnessed the discovery, development, and large-scale manufacturing of novel nanomaterials. While nanomaterials bring in exciting and extraordinary properties in all areas of materials, electronics, mechanics, and medicine, they also could generate potential adverse effects in biological systems and in the environment. The currently limited application of nanomaterials in biological and ecological systems results from the insufficient and often controversial data on describing the complex behaviors of nanomaterials in living systems. The purpose of this dissertation intends to fill such a knowledge void with methodologies from the disciplines of biophysics, biology, and materials science and engineering. Chapter 1 of this dissertation provides a comprehensive review on the structures and properties of carbon nanomaterials (CBNMs), metal oxides, and quantum dots (QDs). This chapter also details the state-of-the-art on the biological applications, ecological applications, and toxicity of nanomaterials. With Chapter 1 serving as a background, Chapters 2-5 present my PhD research, an inquiry on the fate of nanomaterials in biological and ecological systems, on the whole organism and cellular levels. Specifically, CBNMs are introduced to rice plant seedlings and the uptake, translocation and generational transfer of fullerene C70 in the plant compartments are imaged and characterized. The interactions between CBNMs and rice plants on the whole organism level are initiated by the binding between CBNMs and natural organic matter (NOM), driven by the transpiration of water from the roots to the leaves of the plants and mediated by both the physiochemical properties of the CBNMs and plant physiology. In Chapter 3, semiconducting nanocrystals quantum dots (QDs) are introduced to green algae Chlamydomonas to probe the interactions of nanomaterials with ecological systems on the cellular level. The adsorption of QDs onto the algal cell wall is

  8. New Hybrid Nanomaterial Based on Self-Assembly of Cyclodextrins and Cobalt Prussian Blue Analogue Nanocubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caio L. C. Carvalho

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Supramolecular self-assembly has been demonstrated to be a useful approach to developing new functional nanomaterials. In this work, we used a cobalt Prussian blue analogue (PBA, Co3[Co(CN6]2 compound and a β-cyclodextrin (CD macrocycle to develop a novel host-guest PBA-CD nanomaterial. The preparation of the functional magnetic material involved the self-assembly of CD molecules onto a PBA surface by a co-precipitation method. According to transmission electronic microscopy results, PBA-CD exhibited a polydisperse structure composed of 3D nanocubes with a mean edge length of 85 nm, which became shorter after CD incorporation. The supramolecular arrangement and structural, crystalline and thermal properties of the hybrid material were studied in detail by vibrational and electronic spectroscopies and X-ray diffraction. The cyclic voltammogram of the hybrid material in a 0.1 mol·L−1 NaCl supporting electrolyte exhibited a quasi-reversible redox process, attributed to Co2+/Co3+ conversion, with an E1/2 value of 0.46 V (vs. SCE, with higher reversibility observed for the system in the presence of CD. The standard rate constants for PBA and PBA-CD were determined to be 0.07 and 0.13 s−1, respectively, which suggests that the interaction between the nanocubes and CD at the supramolecular level improves electron transfer. We expect that the properties observed for the hybrid material make it a potential candidate for (biosensing designs with a desirable capability for drug delivery.

  9. EDITORIAL: Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials Excelling under strain: band engineering in nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-08-01

    A little stress or strain has been known to improve the performance of athletes, actors and of course nanomaterials alike. In fact strain in silicon is now a major engineering tool for improving the performance of devices, and is ubiquitously used in device design and fabrication. Strain engineering alters a material's band structure, a model of electron behaviour that describes how as atoms come together in a solid, their discrete electron orbitals overlap to ultimately give rise to bands of allowed energy levels. In a strained crystal lattice of silicon or silicon germanium the distance between atoms in the lattice is greater than usual and the bands of allowed energy levels change. This July marks 100 years since Bohr submitted his paper 'On the constitution of atoms and molecules' [1] where he describes the structure of the atom in terms of discrete allowed energy levels. The paper was a seminal contribution to the development of quantum mechanics and laid the initial theoretical precepts for band gap engineering in devices. In this issue Nrauda and a collaboration of researchers in Europe and Australia study the growth of defect-free SiGe islands on pre-patterned silicon [2]. They analyse the strain in the islands and determine at what point lattice dislocations set in with a view to informing implementation of strain engineering in devices. The effects of strain on band structure in silicon and germanium were already studied and reported in the 1950s [3, 4]. Since then the increasing focus on nanoscale materials and the hunger for control of electronic properties has prompted further study of strain effects. The increased surface area to volume ratio in nanostructures changes the strain behaviour with respect to bulk materials, and this can also be exploited for handling and fine tuning strain to manipulate material properties. It is perhaps no surprise that graphene, one of the most high-profile materials in current nanotechnology research, has attracted

  10. Geometrical assembly of ultrastable protein templates for nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Dominic J.; Giger, Lars; Kim, Steve S.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2016-06-01

    The fabrication of nanoscale devices requires architectural templates on which to position functional molecules in complex arrangements. Protein scaffolds are particularly promising templates for nanomaterials due to inherent molecular recognition and self-assembly capabilities combined with genetically encoded functionalities. However, difficulties in engineering protein quaternary structure into stable and well-ordered shapes have hampered progress. Here we report the development of an ultrastable biomolecular construction kit for the assembly of filamentous proteins into geometrically defined templates of controllable size and symmetry. The strategy combines redesign of protein-protein interaction specificity with the creation of tunable connector proteins that govern the assembly and projection angles of the filaments. The functionality of these nanoarchitectures is illustrated by incorporation of nanoparticles at specific locations and orientations to create hybrid materials such as conductive nanowires. These new structural components facilitate the manufacturing of nanomaterials with diverse shapes and functional properties over a wide range of processing conditions.

  11. Enrichment and characterization of ferritin for nanomaterial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Mutskova, Radina; Schwartz, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Ferritin is a ubiquitous iron storage protein utilized as a nanomaterial for labeling biomolecules and nanoparticle construction. Commercially available preparations of horse spleen ferritin, widely used as a starting material, contain a distribution of ferritins with different iron loads. We describe a detailed approach to the enrichment of differentially loaded ferritin molecules by common biophysical techniques such as size exclusion chromatography and preparative ultracentrifugation, and characterize these preparations by dynamic light scattering, and analytical ultracentrifugation. We demonstrate a combination of methods to standardize an approach for determining the chemical load of nearly any particle, including nanoparticles and metal colloids. Purification and characterization of iron content in monodisperse ferritin species is particularly critical for several applications in nanomaterial science.

  12. Combustion process for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials from liquid hydrocarbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Michael D.; Alford, J. Michael; Nabity, James; Hitch, Bradley D.

    2007-01-02

    The present invention provides a combustion apparatus for the production of carbon nanomaterials including fullerenes and fullerenic soot. Most generally the combustion apparatus comprises one or more inlets for introducing an oxygen-containing gas and a hydrocarbon fuel gas in the combustion system such that a flame can be established from the mixed gases, a droplet delivery apparatus for introducing droplets of a liquid hydrocarbon feedstock into the flame, and a collector apparatus for collecting condensable products containing carbon nanomaterials that are generated in the combustion system. The combustion system optionally has a reaction zone downstream of the flame. If this reaction zone is present the hydrocarbon feedstock can be introduced into the flame, the reaction zone or both.

  13. Lanthanide-doped luminescent nanomaterials from fundamentals to bioapplications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xueyuan; Tu, Datao

    2014-01-01

    Lanthanide-Doped Luminescent Nanomaterials reviews the latest advances in the development of lanthanide-doped luminescent inorganic nanoparticles for potential bioapplications. This book covers the chemical and physical fundamentals of these nanoparticles, such as the controlled synthesis methodology, surface modification chemistry, optical physics, and their promising applications in diverse bioassays, with an emphasis on heterogeneous and homogeneous in-vitro biodetection of tumor biomarkers. This book is intended for those readers who are interested in systematically understanding the materials design strategy, optical behavior of lanthanide ions, and practical bioapplications of lanthanide nanoparticles. It primarily focuses on the interdisciplinary frontiers in chemistry, physics and biological aspects of luminescent nanomaterials. All chapters were written by scientists active in this field and for a broad audience, providing both beginners and advanced researchers with comprehensive information on the ...

  14. Nanomaterials for targeted detection and photothermal killing of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Paresh Chandra; Khan, Sadia Afrin; Singh, Anant Kumar; Senapati, Dulal; Fan, Zhen

    2012-04-21

    Despite the modern treatment processes, contamination of food, water and medical equipment by pathogenic bacteria is very common in this world. Since the last two decades, one of the most important and complex problems our society has been facing is that several human pathogens became resistant to most of the clinically approved antibiotics. Recent advancement in nanoscience and nanotechnology has expanded our ability to design and construct nanomaterials with targeting, therapeutic, and diagnostic functions. These multifunctional materials have attracted our attention to be used as the promising tool for selective bacteria sensing and therapy without the current drugs. This tutorial review provides the basic concepts and critical properties of the different nanostructures that are useful for the pathogen detection and photothermal applications. In addition, bio-conjugated nanomaterial based strategies have been discussed with the aim to provide readers an overview of exciting opportunities and challenges in this field.

  15. Electrode materials for microbial fuel cells: nanomaterial approach

    KAUST Repository

    Mustakeem, Mustakeem

    2015-11-05

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has the potential to become a major renewable energy resource by degrading organic pollutants in wastewater. The performance of MFC directly depends on the kinetics of the electrode reactions within the fuel cell, with the performance of the electrodes heavily influenced by the materials they are made from. A wide range of materials have been tested to improve the performance of MFCs. In the past decade, carbon-based nanomaterials have emerged as promising materials for both anode and cathode construction. Composite materials have also shown to have the potential to become materials of choice for electrode manufacture. Various transition metal oxides have been investigated as alternatives to conventional expensive metals like platinum for oxygen reduction reaction. In this review, different carbon-based nanomaterials and composite materials are discussed for their potential use as MFC electrodes.

  16. Occupational Exposure Assessment of Nanomaterials using Control Banding Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liguori, Biase

    to measurements, it was found that models in general can be used successfully and effectively in assessing the exposure to conventional chemicals. Several models are suggested also by the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) in the technical guidance document R.14 for the assessment of occupational exposure and some...... assessment to nanomaterials is still a promising route. A few years ago a new conceptual model for the assessment of inhalation exposure to nanomaterials was developed. As illustrated in this thesis, this new model includes considerations on nanoparticles behaviour and physical and chemical properties...... and the included scientific papers provide an in-depth analysis and a case study of CB tools. A set of parameters were identified which should always be taken into account for occupational assessment of inhalation exposure to nanoparticles. Harmonization considering a set of parameters was encouraged in order...

  17. Current Trends in Sensors Based on Conducting Polymer Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeonseok Yoon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Conducting polymers represent an important class of functional organic materials for next-generation electronic and optical devices. Advances in nanotechnology allow for the fabrication of various conducting polymer nanomaterials through synthesis methods such as solid-phase template synthesis, molecular template synthesis, and template-free synthesis. Nanostructured conducting polymers featuring high surface area, small dimensions, and unique physical properties have been widely used to build various sensor devices. Many remarkable examples have been reported over the past decade. The enhanced sensitivity of conducting polymer nanomaterials toward various chemical/biological species and external stimuli has made them ideal candidates for incorporation into the design of sensors. However, the selectivity and stability still leave room for improvement.

  18. Metallomics insights for in vivo studies of metal based nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Feng, Weiyue; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang

    2013-06-01

    With the rapid development of engineered nanomaterials (NMs) and wide biomedical applications for new types of multifunctional NMs, an understanding of the behavior patterns of NMs in vivo and clarification of their potential health impact as a result of their novel physicochemical properties is essential for ensuring safety in biomedical applications of nanotechnology. NMs have heterogeneous characteristics in that they combine the bulk properties of solids with the mobility of molecules, and present phase transformation, dissolution, oxidation/reduction as well as nano-bio interface reactions in biological milieu, which affect their in vivo behaviors and biological effects. The accurate study of identification, quantification, transformation state of NMs and their biological effects in vivo remains a challenge. This review aims to provide a "metallomics" (an integrated metal-assisted function bioscience) insight into the in vivo behavior and biological effects of NMs, particularly for metal-based nanomaterials (MNMs) and is based mainly on our own research and other previous works.

  19. 2nd international conference on advanced nanomaterials and nanotechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Goswami, D; Perumal, A

    2013-01-01

    Nanoscale science and technology have occupied centre stage globally in modern scientific research and discourses in the early twenty first century. The enabling nature of the technology makes it important in modern electronics, computing, materials, healthcare, energy and the environment. This volume contains selected articles presented (as Invited/Oral/Poster presentations) at the 2nd international conference on advanced materials and nanotechnology (ICANN-2011) held recently at the Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, during Dec 8-10, 2011. The list of topics covered in this proceedings include: Synthesis and self assembly of nanomaterials Nanoscale characterisation Nanophotonics & Nanoelectronics Nanobiotechnology Nanocomposites  F   Nanomagnetism Nanomaterials for Enery Computational Nanotechnology Commercialization of Nanotechnology The conference was represented by around 400 participants from several countries including delegates invited from USA, Germany, Japan, UK, Taiwan, Italy, Singapor...

  20. Modeling of nanotoxicity molecular interactions of nanomaterials with bionanomachines

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of the fundamentals of nanotoxicity modeling and its implications for the development of novel nanomedicines. It lays out the fundamentals of nanotoxicity modeling for an array of nanomaterial systems, ranging from carbon-based nanoparticles to noble metals, metal oxides, and quantum dots. The author illustrates how molecular (classical mechanics) and atomic (quantum mechanics) modeling approaches can be applied to bolster our understanding of many important aspects of this critical nanotoxicity issue. Each chapter is organized by types of nanomaterials for practicality, making this an ideal book for senior undergraduate students, graduate students, and researchers in nanotechnology, chemistry, physics, molecular biology, and computer science. It is also of interest to academic and industry professionals who work on nanodrug delivery and related biomedical applications, and aids readers in their biocompatibility assessment efforts in the coming age of nanotechnology...

  1. Graphene and Other Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Aptasensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veli Cengiz Ozalp

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical aptasensors, which are based on the specificity of aptamer-target recognition, with electrochemical transduction for analytical purposes have received particular attention due to their high sensitivity and selectivity, simple instrumentation, as well as low production cost. Aptamers are functional nucleic acids with specific and high affinity to their targets, similar to antibodies. However, they are completely selected in vitro in contrast to antibodies. Due to their stability, easy chemical modifications and proneness to nanostructured device construction, aptamer-based sensors have been incorporated in a variety of applications including electrochemical sensing devices. In recent years, the performance of aptasensors has been augmented by incorporating novel nanomaterials in the preparation of better electrochemical sensors. In this review, we summarize the recent trends in the use of nanomaterials for developing electrochemical aptasensors.

  2. Nanotherapeutics--product development along the "nanomaterial" discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Matthias G

    2014-03-01

    Nanomaterials have become part of formulation development in the pharmaceutical industry and offer exciting opportunities in the area of targeted drug delivery. But they may also exert unexpected toxicities and potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Since the Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks recommended a definition of "nanomaterials" for implementation into the existing and upcoming regulatory framework in the European Union, a discussion about safety requirements of new nanoscale products has emerged. At the same time, the Food and Drug Administration of the United States still observes recent developments in this area. Although the impact on the pharmaceutical product chain is still uncertain, guidelines on risk assessment in food products and cosmetics are available and offer a preview of future developments in the regimens of pharmaceuticals.

  3. Structural Stability and Optical Properties of Nanomaterials with Reconstructed Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puzder, A; Williamson, A; Reboredo, F; Galli, G

    2003-10-24

    The authors present density functional and quantum Monte Carlo calculations of the stability and optical properties of semiconductor nanomaterials with reconstructed surfaces. they predict the relative stability of silicon nanostructures with reconstructed and unreconstructed surfaces, and show that surface step geometries unique to highly curved surfaces dramatically reduce the optical gaps and decrease excitonic lifetimes. These predictions provide an explanation of both the variations in the photoluminescence spectra of colloidally synthesized nanoparticles and observed deep gap levels in porous silicon.

  4. Experimental investigation of interactions between proteins and carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Bishwambhar

    The global market for nanomaterials based products is forecasted to reach $1 trillion per annum per annum for 2015. Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) exhibit unique physicochemical properties with potential to impact diverse aspects of society through applications in electronics, renewable energy, and medicine. While the research and proposed applications of ENMs continue to grow rapidly, the health and safety of ENMs still remains a major concern to the public as well as to policy makers and funding agencies. It is now widely accepted that focused efforts are needed for identifying the list of physicochemical descriptors of ENM before they can be evaluated for nanotoxicity and biological response. This task is surprisingly challenging, as many physicochemical properties of ENMs are closely inter related and cannot be varied independently (e.g. increasing the size of an ENM can introduce additional defects). For example, varying toxic response may ensue due to different methods of nanomaterial preparation, dissimilar impurities and defects. Furthermore, the inadvertent coating of proteins on ENM surface in any biological milieu results in the formation of the so-called "protein/bio-corona" which can in turn alter the fate of ENMs and their biological response. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide are widely used ENMs. It is now known that defects in CNMs play an important role not only in materials properties but also in the determination of how materials interact at the nano-bio interface. In this regard, this work investigates the influence of defect-induced hydrophilicity on the bio-corona formation using micro Raman, photoluminescence, infrared spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that the interaction of proteins (albumin and fibrinogen) with CNMs is strongly influenced by charge transfer between them, inducing protein unfolding which enhances conformational entropy and

  5. Epidemiological study of health hazards among workers handling engineered nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, Saou-Hsing, E-mail: shliou@nhri.org.tw; Tsou, Tsui-Chun; Wang, Shu-Li; Li, Lih-Ann; Chiang, Hung-Che; Li, Wan-Fen; Lin, Pin-Pin [National Health Research Institutes, Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, Taiwan (China); Lai, Ching-Huang [National Defense Medical Center, Department of Public Health, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hui-Ling [Fu Jen Catholic University, Department of Chemistry, Taiwan (China); Lin, Ming-Hsiu; Hsu, Jin-Huei; Chen, Chiou-Rong [Council of Labor Affairs, Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Taiwan (China); Shih, Tung-Sheng [College of Public Health, China Medical University and Hospital, Institute of Environmental Health, Taiwan (China); Liao, Hui-Yi; Chung, Yu-Teh [National Health Research Institutes, Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, Taiwan (China)

    2012-08-15

    The aim of this study was to establish and identify the health effect markers of workers with potential exposure to nanoparticles (20-100 nm) during manufacturing and/or application of nanomaterials. For this cross-sectional study, we recruited 227 workers who handled nanomaterials and 137 workers for comparison who did not from 14 plants in Taiwan. A questionnaire was used to collect data on exposure status, demographics, and potential confounders. The health effect markers were measured in the medical laboratory. Control banding from the Nanotool Risk Level Matrix was used to categorize the exposure risk levels of the workers. The results showed that the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD) in risk level 1 (RL1) and risk level 2 (RL2) workers was significantly (p < 0.05) lower than in control workers. A significantly decreasing gradient was found for SOD (control > RL1 > RL2). Another antioxidant, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), was significantly lower only in RL1 workers than in the control workers. The cardiovascular markers, fibrinogen and ICAM (intercellular adhesion molecule), were significantly higher in RL2 workers than in controls and a significant dose-response with an increasing trend was found for these two cardiovascular markers. Another cardiovascular marker, interleukin-6, was significantly increased among RL1 workers, but not among RL2 workers. The accuracy rate for remembering 7-digits and reciting them backwards was significantly lower in RL2 workers (OR = 0.48) than in controls and a significantly reversed gradient was also found for the correct rate of backward memory (OR = 0.90 for RL1, OR = 0.48 for RL2, p < 0.05 in test for trend). Depression of antioxidant enzymes and increased expression of cardiovascular markers were found among workers handling nanomaterials. Antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD and GPX, and cardiovascular markers, such as fibrinogen, ICAM, and interluekin-6, are possible biomarkers for medical surveillance of

  6. Epidemiological study of health hazards among workers handling engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Saou-Hsing; Tsou, Tsui-Chun; Wang, Shu-Li; Li, Lih-Ann; Chiang, Hung-Che; Li, Wan-Fen; Lin, Pin-Pin; Lai, Ching-Huang; Lee, Hui-Ling; Lin, Ming-Hsiu; Hsu, Jin-Huei; Chen, Chiou-Rong; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Liao, Hui-Yi; Chung, Yu-Teh

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to establish and identify the health effect markers of workers with potential exposure to nanoparticles (20-100 nm) during manufacturing and/or application of nanomaterials. For this cross-sectional study, we recruited 227 workers who handled nanomaterials and 137 workers for comparison who did not from 14 plants in Taiwan. A questionnaire was used to collect data on exposure status, demographics, and potential confounders. The health effect markers were measured in the medical laboratory. Control banding from the Nanotool Risk Level Matrix was used to categorize the exposure risk levels of the workers. The results showed that the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase (SOD) in risk level 1 (RL1) and risk level 2 (RL2) workers was significantly ( p RL1 > RL2). Another antioxidant, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), was significantly lower only in RL1 workers than in the control workers. The cardiovascular markers, fibrinogen and ICAM (intercellular adhesion molecule), were significantly higher in RL2 workers than in controls and a significant dose-response with an increasing trend was found for these two cardiovascular markers. Another cardiovascular marker, interleukin-6, was significantly increased among RL1 workers, but not among RL2 workers. The accuracy rate for remembering 7-digits and reciting them backwards was significantly lower in RL2 workers (OR = 0.48) than in controls and a significantly reversed gradient was also found for the correct rate of backward memory (OR = 0.90 for RL1, OR = 0.48 for RL2, p Depression of antioxidant enzymes and increased expression of cardiovascular markers were found among workers handling nanomaterials. Antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD and GPX, and cardiovascular markers, such as fibrinogen, ICAM, and interluekin-6, are possible biomarkers for medical surveillance of workers handling engineered nanomaterials.

  7. Advances in biodegradable nanomaterials for photothermal therapy of cancer

    OpenAIRE

    He, Chao-Feng; Wang, Shun-Hao; Yu, Ying-Jie; Shen, He-Yun; Zhao, Yan; Gao, Hui-Ling; Wang, Hai; Li, Lin-Lin; Liu, Hui-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Photothermal cancer therapy is an alternative to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. With the development of nanophotothermal agents, this therapy holds immense potential in clinical translation. However, the toxicity issues derived from the fact that nanomaterials are trapped and retained in the reticuloendothelial systems limit their biomedical application. Developing biodegradable photothermal agents is the most practical route to address these concerns. In addition to the physicochem...

  8. Graphene-polymer-enzyme hybrid nanomaterials for biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The invention relates to a general chemical method for the synthesis of biocompatible hybrid nanomaterials which can be used in the development of new- type enzyme based biosensors. A one-step facile method is presented, in which polyethylenimine (PEI) serves as both a reducing agent for the redu...... for the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) into reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and a biological matrix for accommodation of enzymes....

  9. Diagnostic and therapeutic uses of nanomaterials in the brain

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Nanomedicine has recently emerged as an exciting tool able to improve the early diagnosis and treatment of a variety of intractable or age-related brain disorders. The most relevant properties of nanomaterials are that they can be engineered in such a way that they can cross the blood brain barrier, with the final aim of targeting specific cells and molecules and to act as vehicles for drugs. Potentially beneficial properties of nanotherapeutics derived from its unique characteristics include...

  10. Ranking the in vivo toxicity of nanomaterials in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchio, G.; Galeone, A.; Malvindi, M. A. [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Center for Bio-Molecular Nanotechnologies-UniLe (Italy); Cingolani, R. [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Central Research Laboratories (Italy); Pompa, P. P., E-mail: pierpaolo.pompa@iit.it [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Center for Bio-Molecular Nanotechnologies-UniLe (Italy)

    2013-09-15

    In this work, we propose a quantitative assessment of nanoparticles toxicity in vivo. We show a quantitative ranking of several types of nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs, cadmium-based QDs, cadmium-free QDs, and iron oxide NPs, with different coating and/or surface chemistries), providing a categorization of their toxicity outcomes. This strategy may offer an innovative high-throughput screening tool of nanomaterials, of potential and broad interest to the nanoscience community.

  11. Ranking the in vivo toxicity of nanomaterials in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, G.; Galeone, A.; Malvindi, M. A.; Cingolani, R.; Pompa, P. P.

    2013-09-01

    In this work, we propose a quantitative assessment of nanoparticles toxicity in vivo. We show a quantitative ranking of several types of nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs, cadmium-based QDs, cadmium-free QDs, and iron oxide NPs, with different coating and/or surface chemistries), providing a categorization of their toxicity outcomes. This strategy may offer an innovative high-throughput screening tool of nanomaterials, of potential and broad interest to the nanoscience community.

  12. Green chemical synthesis of silver nanomaterials with maltodextrin.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallant, David Robert; Lu, Ping; Lambert, Timothy N.; Bell, Nelson Simmons

    2010-11-01

    Silver nanomaterials have significant application resulting from their optical properties related to surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, high electrical conductivity, and anti-microbial impact. A 'green chemistry' synthetic approach for silver nanomaterials minimizes the environmental impact of silver synthesis, as well as lowers the toxicity of the reactive agents. Biopolymers have long been used for stabilization of silver nanomaterials during synthesis, and include gum Arabic, heparin, and common starch. Maltodextrin is a processed derivative of starch with lower molecular weight and an increase in the number of reactive reducing aldehyde groups, and serves as a suitable single reactant for the formation of metallic silver. Silver nanomaterials can be formed under either a thermal route at neutral pH in water or by reaction at room temperature under more alkaline conditions. Deposited silver materials are formed on substrates from near neutral pH solutions at low temperatures near 50 C. Experimental conditions based on material concentrations, pH and reaction time are investigated for development of deposited films. Deposit morphology and optical properties are characterized using SEM and UV-vis techniques. Silver nanoparticles are generated under alkaline conditions by a dissolution-reduction method from precipitated silver (II) oxide. Synthesis conditions were explored for the rapid development of stable silver nanoparticle dispersions. UV-vis absorption spectra, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to characterize the nanoparticle formation kinetics and the influence of reaction conditions. The adsorbed content of the maltodextrin was characterized using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  13. The eNanoMapper database for nanomaterial safety information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Jeliazkova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The NanoSafety Cluster, a cluster of projects funded by the European Commision, identified the need for a computational infrastructure for toxicological data management of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs. Ontologies, open standards, and interoperable designs were envisioned to empower a harmonized approach to European research in nanotechnology. This setting provides a number of opportunities and challenges in the representation of nanomaterials data and the integration of ENM information originating from diverse systems. Within this cluster, eNanoMapper works towards supporting the collaborative safety assessment for ENMs by creating a modular and extensible infrastructure for data sharing, data analysis, and building computational toxicology models for ENMs.Results: The eNanoMapper database solution builds on the previous experience of the consortium partners in supporting diverse data through flexible data storage, open source components and web services. We have recently described the design of the eNanoMapper prototype database along with a summary of challenges in the representation of ENM data and an extensive review of existing nano-related data models, databases, and nanomaterials-related entries in chemical and toxicogenomic databases. This paper continues with a focus on the database functionality exposed through its application programming interface (API, and its use in visualisation and modelling. Considering the preferred community practice of using spreadsheet templates, we developed a configurable spreadsheet parser facilitating user friendly data preparation and data upload. We further present a web application able to retrieve the experimental data via the API and analyze it with multiple data preprocessing and machine learning algorithms.Conclusion: We demonstrate how the eNanoMapper database is used to import and publish online ENM and assay data from several data sources, how the “representational state

  14. Synthesis of carbon nanomaterials from corn waste (DDGS)

    OpenAIRE

    Alves,Joner Oliveira; Zhuo, Chuanwei; Levendis, Yiannis Angelo; Tenorio, Jorge Alberto Soares

    2012-01-01

    Syntesis of carbon nanomaterials from corn waste (DDGS). The world's largest ethanol producer (USA) uses corn as feedstock. DDGS (distillers dried grains with solubles) is the main waste generated from this process (around 32 million t/year). DDGS samples were pyrolyzed at 1000 degrees C in a furnace with controlled atmosphere. The effluent was channeled to a second furnace, in which catalyst substrates were placed. Chromatographic analysis was used to evaluate the gaseous effluents, showing ...

  15. Raman spectroscopy in the analysis of food and pharmaceutical nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Ying-Sing Li; Church, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Raman scattering is an inelastic phenomenon. Although its cross section is very small, recent advances in electronics, lasers, optics, and nanotechnology have made Raman spectroscopy suitable in many areas of application. The present article reviews the applications of Raman spectroscopy in food and drug analysis and inspection, including those associated with nanomaterials. Brief overviews of basic Raman scattering theory, instrumentation, and statistical data analysis are also given. With t...

  16. UV-VIS and photoluminescence spectroscopy for nanomaterials characterization

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Second volume of a 40-volume series on nanoscience and nanotechnology, edited by the renowned scientist Challa S.S.R. Kumar. This handbook gives a comprehensive overview about UV-visible and photoluminescence spectroscopy for the characterization of nanomaterials. Modern applications and state-of-the-art techniques are covered and make this volume essential reading for research scientists in academia and industry in the related fields.

  17. Deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in human upper airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei-Chung; Ku, Bon Ki; Kulkarni, Pramod; Cheng, Yung Sung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene nanomaterials have attracted wide attention in recent years on their application to state-of-the-art technology due to their outstanding physical properties. On the other hand, the nanotoxicity of graphene materials also has rapidly become a serious concern especially in occupational health. Graphene naomaterials inevitably could become airborne in the workplace during manufacturing processes. The inhalation and subsequent deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in the human respiratory tract could potentially result in adverse health effects to exposed workers. Therefore, investigating the deposition of graphene nanomaterial aerosols in the human airways is an indispensable component of an integral approach to graphene occupational health. For this reason, this study carried out a series of airway replica deposition experiments to obtain original experimental data for graphene aerosol airway deposition. In this study, graphene aerosols were generated, size classified, and delivered into human airway replicas (nasal and oral-to-lung airways). The deposition fraction and deposition efficiency of graphene aerosol in the airway replicas were obtained by a novel experimental approach. The experimental results acquired showed that the fractional deposition of graphene aerosols in airway sections studied were all less than 4%, and the deposition efficiency in each airway section was generally lower than 0.03. These results indicate that the majority of the graphene nanomaterial aerosols inhaled into the human respiratory tract could easily penetrate through the head airways as well as the upper part of the tracheobronchial airways and then transit down to the lower lung airways, where undesired biological responses might be induced.

  18. Engineered nanomaterial uptake and tissue distribution: from cell to organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kettiger H

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Helene Kettiger,1,* Angela Schipanski,2,* Peter Wick,2 Jörg Huwyler1 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 2Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Materials-Biology Interactions, St Gallen, Switzerland *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Improved understanding of interactions between nanoparticles and biological systems is needed to develop safety standards and to design new generations of nanomaterials. This article reviews the molecular mechanisms of cellular uptake of engineered nanoparticles, their intracellular fate, and their distribution within an organism. We have reviewed the available literature on the uptake and disposition of engineered nanoparticles. Special emphasis was placed on the analysis of experimental systems and their limitations with respect to their usefulness to predict the in vivo situation. The available literature confirms the need to study particle characteristics in an environment that simulates the situation encountered in biological systems. Phenomena such as protein binding and opsonization are of prime importance since they may have a strong impact on cellular internalization, biodistribution, and immunogenicity of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. Extrapolation from in vitro results to the in vivo situation in the whole organism remains a challenge. However, improved understanding of physicochemical properties of engineered nanoparticles and their influence on biological systems facilitates the design of nanomaterials that are safe, well tolerated, and suitable for diagnostic or therapeutic use in humans. Keywords: biodistribution, cellular transport, cellular uptake, endocytosis, engineered nanomaterials, nanosafety

  19. Nanomaterials-Based Fluorimetric Methods for MicroRNAs Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming La

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small endogenous non-coding RNAs of ~22 nucleotides that play important functions in the regulation of many biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and death. Since their expression has been in close association with the development of many diseases, recently, miRNAs have been regarded as clinically important biomarkers and drug discovery targets. However, because of the short length, high sequence similarity and low abundance of miRNAs in vivo, it is difficult to realize the sensitive and selective detection of miRNAs with conventional methods. In line with the rapid development of nanotechnology, nanomaterials have attracted great attention and have been intensively studied in biological analysis due to their unique chemical, physical and size properties. In particular, fluorimetric methodologies in combination with nanotechnology are especially rapid, sensitive and efficient. The aim of this review is to provide insight into nanomaterials-based fluorimetric methods for the detection of miRNAs, including metal nanomaterials, quantum dots (QDs, graphene oxide (GO and silicon nanoparticles.

  20. Nanomaterials incorporated ultrasound contrast agents for cancer theranostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Fu; Heng-Te Ke

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology provides various nanomaterials with tremendous functionalities for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Recently, theranostics has been developed as an alternative strategy for efficient cancer treatment through combination of imaging diagnosis and therapeutic interventions under the guidance of diagnostic results. Ultrasound (US) imaging shows unique advantages with excellent features of real-time imaging, low cost, high safety and portability, making US contrast agents (UCAs) an ideal platform for construction of cancer theranostic agents. This review focuses on the development of nanomaterials incorporated multifunctional UCAs serving as theranostic agents for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics, via conjugation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs), CuS nanoparticles, DNA, siRNA, gold nanoparticles (GNPs), gold nanorods (GNRs), gold nanoshell (GNS), graphene oxides (GOs), polypyrrole (PPy) nanocapsules, Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles and so on to different types of UCAs. The cancer treatment could be more effectively and accurately carried out under the guidance and monitoring with the help of the achieved theranostic agents. Furthermore, nanomaterials incorporated theranostic agents based on UCAs can be designed and constructed by demand for personalized and accurate treatment of cancer, demonstrating their great potential to address the challenges of cancer heterogeneity and adaptation, which can provide alternative strategies for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  1. Probing mechanical principles of cell-nanomaterial interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huajian

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, various types of nanoparticles, nanowires, nanofibers, nanotubes, and atomically thin plates and sheets have emerged as candidates for an ever increasing list of potential applications for next generation electronics, microchips, composites, barrier coatings, biosensors, drug delivery, and energy harvesting and conversion systems. There is now an urgent societal need to understand both beneficial and hazardous effects of nanotechnology which is projected to produce and release thousands of tons of nanomaterials into the environment in the coming decades. This paper aims to present an overview of some recent studies conducted at Brown University on the mechanics of cell-nanomaterial interactions, including the modeling of nanoparticles entering cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of nanoparticles interacting with cell membranes. The discussions will be organized around the following questions: Why and how does cellular uptake of nanoparticles depend on particle size, shape, elasticity and surface structure? In particular, we will discuss the effect of nanoparticle size on receptor-mediated endocytosis, the effect of elastic stiffness on cell-particle interactions, how high aspect ratio nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes and graphenes enter cells and how different geometrical patterns of ligands on a nanoparticle can be designed to control the rate of particle uptake.

  2. Recent trends in nanomaterials applications in environmental monitoring and remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sumistha; Sen, Biswarup; Debnath, Nitai

    2015-12-01

    Environmental pollution is one of the greatest problems that the world is facing today, and it is increasing with every passing year and causing grave and irreparable damage to the earth. Nanomaterials, because of their novel physical and chemical characteristics, have great promise to combat environment pollution. Nanotechnology is being used to devise pollution sensor. A variety of materials in their nano form like iron, titanium dioxide, silica, zinc oxide, carbon nanotube, dendrimers, polymers, etc. are increasingly being used to make the air clean, to purify water, and to decontaminate soil. Nanotechnology is also being used to make renewable energy cheaper and more efficient. The use of nanotechnology in agriculture sector will reduce the indiscriminate use of agrochemicals and thus will reduce the load of chemical pollutant. While remediating environment pollution with nanomaterials, it should also be monitored that these materials do not contribute further degradation of the environment. This review will focus broadly on the applications of nanotechnology in the sustainable development with particular emphasis on renewable energy, air-, water-, and soil-remediation. Besides, the review highlights the recent developments in various types of nanomaterials and nanodevices oriented toward pollution monitoring and remediation.

  3. Predictive tests to evaluate oxidative potential of engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiazza, Mara; Carella, Emanuele; Oliaro-Bosso, Simonetta; Corazzari, Ingrid; Viola, Franca; Fenoglio, Ivana

    2013-04-01

    Oxidative stress constitutes one of the principal injury mechanisms through which particulate toxicants (asbestos, crystalline silica, hard metals) and engineered nanomaterials can induce adverse health effects. ROS may be generated indirectly by activated cells and/or directly at the surface of the material. The occurrence of these processes depends upon the type of material. Many authors have recently demonstrated that metal oxides and carbon-based nanoparticles may influence (increasing or decreasing) the generation of oxygen radicals in a cell environment. Metal oxide, such as iron oxides, crystalline silica, and titanium dioxide are able to generate free radicals via different mechanisms causing an imbalance within oxidant species. The increase of ROS species may lead to inflammatory responses and in some cases to the development of cancer. On the other hand carbon-based nanomaterials, such as fullerene, carbon nanotubes, carbon black as well as cerium dioxide are able to scavenge the free radicals generated acting as antioxidant. The high numbers of new-engineered nanomaterials, which are introduced in the market, are exponentially increasing. Therefore the definition of toxicological strategies is urgently needed. The development of acellular screening tests will make possible the reduction of the number of in vitro and in vivo tests to be performed. An integrated protocol that may be used to predict the oxidant/antioxidant potential of engineered nanoparticles will be here presented.

  4. Engineered Carbon-Nanomaterial-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Jitendra N; Vij, Varun; Kemp, K Christian; Kim, Kwang S

    2016-01-26

    The study of electrochemical behavior of bioactive molecules has become one of the most rapidly developing scientific fields. Biotechnology and biomedical engineering fields have a vested interest in constructing more precise and accurate voltammetric/amperometric biosensors. One rapidly growing area of biosensor design involves incorporation of carbon-based nanomaterials in working electrodes, such as one-dimensional carbon nanotubes, two-dimensional graphene, and graphene oxide. In this review article, we give a brief overview describing the voltammetric techniques and how these techniques are applied in biosensing, as well as the details surrounding important biosensing concepts of sensitivity and limits of detection. Building on these important concepts, we show how the sensitivity and limit of detection can be tuned by including carbon-based nanomaterials in the fabrication of biosensors. The sensing of biomolecules including glucose, dopamine, proteins, enzymes, uric acid, DNA, RNA, and H2O2 traditionally employs enzymes in detection; however, these enzymes denature easily, and as such, enzymeless methods are highly desired. Here we draw an important distinction between enzymeless and enzyme-containing carbon-nanomaterial-based biosensors. The review ends with an outlook of future concepts that can be employed in biosensor fabrication, as well as limitations of already proposed materials and how such sensing can be enhanced. As such, this review can act as a roadmap to guide researchers toward concepts that can be employed in the design of next generation biosensors, while also highlighting the current advancements in the field.

  5. The impact of toxicity testing costs on nanomaterial regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Young; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Kandlikar, Milind

    2009-05-01

    Information about the toxicity of nanoparticles is important in determining how nanoparticles will be regulated. In the U.S., the burden of collecting this information and conducting risk assessment is placed on regulatory agencies without the budgetary means to carry out this mandate. In this paper, we analyze the impact of testing costs on society's ability to gather information about nanoparticle toxicity and whether such costs can reasonably be borne by an emerging industry. We show for the United States that costs for testing existing nanoparticles ranges from $249 million for optimistic assumptions about nanoparticle hazards (i.e., they are primarily safe and mainly require simpler screening assays) to $1.18 billion for a more comprehensive precautionary approach (i.e., all nanomaterials require long-term in vivo testing). At midlevel estimates of total corporate R&D spending, and assuming plausible levels of spending on hazard testing, the time taken to complete testing is likely to be very high (34-53 years) if all existing nanomaterials are to be thoroughly tested. These delays will only increase with time as new nanomaterials are introduced. The delays are considerably less if less-stringent yet risk-averse perspectives are used. Our results support a tiered risk-assessment strategy similar to the EU's REACH legislation for regulating toxic chemicals.

  6. Nanomaterials incorporated ultrasound contrast agents for cancer theranostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lei; Ke, Heng-Te

    2016-09-01

    Nanotechnology provides various nanomaterials with tremendous functionalities for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Recently, theranostics has been developed as an alternative strategy for efficient cancer treatment through combination of imaging diagnosis and therapeutic interventions under the guidance of diagnostic results. Ultrasound (US) imaging shows unique advantages with excellent features of real-time imaging, low cost, high safety and portability, making US contrast agents (UCAs) an ideal platform for construction of cancer theranostic agents. This review focuses on the development of nanomaterials incorporated multifunctional UCAs serving as theranostic agents for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics, via conjugation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs), CuS nanoparticles, DNA, siRNA, gold nanoparticles (GNPs), gold nanorods (GNRs), gold nanoshell (GNS), graphene oxides (GOs), polypyrrole (PPy) nanocapsules, Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles and so on to different types of UCAs. The cancer treatment could be more effectively and accurately carried out under the guidance and monitoring with the help of the achieved theranostic agents. Furthermore, nanomaterials incorporated theranostic agents based on UCAs can be designed and constructed by demand for personalized and accurate treatment of cancer, demonstrating their great potential to address the challenges of cancer heterogeneity and adaptation, which can provide alternative strategies for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  7. Nanomaterials - the Next Great Challenge for Qsar Modelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzyn, Tomasz; Gajewicz, Agnieszka; Leszczynska, Danuta; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    In this final chapter a new perspective for the application of QSAR in the nanosciences is discussed. The role of nanomaterials is rapidly increasing in many aspects of everyday life. This is promoting a wide range of research needs related to both the design of new materials with required properties and performing a comprehensive risk assessment of the manufactured nanoparticles. The development of nanoscience also opens new areas for QSAR modelers. We have begun this contribution with a detailed discussion on the remarkable physical-chemical properties of nanomaterials and their specific toxicities. Both these factors should be considered as potential endpoints for further nano-QSAR studies. Then, we have highlighted the status and research needs in the area of molecular descriptors applicable to nanomaterials. Finally, we have put together currently available nano-QSAR models related to the physico-chemical endpoints of nanoparticles and their activity. Although we have observed many problems (i.e., a lack of experimental data, insufficient and inadequate descriptors), we do believe that application of QSAR methodology will significantly support nanoscience in the near future. Development of reliable nano-QSARs can be considered as the next challenging task for the QSAR community.

  8. Impact of humic/fulvic acid on the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions using nanomaterials: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wang-Wang; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Gong, Ji-Lai; Liang, Jie; Xu, Piao; Zhang, Chang; Huang, Bin-Bin

    2014-01-15

    Nowadays nanomaterials have been widely used to remove heavy metals from water/wastewater due to their large surface area and high reactivity. Humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) exist ubiquitously in aquatic environments and have a variety of functional groups which allow them to complex with metal ions and interact with nanomaterials. These interactions can not only alter the environmental behavior of nanomaterials, but also influence the removal and transportation of heavy metals by nanomaterials. Thus, the interactions and the underlying mechanisms involved warrant specific investigations. This review outlined the effects of HA/FA on the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions by various nanomaterials, mainly including carbon-based nanomaterials, iron-based nanomaterials and photocatalytic nanomaterials. Moreover, mechanisms involved in the interactions were discussed and potential environmental implications of HA/FA to nanomaterials and heavy metals were evaluated.

  9. Metal Oxide Nanomaterial QNAR Models: Available Structural Descriptors and Understanding of Toxicity Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Ying

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal oxide nanomaterials are widely used in various areas; however, the divergent published toxicology data makes it difficult to determine whether there is a risk associated with exposure to metal oxide nanomaterials. The application of quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR modeling in metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity studies can reduce the need for time-consuming and resource-intensive nanotoxicity tests. The nanostructure and inorganic composition of metal oxide nanomaterials makes this approach different from classical QSAR study; this review lists and classifies some structural descriptors, such as size, cation charge, and band gap energy, in recent metal oxide nanomaterials quantitative nanostructure activity relationship (QNAR studies and discusses the mechanism of metal oxide nanomaterials toxicity based on these descriptors and traditional nanotoxicity tests.

  10. Multitasking mesoporous nanomaterials for biorefinery applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandel, Kapil [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) have attracted great interest for last two decades due to their unique and advantageous structural properties, such as high surface area, pore volume, stable mesostructure, tunable pore size and controllable particle morphology. The robust silica framework provides sites for organic modifications, making MSNs ideal platforms for adsorbents and supported organocatalysts. In addition, the pores of MSNs provide cavities/ channels for incorporation of metal and metal oxide nanoparticle catalysts. These supported metal nanoparticle catalysts benefit from confined local environments to enhance their activity and selectivity for various reactions. Biomass is considered as a sustainable feedstock with potential to replace diminishing fossil fuels for the production of biofuels. Among several strategies, one of the promising methods of biofuel production from biomass is to reduce the oxygen content of the feedstock in order to improve the energy density. This can be achieved by creating C-C bonds between biomass derived intermediates to increase the molecular weight of the final hydrocarbon molecules. In this context, pore size and organic functionality of MSNs are varied to obtain the ideal catalyst for a C-C bond forming reaction: the aldol condensation. The mechanistic aspects of this reaction in supported heterogeneous catalysts are explored. The modification of supported organocatalyst and the effect of solvent on the reaction are rationalized. The significance of two functional surfaces of MSNs is exploited by enzyme immobilization on the external surface and organo catalyst functionalization on the internal surface. Using this bifunctional catalyst, the tandem conversion of small chain alcohols into longer chain hydrocarbon molecules is demonstrated. The ability to incorporate metal and metal oxide nanoparticles in the pores and subsequent functionalization led to develop organic modified magnetic MSNs (OM-MSNs) for applications

  11. Dimensionality of carbon nanomaterial impacting on the modulation of amyloid peptide assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Zhu, Z.; Bortolini, C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Amari, A.; Zhang, H. X.; Liu, L.; Dong, M. D.

    2016-07-01

    A wide variety of inorganic nanomaterials have been exploited so far for their great potential for biological applications. Some of these materials could be valid candidates to modulate the assembly of amyloid peptides, which is relevant to amyloid-related diseases. In this work, we reveal that a carbon nanomaterial can indeed modulate the assembly of amyloid peptides and, additionally, we show that this modulating effect is closely related to the dimensionality of the nanomaterials.

  12. Dimensionality of carbon nanomaterial impacting on the modulation of amyloid peptide assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, J.; Zhu, Z.; Bortolini, C.;

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of inorganic nanomaterials have been exploited so far for their great potential for biological applications. Some of these materials could be valid candidates to modulate the assembly of amyloid peptides, which is relevant to amyloid-related diseases. In this work, we reveal...... that a carbon nanomaterial can indeed modulate the assembly of amyloid peptides and, additionally, we show that this modulating effect is closely related to the dimensionality of the nanomaterials....

  13. Genotoxicity of metal oxide nanomaterials: review of recent data and discussion of possible mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbamaki, Nazanin; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cassano, Antonio; Marchese Robinson, Richard L.; Benfenati, Emilio; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Cronin, Mark T. D.

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has rapidly entered into human society, revolutionized many areas, including technology, medicine and cosmetics. This progress is due to the many valuable and unique properties that nanomaterials possess. In turn, these properties might become an issue of concern when considering potentially uncontrolled release to the environment. The rapid development of new nanomaterials thus raises questions about their impact on the environment and human health. This review focuses on the potential of nanomaterials to cause genotoxicity and summarizes recent genotoxicity studies on metal oxide/silica nanomaterials. Though the number of genotoxicity studies on metal oxide/silica nanomaterials is still limited, this endpoint has recently received more attention for nanomaterials, and the number of related publications has increased. An analysis of these peer reviewed publications over nearly two decades shows that the test most employed to evaluate the genotoxicity of these nanomaterials is the comet assay, followed by micronucleus, Ames and chromosome aberration tests. Based on the data studied, we concluded that in the majority of the publications analysed in this review, the metal oxide (or silica) nanoparticles of the same core chemical composition did not show different genotoxicity study calls (i.e. positive or negative) in the same test, although some results are inconsistent and need to be confirmed by additional experiments. Where the results are conflicting, it may be due to the following reasons: (1) variation in size of the nanoparticles; (2) variations in size distribution; (3) various purities of nanomaterials; (4) variation in surface areas for nanomaterials with the same average size; (5) differences in coatings; (6) differences in crystal structures of the same types of nanomaterials; (7) differences in size of aggregates in solution/media; (8) differences in assays; (9) different concentrations of nanomaterials in assay tests. Indeed, due to the

  14. 25th anniversary article: hybrid nanostructures based on two-dimensional nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiao; Tan, Chaoliang; Yin, Zongyou; Zhang, Hua

    2014-04-09

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, such as graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), receive a lot of attention, because of their intriguing properties and wide applications in catalysis, energy-storage devices, electronics, optoelectronics, and so on. To further enhance the performance of their application, these 2D nanomaterials are hybridized with other functional nanostructures. In this review, the latest studies of 2D nanomaterial-based hybrid nanostructures are discussed, focusing on their preparation methods, properties, and applications.

  15. About the influence of carbon nanomaterials on the properties of cement and concrete

    OpenAIRE

    URKHANOVA Larisa A.; LKHASARANOV Solbon A.; BUYANTUEV Sergey L; KUZNETSOVA Anastasia Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the results of studies on the modification of the cement stone and concrete with carbon nanomaterials, which were obtained as a by-product in the plasma gasification of coal. Under the action of plasma arc from the electrode material and coal supplied for the gasification, carbon nanomaterials – fullerene-containing soot are formed simultaneously in one apparatus. This method of production of carbon nanomaterials is a perspective due to a smaller effect on the increase...

  16. Selectively driving optical magnetism (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Norbert F.; Manna, Uttam; Parker, John A.; lee, Jung-Hoon; Deng, Tiansong; Shepherd, Nolan; Weizmann, Yossef

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that one can create a magnetic field by passing a DC or AC electric current through a coil of conductor (i.e., a wire); a phenomenon described by the Maxwell-Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. NMR or ESR (nuclear magnetic resonance or electron spin resonance) spectroscopies involve the interaction of a spin (nuclear or electron, respectively) with a magnetic field. Mathematically, these phenomena can be understood as the curl of the electric field (i.e., the current or spin) producing a (time varying) magnetic field or vise versa. Thus, one should also be able to induce a magnetic response in nano- and meso-scale materials by exploiting Maxwell-Faraday's law of induction through the design of the structure, by employing an electric field with instantaneous curl or do both to produce an instantaneous circulating (or displacement) current. Here we employ cylindrical vector beams with azimuthal polarization to create an angular (cylindrical) electric field, and selectively induce a magnetic response in metal nanoparticle-based nanomaterials at optical frequencies. This time-varying magnetic field at optical frequencies is induced in systems that do not possess spin or orbital angular momentum. Moreover, with the vector beam spectroscopy we also selectively drive electric dipole modes by excitation with a radially polarized light, and show that the strength of the electric and magnetic modes can be equal in magnitude in individual metal nano-structures. This work opens new opportunities for selective spectroscopic investigation of "dark modes" and Fano resonances in nanomaterials, metamaterials and control of nanomaterial excitations and dynamics.

  17. Synthesis, Characterization, and Application of 1-D Cerium Oxide Nanomaterials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuen-Song Lin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work provides a comprehensive overview of the recent progress of research work toward developing new one dimensional (1-D ceria (CeO2 nanomaterials. The review has been classified into three parts: the preparation procedures with identification of the existing different dimensional ceria nanomaterials, the formation mechanisms, and an analysis of their applications. From literature survey, it is inaugurated that the fundamental structures of the ceria nanomaterials constructively dominate their properties and applications. In addition, this work will also provide a perspective on the future technical trends for the development of different dimensional CeO2 nanomaterials.

  18. Recent progress in application of carbon nanomaterials in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Qian; Liang, Yong; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanomaterials have attracted great interest over past decades owing to their unique physical properties, versatile functionalization chemistry, and biological compatibility. In this article, we review recent progress in application of carbon nanomaterials in laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI MS). Various types of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene, carbon nanodots, nanodiamond, nanofibers, nanohorns, and their derivative forms, are involved. The applications of these materials as new matrices or probes in matrix-assisted or surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI or SELDI MS) are discussed. Finally, we summarize current challenges and give our perspectives on the future of applications of carbon nanomaterials in LDI MS.

  19. The potential of protein-nanomaterial interaction for advanced drug delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Qiang; Mu, Huiling

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials, like nanoparticles, micelles, nano-sheets, nanotubes and quantum dots, have great potentials in biomedical fields. However, their delivery is highly limited by the formation of protein corona upon interaction with endogenous proteins. This new identity, instead of nanomaterial itse...... of such interaction for advanced drug delivery are presented.......Nanomaterials, like nanoparticles, micelles, nano-sheets, nanotubes and quantum dots, have great potentials in biomedical fields. However, their delivery is highly limited by the formation of protein corona upon interaction with endogenous proteins. This new identity, instead of nanomaterial itself...

  20. Fmoc-Cl fluorescent determination for amino groups of nanomaterial science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Chen, Y

    2012-06-01

    With the wide application of nanomaterials, the quantification of functional groups on nanomaterial surface becomes more and more necessary. A heterogeneous 9-fluorenylmethoxy carbonyl chloride (Fmoc-Cl) fluorescent method using an aqueous solution was established to determinate amino groups on nanomaterial surface. The effect factors of determination were investigated and the assay was optimised. The Fmoc fluorescent method is 200-fold more sensitive than the current UV assay using an organic solvent, and compared with chemical ninhydrin method and physical elemental analysis. Heterogeneous Fmoc-Cl fluorescent method can be used to determine amino groups on nanomaterials with big size, which is difficult to undergo a direct detection.