WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon-carbon bond cleavage

  1. Carbon-carbon bond cleavage and rearrangement of benzene by a trinuclear titanium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shaowei; Shima, Takanori; Hou, Zhaomin

    2014-08-01

    The cleavage of carbon-carbon (C-C) bonds by transition metals is of great interest, especially as this transformation can be used to produce fuels and other industrially important chemicals from natural resources such as petroleum and biomass. Carbon-carbon bonds are quite stable and are consequently unreactive under many reaction conditions. In the industrial naphtha hydrocracking process, the aromatic carbon skeleton of benzene can be transformed to methylcyclopentane and acyclic saturated hydrocarbons through C-C bond cleavage and rearrangement on the surfaces of solid catalysts. However, these chemical transformations usually require high temperatures and are fairly non-selective. Microorganisms can degrade aromatic compounds under ambient conditions, but the mechanistic details are not known and are difficult to mimic. Several transition metal complexes have been reported to cleave C-C bonds in a selective fashion in special circumstances, such as relief of ring strain, formation of an aromatic system, chelation-assisted cyclometallation and β-carbon elimination. However, the cleavage of benzene by a transition metal complex has not been reported. Here we report the C-C bond cleavage and rearrangement of benzene by a trinuclear titanium polyhydride complex. The benzene ring is transformed sequentially to a methylcyclopentenyl and a 2-methylpentenyl species through the cleavage of the aromatic carbon skeleton at the multi-titanium sites. Our results suggest that multinuclear titanium hydrides could serve as a unique platform for the activation of aromatic molecules, and may facilitate the design of new catalysts for the transformation of inactive aromatics.

  2. Highly Efficient Oxidative Cleavage of Carbon-Carbon Double Bond over meso-Tetraphenyl Cobalt Porphyrin Catalyst in the Presence of Molecular Oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周贤太; 纪红兵

    2012-01-01

    Highly efficient and selective carbon-carbon double bond aerobic cleavage of olefins catalyzed by metallopor- phyrins was investigated, and carbonyl compounds and epoxide were produced as the main products. CoTPP (co- balt meso-tetraphenyl porphyrin) showed excellent activity for the oxidative cleavage of carbon-carbon double bond by using styrene as model compound, in which the TOF (turnover frequency) and selectivity toward benzaldehyde was obtained with 2×10^4h-1 and 86%,respectively.

  3. Purification, molecular cloning, and expression of 2-hydroxyphytanoyl- CoA lyase, a peroxisomal thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the carbon-carbon bond cleavage during à-oxidation of 3- methyl-branched fatty acids

    CERN Document Server

    Foulon, V; Croes, K; Waelkens, E

    1999-01-01

    Purification, molecular cloning, and expression of 2-hydroxyphytanoyl- CoA lyase, a peroxisomal thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the carbon-carbon bond cleavage during à-oxidation of 3- methyl-branched fatty acids

  4. Rhodium(i)-catalysed skeletal reorganisation of benzofused spiro[3.3]heptanes via consecutive carbon-carbon bond cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Takanori; Yuihara, Itaru; Kondo, Kazuki

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal reorganisation of benzofused spiro[3.3]heptanes has been achieved using rhodium(i) catalysts. The reaction of benzofused 2-(2-pyridylmethylene)spiro[3.3]heptanes proceeds via sequential C-C bond oxidative addition and β-carbon elimination. On the other hand, benzofused spiro[3.3]heptan-2-ols undergo two consecutive β-carbon elimination processes. In both cases, substituted naphthalenes are obtained. PMID:27357097

  5. 硅胶担载的高锰酸钾对烯烃碳碳双键的氧化%Carbon-Carbon Double Bond Cleavage by Silica-supported Potassium Permanganate under Conditions Free of Organic Solvent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文军; 戴乾圜

    2002-01-01

    An improved simple method for carbon-carbon double bond cleavage by silica-supported potassium permanganate was described and a possible mechanism was proposed.%在无有机溶剂做介质的条件下,用硅胶吸附的高锰酸钾氧化6种难溶于水的液态烯烃,得到了双键发生断裂的氧化产物.该反应操作简便,反应快,收率好.此外,对硅胶的活化作用机制进行了浅析.

  6. Covalent bond orders for non-bonded atoms: The case for carbon-carbon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cioslowski-Mixon (CM) covalent bond order and the atoms-in-molecules (AIM) delocalization index can be used to study bonding characteristics between atoms not bonded in the conventional chemical sense. In particular, the bond orders between atoms (AIM basins) with one intervening atom evolve in a predictable manner and are related to the bond orders of conventionally bonded species. The CM approach shows that it is the tails of the incompletely localized orbitals that provide for such interactions. Single, multiple, and resonant bond effects are seen which are physically meaningful and useful as an additional characterization of molecular bonding. The important case of carbon-carbon interactions is studied here.

  7. Can laccases catalyze bond cleavage in lignin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Line; Sitarz, Anna Katarzyna; Kalyani, Dayanand;

    2015-01-01

    these enzymes may help degrading lignin, using oxygen as the oxidant. Laccases can catalyze polymerization of lignin, but the question is whether and how laccases can directly catalyze modification of lignin via catalytic bond cleavage. Via a thorough review of the available literature and detailed...

  8. Carbon-carbon composite and copper-composite bond damages for high flux component controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma facing components constitute the first wall in contact with plasma in fusion machines such as Tore Supra and ITER. These components have to sustain high heat flux and consequently elevated temperatures. They are made up of an armour material, the carbon-carbon composite, a heat sink structure material, the copper chromium zirconium, and a material, the OFHC copper, which is used as a compliant layer between the carbon-carbon composite and the copper chromium zirconium. Using different materials leads to the apparition of strong residual stresses during manufacturing, because of the thermal expansion mismatch between the materials, and compromises the lasting operation of fusion machines as damage which appeared during manufacturing may propagate. The objective of this study is to understand the damage mechanisms of the carbon-carbon composite and the composite-copper bond under solicitations that plasma facing components may suffer during their life. The mechanical behaviours of carbon-carbon composite and composite-copper bond were studied in order to define the most suitable models to describe these behaviours. With these models, thermomechanical calculations were performed on plasma facing components with the finite element code Cast3M. The manufacturing of the components induces high stresses which damage the carbon-carbon composite and the composite-copper bond. The damage propagates during the cooling down to room temperature and not under heat flux. Alternative geometries for the plasma facing components were studied to reduce damage. The relation between the damage of the carbon-carbon composite and its thermal conductivity was also demonstrated. (author)

  9. Stable alkanes containing very long carbon-carbon bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokin, Andrey A; Chernish, Lesya V; Gunchenko, Pavel A; Tikhonchuk, Evgeniya Yu; Hausmann, Heike; Serafin, Michael; Dahl, Jeremy E P; Carlson, Robert M K; Schreiner, Peter R

    2012-08-22

    The metal-induced coupling of tertiary diamondoid bromides gave highly sterically congested hydrocarbon (hetero)dimers with exceptionally long central C-C bonds of up to 1.71 Å in 2-(1-diamantyl)[121]tetramantane. Yet, these dimers are thermally very stable even at temperatures above 200 °C, which is not in line with common C-C bond length versus bond strengths correlations. We suggest that the extraordinary stabilization arises from numerous intramolecular van der Waals attractions between the neighboring H-terminated diamond-like surfaces. The C-C bond rotational dynamics of 1-(1-adamantyl)diamantane, 1-(1-diamantyl)diamantane, 2-(1-adamantyl)triamantane, 2-(1-diamantyl)triamantane, and 2-(1-diamantyl)[121]tetramantane were studied through variable-temperature (1)H- and (13)C NMR spectroscopies. The shapes of the inward (endo) CH surfaces determine the dynamic behavior, changing the central C-C bond rotation barriers from 7 to 33 kcal mol(-1). We probe the ability of popular density functional theory (DFT) approaches (including BLYP, B3LYP, B98, B3LYP-Dn, B97D, B3PW91, BHandHLYP, B3P86, PBE1PBE, wB97XD, and M06-2X) with 6-31G(d,p) and cc-pVDZ basis sets to describe such an unusual bonding situation. Only functionals accounting for dispersion are able to reproduce the experimental geometries, while most DFT functionals are able to reproduce the experimental rotational barriers due to error cancellations. Computations on larger diamondoids reveal that the interplay between the shapes and the sizes of the CH surfaces may even allow the preparation of open-shell alkyl radical dimers (and possibly polymers) that are strongly held together exclusively by dispersion forces. PMID:22835264

  10. Olefin metathesis for effective polymer healing via dynamic exchange of strong carbon-carbon bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhibin; Lu, Yixuan

    2015-09-15

    A method of preparing a malleable and/or self-healing polymeric or composite material is provided. The method includes providing a polymeric or composite material comprising at least one alkene-containing polymer, combining the polymer with at least one homogeneous or heterogeneous transition metal olefin metathesis catalyst to form a polymeric or composite material, and performing an olefin metathesis reaction on the polymer so as to form reversible carbon-carbon double bonds in the polymer. Also provided is a method of healing a fractured surface of a polymeric material. The method includes bringing a fractured surface of a first polymeric material into contact with a second polymeric material, and performing an olefin metathesis reaction in the presence of a transition metal olefin metathesis catalyst such that the first polymeric material forms reversible carbon-carbon double bonds with the second polymeric material. Compositions comprising malleable and/or self-healing polymeric or composite material are also provided.

  11. Regioselectivity in the Reductive Bond Cleavage of Diarylalkylsulfonium Salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmeier, Jack; Mansurul Hoque, AKM; D. Saeva, Franklin;

    2009-01-01

    This investigation was stimulated by reports that one-electron reductions of monoaryldialkylsulfonium salts never give aryl bond cleavage whereas reductions of diarylmonoalkylsulfonium salts preferentially give aryl bond cleavage. We studied the product ratios from the reductive cleavage of di-4......- tolylethylsulfonium and di-4-tolyl-2-phenylethylsulfonium salts by a variety of one-electron reducing agents ranging in potential from -0.77 to +2.5 eV (vs SCE) and including thermal reductants, indirect electrolyses mediated by a series of cyanoaromatics, and excited singlet states. We report that the cleavage...... products vary from regiospecific alkyl cleavage to predominant aryl cleavage as a function of the potential of the reducing agent. We conclude that differences between the reductive cleavages of mono- and diarylsulfonium salts are direct consequences of the structures of the sulfuranyl radical...

  12. A New Paradigm for Carbon-Carbon Bond Formation: Aerobic, Copper-Templated Cross-Coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Villalobos, Janette M.; Srogl, Jiri; Liebeskind, Lanny S.

    2007-01-01

    Thiol esters and boronic acids react to produce ketones under aerobic conditions in the presence of catalytic quantities of a CuI or CuII salt. The reaction occurs at reasonable rates between room temperature and 50 °C at neutral pH using thiol esters derived from bulky 2° amides of thiosalicylamides such as those based on N-tert-butyl-2-mercaptobenzamide. In this mechanistically unprecedented reaction system the carbon-carbon bond formation occurs through templating of the thiol ester and th...

  13. Microbial cleavage of organic C-S bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbane, II, John J.

    1994-01-01

    A microbial process for selective cleavage of organic C--S bonds which may be used for reducing the sulfur content of sulfur-containing organic carbonaceous materials, Microorganisms of Rhodococcus rhodochrous and Bacillus sphaericus have been found which have the ability of selective cleavage of organic C--S bonds. Particularly preferred microorganisms are Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain ATCC 53968 and Bacillus sphaericus strain ATCC 53969 and their derivatives.

  14. Carbon dioxide as a carbon source in organic transformation: carbon-carbon bond forming reactions by transition-metal catalysts.

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuji, Yasushi; Fujihara, Tetsuaki

    2012-01-01

    Recent carbon-carbon bond forming reactions of carbon dioxide with alkenes, alkynes, dienes, aryl zinc compounds, aryl boronic esters, aryl halides, and arenes having acidic C-H bonds are reviewed in which transition-metal catalysts play an important role.

  15. Study of the damaging mechanisms of a carbon - carbon composite bonded to copper under thermomechanical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to understand and to identify the damaging mechanisms of Carbon-Carbon composite bonded to copper under thermomechanical loading. The study of the composite allowed the development of non-linear models. These ones have been introduced in the finite elements analysis code named CASTEM 2000. They have been validated according to a correlation between simulation and mechanical tests on multi-material samples. These tests have also permitted us to better understand the behaviour of the bonding between composite and copper (damaging and fracture modes for different temperatures) under shear and tensile loadings. The damaging mechanisms of the bond under thermomechanical loading have been studied and identified according to microscopic observations on mock-ups which have sustained thermal cycling tests: some cracks appear in the composite, near the bond between the composite and the copper. The correlation between numerical and experimental results have been improved because of the reliability of the composite modelization, the use of residual stresses and the results of the bond mechanical characterisation. (author)

  16. Reductive cleavage of the peptide bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holian, J.; Garrison, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    In many biological research efforts, long chain organic molecules are studied by breaking large molecules into smaller components. Cleavage technique of recent interest is the use of solvated electrons. These are formed when aqueous solutions are bombarded with gamma radiation. Solvated electron is very reactive and can reduce most any species present, even to form free radicals.

  17. Practical carbon-carbon bond formation from olefins through nickel-catalyzed reductive olefin hydrocarbonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xi; Xiao, Bin; Zhang, Zhenqi; Gong, Tianjun; Su, Wei; Yi, Jun; Fu, Yao; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    New carbon-carbon bond formation reactions expand our horizon of retrosynthetic analysis for the synthesis of complex organic molecules. Although many methods are now available for the formation of C(sp(2))-C(sp(3)) and C(sp(3))-C(sp(3)) bonds via transition metal-catalyzed cross-coupling of alkyl organometallic reagents, direct use of readily available olefins in a formal fashion of hydrocarbonation to make C(sp(2))-C(sp(3)) and C(sp(3))-C(sp(3)) bonds remains to be developed. Here we report the discovery of a general process for the intermolecular reductive coupling of unactivated olefins with alkyl or aryl electrophiles under the promotion of a simple nickel catalyst system. This new reaction presents a conceptually unique and practical strategy for the construction of C(sp(2))-C(sp(3)) and C(sp(3))-C(sp(3)) bonds without using any organometallic reagent. The reductive olefin hydrocarbonation also exhibits excellent compatibility with varieties of synthetically important functional groups and therefore, provides a straightforward approach for modification of complex organic molecules containing olefin groups. PMID:27033405

  18. Ethenolysis: A Green Catalytic Tool to Cleave Carbon-Carbon Double Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidange, Johan; Fischmeister, Cédric; Bruneau, Christian

    2016-08-22

    Remarkable innovations have been made in the field of olefin metathesis due to the design and preparation of new catalysts. Ethenolysis, which is cross-metathesis with ethylene, represents one catalytic transformation that has been used with the purpose of cleaving internal carbon-carbon double bonds. The objectives were either the ring opening of cyclic olefins to produce dienes or the shortening of unsaturated hydrocarbon chains to degrade polymers or generate valuable shorter terminal olefins in a controlled manner. This Review summarizes several aspects of this reaction: the catalysts, their degradation in the presence of ethylene, some parameters driving their productivity, the side reactions, and the applications of ethenolysis in organic synthesis and in potential industrial applications. PMID:27359344

  19. A dense and strong bonding collagen film for carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Sheng; Li, Hejun, E-mail: lihejun@nwpu.edu.cn; Li, Kezhi; Lu, Jinhua; Zhang, Leilei

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Significantly enhancement of biocompatibility on C/C composites by preparing a collagen film. • The dense and continuous collagen film had a strong bonding strength with C/C composites after dehydrathermal treatment (DHT) crosslink. • Numerous oxygen-containing functional groups formed on the surface of C/C composites without matrix damage. - Abstract: A strong bonding collagen film was successfully prepared on carbon/carbon (C/C) composites. The surface conditions of the modified C/C composites were detected by contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectra. The roughness, optical morphology, bonding strength and biocompatibility of collagen films at different pH values were detected by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), universal test machine and cytology tests in vitro. After a 4-h modification in 30% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solution at 100 °C, the contact angle on the surface of C/C composites was decreased from 92.3° to 65.3°. Large quantities of hydroxyl, carboxyl and carbonyl functional groups were formed on the surface of the modified C/C composites. Then a dense and continuous collagen film was prepared on the modified C/C substrate. Bonding strength between collagen film and C/C substrate was reached to 8 MPa level when the pH value of this collagen film was 2.5 after the preparing process. With 2-day dehydrathermal treatment (DHT) crosslinking at 105 °C, the bonding strength was increased to 12 MPa level. At last, the results of in vitro cytological test showed that this collagen film made a great improvement on the biocompatibility on C/C composites.

  20. SURFACE HYDROPHILIC MODIFICATION FOR CARBON/CARBON COMPOSITES AND ITS EFFECT ON THE BONDING STRENGTH OF HYDROXYAPATITE COATING

    OpenAIRE

    LEILEI ZHANG; HEJUN LI; QIANG SONG; KEZHI LI; JINHUA LU; WEI LI; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V.; SHENG CAO

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the bonding strength of hydroxyapatite coating on carbon/carbon composites, a surface hydrophilic modification was performed on carbon/carbon composites using a combination of H2O2 and FeSO4 ⋅ 7H2O under ultraviolet irradiation. The hydroxyapatite coating was prepared by an ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition method. The results showed that the surface hydrophilic modification introduced a large number of oxygen-containing functional groups (C=O, C–O and COOH gr...

  1. Rhodium-catalyzed C-C bond cleavage reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nečas, D.; Kotora, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 17 (2007), s. 1566-1591. ISSN 1385-2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : rhodium * catalysis * C-C bond cleavage Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.961, year: 2007

  2. Cooperativity between Al Sites Promotes Hydrogen Transfer and Carbon-Carbon Bond Formation upon Dimethyl Ether Activation on Alumina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas-Vives, Aleix; Valla, Maxence; Copéret, Christophe; Sautet, Philippe

    2015-09-23

    The methanol-to-olefin (MTO) process allows the conversion of methanol/dimethyl ether into olefins on acidic zeolites via the so-called hydrocarbon pool mechanism. However, the site and mechanism of formation of the first carbon-carbon bond are still a matter of debate. Here, we show that the Lewis acidic Al sites on the 110 facet of γ-Al2O3 can readily activate dimethyl ether to yield CH4, alkenes, and surface formate species according to spectroscopic studies combined with a computational approach. The carbon-carbon forming step as well as the formation of methane and surface formate involves a transient oxonium ion intermediate, generated by a hydrogen transfer between surface methoxy species and coordinated methanol on adjacent Al sites. These results indicate that extra framework Al centers in acidic zeolites, which are associated with alumina, can play a key role in the formation of the first carbon-carbon bond, the initiation step of the industrial MTO process. PMID:27162986

  3. Formation Mechanism of the First Carbon-Carbon Bond and the First Olefin in the Methanol Conversion into Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue; Müller, Sebastian; Berger, Daniel; Jelic, Jelena; Reuter, Karsten; Tonigold, Markus; Sanchez-Sanchez, Maricruz; Lercher, Johannes A

    2016-05-01

    The elementary reactions leading to the formation of the first carbon-carbon bond during early stages of the zeolite-catalyzed methanol conversion into hydrocarbons were identified by combining kinetics, spectroscopy, and DFT calculations. The first intermediates containing a C-C bond are acetic acid and methyl acetate, which are formed through carbonylation of methanol or dimethyl ether even in presence of water. A series of acid-catalyzed reactions including acetylation, decarboxylation, aldol condensation, and cracking convert those intermediates into a mixture of surface bounded hydrocarbons, the hydrocarbon pool, as well as into the first olefin leaving the catalyst. This carbonylation based mechanism has an energy barrier of 80 kJ mol(-1) for the formation of the first C-C bond, in line with a broad range of experiments, and significantly lower than the barriers associated with earlier proposed mechanisms. PMID:27037603

  4. Cleavage of an amide bond by a ribozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, X.; De Mesmaeker, A.; Joyce, G. F.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A variant form of a group I ribozyme, optimized by in vitro evolution for its ability to catalyze magnesium-dependent phosphoester transfer reactions involving DNA substrates, also catalyzes the cleavage of an unactivated alkyl amide when that linkage is presented in the context of an oligodeoxynucleotide analog. Substrates containing an amide bond that joins either two DNA oligos, or a DNA oligo and a short peptide, are cleaved in a magnesium-dependent fashion to generate the expected products. The first-order rate constant, kcat, is 0.1 x 10(-5) min-1 to 1 x 10(-5) min-1 for the DNA-flanked substrates, which corresponds to a rate acceleration of more than 10(3) as compared with the uncatalyzed reaction.

  5. Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortright, Randy D.; Dumesic, James A.

    2011-01-18

    A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

  6. Correlation between carbon-carbon bond length and the ease of retro Diels-Alder reaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sambasivarao Kotha; Shaibal Banerjee; Mobin Shaikh

    2014-09-01

    The bond length between C8-C9 in (1′R,4′S,4a′R,8a′S)-6′,7′-dimethyl-1′,4′,4a′,8a′-tetrahydrospiro [cyclopropane-1,9′-[1,4]methanonaphthalene]-5′,8′-dione is 1.571 (2) Å and between C7-C12 is 1.567 (2) Å which are longer than the corresponding bond length for saturated bicyclic systems (1.531-1.535Å). This paper reports the correlation between bond length and the ease of retro Diels−Alder reaction.

  7. Velocity Map Imaging Study of Ion-Radical Chemistry: Charge Transfer and Carbon-Carbon Bond Formation in the Reactions of Allyl Radicals with C(.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Linsen; Farrar, James M

    2016-08-11

    We present an experimental and computational study of the dynamics of collisions of ground state carbon cations with allyl radicals, C3H5, at a collision energy of 2.2 eV. Charge transfer to produce the allyl cation, C3H5(+), is exoergic by 3.08 eV and proceeds via energy resonance such that the electron transfer occurs without a significant change in nuclear velocities. The products have sufficient energy to undergo the dissociation process C3H5(+) → C3H4(+) + H. Approximately 80% of the reaction products are ascribed to charge transfer, with ∼40% of those products decaying via loss of a hydrogen atom. We also observe products arising from the formation of new carbon-carbon bonds. The experimental velocity space flux distributions for the four-carbon products are symmetric about the centroid of the reactants, providing direct evidence that the products are mediated by formation of a C4H5(+) complex living at least a few rotational periods. The primary four-carbon reaction products are formed by elimination of molecular hydrogen from the C4H5(+) complex. More than 75% of the nascent C4H3(+) products decay by C-H bond cleavage to yield a C4H2(+) species. Quantum chemical calculations at the MP2/6-311+g(d,p) level of theory support the formation of a nonplanar cyclic C4H5(+) adduct that is produced when the p-orbital containing the unpaired electron on C(+) overlaps with the unpaired spin density on the terminal carbon atoms in allyl. Product formation then occurs by 1,2-elimination of molecular hydrogen from the cyclic intermediate to form a planar cyclic C4H3(+) product. The large rearrangement in geometry as the C4H3(+) products are formed is consistent with high vibrational excitation in that product and supports the observation that the majority of those products decay to form the C4H2(+) species. PMID:27434380

  8. Metal Nanoparticles Catalyzed Selective Carbon-Carbon Bond Activation in the Liquid Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Rong; Yuan, Bing; Zhao, Jie; Ralston, Walter T; Wu, Chung-Yeh; Unel Barin, Ebru; Toste, F Dean; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2016-07-13

    Understanding the C-C bond activation mechanism is essential for developing the selective production of hydrocarbons in the petroleum industry and for selective polymer decomposition. In this work, ring-opening reactions of cyclopropane derivatives under hydrogen catalyzed by metal nanoparticles (NPs) in the liquid phase were studied. 40-atom rhodium (Rh) NPs, encapsulated by dendrimer molecules and supported in mesoporous silica, catalyzed the ring opening of cyclopropylbenzene at room temperature under hydrogen in benzene, and the turnover frequency (TOF) was higher than other metals or the Rh homogeneous catalyst counterparts. Comparison of reactants with various substitution groups showed that electron donation on the three-membered ring boosted the TOF of ring opening. The linear products formed with 100% selectivity for ring opening of all reactants catalyzed by the Rh NP. Surface Rh(0) acted as the active site in the NP. The capping agent played an important role in the ring-opening reaction kinetics. Larger particle size tended to show higher TOF and smaller reaction activation energy for Rh NPs encapsulated in either dendrimer or poly(vinylpyrrolidone). The generation/size of dendrimer and surface group also affected the reaction rate and activation energy. PMID:27322570

  9. Study of the damaging mechanisms of a carbon - carbon composite bonded to copper under thermomechanical loading; Etude des mecanismes d'endommagement d'un assemblage cuivre / composite carbone - carbone sous chargement thermomecanique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moncel, L

    1999-06-15

    The purpose of this work is to understand and to identify the damaging mechanisms of Carbon-Carbon composite bonded to copper under thermomechanical loading. The study of the composite allowed the development of non-linear models. These ones have been introduced in the finite elements analysis code named CASTEM 2000. They have been validated according to a correlation between simulation and mechanical tests on multi-material samples. These tests have also permitted us to better understand the behaviour of the bonding between composite and copper (damaging and fracture modes for different temperatures) under shear and tensile loadings. The damaging mechanisms of the bond under thermomechanical loading have been studied and identified according to microscopic observations on mock-ups which have sustained thermal cycling tests: some cracks appear in the composite, near the bond between the composite and the copper. The correlation between numerical and experimental results have been improved because of the reliability of the composite modelization, the use of residual stresses and the results of the bond mechanical characterisation. (author)

  10. Cleavage enhancement of specific chemical bonds in DNA-Cisplatin complexes induced by X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical bond transformation of cisplatin-DNA complexes can be probed efficiently by XPS which provides a concomitant X-ray irradiation source as well. The presence to Pt could considerably increase formation of the SE induced by X-ray and that the further interaction of these LEE with DNA leads to the enhancement of bond cleavages.

  11. O2 Protonation Controls Threshold Behavior for N-Glycosidic Bond Cleavage of Protonated Cytosine Nucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, R R; Rodgers, M T

    2016-06-01

    IRMPD action spectroscopy studies of protonated 2'-deoxycytidine and cytidine, [dCyd+H](+) and [Cyd+H](+), have established that both N3 and O2 protonated conformers coexist in the gas phase. Threshold collision-induced dissociation (CID) of [dCyd+H](+) and [Cyd+H](+) is investigated here using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry techniques to elucidate the mechanisms and energetics for N-glycosidic bond cleavage. N-Glycosidic bond cleavage is observed as the major dissociation pathways resulting in competitive elimination of either protonated or neutral cytosine for both protonated cytosine nucleosides. Electronic structure calculations are performed to map the potential energy surfaces (PESs) for both N-glycosidic bond cleavage pathways observed. The molecular parameters derived from theoretical calculations are employed for thermochemical analysis of the energy-dependent CID data to determine the minimum energies required to cleave the N-glycosidic bond along each pathway. B3LYP and MP2(full) computed activation energies for N-glycosidic bond cleavage associated with elimination of protonated and neutral cytosine, respectively, are compared to measured values to evaluate the efficacy of these theoretical methods in describing the dissociation mechanisms and PESs for N-glycosidic bond cleavage. The 2'-hydroxyl of [Cyd+H](+) is found to enhance the stability of the N-glycosidic bond vs that of [dCyd+H](+). O2 protonation is found to control the threshold energies for N-glycosidic bond cleavage as loss of neutral cytosine from the O2 protonated conformers is found to require ∼25 kJ/mol less energy than the N3 protonated analogues, and the activation energies and reaction enthalpies computed using B3LYP exhibit excellent agreement with the measured thresholds for the O2 protonated conformers. PMID:27159774

  12. Reductive cleavage of dichalcogenide bonds. Communication 3. Selectivity of electron exchange in diaryldichalcogenide-bispyridinium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of reductive cleavage of the dichalcogenide bond in dimeric Schiff's bases ArEEAr (E = S, Te) induced by indirect electron transfer by the in situ generated bridged bispyridinium radical cations and biradicals was studied by cyclic voltammetry. It is found that the dependence between the apparent rate constants of intermolecular electron transfer and the electron-withdrawing properties of diaryldichalcogenides is violated. The mechanisms of homogeneous (chemical) and heterogeneous (electrochemical) reductive cleavage of diaryldichalcogenides are discussed

  13. Metabolic Engineering to Develop a Pathway for the Selective Cleavage of Carbon-Nitrogen Bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Kilbane II

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the project is to develop a biochemical pathway for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. Specifically a novel biochemical pathway will be developed for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in carbazole. The cleavage of the first C-N bond in carbazole is accomplished by the enzyme carbazole dioxygenase, that catalyzes the conversion of carbazole to 2-aminobiphenyl-2,3-diol. The genes encoding carbazole dioxygenase were cloned from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 and from Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10. The selective cleavage of the second C-N bond has been challenging, and efforts to overcome that challenge have been the focus of recent research in this project. Enrichment culture experiments succeeded in isolating bacterial cultures that can metabolize 2-aminobiphenyl, but no enzyme capable of selectively cleaving the C-N bond in 2-aminobiphenyl has been identified. Aniline is very similar to the structure of 2-aminobiphenyl and aniline dioxygenase catalyzes the conversion of aniline to catechol and ammonia. For the remainder of the project the emphasis of research will be to simultaneously express the genes for carbazole dioxygenase and for aniline dioxygenase in the same bacterial host and then to select for derivative cultures capable of using carbazole as the sole source of nitrogen.

  14. Structural dynamics effects on the ultrafast chemical bond cleavage of a photodissociation reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Corrales, Maria E.; Loriot, Vincent; Balerdi, Garikoitz; González-Vázquez, Jesús; de Nalda, Rebeca; Bañares, Luis; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2014-01-01

    The correlation between chemical structure and dynamics has been explored in a series of molecules with increasing structural complexity in order to investigate its influence on bond cleavage reaction times in a photodissociation event. Femtosecond time-resolved velocity map imaging spectroscopy reveals specificity of the ultrafast carbon–iodine (C–I) bond breakage for a series of linear (unbranched) and branched alkyl iodides, due to the interplay between the pure reaction coordinate and the...

  15. Synthesis of sulfonamides via copper-catalyzed oxidative C-N bond cleavage of tertiary amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jing; Liu, Zhengyi; Liu, Ping; Sun, Peipei

    2016-08-01

    A copper-catalyzed coupling reaction of sulfonyl chlorides with tertiary amines via the oxidative C-N bond cleavage of tertiary amines was developed. Sulfonamides were synthesized using this strategy in moderate to good yields. The reaction was applicable to various tertiary amines, as well as sulfonyl chlorides. PMID:27356858

  16. Rhodium-catalyzed C-C Bond Cleavage Reactions - An Update

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Korotvička, A.; Nečas, D.; Kotora, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 10 (2012), s. 1170-1214. ISSN 1385-2728 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06070 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : rhodium * C-C bond cleavage * catalysis * synthesis Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.039, year: 2012

  17. Facile P-C/C-H Bond Cleavage Reactivity of Nickel Bis(diphosphine) Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shaoguang; Li, Haixia; Appel, Aaron M.; Hall, Michael B.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2016-07-04

    Unusual cleavage of P-C and C-H bonds of the P2N2 ligand in heteroleptic [Ni(P2N2)(diphosphine)]2+ complexes results in the formation of an iminium formyl nickelate featuring a C,P,P-tridentate coordination mode.

  18. Thermodynamic Strategies for C-O Bond Formation and Cleavage via Tandem Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Tracy L; Li, Zhi; Marks, Tobin J

    2016-05-17

    To reduce global reliance on fossil fuels, new renewable sources of energy that can be used with the current infrastructure are required. Biomass represents a major source of renewable carbon based fuel; however, the high oxygen content (∼40%) limits its use as a conventional fuel. To utilize biomass as an energy source, not only with current infrastructure, but for maximum energy return, the oxygen content must be reduced. One method to achieve this is to develop selective catalytic methods to cleave C-O bonds commonly found in biomass (aliphatic and aromatic ethers and esters) for the eventual removal of oxygen in the form of volatile H2O or carboxylic acids. Once selective methods of C-O cleavage are understood and perfected, application to processing real biomass feedstocks such as lignin can be undertaken. This Laboratory previously reported that recyclable "green" lanthanide triflates are excellent catalysts for C-O bond-forming hydroalkoxylation reactions. Based on the virtues of microscopic reversibility, the same lanthanide triflate catalyst should catalyze the reverse C-O cleavage process, retrohydroalkoxylation, to yield an alcohol and an alkene. However, ether C-O bond-forming (retrohydroalkoxylation) to form an alcohol and alkene is endothermic. Guided by quantum chemical analysis, our strategy is to couple endothermic, in tandem, ether C-O bond cleavage with exothermic alkene hydrogenation, thereby leveraging the combined catalytic cycles thermodynamically to form an overall energetically favorable C-O cleavage reaction. This Account reviews recent developments on thermodynamically leveraged tandem catalysis for ether and more recently, ester C-O bond cleavage undertaken at Northwestern University. First, the fundamentals of lanthanide-catalyzed hydroelementation are reviewed, with particular focus on ether C-O bond formation (hydroalkoxylation). Next, the reverse C-O cleavage/retrohydroalkoxylation processes enabled by tandem catalysis are

  19. Biotic and abiotic carbon to sulfur bond cleavage. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    The microbial desulfurization of organosulfur compounds occurs by unprecedented and largely unexplored biochemical processes. A study of such biotic desulfurizations can be expected to give rise to new and useful chemistry and enzymology. The potential value of understanding and harnessing these processes is seen in relation to the need for methods for the removal of organically bound sulfur from coal and the degradation of organic sulfur-containing pollutants. This research effort has been directed towards an examination of desulfurization ability in well characterized microorganisms, the isolation of bacteria with desulfurization ability from natural sources, the characterization and mechanistic evaluation of the observed biocatalytic processes, the development of biomimetic synthetic organic chemistry based on biotic desulfurization mechanisms and the design and preparation of improved coal model compounds for use in microbial selection processes. A systematic approach to studying biodesulfurizations was undertaken in which organosulfur compounds have been broken down into classes based on the oxidation state of the sulfur atom and the structure of the rest of the organic material. Microbes have been evaluated in terms of ability to degrade organosulfur compounds with sulfur in its sulfonic acid oxidation state. These compounds are likely intermediates in coal desulfurization and are present in the environment as persistent pollutants in the form of detergents. It is known that oxygen bonded to sulfur lowers the carbon-sulfur bond energy, providing a thermodynamic basis for starting with this class of compounds.

  20. Reaction Pathways and Energetics of Etheric C–O Bond Cleavage Catalyzed by Lanthanide Triflates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Atesin, Abdurrahman C.; Li, Zhi; Curtiss, Larry A.; Marks, Tobin J.

    2013-09-06

    Efficient and selective cleavage of etheric C-O bonds is crucial for converting biomass into platform chemicals and liquid transportation fuels. In this contribution, computational methods at the DFT B3LYP level of theory are employed to understand the efficacy of lanthanide triflate catalysts (Ln(OTf)3, Ln = La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Yb, and Lu) in cleaving etheric C-O bonds. In agreement with experiment, the calculations indicate that the reaction pathway for C-O cleavage occurs via a C-H → O-H proton transfer in concert with weakening of the C-O bond of the coordinated ether substrate to ultimately yield a coordinated alkenol. The activation energy for this process falls as the lanthanide ionic radius decreases, reflecting enhanced metal ion electrophilicity. Details of the reaction mechanism for Yb(OTf)3-catalyzed ring opening are explored in depth, and for 1-methyl-d3-butyl phenyl ether, the computed primary kinetic isotope effect of 2.4 is in excellent agreement with experiment (2.7), confirming that etheric ring-opening pathway involves proton transfer from the methyl group alpha to the etheric oxygen atom, which is activated by the electrophilic lanthanide ion. Calculations of the catalytic pathway using eight different ether substrates indicate that the more rapid cleavage of acyclic versus cyclic ethers is largely due to entropic effects, with the former C-O bond scission processes increasing the degrees of freedom/particles as the transition state is approached.

  1. Characterization and Modeling of the Collision Induced Dissociation Patterns of Deprotonated Glycosphingolipids: Cleavage of the Glycosidic Bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rožman, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Glycosphingolipid fragmentation behavior was investigated by combining results from analysis of a series of negative ion tandem mass spectra and molecular modeling. Fragmentation patterns extracted from 75 tandem mass spectra of mainly acidic glycosphingolipid species (gangliosides) suggest prominent cleavage of the glycosidic bonds with retention of the glycosidic oxygen atom by the species formed from the reducing end (B and Y ion formation). Dominant product ions arise from dissociation of sialic acids glycosidic bonds whereas product ions resulting from cleavage of other glycosidic bonds are less abundant. Potential energy surfaces and unimolecular reaction rates of several low-energy fragmentation pathways leading to cleavage of glycosidic bonds were estimated in order to explain observed dissociation patterns. Glycosidic bond cleavage in both neutral (unsubstituted glycosyl group) and acidic glycosphingolipids was the outcome of the charge-directed intramolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) mechanism. According to the suggested mechanism, the nucleophile in a form of carboxylate or oxyanion attacks the carbon at position one of the sugar ring, simultaneously breaking the glycosidic bond and yielding an epoxide. For gangliosides, unimolecular reaction rates suggest that dominant product ions related to the cleavage of sialic acid glycosidic bonds are formed via direct dissociation channels. On the other hand, low abundant product ions related to the dissociation of other glycosidic bonds are more likely to be the result of sequential dissociation. Although results from this study mainly contribute to the understanding of glycosphingolipid fragmentation chemistry, some mechanistic findings regarding cleavage of the glycosidic bond may be applicable to other glycoconjugates.

  2. Carbon–carbon bond cleavage for Cu-mediated aromatic trifluoromethylations and pentafluoroethylations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyuka Sugiishi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This short review highlights the copper-mediated fluoroalkylation using perfluoroalkylated carboxylic acid derivatives. Carbon–carbon bond cleavage of perfluoroalkylated carboxylic acid derivatives takes place in fluoroalkylation reactions at high temperature (150–200 °C or under basic conditions to generate fluoroalkyl anion sources for the formation of fluoroalkylcopper species. The fluoroalkylation reactions, which proceed through decarboxylation or tetrahedral intermediates, are useful protocols for the synthesis of fluoroalkylated aromatics.

  3. Carbon–carbon bond cleavage for Cu-mediated aromatic trifluoromethylations and pentafluoroethylations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiishi, Tsuyuka; Aikawa, Kohsuke

    2015-01-01

    Summary This short review highlights the copper-mediated fluoroalkylation using perfluoroalkylated carboxylic acid derivatives. Carbon–carbon bond cleavage of perfluoroalkylated carboxylic acid derivatives takes place in fluoroalkylation reactions at high temperature (150–200 °C) or under basic conditions to generate fluoroalkyl anion sources for the formation of fluoroalkylcopper species. The fluoroalkylation reactions, which proceed through decarboxylation or tetrahedral intermediates, are useful protocols for the synthesis of fluoroalkylated aromatics. PMID:26734112

  4. D-β-aspartyl residue exhibiting uncommon high resistance to spontaneous peptide bond cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aki, Kenzo; Okamura, Emiko

    2016-02-01

    Although L-amino acids were selected as main constituents of peptides and proteins during chemical evolution, D-aspartyl (Asp) residue is found in a variety of living tissues. In particular, D-β-Asp is thought to be stable than any other Asp isomers, and this could be a reason for gradual accumulation in abnormal proteins and peptides to modify their structures and functions. It is predicted that D-β-Asp shows high resistance to biomolecular reactions. For instance, less reactivity of D-β-Asp is expected to bond cleavage, although such information has not been provided yet. In this work, the spontaneous peptide bond cleavage was compared between Asp isomers, by applying real-time solution-state NMR to eye lens αΑ-crystallin 51-60 fragment, S51LFRTVLD58SG60 and αΒ-crystallin 61-67 analog, F61D62TGLSG67 consisting of L-α- and D-β-Asp 58 and 62, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed how tough the uncommon D-β-Asp residue was against the peptide bond cleavage as compared to natural L-α-Asp. Differences in pKa and conformation between L-α- and D-β-Asp side chains were plausible factors to determine reactivity of Asp isomers. The present study, for the first time, provides a rationale to explain less reactivity of D-β-Asp to allow abnormal accumulation.

  5. Competition between Covalent and Noncovalent Bond Cleavages in Dissociation of Phosphopeptide-Amine Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskin, Julia; Yang, Zhibo; Woods, Amina S.

    2011-04-21

    Interactions between quaternary amino or guanidino groups with anions are ubiquitous in nature. Here, we present a first study focused on quantifying such interactions using complexes of phosphorylated A3pXA3-NH2 (X=S, T, Y) peptides with decamethonium (DCM) or diaguanidinodecane (DGD) ligands as model systems. Time- and collision energy-resolved surface-induced dissociation (SID) of the singly charged complexes was examined using a specially configured Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICR-MS). Dissociation thresholds and activation energies were obtained from RRKM modeling of the experimental data that has been described and carefully characterized in our previous studies. We demonstrate that covalent bond cleavages resulting in phosphate abstraction by the cationic ligand are characterized by low dissociation thresholds and relatively tight transition states. In contrast, high dissociation barriers and large positive activation entropies were obtained for cleavages of non-covalent bonds. Dissociation parameters obtained from the modeling of the experimental data are in excellent agreement with the results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Comparison between the experimental data and theoretical calculations indicate that phosphate abstraction by the ligand is rather localized and mainly affected by the identity of the phosphorylated side chain. The hydrogen bonding in the peptide and ligand properties play a minor role in determining the energetics and dynamics of the phosphate abstraction channel

  6. N-H bond cleavage of ammonia on graphene-like B36 borophene: DFT studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Zahra; Soleymanabadi, Hamed

    2016-04-01

    Ammonia N-H bond cleavage at metal-free substrates has attracted great attention because of its industrial importance. Here, we investigate the dissociative adsorption of ammonia onto the surface of a B36 borophene sheet by means of density functional theory calculations. We show that the N-H bond may be broken at the edges of B36 even at room temperature, regarding the small energy barrier of 14.1-19.3 kcal mol(-1) at different levels of theory, and more negative Gibbs free energy change. Unlike basis set size, the kind of exchange correlation functional significantly affects the electronic properties of the studied systems. Also, by increasing the percentage of Hartree Fock (HF) exchange of density functionals, the activation and adsorption energies are lowered. A linear relationship between the highest occupied molecular orbital or lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of B36 borophene and the %HF exchange of functionals is predicted. Our work reveals that pure whole boron nanosheets may be promising metal-free materials in N-H bond cleavage, which would raise the potential application of these sheets. PMID:26969676

  7. Bond cleavages of adenosine 5'-triphosphate induced by monochromatic soft X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate which type of bond is likely to be cleaved by soft X-ray exposure to an adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), we observed spectral changes in X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) around nitrogen and oxygen K-edge of an ATP film by soft X-ray irradiation. Experiments were performed at a synchrotron soft X-ray beamline at SPring-8, Japan. The XANES spectra around the nitrogen and oxygen .K-edge slightly varied by exposure to 560 eV soft X-rays. These changes are originated from the cleavage of C-N bonds between a sugar and a nucleobase site and of C-O, P-O or O-H bond of sugar and phosphate site. From the comparison between the change in XANES intensity of σ* peak at nitrogen and that at oxygen K-edges, it is inferred that the C-O, P-O or O-H bond of sugar and phosphate is much efficiently cleaved than the C-N of N-glycoside bond by the exposure of 560 eV soft X-ray to ATP film.

  8. METABOLIC ENGINEERING TO DEVELOP A PATHWAY FOR THE SELECTIVE CLEAVAGE OF CARBON-NITROGEN BONDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Kilbane II

    2004-10-01

    The objective of the project is to develop biochemical pathways for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. The initial phase of the project was focused on the isolation or development of an enzyme capable of cleaving the C-N bond in aromatic amides, specifically 2-aminobiphenyl. The objective of the second phase of the research will be to construct a biochemical pathway for the selective removal of nitrogen from carbazole by combining the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 with the gene(s) encoding an appropriate deaminase. The objective of the final phase of the project will be to develop derivative C-N bond cleaving enzymes that have broader substrate ranges and to demonstrate the use of such strains to selectively remove nitrogen from petroleum. During the first year of the project (October, 2002-September, 2003) enrichment culture experiments resulted in the isolation of microbial cultures that utilize aromatic amides as sole nitrogen sources, several amidase genes were cloned and were included in directed evolution experiments to obtain derivatives that can cleave C-N bonds in aromatic amides, and the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11, and Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10 were cloned in vectors capable of replicating in Escherichia coli. During the second year of the project (October, 2003-September, 2004) enrichment culture experiments succeeded in isolating a mixed bacterial culture that can utilize 2-aminobiphenyl as a sole nitrogen source, directed evolution experiments were focused on the aniline dioxygenase enzyme that is capable of deaminating aniline, and expression vectors were constructed to enable the expression of genes encoding C-N bond cleaving enzymes in Rhodococcus hosts. The construction of a new metabolic pathway to selectively remove nitrogen from carbazole and other molecules typically found in petroleum should lead to the development of a process to improve oil refinery efficiency by reducing the

  9. Molecular features in complex environment: Cooperative team players during excited state bond cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thallmair, Sebastian; Roos, Matthias K; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2016-07-01

    Photoinduced bond cleavage is often employed for the generation of highly reactive carbocations in solution and to study their reactivity. Diphenylmethyl derivatives are prominent precursors in polar and moderately polar solvents like acetonitrile or dichloromethane. Depending on the leaving group, the photoinduced bond cleavage occurs on a femtosecond to picosecond time scale and typically leads to two distinguishable products, the desired diphenylmethyl cations (Ph2CH(+)) and as competing by-product the diphenylmethyl radicals ([Formula: see text]). Conical intersections are the chief suspects for such ultrafast branching processes. We show for two typical examples, the neutral diphenylmethylchloride (Ph2CH-Cl) and the charged diphenylmethyltriphenylphosphonium ions ([Formula: see text]) that the role of the conical intersections depends not only on the molecular features but also on the interplay with the environment. It turns out to differ significantly for both precursors. Our analysis is based on quantum chemical and quantum dynamical calculations. For comparison, we use ultrafast transient absorption measurements. In case of Ph2CH-Cl, we can directly connect the observed signals to two early three-state and two-state conical intersections, both close to the Franck-Condon region. In case of the [Formula: see text], dynamic solvent effects are needed to activate a two-state conical intersection at larger distances along the reaction coordinate. PMID:26958588

  10. Cleavage of thymine N3-H bonds by low-energy electrons attached to base π* orbitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we extend our earlier studies on single strand break (SSB) formation in DNA to consider the possibility of cleaving a thymine N3-H bond to generate a nitrogen-centered anion and a hydrogen radical which might proceed to induce further bond cleavages. In earlier studies, we considered SSBs induced by low-energy electrons that attach to DNA bases' π* orbitals or to phosphate P=O π* orbitals to cleave sugar-phosphate C-O bonds or base-sugar N1-C bonds. We also studied the effects of base π-stacking on the rates of such bond cleavages. To date, our results suggest that sugar-phosphate C-O bonds have the lowest barriers to cleavage, that attachment of electrons with energies below 2 eV most likely occurs at the base π* orbitals, that electrons with energy above 2 eV can also attach to phosphate P=O π* orbitals, and that base π stacking has a modest but slowing effect on the rates of SSB formation. However, we had not yet examined the possibility that base N3-H bonds could rupture subsequent to base π* orbital capture. In the present work, the latter possibility is considered and it is found that the barrier to cleavage of the N3-H bond in thymine is considerably higher than for cleaving sugar-phosphate C-O bonds, so our prediction that SSB formation is dominated by C-O bond cleavage remains intact

  11. METABOLIC ENGINEERING TO DEVELOP A PATHWAY FOR THE SELECTIVE CLEAVAGE OF CARBON-NITROGEN BONDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Kilbane III

    2003-12-01

    The objective of the project is to develop biochemical pathways for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. The initial phase of the project will focus on the isolation or development of an enzyme capable of cleaving the C-N bond in aromatic amides, specifically 2-aminobiphenyl. The objective of the second phase of the research will be to construct a biochemical pathway for the selective removal of nitrogen from carbazole by combining the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 with the gene(s) encoding an appropriate amidase. The objective of the final phase of the project will be to develop derivative CN bond cleaving enzymes that have broader substrate ranges and to demonstrate the use of such strains to selectively remove nitrogen from petroleum. The project is on schedule and no major difficulties have been encountered. During the first year of the project (October, 2002-September, 2003) enrichment culture experiments have resulted in the isolation of promising cultures that may be capable of cleaving C-N bonds in aromatic amides, several amidase genes have been cloned and are currently undergoing directed evolution to obtain derivatives that can cleave C-N bonds in aromatic amides, and the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11, and Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10 were cloned in vectors capable of replicating in Escherichia coli. Future research will address expression of these genes in Rhodococcus erythropolis. Enrichment culture experiments and directed evolution experiments continue to be a main focus of research activity and further work is required to obtain an appropriate amidase that will selectively cleave C-N bonds in aromatic substrates. Once an appropriate amidase gene is obtained it must be combined with genes encoding an enzyme capable of converting carbazole to 2'aminobiphenyl-2,3-diol: specifically carA genes. The carA genes from two sources have been cloned and are ready for construction of C-N bond cleavage

  12. Concurrent Formation of Carbon-Carbon Bonds and Functionalized Graphene by Oxidative Carbon-Hydrogen Coupling Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioku, Kumika; Morimoto, Naoki; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Nishina, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative C-H coupling reactions were conducted using graphene oxide (GO) as an oxidant. GO showed high selectivity compared with commonly used oxidants such as (diacetoxyiodo) benzene and 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone. A mechanistic study revealed that radical species contributed to the reaction. After the oxidative coupling reaction, GO was reduced to form a material that shows electron conductivity and high specific capacitance. Therefore, this system could concurrently achieve two important reactions: C-C bond formation via C-H transformation and production of functionalized graphene. PMID:27181191

  13. The first chiral diene-based metal-organic frameworks for highly enantioselective carbon-carbon bond formation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawano, Takahiro; Ji, Pengfei; McIsaac, Alexandra R.; Lin, Zekai; Abney, Carter W.; Lin, Wenbin [UC

    2016-02-01

    We have designed the first chiral diene-based metal–organic framework (MOF), E₂-MOF, and postsynthetically metalated E₂-MOF with Rh(I) complexes to afford highly active and enantioselective single-site solid catalysts for C–C bond formation reactions. Treatment of E₂-MOF with [RhCl(C₂H₄)₂]₂ led to a highly enantioselective catalyst for 1,4-additions of arylboronic acids to α,β-unsaturated ketones, whereas treatment of E₂-MOF with Rh(acac)(C₂H₄)₂ afforded a highly efficient catalyst for the asymmetric 1,2-additions of arylboronic acids to aldimines. Interestingly, E₂-MOF·Rh(acac) showed higher activity and enantioselectivity than the homogeneous control catalyst, likely due to the formation of a true single-site catalyst in the MOF. E₂-MOF·Rh(acac) was also successfully recycled and reused at least seven times without loss of yield and enantioselectivity.

  14. The solvent effect on the electrocatalytic cleavage of carbon-halogen bonds on Ag and Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years it has been shown in detail how the electrocatalytic cleavage of carbon-halogen bonds is modulated by (a) the stepwise or concerted nature of the dissociative electron-transfer mechanism, which is influenced by the nature of the electrode surface, the type of halogen atom and the molecular structure of RX as a whole, and (b) the double-layer structure (as a function of the nature and bulkiness of the supporting electrolyte ions). In order to both complete and support the interpretative scheme thus developed, this work is focused on the solvent role. When one compares aprotic with protic organic solvents after appropriate intersolvental normalization, interesting peculiarities emerge, especially concerning protic media. Solvent proticity deeply affects both the reaction mechanism (on both non-catalytic and catalytic electrodes) and the extent of the catalytic effects. These items are discussed on the basis of a complete investigation carried out with a carefully controlled experimental protocol on two chloride and bromide couples, one aromatic and one aliphatic, representative of stepwise and concerted mechanisms, respectively, in four aprotic and four protic solvents, on both non−catalytic GC and catalytic Ag and Au electrodes. The results are discussed in the framework of a recently developed interpretative scheme of the carbon-halogen cleavage mechanism

  15. ATP-Dependent C–F Bond Cleavage Allows the Complete Degradation of 4-Fluoroaromatics without Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedt, Oliver; Mergelsberg, Mario; Boll, Kerstin; Müller, Michael; Adrian, Lorenz; Jehmlich, Nico; von Bergen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Complete biodegradation of the abundant and persistent fluoroaromatics requires enzymatic cleavage of an arylic C–F bond, probably the most stable single bond of a biodegradable organic molecule. While in aerobic microorganisms defluorination of fluoroaromatics is initiated by oxygenases, arylic C–F bond cleavage has never been observed in the absence of oxygen. Here, an oxygen-independent enzymatic aryl fluoride bond cleavage is described during the complete degradation of 4-fluorobenzoate or 4-fluorotoluene to CO2 and HF in the denitrifying Thauera aromatica: the ATP-dependent defluorination of 4-fluorobenzoyl-coenzyme A (4-F-BzCoA) to benzoyl-coenzyme A (BzCoA) and HF, catalyzed by class I BzCoA reductase (BCR). Adaptation to growth with the fluoroaromatics was accomplished by the downregulation of a promiscuous benzoate-CoA ligase and the concomitant upregulation of 4-F-BzCoA-defluorinating/dearomatizing BCR on the transcriptional level. We propose an unprecedented mechanism for reductive arylic C–F bond cleavage via a Birch reduction-like mechanism resulting in a formal nucleophilic aromatic substitution. In the proposed anionic 4-fluorodienoyl-CoA transition state, fluoride elimination to BzCoA is favored over protonation to a fluorinated cyclic dienoyl-CoA. PMID:27507824

  16. Efficient Synthesis of Functionalized Benzimidazoles and Perimidines: Ytterbium Chloride Catalyzed CmC Bond Cleavage%Efficient Synthesis of Functionalized Benzimidazoles and Perimidines: Ytterbium Chloride Catalyzed CmC Bond Cleavage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai, Lijian; Ji, Xiaofeng; Yao, Zhigang; Xu, Fan; Shen, Qi

    2011-01-01

    An efficient method is developed for the synthesis of functionalized benzimidazoles and perimidines by the condensation of aryl diamines with β-carbonyl compounds catalyzed by ytterbium chloride. The reactions give good yields under mild conditions. A mechanism involving a lanthanide activated C--C bond cleavage is proposed.

  17. Controllable synthesis of silver and silver sulfide nanocrystals via selective cleavage of chemical bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A one-step colloidal process has been adopted to prepare silver (Ag) and silver sulfide (Ag2S) nanocrystals, thus avoiding presynthesis of an organometallic precursor and the injection of a toxic phosphine agent. During the reaction, a layered intermediate compound is first formed, which then acts as a precursor, decomposing into the nanocrystals. The composition of the as-obtained products can be controlled by selective cleavage of S–C bonds or Ag–S bonds. Pure Ag2S nanocrystals can be obtained by directly heating silver acetate (Ag(OAc)) and n-dodecanethiol (DDT) at 200 ° C without any surfactant, and pure Ag nanocrystals can be synthesized successfully if the reaction temperature is reduced to 190 ° C and the amount of DDT is decreased to 1 ml in the presence of a non-coordinating organic solvent (1-octadecene, ODE). Otherwise, the mixture of Ag and Ag2S is obtained by directly heating Ag(OAc) in DDT by increasing the reaction temperature or in a mixture of DDT and ODE at 200 ° C. The formation mechanism has been discussed in detail in terms of selective S–C and Ag–S bond dissociation due to the nucleophilic attack of DDT and the lower bonding energy of Ag–S. Interestingly, some products can easily self-assemble into two- or three-dimensional (2D or 3D) highly ordered superlattice structures on a copper grid without any additional steps. The excess DDT plays a key role in the superlattice structure due to the bundling and interdigitation of the thiolate molecules adsorbed on the as-obtained nanocrystals. (paper)

  18. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Quarterly report No. 1, October 1-December 31, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, D.H.; Mayo, F.R.

    1979-01-25

    Bituminous coal is assumed to consist mostly of an aggregate of condensed aromatic and aliphatic rings, connected and made insoluble (but swellable) by crosslinks containing only single bonds. These connecting links consist mainly, possibly entirely, of combinations of carbon-carbon single bonds and ether (possibly ester) groups. It is at these crosslinks that the most extensive cuts can be made in the coal structure (to make it soluble or liquid) under the mildest conditions and with the least loss in fuel values. The objective of this project is to determine the proportion of the various kinds of connecting links and how they can best be broken; in other words, to determine the structure of coal with emphasis on the crosslinks. At present, our attention is directed to five kinds of connecting links: single (Ar-CH/sub 2/-Ar) and multiple methylene groups (Ar-(CH/sub 2/)/sub 2/-Ar) and three kinds of ethers, Ar-O-Ar, Ar-O-R, and R-O-R (Ar represents an aromatic aggregate and R is attached to O through at least one aliphatic carbon.) The work described in this quarterly report deals mainly with the oxidation of pyridine-extracted coal by O/sub 2/ and the cleavage by sodium in liquid ammonia of aromatic ether linkages in a pyridine-soluble, toluene-insoluble fraction of coal extract. Products from the NaOCl oxidation of pyridine-extracted coal were also studied by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and acid-base titrations. 7 references, 2 figures, 6 tables.

  19. Transition metal-catalyzed oxidative double bond cleavage of simple and bio-derived alkenes and unsaturated fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spannring, Peter; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.; Weckhuysen, Bert. M.; Klein Gebbink, Bert

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative cleavage of the C=C double bond in unsaturated fatty acids into aldehydes or carboxylic acids is a reaction of current interest in biomass valorization. The products of this reaction, which is currently being performed on an industrial scale by means of ozonolysis, can be applied for t

  20. Dihydrogen bond interactions as a result of H2 cleavage at Cu, Ag and Au centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Sławomir J; Ruipérez, Fernando

    2016-05-14

    A quantum chemical study of H2 activation at fluorides of coinage metals, MF (M = Cu, Ag and Au), and its splitting was performed. The following reaction path was analyzed: FMH2→ FHHM → HMFH, where both the molecular complexes and the corresponding transition states have been characterized at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ//MP2/aug-cc-pVQZ level of theory. Further single-point CASSCF/CASPT2 calculations, including spin-orbit coupling effects, were also performed to analyze the role of non-dynamic correlation. The scalar relativistic effects are included via aug-cc-pVQZ-PP basis sets used for the metals. The dihydrogen-bonded copper (FHHCu) and silver (FHHAg) complexes are observed as a result of H2 cleavage, while the corresponding FHHAu gold complex is not found but the HAuHF arrangement is observed, instead. The energetic and geometrical parameters of the complexes have been analyzed and both the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules approach and the Natural Bond Orbitals method were additionally applied to analyze the intermolecular interactions. PMID:27101741

  1. Crystal Structures of Two Bacterial 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA Lyases Suggest a Common Catalytic Mechanism among a Family of TIM Barrel Metalloenzymes Cleaving Carbon-Carbon Bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forouhar,F.; Hussain, M.; Farid, R.; Benach, J.; Abashidze, M.; Edstrom, W.; Vorobiev, S.; Montelione, G.; Hunt, J.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) lyase catalyzes the terminal steps in ketone body generation and leucine degradation. Mutations in this enzyme cause a human autosomal recessive disorder called primary metabolic aciduria, which typically kills victims because of an inability to tolerate hypoglycemia. Here we present crystal structures of the HMG-CoA lyases from Bacillus subtilis and Brucella melitensis at 2.7 and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. These enzymes share greater than 45% sequence identity with the human orthologue. Although the enzyme has the anticipated triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold, the catalytic center contains a divalent cation-binding site formed by a cluster of invariant residues that cap the core of the barrel, contrary to the predictions of homology models. Surprisingly, the residues forming this cation-binding site and most of their interaction partners are shared with three other TIM barrel enzymes that catalyze diverse carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions believed to proceed through enolate intermediates (4-hydroxy-2-ketovalerate aldolase, 2-isopropylmalate synthase, and transcarboxylase 5S). We propose the name 'DRE-TIM metallolyases' for this newly identified enzyme family likely to employ a common catalytic reaction mechanism involving an invariant Asp-Arg-Glu (DRE) triplet. The Asp ligates the divalent cation, while the Arg probably stabilizes charge accumulation in the enolate intermediate, and the Glu maintains the precise structural alignment of the Asp and Arg. We propose a detailed model for the catalytic reaction mechanism of HMG-CoA lyase based on the examination of previously reported product complexes of other DRE-TIM metallolyases and induced fit substrate docking studies conducted using the crystal structure of human HMG-CoA lyase (reported in the accompanying paper by Fu, et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 7526-7532). Our model is consistent with extensive mutagenesis

  2. Bond cleavage reactions in the tripeptide tri-alanine upon free electron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study we performed dissociative electron attachment (DEA) measurements with the tripeptide tri-alanine, C9H17N3O4, utilizing a crossed electron-molecular beam experiment with high electron energy resolution (about 100 meV). Anion efficiency yields as a function of the incident electron energy are obtained for the most abundant anions up to electron energies of ∼ eV. Quantum chemical calculations are performed to determine the thermochemical thresholds for the anions observed in the measurements. There is no evidence of a molecular anion with lifetime of mass spectrometric timescales. The dehydrogenated closed shell anion (M-H)- is one of the fragment anions observed for which the calculations show that H-loss is energetically possible from carboxyl, as well as amide groups. In contrast to the dipeptide di-alanine and monomer alanine the cleavage of the N-Cα bond in the peptide chain is already possible by attachment of electrons at ∼ 0 eV. (authors)

  3. Unexpected carbon-oxygen bond cleavage of THF promoted by guanidinate titanium complex/lithium diisopropylamide: Synthesis and crystal structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong; WANG Mei; YAO Yingming; SHEN Qi

    2005-01-01

    An unexpected carbon-oxygen bond cleavage of THF (THF = tetrahydrofuran) promoted by guanidinate titanium complex was described. Guanidinate lithium [Pr2iNC(NCy)2]Li (Cy = cyclohexyl) formed in situ reacted with TiCl4(THF)2 in a 2:1 molar ratio to produce the guanidinate titanium chloride [Pr2iNC(NCy)2]2TiCl2 (1) in good yield. The reaction of [Pr2iNC(NCy)2]2TiCl2 with lithium diisopropylamide in THF afforded an unexpected [Pr2iNC(NCy)2]2Ti(OBun)2 (2), which was formed by the cleavage of carbon-oxygen bond of THF. Complexes 1 and 2 were fully characterized by elemental analysis, NMR and IR spectroscopies, and X-ray crystal structure determination for complex 2.

  4. Metal-catalyzed activation of ethers via C-O bond cleavage: a new strategy for molecular diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornella, Josep; Zarate, Cayetana; Martin, Ruben

    2014-12-01

    In 1979, the seminal work of Wenkert set the standards for the utilization of aryl and vinyl ethers as coupling partners via C-O bond-cleavage. Although the topic remained dormant for almost three decades, the last few years have witnessed a renaissance in this area of expertise, experiencing an exponential growth and becoming a significant discipline within the cross-coupling arena. The means to utilize readily accessible aryl or vinyl ethers as counterparts does not only represent a practical, powerful and straightforward alternative to organic halides, but also constitutes an excellent opportunity to improve our chemical knowledge about a relatively unexplored area of expertise. This review summarizes the most significant developments in the area of C-O bond-cleavage when employing aryl or vinyl ethers, providing a detailed overview of the current state of the art and including future aspects, when applicable. PMID:25157613

  5. In vitro characterization of a phosphate starvation-independent carbon-phosphorus bond cleavage activity in Pseudomonas fluorescens 23F.

    OpenAIRE

    McMullan, G.; Quinn, J P

    1994-01-01

    A novel, metal-dependent, carbon-phosphorus bond cleavage activity, provisionally named phosphonoacetate hydrolase, was detected in crude extracts of Pseudomonas fluorescens 23F, an environmental isolate able to utilize phosphonoacetate as the sole carbon and phosphorus source. The activity showed unique specificity toward this substrate; its organic product, acetate, was apparently metabolized by the glyoxylate cycle enzymes of the host cell. Unlike phosphonatase, which was also detected in ...

  6. Mechanisms and energetics for N-glycosidic bond cleavage of protonated adenine nucleosides: N3 protonation induces base rotation and enhances N-glycosidic bond stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, R R; Rodgers, M T

    2016-06-21

    Our previous gas-phase infrared multiple photon dissociation action spectroscopy study of protonated 2'-deoxyadenosine and adenosine, [dAdo+H](+) and [Ado+H](+), found that both N3 and N1 protonated conformers are populated with the N3 protonated ground-state conformers predominant in the experiments. Therefore, N-glycosidic bond dissociation mechanisms of N3 and N1 protonated [dAdo+H](+) and [Ado+H](+) and the associated quantitative thermochemical values are investigated here using both experimental and theoretical approaches. Threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) of [dAdo+H](+) and [Ado+H](+) with Xe is studied using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry techniques. For both systems, N-glycosidic bond cleavage reactions are observed as the major dissociation pathways resulting in production of protonated adenine or elimination of neutral adenine. Electronic structure calculations are performed at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory to probe the potential energy surfaces (PESs) for N-glycosidic bond cleavage of [dAdo+H](+) and [Ado+H](+). Relative energetics of the reactants, transition states, intermediates and products along the PESs for N-glycosidic bond cleavage are determined at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p), B3LYP-GD3BJ/6-311+G(2d,2p), and MP2(full)/6-311+G(2d,2p) levels of theory. The predicted N-glycosidic bond dissociation mechanisms for the N3 and N1 protonated species differ. Base rotation of the adenine residue enables formation of a strong N3H(+)O5' hydrogen-bonding interaction that stabilizes the N3 protonated species and its glycosidic bond. Comparison between experiment and theory indicates that the N3 protonated species determine the threshold energies, as excellent agreement between the measured and B3LYP computed activation energies (AEs) and reaction enthalpies (ΔHrxns) for N-glycosidic bond cleavage of the N3 protonated species is found. PMID:27240654

  7. Reductive cleavage of the O-O bond in multicopper oxidases: a QM/MM and QM study

    OpenAIRE

    Srnec, Martin; Ryde, Ulf; Rulisek, Lubomir

    2011-01-01

    The key step in the reaction mechanism of multicopper oxidases (MCOs)-the cleavage of the O-O bond in O-2-has been investigated using combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods. This process represents a reaction pathway from the peroxy intermediate after it accepts one electron from the nearby type-1 Cu site to the experimentally-observed native intermediate, which is the only fully oxidised catalytically relevant state in MCOs. Scans of the QM(DFT)/MM potential ene...

  8. Selective Oxidative Decarbonylative Cleavage of Unstrained C(sp(3))-C(sp(2)) Bond: Synthesis of Substituted Benzoxazinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ajay; Kumar, Sangit

    2016-09-01

    A transition metal (TM)-free practical synthesis of biologically relevant benzoxazinones has been established via a selective oxidative decarbonylative cleavage of an unstrained C(sp(3))-C(sp(2)) bond employing iodine, sodium bicarbonate, and (t)butyl hydroperoxide in DMSO at 95 °C. Control experiments and Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations suggest that the reaction involves a [1,5]H shift and extrusion of CO gas as the key steps. The extrusion of CO has also been established using PMA-PdCl2. PMID:27549986

  9. Anaerobic DNA cleavage in red light by dicopper(II) complexes on disulphide bond activation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debojyoti Lahiri; Ritankar Majumdar; Ashis K Patra; Akhil R Chakravarty

    2010-05-01

    Binuclear complexes [Cu(-RSSR)]2 (1) and [M2(-PDS)(H2O)]2 (M = Cu(II), 2; Fe(II), 3), where H2RSSR is a reduced Schiff base derived from 2-(thioethyl)salicylaldimine having a disulphide moiety and H2PDS is derived from dimerization of D-penicillamine, have been prepared, structurally characterized, and their photo-induced DNA cleavage activity studied. The crystal structure of 1 shows the complex as a discrete binuclear species with each metal in a CuN2O2 square-planar geometry (Cu…Cu, 6.420 Å). The tetradentate RSSR2- acts as a bridging ligand. The sulphur atoms in the disulphide unit do not interact with the metal ions. Complexes 1-3 do not show any DNA cleavage activity in darkness. The copper(II) complexes exhibit chemical nuclease activity in the presence of 3-mercaptopropionic acid. Cleavage of supercoiled DNA has been observed in UV-A light of 365 nm for 1 and red light of 647.1 nm for both 1 and 2 in air. Mechanistic data reveal the involvement of the disulphide unit as photosensitizer generating hydroxyl radicals ($^{\\bullet}$OH) as the reactive species. Photo-induced DNA cleavage in red light seems to involve sulphide radicals in a type-I process and hydroxyl radicals. The dicopper(II) complexes show significant anaerobic photo-induced DNA cleavage activity in red light under argon following type-I pathway without involving any reactive oxygen species.

  10. Demonstration of carbon-carbon bond cleavage of acetyl coenzyme A by using isotopic exchange catalyzed by the CO dehydrogenase complex from acetate-grown Methanosarcina thermophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purified nickel-containing CO dehydrogenase complex isolated from methanogenic Methanosarcina thermophila grown on acetate is able to catalyze the exchange of [1-14C] acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) (carbonyl group) with 12CO as well as the exchange of [3'-32P]CoA with acetyl-CoA. Kinetic parameters for the carbonyl exchange have been determined: Km (acetyl-CoA) = 200 microM, Vmax = 15 min-1. CoA is a potent inhibitor of this exchange (Ki = 25 microM) and is formed under the assay conditions because of a slow but detectable acetyl-CoA hydrolase activity of the enzyme. Kinetic parameters for both exchanges are compared with those previously determined for the acetyl-CoA synthase/CO dehydrogenase from the acetogenic Clostridium thermoaceticum. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the postulated role of CO dehydrogenase as the key enzyme for acetyl-CoA degradation in acetotrophic bacteria

  11. Probing Electron-Induced Bond Cleavage at the Single-Molecule Level Using DNA Origami Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Adrian Clemens; Bald, Ilko; Rotaru, Alexandru;

    2012-01-01

    nucleobases. Here we present a strategy that allows for the first time to visualize the electron-induced dissociation of single chemical bonds within complex, but well-defined self-assembled DNA nanostructures. We employ atomic force microscopy to image and quantify LEE-induced bond dissociations within...... chromatin, now becomes feasible....

  12. Investigations on organolead compounds V. Lead---lead bond cleavage reactions of hexaphenyldilead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsens, L.C.; Kerk, G.J.M. van der

    1968-01-01

    It has been shown that a number of nucleophilic and weakly electrophilic reagents (organolithium and organomagnesium compounds, metallic lithium, potassium permanganate, sodium ethoxide, diaryl disulphides, sulphur, ozone, hypochlorous acid and iodine/iodide) selectively cleave the lead---lead bond

  13. Mechanisms of Selective Cleavage of C-O Bonds in Di-aryl Ethers in Aqueous Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jiayue; Zhao, Chen; Mei, Donghai; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2014-01-02

    A novel route for cleaving the C-O aryl ether bonds of p-substituted H-, CH3-, and OH- diphenyl ethers has been explored over Ni/SiO2 catalysts at very mild conditions. The C-O bond of diphenyl ether is cleaved by parallel hydrogenolysis and hydrolysis (hydrogenolysis combined with HO* addition) on Ni. The rates as a function of H2 pressure from 0 to 10 MPa indicate that the rate-determining step is the C-O bond cleavage on Ni. H* atoms compete with the organic reactant for adsorption leading to a maximum in the rate with increasing H2 pressure. In contrast to diphenyl ether, hydrogenolysis is the exclusive route for cleaving an ether C-O bond of di-p-tolyl ether to form p-cresol and toluene. 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl ether undergoes sequential surface hydrogenolysis, first to phenol and HOC6H4O* (adsorbed), which is then cleaved to phenol (C6H5O* with added H*) and H2O (O* with two added H*) in a second step. Density function theory supports the operation of this pathway. Notably, addition of H* to HOC6H4O* is less favorable than a further hydrogenolytic C-O bond cleavage. The TOFs of three aryl ethers with Ni/SiO2 in water followed the order 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl ether (69 h-1) > diphenyl ether (26 h-1) > di-p-tolyl ether (1.3 h-1), in line with the increasing apparent activation energies, ranging from 93 kJ∙mol-1 (4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl ether) < diphenyl ether (98 kJ∙mol-1) to di-p-tolyl ether (105 kJ∙mol-1). D.M. thanks the support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the

  14. Enzymatic Cleavage of Glycosidic Bonds: Strategies on How to Set Up and Control a QM/MM Metadynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raich, L; Nin-Hill, A; Ardèvol, A; Rovira, C

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates play crucial roles in many biological processes, from cell-cell adhesion to chemical signaling. Their complexity and diversity, related to α/β anomeric configuration, ring substituents, and conformational variations, require a diverse set of enzymes for their processing. Among them, glycoside hydrolases (GHs) are responsible for the hydrolysis of one of the strongest bonds in nature: the glycosidic bond. These highly specialized biological catalysts select particular conformations their carbohydrate substrates to enhance catalysis. The evolution of this conformation during the reaction of glycosidic bond cleavage, known as the conformational catalytic itinerary, is of fundamental interest in glycobiology, with impact on inhibitor and drug design. Here we review some of the aspects and the main strategies one needs to take into account when simulating a reaction in a GH enzyme using QM/MM metadynamics. Several specific aspects are highlighted, from the importance of the distortion of the substrate at the Michaelis complex to the variable control during the metadynamics simulation or the analysis of the reaction mechanism and conformational itinerary. The increasing speed of computer power and methodological advances have added a vital tool to the study of GH mechanisms, as shown here and recent reviews. It is hoped that this chapter will serve as a first guide for those attempting to perform a metadynamics simulation of these relevant and fascinating enzymes. PMID:27498638

  15. Oxidative C-C bond cleavage of ketone enolates by nitrosation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mašek, Tomáš; Champalet, Valentine; Jahn, Ullrich

    Lisboa : -, 2015 - (Rauter, A.; Martins, A.; Matos, A.; Dias, C.; Xavier, N.; Nunes, R.; Lucas, S.; Cachatra, V.; Paiva, A.; Batista, D.). s. 249 ISBN 978-989-8124-11-1. [ESOC 2015. European Symposium on Organic Chemistry /19./. 12.07.2015-16.07.2015, Lisboa] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ketone enolates * nitrosation * C-C bond Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  16. Carbon Carbon Composites: An Overview .

    OpenAIRE

    G. Rohini Devi; K. Rama Rao

    1993-01-01

    Carbon carbon composites are a new class of engineering materials that are ceramic in nature but exhibit brittle to pseudoplastic behaviour. Carbon-carbon is a unique all-carbon composite with carbon fibre embeded in carbon matrix and is known as an inverse composite. Due to their excellent thermo-structural properties, carbon-carbon composites are used in specialised application like re-entry nose-tips, leading edges, rocket nozzles, and aircraft brake discs apart from several indust...

  17. Characterization of carbon-sulfur bond cleavage by axenic and mixed cultures of Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayser, K.J.; Bielaga, B.A.; Jackowski, K.; Oduson, O.; Kilbane, J. II

    1992-12-31

    Growth assays reveal that Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 can utilize a wide range of organosulfur compounds as the sole source of sulfur. Compounds that are utilized include thiophenes, sulfides, disulfides, mercaptans, sulfoxides, and sulfones. None of the organosulfur compounds tested can serve as a carbon source. A convenient spectrophotometric assay (Gibbs assay) based on the chromogenic reaction of 2,6-dichloroquinone-4-chloroimide with aromatic hydroxyl groups was developed and used in conjunction with GC/MS analysis to examine the kinetics of carbon-sulfur bond cleavage by axenic and mixed cell cultures of Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8. The desulfurization trait is expressed at uniform levels during the mid-exponential phase, reaches a maximum during idiophase, and then declines in stationary-phase cells. Desulfurization rates for dibenzothiophene (DBT) range from 8 to 15 {mu}M of DBT/10{sup 12} cells/hour. Mixtures of genetically marked Rhodococcus rhodochrous IGTS8 and an organisms incapable of cleaning carbon-sulfur bonds in relevant test compounds, Enterobacter cloacae, were prepared in ratios that varied over six orders of magnitude. Growth studies revealed that Enterobacter cloacae was able to gain access to sulfur liberated from organosulfur compounds by IGTS8; however, cell-to-cell contact was required. These data also indicate that the desulfurization activity of IGTS8 cells in mixed cultures may be as much as 200-fold higher than in axenic cultures.

  18. Bond cleavage reactions of the bridge structure in coal in the presence of hydrogen donating compounds; Suiso kyoyosei kagobutsu sonzaika deno sekitanchu no kakyo kozo no kairetsu hanno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bando, N.; Kidena, K.; Murata, S.; Nomura, M. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-28

    In this paper, bond cleavage reactions are discussed in relation to the softening and solubilization of coal. Were used 9,10-dihydroanthracene (DHA) and 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (DHP) as models of hydrogen donating compounds in coal, and bibenzyl, 1,2-diethane, benzylphenylether, and 1,5-dibenzylnaphthalene were used as models of bridge structure compounds. They were compared mutually, as to reactivity of coal against DHA and DHP. For the homolytic cleavage of bridges, DHA with excellent radical supplement performance provided excellent hydrogen donating performance. While, for the ipso-position cleavage of bridges, it was found that DHP can act as an effective hydrogen donor. For the reaction between coal and hydrogenated aromatic compounds, cleavage of relatively weak bonds, such as ether linkage and dimethylene linkage, occurred at about 380{degree}C, and hydrogen from DHA or DHP was consumed. On the other hand, the results suggested that the cleavage reaction at ipso-position affected by hydrogen donating solvent is also important at temperature range around 420{degree}C. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Unified view of oxidative C-H bond cleavage and sulfoxidation by a nonheme iron(IV)-oxo complex via Lewis acid-promoted electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jiyun; Morimoto, Yuma; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2014-04-01

    Oxidative C-H bond cleavage of toluene derivatives and sulfoxidation of thioanisole derivatives by a nonheme iron(IV)-oxo complex, [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) (N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine), were remarkably enhanced by the presence of triflic acid (HOTf) and Sc(OTf)3 in acetonitrile at 298 K. All the logarithms of the observed second-order rate constants of both the oxidative C-H bond cleavage and sulfoxidation reactions exhibit remarkably unified correlations with the driving forces of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and metal ion-coupled electron transfer (MCET) in light of the Marcus theory of electron transfer when the differences in the formation constants of precursor complexes between PCET and MCET were taken into account, respectively. Thus, the mechanisms of both the oxidative C-H bond cleavage of toluene derivatives and sulfoxidation of thioanisole derivatives by [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) in the presence of HOTf and Sc(OTf)3 have been unified as the rate-determining electron transfer, which is coupled with binding of [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) by proton (PCET) and Sc(OTf)3 (MCET). There was no deuterium kinetic isotope effect (KIE) on the oxidative C-H bond cleavage of toluene via the PCET pathway, whereas a large KIE value was observed with Sc(OTf)3, which exhibited no acceleration of the oxidative C-H bond cleavage of toluene. When HOTf was replaced by DOTf, an inverse KIE (0.4) was observed for PCET from both toluene and [Ru(II)(bpy)3](2+) (bpy =2,2'-bipyridine) to [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+). The PCET and MCET reactivities of [(N4Py)Fe(IV)(O)](2+) with Brønsted acids and various metal triflates have also been unified as a single correlation with a quantitative measure of the Lewis acidity. PMID:24605985

  20. Low energy electron induced cytosine base release in 2′-deoxycytidine-3′-monophosphate via glycosidic bond cleavage: A time-dependent wavepacket study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low energy electron (LEE) induced cytosine base release in a selected pyrimidine nucleotide, viz., 2′-deoxycytidine-3′-monophosphate is investigated using ab initio electronic structure methods and time dependent quantum mechanical calculations. It has been noted that the cytosine base scission is comparatively difficult process than the 3′ C–O bond cleavage from the lowest π* shape resonance in energy region * orbital of the base to the σ* orbital of the glycosidic N–C bond. In addition, the metastable state formed after impinging LEE (0–1 eV) has very short lifetime (10 fs) which may decay in either of the two competing auto-detachment or dissociation process simultaneously. On the other hand, the selected N–C mode may cleave to form the cytosine base anion at higher energy regions (>2 eV) via tunneling of the glycosidic bond. Resonance states generated within this energy regime will exist for a duration of ∼35–55 fs. Comparison of salient features of the two dissociation events, i.e., 3′ C–O single strand break and glycosidic N–C bond cleavage in 3′-dCMPH molecule are also provided

  1. Effect of copper-sulphur bond on the DNA photo-cleavage activity of 2-(methylthio)ethylpyridine-2-carbaldimine copper(II) complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tarkeshwar Gupta; Ashis K Patra; Shanta Dhar; Munirathinam Nethaji; Akhil R Chakravarty

    2005-03-01

    The binding and photo-induced DNA cleavage activity of a binary complex [CuL2](ClO4)2 (1) and the in situ generated ternary complexes [CuLB](ClO4)2 from 1 (B: 1,10-phenanthroline, phen, 2; dipyrido[3,2-: 2',3'-]quinoxaline, dpq, 3) are studied, where L is a N2S-donor tridentate Schiff base 2-(methylthio)ethylpyridine-2-carbaldimine. Complex 1, structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction study, has six-coordinate meridional geometry showing CuN4S2 coordination. The Cu-N bond lengths are in the range of 1.968(3) to 2.158(4) Å. The Cu-S bond lengths of 2.599(2) and 2.705(2) Å are significantly long indicating weak covalent interaction between copper and sulphur atoms. The thiomethyl groups are cis to each other giving S-Cu-S angle of 75.82(5)°. The Cu-N(pyridyl) bond distances are longer than the Cu-N(imine) bonds. The complexes are redox active and display a quasi-reversible cyclic voltammetric response assignable to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) couple near 0.0 V vs SCE in DMF-Tris buffer (1 : 4 /) using 0.1 M KCl as supporting electrolyte. Electronic spectra of the complexes show a - band in the range 630 to 700 nm in DMF along with higher energy charge transfer bands. While complex 1 is a poor binder to DNA, the ternary complexes show good DNA binding propensity. The photo-nuclease activity of 1-3 is studied using UV and visible wavelengths. The DNA cleavage activity at 365 nm follows the order: 3 > 2 > 1. The cleavage reaction involves the formation of singlet oxygen as the reactive species in a type-II process.

  2. Insights into the mechanism of X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage in lysozyme crystals based on EPR, optical absorption and X-ray diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage, to confirm a multi-track radiation-damage process and to develop a model of that process. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and online UV–visible absorption microspectrophotometry with X-ray crystallography have been used in a complementary manner to follow X-ray-induced disulfide-bond cleavage. Online UV–visible spectroscopy showed that upon X-irradiation, disulfide radicalization appeared to saturate at an absorbed dose of approximately 0.5–0.8 MGy, in contrast to the saturating dose of ∼0.2 MGy observed using EPR at much lower dose rates. The observations suggest that a multi-track model involving product formation owing to the interaction of two separate tracks is a valid model for radiation damage in protein crystals. The saturation levels are remarkably consistent given the widely different experimental parameters and the range of total absorbed doses studied. The results indicate that even at the lowest doses used for structural investigations disulfide bonds are already radicalized. Multi-track considerations offer the first step in a comprehensive model of radiation damage that could potentially lead to a combined computational and experimental approach to identifying when damage is likely to be present, to quantitate it and to provide the ability to recover the native unperturbed structure

  3. Splitting a Substrate into Three Parts: Gold-Catalyzed Nitrogenation of Alkynes by C-C and C≡C Bond Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chong; Su, Yijin; Shen, Tao; Shi, Xiaodong; Jiao, Ning

    2016-01-01

    A gold-catalyzed nitrogenation of alkynes for the synthesis of carbamides and amino tetrazoles through C-C and C≡C bond cleavages is described. A diverse set of functionalized carbamide and amino tetrazole derivatives were selectively constructed under mild conditions. The chemoselectivity can be easily switched by the selection of the acid additives. The reaction is characterized by its broad substrate scope, direct construction of high value products, easy operation under air, and mild conditions at room temperature. This chemistry provides a way to transform alkynes by splitting the substrate into three parts. PMID:26494539

  4. Homolytic cleavage of the O-Cu(ii) bond: XAFS and EPR spectroscopy evidence for one electron reduction of Cu(ii) to Cu(i).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hong; Zhang, Guanghui; Xin, Jie; Deng, Yi; Miller, Jeffrey T; Kropf, Arthur J; Bunel, Emilio E; Qi, Xiaotian; Lan, Yu; Lee, Jyh-Fu; Lei, Aiwen

    2016-05-25

    The investigation into the active copper(i) catalysts from copper(ii) precursors has become a fundamental and important task in copper catalysis. In this work, we demonstrate that the (t)BuO(-) anion serves not only as a base but also as a mediator to promote the reduction of Cu(ii) to Cu(i) in copper catalysis. XAFS and EPR spectroscopy evidence the [Cu(O(t)Bu)3](-) ate complex as the key intermediate which undergoes homolytic-cleavage of the O-Cu(ii) bond generating [Cu(O(t)Bu)2](-) ate complex. PMID:27145712

  5. Formation of a Six-Coordinate fac-[Re(Co)3]+ Complex by the N-C bond cleavage of a potentially tetradentate ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rhenium(I) compound fac-[Re(CO)3(daa)]. Hpab.H2O (Hpab N,N'-(l,2-phenylene)bis(2'-aminobenzamide); Hdaa 2-amino-N-(2-aminophenyl)benzamide) was synthesized from the reaction of [Re(CO)5,Br] with two equivalent of Hpab in toluene. The monoanionic tridentate ligand daa was formed by the rhenium-mediated cleavage of an amido N-C bond of the potentially tetradentate ligand Hpab. The compound was characterized by IR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography, and daa is coordinated as a diamino amide via three nitrogen-donor atoms

  6. Catalytic diastereoselective tandem conjugate addition-elimination reaction of Morita-Baylis-Hillman C adducts by C-C bond cleavage

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Wenguo

    2012-02-08

    Through the cleavage of the C-C bond, the first catalytic tandem conjugate addition-elimination reaction of Morita-Baylis-Hillman C adducts has been presented. Various S N2′-like C-, S-, and P-allylic compounds could be obtained with exclusive E configuration in good to excellent yields. The Michael product could also be easily prepared by tuning the β-C-substituent group of the α-methylene ester under the same reaction conditions. Calculated relative energies of various transition states by DFT methods strongly support the observed chemoselectivity and diastereoselectivity. © 2012 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH&Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Tomato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases 1A and 1B: Relaxed double bond specificity leads to a plenitude of dialdehydes, mono-apocarotenoids and isoprenoid volatiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ilg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The biosynthetic processes leading to many of the isoprenoid volatiles released by tomato fruits are still unknown, though previous reports suggested a clear correlation with the carotenoids contained within the fruit. In this study, we investigated the activity of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (SlCCD1B, which is highly expressed in fruits, and of its homolog SlCCD1A. Using in vitro assays performed with purified recombinant enzymes and by analyzing products formed by the two enzymes in carotene-accumulating Escherichia coli strains, we demonstrate that SlCCD1A and, to a larger extent, SlCCD1B, have a very relaxed specificity for both substrate and cleavage site, mediating the oxidative cleavage of cis- and all-trans-carotenoids as well as of different apocarotenoids at many more double bonds than previously reported. This activity gives rise to a plenitude of volatiles, mono-apocarotenoids and dialdehyde products, including cis-pseudoionone, neral, geranial, and farnesylacetone. Our results provide a direct evidence for a carotenoid origin of these compounds and point to CCD1s as the enzymes catalyzing the formation of the vast majority of tomato isoprenoid volatiles, many of which are aroma constituents.

  8. Tomato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases 1A and 1B: Relaxed double bond specificity leads to a plenitude of dialdehydes, mono-apocarotenoids and isoprenoid volatiles

    KAUST Repository

    Ilg, Andrea

    2014-06-25

    The biosynthetic processes leading to many of the isoprenoid volatiles released by tomato fruits are still unknown, though previous reports suggested a clear correlation with the carotenoids contained within the fruit. In this study, we investigated the activity of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (SlCCD1B), which is highly expressed in fruits, and of its homolog SlCCD1A. Using in vitro assays performed with purified recombinant enzymes and by analyzing products formed by the two enzymes in carotene-accumulating Escherichia coli strains, we demonstrate that SlCCD1A and, to a larger extent, SlCCD1B, have a very relaxed specificity for both substrate and cleavage site, mediating the oxidative cleavage of cis- and all-. trans-carotenoids as well as of different apocarotenoids at many more double bonds than previously reported. This activity gives rise to a plenitude of volatiles, mono-apocarotenoids and dialdehyde products, including cis-pseudoionone, neral, geranial, and farnesylacetone. Our results provide a direct evidence for a carotenoid origin of these compounds and point to CCD1s as the enzymes catalyzing the formation of the vast majority of tomato isoprenoid volatiles, many of which are aroma constituents. © 2014 The Authors.

  9. Aggregation of bovine serum albumin upon cleavage of its disulfide bonds, studied by the time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering technique with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid mixing system of the stopped-flow type, used with small-angle X-ray scattering equipment using synchrotron radiation, is described. The process of aggregation of bovine serum albumin was traced with a time interval of 50 s, initiated upon cleavage of its disulfide bonds by reduction with dithiothreitol. The results indicate that a 218-fold molar excess of dithiothreitol over the number of moles of disulfide bonds in bovine serum albumin is sufficient to initiate the reaction immediately after mixing, which reaches equilibrium in about 15 min. On the other hand, half this amount is not sufficient to initiate the reaction, so that the reaction is delayed by about 150 s. Such a single-shot time-resolved experiment showed that experiments with a time interval of 100 ms are possible with repeated multi-shot runs. (Auth.)

  10. Mechanism of ribonucleotide reductase from Herpes simplex virus type 1. Evidence for 3' carbon-hydrogen bond cleavage and inactivation by nucleotide analogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope effects of 2.5, 2.1, and 1.0 were measured on the conversion of [3'-3H]ADP, [3'-H]UDP, and [5-3H] UDP to the corresponding 2'-deoxynucleotides by herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase. These results indicate that the reduction of either purine or pyrimidine nucleotides requires cleavage of the 3' carbon-hydrogen bond of the substrate. The substrate analogs 2'-chloro-2'-deoxyuridine 5'-diphosphate (ClUDP), 2'-deoxy-2'-fluorouridine 5'-diphosphate, and 2'-azido-2'-deoxyuridine 5'-diphosphate were time-dependent inactivators of the herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase. Incubation of [3'-3H]ClUDP with the enzyme was accompanied by time-dependent release of 3H to the solvent. Reaction of [beta-32P]ClUDP with the reductase resulted in the production of inorganic pyrophosphate. These results are consistent with the enzyme-mediated cleavage of the 3' carbon-hydrogen bond of ClUDP and the subsequent conversion of the nucleotide to 2-methylene-3(2H)furanone, as previously reported with the Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase

  11. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschon, A.S.; Zevely, J.; Mayo, F.R.

    1981-11-12

    The objective of this project is to determine the structure of bituminous coal by determining the proportions of the various kinds of connecting bonds and how they can best be broken. Results obtained during the past quarter are presented for the following tasks: (1) extractions and fractionations of coal products which covers pyridine extraction, fractionation of TIPS fractions, EDA extraction of Illinois No. 6 coal and swelling ratios of coal samples; (2) experiments on breakable single bonds which cover reactions of ethylenediamine and model ethers, reaction of pyridine-extracted coal with Me/sub 3/SiI, Baeyer-Villiger oxidations, reaction to diphenylmethane with 15% HNO/sub 3/, cleavage of TIPS with ZnI/sub 2/, and cleavage of black acids; and (3) oxygen oxidation No. 18. Some of the highlights of these studies are: (1) some model ethers are not cleaved by EDA under extraction conditions; (2) oxidation of diaryl ketones with m-chloroperbenzoic acid and saponification of the resulting esters in promising for identifying ketones, (3) treatment of a black acid with pyridine hydroiodide reduced the acid's molecular weight and increased its solubility in pyridine, but treatment with ZnI/sub 2/ was ineffective; (4) in comparison with 0.1 M K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/, 0.01 M persulfate is relatively ineffective in accelerating oxidation of BnNH/sub 2/-extracted coal in water suspension. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Effect of thermal denaturation, inhibition, and cleavage of disulfide bonds on the low-frequency Raman and FTIR spectra of chymotrypsin and albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Nikolay N.; Chikishev, Andrey Yu; Mankova, Anna A.; Sakodynskaya, Inna K.

    2015-05-01

    The analysis of the structure-function relationship is extremely important in the study of proteins. The importance of function-related motions of large parts or subglobules of protein molecules stimulates the spectroscopic study in the low-frequency (terahertz) domain. However, only tentative assignments are available and the spectroscopic data are insufficiently discussed in terms of structural changes. This work is aimed at the analysis of regularities of changes in the low-frequency (100 to 600 cm-1) FTIR and Raman spectra of proteins related to their structural modifications. We study the spectra of two proteins with substantially different structures (albumin and chymotrypsin) and the spectra of samples in which the structures of protein molecules are modified using inhibition, thermal denaturation, and cleavage of disulfide bonds. The results indicate that the low-frequency spectral interval can be used to characterize protein conformations. Correlated variations in the intensities of several low-frequency bands are revealed in the spectra of the modified proteins. The strongest spectral changes are caused by thermal denaturation of proteins, and the effect of cleavage of disulfide bonds is generally weaker. It is demonstrated that the inhibitor binding in the active site causes spectral changes that can be compared to the changes induced by thermal denaturation.

  13. Sequence-Specific Ultrasonic Cleavage of DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Grokhovsky, Sergei L.; Il'icheva, Irina A.; Nechipurenko, Dmitry Yu.; Golovkin, Michail V.; Panchenko, Larisa A.; Polozov, Robert V.; Nechipurenko, Yury D.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the phenomenon of ultrasonic cleavage of DNA by analyzing a large set of cleavage patterns of DNA restriction fragments using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The cleavage intensity of individual phosphodiester bonds was found to depend on the nucleotide sequence and the position of the bond with respect to the ends of the fragment. The relative intensities of cleavage of the central phosphodiester bond in 16 dinucleotides and 256 tetranucleotides were determined by multiva...

  14. Catalysis and co-catalysis of bond cleavages in coal and coal analogs. Final report, August 1, 1990--January 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, B.

    1994-05-01

    In work prior to the inception of this project, the authors observed that mixtures of phenolic materials and polyalkoxyaromatic molecules were appreciably more effective in catalyzing the decompositions of di-2-naphthyl ether and of di-1-naphthyl sulfide in tetralin solutions at 450{degrees}C than were the phenols by themselves, even though the polyalkoxyaromatic molecules, in the absence of phenolic co- catalysts, show essentially no catalytic activity. This was of appreciable interest in coal research because dinapthyl ether and dinapthyl sulfide have been employed as model compounds for coals in studies aimed at cleaving ether and sulfide bonds similar to those in coals. The authors proposed (R. K. Sharma, K. P. Raman, and B. Miller) that the mixed catalysts used in these studies catalyze cleavages of ether and sulfide bonds by means of a mechanism involving electron transfer from the polyalkoxyaromatics to the substrates, which are activated as electron acceptors by hydrogen bonding to phenols. Since phenols themselves are electron donors, they also proposed that the well known effects of phenols in catalyzing the conversion of coals are due to similar electron transfer mechanisms.

  15. Protolytic Cleavage of Hg–C Bonds Induced by 1-Methyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazole-2-selone: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Mercury Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Multinuclear (1H, 77Se, and 199Hg) NMR spectroscopy demonstrates that 1-methyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazole-2-selone, H(sebenzimMe), a structural analogue of the selenoamino acid, selenoneine, binds rapidly and reversibly to the mercury centers of HgX2 (X = Cl, Br, I), while X-ray diffraction studies provide evidence for the existence of adducts of composition [H(sebenzimMe)]xHgX2 (X = Cl, x = 2, 3, 4; X = I, x = 2) in the solid state. H(sebenzimMe) also reacts with methylmercury halides, but the reaction is accompanied by elimination of methane resulting from protolytic cleavage of the Hg–C bond, an observation that is of relevance to the report that selenoneine demethylates CysHgMe, thereby providing a mechanism for mercury detoxification. Interestingly, the structures of [H(sebenzimMe)]xHgX2 exhibit a variety of different hydrogen bonding patterns resulting from the ability of the N–H groups to form hydrogen bonds with chlorine, iodine, and selenium. PMID:25822075

  16. Mechanistic aspects of dinitrogen cleavage and hydrogenation to produce ammonia in catalysis and organometallic chemistry: relevance of metal hydride bonds and dihydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hong-Peng; Quadrelli, Elsje Alessandra

    2014-01-21

    Dinitrogen cleavage and hydrogenation by transition-metal centers to produce ammonia is central in industry and in Nature. After an introductory section on the thermodynamic and kinetic challenges linked to N2 splitting, this tutorial review discusses three major classes of transition-metal systems (homogeneous, heterogeneous and biological) capable of achieving dissociation and hydrogenation of dinitrogen. Molecular complexes, solid-state Haber-Bosch catalytic systems, silica-supported tantalum hydrides and nitrogenase will be discussed. Emphasis is focused on the reaction mechanisms operating in the process of dissociation and hydrogenation of dinitrogen, and in particular on the key role played by metal hydride bonds and by dihydrogen in such reactions. PMID:24108246

  17. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Quarterly report No. 12, June 1-September 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirschon, A.S.; Zevely, J.; Mayo, F.R.

    1981-11-12

    We assume that bituminous coal consists mostly of an aggregate of condensed aromatic and aliphatic rings, connected and made insoluble (but swellable) by crosslinks containing single bonds. The objective of this project is to determine the proportions of the various kinds of connecting links and how they can best be broken - in other words, to determine the structure of bituminous coal, with emphasis on the crosslinks and breakable single bonds. The program began with an investigation of the structure of the TIPS fraction of Illinois No. 6 coal, that is, the two-thirds of the 16% extracted by pyridine that is toluene-insoluble, pyridine-soluble, mostly through changes in molecular weight during cleavage reactions in pyridine solution. The most promising of these cleavage reactions are now being applied to the 84% of coal that is insoluble in pyridine and presents the main problem in coal liquefaction, following the progress of the reactions by formation of soluble material and swelling of the insoluble portion. We found that benzylamine (BnNH/sub 2/) would extract an additional 14% (of the original weight of coal) of material from pyridine-extracted coal, and later that an ethylenediamine/dimethyl sulfoxide (EDA/DMSO) mixture would dissolve another 21% of the original coal. The BnNH/sub 2/ extract is soluble in pyridine. Our best present guess is that the BnNH/sub 2/ extract cleaves most of the ester groups in coal and that EDA/DMSO cleaves the remaining ester and most of the ether groups.

  18. Synthesis of Biaryls through Nickel-Catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura Coupling of Amides by Carbon-Nitrogen Bond Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shicheng; Meng, Guangrong; Szostak, Michal

    2016-06-01

    The first Ni-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of amides for the synthesis of widely occurring biaryl compounds through N-C amide bond activation is reported. The reaction tolerates a wide range of electron-withdrawing, electron-neutral, and electron-donating substituents on both coupling partners. The reaction constitutes the first example of the Ni-catalyzed generation of aryl electrophiles from bench-stable amides with potential applications for a broad range of organometallic reactions. PMID:27101428

  19. EFFECT OF SOLVENT ON THE BETA-O-4 BOND CLEAVAGE OF A LIGNIN MODEL COMPOUND BY TERT-BUTOXIDE UNDER MILD CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Matsumoto

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The beta-O-4 bond cleavage of a non-phenolic β-O-4 type dimeric lignin model compound, 2-(2-methoxyphenoxy-1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl-ethanol (III, was examined in systems using potassium tert-butoxide as a base (0.5 mol/l and tert-butanol (tBuOH, dimethylsulfoxide, 1,4-dioxane, or tetrahydrofuran as a solvent. The β-O-4 bond of compound III was cleaved in any system at 30°C, and 2-methoxyphenol (II was liberated. The amount of compound II liberated was close to the quantitative yield on the basis of the amount of compound III that disappeared, except for the treatment in the t-BuOH system. The reaction rate was dependent on what solvent was used. Half-life periods for these systems were roughly about 6.0, 3.0, 0.7, and 0.2h, respectively. It seemed that the rates were very high when the polarity of the solvents was low. Two reaction products generated from the aromatic ring with two methoxyl groups of compound III, 4-acetyl-1,2-dimethoxybenzene and 3,4-dimethoxybenzoic acid, were detected in all the systems. A peculiar reaction product, 1,2-dimethoxybenzene, was detected in a fairly large quantity, only when the latter two solvents with low polarities were applied.

  20. Solvent dependent branching between C-I and C-Br bond cleavage following 266 nm excitation of CH2BrI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well known that ultraviolet photoexcitation of halomethanes results in halogen-carbon bond cleavage. Each halogen-carbon bond has a dominant ultraviolet (UV) absorption that promotes an electron from a nonbonding halogen orbital (nX) to a carbon-halogen antibonding orbital (σ*C-X). UV absorption into specific transitions in the gas phase results primarily in selective cleavage of the corresponding carbon-halogen bond. In the present work, broadband ultrafast UV-visible transient absorption studies of CH2BrI reveal a more complex photochemistry in solution. Transient absorption spectra are reported spanning the range from 275 nm to 750 nm and 300 fs to 3 ns following excitation of CH2BrI at 266 nm in acetonitrile, 2-butanol, and cyclohexane. Channels involving formation of CH2Br + I radical pairs, iso-CH2Br-I, and iso-CH2I-Br are identified. The solvent environment has a significant influence on the branching ratios, and on the formation and stability of iso-CH2Br-I. Both iso-CH2Br-I and iso-CH2I-Br are observed in cyclohexane with a ratio of ∼2.8:1. In acetonitrile this ratio is 7:1 or larger. The observation of formation of iso-CH2I-Br photoproduct as well as iso-CH2Br-I following 266 nm excitation is a novel result that suggests complexity in the dissociation mechanism. We also report a solvent and concentration dependent lifetime of iso-CH2Br-I. At low concentrations the lifetime is >4 ns in acetonitrile, 1.9 ns in 2-butanol and ∼1.4 ns in cyclohexane. These lifetimes decrease with higher initial concentrations of CH2BrI. The concentration dependence highlights the role that intermolecular interactions can play in the quenching of unstable isomers of dihalomethanes

  1. Heterolytic Cleavage of Hydrogen by an Iron Hydrogenase Model: An Fe-H - - - H-N Dihydorgen Bond Characterized by Neutron Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of hydrogen as a fuel by [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzymes in nature requires heterolytic cleavage of the H-H bond into a proton (H+) and hydride (H-), a reaction that is also a critical step in homogeneous catalysts for hydrogenation of C=O and C=N bonds. An understanding of the catalytic oxidation of H2 by hydrogenases provides insights into the design of synthetic catalysts that are sought as cost-effective alternatives to the use of the precious metal platinum in fuel cells. Crystallographic studies on the [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzyme were critical to understanding of its reactivity, but the key H-H cleavage step is not readily observed experimentally in natural hydrogenases. Synthetic biomimics have provided evidence for H2 cleavage leading to hydride transfer to the metal and proton transfer to an amine. Limitations on the precise location of hydrogen atoms by x-ray diffraction can be overcome by use of neutron diffraction, though its use is severely limited by the difficulty of obtaining suitable crystals and by the scarcity of neutron sources. Here we show that an iron complex with a pendant amine in the diphosphine ligand cleaves hydrogen heterolytically under mild conditions, leading to [CpC5F4NFeH(PtBu2NtBu2H)]+BArF4-, [PtBu2NtBu2 = 1,5-di(tert-butyl)-3,7-di(tert-butyl)-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane; ArF = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]. The Fe-H- - - H-N moiety has a strong dihydrogen bond, with a remarkably short H··· H distance of 1.489(10) Angstrom between the protic N-Hδ+ and hydridic Fe-Hδ-. The structural data for [CpC5F4NFeH(PtBu2NtBu2H)]+ provide a glimpse of how the H-H bond is oxidized or generated in hydrogenase enzymes, with the pendant amine playing a key role as a proton relay. The iron complex [CpC5F4NFeH(PtBu2NtBu2H)]+BArF4- is an electrocatalyst for oxidation of H2 (1 atm) at 22 °C, so the structural data are obtained on a complex that is a functional model for catalysis by [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzymes. This research was supported

  2. Cleavage of peptide bonds bearing ionizable amino acids at P1 by serine proteases with hydrophobic S1 pocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Large pK shifts in ionizable groups when buried in the protein interior. → Substrate dependent shifts in pH optimum for serine proteases. → Lys side chain is a stronger acid in serine protease S1 pocket than Asp side chain. -- Abstract: Enzymatic hydrolysis of the synthetic substrate succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Xxx-pNA (where Xxx = Leu, Asp or Lys) catalyzed by bovine chymotrypsin (CHYM) or Streptomyces griseus protease B (SGPB) has been studied at different pH values in the pH range 3-11. The pH optima for substrates having Leu, Asp, and Lys have been found to be 7.5-8.0, 5.5-6.0, and ∼10, respectively. At the normally reported pH optimum (pH 7-8) of CHYM and SGPB, the substrate with Leu at the reactive site is more than 25,000-fold more reactive than that with Asp. However, when fully protonated, Asp is nearly as good a substrate as Leu. The pK values of the side chains of Asp and Lys in the hydrophobic S1 pocket of CHYM and SGPB have been calculated from pH-dependent hydrolysis data and have been found to be about 9 for Asp and 7.4 and 9.7 for Lys for CHYM and SGPB, respectively. The results presented in this communication suggest a possible application of CHYM like enzymes in cleaving peptide bonds contributed by acidic amino acids between pH 5 and 6.

  3. The Molybdenum Active Site of Formate Dehydrogenase Is Capable of Catalyzing C-H Bond Cleavage and Oxygen Atom Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Tobias; Schrapers, Peer; Utesch, Tillmann; Nimtz, Manfred; Rippers, Yvonne; Dau, Holger; Mroginski, Maria Andrea; Haumann, Michael; Leimkühler, Silke

    2016-04-26

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are capable of performing the reversible oxidation of formate and are enzymes of great interest for fuel cell applications and for the production of reduced carbon compounds as energy sources from CO2. Metal-containing FDHs in general contain a highly conserved active site, comprising a molybdenum (or tungsten) center coordinated by two molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide molecules, a sulfido and a (seleno-)cysteine ligand, in addition to a histidine and arginine residue in the second coordination sphere. So far, the role of these amino acids in catalysis has not been studied in detail, because of the lack of suitable expression systems and the lability or oxygen sensitivity of the enzymes. Here, the roles of these active site residues is revealed using the Mo-containing FDH from Rhodobacter capsulatus. Our results show that the cysteine ligand at the Mo ion is displaced by the formate substrate during the reaction, the arginine has a direct role in substrate binding and stabilization, and the histidine elevates the pKa of the active site cysteine. We further found that in addition to reversible formate oxidation, the enzyme is further capable of reducing nitrate to nitrite. We propose a mechanistic scheme that combines both functionalities and provides important insights into the distinct mechanisms of C-H bond cleavage and oxygen atom transfer catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase. PMID:27054466

  4. C-H Bond Activation of Bisimines by Palladium (Ⅱ) and Platinum (Ⅱ).Synthesis,Characterization of Bis (imino) aryl-palladium (Ⅱ) Pincer Complexes and Their Application in Carbon-Carbon Cross Coupling Reactions%C-H Bond Activation of Bisimines by Palladium (Ⅱ) and Platinum (Ⅱ).Synthesis, Characterization of Bis (imino) aryl-palladium (Ⅱ) Pincer Complexes and Their Application in Carbon-Carbon Cross Coupling Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rong; CHEN Ying; LIU Fang; LI Ping; HU Zhao-xia; WANG Hong-xing

    2013-01-01

    Abstract:The reactions of a variety of 4,6-dimethyl-1,3-bis (imino) benzenes 2a-g derived from 4,6-dimethylisophthalaldehyde and anilines or benzylamine with palladium (Ⅱ) acetate in anhydrous acetic acid under nitrogen were investigated.Experiment results demonstrate that cyclopalladations in such condition are applicable not only to the present system under study but also to the 5-substituted bis(imino)benzenes 6,7.The molecular structure of 3 b was further confirmed by X-Ray single-crystal diffraction.3b Crystallizes in orthorhombic,space groupP2 (1) 2 (1) 2 (1) with a =0.734 53 (8),b =1.683 8 (3),c =1.691 7(2) nm,α =β =γ =90°.Treatment of 2b with K2PtCl4 in anhydrous acetic acid affords the corresponding NCN-platinum pincer.Carbon-carbon cross coupling reactions catalyzed with 3b were investigated.These palladium complexes have been proved to be high effective catalysts for Suzuki coupling reaction.

  5. Integral Ring Carbon-Carbon Piston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for a reciprocating internal combustion engine or compressor piston fabricate from carbon-carbon composite materials is disclosed. An integral ring carbon-carbon composite piston, disclosed herein, reduces the need for piston rings and for small clearances by providing a small flexible, integral component around the piston that allows for variation in clearance due to manufacturing tolerances, distortion due to pressure and thermal loads, and variations in thermal expansion differences between the piston and cylinder liner.

  6. Unusual C-C bond cleavage in the formation of amine-bis(phenoxy) group 4 benzyl complexes: Mechanism of formation and application to stereospecific polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Gowda, Ravikumar R.

    2014-08-11

    Group 4 tetrabenzyl compounds MBn4 (M = Zr, Ti), upon protonolysis with an equimolar amount of the tetradentate amine-tris(phenol) ligand N[(2,4-tBu2C6H2(CH 2)OH]3 in toluene from -30 to 25 °C, unexpectedly lead to amine-bis(phenoxy) dibenzyl complexes, BnCH2N[(2,4- tBu2C6H2(CH2)O] 2MBn2 (M = Zr (1), Ti (2)) in 80% (1) and 75% (2) yields. This reaction involves an apparent cleavage of the >NCH2-ArOH bond (loss of the phenol in the ligand) and formation of the >NCH 2-CH2Bn bond (gain of the benzyl group in the ligand). Structural characterization of 1 by X-ray diffraction analysis confirms that the complex formed is a bis(benzyl) complex of Zr coordinated by a newly derived tridentate amine-bis(phenoxy) ligand arranged in a mer configuration in the solid state. The abstractive activation of 1 and 2 with B(C6F 5)3·THF in CD2Cl2 at room temperature generates the corresponding benzyl cations {BnCH2N[(2,4- tBu2C6H2(CH2)O] 2MBn(THF)}+[BnB(C6F5) 3]- (M = Zr (3), Ti, (4)). These cationic complexes, along with their analogues derived from (imino)phenoxy tri- and dibenzyl complexes, [(2,6-iPr2C6H3)N=C(3,5- tBu2C6H2)O]ZrBn3 (5) and [2,4-Br2C6H2(O)(6-CH2(NC 5H9))CH2N=CH(2-adamantyl-4-MeC 6H2O)]ZrBn2 (6), have been found to effectively polymerize the biomass-derived renewable β-methyl-α-methylene- γ-butyrolactone (βMMBL) at room temperature into the highly stereoregular polymer PβMMBL with an isotacticity up to 99% mm. A combined experimental and DFT study has yielded a mechanistic pathway for the observed unusual C-C bond cleavage in the present protonolysis reaction between ZrBn4 and N[(2,4-tBu2C 6H2(CH2)OH]3 for the formation of complex 1, which involves the benzyl radical and the Zr(III) species, resulting from thermal and photochemical decomposition of ZrBn4, followed by a series of reaction sequences consisting of protonolysis, tautomerization, H-transfer, oxidation, elimination, and radical coupling. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  7. Aza-Quaternary Scaffolds from Selective Bond Cleavage of Bridgehead-Substituted 7-Azabicyclo[2.2.1]heptane: Total Synthesis of (+)-Cylindricines C-E and (-)-Lepadiformine A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ganesh; Janakiram, Vaitla

    2015-09-01

    A novel bridgehead-substituted aza-bicyclic framework has been designed and developed in both enantiomeric forms through an asymmetric desymmetrization reaction. Strategic exploitation of the ring strain in the aza-bicyclic framework has been utilized for the construction of the chiral aza-quaterenary scaffolds by selective bond fragmentation processes. Furthermore, a strategically designed precursor is employed for selective bond cleavage to initiate a cascade rearrangement for the total synthesis of the 1-azaspirotricyclic marine alkaloids (+)-cylindricines C, D, and E, as well as (-)-lepadiformine A. An oxidation/retro-aldol/aza-Michael sequence generated three new chiral centers with the required configuration in one pot. PMID:26220441

  8. Determining the Carbon-Carbon Distance in an Organic Molecule with a Ruler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Jose A.; Tubino, Matthieu; Ricchi, Reinaldo Alberto, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The procedure to estimate the carbon-carbon bond distance in the naphthalene molecule is described. The procedure is easily performed and can be done either at home or in the classroom, with the restriction that the mass of the naphthalene must be determined using an analytical or a precise balance.

  9. New carbon-carbon linked amphiphilic carboranyl-porphyrins as boron neutron capture agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel amphiphilic carboranyl-porphyrins have been synthesized for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). These compounds have carbon-carbon bonds between the carborane residues and the porphyrin meso-phenyl groups, and contain 28-31% boron by weight . (author)

  10. Formation of a dinuclear copper(II) complex through the cleavage of CN bond of 1-benzoyl-3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple mononuclear octahedral copper(II) complex was attempted from the reaction of three moles of 1-benzoyl-3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole and one mole of copper(II) perchlorate hexahydrate in methanol. However, the product of the reaction was confirmed to be a dinuclear copper(II) complex with μ-(3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato) and 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole ligands attached to each of the Cu(II) centre atom. The copper(II) ion assisted the cleavage of the CbenzoylN bond afforded a 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole molecule. Deprotonation of the 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole gave a 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato, which subsequently reacted with the Cu(II) ion to give the (3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato)(3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole)Cu(II) product moiety. The structure of the dinuclear complex was confirmed by x-ray crystallography. The complex crystallized in a monoclinic crystal system with P2(1)/n space group and cell dimensions of a = 12.2029(8) Å, b = 11.4010(7) Å, c = 14.4052(9) Å and β = 102.414(2)°. The compound was further characterized by mass spectrometry, CHN elemental analysis, infrared and UV-visible spectroscopy and the results concurred with the x-ray structure. The presence of d-d transition at 671 nm (ε = 116 dm3 mol−1 cm−1) supports the presence of Cu(II) centres

  11. A hybrid density functional study of O-O bond cleavage and phenyl ring hydroxylation for a biomimetic non-heme iron complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Tomasz; Bassan, Arianna; Siegbahn, Per E M

    2004-05-17

    Density functional calculations using the B3LYP functional have been used to study the reaction mechanism of [Fe(Tp(Ph2))BF] (Tp(Ph2) = hydrotris(3,5-diphenylpyrazol-1-yl)borate; BF = benzoylformate) with dioxygen. This mononuclear non-heme iron(II) complex was recently synthesized, and it proved to be the first biomimetic complex reproducing the dioxygenase activity of alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent enzymes. Moreover, the enthalpy and entropy of activation for this biologically interesting process were derived from kinetic experiments offering a unique possibility for direct comparison of theoretical and experimental data. The results reported here support a mechanism in which oxidative decarboxylation of the keto acid is the rate-limiting step. This oxygen activation process proceeds on the septet potential energy surface through a transition state for a concerted O-O and C-C bond cleavage. In the next step, a high-valent iron-oxo species performs electrophilic attack on the phenyl ring of the Tp(Ph2) ligand leading to an iron(III)-radical sigma-complex. Subsequent proton-coupled electron-transfer yields an iron(II)-phenol intermediate, which can bind dioxygen and reduce it to a superoxide radical. Finally, the protonated superoxide radical leaves the first coordination sphere of the iron(III)-phenolate complex and dismutates to dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide. The calculated activation barrier (enthalpy and entropy) and the overall reaction energy profile agree well with experimental data. A comparison to the enzymatic process, which is suggested to occur on the quintet surface, has been made. PMID:15132638

  12. Recent Progress in the Research of Transition-Metal-Catalyzed C-CN Bond Cleavage%过渡金属催化的C—CN键断裂的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    寇学振; 范佳骏; 童晓峰; 沈增明

    2013-01-01

    有机氰化物是一种重要的合成中间体,在药物、农药、染料和活性物质中都有应用.使用廉价、简单、低毒的氰基化合物在过渡金属的催化下通过C-CN键断裂生成复杂的氰化物是合成有机氰化物的重要手段之一.综述了不同过渡金属(如Ni,Pd,Rh,Cu,Ru,Fe,Mo,Co等)催化不同种类的氰基化合物C-CN键断裂的最新研究进展,如含C(sp1)-CN键化合物、C(sp2)-CN键化合物以及C(sp3)-CN键化合物,并对有关的反应机理及C-CN键断裂机理的进展进行了探讨.%Nitriles are an important class of organic compounds which can be found in pharmaceuticals,agrochemicals,dyes,and bioactive compounds.Transition-metal-catalyzed C-CN bond cleavage using inexpensive,simple and less toxic nitriles is one of the most attractive modem methods for the synthesis of complicated organic cyanides.Research progress of transition-metal-catalyzed (Ni,Pd,Rh,Cu,Ru,Fe,Mo,Co) different types of C-CN bond cleavage is reviewed,which includes some organic cyanides containing C(sp1)—CN bond,C(sp2)—CN bond and C(sp3)—CN bond.The C-CN cleavage mechanisms are also discussed in this review.

  13. Fabrication of carbon-carbon heat pipes for space nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that significant advancements have been made in the development of lightweight, high performance, carbon-carbon heat pipes for space nuclear power applications. The subject program has progressed through the concept definition and feasibility analysis stages to the current test article component fabrication and assembly phase. This concept utilizes a carbon-carbon tube with integrally woven fins as the primary structural element and radiative surface, Nb-1Zr liners to contain a potassium working fluid, and welded end caps and fill tubes. Various tests have been performed in the development of suitable liner bonding techniques and in the assessment of material stability

  14. Formation of a dinuclear copper(II) complex through the cleavage of CBond' name='Single-Bond' value='Single-Bond'/>N bond of 1-benzoyl-3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shardin, Rosidah; Pui, Law Kung; Yamin, Bohari M. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, UKM 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Kassim, Mohammad B. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, UKM 43600 Bangi, Selangor, Malaysia and Fuel Cell Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, UKM 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    A simple mononuclear octahedral copper(II) complex was attempted from the reaction of three moles of 1-benzoyl-3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole and one mole of copper(II) perchlorate hexahydrate in methanol. However, the product of the reaction was confirmed to be a dinuclear copper(II) complex with μ-(3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato) and 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole ligands attached to each of the Cu(II) centre atom. The copper(II) ion assisted the cleavage of the C{sub benzoyl}Bond' name='Single-Bond' value='Single-Bond'/>N bond afforded a 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole molecule. Deprotonation of the 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole gave a 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato, which subsequently reacted with the Cu(II) ion to give the (3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato)(3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole)Cu(II) product moiety. The structure of the dinuclear complex was confirmed by x-ray crystallography. The complex crystallized in a monoclinic crystal system with P2(1)/n space group and cell dimensions of a = 12.2029(8) Å, b = 11.4010(7) Å, c = 14.4052(9) Å and β = 102.414(2)°. The compound was further characterized by mass spectrometry, CHN elemental analysis, infrared and UV-visible spectroscopy and the results concurred with the x-ray structure. The presence of d-d transition at 671 nm (ε = 116 dm{sup 3} mol{sup −1} cm{sup −1}) supports the presence of Cu(II) centres.

  15. Diversification of ortho-Fused Cycloocta-2,5-dien-1-one Cores and Eight- to Six-Ring Conversion by σ Bond C-C Cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccleshare, Lee; Lozada-Rodríguez, Leticia; Cooper, Phillippa; Burroughs, Laurence; Ritchie, John; Lewis, William; Woodward, Simon

    2016-08-22

    Sequential treatment of 2-C6 H4 Br(CHO) with LiC≡CR(1) (R(1) =SiMe3 , tBu), nBuLi, CuBr⋅SMe2 and HC≡CCHClR(2) [R(2) =Ph, 4-CF3 Ph, 3-CNPh, 4-(MeO2 C)Ph] at -50 °C leads to formation of an intermediate carbanion (Z)-1,2-C6 H4 {CA (=O)C≡CB R(1) }{CH=CH(CH(-) )R(2) } (4). Low temperatures (-50 °C) favour attack at CB leading to kinetic formation of 6,8-bicycles containing non-classical C-carbanion enolates (5). Higher temperatures (-10 °C to ambient) and electron-deficient R(2) favour retro σ-bond C-C cleavage regenerating 4, which subsequently closes on CA providing 6,6-bicyclic alkoxides (6). Computational modelling (CBS-QB3) indicated that both pathways are viable and of similar energies. Reaction of 6 with H(+) gave 1,2-dihydronaphthalen-1-ols, or under dehydrating conditions, 2-aryl-1-alkynylnaphthlenes. Enolates 5 react in situ with: H2 O, D2 O, I2 , allylbromide, S2 Me2 , CO2 and lead to the expected C-E derivatives (E=H, D, I, allyl, SMe, CO2 H) in 49-64 % yield directly from intermediate 5. The parents (E=H; R(1) =SiMe3 , tBu; R(2) =Ph) are versatile starting materials for NaBH4 and Grignard C=O additions, desilylation (when R(1) =SiMe) and oxime formation. The latter allows formation of 6,9-bicyclics via Beckmann rearrangement. The 6,8-ring iodides are suitable Suzuki precursors for Pd-catalysed C-C coupling (81-87 %), whereas the carboxylic acids readily form amides under T3P® conditions (71-95 %). PMID:27452351

  16. Transparent Films from CO2 -Based Polyunsaturated Poly(ether carbonate)s: A Novel Synthesis Strategy and Fast Curing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhani, Muhammad Afzal; Köhler, Burkhard; Gürtler, Christoph; Leitner, Walter; Müller, Thomas E

    2016-04-25

    Transparent films were prepared by cross-linking polyunsaturated poly(ether carbonate)s obtained by the multicomponent polymerization of CO2 , propylene oxide, maleic anhydride, and allyl glycidyl ether. Poly(ether carbonate)s with ABXBA multiblock structures were obtained by sequential addition of mixtures of propylene oxide/maleic anhydride and propylene oxide/allyl glycidyl ether during the polymerization. The simultaneous addition of both monomer mixtures provided poly(ether carbonate)s with AXA triblock structures. Both types of polyunsaturated poly(ether carbonate)s are characterized by diverse functional groups, that is, terminal hydroxy groups, maleate moieties along the polymer backbone, and pendant allyl groups that allow for versatile polymer chemistry. The combination of double bonds substituted with electron-acceptor and electron-donor groups enables particularly facile UV- or redox-initiated free-radical curing. The resulting materials are transparent and highly interesting for coating applications. PMID:27028458

  17. Carbon/Carbon Pistons for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A. H.

    1986-01-01

    Carbon/carbon piston performs same function as aluminum pistons in reciprocating internal combustion engines while reducing weight and increasing mechanical and thermal efficiencies of engine. Carbon/carbon piston concept features low piston-to-cylinder wall clearance - so low piston rings and skirts unnecessary. Advantages possible by negligible coefficient of thermal expansion of carbon/carbon.

  18. Efficient and facile Ar-Si bond cleavage by montmorillonite KSF: synthetic and mechanistic aspects of solvent-free protodesilylation studied by solution and solid-state MAS NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafrani, Yossi; Gershonov, Eytan; Columbus, Ishay

    2007-08-31

    A facile and efficient method for the cleavage of the Ar-Si bond of various aryl trimethyl silanes is described. When adsorbed on montmorillonite KSF (mont KSF), these arylsilanes readily undergo a solvent-free protodesilylation to the corresponding arenes at room temperature in excellent yields. This approach seems to be superior to the traditional mild methods (i.e., desilylation by TFA, TBAF, CsF), in terms of reaction yield, rate, and environmentally benign conditions. Some mechanistic studies using both solution and solid-state magic-angle spinning (SS MAS) (1)H NMR are also presented. PMID:17676903

  19. Organometallic Methods for Forming and Cleaving Carbon-Carbon Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Stig Holden

    lipophilic anchors and performing the dehydrogenative decarbonylation with the anchor monools proceeded well, while the corresponding anchor triols were unstable at the elevated temperatures. Of the simple primary alcohols investigated, 2-(2-naphthyl)ethanol, hexane-1,6-diol and dodecane-1,12-diol were found...

  20. Leukemogenic membrane glycoprotein encoded by Friend spleen focus-forming virus: Transport to cell surfaces and shedding are controlled by disulfide-bonded dimerization and by cleavage of a hydrophobic membrane anchor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leukemogenic glycoprotein (gp55) encoded by Friend spleen focus-forming virus is predominantly retained in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). However, a small proportion (ca. 5%) is processed to form a derivative that occurs on plasma membranes and causes mitosis of infected erythroblasts. The authors have now found that gp55 folds heterogeneously in the RER to form components with different disulfide bonds and that this difference may determine their processing fates. RER gp55 consists predominantly of monomers with intrachain disulfide bonds. In contrast, the processed molecules are disulfide-bonded dimers. These dimers are extensively modified in transit to cell surfaces by conversion of four N-linked high-mannose oligosaccharides to complex derivatives and by attachment of a sialylated O-linked oligosaccharide. The plasma membrane dimers are then slowly shed into the medium by a mechanism that involves proteolytic cleavage of approximately 25 membrane-anchoring hydrophobic amino acids from the carboxyl termini of the glycoproteins. Consequently, shed molecules have shorter polypeptide chains than cell-associated gp55. They conclude that gp55 folds into different disulfide-bonded components that do not substantially isomerize, and that only one specific dimer is competent for export from the RER. Mitogenic activity of gp55 could be caused by the cell surface dimers, by the shed derivative, or by the carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic anchors that remain in the membranes after the shedding reaction

  1. Method for Making a Carbon-Carbon Cylinder Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransone, Phillip O. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method for making a lightweight cylinder block composed of carbon-carbon is disclosed. The use of carbon-carbon over conventional materials. such as cast iron or aluminum, reduces the weight of the cylinder block and improves thermal efficiency of the internal combustion reciprocating engine. Due to the negligible coefficient of thermal expansion and unique strength at elevated temperatures of carbon-carbon, the piston-to-cylinder wall clearance can be small, especially when the carbon-carbon cylinder block is used in conjunction with a carbon-carbon piston. Use of the carbon-carbon cylinder block has the effect of reducing the weight of other reciprocating engine components allowing the piston to run at higher speeds and improving specific engine performance.

  2. PhnY and PhnZ comprise a new oxidative pathway for enzymatic cleavage of a carbon-phosphorus bond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McSorley, Fern R.; Wyatt, Peter W.; Martinez, Ascuncion;

    2012-01-01

    The sequential activities of PhnY, an α-ketoglutarate/Fe(II)-dependent dioxygenase, and PhnZ, a Fe(II)-dependent enzyme of the histidine-aspartate motif hydrolase family, cleave the carbon-phosphorus bond of the organophosphonate natural product 2-aminoethylphosphonic acid. PhnY adds a hydroxyl...

  3. Applications of bis(1-R-imidazol-2-yl)disulfides and diselenides as ligands for main-group and transition metals: kappa2-(N,N) coordination, S-S bond cleavage, and S-S/E-E (E = S, Se) bond metathesis reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Joshua S; Yurkerwich, Kevin; Melnick, Jonathan; Buccella, Daniela; Parkin, Gerard

    2007-10-29

    Bis(1-R-imidazol-2-yl)disulfides, (mim(R))2 (R = Ph, Bu(t)), and diselenides, (seim(Mes))2, serve as bidentate N,N-donor ligands for main-group and transition metals. For example, [kappa2-(mim(Bu)(t))2]MCl2 (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Zn), [kappa2-(mim(Ph))2]MCl2 (M = Co, Zn), [kappa2-(mim(Bu)(t))2]CuX (X = Cl, I), and [kappa2-(seim(Mes))2]MCl2 (M = Fe, Co, Ni) are obtained by treatment of (mim(Bu)(t))2 or (seim(Mes))2 with the respective metal halide and have been structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. On the other hand, the zerovalent nickel complex Ni(PMe3)4 effects cleavage of the disulfide bond of (mim(Bu)(t))2 to give square-planar trans-Ni(PMe3)2(mim(Bu)(t))2 in which the (mim(Bu)(t)) ligands coordinate via nitrogen rather than sulfur, a most uncommon coordination mode for this class of ligands. Although [kappa2-(mim(R))2]MCl2 (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Zn) are not subject to homolytic cleavage of the S-S bond because the tetravalent state is not readily accessible, the observation that [kappa2-(mimPh)2]CoCl2 and [kappa2-(mim(Bu)(t))2]CoCl2 form an equilibrium mixture with the asymmetric disulfide [kappa2-(mim(Ph))(mim(Bu)(t))]CoCl2 indicates that S-S bond cleavage via another mechanism is possible. Likewise, metathesis between disulfide and diselenide ligands is observed in the formation of [kappa2-(mim(Bu)(t))(seim(Mes))]CoCl2 upon treatment of [kappa2-(mim(Bu)(t))2]CoCl2 with [kappa2-(seim(Mes))2]CoCl2. PMID:17900186

  4. Applications of Bis(1-R-imidazol-2-yl)disulfides and Diselenides as Ligands for Main Group and Transition Metals: κ2-[N,N] Coordination, S-S Bond Cleavage and S-S/E-E (E = S, Se) Bond Metathesis Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Joshua S.; Yurkerwich, Kevin; Melnick, Jonathan; Buccella, Daniela; Parkin, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    Bis(1-R-imidazol-2-yl)disulfides, (mimR)2 (R = Ph, But), and diselenides, (seimMes)2, serve as bidentate [N,N]-donor ligands for main group and transition metals. For example, [κ2-(mimBut)2]MCl2 (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Zn), [κ2-(mimPh)2]MCl2 (M = Co, Zn), [κ2-(mimBut)2]CuX (X = Cl, I) and [κ2-(seimMes)2]MCl2 (M = Fe, Co, Ni) are obtained by treatment of (mimBut)2 or (seimMes)2 with the respective metal halide, and have been structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. On the other hand, the zerovalent nickel complex Ni(PMe3)4 effects cleavage of the disulfide bond of (mimBut)2 to give square planar trans-Ni(PMe3)2(mimBut)2 in which the (mimBut) ligands coordinate via nitrogen rather than sulfur, a most uncommon coordination mode for this class of ligands. Although [κ2-(mimR)2]MCl2 (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Zn) are not subject to homolytic cleavage of the S-S bond because the tetravalent state is not readily accessible, the observation that [κ2-(mimPh)2]CoCl2 and [κ2-(mimBut)2]CoCl2 form an equilibrium mixture with the asymmetric disulfide [κ2-(mimPh)(mimBut)]CoCl2 indicates that S-S bond cleavage via another mechanism is possible. Likewise, metathesis between disulfide and diselenide ligands is observed in the formation of [κ2-(mimBut)(seimMes)]CoCl2 upon treatment of [κ2-(mimBut)2]CoCl2 with [κ2-(seimMes)2]CoCl2. PMID:17900186

  5. High performance carbon-carbon composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lalit M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon-carbon composites rank first among ceramic composite materials with a spectrum of properties and applications in various sectors. These composites are made of fibres in various directions and carbonaceous polymers and hydrocarbons as matrix precursors. Their density and properties depend on the type and volume fraction of reinforcement, matrix precursor used and end heat treatment temperature. Composites made with thermosetting resins as matrix precursors possess low densities (1.55–1.75 g/cm3) and well-distributed microporosity whereas those made with pitch as the matrix precursor, after densification exhibit densities of 1.8–2.0 g/cm3 with some mesopores, and those made by the CVD technique with hydrocarbon gases, possess intermediate densities and matrices with close porosities. The former (resin-based) composites exhibit high flexural strength, low toughness and low thermal conductivity, whereas the latter (pitch- and CVD-based) can be made with very high thermal conductivity (400–700 W/MK) in the fibre direction. Carbon-carbon composites are used in a variety of sectors requiring high mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, good frictional properties for brake pads in high speed vehicles or high thermal conductivity for thermal management applications. However, for extended life applications, these composites need to be protected against oxidation either through matrix modification with Si, Zr, Hf etc. or by multilayer oxidation protection coatings consisting of SiC, silica, zircon etc.

  6. Transparent Films from CO2‐Based Polyunsaturated Poly(ether carbonate)s: A Novel Synthesis Strategy and Fast Curing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhani, Muhammad Afzal; Köhler, Burkhard; Gürtler, Christoph; Leitner, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Transparent films were prepared by cross‐linking polyunsaturated poly(ether carbonate)s obtained by the multicomponent polymerization of CO2, propylene oxide, maleic anhydride, and allyl glycidyl ether. Poly(ether carbonate)s with ABXBA multiblock structures were obtained by sequential addition of mixtures of propylene oxide/maleic anhydride and propylene oxide/allyl glycidyl ether during the polymerization. The simultaneous addition of both monomer mixtures provided poly(ether carbonate)s with AXA triblock structures. Both types of polyunsaturated poly(ether carbonate)s are characterized by diverse functional groups, that is, terminal hydroxy groups, maleate moieties along the polymer backbone, and pendant allyl groups that allow for versatile polymer chemistry. The combination of double bonds substituted with electron‐acceptor and electron‐donor groups enables particularly facile UV‐ or redox‐initiated free‐radical curing. The resulting materials are transparent and highly interesting for coating applications. PMID:27028458

  7. Hydrodenitrogenation chemistry. I. Cleavage of alkylcarbon-nitrogen bonds, methane and ammonia formation in the HDN reaction of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline with a nickel oxide catalyst supported on silica/alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, R.H.; Thormodsen, A.D.; Moore, R.S.; Perry, D.L.; Heinemann, H.

    1986-11-01

    The hydrodenitrogenation reaction (HDN) is one of the most important industrial processes used in the refining of petroleum feedstocks and involves the removal of the nitrogen atom, as ammonia, from polynuclear heteroaromatic nitrogen compounds at high temperatures and high pressures of hydrogen gas (350-500/sup 0/C and 2000 psi). It is interesting to note that most of the reported heterogeneous catalysts require the complete hydrogenation of both the nitrogen heterocyclic ring and the aromatic ring before carbon-nitrogen bond cleavage can occur. A major breakthrough in the technical and economic aspects of the HDN reaction would take place if, in fact a catalyst could be found that would selectively cleave the C-N bond din the saturated nitrogen ring and subsequently produce ammonia, without substantial reduction of the aromatic rings, at lower temperatures as well as lower pressures of hydrogen gas. In this note, the authors report on a highly loaded nickel oxide catalyst (50% by weight Ni), supported on silica/alumina, that will effectively provide some of the criteria for an ideal HDN catalyst. 8 references.

  8. Temperature dependent structural variation from 2D supramolecular network to 3D interpenetrated metal–organic framework: In situ cleavage of S–S and C–S bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ugale, Bharat; Singh, Divyendu; Nagaraja, C.M., E-mail: cmnraja@iitrpr.ac.in

    2015-03-15

    Two new Zn(II)–organic compounds, [Zn(muco)(dbds){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] (1) and [Zn(muco)(dbs)] (2) (where, muco=trans, trans-muconate dianion, dbds=4,4′-dipyridyldisulfide and dbs=4,4′-dipyridylsulfide) have been synthesized from same precursors but at two different temperatures. Both the compounds have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and photoluminescence studies. Compound 1 prepared at room temperature possesses a molecular structure extended to 2D supramolecular network through (H–O…H) hydrogen-bonding interactions. Compound 2, obtained at high temperature (100 °C) shows a 3-fold interpenetrating 3D framework constituted by an in situ generated dbs linker by the cleavage of S–S and C–S bonds of dbds linker. Thus, the influence of reaction temperature on the formation of two structural phases has been demonstrated. Both 1 and 2 exhibit ligand based luminescence emission owing to n→π⁎ and π→π⁎ transitions and also high thermal stabilities. - Graphical abstract: The influence of temperature on the formation of two structural phases, a 2D supramolecular network and a 3D 3-fold interpenetrating framework has been demonstrated and their luminescence emission is measured. - Highlights: • Two new Zn(II)–organic compounds were synthesized by tuning reaction temperatures. • Temperature induced in situ generation of dbs linker has been observed. • The compounds exhibit high thermal stability and luminescence emission properties. • The effect of temperature on structure, dimension and topology has been presented.

  9. Temperature dependent structural variation from 2D supramolecular network to 3D interpenetrated metal–organic framework: In situ cleavage of S–S and C–S bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two new Zn(II)–organic compounds, [Zn(muco)(dbds)2(H2O)2] (1) and [Zn(muco)(dbs)] (2) (where, muco=trans, trans-muconate dianion, dbds=4,4′-dipyridyldisulfide and dbs=4,4′-dipyridylsulfide) have been synthesized from same precursors but at two different temperatures. Both the compounds have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and photoluminescence studies. Compound 1 prepared at room temperature possesses a molecular structure extended to 2D supramolecular network through (H–O…H) hydrogen-bonding interactions. Compound 2, obtained at high temperature (100 °C) shows a 3-fold interpenetrating 3D framework constituted by an in situ generated dbs linker by the cleavage of S–S and C–S bonds of dbds linker. Thus, the influence of reaction temperature on the formation of two structural phases has been demonstrated. Both 1 and 2 exhibit ligand based luminescence emission owing to n→π⁎ and π→π⁎ transitions and also high thermal stabilities. - Graphical abstract: The influence of temperature on the formation of two structural phases, a 2D supramolecular network and a 3D 3-fold interpenetrating framework has been demonstrated and their luminescence emission is measured. - Highlights: • Two new Zn(II)–organic compounds were synthesized by tuning reaction temperatures. • Temperature induced in situ generation of dbs linker has been observed. • The compounds exhibit high thermal stability and luminescence emission properties. • The effect of temperature on structure, dimension and topology has been presented

  10. Synthesis and characterization of ethylbis(2-pyridylethyl)amineruthenium complexes and two different types of C-H bond cleavage at an ethylene arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Sohei; Kajihara, Akari; Hirano, Toshiyuki; Sato, Fumitoshi; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Nagao, Hirotaka

    2011-06-01

    Ruthenium complexes bearing ethylbis(2-pyridylethyl)amine (ebpea), which has flexible -C(2)H(4)- arms between the amine and the pyridyl groups and coordinates to a metal center in facial and meridional modes, have been synthesized and characterized. Three trichloro complexes, fac-[Ru(III)Cl(3)(ebpea)] (fac-[1]), mer-[Ru(III)Cl(3)(ebpea)] (mer-[1]), and mer-[Ru(II)Cl(3){η(2)-N(C(2)H(5))(C(2)H(4)py)═CH-CH(2)py}] (mer-[2]), were synthesized using the Ru blue solution. Formation of mer-[2] proceeded via a C-H activation of the CH(2) group next to the amine nitrogen atom of the ethylene arm. Reduction reactions of fac- and mer-[1] afforded a triacetonitrile complex mer-[Ru(II)(CH(3)CN)(3)(ebpea)](PF(6))(2) (mer-[3](PF(6))(2)). Five nitrosyl complexes fac-[RuX(2)(NO)(ebpea)]PF(6) (X = Cl for fac-[4]PF(6); X = ONO(2) for fac-[5]PF(6)) and mer-[RuXY(NO)(ebpea)]PF(6) (X = Cl, Y = Cl for mer-[4]PF(6); X = Cl, Y = CH(3)O for mer-[6]PF(6); X = Cl, Y = OH for mer-[7]PF(6)) were synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography. A reaction of mer-[2] in H(2)O-C(2)H(5)OH at room temperature afforded mer-[1]. Oxidation of C(2)H(5)OH in H(2)O-C(2)H(5)OH and i-C(3)H(7)OH in H(2)O-i-C(3)H(7)OH to acetaldehyde and acetone by mer-[2] under stirring at room temperature occurred with formation of mer-[1]. Alternative C-H activation of the CH(2) group occurred next to the pyridyl group, and formation of a C-N bond between the CH moiety and the nitrosyl ligand afforded a nitroso complex [Ru(II)(N(3))(2){N(O)CH(py)CH(2)N(C(2)H(5))C(2)H(4)py}] ([8]) in reactions of nitrosyl complexes with sodium azide in methanol, and reaction of [8] with hydrochloric acid afforded a corresponding chloronitroso complex [Ru(II)Cl(2){N(O)CH(py)CH(2)N(C(2)H(5))C(2)H(4)py}] ([9]). PMID:21517051

  11. Effect of Test Specimen Shape and Size on Interlaminar Tensile Properties of Advanced Carbon-Carbon Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.

    2015-01-01

    The interlaminar tensile strength of 1000-tow T-300 fiber ACC-6 carbon-carbon composites was measured using the method of bonding the coupons to adherends at room temperature. The size, 0.70 to 1.963 inches maximum width or radius, and shape, round or square, of the test coupons were varied to determine if the test method was sensitive to these variables. Sixteen total variations were investigated and the results modeled.

  12. Comparison of Bond Character in Hydrocarbons and Fullerenes

    OpenAIRE

    Snoke, D. W.; Cardona, M.; Sanguinetti, S.; Benedek, G

    1996-01-01

    We present a comparison of the bond polarizabilities for carbon-carbon bonds in hydrocarbons and fullerenes, using two different models for the fullerene Raman spectrum and the results of Raman measurements on ethane and ethylene. We find that the polarizabilities for single bonds in fullerenes and hydrocarbons compare well, while the double bonds in fullerenes have greater polarizability than in ethylene.

  13. Si(111) cleavage and the (2 x 1) reconstruction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, E. M.; Halicioglu, T.; Tiller, W. A.

    1987-01-01

    Using a computer simulation technique with a semiempirical potential, a Si crystal was cleaved along the (111) plane. The pi-bonded chain structural features of the Si(111) cleavage surface are observed and found to be a consequence of the dynamics of this cleavage process and seem not to be influenced by the final energetics.

  14. Chemical bond cleavage induced by electron heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas emissions from titanium-metalloid compounds (titanium nitride and oxide) have been investigated to understand the effects of a microwave field on chemical reactions. We employed a high vacuum system (PO2 = 10−6 Pa) to observe in situ reductions. For titanium oxides, H-field heating significantly differed from conventional one in terms of oxygen emissions. For titanium nitride, the emissions were also induced by microwave heating. These tendencies were observed at temperatures above 1000 °C. A quantum chemical interpretation is provided to explain the emissions of the gases, and the experimental data is in good agreement with results predicted using the electronic energy band structure.

  15. Carbon-Carbon Turbocharger Housing Unit for Intermittent Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An improved, lightweight, turbine housing unit for an intermittent combustion reciprocating internal combustion engine turbocharger is prepared from a lay-up or molding of carbon-carbon composite materials in a single-piece or two-piece process. When compared to conventional steel or cast iron, the use of carbon-carbon composite materials in a turbine housing unit reduces the overall weight of the engine and reduces the heat energy loss used in the turbocharging process. This reduction in heat energy loss and weight reduction provides for more efficient engine operation.

  16. Study of the damaging mechanisms of a copper / carbon - carbon composite under thermomechanical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to understand and to identify the damaging mechanisms of Carbon-Carbon composite bonded to copper under thermomechanical loading. The study of the composite allowed the development of non-linear models. These ones have been introduced in the finite elements analysis code named CASTEM2000. They have been validated according to a correlation between simulation and mechanical tests on multi-material samples. These tests have also permitted us to better understand the behaviour of the bonding between composite and copper (damaging and fracture modes for different temperatures) under shear and tensile loadings. The damaging mechanisms of the bond under thermomechanical loading have been studied and identified according to microscopic observations on mock-ups which have sustained thermal cycling tests: some cracks appear in the composite, near the bond between the composite and the copper. The correlation between numerical and experimental results have been improved because of the reliability of the composite modelization, the use of residual stresses and the results of the bond mechanical characterization. (author)

  17. Carbon-Carbon High Melt Coating for Nozzle Extensions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Melt Coating system is applied to a carbon-carbon structure and embeds HfC, ZrB2 in the outer layers. ACC High Melt builds on the time tested base material...

  18. Carbon-Carbon High Melt Coating for Nozzle and Nozzle Extensions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — C-CAT, which has proven carbon-carbon fabrication capabilities, will investigate use of ACC-6 High Melt oxidation protective system on carbon-carbon for use on the...

  19. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor L. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  20. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Waunakee, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow; Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  1. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  2. Failure behaviour of carbon/carbon composite under compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tushtev, K.; Grathwohl, G. [Universitaet Bremen, Advanced Ceramics, Bremen (Germany); Koch, D. [Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Institut fuer Bauweisen- und Konstruktionsforschung, Keramische Verbundstrukturen, Stuttgart (Germany); Horvath, J.

    2012-11-15

    In this work the properties of Carbon/Carbon-material are investigated under quasi-static compression and model-like characterized. The investigated material was produced by pyrolysis of a Carbon/Carbon - composite of bidirectionally reinforced fabric layers. For the compression tests, a device to prevent additional bending stress was made. The stress-strain behaviour of this material has been reproduced in various publications. This will be discussed on the fracture behaviour and compared the experimental results from the compression tests with the characteristics of tensile and shear tests. The different compression and tensile properties of stiffness, poisson and strength were assessed. Differences between the tensile and compression behaviour resulting from on-axis tests by micro buckling and crack closure and off-axis experiments by superimposed pressure normal stresses that lead to increased shear friction. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Intermediate Temperature Carbon - Carbon Composite Structures. CRADA Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the "Contractor") and Synterials, Inc. (the "Participant") was to demonstrate promising processing methods, which can lead to producing Carbon-Carbon Composites (CCC), with tensile and interlaminar properties comparable to those of organic matrix composites and environmental stability at 1200 F for long periods of time. The participant synthesized carbon-carbon composites with two different fiber coatings and three different matrices. Both parties evaluated the tensile and interlaminar properties of these materials and characterized the microstructure of the matrices and interfaces. It was found that fiber coatings of carbon and boron carbide provided the best environmental protection and resulted in composites with high tensile strength.

  4. AASPT Carbon/Carbon Aircraft Brake Disk Granted MPA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Xi'an Chaoma Technology Co. Ltd. was issued Parts Manufacturer Approval (PMA) for Carbon/Carbon aircraft brake disk for Airbus 320 series by Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC). The company is held by Academy of Aerospace Solid Propulsion Technology (AASPT), a subsidiary of China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC). It is the first approval given to a Chinese company to design and produce brakes for main civilian aircraft.

  5. Photochemical Degradation of Lignin through αC—O Bond Cleavage of Non Phenolic Benzyl Aryl Ether Units. A Study of the Photochemistry of a(2',4',6'-Trimethyl-Phenoxy)-3,4 Dimethoxy Toluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of this study show that, even in the case of a complete chemical group protection (phenolic groups as aliphatic ethers, carbonyl groups reduced to CH2), the UV part of the sunlight near 300 nm can initiate a benzylic cleavage responsible for a subsequent yellowing of the lignin materials

  6. Ratcheting of the substrate from the zymogen to proteinase conformations directs the sequential cleavage of prothrombin by prothrombinase

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchini, Elsa P.; Orcutt, Steven J.; Panizzi, Peter; Bock, Paul E.; Krishnaswamy, Sriram

    2005-01-01

    Prothrombinase catalyzes thrombin formation by the ordered cleavage of two peptide bonds in prothrombin. Although these bonds are likely ≈36 Å apart, sequential cleavage of prothrombin at Arg-320 to produce meizothrombin, followed by its cleavage at Arg-271, are both accomplished by equivalent exosite interactions that tether each substrate to the enzyme and facilitate presentation of the scissile bond to the active site of the catalyst. We show that impairing the conformational transition fr...

  7. Selective cleavage of pepsin by molybdenum metallopeptidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yenjai, Sudarat; Malaikaew, Pinpinat; Liwporncharoenvong, Teerayuth [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot University, Sukhumvit 23, Bangkok 10110 (Thailand); Buranaprapuk, Apinya, E-mail: apinyac@swu.ac.th [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot University, Sukhumvit 23, Bangkok 10110 (Thailand)

    2012-03-02

    Graphical abstract: Molybdenum metallopeptidase: the Mo(VI) cluster with six molybdenum cations has the ability to cleave protein under mild conditions (37 Degree-Sign C, pH 7) without reducing agents. The reaction required only low concentration of ammonium heptamolybdatetetrahydrate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O) (0.125 mM). The reaction undergoes possibly via a hydrolytic mechanism. This is the first demonstration of protein cleavage by a molybdenum cluster. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first demonstration of protein cleavage by a Mo(VI) cluster with six molybdenum cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cleavage reaction undergoes at mild conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No need of reducing agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only low concentration of Mo(VI) cluster and short time of incubation are needed. -- Abstract: In this study, the cleavage of protein by molybdenum cluster is reported for the first time. The protein target used is porcine pepsin. The data presented in this study show that pepsin is cleaved to at least three fragments with molecular weights of {approx}23, {approx}19 and {approx}16 kDa when the mixture of the protein and ammonium heptamolybdate tetrahydrate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O) was incubated at 37 Degree-Sign C for 24 h. No self cleavage of pepsin occurs at 37 Degree-Sign C, 24 h indicating that the reaction is mediated by the metal ions. N-terminal sequencing of the peptide fragments indicated three cleavage sites of pepsin between Leu 112-Tyr 113, Leu 166-Leu 167 and Leu 178-Asn 179. The cleavage reaction occurs after incubation of the mixture of pepsin and (NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O) only for 2 h. However, the specificity of the cleavage decreases when incubation time is longer than 48 h. The mechanism for cleavage of pepsin is expected to be hydrolytic chemistry of the amide bonds in the protein

  8. Selective cleavage of pepsin by molybdenum metallopeptidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Molybdenum metallopeptidase: the Mo(VI) cluster with six molybdenum cations has the ability to cleave protein under mild conditions (37 °C, pH 7) without reducing agents. The reaction required only low concentration of ammonium heptamolybdatetetrahydrate ((NH4)6Mo7O24·4H2O) (0.125 mM). The reaction undergoes possibly via a hydrolytic mechanism. This is the first demonstration of protein cleavage by a molybdenum cluster. Highlights: ► This is the first demonstration of protein cleavage by a Mo(VI) cluster with six molybdenum cations. ► The cleavage reaction undergoes at mild conditions. ► No need of reducing agents. ► Only low concentration of Mo(VI) cluster and short time of incubation are needed. -- Abstract: In this study, the cleavage of protein by molybdenum cluster is reported for the first time. The protein target used is porcine pepsin. The data presented in this study show that pepsin is cleaved to at least three fragments with molecular weights of ∼23, ∼19 and ∼16 kDa when the mixture of the protein and ammonium heptamolybdate tetrahydrate ((NH4)6Mo7O24·4H2O) was incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. No self cleavage of pepsin occurs at 37 °C, 24 h indicating that the reaction is mediated by the metal ions. N-terminal sequencing of the peptide fragments indicated three cleavage sites of pepsin between Leu 112-Tyr 113, Leu 166-Leu 167 and Leu 178-Asn 179. The cleavage reaction occurs after incubation of the mixture of pepsin and (NH4)6Mo7O24·4H2O) only for 2 h. However, the specificity of the cleavage decreases when incubation time is longer than 48 h. The mechanism for cleavage of pepsin is expected to be hydrolytic chemistry of the amide bonds in the protein backbone.

  9. Les trifluoro(organo)borates de potassium : nouvelles perspectives pour la formation de liaisons carbone-carbone à l'aide de complexes du rhodium

    OpenAIRE

    Pucheault, Mathieu

    2004-01-01

    This manuscript describes the use of potassium trifluoro(organo)borates in rhodiumcatalyzed carbon-carbon bond forming reactions. These easy to purify and very stable reagents turned out to constitute a valuable alternative to other boron reagents commonly used in transition metal catalyzed reactions. Asymmetric rhodium-catalyzed 1,4-additions of trifluoroborates were developed with the use of a chiral diphosphine which allowed a good control of the enantioselectivity. Under neutral condition...

  10. The First Example of Cation Radical Induced Ether Cleavage of Benzyl Phenyl Ether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermally stable benzyl phenyl ether has been shown to cleavage under mild conditions. The new reaction described herein further expands the chemistry of the ether cleavage by cation radicals. Over the last several years, our lab has discovered cation radical-induced oxidative C-O bond cleavages such as carbonates (eq 1), carbamates (eq 2), peroxides (eq 3), and alcohols (eq 4), where R is either tert-butyl or benzyl. It was recognized from those reactions that carbocationic chemistry with C-O bond cleavages was predominant, with a 2:1 stoichiometry of Th+·:oxidized molecules

  11. Scale-up of Carbon/Carbon Bipolar Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David P. Haack

    2009-04-08

    This project was focused upon developing a unique material technology for use in PEM fuel cell bipolar plates. The carbon/carbon composite material developed in this program is uniquely suited for use in fuel cell systems, as it is lightweight, highly conductive and corrosion resistant. The project further focused upon developing the manufacturing methodology to cost-effectively produce this material for use in commercial fuel cell systems. United Technology Fuel Cells Corp., a leading fuel cell developer was a subcontractor to the project was interested in the performance and low-cost potential of the material. The accomplishments of the program included the development and testing of a low-cost, fully molded, net-shape carbon-carbon bipolar plate. The process to cost-effectively manufacture these carbon-carbon bipolar plates was focused on extensively in this program. Key areas for cost-reduction that received attention in this program was net-shape molding of the detailed flow structures according to end-user design. Correlations between feature detail and process parameters were formed so that mold tooling could be accurately designed to meet a variety of flow field dimensions. A cost model was developed that predicted the cost of manufacture for the product in near-term volumes and long-term volumes (10+ million units per year). Because the roduct uses lowcost raw materials in quantities that are less than competitive tech, it was found that the cost of the product in high volume can be less than with other plate echnologies, and can meet the DOE goal of $4/kW for transportation applications. The excellent performance of the all-carbon plate in net shape was verified in fuel cell testing. Performance equivalent to much higher cost, fully machined graphite plates was found.

  12. Eddy-Current Detection Of Cracks In Reinforced Carbon/Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Scott V.; Koshti, Ajay M.

    1995-01-01

    Investigations of failures of components made of reinforced carbon/carbon show eddy-current flaw-detection techniques applicable to these components. Investigation focused on space shuttle parts, but applicable to other parts made of carbon/carbon materials. Techniques reveal cracks, too small to be detected visually, in carbon/carbon matrix substrates and in silicon carbide coates on substrates. Also reveals delaminations in carbon/carbon matrices. Used to characterize extents and locations of discontinuities in substrates in situations in which ultrasonic techniques and destructive techniques not practical.

  13. NDE for Characterizing Oxidation Damage in Reinforced Carbon-Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Don J.; Rauser, Richard W.; Jacobson, nathan S.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Walker, James L.; Cosgriff, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, coated reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples of similar structure and composition as that from the NASA space shuttle orbiter s thermal protection system were fabricated with slots in their coating simulating craze cracks. These specimens were used to study oxidation damage detection and characterization using NDE methods. These specimens were heat treated in air at 1143 and 1200 C to create cavities in the carbon substrate underneath the coating as oxygen reacted with the carbon and resulted in its consumption. The cavities varied in diameter from approximately 1 to 3 mm. Single-sided NDE methods were used since they might be practical for on-wing inspection, while x-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) was used to measure cavity sizes in order to validate oxidation models under development for carbon-carbon materials. An RCC sample having a naturally-cracked coating and subsequent oxidation damage was also studied with x-ray micro-CT. This effort is a follow-on study to one that characterized NDE methods for assessing oxidation damage in an RCC sample with drilled holes in the coating. The results of that study are briefly reviewed in this article as well. Additionally, a short discussion on the future role of simulation to aid in these studies is provided.

  14. Thermomechanical response of inhibited carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical models to capture the additional inhomogeneities such as boron carbide particulates added to enhance the oxidation resistance of carbon-carbon composites are developed. In parallel, the test results of laminates subjected to static and fatigue loading at ambient and high temperature (900 C) are monitored so that an interactive numerical simulation and observation procedure can be developed. The material system studied is HITCO 2D CC137EH, highly inhibited, eight harness satin weave, RT42 CVD SiC coated, carbon-carbon laminate. The static testing to date focuses on generating the upper bound loads to be used in the thermomechanical fatigue tests. The stress-strain response obtained from the static tension tests reveal a region of nonlinearity which is attributed to the presence of the porosity, the microcracking and the inhibitors. The significant number of oxidation tests of coated as well as partially uncoated specimens clearly indicate the preferential oxidation along the fiber bundles perpendicular to the exposed edges

  15. Study of the damaging mechanisms of a copper / carbon - carbon composite under thermomechanical loading; Etude des mecanismes d'endommagement d'un assemblage cuivre / composite carbone - carbone sous chargement thermomecanique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moncel, L

    1999-06-18

    The purpose of this work is to understand and to identify the damaging mechanisms of Carbon-Carbon composite bonded to copper under thermomechanical loading. The study of the composite allowed the development of non-linear models. These ones have been introduced in the finite elements analysis code named CASTEM2000. They have been validated according to a correlation between simulation and mechanical tests on multi-material samples. These tests have also permitted us to better understand the behaviour of the bonding between composite and copper (damaging and fracture modes for different temperatures) under shear and tensile loadings. The damaging mechanisms of the bond under thermomechanical loading have been studied and identified according to microscopic observations on mock-ups which have sustained thermal cycling tests: some cracks appear in the composite, near the bond between the composite and the copper. The correlation between numerical and experimental results have been improved because of the reliability of the composite modelization, the use of residual stresses and the results of the bond mechanical characterization. (author)

  16. Mechanistic deductions from multiple kinetic and solvent deuterium isotope effects and pH studies of pyridoxal phosphate dependent carbon-carbon lyases: escherichia coli tryptophan indole-lyase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of the pH dependence of the kinetic parameters and competitive inhibitor Ki values for tryptophan indole-lyase suggests two enzymic groups must be unprotonated in order to facilitate binding and catalysis of tryptophan. The V/K for tryptophan and the pKi for oxindolyl-L-alanine, a putative transition state analogue and competitive inhibitor, decrease below two pK values of 7.6 and 6.0, while the Ki for L-alanine, also a competitive inhibitor, is 3300-fold larger (20 mM) than that for oxindolyl-L-alanine and increases below a single pK of 7.6. A single pK of 7.6 is also observed in the V/K profile for the alternate substrate, S-methyl-L-cysteine. Therefore, the enzymic group with a pK of 7.6 is responsible for proton abstraction at the 2-position of tryptophan, while the enzymic group with a pK of 6.0 interacts with the indole portion of tryptophan and probably catalyzes formation of the indolenine tautomer of tryptophan (in concert with proton transfer to C-3 of indole from the group with pK 7.6) to facilitate carbon-carbon bond cleavage and elimination of indole. The pH variation of the primary deuterium isotope effects for proton abstraction at the 2-position of tryptophan (DV = 2.5 and D(V/Ktrp) = 2.8) are pH independent, while the Vmax for tryptophan or S-methyl-L-cysteine is the same and also pH independent. Thus, substrates bind only to the correctly protonated form of the enzyme. Further, tryptophan is not sticky, and the pK values observed in both V/K profiles are the correct ones

  17. Neutron scattering investigation of carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Carbon/Carbon (C/C) composites, built up from bi-directionally woven fabrics from PAN based carbon fibers, pre-impregnated with phenolic resin followed by pressure curing and carbonization at 1000oC and a final heat treatment at either 1800oC or 2400oC, were investigated by means of small-angle as well as wideangle elastic neutron scattering. Sample orientations arranging the carbon fibers parallel and perpendicular to the incoming beam were examined. Structural features of the composites, i.e. of the fibers as well as the inherently existing pores, are presented and the influence of the heat treatment on the structural properties is discussed. (author)

  18. Prospects for using carbon-carbon composites for EMI shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.

    1990-01-01

    Since pyrolyzed carbon has a higher electrical conductivity than most polymers, carbon-carbon composites would be expected to have higher electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding ability than polymeric resin composites. A rule of mixtures model of composite conductivity was used to calculate the effect on EMI shielding of substituting a pyrolyzed carbon matrix for a polymeric matrix. It was found that the improvements were small, no more than about 2 percent for the lowest conductivity fibers (ex-rayon) and less than 0.2 percent for the highest conductivity fibers (vapor grown carbon fibers). The structure of the rule of mixtures is such that the matrix conductivity would only be important in those cases where it is much higher than the fiber conductivity, as in metal matrix composites.

  19. Inhibition of RecA-mediated cleavage in covalent dimers of UmuD.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, M. H.; Guzzo, A; Walker, G C

    1996-01-01

    Disulfide-cross-linked UmuD2 derivatives were cleaved poorly upon incubation with activated RecA. Reducing the disulfide bonds prior to incubating the derivatives with RecA dramatically increased their extent of cleavage. These observations suggest that the UmuD monomer is a better substrate for the RecA-mediated cleavage reaction than the dimer.

  20. Phosphate diester cleavage promoted by the novel artificial biomimetic agent

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bím, Daniel; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Hodačová, J.

    Praha: Czech Chemical Society, 2014. s. 51. [Liblice 2014. Advances in Organic, Bioorganic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry /49./. 07.11.2014-09.11.2014, Lázně Bělohrad] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : phosphate diesters * bond cleavage Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  1. "Homeopathic" palladium nanoparticle catalysis of cross carbon-carbon coupling reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deraedt, Christophe; Astruc, Didier

    2014-02-18

    Catalysis by palladium derivatives is now one of the most important tools in organic synthesis. Whether researchers design palladium nanoparticles (NPs) or nanoparticles occur as palladium complexes decompose, these structures can serve as central precatalysts in common carbon-carbon bond formation. Palladium NPs are also valuable alternatives to molecular catalysts because they do not require costly and toxic ligands. In this Account, we review the role of "homeopathic" palladium catalysts in carbon-carbon coupling reactions. Seminal studies from the groups of Beletskaya, Reetz, and de Vries showed that palladium NPs can catalyze Heck and Suzuki-Miyaura reactions with aryl iodides and, in some cases, aryl bromides at part per million levels. As a result, researchers coined the term "homeopathic" palladium catalysis. Industry has developed large-scale applications of these transformations. In addition, chemists have used Crooks' concept of dendrimer encapsulation to set up efficient nanofilters for Suzuki-Miyaura and selective Heck catalysis, although these transformations required high PdNP loading. With arene-centered, ferrocenyl-terminated dendrimers containing triazolyl ligands in the tethers, we designed several generations of dendrimers to compare their catalytic efficiencies, varied the numbers of Pd atoms in the PdNPs, and examined encapsulation vs stabilization. The catalytic efficiencies achieved "homeopathic" (TON = 540 000) behavior no matter the PdNP size and stabilization type. The TON increased with decreasing the Pd/substrate ratio, which suggested a leaching mechanism. Recently, we showed that water-soluble arene-centered dendrimers with tri(ethylene glycol) (TEG) tethers stabilized PdNPs involving supramolecular dendritic assemblies because of the interpenetration of the TEG branches. Such PdNPs are stable and retain their "homeopathic" catalytic activities for Suzuki-Miyaura reactions for months. (TONs can reach 2.7 × 10(6) at 80 °C for aryl

  2. NMR experiments for the measurement of proton-proton and carbon-carbon residual dipolar couplings in uniformly labelled oligosaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Pastor, Manuel [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Laboratorio Integral de Estructura de Biomoleculas Jose. R. Carracido, Unidade de Resonancia Magnetica, RIAIDT (Spain)], E-mail: mmartin@usc.es; Canales-Mayordomo, Angeles; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus [Departamento de Estructura y funcion de proteinas, Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas, CSIC (Spain)], E-mail: jjbarbero@cib.csic.es

    2003-08-15

    A 2D-HSQC-carbon selective/proton selective-constant time COSY, 2D-HSQC-(sel C, sel H)-CT COSY experiment, which is applicable to uniformly {sup 13}C isotopically enriched samples (U-{sup 13}C) of oligosaccharides or oligonucleotides is proposed for the measurement of proton-proton RDC in crowded regions of 2D-spectra. In addition, a heteronuclear constant time-COSY experiment, {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C CT-COSY, is proposed for the measurement of one bond carbon-carbon RDC in these molecules. These two methods provide an extension, to U-{sup 13}C molecules, of the original homonuclear constant time-COSY experiment proposed by Tian et al. (1999) for saccharides. The combination of a number of these RDC with NOE data may provide the method of choice to study oligosaccharide conformation in the free and receptor-bound state.

  3. Carbon-Carbon Recuperators in Closed-Brayton-Cycle Nuclear Space Power Systems: A Feasibility Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Michael J.; Johnson, Paul K.

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of using carbon-carbon recuperators in closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) nuclear space power conversion systems (PCS) was assessed. Recuperator performance expectations were forecast based on projected thermodynamic cycle state values for a planetary mission. Resulting thermal performance, mass and volume for a plate-fin carbon-carbon recuperator were estimated and quantitatively compared with values for a conventional offset-strip-fin metallic design. Material compatibility issues regarding carbon-carbon surfaces exposed to the working fluid in the CBC PCS were also discussed.

  4. Various Carbon to Carbon Bond Lengths Inter-related via the Golden Ratio, and their Linear Dependence on Bond Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01

    This work presents the relations between the carbon to carbon bond lengths in the single, double and triple bonds and in graphite, butadiene and benzene. The Golden ratio, which was shown to divide the Bohr radius into two parts pertaining to the charged particles, the electron and proton, and to divide inter-atomic distances into their cationic and anionic radii, also plays a role in the carbon-carbon bonds and in the ionic/polar character of those in graphite, butadiene and benzene. Further, the bond energies of the various CC bonds are shown to vary linearly with the bond lengths.

  5. Ablation properties of carbon/carbon composites with tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ablation properties and morphologies of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites with tungsten carbide (WC) filaments were investigated by ablation test on an arc heater and scanning electron microscopy. And the results were compared with those without tungsten carbide (WC) filaments tested under the same conditions. It shows that there is a big difference between C/C composites with and without WC filaments on both macroscopic and microscopic ablation morphologies and the ablation rates of the former are higher than the latter. It is found that the ablation process of C/C composites with WC filaments includes oxidation of carbon fibers, carbon matrices and WC, melting of WC and WO3, and denudation of WC, WO3 and C/C composites. Oxidation and melting of WC leads to the formation of holes in z directional carbon fiber bundles, which increases the coarseness of the ablation surfaces of the composites, speeds up ablation and leads to the higher ablation rate. Moreover, it is further found that the molten WC and WO3 cannot form a continuous film on the ablation surface to prevent further ablation of C/C composites.

  6. Texturing Carbon-carbon Composite Radiator Surfaces Utilizing Atomic Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raack, Taylor

    2004-01-01

    Future space nuclear power systems will require radiator technology to dissipate excess heat created by a nuclear reactor. Large radiator fins with circulating coolant are in development for this purpose and an investigation of how to make them most efficient is underway. Maximizing the surface area while minimizing the mass of such radiator fins is critical for obtaining the highest efficiency in dissipating heat. Processes to develop surface roughness are under investigation to maximize the effective surface area of a radiator fin. Surface roughness is created through several methods including oxidation and texturing. The effects of atomic oxygen impingement on carbon-carbon surfaces are currently being investigated for texturing a radiator surface. Early studies of atomic oxygen impingement in low Earth orbit indicate significant texturing due to ram atomic oxygen. The surface morphology of the affected surfaces shows many microscopic cones and valleys which have been experimentally shown to increase radiation emittance. Further study of this morphology proceeded in the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Atomic oxygen experiments on the LDEF successfully duplicated the results obtained from materials in spaceflight by subjecting samples to 4.5 eV atomic oxygen from a fixed ram angle. These experiments replicated the conical valley morphology that was seen on samples subjected to low Earth orbit.

  7. Novel apparatus for joining of carbon-carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jeremiah D. E.; Mukasyan, Alexander S.; La Forest, Mark L.; Simpson, Allen H.

    2007-01-01

    A novel apparatus for joining carbon-carbon (C-C) composites is presented. This device was designed and built based on the concept of self-sustained oxygen-free high-temperature reactions. A layer of reactive mixture is contained between two disks of C-C composite that are to be joined. The stack is held in place between two electrodes, which are connected to a dc power supply. dc current is used to uniformly initiate the reaction in the reactive layer. The electrodes are also part of the pneumatic system, which applies a load to the stack. The designed hydraulic system is effective, lending to low cost and simplified, rapid, accurate operation. It provides a very short response time (˜10ms), which is important for the considered applications. All operational parameters such as initial and final loads, applied current, delay time between ignition and final load application, duration of Joule heating, and safety interlocks are controlled by a programable logic controller system. These features make it an efficient, user-friendly and safe machine to join refractory materials. The entire joining process takes place on the order of seconds, rather than hours as required for solid-state joining methods. The mechanical properties of the obtained joints are higher than those for the C-C composites.

  8. Exploiting Catalytic Promiscuity for Biocatalysis: Carbon-Carbon Bond Formation by a Proline-Based Tautomerase

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Een belangrijk thema bij het ontwikkelen van nieuwe biokatalysatoren is katalytische promiscuïteit, waarbij een enzym alternatieve reacties katalyseert naast de reactie die biologisch relevant is. Promiscue enzymactiviteiten zijn een veelbelovende bron van synthetisch bruikbare katalytische omzettingen. Aangezien het actieve centrum van de meeste enzymen is opgebouwd uit meerdere potentiële katalytische groepen die kunnen dienen als zuren, basen of nucleofielen, zijn promiscue enzymactiviteit...

  9. Exploiting Catalytic Promiscuity for Biocatalysis : Carbon-Carbon Bond Formation by a Proline-Based Tautomerase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Een belangrijk thema bij het ontwikkelen van nieuwe biokatalysatoren is katalytische promiscuïteit, waarbij een enzym alternatieve reacties katalyseert naast de reactie die biologisch relevant is. Promiscue enzymactiviteiten zijn een veelbelovende bron van synthetisch bruikbare katalytische omzettin

  10. Continuously operated falling film microreactor for selective hydrogenation of carbon-carbon triple bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Rehm, Thomas H.; Berguerand, Charline; Ek, Satu; Zapf, Ralf; Löb, Patrick; Nikoshvili, Linda; Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant advances in the fabrication and applications of microreactors for production of chemicals, their use for catalytic reactions remains a challenge, especially in fine chemical synthesis where the selectivity towards the desired product is an issue. A falling film microstructured reactor (FFMR) was tested in the selective hydrogenation of 2-butyne-1,4-diol (1) to its olefinic derivative (2). The FFMR plates were coated with Al2O3 or ZnO followed by the deposition of Pd nanopa...

  11. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  12. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  13. Lyocell Based Carbon Carbon Composite for Use as a Large Exit Cone Material Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) has identified a "carbon-carbon nozzle (domestic source)" as a "Top Technical Challenge" in the 2011-2016 timeframe...

  14. Alternative Fabrication Designs for Carbon-Carbon (C-C) Nozzle Extensions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In order for carbon-carbon nozzle extensions and exit cones to serve as practical, low cost components for future Earth-to-Orbit propulsion systems, it is necessary...

  15. Irradiation-induced structure and property changes in tokamak plasma-facing, carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma-facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce large neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600 degree C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included uni-directional, two-directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Dimensional changes are reported for the composite materials and are related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, the irradiation-induced dimensional changes are reported and discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. The effect of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of two three-directional, carbon-carbon composites is reported and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is discussed

  16. Na-doped hydroxyapatite coating on carbon/carbon composites: Preparation, in vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Na-HA coating with a thickness of 10 ± 2 μm was directly prepared onto C/C using ECD. ► The shear bonding strength of Na-HA coating on C/C is 5.55 ± 0.77 MPa. ► Na-HA coated C/C can rapidly induce bone-like apatite nucleation and growth on its surface in SBF. ► The Na-HA coating was better to improve the biocompatibility of C/C compared with HA coating. - Abstract: Na-doped hydroxyapatite (Na-HA) coating was directly prepared onto carbon/carbon (C/C) composites using electrochemical deposition (ECD) and the mean thickness of the coating is approximately 10 ± 2 μm. The formed Na-HA crystals which are Ca-deficient, are rod-like with a hexagonal cross section. The Na/P molar ratios of the coating formed on C/C substrate is 0.097. During the deposition, the Na-HA crystals grow in both radial and longitudinal directions, and faster along the longitudinal direction. The pattern formation of crystal growth leads to dense coating which would help to increase the bonding strength of the coating. The average shear bonding strength of Na-HA coating on C/C is 5.55 ± 0.77 MPa. The in vitro bioactivity of the Na-HA coated C/C composites were investigated by soaking the samples in a simulated body fluid (SBF) for 14 days. The results indicate that the Na-HA coated C/C composites can rapidly induce bone-like apatite nucleation and growth on its surface in SBF. The in vitro cellular biocompatibility tests reveal that the Na-HA coating was better to improve the in vitro biocompatibility of C/C composites compared with hydroxyapatite (HA) coating. It was suggested that the Na-HA coating might be an effective method to improve the surface bioactivity and biocompatibility of C/C composites.

  17. Studies on pharmacological activation of human serum immunoglobulin G by chemical modification and active subfragments. IV. Induction of anti-inflammatory activity by chemical cleavage of interchain disulfide bonds in human immunoglobulin G and pharmacological activity of alkylated subfragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, T; Tsujikawa, K; Nakajima, H; Okabe, M; Kohama, Y; Iwai, M; Yokoyama, K

    1986-01-01

    Commercially available human serum immunoglobulin G (IgG, native IgG) was separated into two fractions (Fr.I and II) using a diethylaminoethyl cellulose column. Heavy and light chains containing fractions were obtained from these two fractions after carboxamide-methylation. Thus, these fractions were subjected to an anti-inflammatory screening procedure and were shown to have a potent inhibitory activity against rat carrageenin induced paw edema, while no effect was observed in native IgG, Fr.I or II. The reduction and alkylation of the interchain disulfide bonds were essential to induce the anti-inflammatory activity. The anti-inflammatory activity of alkylated heavy and light chains of Fr.I (Fr.I-H and I-L) was also noted in subacute inflammation caused by the felt pellet and croton oil granuloma methods. Moreover, strong membrane stabilizing activities of Fr.I-H and I-L were demonstrated in vitro using rat red blood cell membrane and liver lysosomal membrane. PMID:3712209

  18. Heterolytic cleavage of ammonia N-H bond by bifunctional activation in silica-grafted single site Ta(V) imido amido surface complex. Importance of the outer sphere NH3 assistance

    KAUST Repository

    Gouré, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia N-H bond is cleaved at room temperature by the silica-supported tantalum imido amido complex [(≡SiO)2Ta(NH)(-NH2)], 2, if excess ammonia is present, but requires 150 °C to achieve the same reaction if only one equivalent NH3 is added to 2. MAS solid-state 15N NMR and in situ IR spectroscopic studies of the reaction of either 15N or 2H labeled ammonia with 2 show that initial coordination of the ammonia is followed by scrambling of either 15N or 2H among ammonia, amido and imido groups. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations with a cluster model [{(μ-O)[(H3SiO) 2SiO]2}Ta(NH)(-NH2)(NH3)], 2 q·NH3, show that the intramolecular H transfer from Ta-NH2 to TaNH is ruled out, but the H transfers from the coordinated ammonia to the amido and imido groups have accessible energy barriers. The energy barrier for the ammonia N-H activation by the Ta-amido group is energetically preferred relative to the Ta-imido group. The importance of excess NH3 for getting full isotope scrambling is rationalized by an outer sphere assistance of ammonia acting as proton transfer agent, which equalizes the energy barriers for H transfer from coordinated ammonia to the amido and imido groups. In contrast, additional coordinated ammonia does not favor significantly the H transfer. These results rationalize the experimental conditions used. © The Royal Society of Chemistry and the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique 2011.

  19. Cleavage behaviors in nuclear vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleavage behaviors of nuclear vessel steels in the transition temperature range are reviewed. Viewpoints are presented to assist understanding of cleavage crack speed, cleavage initiation, cleavage arrest, and the sensitivity of fracture toughness to constraint and temperature. The importance of high local stress elevations by high strain rate is emphasized. This report is designated as HSST Report No. 149

  20. Selective cleavage enhanced by acetylating the side chain of lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Leixiaomeng; Chen, Tingting; Xue, Gaiqing; Zu, Lily; Fang, Weihai

    2013-01-01

    Selective cleavage is of great interest in mass spectrometry studies as it can help sequence identification by promoting simple fragmentation pattern of peptides and proteins. In this work, the collision-induced dissociation of peptides containing internal lysine and acetylated lysine residues were studied. The experimental and computational results revealed that multiple fragmentation pathways coexisted when the lysine residue was two amino acid residues away from N-terminal of the peptide. After acetylation of the lysine side-chain, b(n)+ ions were the most abundant primary fragment products and the Lys(Ac)-Gly amide bond became the dominant cleavage site via an oxazolone pathway. Acetylating the side-chain of lysine promoted the selective cleavage of Lys-Xxx amide bond and generated much more information of the peptide backbone sequence. The results re-evaluate the selective cleavage due to the lysine basic side-chain and provide information for studying the post-translational modification of proteins and other bio-molecules containing Lys residues. PMID:23303756

  1. Multielectron redox reactions involving C-C coupling and cleavage in uranium Schiff base complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction of U(III) with Schiff base ligands and the reduction of U(IV) Schiff base complexes both promote C-C bond formation to afford dinuclear or mononuclear U(IV) amido complexes, which can release up to four electrons to substrates through the oxidative cleavage of the C-C bond. (authors)

  2. Restricted Active Site Docking by Enzyme-bound Substrate Enforces the Ordered Cleavage of Prothrombin by Prothrombinase*

    OpenAIRE

    Hacisalihoglu, Ayse; Panizzi, Peter; Bock, Paul E.; Camire, Rodney M.; Krishnaswamy, Sriram

    2007-01-01

    The preferred pathway for prothrombin activation by prothrombinase involves initial cleavage at Arg320 to produce meizothrombin, which is then cleaved at Arg271 to liberate thrombin. Exosite binding drives substrate affinity and is independent of the bond being cleaved. The pathway for cleavage is determined by large differences in Vmax for cleavage at the two sites within intact prothrombin. By fluorescence binding studies in the absence of catalysis, we have assessed the ability of the indi...

  3. Thermal and electrochemically assisted Pd-Cl bond cleavage in the d9-d9 Pd2dppm2Cl2 complex by Pd3 dppm3COn+ clusters (n = 2, 1, 0).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cugnet, Cyril; Mugnier, Yves; Dal Molin, Sophie; Brevet, David; Lucas, Dominique; Harvey, Pierre D

    2007-04-16

    A new aspect of reactivity of the cluster [Pd3(dppm)3(micro3-CO)]n+, ([Pd3]n+, n = 2, 1, 0) with the low-valent metal-metal-bonded Pd2(dppm)2Cl2 dimer (Pd2Cl2) was observed using electrochemical techniques. The direct reaction between [Pd3]2+ and Pd2Cl2 in THF at room temperature leads to the known [Pd3(dppm)3(micro3-CO)(Cl)]+ ([Pd3(Cl)]+) adduct and the monocationic species Pd2(dppm)2Cl+ (very likely as Pd2(dppm)2(Cl)(THF)+, [Pd2Cl]+) as unambiguously demonstrated by UV-vis and 31P NMR spectroscopy. In this case, [Pd3]2+ acts as a strong Lewis acid toward the labile Cl- ion, which weakly dissociates from Pd2Cl2 (i.e., dissociative mechanism). Host-guest interactions between [Pd3]2+ and Pd2Cl2 seem unlikely on the basis of computer modeling because of the strong screening of the Pd-Cl fragment by the Ph-dppm groups in Pd2Cl2. The electrogenerated clusters [Pd3]+ and [Pd3]0 also react with Pd2Cl2 to unexpectedly form the same oxidized adduct, [Pd3(Cl)]+, despite the known very low affinity of [Pd3]+ and [Pd3]0 toward Cl- ions. The reduced biproduct in this case is the highly reactive zerovalent species "Pd2(dppm)2" or "Pd(dppm)" as demonstrated by quenching with CDCl3 (forming the well-known complex Pd(dppm)Cl2) or in presence of dppm (forming the known Pd2(dppm)3 d10-d10 dimer). To bring these halide-electron exchange reactions to completion for [Pd3]+ and [Pd3]0, 0.5 and 1.0 equiv of Pd2Cl2 are necessary, respectively, accounting perfectly for the number of exchanged electrons. The presence of a partial dissociation of Pd2Cl2 into the Cl- ion and the monocation [Pd2Cl]+, which is easier to reduce than Pd2Cl2, is suggested to explain the overall electrochemical results. It is possible to regulate the nature of the species formed from Pd2Cl2 by changing the state of charge of the title cluster. PMID:17371010

  4. Thermal and Mechanical Performance of a Carbon/Carbon Composite Spacecraft Radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Jonathan; Benner, Steve; Butler, Dan; Silk, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Carbon-carbon composite materials offer greater thermal efficiency, stiffness to weight ratio, tailorability, and dimensional stability than aluminum. These lightweight thermal materials could significantly reduce the overall costs associated with satellite thermal control and weight. However, the high cost and long lead-time for carbon-carbon manufacture have limited their widespread usage. Consequently, an informal partnership between government and industrial personnel called the Carbon-Carbon Spacecraft Radiator Partnership (CSRP) was created to foster carbon-carbon composite use for thermally and structurally demanding space radiator applications. The first CSRP flight opportunity is on the New Millennium Program (NMP) Earth Orbiter-1 (EO-1) spacecraft, scheduled for launch in late 1999. For EO-1, the CSRP designed and fabricated a Carbon-Carbon Radiator (CCR) with carbon-carbon facesheets and aluminum honeycomb core, which will also serve as a structural shear panel. While carbon-carbon is an ideal thermal candidate for spacecraft radiators, in practice there are technical challenges that may compromise performance. In this work, the thermal and mechanical performance of the EO-1 CCR is assessed by analysis and testing. Both then-nal and mechanical analyses were conducted to predict the radiator response to anticipated launch and on-orbit loads. The thermal model developed was based on thermal balance test conditions. The thermal analysis was performed using SINDA version 4.0. Structural finite element modeling and analysis were performed using SDRC/1-DEAS and UAI/NASTRAN, respectively. In addition, the CCR was subjected to flight qualification thermal/vacuum and vibration tests. The panel meets or exceeds the requirements for space flight and demonstrates promise for future satellite missions.

  5. A carbon-carbon composite materials development program for fusion energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-carbon composites increasingly are being used for plasma-facing component (PFC) applications in magnetic-confinement plasma-fusion devices. They offer substantial advantages such as enhanced physical and mechanical properties and superior thermal shock resistance compared to the previously favored bulk graphite. Next-generation plasma-fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX), will require advanced carbon-carbon composites possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated extreme thermal heat loads. This report outlines a program that will facilitate the development of advanced carbon-carbon composites specifically tailored to meet the requirements of ITER and BPX. A strategy for developing the necessary associated design data base is described. Materials property needs, i.e., high thermal conductivity, radiation stability, tritium retention, etc., are assessed and prioritized through a systems analysis of the functional, operational, and component requirements for plasma-facing applications. The current Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fusion Energy Program on carbon-carbon composites is summarized. Realistic property goals are set based upon our current understanding. The architectures of candidate PFC carbon-carbon composite materials are outlined, and architectural features considered desirable for maximum irradiation stability are described. The European and Japanese carbon-carbon composite development and irradiation programs are described. The Working Group conclusions and recommendations are listed. It is recommended that developmental carbon-carbon composite materials from the commercial sector be procured via request for proposal/request for quotation (RFP/RFQ) as soon as possible

  6. Intrinsic transcript cleavage activity of RNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Orlova, M; Newlands, J; Das, A; Goldfarb, A; Borukhov, S

    1995-01-01

    The GreA and GreB transcript cleavage factors of Escherichia coli suppress elongation arrest and may have a proofreading role in transcription. With the use of E. coli greA-greB- mutant, RNA polymerase is demonstrated to possess substantial intrinsic transcript cleavage activity. Mildly alkaline pH mimics the effect of the Gre proteins by inducing transcript cleavage in ternary complexes and antagonizing elongation arrest through a cleavage-and-restart reaction. Thus, transcript cleavage cons...

  7. The effect of neutron irradiation on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-based materials are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma facing components (PFCs) because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing extremely high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce high neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from an irradiation experiment are reported and discussed here. Fusion relevant graphite and carbon-carbon composites were irradiated in a target capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 1.59 dpa at 600 degrees C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included nuclear graphite grade H-451 and one-, two-, and three-directional carbon-carbon composite materials. Dimensional changes, thermal conductivity and strength are reported for the materials examined. The influence of fiber type, architecture, and heat treatment temperature on properties and irradiation behavior are reported. Carbon-Carbon composite dimensional changes are interpreted in terms of simple microstructural models

  8. Carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating for carbon/carbon composites: Microstructure and biocompatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To improve the surface biocompatibility of carbon/carbon composites, a carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was applied using a combination method of slurry procedure and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The biocompatibility of the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating was investigated by osteoblast-like MG63 cell culture tests. The results showed that the carbon foam could provide a large number of pores on the surface of carbon/carbon composites. The hydroxyapatite crystals could infiltrate into the pores and form the carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating. The coating covered the carbon/carbon composites fully and uniformly with slice morphology. The cell response tests showed that the MG63 cells on carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coating had a better cell adhesion and cell proliferation than those on uncoated carbon/carbon composites. The carbon foam/hydroxyapatite coatings were cytocompatible and were beneficial to improve the biocompatibility. The approach presented here may be exploited for fabrication of carbon/carbon composite implant surfaces.

  9. Facile scission of isonitrile carbon–nitrogen triple bond using a diborane(4) reagent

    OpenAIRE

    Asakawa, Hiroki; Lee, Ka-Ho; Lin, Zhenyang; Yamashita, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Transition metal reagents and catalysts are generally effective to cleave all three bonds (one σ and two π) in a triple bond despite its high bonding energy. Recently, chemistry of single-bond cleavage by using main-group element compounds is rapidly being developed in the absence of transition metals. However, the cleavage of a triple bond using non-transition-metal compounds is less explored. Here we report that an unsymmetrical diborane(4) compound could react with carbon monoxide and tert...

  10. Process for Making Carbon-Carbon Turbocharger Housing Unit for Intermittent Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved. lightweight, turbine housing unit for an intermittent combustion reciprocating internal combustion engine turbocharger is prepared from a lay-up or molding of carbon-carbon composite materials in a single-piece or two-piece process. When compared to conventional steel or cast iron, the use of carbon-carbon composite materials in a turbine housing unit reduces the overall weight of the engine and reduces the heat energy loss used in the turbo-charging process. This reduction in heat energy loss and weight reduction provides for more efficient engine operation.

  11. Passive Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition Control Using Ultrasonically Absorptive Carbon-Carbon Ceramic with Random Microstructure

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In the presented work ultrasonically absorptive carbon-carbon ceramic was shown for the first time to delay hypersonic laminar to turbulent boundarylayer transition. Three 7° half-angle cones with nose radii between 0.1 mm and 5.0 mm and a total length of 1100 mm were tested at zero angle of attack in the High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel Göttingen (HEG) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) at Mach 7.5. One model was equipped with an inhouse manufactured ultrasonically absorptive carbon-carbon ...

  12. Regioselective Cleavage of Thioether Linkages in Microcystin Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemskov, Ivan; Kropp, Heike M; Wittmann, Valentin

    2016-07-25

    Microcystins are cyanobacterial toxins that can be found in fresh and coastal waters during algal blooms. Microcystin contamination of water can cause severe poisoning of animals and humans. Quantification of these toxins in biological samples is complicated because a major proportion of microcystins is covalently linked to proteins through thioether bonds formed through a Michael-type addition of cysteine residues of proteins to an N-methyldehydroalanine residue in the microcystins. We investigated chemical methods that can be used to cleave such thioether bonds by means of an elimination reaction that leaves the microcystin backbone intact for subsequent analysis. The known reagent O-mesitylenesulfonylhydroxylamine (MSH) led to regioselective thioether cleavage, but a large excess of reagent was needed, thus making purification challenging. An unexpected side reaction observed during the investigation of the base-induced elimination inspired us to develop a new thioether-cleavage methodology based on the addition of propargylamine as a nucleophile that can trap the elimination product. This methodology could be successfully applied to the quantitative cleavage of a microcystin-LF-glutathione conjugate. The alkyne moiety introduced by this procedure offers the possibility for further reactions with azides by using click chemistry, which might be useful for the derivatization or isolation of microcystins. PMID:27346324

  13. Theoretical estimates of photoproduction cross sections for neutral subthreshold pions in carbon-carbon collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Using the Weizsacher-Williams method of virtual quanta, total cross section estimates for the photoproduction of neutral subthreshold pins in carbon-carbon collisions at incident energies below 300 MeV/nucleon are made. Comparisons with recent experimental data indicate that the photoproduction mechanism makes an insignificant contribution to these measured cross sections.

  14. Small Carbon-Carbon Couplings in Monosubstituted Benzenes - Their Signs and Magnitudes Determined by HCSE Method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blechta, Vratislav; Schraml, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 6 (2013), s. 378-381. ISSN 0749-1581 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010646 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : HCSE * carbon-carbon coupling sign * monosubstituted benzenes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.559, year: 2013

  15. Prediction on Carbon/Carbon Composites Ablative Performance by Artificial Neutral Net

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guanghui BAI; Songhe MENG; Boming ZHANG; Yang LIU

    2008-01-01

    A preliminary estimation of ablation property for carbon-carbon composites by artificial neutral net (ANN) method was presented.It was found that the carbon-carbon composites' density,degree of graphitization and the sort of matrix are the key controlling factors for its ablative performance.Then,a brief fuzzy mathe-matical relationship was established between these factors and ablative performance.Through experiments,the performance of the ANN was evaluated,which was used in the ablative performance prediction of C/C composites.When the training set,the structure and the training parameter of the net change,the best match ratio of these parameters was achieved.Based on the match ratio,this paper forecasts and evalu-ates the carbon-carbon ablation performance.Through experiences,the ablative performance prediction of carbon-carbon using ANN can achieve the line ablation rate,which satisfies the need of precision of practical engineering fields.

  16. Dinitrogen cleavage and hydrogenation by a trinuclear titanium polyhydride complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Takanori; Hu, Shaowei; Luo, Gen; Kang, Xiaohui; Luo, Yi; Hou, Zhaomin

    2013-06-28

    Both the Haber-Bosch and biological ammonia syntheses are thought to rely on the cooperation of multiple metals in breaking the strong N≡N triple bond and forming an N-H bond. This has spurred investigations of the reactivity of molecular multimetallic hydrides with dinitrogen. We report here the reaction of a trinuclear titanium polyhydride complex with dinitrogen, which induces dinitrogen cleavage and partial hydrogenation at ambient temperature and pressure. By (1)H and (15)N nuclear magnetic resonance, x-ray crystallographic, and computational studies of some key reaction steps and products, we have determined that the dinitrogen (N2) reduction proceeds sequentially through scission of a N2 molecule bonded to three Ti atoms in a μ-η(1):η(2):η(2)-end-on-side-on fashion to give a μ2-N/μ3-N dinitrido species, followed by intramolecular hydrogen migration from Ti to the μ2-N nitrido unit. PMID:23812710

  17. Centralspindlin in Rappaport's cleavage signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Masanori

    2016-05-01

    Cleavage furrow in animal cell cytokinesis is formed by cortical constriction driven by contraction of an actomyosin network activated by Rho GTPase. Although the role of the mitotic apparatus in furrow induction has been well established, there remain discussions about the detailed molecular mechanisms of the cleavage signaling. While experiments in large echinoderm embryos highlighted the role of astral microtubules, data in smaller cells indicate the role of central spindle. Centralspindlin is a constitutive heterotetramer of MKLP1 kinesin and the non-motor CYK4 subunit and plays crucial roles in formation of the central spindle and recruitment of the downstream cytokinesis factors including ECT2, the major activator of Rho during cytokinesis, to the site of division. Recent reports have revealed a role of this centralspindlin-ECT2 pathway in furrow induction both by the central spindle and by the astral microtubules. Here, a unified view of the stimulation of cortical contractility by this pathway is discussed. Cytokinesis, the division of the whole cytoplasm, is an essential process for cell proliferation and embryonic development. In animal cells, cytokinesis is executed using a contractile network of actin filaments driven by a myosin-II motor that constricts the cell cortex (cleavage furrow ingression) into a narrow channel between the two daughter cells, which is resolved by scission (abscission) [1-3]. The anaphase-specific organization of the mitotic apparatus (MA, spindle with chromosomes plus asters) positions the cleavage furrow and plays a major role in spatial coupling between mitosis and cytokinesis [4-6]. The nucleus and chromosomes are dispensable for furrow specification [7-10], although they contribute to persistent furrowing and robust completion in some cell types [11,12]. Likewise, centrosomes are not essential for cytokinesis, but they contribute to the general fidelity of cell division [10,13-15]. Here, classical models of cleavage furrow

  18. Various Carbon to Carbon Bond Lengths Inter-related via the Golden Ratio, and their Linear Dependence on Bond Energies

    OpenAIRE

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2008-01-01

    This work presents the relations between the carbon to carbon bond lengths in the single, double and triple bonds and in graphite, butadiene and benzene. The Golden ratio, which was shown to divide the Bohr radius into two parts pertaining to the charged particles, the electron and proton, and to divide inter-atomic distances into their cationic and anionic radii, also plays a role in the carbon-carbon bonds and in the ionic/polar character of those in graphite, butadiene and benzene. Further...

  19. Multi-physical field coupling simulation of TCVI process for preparing carbon/carbon composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    To prepare Carbon/Carbon (C/C) composites with advanced performance, the thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration (TCVI) process has been optimized by simulation. A 2D axisymmetric unstable model was built, which included convection, conduction, diffusion, densification reactions in the pores and the evolution of the porous medium. The multi-physical field coupling model was solved by finite element method (FEM) and iterative calculation. The time evolution of the fluid, temperature and preform density field were obtained by the calculation. It is indicated that convection strongly affects the temperature field. For the preform of carbon/carbon composites infiltrated for 100 h by TCVI, the radial average densities from simulation agrees well with those from experiment. The model is validated to be reliable and the simulation has capability of forecasting the process.

  20. Carbon-carbon composites for orthopedic prosthesis and implants. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T D; Klett, J W; Strizak, J P [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Baker, C [FMI, Biddeford, ME (United States)

    1998-01-21

    The prosthetic implant market is extensive. For example, because of arthritic degeneration of hip and knee cartilage and osteoporotic fractures of the hip, over 200,000 total joint replacements (TJRs) are performed in the United States each year. Current TJR devices are typically metallic (stainless steel, cobalt, or titanium alloy) and are fixed in the bone with polymethylacrylate (PMMA) cement. Carbon-carbon composite materials offer several distinct advantages over metals for TJR prosthesis. Their mechanical properties can be tailored to match more closely the mechanical properties of human bone, and the composite may have up to 25% porosity, the size and distribution of which may be controlled through processing. The porous nature of carbon-carbon composites will allow for the ingrowth of bone, achieving biological fixation, and eliminating the need for PMMA cement fixation.

  1. Carbon-Carbon Composites as Recuperator Materials for Direct Gas Brayton Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the numerous energy conversion options available for a space nuclear power plant (SNPP), one that shows promise in attaining reliable operation and high efficiency is the direct gas Brayton (GB) system. In order to increase efficiency, the GB system incorporates a recuperator that accounts for nearly half the weight of the energy conversion system (ECS). Therefore, development of a recuperator that is lighter and provides better performance than current heat exchangers could prove to be advantageous. The feasibility of a carbon-carbon (C/C) composite recuperator core has been assessed and a mass savings of 60% and volume penalty of 20% were projected. The excellent thermal properties, high-temperature capabilities, and low density of carbon-carbon materials make them attractive in the GB system, but development issues such as material compatibility with other structural materials in the system, such as refractory metals and superalloys, permeability, corrosion, joining, and fabrication must be addressed

  2. Carbon-Carbon Composites as Recuperator Material for Direct Gas Brayton Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RA Wolf

    2006-07-19

    Of the numerous energy conversion options available for a space nuclear power plant (SNPP), one that shows promise in attaining reliable operation and high efficiency is the direct gas Brayton (GB) system. In order to increase efficiency, the GB system incorporates a recuperator that accounts for nearly half the weight of the energy conversion system (ECS). Therefore, development of a recuperator that is lighter and provides better performance than current heat exchangers could prove to be advantageous. The feasibility of a carbon-carbon (C/C) composite recuperator core has been assessed and a mass savings of 60% and volume penalty of 20% were projected. The excellent thermal properties, high-temperature capabilities, and low density of carbon-carbon materials make them attractive in the GB system, but development issues such as material compatibility with other structural materials in the system, such as refractory metals and superalloys, permeability, corrosion, joining, and fabrication must be addressed.

  3. Erosion of carbon/carbon by solar wind charged particle radiation during a solar probe mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Witold; O'Donnell, Tim; Millard, Jerry

    1991-01-01

    The possible erosion of a carbon/carbon thermal shield by solar wind-charged particle radiation is reviewed. The present knowledge of erosion data for carbon and/or graphite is surveyed, and an explanation of erosion mechanisms under different charged particle environments is discussed. The highest erosion is expected at four solar radii. Erosion rates are analytically estimated under several conservative assumptions for a normal quiet and worst case solar wind storm conditions. Mass loss analyses and comparison studies surprisingly indicate that the predicted erosion rate by solar wind could be greater than by nominal free sublimation during solar wind storm conditions at four solar radii. The predicted overall mass loss of a carbon/carbon shield material during the critical four solar radii flyby can still meet the mass loss mission requirement of less than 0.0025 g/sec.

  4. Kinetics of hairpin ribozyme cleavage in yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    Donahue, C P; Fedor, M J

    1997-01-01

    Hairpin ribozymes catalyze a self-cleavage reaction that provides a simple model for quantitative analyses of intracellular mechanisms of RNA catalysis. Decay rates of chimeric mRNAs containing self-cleaving ribozymes give a direct measure of intracellular cleavage kinetics in yeast. Intracellular ribozyme-mediated cleavage occurs at similar rates and shows similar inhibition by ribozyme mutations as ribozyme-mediated reactions in vitro, but only when ribozymes are located in a favorable mRNA...

  5. Carbon-Carbon Cross Coupling Reactions in Ionic Liquids Catalysed by Palladium Metal Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Martin H. G. Prechtl; Scholten, Jackson D.; Jairton Dupont

    2010-01-01

    A brief summary of selected pioneering and mechanistic contributions in the field of carbon-carbon cross-coupling reactions with palladium nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) in ionic liquids (ILs) is presented. Five exemplary model systems using the Pd-NPs/ILs approach are presented: Heck, Suzuki, Stille, Sonogashira and Ullmann reactions which all have in common the use of ionic liquids as reaction media and the use of palladium nanoparticles as reservoir for the catalytically active palladium species.

  6. Improvement in char formability of phenolic resin for development of Carbon/Carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the processing of carbon/carbon composites using polymer resin as the matrix precursor, it is inevitable that a porous structure was formed after carbonization. As a result, densification by liquid phase impregnation followed by recarbonization is required to obtain a densified composite. Consequently, the char formability of resin is an important factor in reducing the number of densification cycles and hence the processing cost. In this study, a novel approach is adopted to improve the densification of carbon/carbon composites by using a new phenolic resin modified by pitch. For this purpose, soluble part of pitch was extracted and dispersed in resol type phenolic resin. The polymerization reaction was performed in presence of para-formaldehyde and a resol-pitch compound was obtained. The second compound was prepared by mixing novolac-furfural in 55:45 weight ratio containing 9% by weight hexamethylene tetramine. This compound was added to resol-pitch compound in 10,20,50 and 80 w %. The microstructure of carbonized resin was investigated by X-ray diffraction and char yield, and the linear and volumetric shrinkage were obtained. Results show that in 80:20 ratio of resol-pitch to novolac-furfural , the char yield would be maximized by 71% and volumetric shrinkage would be minimized at 16.4%. At the same time, XRD results indicate that the resin has a strong ability to graphitize carbon/carbon composites matrix as a necessary step for its processing

  7. Cleavage speed and implantation potential of early-cleavage embryos in IVF or ICSI cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Meng-Ju; Lee, Robert Kuo-Kuang; Lin, Ming-Huei; Hwu, Yuh-Ming

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether there is a correlation among early embryo cleavage, speed of cleavage, and implantation potential for in-vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). This retrospective study examined 112 cycles of IVF and 82 cycles of ICSI in patients less than 40 years of age. Early cleavage was defined as embryonic mitosis occurring 25–27 h after insemination. These day-3 embryos were then grouped according to cleavage speed (rapid, normal, and slow) ...

  8. Pre-mRNA 3’ Cleavage is Reversibly Inhibited In Vitro by Cleavage Factor Dephosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    During 3' end formation most pre-mRNAs undergo endonucleolytic cleavage and polyadenylation in the 3' untranslated region. Very little is known concerning the role that post-translational modifications play in the function and regulation of the factors required for 3' cleavage. Using the reconstituted pre-mRNA cleavage reaction, we find that non-specific dephosphorylation of HeLa cell nuclear extract leads to the loss of 3' cleavage activity. A variety of serine/threonine phosphatases inhibit...

  9. Lightweight, Ultra-High-Temperature, CMC-Lined Carbon/Carbon Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Matthew J.; Ramachandran, Gautham; Williams, Brian E.

    2011-01-01

    Carbon/carbon (C/C) is an established engineering material used extensively in aerospace. The beneficial properties of C/C include high strength, low density, and toughness. Its shortcoming is its limited usability at temperatures higher than the oxidation temperature of carbon . approximately 400 C. Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are used instead, but carry a weight penalty. Combining a thin laminate of CMC to a bulk structure of C/C retains all of the benefits of C/C with the high temperature oxidizing environment usability of CMCs. Ultramet demonstrated the feasibility of combining the light weight of C/C composites with the oxidation resistance of zirconium carbide (ZrC) and zirconium- silicon carbide (Zr-Si-C) CMCs in a unique system composed of a C/C primary structure with an integral CMC liner with temperature capability up to 4,200 F (.2,315 C). The system effectively bridged the gap in weight and performance between coated C/C and bulk CMCs. Fabrication was demonstrated through an innovative variant of Ultramet fs rapid, pressureless melt infiltration processing technology. The fully developed material system has strength that is comparable with that of C/C, lower density than Cf/SiC, and ultra-high-temperature oxidation stability. Application of the reinforced ceramic casing to a predominantly C/C structure creates a highly innovative material with the potential to achieve the long-sought goal of long-term, cyclic high-temperature use of C/C in an oxidizing environment. The C/C substructure provided most of the mechanical integrity, and the CMC strengths achieved appeared to be sufficient to allow the CMC to perform its primary function of protecting the C/C. Nozzle extension components were fabricated and successfully hot-fire tested. Test results showed good thermochemical and thermomechanical stability of the CMC, as well as excellent interfacial bonding between the CMC liner and the underlying C/C structure. In particular, hafnium-containing CMCs on

  10. Fracto—emissions in Catastrophic Cleavage Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HonglaiTAN; WeiYANG

    1996-01-01

    Fracto-emissions accompanying crack propagation are observed in the recent experiments.The energy impulses during and after fracture stimulate the fracto-emissions.Model concerning atomic scale cleavage processes is proposed to formulate a catastrophic fracure theory relevant to these phenomena.A criterion for catastrophic jump of the cleavage potential is applied to representative crystals.

  11. Microstructure and cleavage in lath martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we discuss the microstructure of lath martensitic steels and the mechanisms by which it controls cleavage fracture. The specific experimental example is a 9Ni (9 wt% Ni) steel annealed to have a large prior austenite grain size, then examined and tested in the as-quenched condition to produce a relatively coarse lath martensite. The microstructure is shown to approximate the recently identified ‘classic’ lath martensite structure: prior austenite grains are divided into packets, packets are subdivided into blocks, and blocks contain interleaved laths whose variants are the two Kurjumov–Sachs relations that share the same Bain axis of the transformation. When the steel is fractured in brittle cleavage, the laths in the block share {100} cleavage planes and cleave as a unit. However, cleavage cracks deflect or blunt at the boundaries between blocks with different Bain axes. It follows that, as predicted, the block size governs the effective grain size for cleavage. (paper)

  12. Collision-induced dissociation of fatty acid [M - 2H + Na]- ions: charge-directed fragmentation and assignment of double bond position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael C; Altvater, Jens; Gallagher, Thomas J; Nette, Geoffrey W

    2014-11-01

    The collision-induced dissociation (CID) of cationic fatty acid-metal ion complexes has been extensively studied and, in general, provides rich structural information. In particular, charge-remote fragmentation processes are commonly observed allowing the assignment of double bond position. In a previous manuscript, we presented two methods to doubly deprotonate polyunsaturated fatty acids to form anionic fatty acid-sodium ion complexes, referred to as [M - 2H + Na] (-) ions. In the current manuscript, the CID behavior of these [M - 2H + Na] (-) ions is investigated for the first time. Significantly, we also present a deuterium-labeling experiment, which excludes the possibility that deprotonation occurs predominately at the α-carbon in the formation of fatty acid [M - H + NaF](-) ions. This supports our original proposal where deprotonation occurs at the bis-allylic positions of polyunsaturated fatty acids. CID spectra of polyunsaturated fatty acid [M - 2H + Na](-) ions display abundant product ions arising from acyl chain cleavages. Through the examination of fatty acid isomers, it is demonstrated that double bond position may be unequivocally determined for methylene-interrupted polyunsaturated fatty acids with three or more carbon-carbon double bonds. In addition, CID of [M - 2H + Na](-) ions was applied to 18:3 isomers of Nannochloropsis oculata and three isomers were tentatively identified: ∆(9,12,15)18:3, ∆(6,9,12)18:3, and ∆(5,8,11)18:3. We propose that structurally-informative product ions are formed via charge-driven fragmentation processes at the site of the resonance-stabilized carbanion as opposed to charge-remote fragmentation processes, which could be inferred if deprotonation occurred predominately at the α-carbon. PMID:25142324

  13. The role of the plasma membrane and a non-lysosomal compartment in the disulfide cleavage of endocytosed macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cleavage of disulfide bonds in endocytosed macromolecules was investigated using new disulfide containing macromolecular conjugates. A conjugate, in which (125I-tyr) was linked to the nondegradable macromolecular carrier poly D-lysine (PDL) through a disulfide spacer (125I-tyr-SS-PDL), was used to monitor disulfide cleavage in adsorptive endocytosis in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Reductive cleavage of this probe released 3-thiopropionyl-125125I-tyramine, measurable as acid soluble radioactivity. In pulse experiments, reductive cleavage of 125I-tyr-SS-PDL differed in its kinetics from the proteolysis of 125I-labeled Poly L-lysine. Proteolytic degradation began after a 15 to 30 min lag, i.e. the time required for transport of poly(lysine) to heavy lysosomes, while reductive cleavage increased linearly between 0 and 15 min. In the first hour of chase, proteolytic and reductive cleavage amounted to 30% and 7% of the total cell bound radioactivity, respectively. The reductive cleavage observed during the first 30 min of chase was inhibited by 80-90% with cell impermeant sulfhydryl reagents [dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and p-chloromercuriphenyl-sulfonate], which indicated that cleavage occurred at the cell surface. In contrast, disulfide cleavage observed after 1 hr chase was not significantly inhibited by these reagents and, therefore, resulted from an intracellular process. Subcellular fractionation demonstrated that lysosomes could be excluded as a site of disulfide cleavage, but that a subcellular fraction characterized by a buoyant density of 1.03g/ml was associated with the cleavage of 125I-tyr-SS-PDL. Of the relevant structures which constitute this subcellular fraction, early endosomes and plasma membrane could be excluded as the reducing structures on the basis of kinetic considerations

  14. ABLATION PROPERTY OF SiC-TaSi2 COATED CARBON/CARBON COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    SHUPING LI; KEZHI LI; HEJUN LI

    2010-01-01

    To prevent the carbon/carbon (C/C) composites from ablation, a new type of ablation protective coating was prepared on the surface of the C/C composites by a step pack cementation technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis show, the coatings obtained by pack cementation were silicon carbide/tantalum silicide (SiC-TaSi2). The ablation behavior of the coated samples were evaluated by the oxyacetylene flame. The results show that, the SiC-TaSi2 coating can...

  15. Radiation stability of carbon-carbon composites after high-temperature neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-carbon composites of fibers (CCCF) differing in construction and structure are investigated in the present work under conditions of neutron irradiation. The minimal cross section of the samples (4 x 4, 5 x 5, 8 x 8 mm) was chosen on the basis of the structural features of the composite and the sizes of the product. The following characteristics were determined for samples before and after irradiation: density, bending, compression strength, dynamic elastic modulus, thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, thermal coefficient of linear expansion, and unit-cell constant. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab

  16. Model for the Effect of Fiber Bridging on the Fracture Resistance of Reinforced-Carbon-Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kwai S.; Lee, Yi-Der; Hudak, Stephen J., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    A micromechanical methodology has been developed for analyzing fiber bridging and resistance-curve behavior in reinforced-carbon-carbon (RCC) panels with a three-dimensional (3D) composite architecture and a silicon carbide (SiC) surface coating. The methodology involves treating fiber bridging traction on the crack surfaces in terms of a weight function approach and a bridging law that relates the bridging stress to the crack opening displacement. A procedure has been developed to deduce material constants in the bridging law from the linear portion of the K-resistance curve. This report contains information on the application of procedures and outcomes.

  17. Experiments on schistosity and slaty cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, George Ferdinand

    1904-01-01

    Schistosity as a structure is important, and it is a part of the business of geologists to explain its origin. Slaty cleavage has further and greater importance as a possible tectonic feature. Scarcely a great mountain range exists, or has existed, along the course of which belts of slaty rock are not found, the dip of the cleavage usually approaching verticality. Are these slate belts equivalent to minutely distributed step faults of great total throw, or do they indicate compression perpendicular to the cleavage without attendant relative dislocation? Evidently the answer to this question is of first importance in the interpretation of orogenic phenomena.

  18. Metalloradical-Catalyzed Selective 1,2-Rh-H Insertion into the Aliphatic Carbon-Carbon Bond of Cyclooctane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.W. Chan; B. de Bruin; K.S. Chan

    2015-01-01

    The selective aliphatic carboncarbon activation of cyclo-octane (c-octane) was achieved via the Rh-II(ttp)-catalyzed 1,2-addition of Rh(ttp)H to give Rh(ttp)(n-octyl) (ttp = tetratolylporphyrinato dianion) in good yield under mild reaction conditions. This mechanism is further supported by DFT calcu

  19. Photocatalytic carbon-carbon bond formation with concurrent hydrogen evolution on the Pt/TiO2 nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Yang, Pengju; Cao, Baoyue; Zhao, Jianghong; Zhu, Zhenping

    2015-01-01

    The photocatalytic H2-production from water by using different aliphatic alcohols as sacrifice agent, over Pt/TiO2 nanotube, has been studied. The rate of H2-production over Pt/TiO2 showed the following trend: methanol > ethanol > i-propanol > n-propanol > sec-butanol > tert-butanol. Moreover, it was found that the aliphatic alcohols after photocatalytic reaction, including ethanol, n-propanol, i-propanol, sec-butanol and tert-butanol, were successfully coupled to corresponding dihydric alcohol such as 2,3-butanol, pinacol, 3,4-hexanediol, 3,4-dimethyl-3,4-hexanediol and 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-hexanediol. The effect of reaction condition on the Csbnd C coupling of alcohols was also investigated, and the possible mechanism of Csbnd C coupling depend on whether α-C radicals oxidized by hole or rad OH can fast strip from the TiO2 surface.

  20. Cleavage site analysis in picornaviral polyproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Nikolaj; Hansen, Jan; Blaas, Dieter;

    1996-01-01

    Picornaviral proteinases are responsible for maturation cleavages of the viral polyprotein, but also catalyze the degradation of cellular targets. Using graphical visualization techniques and neural network algorithms, we have investigated the sequence specificity of the two proteinases 2Apro and 3......Cpro. The cleavage of VP0 (giving rise to VP2 and VP4), which is carried out by a so-far unknown proteinase, was also examined. In combination with a novel surface exposure prediction algorithm, our neural network approach successfully distinguishes known cleavage sites from nocleavage sites and yields...... a more consistent definition of features common to these sites. The method is able to predict experimentally determined cleavage sites in cellular proteins. We present a list of mammalian and other proteins that are predicted to be possible targets for the viral proteinases. Whether these proteins...

  1. Centrosomes: CNN's Broadcast Reaches the Cleavage Furrow

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, William

    2009-01-01

    Centrosomin (CNN), a core Drosophila centrosome protein, interacts with the newly identified protein Centrocortin to promote cleavage furrow formation in the early embryo. Significantly, this activity is distinct from CNN's well-established role in centrosome-based microtubule organization.

  2. Application of Eddy Current Techniques for Orbiter Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Simpson, John

    2005-01-01

    The development and application of advanced nondestructive evaluation techniques for the Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC) components of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS) was identified as a crucial step toward returning the shuttle fleet to service. In order to help meet this requirement, eddy current techniques have been developed for application to RCC components. Eddy current technology has been found to be particularly useful for measuring the protective coating thickness over the reinforced carbon-carbon and for the identification of near surface cracking and voids in the RCC matrix. Testing has been performed on as manufactured and flown RCC components with both actual and fabricated defects representing impact and oxidation damage. Encouraging initial results have led to the development of two separate eddy current systems for in-situ RCC inspections in the orbiter processing facility. Each of these systems has undergone blind validation testing on a full scale leading edge panel, and recently transitioned to Kennedy Space Center to be applied as a part of a comprehensive RCC inspection strategy to be performed in the orbiter processing facility after each shuttle flight.

  3. Preparation of PAN/phenolic-based carbon/carbon composites with flexible towpreg carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon/carbon composites made with flexible towpreg carbon fiber as reinforcement and phenolic resins as matrix precursor were impregnated with pitch during re-carbonization process. The structural characteristics of the composites were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), three-point bending tests, Archimedes' method and water adsorption. Results showed that the density of the carbon/carbon composites increases from 1.45 to 1.54 g/cm3 with the cycles of pitch impregnated and re-carbonization. Open porosity measurement indicated that the increase of porosity resulted from the decomposition of phenolic resin matrix, and the open porosity of the composite gradually decreased after the impregnation and re-carbonization process. These composites also exhibited an improvement in flexural strength with increasing number of densification cycles. From SEM morphological observation, it was concluded that few cracks appeared in the surfaces and a few smaller pores with a diameter <1 μm could be observed

  4. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) for Characterizing Oxidation Damage in Cracked Reinforced Carbon-Carbon (RCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Don J.; Rauser, Richard W.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Walker, James L.; Cosgriff, Laura A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, coated reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples of similar structure and composition as that from the NASA space shuttle orbiter's thermal protection system were fabricated with slots in their coating simulating craze cracks. These specimens were used to study oxidation damage detection and characterization using nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods. These specimens were heat treated in air at 1143 and 1200 C to create cavities in the carbon substrate underneath the coating as oxygen reacted with the carbon and resulted in its consumption. The cavities varied in diameter from approximately 1 to 3 mm. Single-sided NDE methods were used since they might be practical for on-wing inspection, while x-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) was used to measure cavity sizes in order to validate oxidation models under development for carbon-carbon materials. An RCC sample having a naturally-cracked coating and subsequent oxidation damage was also studied with x-ray micro-CT. This effort is a follow-on study to one that characterized NDE methods for assessing oxidation damage in an RCC sample with drilled holes in the coating.

  5. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) for Characterizing Oxidation Damage in Cracked Reinforced Carbon-Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Don J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Rauser, Richard W.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Walker, James L.; Cosgriff, Laura A.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, coated reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) samples of similar structure and composition as that from the NASA space shuttle orbiter's thermal protection system were fabricated with slots in their coating simulating craze cracks. These specimens were used to study oxidation damage detection and characterization using nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods. These specimens were heat treated in air at 1143 C and 1200 C to create cavities in the carbon substrate underneath the coating as oxygen reacted with the carbon and resulted in its consumption. The cavities varied in diameter from approximately 1 to 3mm. Single-sided NDE methods were used because they might be practical for on-wing inspection, while X-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) was used to measure cavity sizes in order to validate oxidation models under development for carbon-carbon materials. An RCC sample having a naturally cracked coating and subsequent oxidation damage was also studied with X-ray micro-CT. This effort is a follow-on study to one that characterized NDE methods for assessing oxidation damage in an RCC sample with drilled holes in the coating.

  6. Preparation and physical properties of vapour-deposited carbon-carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its first part, this research thesis reports a bibliographical study on methods of preparation of various types of vapour-deposited (CVD) carbons, and the author notices that only structure and texture properties of these macroscopically homogeneous pyro-carbons have been studied in detail. For a better understanding of the behaviour of carbon-carbon composites, this thesis thus reports the study of the relationships between physical properties, macroscopic texture and microscopic structure. A densification installation and methods of characterisation have been developed. The fabrication process and its installation are presented (oven with its temperature and gas rate controls, study of its thermal gradient, substrate, heat treatments), and the study and characterisation of carbon-carbon composites are reported: structure and texture properties (studied by optic and scanning electronic microscopy, density measurements, and X-ray diffraction), physical properties (electronic paramagnetic resonance, static magnetism, electric and thermal conductivity). In the last part, the author comments and discusses the obtained results: conditions of preparation, existence, physical properties of the different observed microstructures

  7. Characterization of carbon/carbon composites prepared by different processing routes including liquid pitch densification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon/carbon composites with an apparent density higher than 1.80 g/cm3 were prepared using a multi-step densification process. This consists of a pre-densification step followed by pitch impregnation/pyrolysis (I/P) cycles carried out under moderate pressure. Three pre-densification methods were investigated to significantly increase the apparent density of a raw preform to about 1.4 g/cm3. These were:(i) impregnation by carbonaceous powder slurry, (ii) film boiling chemical vapor infiltration, (iii) impregnation with a combination of synthetic pitch I/P and carbonaceous powder slurry. Composites were prepared from each of these three pre-densified materials, using a liquid pitch processing route with four I/P cycles with M50 petroleum pitch, under moderate pressures (10 MPa). As a reference a carbon/carbon composite was prepared using four I/P cycles with pitch. All four composites had different microstructural characteristics and different thermal properties. The influence of processing on thermal properties is discussed in relation to the microstructural characteristics. (authors)

  8. Mechanical testing and modelling of carbon-carbon composites for aircraft disc brakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Luke R.

    The objective of this study is to improve the understanding of the stress distributions and failure mechanisms experienced by carbon-carbon composite aircraft brake discs using finite element (FE) analyses. The project has been carried out in association with Dunlop Aerospace as an EPSRC CASE studentship. It therefore focuses on the carbon-carbon composite brake disc material produced by Dunlop Aerospace, although it is envisaged that the approach will have broader applications for modelling and mechanical testing of carbon-carbon composites in general. The disc brake material is a laminated carbon-carbon composite comprised of poly(acrylonitrile) (PAN) derived carbon fibres in a chemical vapour infiltration (CVI) deposited matrix, in which the reinforcement is present in both continuous fibre and chopped fibre forms. To pave the way for the finite element analysis, a comprehensive study of the mechanical properties of the carbon-carbon composite material was carried out. This focused largely, but not entirely, on model composite materials formulated using structural elements of the disc brake material. The strengths and moduli of these materials were measured in tension, compression and shear in several orientations. It was found that the stress-strain behaviour of the materials were linear in directions where there was some continuous fibre reinforcement, but non-linear when this was not the case. In all orientations, some degree of non-linearity was observed in the shear stress-strain response of the materials. However, this non-linearity was generally not large enough to pose a problem for the estimation of elastic moduli. Evidence was found for negative Poisson's ratio behaviour in some orientations of the material in tension. Additionally, the through-thickness properties of the composite, including interlaminar shear strength, were shown to be positively related to bulk density. The in-plane properties were mostly unrelated to bulk density over the range of

  9. Numerical simulation of isothermal chemical vapor infiltration process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites by finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李克智; 李贺军; 姜开宇

    2000-01-01

    The chemical vapor infiltration process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites is highly inefficient and requires long processing time. These limitations add considerably to the cost of fabrication and restrict the application of this material. Efforts have been made to study the CVI process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites by computer simulation and predict the process parameters, density, porosity, etc. According to the characteristics of CVI process, the basic principle of FEM and mass transport, the finite element model has been established. Incremental finite element equations and the elemental stiffness matrices have been derived for the first time. The finite element program developed by the authors has been used to simulate the ICVI process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites. Computer color display of simulated results can express the densification and distributions of density and porosity in preform clearly. The influence of process parameters on the densification of prefo

  10. The mechanical property and resistance ability to atomic oxygen corrosion of boron modified carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Before being densified by chemical vapor deposition, carbon preform was modified by boron. The mechanical property and resistance to atomic oxygen corrosion of carbon/carbon composites were investigated. The results show that fiber surface modification induces the deposition of high texture pyrocarbon and a moderate interfacial transition layer between carbon fibers and matrix carbon. After being modified by boron, the flexural and compressive strength of carbon/carbon composite is significantly increased. The bending curve has been adjusted with obvious pseudo-ductility phenomenon. The resistance ability to atomic oxygen corrosion is improved significantly. The mass loss and corrosion degree of the modified composite are lower than that of pure carbon/carbon composite

  11. Distinct mechanisms for DNA cleavage by myoglobin with a designed heme active center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan; Du, Ke-Jie; Gao, Shu-Qin; He, Bo; Wen, Ge-Bo; Tan, Xiangshi; Lin, Ying-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Heme proteins perform diverse biological functions, of which myoglobin (Mb) is a representative protein. In this study, the O2 carrier Mb was shown to cleave double stranded DNA upon aerobic dithiothreitol-induced reduction, which is fine-tuned by an additional distal histidine, His29 or His43, engineered in the heme active center. Spectroscopic (UV-vis and EPR) and inhibition studies suggested that free radicals including singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical are responsible for efficient DNA cleavage via an oxidative cleavage mechanism. On the other hand, L29E Mb, with a distinct heme active center involving three water molecules in the met form, was found to exhibit an excellent DNA cleavage activity that was not depending on O2. Inhibition and ligation studies demonstrated for the first time that L29E Mb cleaves double stranded DNA into both the nicked circular and linear forms via a hydrolytic cleavage mechanism, which resembles native endonucleases. This study provides valuable insights into the distinct mechanisms for DNA cleavage by heme proteins, and lays down a base for creating artificial DNA endonucleases by rational design of heme proteins. Moreover, this study suggests that the diverse functions of heme proteins can be fine-tuned by rational design of the heme active center with a hydrogen-bonding network. PMID:26775281

  12. Catalysts of DNA Strand Cleavage at Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minko, Irina G; Jacobs, Aaron C; de Leon, Arnie R; Gruppi, Francesca; Donley, Nathan; Harris, Thomas M; Rizzo, Carmelo J; McCullough, Amanda K; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are constantly formed in cellular DNA due to instability of the glycosidic bond, particularly at purines and various oxidized, alkylated, or otherwise damaged nucleobases. AP sites are also generated by DNA glycosylases that initiate DNA base excision repair. These lesions represent a significant block to DNA replication and are extremely mutagenic. Some DNA glycosylases possess AP lyase activities that nick the DNA strand at the deoxyribose moiety via a β- or β,δ-elimination reaction. Various amines can incise AP sites via a similar mechanism, but this non-enzymatic cleavage typically requires high reagent concentrations. Herein, we describe a new class of small molecules that function at low micromolar concentrations as both β- and β,δ-elimination catalysts at AP sites. Structure-activity relationships have established several characteristics that appear to be necessary for the formation of an iminium ion intermediate that self-catalyzes the elimination at the deoxyribose ring. PMID:27363485

  13. Does Cleavage Work at Work? Men, but Not Women, Falsely Believe Cleavage Sells a Weak Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Peter; Chrislock, Karyna; Petersik, Korinne; Vijay, Madhuri; Turek, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    We examined whether men, but not women, would be distracted by a female sales representative's exposed cleavage, leading to greater perceived efficacy for a weak, but not for a strong product. A community sample of 88 men and 97 women viewed a video of a female pharmaceutical sales representative who (a) had exposed cleavage or dressed modestly…

  14. The potato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 catalyzes a single cleavage of β-ionone ring-containing carotenes and non-epoxidated xanthophylls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Mark; Beyer, Peter; Al-Babili, Salim

    2015-04-15

    Down-regulation of the potato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 (StCCD4) transcript level led to tubers with altered morphology and sprouting activity, which also accumulated higher levels of violaxanthin and lutein leading to elevated carotenoid amounts. This phenotype indicates a role of this enzyme in tuber development, which may be exerted by a cleavage product. In this work, we investigated the enzymatic activity of StCCD4, by expressing the corresponding cDNA in carotenoid accumulating Escherichia coli strains and by performing in vitro assays with heterologously expressed enzyme. StCCD4 catalyzed the cleavage of all-trans-β-carotene at the C9'-C10' double bond, leading to β-ionone and all-trans-β-apo-10'-carotenal, both in vivo and in vitro. The enzyme also cleaved β,β-cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein either at the C9'-C10' or the C9-C10 double bond in vitro. In contrast, we did not observe any conversion of violaxanthin and only traces of activity with 9-cis-β-carotene, which led to 9-cis-β-apo-10'-carotenal. Our data indicate that all-trans-β-carotene is the likely substrate of StCCD4 in planta, and that this carotene may be precursor of an unknown compound involved in tuber development. PMID:25703194

  15. The potato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 catalyzes a single cleavage of β-ionone ring-containing carotenes and non-epoxidated xanthophylls

    KAUST Repository

    Bruno, Mark

    2015-04-01

    Down-regulation of the potato carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 4 (StCCD4) transcript level led to tubers with altered morphology and sprouting activity, which also accumulated higher levels of violaxanthin and lutein leading to elevated carotenoid amounts. This phenotype indicates a role of this enzyme in tuber development, which may be exerted by a cleavage product. In this work, we investigated the enzymatic activity of StCCD4, by expressing the corresponding cDNA in carotenoid accumulating Escherichia coli strains and by performing in vitro assays with heterologously expressed enzyme. StCCD4 catalyzed the cleavage of all-. trans-β-carotene at the C9\\'-C10\\' double bond, leading to β-ionone and all-. trans-β-apo-10\\'-carotenal, both in vivo and in vitro. The enzyme also cleaved β,β-cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein either at the C9\\'-C10\\' or the C9-C10 double bond in vitro. In contrast, we did not observe any conversion of violaxanthin and only traces of activity with 9-. cis-β-carotene, which led to 9-. cis-β-apo-10\\'-carotenal. Our data indicate that all-. trans-β-carotene is the likely substrate of StCCD4 in planta, and that this carotene may be precursor of an unknown compound involved in tuber development.

  16. THE BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF FERRET CAROTENE-9', 10'-MONOOXYGENASE CATALYZING CLEAVAGE OF CAROTENOIDS IN VITRO AND IN VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that beta -carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase (CMO1) catalyzes the cleavage of beta -carotene at the central carbon 15, 15’-double bond, but cleaves lycopene with much lower activity. However, expressing the mouse carotene-9’,10’-monooxygenase (CMO2) in beta-carotene/lycopene...

  17. Carbon-Carbon Recuperators in Closed-Brayton-Cycle Space Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Michael J.; Johnson, Paul K.; Naples, Andrew G.

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of using carbon-carbon (C-C) recuperators in conceptual closed-Brayton-cycle space power conversion systems was assessed. Recuperator performance expectations were forecast based on notional thermodynamic cycle state values for potential planetary missions. Resulting thermal performance, mass and volume for plate-fin C-C recuperators were estimated and quantitatively compared with values for conventional offset-strip-fin metallic designs. Mass savings of 30 to 60 percent were projected for C-C recuperators with effectiveness greater than 0.9 and thermal loads from 25 to 1400 kWt. The smaller thermal loads corresponded with lower mass savings; however, 60 percent savings were forecast for all loads above 300 kWt. System-related material challenges and compatibility issues were also discussed.

  18. Fractal characterization of pore microstructure evolution in carbon/carbon composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI MiaoLing; QI LeHua; LI HeJun; XU GuoZhong

    2009-01-01

    A fractal characterization approach was proposed to research pore microstructure evolution in carbon/carbon (C/C) composites during the chemical vapor infiltration process. The data obtained from mercury porosimetry determinations were analyzed using the sponge fractal model and the thermodynamics relation fractal model, respectively. The fractal dimensions of C/C composites at different densification stages were evaluated. The pore microstructure evolution with densification time was studied by fractal dimension analysis. The results showed that ClC composites belong to porous fractal structure. The fractal dimensions increase on the whole with decreasing porosity as the densification proceeds. The fractal dimensions are influenced by the texture of pyrocarbon and decrease with increasing anisotropy from isotropic pyrocarbon to high textural one. Both the complicacy of pore structure and the textural morphology of pyrocarbon can be represented simultaneously by the fractal dimension. The pore evolution of C/C composites in the densification process can be monitored using fractal dimension.

  19. Sodium VCHP with Carbon-Carbon Radiator for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Miller, William O.; Ramirez, Rogelio

    2010-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. The Stirling converter normally provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS at the cost of an earlier termination of the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) can be used to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. A sodium VCHP with a Haynes 230 envelope was designed and fabricated for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), with a baseline 850° C heater head temperature. When the Stirling convertor is stopped, the heat from the GPHS is rejected to the Cold Side Adapter Flange using a low-mass, carbon-carbon radiator. The VCHP is designed to activate with a AT of 30° C. The 880° C temperature when the Stirling convertor is stopped is high enough to avoid risking standard ASRG operation, but low enough to save most of the heater head life. The VCHP has low mass and low thermal losses for normal operation. The design has been modified from an earlier, stainless steel prototype with a nickel radiator. In addition to replacing the nickel radiator with a low mass carbon-carbon radiator, the radiator location has been moved from the ASRG case to the cold side adapter flange. This flange already removes two-thirds of the heat during normal operation, so it is optimized to transfer heat to the case. The VCHP was successfully tested with a turn-on ΔT of 30° C in three orientations: horizontal, gravity-aided, and against gravity.

  20. Hyperspectral Analysis of Soil Nitrogen, Carbon, Carbonate, and Organic Matter Using Regression Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Monika Moskal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of soil attributes using hyperspectral sensors has revealed patterns in soil spectra that are known to respond to mineral composition, organic matter, soil moisture and particle size distribution. Soil samples from different soil horizons of replicated soil series from sites located within Washington and Oregon were analyzed with the FieldSpec Spectroradiometer to measure their spectral signatures across the electromagnetic range of 400 to 1,000 nm. Similarity rankings of individual soil samples reveal differences between replicate series as well as samples within the same replicate series. Using classification and regression tree statistical methods, regression trees were fitted to each spectral response using concentrations of nitrogen, carbon, carbonate and organic matter as the response variables. Statistics resulting from fitted trees were: nitrogen R2 0.91 (p < 0.01 at 403, 470, 687, and 846 nm spectral band widths, carbonate R2 0.95 (p < 0.01 at 531 and 898 nm band widths, total carbon R2 0.93 (p < 0.01 at 400, 409, 441 and 907 nm band widths, and organic matter R2 0.98 (p < 0.01 at 300, 400, 441, 832 and 907 nm band widths. Use of the 400 to 1,000 nm electromagnetic range utilizing regression trees provided a powerful, rapid and inexpensive method for assessing nitrogen, carbon, carbonate and organic matter for upper soil horizons in a nondestructive method.

  1. Eurosceptism: the Birth of a New Cleavage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Viviani

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Euroscepticism is an ambivalent and polysemic concept, consisting of the theme of the European identity, the construction of European Union as new polity, the development of an opposition as expression of new social cleavage, and finally the perspective of an ideological politicization of the european integration by national and supranational political actors. The article attempts to make light on the nature and on the dynamics of development of the euroscepticism through a sequence of analysis that starts from the identity of Europe (what we mean by euroscepticism, then addresses the social dimension of Europe (what we mean by the new european cleavage, and it finally examines the political dimension (the risks and opportunities of politicization by political parties of the european cleavage.

  2. Activation of the C−N Bond in Nitromethane by Palladium α-Diimine Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Golisz, Suzanne R.; Hazari, Nilay; Labinger, Jay A.; Bercaw, John E.

    2009-01-01

    The reaction of glyoxal-derived α-diimines with palladium acetates in nitromethane leads to cleavage of the C−N bond in nitromethane, to give palladium nitro complexes in which the α-diimine ligand has been methylated.

  3. Cleavage of cytoplasm within the oligonucleate zoosporangia of allomyces macrogynus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yunjeong; Song, Youngsun; Kim, Namhun; Youn, Hyunjoo; Kang, Minkook; Song, Yurim; Cho, Chungwon

    2014-01-01

    Allomyces macrogynus produces zoosporangia that discharge uninucleate zoospores after cleavage of multinucleate cytoplasm. Cleavage of cytoplasm within the oligonucleate zoosporangia of A. macrogynus was visualized by constructing three-dimensional models based on electron micrographs and confocal images. In oligonucleate zoosporangia, three adjacent nuclei can form three cleavage planes with a line of intersection of the planes. The position and boundary of the cleavage planes are thought to be determined by the relative positions of the nuclei. The establishment of three cleavage planes by cleavage membranes occurred sequentially, and the nuclear axis connecting the centers of two nuclei affected the development of cleavage membranes on each cleavage plane. In multinucleate zoosporangia, groups of three neighboring nuclei near the cell cortex may initiate the sequential establishment of cleavage planes and then may interact with the nuclei further from the cortex until the interactions of nuclei are propagated to the central region of the cytoplasm. PMID:24871589

  4. Role of trypsin-like cleavage at arginine 192 in the enzymatic and cytotonic activities of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    OpenAIRE

    C.C. Grant; Messer, R J; Cieplak, W

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies of cholera toxin and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin have suggested that proteolytic cleavage plays an important role in the expression of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and toxicity. Specifically, several studies have implicated a trypsin-like cleavage at arginine 192, which lies within an exposed region subtended by a disulfide bond in the intact A subunit, in toxicity. To investigate the role of this modification in the enzymatic and cytotonic properties of heat-...

  5. Prediction of proprotein convertase cleavage sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duckert, Peter; Brunak, Søren; Blom, Nikolaj

    2004-01-01

    has created additional focus on proprotein processing. We have developed a method for prediction of cleavage sites for PCs based on artificial neural networks. Two different types of neural networks have been constructed: a furin-specific network based on experimental results derived from the...

  6. Cleavage site analysis in picornaviral polyproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Nikolaj; Hansen, Jan; Blaas, Dieter; Brunak, Søren

    1996-01-01

    are indeed cleaved awaits experimental verification. Additionally, we report several errors detected in the protein databases. A computer server for prediction of cleavage sites by picornaviral proteinases is publicly available at the e-mail address NetPicoRNA@cbs.dtu.dk or via WWW at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetPicoRNA...

  7. Extension of microwave-accelerated residue-specific acid cleavage to proteins with carbohydrate side chains and disulfide linkages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinxi; Shefcheck, Kevin; Callahan, John; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-12-01

    This laboratory has introduced a chemical method for residue-specific protein cleavage and has provided a preliminary assessment of the suitability of microwave-accelerated acid cleavage as a proteomic tool. This report is a continuing assessment of the fate of common protein modifications in microwave-accelerated acid cleavage. We have examined the cleavage of ribonuclease A and the related N-linked glycoprotein ribonuclease B, and the O-linked glycoprotein alpha crystallin A chain, using MALDI-TOF and LC-ESI-MS to identify the peptide products. RNase A and B each contains four disulfide bonds, and the addition of a reducing reagent, such as dithiothreitol, was found to be required to achieve efficient acidic proteolysis. The linkage of the glycosidic group to the asparagine side chain in ribonuclease B was found not to be cleaved by brief microwave treatment in 12.5% acetic acid. The distribution of the heterogeneous carbohydrate side chain in the glycopeptide products of acid cleavage was compared to that of the glycopeptide products of tryptic digestion. Hydrolysis within the carbohydrate chain itself is minimal under the conditions used. The O-linked side chain on alpha crystalline A was found to be cleaved during acid cleavage of the protein.

  8. Cross talk between the +73/294 interaction and the cleavage site in RNase P RNA mediated cleavage

    OpenAIRE

    Brännvall, Mathias; Kikovska, Ema; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2004-01-01

    To monitor functionally important metal ions and possible cross talk in RNase P RNA mediated cleavage we studied cleavage of substrates, where the 2′OH at the RNase P cleavage site (at −1) and/or at position +73 had been replaced with a 2′ amino group (or 2′H). Our data showed that the presence of 2′ modifications at these positions affected cleavage site recognition, ground state binding of substrate and/or rate of cleavage. Cleavage of 2′ amino substituted substrates at different pH showed ...

  9. Bond Boom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The Ministry of Finance recently kick-started a pilot program allowing local governments of Shanghai and Shenzhen,and Zhejiang and Guangdong provinces to issue bonds for the first time.How will the new policy affect fiscal capacities of local governments and the broader economy? What else should the country do to build a healthy bond market? Economists and experts discussed these issues in an interview with the Shanghai Securities Journal.Edited excerpts follow.

  10. Bond Boom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The Ministry of Finance recently kick-started a pilot program allowing local governments of Shanghai and Shenzhen, and Zhejiang and Guangdong provinces to issue bonds for the first time. How will the new policy affect fiscal capacities of local governments and the broader economy? What else should the country do to build a healthy bond market? Economists and experts discussed these issues in an interview with the ShanghaiSecuritiesJournal. Edited excerpts follow:

  11. Autoproteolytic Cleavage and Activation of Human Acid Ceramidase*

    OpenAIRE

    Shtraizent, Nataly; Eliyahu, Efrat; Park, Jae-Ho; He, Xingxuan; Shalgi, Ruth; Schuchman, Edward H.

    2008-01-01

    Herein we report the mechanism of human acid ceramidase (AC; N-acylsphingosine deacylase) cleavage and activation. A highly purified, recombinant human AC precursor underwent self-cleavage into α and β subunits, similar to other members of the N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase superfamily. This reaction proceeded with first order kinetics, characteristic of self-cleavage. AC self-cleavage occurred most rapidly at acidic pH, but also at neutral pH. Site-directed mutagene...

  12. Coincidence of cleavage sites of intron endonuclease I-TevI and critical sequences of the host thymidylate synthase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgell, David R; Stanger, Matthew J; Belfort, Marlene

    2004-11-01

    To maximize spread of their host intron or intein, many homing endonucleases recognize nucleotides that code for important and conserved amino acid residues of the target gene. Here, we examine the cleavage requirements for I-TevI, which binds a stretch of thymidylate synthase (TS) DNA that codes for functionally critical residues in the TS active site. Using an in vitro selection scheme, we identified two base-pairs in the I-TevI cleavage site region as important for cleavage efficiency. These were confirmed by comparison of I-TevI cleavage efficiencies on mutant and on wild-type substrates. We also showed that nicking of the bottom strand by I-TevI is not affected by mutation of residues surrounding the bottom-strand cleavage site, unlike other homing endonucleases. One of these two base-pairs is universally conserved in all TS sequences, and is identical with a previously identified cleavage determinant of I-BmoI, a related GIY-YIG endonuclease that binds a homologous stretch of TS-encoding DNA. The other base-pair is conserved only in a subset of TS genes that includes the I-TevI, but not the I-BmoI, target sequence. Both the I-TevI and I-BmoI cleavage site requirements correspond to functionally critical residues involved in an extensive hydrogen bond network within the TS active site. Remarkably, these cleavage requirements correlate with TS phylogeny in bacteria, suggesting that each endonuclease has individually adapted to efficiently cleave distinct TS substrates. PMID:15491609

  13. Cleavage specificity analysis of six type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs using PICS with proteome-derived peptide libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Barré

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs are a family of cell membrane tethered serine proteases with unclear roles as their cleavage site specificities and substrate degradomes have not been fully elucidated. Indeed just 52 cleavage sites are annotated in MEROPS, the database of proteases, their substrates and inhibitors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: To profile the active site specificities of the TTSPs, we applied Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS. Human proteome-derived database searchable peptide libraries were assayed with six human TTSPs (matriptase, matriptase-2, matriptase-3, HAT, DESC and hepsin to simultaneously determine sequence preferences on the N-terminal non-prime (P and C-terminal prime (P' sides of the scissile bond. Prime-side cleavage products were isolated following biotinylation and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. The corresponding non-prime side sequences were derived from human proteome databases using bioinformatics. Sequencing of 2,405 individual cleaved peptides allowed for the development of the family consensus protease cleavage site specificity revealing a strong specificity for arginine in the P1 position and surprisingly a lysine in P1' position. TTSP cleavage between R↓K was confirmed using synthetic peptides. By parsing through known substrates and known structures of TTSP catalytic domains, and by modeling the remainder, structural explanations for this strong specificity were derived. CONCLUSIONS: Degradomics analysis of 2,405 cleavage sites revealed a similar and characteristic TTSP family specificity at the P1 and P1' positions for arginine and lysine in unfolded peptides. The prime side is important for cleavage specificity, thus making these proteases unusual within the tryptic-enzyme class that generally has overriding non-prime side specificity.

  14. Reaction kinetics of bond rotations in graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Skowron, Stephen T.

    2016-04-12

    The formation and healing processes of the fundamental topological defect in graphitic materials, the Stone-Wales (SW) defect, are brought into a chemical context by considering the rotation of a carbon-carbon bond as chemical reaction. We investigate the rates and mechanisms of these SW transformations in graphene at the atomic scale using transmission electron microscopy. We develop a statistical atomic kinetics formalism, using direct observations obtained under different conditions to determine key kinetic parameters of the reactions. Based on the obtained statistics we quantify thermally and irradiation induced routes, identifying a thermal process of healing with an activation energy consistent with predicted adatom catalysed mechanisms. We discover exceptionally high rates for irradiation induced SW healing, incompatible with the previously assumed mechanism of direct knock-on damage and indicating the presence of an efficient nonadiabatic coupling healing mechanism involving beam induced electronic excitations of the SW defect.

  15. First-wall tile attachment using carbon-carbon composite fittings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the reality of a tokamak device capable of achieving sustained burn missions approaches, the need for a reliable and maintainable plasma-interfacing first wall becomes more evident. This is especially true of compact ignition tokamaks such as LITE, ISP, and Ignitor. Current studies indicate that the compact ignition tokamak may be designed for inertial cooling using a cryogen such as liquid nitrogen, for active cooling using water, or for a combination of inertial (LN2) and active (H2O) cooling. In none of these cases it is anticipated that the first wall proper will be actively cooled. Based on limiter development for operating tokamaks such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and on supporting engineering studies, an array of monolithic graphite blocks or tiles of appropriate thickness, size, and shape appears to be the most effective approach for a first-wall design. The entire internal wetted surface of the vacuum vessel, exclusive of penetrations and minimal clearance (∼ 1.5 mm) between tiles, will be covered by the monolithic graphite tiles. One of the major challenges of this first-wall approach will be the physical attachment of the tiles to the vacuum vessel inner surface. This paper presents unique first-wall tile attachment concepts that use structural attachment of the graphite tiles to an Inconel 625 vacuum vessel with carbon-carbon composite structural/mechanical elements

  16. Preparation of carbon/carbon composite by pyrolysis of ethanol and methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The mixture of ethanol and methane was used as the precursor of pyrolytic carbon. • C/C composites with high textured pyrolytic carbon and high density were obtained. • At the same condition, the high textured carbon cannot be obtained using methane. • The mixture precursor is a promising candidate for C/C composites in CVI. - Abstract: A high textured carbon/carbon (C/C) composite was prepared using the mixture gas of ethanol and methane as the precursor by isothermal chemical vapor infiltration. The preform was infiltrated at 1180 °C with the gas pressure from 2 to 10 kPa. For 85 h infiltration, the average bulk density is up to 1.8 ± 0.02 g cm−3. The texture of the infiltrated carbon was studied by polarized-light microscopy and characterized with the aid of the extinction angle. Texture and fracture morphology of the pyrolytic carbon matrix were observed using scanning electronic microscope. C/C composites with high textured pyrolytic carbon matrix and high density were obtained by pyrolysis of ethanol and methane. This indicates the mixture of ethanol and methane is a promising candidate of the precursors for the preparation of C/C composites

  17. Modeling of CVI process in fabrication of carbon/carbon composites by an artificial neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Aijun; (李爱军); LI; Hejun; (李贺军); LI; Kezhi; (李克智); GU; Zhengbing; (顾正彬)

    2003-01-01

    The chemical vapor infiltration(CVI) process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites is very complex and highly inefficient, which adds considerably to the cost of fabrication and limits the application of the material. This paper tries to use a supervised artificial neural network(ANN) to model the nonlinear relationship between parameters of isothermal CVI(ICVI) processes and physical properties of C/C composites. A model for preprocessing dataset and selecting its topology is developed using the Levenberg-Marquardt training algorithm and trained with comprehensive dataset of tubal C/C components collected from experimental data and abundant simulated data obtained by the finite element method. A basic repository on the domain knowledge of CVI processes is established via sufficient data mining by the network. With the help of the repository stored in the trained network, not only the time-dependent effects of parameters in CVI processes but also their coupling effects can be analyzed and predicted. The results show that the ANN system is effective and successful for optimizing CVI processes in fabrication of C/C composites.

  18. Interlaminar failure criteria for multi-layered carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon/Carbon composites (C/C) have recently been studied and developed for structural applications in the field of aerospace and power generator technologies. However, C/C has low interlaminar strength. Therefore, it is important to evaluate interlaminar fracture properties and test methods for interlaminar strength. In the present paper, each of the ILSS (interlaminar shear strength), the ILTS (interlaminar tensile strength) and the interlaminar mixed-mode strength with the coexistence of interlaminar shear and tensile or compressive stresses was studied by using several different test methods on C/C. The ILSS was obtained by using the SBS (short beam shear) test, the DNS (double notch shear) test, the Arcan test and the quasi-Arcan shear mode test. The ILTS was obtained by using the Arcan test and the quasi-Arcan tensile mode test. The interlaminar mixed-mode strength was obtained by the Arcan test. Comparisons of respective tests and several laminate configurations were conducted using microscopic failure mechanism and 3-dimensional FEM analysis. Both Von-Mises, Tsai-Hill and Tsai-Wu failure criterions were used to explain the mixed-mode fracture behavior. Effects of notch stress concentration were found negligible based on FEM analysis and experimental results. (author)

  19. Structural analysis of an NDE-inspected carbon-carbon component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striz, A. G.; Cruse, G.; Kline, R. A.; Madaras, E. I.

    1992-01-01

    In this research, it is demonstrated that the integration of nondestructive evaluation with the finite element method (a quantitative NDE/FEM approach) can be used for analysis and behavior prediction of advanced materials, such as fiber composites, after processing and during in-service testing. First, stress, strain, and energy data were calculated by the finite element method for square plates with a 10 percent difference in the material properties between specified segments, i.e., between the center and the outside section or between two halves of the plate. This demonstrated the efficiency of the method in predicting variations in the structural behavior based on small material property differences. Then, finite element analyses and actual axial compression tests were performed on a Space Shuttle brake stator made from woven carbon-carbon composites. The material properties used in the numerical modeling of the stator were previously characterized at a large number of points on the component by quantitative NDE-procedures, i.e., ultrasonics and radiography. The results from the experimental compressive loading tests were used to verify the NDE/FEM results. Good agreement was found for most parameters.

  20. Direct measurement of acylenzyme hydrolysis demonstrates rate-limiting deacylation in cleavage of physiological sequences by the processing protease Kex2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, N C; Fuller, R S

    2001-03-27

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Kex2 protease is the prototype for the family of eukaryotic proprotein convertases that includes furin, PC1/3, and PC2. These enzymes belong to the subtilase superfamily of serine proteases and are distinguished from degradative subtilisins by structural features and by their much more stringent substrate specificity. Pre-steady-state studies have shown that both Kex2 and furin exhibit an initial burst of 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin release in cleavage of peptidyl methylcoumarinamide substrates that are based on physiological cleavage sites. Thus, in cleavage of such substrates, formation of the acylenzyme intermediate is fast relative to some later step (deacylation or N-terminal product release). This behavior is significant, because Kex2 also exhibits burst kinetics in cleavage of peptide bonds. k(cat) for cleavage of a tetrapeptidyl methylcoumarinamide substrate based on the physiological yeast substrate pro-alpha-factor exhibits a weak solvent isotope effect, but neither this isotope effect nor temperature dependence studies with this substrate conclusively identify the rate-limiting step for Kex2 cleavage of this substrate. We therefore developed an assay to measure deacylation directly by pulse-chase incorporation of H(2)(18)O in a rapid-quenched-flow mixer followed by mass spectrometric quantitation. The results given by this assay rule out rate-limiting product release for cleavage of this substrate by Kex2. These experiments demonstrate that cleavage of the acylenzyme ester bond, as opposed to either the initial attack on the amide bond or product release, is rate-limiting for the action of Kex2 at physiological sequences. This work demonstrates a fundamental difference in the catalytic strategy of proprotein processing enzymes and degradative subtilisins. PMID:11297433

  1. Calcium waves along the cleavage furrows in cleavage-stage Xenopus embryos and its inhibition by heparin

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Calcium signaling is known to be associated with cytokinesis; however, the detailed spatio-temporal pattern of calcium dynamics has remained unclear. We have studied changes of intracellular free calcium in cleavage-stage Xenopus embryos using fluorescent calcium indicator dyes, mainly Calcium Green-1. Cleavage formation was followed by calcium transients that localized to cleavage furrows and propagated along the furrows as calcium waves. The calcium transients at the cleavage furrows were o...

  2. On the Relative Merits of Non-Orthogonal and Orthogonal Valence Bond Methods Illustrated on the Hydrogen Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Malrieu, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    Valence bond (VB) is one of the cornerstone theories of quantum chemistry. Even if in practical applications the molecular orbital (MO) approach has obtained more attention, some basic chemical concepts (such as the nature of the chemical bond and the failure of the single determinant-based MO methods in describing the bond cleavage) are normally…

  3. Mechanical Testing of Carbon-Carbon Composite for Applications in Human Spine Surgery in the Form of Intervertebral Cages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sochor, M.; Balík, Karel; Suchý, Tomáš; Sedláček, R.; Tichý, P.

    Praha : Ústav struktury a mechaniky hornin AV ČR, 2003 - (Kolář, F.), s. - [Czech-Polish Workshop on Testing of Composite Materials. Praha (CZ), 11.09.2003-12.09.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/00/1407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : carbon-carbon composite * mechanical testing * biocompatibility Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  4. Distinguishing Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahm, Martin; Hoffmann, Roald

    2016-03-23

    The energy change per electron in a chemical or physical transformation, ΔE/n, may be expressed as Δχ̅ + Δ(VNN + ω)/n, where Δχ̅ is the average electron binding energy, a generalized electronegativity, ΔVNN is the change in nuclear repulsions, and Δω is the change in multielectron interactions in the process considered. The last term can be obtained by the difference from experimental or theoretical estimates of the first terms. Previously obtained consequences of this energy partitioning are extended here to a different analysis of bonding in a great variety of diatomics, including more or less polar ones. Arguments are presented for associating the average change in electron binding energy with covalence, and the change in multielectron interactions with electron transfer, either to, out, or within a molecule. A new descriptor Q, essentially the scaled difference between the Δχ̅ and Δ(VNN + ω)/n terms, when plotted versus the bond energy, separates nicely a wide variety of bonding types, covalent, covalent but more correlated, polar and increasingly ionic, metallogenic, electrostatic, charge-shift bonds, and dispersion interactions. Also, Q itself shows a set of interesting relations with the correlation energy of a bond. PMID:26910496

  5. Experiments on passive hypersonic boundary layer control using ultrasonically absorptive carbon-carbon material with random microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Alexander; Kuhn, Markus; Martinez Schramm, Jan; Hannemann, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    For the first time, the influence of ultrasonically absorptive carbon-carbon material on hypersonic laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition was investigated experimentally. A 7° half-angle blunted cone with a nose radius of 2.5 mm and a total length of 1,077 mm was tested at zero angle of attack in the High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel Göttingen of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) at Mach 7.5. One-third of the metallic model surface in circumferential direction was replaced by DLR in-house manufactured ultrasonically absorptive carbon-carbon material with random microstructure for passive transition control. The remaining model surface consisted of polished steel and served as reference surface. The model was equipped with coaxial thermocouples to determine the transition location by means of surface heat flux distribution. Flush-mounted piezoelectric fast-response pressure transducers were used to measure the pressure fluctuations in the boundary layer associated with second-mode instabilities. The free-stream unit Reynolds number was varied over a range of Re m = 1.5 × 106 m-1 to Re m = 6.4 × 106 m-1 at a stagnation enthalpy of h 0 ≈ 3.2 MJ/kg and a wall temperature ratio of T w/ T 0 ≈ 0.1. The present study revealed a clear damping of the second-mode instabilities and a delay of boundary layer transition along the ultrasonically absorptive carbon-carbon insert.

  6. Numerical simulation of isothermal chemical vapor infiltration process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites by finite element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The chemical vapor infiltration process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites is highly inefficient and requires long processing time. These limitations add considerably to the cost of fabrication and restrict the application of this material. Efforts have been made to study the CVI process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites by computer simulation and predict the process parameters, density, porosity, etc. According to the characteristics of CVI process, the basic principle of FEM and mass transport, the finite element model has been established. Incremental finite element equations and the elemental stiffness matrices have been derived for the first time. The finite element program developed by the authors has been used to simulate the ICVI process in fabrication of carbon-carbon composites. Computer color display of simulated results can express the densification and distributions of density and porosity in preform clearly. The influence of process parameters on the densification of preform has been analyzed. The numerically simulated and experimental results give a good agreement.

  7. Cleavage crystallography of liquid metal embrittled aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, A. P.; Stoner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    The crystallography of liquid metal-induced transgranular cleavage in six aluminum alloys having a variety of microstructures has been determined via Laue X-ray back reflection. The cleavage crystallography was independent of alloy microstructure, and the cleavage plane was 100-plane oriented in all cases. It was further determined that the cleavage crystallography was not influenced by alloy texture. Examination of the fracture surface indicated that there was not a unique direction of crack propagation. In addition, the existence of 100-plane cleavage on alloy 2024 fracture surfaces was inferred by comparison of secondary cleavage crack intersection geometry on the 2024 surfaces with the geometry of secondary cleavage crack intersections on the test alloys.

  8. Effect of mutations in the human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) hinge on its susceptibility to cleavage by diverse bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Bernard W; Woof, Jenny M

    2005-03-01

    Components of the human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) hinge governing sensitivity to cleavage by bacterial IgA1 proteases were investigated. Recombinant antibodies with distinct hinge mutations were constructed from a hybrid comprised of human IgA2 bearing half of the human IgA1 hinge region. This hybrid antibody and all the mutant antibodies derived from it were resistant to cleavage by the IgA1 proteases from Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 strains but were cleaved to various degrees by those of Streptococcus pneumoniae, some Streptococcus sanguis strains, and the type 1 and 2 IgA1 proteases of Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Remarkably, those proteases that cleave a Pro-Ser peptide bond in the wild-type IgA1 hinge were able to cleave mutant antibodies lacking a Pro-Ser peptide bond in the hinge, and those that cleave a Pro-Thr peptide bond in the wild-type IgA1 hinge were able to cleave mutant antibodies devoid of a Pro-Thr peptide bond in the hinge. Thus, the enzymes can cleave alternatives to their preferred postproline peptide bond when such a bond is unavailable. Peptide sequence analysis of a representative antibody digestion product confirmed this conclusion. The presence of a cleavable peptide bond near the CH2 end of the hinge appeared to result in greater cleavage than if the scissile bond was at the CH1 end of the hinge. Proline-to-serine substitution at residue 230 in a hinge containing potentially cleavable Pro-Ser and Pro-Thr peptide bonds increased the resistance of the antibody to cleavage by many IgA1 proteases. PMID:15731049

  9. On the quantification of atmospheric carbonate carbon by thermal/optical analysis protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karanasiou

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbonaceous species, usually classified into two categories, organic carbon (OC and elemental carbon (EC, constitute an important component of the atmospheric aerosol. Carbonate carbon (CC, or inorganic carbon, another constituent of carbonaceous material, is often not considered in many atmospheric chemistry studies. The reason for this may be its low contribution to fine particle mass in most areas studied, along with the difficulties in its analytical determination in atmospheric aerosols. The objective of this study was the quantification of atmospheric carbonate concentrations using the thermal optical transmittance method (Sunset Laboratory, Inc.. Three different temperature protocols (two modified NIOSH protocols and the EUSAAR-2 protocol were tested on filter samples containing known amounts of CC. Moreover, the performance of the two most widely used protocols across European countries (NIOSH and EUSAAR-2 was also checked on two different instruments namely the semi-continuous OCEC analyzer and the laboratory OCEC analyzer. NIOSH-840 thermal protocol (NIOSH protocol with a maximum temperature of 840 °C in the He-mode can be used for the detection and quantification of atmospheric carbonate concentrations. CC was determined in ambient PM10 and PM2.5 samples From Athens and Barcelona by using the NIOSH-840 thermal protocol. The results confirm that in South European countries CC may constitute a significant fraction of carbonaceous aerosols (~15%, thus it should not be neglected. However, the NIOSH-840 protocol seems to overestimate the OC concentrations when compared to the EUSAAR-2 protocol. The results suggest that during dust episodes, common for the Southern Europe, the analytical laboratories could use the NIOSH-840 protocol as a suitable method for the carbonate determination and manually integrate the sharp peak that appears in the maximum temperature step in the inert mode. Afterwards, carbonate should be

  10. Effect of carbon nanofibers on the infiltration and thermal conductivity of carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The CNFs improve the infiltration rate and thermal properties of carbon/carbon composites. → The densification rate increases with the CNF content increasing at the beginning of infiltration. → The values of the thermal conductivity of the composite obtain their maximum values at 5 wt.%. -- Abstract: Preforms containing 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt.% carbon nanofibers (CNFs) were fabricated by spreading layers of carbon cloth, and infiltrated using the electrified preform heating chemical vapor infiltration method (ECVI) under atmospheric pressure. Initial thermal gradients were determined. Resistivity and density evolutions with infiltration time have been recorded. Scanning electron microscopy, polarized light micrograph and X-ray diffraction technique were used to analyze the experiment results. The results showed that the infiltration rate increased with the rising of CNF content, and after 120 h of infiltration, the density was the highest when the CNF content was 5 wt.%, but the composite could not be densified efficiently as the CNF content ranged from 10 wt.% to 20 wt.%. CNF-reinforced C/C composites have enhanced thermal conductivity, the values at 5 wt.% were increased by nearly 5.5-24.1% in the X-Y direction and 153.8-251.3% in the Z direction compared to those with no CNFs. When the additive content was increased to 20 wt.%, due to the holes and cavities in the CNF web and between carbon cloth and matrix, the thermal conductivities in the X-Y and Z directions decreased from their maximum values at 5 wt.%.

  11. Dynamical Binding of Hydrogen Bond Surrogate-Derived Bak Helices to Anti-apoptotic Protein Bcl-xL

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Ju; Dong, Xiao Y.; John Z. H. Zhang; Arora, Paramjit S.

    2009-01-01

    A new peptide modification strategy was recently developed to replace the i to i+4 hydrogen bond of the main chain of an a-helix with a carbon-carbon covalent bond to afford highly stable constrained α-helices, termed Hydrogen Bond Surrogate (HBS) helices. HBS helices that mimic the Bak BH3 domains were experimentally demonstrated to target protein Bcl-xL with high affinity. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is used to understand how the covalent modification of the natural Ba...

  12. Regulated Cleavage of Prothrombin by Prothrombinase: REPOSITIONING A CLEAVAGE SITE REVEALS THE UNIQUE KINETIC BEHAVIOR OF THE ACTION OF PROTHROMBINASE ON ITS COMPOUND SUBSTRATE*♦

    OpenAIRE

    Bradford, Harlan N.; Micucci, Joseph A.; Krishnaswamy, Sriram

    2009-01-01

    Prothrombinase converts prothrombin to thrombin via cleavage at Arg320 followed by cleavage at Arg271. Exosite-dependent binding of prothrombin to prothrombinase facilitates active site docking by Arg320 and initial cleavage at this site. Precise positioning of the Arg320 site for cleavage is implied by essentially normal cleavage at Arg320 in recombinant prothrombin variants...

  13. Diffusion bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  14. Effects of Atomic-Scale Structure on the Fracture Properties of Amorphous Carbon - Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    The fracture of carbon materials is a complex process, the understanding of which is critical to the development of next generation high performance materials. While quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are the most accurate way to model fracture, the fracture behavior of many carbon-based composite engineering materials, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) composites, is a multi-scale process that occurs on time and length scales beyond the practical limitations of QM methods. The Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) is capable of predicting mechanical properties involving strong deformation, bond breaking and bond formation in the classical molecular dynamics framework. This has been achieved by adding to the potential energy function a bond-order term that varies continuously with distance. The use of an empirical bond order potential, such as ReaxFF, enables the simulation of failure in molecular systems that are several orders of magnitude larger than would be possible in QM techniques. In this work, the fracture behavior of an amorphous carbon (AC) matrix reinforced with CNTs was modeled using molecular dynamics with the ReaxFF reactive forcefield. Care was taken to select the appropriate simulation parameters, which can be different from those required when using traditional fixed-bond force fields. The effect of CNT arrangement was investigated with three systems: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. For each arrangement, covalent bonds are added between the CNTs and AC, with crosslink fractions ranging from 0-25% of the interfacial CNT atoms. The SWNT and MWNT array systems represent ideal cases with evenly spaced CNTs; the SWNT bundle system represents a more realistic case because, in practice, van der Waals interactions lead to the agglomeration of CNTs into bundles. The simulation results will serve as guidance in setting experimental processing conditions to optimize the mechanical properties of CNT

  15. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of [1-13C] enriched monosaccharides. Signal assignments and orientational dependence of geminal and vicinal carbon--carbon and carbon--hydrogen spin--spin coupling constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early assignments of the 13C resonances in the natural abundance 13C NMR spectra of monosaccharides have been reevaluated in light of recent coupling data from the spectra of 13C-1 labeled sugars. The technique of specific 13C enrichment not only identifies the labeled carbon unambiguously but can be used to assign more remote carbon resonances due to scalar carbon-carbon coupling. The pattern of carbon-carbon coupling observed in all of the sugars thus far studied is remarkably constant. In addition to the large (approximately 46 Hz) one-bond coupling between C-1 and C-2, C-3 exhibits a coupling to C-1 only in the β anomer (approximately 4 Hz) while C-5 is coupled to C-1 only in the α anomer (approximately 2 Hz). In addition, C-6 is coupled to C-1 in both anomers and C-4 shows no evidence of coupling to C-1 in any of the sugars examined. These couplings have been used to reassign several resonances and the original assignments are discussed in terms of the predictive rules used for resonance assignments in carbohydrates. The vicinal couplings of C-6 and C-4 to C-1 appear to obey a Karplus-type relationship. The geminal 2J/sub CCC/ and 2J/sub COC/ couplings are discussed in terms of a dihedral angle dependence where the angle is defined by the relative orientations of C-3 or C-5 and the electronegative oxygen substituents on C-1. Additional data on 2J/sub CCH/ couplings involving C-1 and H-2 are also readily obtained with the C-1 labeled sugars

  16. A potent inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation is generated by proteolytic cleavage of the chemokine platelet factor 4.

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, S K; Hassel, T; Singh, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF-4) is an archetype of the "chemokine" family of low molecular weight proteins that play an important role in injury responses and inflammation. From activated human leukocyte culture supernatants, we have isolated a form of PF-4 that acts as a potent inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation. The PF-4 derivative is generated by peptide bond cleavage between Thr-16 and Ser-17, a site located downstream from the highly conserved and structurally important CXC motif. The ...

  17. Reductive Cleavage of Demeton-S-Methyl by Corynebacterium glutamicum in Cometabolism on More Readily Metabolizable Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Girbal, Laurence; Hilaire, Didier; Leduc, Sébastien; Delery, Laure; Rols, Jean-Luc; Lindley, Nicholas D.

    2000-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is able to biotransform demeton-S-methyl, an organophosphorus compound, during cometabolism with more readily metabolizable substrates. Among the cosubstrates used, fructose is the growth substrate that is most favorable for demeton-S-methyl biotransformation. The reaction mechanism of demeton-S-methyl biotransformation involves reductive cleavage of an S-C bond, which leads to accumulation of dimethyl thiophosphate in the culture medium.

  18. A Historical Trend of Ethnic Cleavages in Contemporary Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Mohammadzadeh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is evaluation social and historical content of social cleavage in contemporary Iran. Analytical framework rooted in Rokan theory. Rokan believed that social cleavage appearance post of revolutions. Method of study was historical comparatives.The method of this research is comparative historical in which we used of historical documents and data. In this field, I have compared data of indexes of socio-economic of ethnic states.Assessment of data and documents show that social cleavages and particularly ethnic cleavages rise after Reza shah revolution. He established centralized and dictated government and divided society of Iran and institutionalization the inequality in social structure. Sense of deprivation about inequality and suited circumstance activated ethnic cleavage in Iran. Decrease of inequality and justice could decrease of social deprivation and deactivated social cleavages.

  19. Dilepton spectroscopy at intermediate energies; the carbon - carbon reaction at 1 GeV/A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Physics context of this work is heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies where di-electron provide informations on the produced hot and dense nuclear matter. The experiment is performed by the DiLepton Spectrometer (DLS) Collaboration at the Lawrence Berkeley's Bevalac. After a description of the apparatus, we review the whole program and the main results so far obtained: first evidence of a significant di-electron signal at energies above 1 GeV/A; improvement of the understanding of di-electron production (electromagnetic decays of hadrons, π+π- annihilation and hadronic Bremsstrahlung). The results of p-p, p-d reactions from 1 to 4.9 GeV/A show that hadronic Bremsstrahlung (pp, pn) should be reformulated. Our analysis, optimized on the reaction Carbon-Carbon at 1 GeV/A, has been applied to α-Ca and d-Ca. We have developed two main aspects: improvement of the time resolution (500 ps) in order to eliminate all of the protons. Improvement of the space resolution (300 μ) for better mass resolution, in particular in the ρ region. We obtain the cross section of di-electron production as a function of mass, transverse momentum and rapidity from the C-C, α-Ca and d-Ca reactions at 1 GeV/A. We also compare the cross section for all of the measured systems at 1 GeV/A, including Ca-Ca, and we show a (ApAt)α dependence with α ≅ 1.1. A study of the associated multiplicity has also been performed. Nevertheless, the limited acceptance of the DLS and its poor mass resolution to identify the ρ, ω vector mesons, do not allow to conclude on hadron behaviour in nuclear matter. This point is one of the main goal of the HADES project at GSI (Darmstadt), which we give a brief description of the main features. (authors). 60 refs

  20. SVM-based prediction of caspase substrate cleavage sites

    OpenAIRE

    Wee, Lawrence JK; Tan, Tin Wee; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2006-01-01

    Background Caspases belong to a class of cysteine proteases which function as critical effectors in apoptosis and inflammation by cleaving substrates immediately after unique sites. Prediction of such cleavage sites will complement structural and functional studies on substrates cleavage as well as discovery of new substrates. Recently, different computational methods have been developed to predict the cleavage sites of caspase substrates with varying degrees of success. As the support vector...

  1. Modeling and Inferring Cleavage Patterns in Proliferating Epithelia

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Ankit B.; Gibson, William T.; Gibson, Matthew C; Radhika Nagpal

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of cleavage plane orientation is one of the key mechanisms driving epithelial morphogenesis. Still, many aspects of the relationship between local cleavage patterns and tissue-level properties remain poorly understood. Here we develop a topological model that simulates the dynamics of a 2D proliferating epithelium from generation to generation, enabling the exploration of a wide variety of biologically plausible cleavage patterns. We investigate a spectrum of models that incorp...

  2. Densification and microstructure of carbon/carbon composites prepared by chemical vapor infiltration using ethanol as precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Chemical vapor infiltration of carbon fiber felts with uniform initial bulk density of 0.47 g·cm-3 was investigated at the ethanol partial pressures of 5-20 kPa,as well as the temperatures of 1050,1100,1150 and 1200°C.Ethanol,diluted by nitrogen,was employed as the precursor of pyrolytic carbon.Polarized light microscopy(PLM),scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were adopted to study the texture of pyrolytic carbon deposited at various temperatures.A change from medium-to high-textured pyrolytic carbon was observed in the sample infiltrated at 1050°C.Whereas,homogeneous high-textured pyrolytic carbons were deposited at the temperatures of 1100,1150 and 1200°C.Extinction angles of 19°-21° were determined for different regions in the samples densified at the temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1200°C.Scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surface after bending test indicated that the prepared carbon/carbon composite samples exhibited a pseudo-plastic fracture behavior.In addition,fracture behavior of the carbon/carbon samples was obviously effected by their infiltration temperature.The fracture mode of C/C composites was transformed from shearing failure to tensile breakage with increasing infiltration temperature. Results of this study show that ethanol is a promising carbon source to synthesize carbon/carbon composites with homogeneously high-textured pyrolytic carbon over a wide range of temperatures(from 1100 to 1200°C).

  3. Two Spin-State Reactivity in the Activation and Cleavage of CO2 by [ReO2](.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canale, Valentino; Robinson, Robert; Zavras, Athanasios; Khairallah, George N; d'Alessandro, Nicola; Yates, Brian F; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2016-05-19

    The rhenium dioxide anion [ReO2](-) reacts with carbon dioxide in a linear ion trap mass spectrometer to produce [ReO3](-) corresponding to activation and cleavage of a C-O bond. Isotope labeling experiments using [Re(18)O2](-) reveal that (18)O/(16)O scrambling does not occur prior to cleavage of the C-O bond. Density functional theory calculations were performed to examine the mechanism for this oxygen atom abstraction reaction. Because the spins of the ground states are different for the reactant and product ions ((3)[ReO2](-) versus (1)[ReO3](-)), both reaction surfaces were examined in detail and multiple [O2Re-CO2](-) intermediates and transition structures were located and minimum energy crossing points were calculated. The computational results show that the intermediate [O2Re(η(2)-C,O-CO2)](-) species most likely initiates C-O bond activation and cleavage. The stronger binding affinity of CO2 within this species and the greater instabilities of other [O2Re-CO2)](-) intermediates are significant enough that oxygen atom exchange is avoided. PMID:27193088

  4. Thermodynamic diagrams for high temperature plasmas of air, air-carbon, carbon-hydrogen mixtures, and argon

    CERN Document Server

    Kroepelin, H; Hoffmann, K-U

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamic Diagrams for High Temperature Plasmas of Air, Air-Carbon, Carbon-Hydrogen Mixtures, and Argon provides information relating to the properties of equilibrium gas plasmas formed from hydrocarbons, from air without argon, from pure argon, and from mixtures of air and carbon at various compositions, temperatures and pressures. The data are presented in graphical rather than tabular form to provide a clearer picture of the plasma processes investigated. This book is composed of four chapters, and begins with the introduction to the characteristics of plasmas, with emphasis on their th

  5. Structural Basis for Accelerated Cleavage of Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor (BPTI) by Human Mesotrypsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salameh,M.; Soares, A.; Hockla, A.; Radisky, E.

    2008-01-01

    Human mesotrypsin is an isoform of trypsin that displays unusual resistance to polypeptide trypsin inhibitors and has been observed to cleave several such inhibitors as substrates. Whereas substitution of arginine for the highly conserved glycine 193 in the trypsin active site has been implicated as a critical factor in the inhibitor resistance of mesotrypsin, how this substitution leads to accelerated inhibitor cleavage is not clear. Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) forms an extremely stable and cleavage-resistant complex with trypsin, and thus provides a rigorous challenge of mesotrypsin catalytic activity toward polypeptide inhibitors. Here, we report kinetic constants for mesotrypsin and the highly homologous (but inhibitor sensitive) human cationic trypsin, describing inhibition by, and cleavage of BPTI, as well as crystal structures of the mesotrypsin-BPTI and human cationic trypsin-BPTI complexes. We find that mesotrypsin cleaves BPTI with a rate constant accelerated 350-fold over that of human cationic trypsin and 150,000-fold over that of bovine trypsin. From the crystal structures, we see that small conformational adjustments limited to several side chains enable mesotrypsin-BPTI complex formation, surmounting the predicted steric clash introduced by Arg-193. Our results show that the mesotrypsin-BPTI interface favors catalysis through (a) electrostatic repulsion between the closely spaced mesotrypsin Arg-193 and BPTI Arg-17, and (b) elimination of two hydrogen bonds between the enzyme and the amine leaving group portion of BPTI. Our model predicts that these deleterious interactions accelerate leaving group dissociation and deacylation.

  6. Active site specificity profiling of the matrix metalloproteinase family: Proteomic identification of 4300 cleavage sites by nine MMPs explored with structural and synthetic peptide cleavage analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhard, Ulrich; Huesgen, Pitter F; Schilling, Oliver; Bellac, Caroline L; Butler, Georgina S; Cox, Jennifer H; Dufour, Antoine; Goebeler, Verena; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Keller, Ulrich Auf dem; Klein, Theo; Lange, Philipp F; Marino, Giada; Morrison, Charlotte J; Prudova, Anna; Rodriguez, David; Starr, Amanda E; Wang, Yili; Overall, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    leucine locked in S1'. Similar negative cooperativity between P3 proline and the novel preference for asparagine in P1 cements our conclusion that non-prime side flexibility greatly impacts MMP binding affinity and cleavage efficiency. Thus, unexpected sequence cooperativity consequences were revealed by PICS that uniquely encompasses both the non-prime and prime sides flanking the proteomic-pinpointed scissile bond. PMID:26407638

  7. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  8. Analysis of the cleavage site of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 glycoprotein: requirement of precursor cleavage for glycoprotein incorporation.

    OpenAIRE

    Dubay, J W; Dubay, S R; Shin, H. J.; Hunter, E

    1995-01-01

    Endoproteolytic cleavage of the glycoprotein precursor to the mature SU and TM proteins is an essential step in the maturation of retroviral glycoproteins. Cleavage of the precursor polyprotein occurs at a conserved, basic tetrapeptide sequence and is carried out by a cellular protease. The glycoprotein of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 contains two potential cleavage sequences immediately preceding the N terminus of the TM protein. To determine the functional significance of these t...

  9. Cleavage of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by the ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinkovic, M; Dunn, G; Wood, G E; Husain, J; Wood, S P; Gill, R

    2015-09-01

    The interaction of momordin, a type 1 ribosome-inactivating protein from Momordica charantia, with NADP(+) and NADPH has been investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis of complexes generated by co-crystallization and crystal soaking. It is known that the proteins of this family readily cleave the adenine-ribose bond of adenosine and related nucleotides in the crystal, leaving the product, adenine, bound to the enzyme active site. Surprisingly, the nicotinamide-ribose bond of oxidized NADP(+) is cleaved, leaving nicotinamide bound in the active site in the same position but in a slightly different orientation to that of the five-membered ring of adenine. No binding or cleavage of NADPH was observed at pH 7.4 in these experiments. These observations are in accord with current views of the enzyme mechanism and may contribute to ongoing searches for effective inhibitors. PMID:26323301

  10. Iterative reactions of transient boronic acids enable sequential C-C bond formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battilocchio, Claudio; Feist, Florian; Hafner, Andreas; Simon, Meike; Tran, Duc N.; Allwood, Daniel M.; Blakemore, David C.; Ley, Steven V.

    2016-04-01

    The ability to form multiple carbon-carbon bonds in a controlled sequence and thus rapidly build molecular complexity in an iterative fashion is an important goal in modern chemical synthesis. In recent times, transition-metal-catalysed coupling reactions have dominated in the development of C-C bond forming processes. A desire to reduce the reliance on precious metals and a need to obtain products with very low levels of metal impurities has brought a renewed focus on metal-free coupling processes. Here, we report the in situ preparation of reactive allylic and benzylic boronic acids, obtained by reacting flow-generated diazo compounds with boronic acids, and their application in controlled iterative C-C bond forming reactions is described. Thus far we have shown the formation of up to three C-C bonds in a sequence including the final trapping of a reactive boronic acid species with an aldehyde to generate a range of new chemical structures.

  11. Presence of Meiotic Spindles Indicates Early Cleavage of Embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the detection of the meiotic spindle could anticipate the appearance of early cleavage.Methods Oocytes were obtained from stimulated ovaries of consenting patients undergoing oocytes retrieval for ICSI.Spindles were imaged with the Polscope.After ICSI,oocytes with or without spindles were cultured for examination of early cleavage and embryo development.A total of 328 oocytes from 50 cycles were examined with the Polscope and inseminated by ICSI.Results Spindles were imaged in 81.7% of oocytes.After ICSI,more oocytes with spindles (78.4%) fertilized normally than oocytes without spindles (53.3%)(P<0.001).At 25-27 h post ICSI.more fertilized oocytes developed from oocytes with spindles (81.9%) were detected early cleavage than those from oocytes without spindles(28.1%)(P<0.001).Significantly more embryos with early cleavage (82.2%) developed to high quality embryos at d 3 compared with the embryos without early cleavage(48.3%)(P=0.001).The value of rs related to the relationship between spindles and early cleavage was 0.420(P<0.0001).Conclusion The existing of the early cleavage may have a predictive value on the opportunity of high quality embryos and the existing of the spindle may have a predictive value in the appearance of early cleavage.

  12. Deletion Mapping of the Encephalomyocarditis Virus Primary Cleavage Site

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Harry; Palmenberg, Ann C.

    2001-01-01

    The cotranslational, primary self-cleavage reaction of cardiovirus polyprotein relies on a highly conserved, short segment of amino acids at the 2A-2B protein boundary. The amino terminus of the required element for encephalomyocarditis virus has now been mapped to include Tyr126 of the 2A protein, the 18th amino acid before the cleavage site.

  13. A photoinduced cleavage of DNA useful for determining T residues.

    OpenAIRE

    Simoncsits, A; Török, I

    1982-01-01

    Irradiation of 5'-[32P]-phosphate labeled DNA fragments with ultraviolet light in the presence of primary amines followed by piperidine treatment resulted in base-specific cleavage of the DNA chain at T residues, accompanied by a less intensive G reaction. This simple, T greater than G cleavage offers an alternative method for determining T residues in chemical DNA sequencing.

  14. Alkali metal control over N-N cleavage in iron complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubel, Katarzyna; Brennessel, William W; Mercado, Brandon Q; Holland, Patrick L

    2014-12-01

    Though N2 cleavage on K-promoted Fe surfaces is important in the large-scale Haber-Bosch process, there is still ambiguity about the number of Fe atoms involved during the N-N cleaving step and the interactions responsible for the promoting ability of K. This work explores a molecular Fe system for N2 reduction, particularly focusing on the differences in the results obtained using different alkali metals as reductants (Na, K, Rb, Cs). The products of these reactions feature new types of Fe-N2 and Fe-nitride cores. Surprisingly, adding more equivalents of reductant to the system gives a product in which the N-N bond is not cleaved, indicating that the reducing power is not the most important factor that determines the extent of N2 activation. On the other hand, the results suggest that the size of the alkali metal cation can control the number of Fe atoms that can approach N2, which in turn controls the ability to achieve N2 cleavage. The accumulated results indicate that cleaving the triple N-N bond to nitrides is facilitated by simultaneous approach of least three low-valent Fe atoms to a single molecule of N2. PMID:25412468

  15. The Oxygenase CAO-1 of Neurospora crassa Is a Resveratrol Cleavage Enzyme

    KAUST Repository

    Diaz-Sanchez, V.

    2013-07-26

    The genome of the ascomycete Neurospora crassa encodes CAO-1 and CAO-2, two members of the carotenoid cleavage oxygenase family that target double bonds in different substrates. Previous studies demonstrated the role of CAO-2 in cleaving the C40 carotene torulene, a key step in the synthesis of the C35 apocarotenoid pigment neurosporaxanthin. In this work, we investigated the activity of CAO-1, assuming that it may provide retinal, the chromophore of the NOP-1 rhodopsin, by cleaving β-carotene. For this purpose, we tested CAO-1 activity with carotenoid substrates that were, however, not converted. In contrast and consistent with its sequence similarity to family members that act on stilbenes, CAO-1 cleaved the interphenyl Cα-Cβ double bond of resveratrol and its derivative piceatannol. CAO-1 did not convert five other similar stilbenes, indicating a requirement for a minimal number of unmodified hydroxyl groups in the stilbene background. Confirming its biological function in converting stilbenes, adding resveratrol led to a pronounced increase in cao-1 mRNA levels, while light, a key regulator of carotenoid metabolism, did not alter them. Targeted Δcao-1 mutants were not impaired by the presence of resveratrol, a phytoalexin active against different fungi, which did not significantly affect the growth and development of wild-type Neurospora. However, under partial sorbose toxicity, the Δcao-1 colonies exhibited faster radial growth than control strains in the presence of resveratrol, suggesting a moderate toxic effect of resveratrol cleavage products.

  16. Semiconductor Surface Structure Determination via Low Energy Positron Diffraction: Cleavage Faces of Cadmium-Selenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsky, Thomas Neil

    Low energy positron diffraction (LEPD) is used to determine the surface structure of the wurtzite CdSe(1010) and CdSe(1120) cleavage faces. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) is also performed, utilizing a beam optical system which produces both a e^+ and e ^- beam with the same phase-space characteristics, i.e. 1 mm-deg. Both e^+ and e^- measurements were collected from the same sample surface of each cleavage face, removing systematic errors from the comparison. Dynamical calculations were performed for both the LEPD and LEED using the R-factor methodology of Duke et al. For the (1010) surface, the calculations and analyses were performed at Brandeis via link to the John Von Neumann Supercomputer Center at Princeton, NJ. For the (1120) surface, the LEPD calculations and analysis was performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories, while the LEED calculations were performed by Princeton University. Resulting surface structures for CdSe(1010) are in accord with the proposed reconstruction model of Wang and Duke, indicating a bond-length-conserving rotation of the surface dimer. The best-fit values of the bond-rotation angle omega are 15^circ +/- 5^circ as determined by LEPD and omega = 21.5^ circ +/- 4^ circ as determined by LEED. These values are in agreement with the predicted value of omega = 17^circ. For CdSe(1120), the best-fit LEPD results indicate an omega of 27^circ +/- 7^circ while preliminary LEED results indicate an omega of 35^circ +/- 5^circ. Both values for this previously undetermined surface are also in agreement with the theoretically predicted value of omega = 32^circ . These results serve to confirm a universal model of reconstruction which describes the surface structures of both the zincblende and wurtzite compound semiconductor cleavage faces.

  17. A novel carotenoid cleavage activity involved in the biosynthesis of Citrus fruit-specific apocarotenoid pigments

    KAUST Repository

    Rodrigo, María J.

    2013-09-04

    Citrus is the first tree crop in terms of fruit production. The colour of Citrus fruit is one of the main quality attributes, caused by the accumulation of carotenoids and their derivative C30 apocarotenoids, mainly ?-citraurin (3-hydroxy-?-apo-8?-carotenal), which provide an attractive orange-reddish tint to the peel of oranges and mandarins. Though carotenoid biosynthesis and its regulation have been extensively studied in Citrus fruits, little is known about the formation of C30 apocarotenoids. The aim of this study was to the identify carotenoid cleavage enzyme(s) [CCD(s)] involved in the peel-specific C30 apocarotenoids. In silico data mining revealed a new family of five CCD4-type genes in Citrus. One gene of this family, CCD4b1, was expressed in reproductive and vegetative tissues of different Citrus species in a pattern correlating with the accumulation of C30 apocarotenoids. Moreover, developmental processes and treatments which alter Citrus fruit peel pigmentation led to changes of ?-citraurin content and CCD4b1 transcript levels. These results point to the involvement of CCD4b1 in ?-citraurin formation and indicate that the accumulation of this compound is determined by the availability of the presumed precursors zeaxanthin and ?-cryptoxanthin. Functional analysis of CCD4b1 by in vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated the asymmetric cleavage activity at the 7?,8? double bond in zeaxanthin and ?-cryptoxanthin, confrming its role in C30 apocarotenoid biosynthesis. Thus, a novel plant carotenoid cleavage activity targeting the 7?,8? double bond of cyclic C40 carotenoids has been identified. These results suggest that the presented enzyme is responsible for the biosynthesis of C30 apocarotenoids in Citrus which are key pigments in fruit coloration. The Author 2013.

  18. Development of electrically heated rods with resistive element of graphite or carbon/carbon composites for simulating transients in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermo-hydraulic problems, in nuclear plants are normally analysed by the use of electrically heated rods. The direct or indirect heater rods are limited in their use because, for high temperatures and high heat flux, the heating element temperature approach its melting point. The use of platinum or tantalum is not economically viable. Graphite and carbon/carbon composites are alternative materials because they are good electrical conductors and have good mechanical properties at high temperatures. Graphite and carbon/carbon composites were used to make heating elements for testing by indirect heating. The swaging process used to reduce the cladding diameter prevented the fabrication of graphite heater rods. Carbon/carbon composite used to make heating elements gave good results up to a heat flux of 100 W/cm2. It is easy to verify that this value can be exceeded if the choice of the complementary materials for insulator and cladding improved. (author)

  19. Cleavage factor Im (CFIm) as a regulator of alternative polyadenylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jessica G; Norbury, Chris J

    2016-08-15

    Most mammalian protein coding genes are subject to alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA), which can generate distinct mRNA 3'UTRs with differing regulatory potential. Although this process has been intensely studied in recent years, it remains unclear how and to what extent cleavage site selection is regulated under different physiological conditions. The cleavage factor Im (CFIm) complex is a core component of the mammalian cleavage machinery, and the observation that its depletion causes transcriptome-wide changes in cleavage site use makes it a key candidate regulator of APA. This review aims to summarize current knowledge of the CFIm complex, and explores the evidence surrounding its potential contribution to regulation of APA. PMID:27528751

  20. Distinct oxidative cleavage and modification of bovine [Cu- Zn]-SOD by an ascorbic acid/Cu(II) system: Identification of novel copper binding site on SOD molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Hiroshi; Luo, Shen; Aryal, Baikuntha; Levine, Rodney L; Rao, V Ashutosh

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the combined effect of ascorbate and copper [Asc/Cu(II)] on the integrity of bovine [Cu-Zn]-superoxide dismutase (bSOD1) as a model system to study the metal catalyzed oxidation (MCO) and fragmentation of proteins. We found Asc/Cu(II) mediates specific cleavage of bSOD1 and generates 12.5 and 3.2kDa fragments in addition to oxidation/carbonylation of the protein. The effect of other tested transition metals, a metal chelator, and hydrogen peroxide on the cleavage and oxidation indicated that binding of copper to a previously unknown site on SOD1 is responsible for the Asc/Cu(II) specific cleavage and oxidation. We utilized tandem mass spectrometry to identify the specific cleavage sites of Asc/Cu(II)-treated bSOD1. Analyses of tryptic- and AspN-peptides have demonstrated the cleavage to occur at Gly31 with peptide bond breakage with Thr30 and Ser32 through diamide and α-amidation pathways, respectively. The three-dimensional structure of bSOD1 reveals the imidazole ring of His19 localized within 5Å from the α-carbon of Gly31 providing a structural basis that copper ion, most likely coordinated by His19, catalyzes the specific cleavage reaction. PMID:26872685

  1. Amino acid sequence requirements in the human IgA1 hinge for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senior, BW; Batten, MR; Kilian, Mogens;

    2002-01-01

    All the IgA1 proteases of the different pathogenic species of Streptococcus cleave the hinge of the alpha chain of human IgA1 only at one proline-threonine peptide bond. In order to study the importance of these amino acids for cleavage, several hinge mutant recombinant IgA1 antibodies were...... constructed. The mutations were found to be without major effect upon the structure or functional abilities of the antibodies. However, they had a major effect upon their sensitivity to cleavage by some of the IgA1 proteases....

  2. Amino acid sequence requirements in the human IgA1 hinge for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, B W; Batten, M R; Kilian, M; Woof, J M

    2002-08-01

    All the IgA1 proteases of the different pathogenic species of Streptococcus cleave the hinge of the alpha chain of human IgA1 only at one proline-threonine peptide bond. In order to study the importance of these amino acids for cleavage, several hinge mutant recombinant IgA1 antibodies were constructed. The mutations were found to be without major effect upon the structure or functional abilities of the antibodies. However, they had a major effect upon their sensitivity to cleavage by some of the IgA1 proteases. PMID:12196126

  3. Use of Cleavage as an Aid in the Optical Determination of Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Ernest G.

    1980-01-01

    Described is the use of cleavage as an aid to microscopic determination of unknown minerals by immersion methods. Cleavages are examined in relation to fragment shapes, types of extinction, and cleavage-optical relationships. (Author/DS)

  4. Peptidase specificity from the substrate cleavage collection in the MEROPS database and a tool to measure cleavage site conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, Neil D

    2016-03-01

    One peptidase can usually be distinguished from another biochemically by its action on proteins, peptides and synthetic substrates. Since 1996, the MEROPS database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk) has accumulated a collection of cleavages in substrates that now amounts to 66,615 cleavages. The total number of peptidases for which at least one cleavage is known is 1700 out of a total of 2457 different peptidases. This paper describes how the cleavages are obtained from the scientific literature, how they are annotated and how cleavages in peptides and proteins are cross-referenced to entries in the UniProt protein sequence database. The specificity profiles of 556 peptidases are shown for which ten or more substrate cleavages are known. However, it has been proposed that at least 40 cleavages in disparate proteins are required for specificity analysis to be meaningful, and only 163 peptidases (6.6%) fulfil this criterion. Also described are the various displays shown on the website to aid with the understanding of peptidase specificity, which are derived from the substrate cleavage collection. These displays include a logo, distribution matrix, and tables to summarize which amino acids or groups of amino acids are acceptable (or not acceptable) in each substrate binding pocket. For each protein substrate, there is a display to show how it is processed and degraded. Also described are tools on the website to help with the assessment of the physiological relevance of cleavages in a substrate. These tools rely on the hypothesis that a cleavage site that is conserved in orthologues is likely to be physiologically relevant, and alignments of substrate protein sequences are made utilizing the UniRef50 database, in which in each entry sequences are 50% or more identical. Conservation in this case means substitutions are permitted only if the amino acid is known to occupy the same substrate binding pocket from at least one other substrate cleaved by the same peptidase. PMID

  5. Silver(I) NHC mediated C-C bond activation of alkyl nitriles and catalytic efficiency in oxazoline synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Rachael; Müller-Bunz, Helge; Albrecht, Martin

    2015-05-21

    Preparation of silver triazolylidene (trz) species from triazolium salts and Ag2O in refluxing MeCN leads to a selective C-C bond cleavage and the formation of complexes of general formula [(trz)Ag(CN)] from Calkyl-CN bond activation. Moreover, these silver carbene complexes are precursors of highly active catalysts for oxazoline formation via aldol condensation. PMID:25913007

  6. Active Metal Brazing and Characterization of Brazed Joints in Titanium to Carbon-Carbon Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Shpargel, T. P.; Morscher, G. N.; Asthana, R.

    2006-01-01

    The Ti-metal/C-C composite joints were formed by reactive brazing with three commercial brazes, namely, Cu-ABA, TiCuNi, and TiCuSiI. The joint microstructures were examined using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The results of the microstructure analysis indicate solute redistribution across the joint and possible metallurgical bond formation via interdiffusion, which led to good wetting and spreading. A tube-on-plate tensile test was used to evaluate joint strength of Ti-tube/ C-C composite joints. The load-carrying ability was greatest for the Cu-ABA braze joint structures. This system appeared to have the best braze spreading which resulted in a larger braze/C-C composite bonded area compared to the other two braze materials. Also, joint loadcarrying ability was found to be higher for joint structures where the fiber tows in the outer ply of the C-C composite were aligned perpendicular to the tube axis when compared to the case where fiber tows were aligned parallel to the tube axis.

  7. Specific Cleavage of the Nucleoprotein of Fish Rhabdovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, G-Z; Yi, Y-J; Chen, Z-Y; Zhang, Q-Y

    2015-11-01

    Siniperca chuatsi rhabdovirus (SCRV) is one of myriad rhabdoviruses recorded in fish. Preliminary data show that inhibition of the SCRV nucleoprotein (N) could significantly reduce the progeny virus titers in infected Epithelioma papulosum cyprinid (EPC) cells. Here, the authors propose that cleavage of the viral 47-kDa N protein is caspase-mediated based on caspase inhibition experiments, transient expression in EPC transfection, and analysis of cleavage sites. Cleavage of the SCRV N protein in culture was prevented by a pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-FMK (z-Val-Ala-DL-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone). Subsequently, N was transiently expressed in EPC cells, the results of which indicated that the specific cleavage of N also occurred in the cells transfected with N-GFP plasmid. Several truncated fragments of the N gene were constructed and transiently transfected into EPC cells. Immunoblotting results indicated that D324 and D374 are the cleavage sites of N by caspases. The authors also found that z-VAD-FMK could inhibit the cytopathic effect in SCRV-infected EPC cells but not affect the production of infectious progeny, suggesting that the caspase-mediated cleavage of N protein is not required for in vitro SCRV replication. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on the cleavage of rhabdovirus proteins. PMID:25689989

  8. Bundled slaty cleavage in laminated argillite, north-central minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwick, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    Exceptional bundled slaty cleavage (defined herein) has been found in drill cores of laminated, folded, weakly metamorphosed argillite at several localities in the early Proterozoic Animikie basin of north-central Minnesota. The cleavage domains are more closely spaced within the cleavage bundles than outside them, the mean tectosilicate grain size of siltstone layers, measured normal to cleavage, is less in the cleavage bundles than outside them, and the cleavage bundles are enriched in opaque phases and phyllosilicates relative to extra-bundle segments. These facts suggest that pressure solution was a major factor in bundle development. If it is assumed that opaque phases have been conserved during pressure solution, the modal differences in composition between intra-bundle and extra-bundle segments of beds provide a means for estimating bulk material shortening normal to cleavage. Argillite samples from the central part of the Animikie basin have been shortened a minimum of about 22%, as estimated by this method. These estimates are similar to the shortening values derived from other strain markers in other rock types interbedded with the argillite, and are also consistent with the regional pattern of deformation. ?? 1987.

  9. Measurement of temperature rise during Si cleavage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transient temperature change has been measured during the cleavage of Si(100) wafers both in air and in vacuum (5xl06 torr). A fine thermocouple(TC) (E type) formed by wires of diameter 25 μm was placed in a groove cut on the (100) surface where the crack was to occur. A tiny drop of thermal transfer compound was applied to enhance the thermal conduction between TC and sample surface. The thermocouple signal was recorded by a digital storage adaptor after an amplification of 10,000 by a special low noise amplifier. The width of the pulse appeared to be narrower in vacuum than in air. The difference is ascribed to effects of adsorption. Great care was taken to avoid spurious effects. The technique was tested by experiments on perspex and glass, where the results show reasonable agreement with those from previous work. Theoretical analysis of the measurements shows that the freshly cleaved surface can temporarily attain high temperatures, which is very significant for formation of surface structures

  10. A cleavage toughness master curve model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of fusion power will require a fracture toughness database, derived largely from small specimen tests, closely integrated with methods to assess first wall and blanket structural integrities. A master curve-shift (MC-ΔT) method has been proposed as an engineering expedient to treat the effects of structural geometry, irradiation, loading rates and safety margins. However, a number of issues related to the MC-ΔT method remain to be resolved, including the universality of MC shapes. A new micromechanical model of fracture toughness in the cleavage transition regime is proposed that combines analytical representations of finite element analysis simulations of crack-tip stress fields with a local critical stress-critical stressed area (σ*-A*) fracture criterion. This model, has been successful in predicting geometry effects, as well as high loading rate and irradiation hardening-induced Charpy shifts. By incorporating a modest temperature dependence in σ*(T), an inconsistency between model predictions and an observed universal-type MC shape is resolved

  11. Localized Calcium Signals along the Cleavage Furrow of the Xenopus Egg Are Not Involved in Cytokinesis

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Tatsuhiko; Mabuchi, Issei

    2002-01-01

    It has been proposed that a localized calcium (Ca) signal at the growing end of the cleavage furrow triggers cleavage furrow formation in large eggs. We have examined the possible role of a Ca signal in cleavage furrow formation in the Xenopus laevis egg during the first cleavage. We were able to detect two kinds of Ca waves along the cleavage furrow. However, the Ca waves appeared after cleavage furrow formation in late stages of the first cleavage. In addition, cleavage was not affected by ...

  12. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor (Madison, WI); Olive, David Michael (Madison, WI); Prudent, James Robert (Madison, WI)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  13. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  14. Prediction of proteasome cleavage motifs by neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesimir, C.; Nussbaum, A.K.; Schild, H.;

    2002-01-01

    We present a predictive method that can simulate an essential step in the antigen presentation in higher vertebrates, namely the step involving the proteasomal degradation of polypeptides into fragments which have the potential to bind to MHC Class I molecules. Proteasomal cleavage prediction...... the prediction of MHC Class I ligand boundaries more accurate: 65% of the cleavage sites and 85% of the non-cleavage sites are correctly determined. Moreover, we show that the neural networks trained on the constitutive proteasome data learns a specificity that differs from that of the networks...

  15. Theoretical spectral distributions and total cross sections for neutral subthreshold pion production in carbon-carbon collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Deutchman, P. A.; Townsend, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    A coherent isobar formalism is employed to model subthreshold production of neutral pions in carbon-carbon collisions at energies below 100 MeV/nucleon. No arbitrary scale factors or adjustable free parameters are used in calculation of the Lorentz-invariant cross sections for pion production in the projectile, which produces an excited state that goes to M1 resonance in the target by conservation of spin and isospin. Pion production is also modeled for the projectile, which also reaches M1 resonance. The overall pion spectral distribution in the center of mass system is then integrated over the energy range 35-84 MeV/nucleon. The results expose an energy loss in the incident ions, as observed experimentally, and indicate that an isobar mechanism is responsible for higher energy pion production. Lower energy pions are a result of thermal processes.

  16. Carbide Coatings for Nickel Alloys, Graphite and Carbon/Carbon Composites to be used in Fluoride Salt Valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, Denis [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Dajie [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-10-22

    The focus of this research was concerned with developing materials technology that supports the evolution of Generation IV Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concepts. Specifically, we investigate refractory carbide coatings for 1) nickel alloys, and 2) commercial carbon-carbon composites (CCCs). Numerous compelling reasons have driven us to focus on carbon and carbide materials. First, unlike metals, the strength and modulus of CCCs increase with rising temperature. Secondly, graphite and carbon composites have been proven effective for resisting highly corrosive fluoride melts such as molten cryolite [Na₃AlF₆] at ~1000°C in aluminum reduction cells. Thirdly, graphite and carbide materials exhibit extraordinary radiation damage tolerance and stability up to 2000°C. Finally, carbides are thermodynamically more stable in liquid fluoride salt than the corresponding metals (i.e. Cr and Zr) found in nickel based alloys.

  17. Thermal Shock Strength of Carbon-Carbon Composite by Laser Irradiation Technique Based on Shear Strength Criterion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laminated carbon-carbon (C/C) composite is candidate material for plasma-facing components in fusion reactors. Its thermal shock strength must be evaluated for an application to the components facing the high-temperature plasma field. However, few studies have been done. A laser irradiation method newly proposed was applied effectively to lamination of C/C composite for the evaluation of thermal shock strength by subjecting a heat flux up to 27 J/mm2 on the specimen surface. By introducing the critical power density at which the material fracture occurs, thermal shock strength was obtained. It was concluded that the critical power density could be a new measure to evaluate thermal shock strength for laminated C/C composite

  18. Strontium and magnesium substituted dicalcium phosphate dehydrate coating for carbon/carbon composites prepared by pulsed electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shou-jie; Li, He-jun; Zhang, Lei-lei; Feng, Lei; Yao, Pei

    2015-12-01

    Trace elements substituted apatite coatings have received a lot of interest recently as they have many benefits. In this work, strontium and magnesium substituted DCPD (SM-DCPD) coatings were deposited on carbon/carbon (C/C) composites by pulsed electrodeposition method. The morphology, microstructure, corrosion resistance and in vitro bioactivity of the SM-DCPD coatings are analyzed. The results show that the SM-DCPD coatings exhibit a flake-like morphology with dense and uniform structure. The SM-DCPD coatings could induce the formation of apatite layers on their surface in simulated body fluid. The electrochemical test indicates that the SM-DCPD coatings can evidently decrease the corrosion rate of the C/C composites in simulated body fluid. The SM-DCPD has potential application as the bioactive coatings.

  19. Preparation and Microstructure of a Si-Mo Fused Slurry Coating on Carbon/Carbon Composites for Oxidation Protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A coating of composition Si-40Mo (wt pct) was prepared by fused slurry coating method on the two-dimensional carbon/carbon (2D-C/C) composite to improve oxidation resistance. In the procedure of the fabrication, pure Si slurry inner layer in the pre-coating was necessary to apply because of infiltration of liquid Si into the substrate during the sintering. The coating consists of Si continuous phase and MoSi2 particles. In addition, the infiltration of Si into the substrate and the SiC reaction layer between the coating and the C/C composite were observed. Oxidation behavior of coated and uncoated C/C composites was studied in cyclic mode. The oxidation resistance and the thermal shock resistance of the Si-Mo fused slurry coating were quite excellent at 1370°C.

  20. A Study on Reactions of Carbon-Carbonate Mixture at Elevated Temperature : As an Anode Media of SO-DCFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) generates electricity directly by converting the chemical energy in coal. In particular, a DCFC system with a solid oxide electrolyte and molten carbonate anode media has been proposed by SRI. In this system, however, there are conflicting effects of temperature, which enhances the ion conductivity of the solid electrolyte and reactivity at the electrodes while causing a stability problem for the anode media. In this study, the effect of temperature on the stability of a carbon-carbonate mixture was investigated experimentally. TGA analysis was conducted under either nitrogen or carbon dioxide ambient for Li2 CO3, K2 CO3, and their mixtures with carbon black. The composition of the exit gas was also monitored during temperature elevation. A simplified reaction model was suggested by considering the decomposition of carbonates and the catalyzed Boudouard reactions. The suggested model could well explain both the measured weight loss of the mixture and the gas formation from it

  1. 1,4-Diketones from Cross-Conjugated Dienones: Potassium Permanganate-Interrupted Nazarov Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yonghoon; Schatz, Devon J; West, Frederick G

    2015-08-17

    A domino potassium permanganate-interrupted Nazarov reaction to yield syn-2,3-disubstituted 1,4-diketones via a decarbonylative cleavage of the Nazarov oxyallyl intermediate, believed to be without precedent, is presented. This process allows syn substituents to be established stereospecifically on the 2-carbon bridge connecting the ketone carbonyl carbons, and the formation of one carbon-carbon and two carbon-oxygen bonds. Two carbon-carbon bonds are cleaved in this process. PMID:26138361

  2. Microstructural study of the ablation behaviors of 3D fine weave pierced Carbon/Carbon composites using plasma torch at ultra-high temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A simple and effective method of testing ablation behaviors of carbon/carbon composites at high temperature was provided, which used plasma torch as the heater. The ablation resistance of 3D fine weave pierced carbon/carbon composites at high temperature was also studied. The results show that temperature of the plasma flame is very high which is much closer to the real work environment of carbon/carbon composites. The factors that affect the ablation characters of carbon/carbon composites depend on both the properties of their components and the environmental conditions in which the material is placed. The ablation behaviors of C/C composites change from the center flame region predominantly influenced by sublimation of graphite to the region close to the outer flame influenced mainly by oxidization of graphite. The sublimation ability of carbon matrix is equal to that of carbon fibers but the oxidization ability of carbon fibers is significantly enhanced compared to that of carbon matrix.

  3. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages 02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Mast, Andrea L. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  4. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Mast, Andrea L. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  5. Implementation of a combinatorial cleavage and deprotection scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John; Rasmussen, Palle H.

    1996-01-01

    Phthalhydrazide libraries are synthesized in solution from substituted hydrazines and phthalimides in several different library formats including single compounds, indexed sub-libraries and a full library. When carried out during solid-phase synthesis, this combinatorial cleavage and deprotection...

  6. Scanning tunneling microscopy of the cleavage surface of bismuth crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of in situ studies of the surface structure of the cleavages of bismuth crystals by the method of scanning tunneling microscopy are presented. It is established that cleavage 'opens' the (111) surface with atomically smooth terraces of diatomic steps whose heights are equal to 0.4 nm or a multiple of this value. If the cleavage is made at room temperature, the boundaries of the terraces are usually curved and diffuse owing to the thermal motion with the activation energy of ∼700 K. The cleavage at liquid nitrogen or helium temperatures provides the formation of straight boundaries along the atomic rows on the surface. Twin interlayers of the quantized width of ∼7 nm are revealed. This width value indicates that the atomic planes on both sides of such interlayers intergrow with the interlayer planes inclined to them at a small angle

  7. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Jeff G; Lyamichev, Victor I; Mast, Andrea L; Brow, Mary Ann D

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  8. Mechanisms for ribotoxin-induced ribosomal RNA cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Kaiyu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zhou, Hui-Ren [Food Science and Human Nutrition (United States); Pestka, James J., E-mail: pestka@msu.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics (United States); Food Science and Human Nutrition (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    The Type B trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON), a ribotoxic mycotoxin known to contaminate cereal-based foods, induces ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage in the macrophage via p38-directed activation of caspases. Here we employed the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage model to test the hypothesis that this rRNA cleavage pathway is similarly induced by other ribotoxins. Capillary electrophoresis confirmed that the antibiotic anisomycin (≥ 25 ng/ml), the macrocylic trichothecene satratoxin G (SG) (≥ 10 ng/ml) and ribosome-inactivating protein ricin (≥ 300 ng/ml) induced 18s and 28s rRNA fragmentation patterns identical to that observed for DON. Also, as found for DON, inhibition of p38, double-stranded RNA-activated kinase (PKR) and hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck) suppressed MAPK anisomycin-induced rRNA cleavage, while, in contrast, their inhibition did not affect SG- and ricin-induced rRNA fragmentation. The p53 inhibitor pifithrin-μ and pan caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK suppressed rRNA cleavage induced by anisomycin, SG and ricin, indicating that these ribotoxins shared with DON a conserved downstream pathway. Activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3 concurrently with apoptosis further suggested that rRNA cleavage occurred in parallel with both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of programmed cell death. When specific inhibitors of cathepsins L and B (lysosomal cysteine cathepsins active at cytosolic neutral pH) were tested, only the former impaired anisomycin-, SG-, ricin- and DON-induced rRNA cleavage. Taken together, the data suggest that (1) all four ribotoxins induced p53-dependent rRNA cleavage via activation of cathepsin L and caspase 3, and (2) activation of p53 by DON and anisomycin involved p38 whereas SG and ricin activated p53 by an alternative mechanism. Highlights: ► Deoxynivalenol (DON) anisomycin, satratoxin G (SG) and ricin are ribotoxins. ► Ribotoxins induce 18s and 28s rRNA cleavage in the RAW 264.7 macrophage model. ► Ribotoxins induce rRNA cleavage via

  9. Mechanisms for ribotoxin-induced ribosomal RNA cleavage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Type B trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON), a ribotoxic mycotoxin known to contaminate cereal-based foods, induces ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage in the macrophage via p38-directed activation of caspases. Here we employed the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage model to test the hypothesis that this rRNA cleavage pathway is similarly induced by other ribotoxins. Capillary electrophoresis confirmed that the antibiotic anisomycin (≥ 25 ng/ml), the macrocylic trichothecene satratoxin G (SG) (≥ 10 ng/ml) and ribosome-inactivating protein ricin (≥ 300 ng/ml) induced 18s and 28s rRNA fragmentation patterns identical to that observed for DON. Also, as found for DON, inhibition of p38, double-stranded RNA-activated kinase (PKR) and hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck) suppressed MAPK anisomycin-induced rRNA cleavage, while, in contrast, their inhibition did not affect SG- and ricin-induced rRNA fragmentation. The p53 inhibitor pifithrin-μ and pan caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK suppressed rRNA cleavage induced by anisomycin, SG and ricin, indicating that these ribotoxins shared with DON a conserved downstream pathway. Activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3 concurrently with apoptosis further suggested that rRNA cleavage occurred in parallel with both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of programmed cell death. When specific inhibitors of cathepsins L and B (lysosomal cysteine cathepsins active at cytosolic neutral pH) were tested, only the former impaired anisomycin-, SG-, ricin- and DON-induced rRNA cleavage. Taken together, the data suggest that (1) all four ribotoxins induced p53-dependent rRNA cleavage via activation of cathepsin L and caspase 3, and (2) activation of p53 by DON and anisomycin involved p38 whereas SG and ricin activated p53 by an alternative mechanism. Highlights: ► Deoxynivalenol (DON) anisomycin, satratoxin G (SG) and ricin are ribotoxins. ► Ribotoxins induce 18s and 28s rRNA cleavage in the RAW 264.7 macrophage model. ► Ribotoxins induce rRNA cleavage via

  10. Electronic fluxes during large amplitude vibrations of single, double and triple bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredtmann, Timm; Hupf, Emanuel; Paulus, Beate

    2012-11-28

    We present a time-dependent quantum mechanical analysis of electronic fluxes during large amplitude vibrations of ethane, ethene and ethyne in the electronic ground state. We find that the number of electrons which participate in the concerted electron-nuclear vibrations decrease from ethane via ethene to ethyne. Different initial conditions and different sets of "observer planes" monitoring the electronic rearrangement are tested to demonstrate the robustness of the results. This counter-intuitive result is due to similar electron distributions of single, double and triple bonds along the carbon-carbon (CC)-axis at equal CC-distances. PMID:23073346

  11. Cross Shear Roll Bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Bjerregaard, Henrik; Petersen, Søren. B;

    1994-01-01

    The present paper describes an investigation of roll bonding an AlZn alloy to mild steel. Application of cross shear roll bonding, where the two equal sized rolls run with different peripheral speed, is shown to give better bond strength than conventional roll bonding. Improvements of up to 20......-23% in bond strength are found and full bond strength is obtained at a reduction of 50% whereas 65% is required in case of conventional roll bonding. Pseudo cross shear roll bonding, where the cross shear effect is obtained by running two equal sized rolls with different speed, gives the same results....

  12. A Historical Trend of Ethnic Cleavages in Contemporary Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein Mohammadzadeh

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study is evaluation social and historical content of social cleavage in contemporary Iran. Analytical framework rooted in Rokan theory. Rokan believed that social cleavage appearance post of revolutions. Method of study was historical comparatives.The method of this research is comparative historical in which we used of historical documents and data. In this field, I have compared data of indexes of socio-economic of ethnic states.Assessment of data and documents show that so...

  13. Mutational analysis of the encephalomyocarditis virus primary cleavage.

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, H.; Palmenberg, A C

    1996-01-01

    Sixteen substitution mutations of the conserved DvExNPGP sequence, implicated in cardiovirus and aphthovirus primary polyprotein cleavage, were created in encephalomyocarditis virus cDNA, expressed, and characterized for processing activity. Nearly all the mutations severely decreased the efficiency of the primary cleavage reaction during cell-free synthesis of viral precursors, indicating a stringent requirement for the natural sequence in this processing event. When representative mutations...

  14. Cleavage of a viral polyprotein by a cellular proteolytic activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Y. C.; Shih, D S

    1986-01-01

    The 200,000-dalton polyprotein encoded by the bottom component RNA of cowpea mosaic virus was synthesized in rabbit reticulocyte lysates, and this in vitro-synthesized protein was isolated from the lysate reaction mixture by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Incubation of the isolated polyprotein with buffer caused no change in the protein, but incubation with reticulocyte lysates or with fractionated lysate proteins resulted in cleavage of the protein into the expected cleavage produc...

  15. Evidence for intramolecular self-cleavage of picornaviral replicase precursors.

    OpenAIRE

    Palmenberg, A C; Rueckert, R R

    1982-01-01

    It has previously been shown that when encephalomyocarditis viral RNA is translated in cell-free extracts of rabbit reticulocytes, it synthesizes a virus-coded protease, p22, which is derived by cleavage of a precursor protein, C. Protein C is shown here to be cleaved by two different mechanisms, which were distinguished by their sensitivity to dilution. One mechanism was sensitive to dilution; the other was not. The biphasic cleavage behavior was unchanged by diluting incubation mixtures wit...

  16. Studies of reductive elimination reactions to form carbon-oxygen bonds from Pt(IV) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B S; Goldberg, K I

    2001-03-21

    The platinum(IV) complexes fac-L(2)PtMe(3)(OR) (L(2) = bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane, o-bis(diphenylphosphino)benzene, R = carboxyl, aryl; L = PMe(3), R = aryl) undergo reductive elimination reactions to form carbon-oxygen bonds and/or carbon-carbon bonds. The carbon-oxygen reductive elimination reaction produces either methyl esters or methyl aryl ethers (anisoles) and L(2)PtMe(2), while the carbon-carbon reductive elimination reaction affords ethane and L(2)PtMe(OR). Choice of reaction conditions allows the selection of either type of coupling over the other. A detailed mechanistic study of the reductive elimination reactions supports dissociation of the OR(-) ligand as the initial step for the C-O bond formation reaction. This is followed by a nucleophilic attack of OR(-) upon a methyl group bound to the Pt(IV) cation to produce the products MeOR and L(2)PtMe(2). C-C reductive elimination proceeds from L(2)PtMe(3)(OR) by initial L (L = PMe(3)) or OR(-) (L(2) = dppe, dppbz) dissociation, followed by C-C coupling from the resulting five-coordinate intermediate. Our studies demonstrate that both C-C and C-O reductive elimination reactions from Pt(IV) are more facile in polar solvents, in the presence of Lewis acids, and for OR(-) groups that contain electron withdrawing substituents. PMID:11456927

  17. Catalysis and co-catalysis of bond cleavages in coal and coal analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, B.

    1992-01-01

    The catalytic efficiency of 2-pyridone and 4-pyridone (tautomers of 2-hydroxy and 4-hydroxypyridine) for transfer hydrogenolysis of dinaphthyl ether in tetralin at 450 C was investigated. The effectiveness of 2-pyridone dropped when the reaction time was increased, suggesting that the catalyst is destroyed. Reaction of a compound with bromine in CCl[sub 4] yielded a rearrangement product with a minor amount of the cyclization product; in acetonitrile, only the rearrangement product is obtained.

  18. Chemistry of zerumbone. 2. Regulation of ring bond cleavage and unique antibacterial activities of zerumbone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, T; Yamamoto, K; Utsumi, R; Takatani, M; Hill, R K; Kawai, Y; Sawada, S; Okamoto, T

    2001-10-01

    Further investigation of the chemistry of the eleven-membered cyclic sesquiterpene, zerumbone, the major component of the wild ginger, Zingiber zerumbet Smith, has revealed a new selective epoxidation process, a further example of a novel Favorskii-initiated double ring contraction, and a regiospecific fragmentation of zerumbone dibromide derivatives. Several zerumbone derivatives were found to be selective inhibitors of the growth of gram-positive bacteria. PMID:11758909

  19. Mild N-O Bond Cleavage Reactions of a Pyramidalized Nitrosyl Ligand Bridging a Dimolybdenum Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, M Angeles; García, M Esther; García-Vivó, Daniel; Ruiz, Miguel A; Toyos, Adrián

    2015-11-16

    Complex [Mo2Cp2(μ-PCy2)(μ-NO)(NO)2] (1) was prepared by reacting [Mo2Cp2(μ-H)(μ-PCy2)(CO)4] with 2 equiv of [NO]BF4 and then treating the resulting product [Mo2Cp2(μ-PCy2)(CO)2(NO)2](BF4) with NaNO2 at 323 K, and it was shown to display a bridging nitrosyl ligand with significant pyramidalization at the N atom, a circumstance related to an unusual behavior concerning degradation of the bridging nitrosyl. Indeed, complex 1 reacts with HBF4·OEt2 to give the nitroxyl-bridged derivative [Mo2Cp2(μ-PCy2)(μ-κ(1):η(2)-HNO)(NO)2](BF4), is reduced by Zn(Hg) in the presence of trace H2O to give the amido complex [Mo2Cp2(μ-PCy2)(μ-NH2)(NO)2], and reacts with excess P(OPh)3 to give the phosphoraniminato-bridged derivative [Mo2Cp2(μ-PCy2){μ-NP(OPh)3}(NO)2]. PMID:26529181

  20. On the radical scavenging activity of isoflavones: thermodynamics of O–H bond cleavage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lengyel, Jozef; Rimarčík, J.; Vagánek, A.; Klein, E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 26 (2013), s. 10895-10903. ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0422 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : LOSS ELECTRON-TRANSFER * DISSOCIATION ENTHALPIES * ANTIOXIDANT PROPERTIES Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.198, year: 2013

  1. Dramatically Enhanced Cleavage of the C–C Bond Using an Electrocatalytically Coupled Reaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    He, Q. P.; Shyam, B.; Macounová, Kateřina; Krtil, Petr; Ramaker, D.; Mukerjee, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 134, č. 20 (2012), s. 8655-8661. ISSN 0002-7863 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : RAY-ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY * IN-SITU XANES * ETHANOL ELECTROOXIDATION Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 10.677, year: 2012

  2. Oxidation of sterols: Energetics of C–H and O–H bond cleavage

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lengyel, Jozef; Rimarčík, J.; Vagánek, A.; Fedor, J.; Lukeš, V.; Klein, E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 133, č. 4 (2012), s. 1435-1440. ISSN 0308-8146 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0161 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : phytosterol * oxidation * antioxidant Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.334, year: 2012

  3. Intercapsomeric Disulfide Bonds in Papillomavirus Assembly and Disassembly

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Maolin; Beard, Peter; Estes, Patricia A.; Lyon, Mary K.; Garcea, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    In order to analyze bonding contacts that stabilize the virion or promote capsid assembly, bovine papillomavirus (BPV) virions were subjected to buffer conditions known to disrupt polyomavirus virions. At physiologic ionic strength, incubation with dithiothreitol (DTT), EGTA, or DTT plus EGTA did not disrupt BPV virions as determined by electron microscopy. However, incubation of virions with DTT rendered the BPV L1 protein susceptible to trypsin cleavage at its carboxy terminus and rendered ...

  4. Internal guide RNA interactions interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyme, Summer B.; Akhmetova, Laila; Montague, Tessa G.; Valen, Eivind; Schier, Alexander F.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas system uses guide RNAs (gRNAs) to direct sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Not every gRNA elicits cleavage and the mechanisms that govern gRNA activity have not been resolved. Low activity could result from either failure to form a functional Cas9–gRNA complex or inability to recognize targets in vivo. Here we show that both phenomena influence Cas9 activity by comparing mutagenesis rates in zebrafish embryos with in vitro cleavage assays. In vivo, our results suggest that genomic factors such as CTCF inhibit mutagenesis. Comparing near-identical gRNA sequences with different in vitro activities reveals that internal gRNA interactions reduce cleavage. Even though gRNAs containing these structures do not yield cleavage-competent complexes, they can compete with active gRNAs for binding to Cas9. These results reveal that both genomic context and internal gRNA interactions can interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage and illuminate previously uncharacterized features of Cas9–gRNA complex formation. PMID:27282953

  5. Wire bonding in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Harman, George G

    2010-01-01

    Wire Bonding in Microelectronics, Third Edition, has been thoroughly revised to help you meet the challenges of today's small-scale and fine-pitch microelectronics. This authoritative guide covers every aspect of designing, manufacturing, and evaluating wire bonds engineered with cutting-edge techniques. In addition to gaining a full grasp of bonding technology, you'll learn how to create reliable bonds at exceedingly high yields, test wire bonds, solve common bonding problems, implement molecular cleaning methods, and much more. Coverage includes: Ultrasonic bonding systems and technologies, including high-frequency systems Bonding wire metallurgy and characteristics, including copper wire Wire bond testing Gold-aluminum intermetallic compounds and other interface reactions Gold and nickel-based bond pad plating materials and problems Cleaning to improve bondability and reliability Mechanical problems in wire bonding High-yield, fine-pitch, specialized-looping, soft-substrate, and extreme-temperature wire bo...

  6. Novel tridentate diamino organomanganese(II) complexes as homogeneous catalysts in manganese(II)/copper(I) catalyzed carbon-carbon bond forming reactions

    OpenAIRE

    van Koten, G; Donkervoort, J.G.; Vicario, J.L.; Jastrzebski, J.T.B.H.; Gossage, R.A.; Cahiez, G.

    1998-01-01

    The new, paramagnetic arylmanganese(II) complex Li[MnCl2(NCN)] (2, NCN [C6H3(CH2NMe2)2-2,6]−) has been obtained in high yield from the reaction of MnCl2 and [Li(NCN)]2 in a 2:1 molar ratio. In THF solution, 2 is likely an ionic species [Li(THF)n] [MnCl2(NCN)] (molecular weight determination and conductivity measurements), while magnetic measurements indicate that a high spin d5 manganese(II) center is present. Subsequent reaction of 2 with RLi afforded [MnR(NCN)] (R=Me (3a), n-Bu (3b)). Compl...

  7. Intramolecular coupling of eta/sup 2/-iminoacyl groups at group 4 metal centers: a kinetic study of the carbon-carbon double-bond-forming reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durfee, L.D.; McMullen, A.K.; Rothwell, I.P.

    1988-03-02

    The series of bis(eta/sup 2/-iminoacyl) compounds of general formula M(OAr)/sub 2/(eta/sup 2/-R'NCR)/sub 2/ (M = Ti, Zr, Hf; OAr = 2,6-diisopropyl- and 2,6-di-tert-butylphenoxide; R = CH/sub 3/, CH/sub 2/Ph; R' = various substituted phenyls) undergo intramolecular coupling on thermolysis to produce the corresponding enediamide derivatives M(OAr)/sub 2/(R'NC(R) = C(R)NR'). A kinetic study of the reaction in hydrocarbon solvents has shown it to be first order. The reaction is metal dependent with the rate decreasing in the order Ti > Zr > Hf. The rate of the reaction is also dependent on the steric and electronic nature of the nitrogen substituent (R'). The use of the bulky aryl group 2,6-dimethylphenyl retards the reaction, while the use of various 3- and 4-substituted phenyls (3-F, 3-OMe, 4-OMe, 4-Cl, 4-NMe/sub 2/) shows the reaction to be accelerated by electron-withdrawing substituents. A sigma plot based on kinetic data obtained at 67/sup 0/C and 77/sup 0/C yielded rho values of 0.83 (R = 0.97) and 0.84 (R = 0.95), respectively. Both the steric and electronic dependence of the reactivity on the nitrogen substituents is discussed mechanistically and used to rationalize the much more facile intramolecular coupling observed for the related eta/sup 2/-acyl (eta/sup 2/-OCR) functionalities.

  8. Direct carbon-carbon bond formation via reductive soft enolization: a syn-selective Mannich addition of α-iodo thioesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Ngoc; Sauer, Scott J; Seraphin-Hatcher, Cyndie; Coltart, Don M

    2016-08-16

    The β-amino carboxylic acid moiety is a key feature of numerous important biologically active compounds. We describe a syn-selective direct Mannich addition reaction that uses α-iodo thioesters and sulfonyl imines and produces β-amino thioesters. Enolate formation is achieved by reductive soft enolization. The products of the reaction provide straightforward access to biologically important β-lactams through a variety of known reactions. PMID:27492274

  9. Catalytic mechanism of RNA backbone cleavage by ribonuclease H from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Edina; Nowotny, Marcin; Yang, Wei; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-06-15

    We use quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations to study the cleavage of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) backbone catalyzed by ribonuclease H. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family of enzymes that use two-metal catalysis to process nucleic acids. By combining Hamiltonian replica exchange with a finite-temperature string method, we calculate the free energy surface underlying the RNA-cleavage reaction and characterize its mechanism. We find that the reaction proceeds in two steps. In a first step, catalyzed primarily by magnesium ion A and its ligands, a water molecule attacks the scissile phosphate. Consistent with thiol-substitution experiments, a water proton is transferred to the downstream phosphate group. The transient phosphorane formed as a result of this nucleophilic attack decays by breaking the bond between the phosphate and the ribose oxygen. In the resulting intermediate, the dissociated but unprotonated leaving group forms an alkoxide coordinated to magnesium ion B. In a second step, the reaction is completed by protonation of the leaving group, with a neutral Asp132 as a likely proton donor. The overall reaction barrier of ∼15 kcal mol(-1), encountered in the first step, together with the cost of protonating Asp132, is consistent with the slow measured rate of ∼1-100/min. The two-step mechanism is also consistent with the bell-shaped pH dependence of the reaction rate. The nonmonotonic relative motion of the magnesium ions along the reaction pathway agrees with X-ray crystal structures. Proton-transfer reactions and changes in the metal ion coordination emerge as central factors in the RNA-cleavage reaction. PMID:21539371

  10. Catalytic Mechanism of RNA Backbone Cleavage by Ribonuclease H from QM/MM Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Edina; Nowotny, Marcin; Yang, Wei; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    We use quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to study the cleavage of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) backbone catalyzed by ribonuclease H. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family of enzymes that use two-metal catalysis to process nucleic acids. By combining Hamiltonian replica exchange with a finite-temperature string method, we calculate the free energy surface underlying the RNA cleavage reaction and characterize its mechanism. We find that the reaction proceeds in two steps. In a first step, catalyzed primarily by magnesium ion A and its ligands, a water molecule attacks the scissile phosphate. Consistent with thiol-substitution experiments, a water proton is transferred to the downstream phosphate group. The transient phosphorane formed as a result of this nucleophilic attack decays by breaking the bond between the phosphate and the ribose oxygen. In the resulting intermediate, the dissociated but unprotonated leaving group forms an alkoxide coordinated to magnesium ion B. In a second step, the reaction is completed by protonation of the leaving group, with a neutral Asp132 as a likely proton donor. The overall reaction barrier of ~15 kcal mol−1, encountered in the first step, together with the cost of protonating Asp132, is consistent with the slow measured rate of ~1–100/min. The two-step mechanism is also consistent with the bell-shaped pH dependence of the reaction rate. The non-monotonic relative motion of the magnesium ions along the reaction pathway agrees with X-ray crystal structures. Proton transfer reactions and changes in the metal ion coordination emerge as central factors in the RNA cleavage reaction. PMID:21539371

  11. Novel carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase catalyzes the first dedicated step in saffron crocin biosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Frusciante, Sarah

    2014-08-05

    Crocus sativus stigmas are the source of the saffron spice and accumulate the apocarotenoids crocetin, crocins, picrocrocin, and safranal, responsible for its color, taste, and aroma. Through deep transcriptome sequencing, we identified a novel dioxygenase, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase 2 (CCD2), expressed early during stigma development and closely related to, but distinct from, the CCD1 dioxygenase family. CCD2 is the only identified member of a novel CCD clade, presents the structural features of a bona fide CCD, and is able to cleave zeaxanthin, the presumed precursor of saffron apocarotenoids, both in Escherichia coli and in maize endosperm. The cleavage products, identified through high-resolution mass spectrometry and comigration with authentic standards, are crocetin dialdehyde and crocetin, respectively. In vitro assays show that CCD2 cleaves sequentially the 7,8 and 7′,8′ double bonds adjacent to a 3-OH-β-ionone ring and that the conversion of zeaxanthin to crocetin dialdehyde proceeds via the C30 intermediate 3-OH-β-apo-8′-carotenal. In contrast, zeaxanthin cleavage dioxygenase (ZCD), an enzyme previously claimed to mediate crocetin formation, did not cleave zeaxanthin or 3-OH-β-apo-8′-carotenal in the test systems used. Sequence comparison and structure prediction suggest that ZCD is an N-truncated CCD4 form, lacking one blade of the β-propeller structure conserved in all CCDs. These results constitute strong evidence that CCD2 catalyzes the first dedicated step in crocin biosynthesis. Similar to CCD1, CCD2 has a cytoplasmic localization, suggesting that it may cleave carotenoids localized in the chromoplast outer envelope.

  12. CD44 Binding to Hyaluronic Acid Is Redox Regulated by a Labile Disulfide Bond in the Hyaluronic Acid Binding Site

    OpenAIRE

    Kellett-Clarke, Helena; Stegmann, Monika; Barclay, A. Neil; Metcalfe, Clive

    2015-01-01

    CD44 is the primary leukocyte cell surface receptor for hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix. Enzymatic post translational cleavage of labile disulfide bonds is a mechanism by which proteins are structurally regulated by imparting an allosteric change and altering activity. We have identified one such disulfide bond in CD44 formed by Cys77 and Cys97 that stabilises the HA binding groove. This bond is labile on the surface of leukocytes treated with chemical and enzyma...

  13. Palladium-Catalyzed Deaminative Phenanthridinone Synthesis from Aniline via C-H Bond Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedage, Subhash L; Bhanage, Bhalchandra M

    2016-05-20

    This work reports palladium-catalyzed phenanthridinone synthesis using the coupling of aniline and amide by formation of C-C and C-N bonds in a one-pot fashion via dual C-H bond activation. It involves simultaneous cleavage of four bonds and the formation of two new bonds. The present protocol is ligand-free, takes place under mild reaction conditions, and is environmentally benign as nitrogen gas and water are the only side products. This transformation demonstrates a broad range of aniline and amide substrates with different functional groups and has been scaled up to gram level. PMID:27088815

  14. Location of spermine and other polyamines on DNA as revealed by photoaffinity cleavage with polyaminobenzenediazonium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although polyamines interact strongly with nucleic acids, X-ray and NMR studies have not revealed much structural information about spermine-DNA complexes. Therefore, it was of interest to look at the binding of polyamines to 32P-labeled DNA restriction fragments by sequencing gel electrophoresis of the photoaffinity cleavage products induced by polyaminobenzenediazonium salts. The shift of cleavage patterns observed on opposite strands as well as competition experiments with distamycin shows polyamines to be located in the minor groove of B-DNA and to depend on the nucleic acid polymorphism, jumping to the major groove in the A-form. The sequence selectivities of various polycations (spermine, putrescine, and cobalt(III) hexaammine) are similar and slightly favor A,T-rich regions. Taken together, these results show that polycations which are not point charges are guided by the electronegative potential along the nucleic acid and suggest fast crawling of the polyamine within the minor groove, due to individual NH2+ jumping between multiple equidistant and isoenergetic bidentate hydrogen-bonding sites. Such a picture could be the clue to the unexpected NMR and to the frequently silent X-ray behavior of polyamines when bound to DNA

  15. Optimization schemes for selective molecular cleavage with tailored ultrashort laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Isosurface plot of the electronic density, and positions of the nuclei, during the irradiation of a formaldiminium ion with an optimized laser pulse, leading to the selective cleavage of a proton. Display Omitted Highlights: ► We use QOCT in combination with mixed quantum-classical molecular models. ► TDDFT models the electrons coupled to the nuclei through Ehrenfest equations. ► Both gradient-free and gradient-based algorithms are explored for the optimization. ► We explore different options for the definition of the target functional. - Abstract: We present some approaches to the computation of ultra-fast laser pulses capable of selectively breaking molecular bonds. The calculations are based on a mixed quantum-classical description: The electrons are treated quantum mechanically (making use of time-dependent density-functional theory), whereas the nuclei are treated classically. The temporal shape of the pulses is tailored to maximize a control target functional which is designed to produce the desired molecular cleavage. The precise definition of this functional is a crucial ingredient: we explore expressions based on the forces, on the momenta and on the velocities of the nuclei. The algorithm used to find the optimum pulse is also relevant; we test both direct gradient-free algorithms, as well as schemes based on formal optimal control theory. The tests are performed both on one dimensional models of atomic chains, and on first-principles descriptions of molecules.

  16. On Bond Portfolio Management

    OpenAIRE

    Vladislav Kargin

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes a new method of bond portfolio optimization based on stochastic string models of correlation structure in bond returns. The paper shows how to approximate correlation function of bond returns, compute the optimal portfolio allocation using Wiener-Hopf factorization, and check whether a collection of bonds presents arbitrage opportunities.

  17. Synthesis and Integration of Nanostructured Carbon: Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Nanocomposites and Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulotty, Richard Stephen

    Nanostructured carbon, in the form of tubes or sheets, exhibits exceptional thermal and electrical properties. Graphene, a single atomic sheet of hexagonal sp2 bonded carbon, posesses a thermal conductivity higher than diamond, with an extremely high electron mobility. Carbon nanotubes (CNT), which are tubes composed of one or more graphene sheets, also posess high thermal conductivity and electron mobility. One of the major problems facing the application of nanomaterials is integration into already existing material systems. A second challenge is controlled synthesis of nanomaterials. In this dissertation research novel methods were investigated for coupling carbon nanotubes to polymer matrices, as well as new approaches for controlling the synthesis of graphene and reduced graphene oxide like carbon (R-GOC) on copper (Cu) foils via chemical vapor deposition. It was determined that carboxylic functionalization of carbon nanotubes was effective in improving the coupling of CNTs to polymer matrices, affecting the thermal transport of the resulting CNT-polymer nanocomposites. From the CVD studies it was established that the cooling phase gases flowed after deposition influence the growth mechanics of graphene on Cu foil. Further CVD studies showed that methane may be decomposed directly onto quartz to form reduced graphene oxide like carbon thin films. The obtained thermal characterization results are important for development of CNTs as fillers for composite pastes with high thermal conductivity, and the results of the CVD studies are important for developing further understanding of growth mechanics of bilayer graphene and other nanostructured carbon. In addition to the fundamental study of CVD synthesis of graphene and R-GOC, this dissertation work includes engineering of graphene and R-GOC to various applications, including the development of the thinnest flexible transistor with active materials made from all-2D materials, as well as large-scale electron

  18. Molecular Basis of Catalytic Chamber-assisted Unfolding and Cleavage of Human Insulin by Human Insulin-degrading Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manolopoulou, Marika; Guo, Qing; Malito, Enrico; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen; (UC); (UIC)

    2009-06-02

    Insulin is a hormone vital for glucose homeostasis, and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) plays a key role in its clearance. IDE exhibits a remarkable specificity to degrade insulin without breaking the disulfide bonds that hold the insulin A and B chains together. Using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry to obtain high mass accuracy, and electron capture dissociation (ECD) to selectively break the disulfide bonds in gas phase fragmentation, we determined the cleavage sites and composition of human insulin fragments generated by human IDE. Our time-dependent analysis of IDE-digested insulin fragments reveals that IDE is highly processive in its initial cleavage at the middle of both the insulin A and B chains. This ensures that IDE effectively splits insulin into inactive N- and C-terminal halves without breaking the disulfide bonds. To understand the molecular basis of the recognition and unfolding of insulin by IDE, we determined a 2.6-A resolution insulin-bound IDE structure. Our structure reveals that IDE forms an enclosed catalytic chamber that completely engulfs and intimately interacts with a partially unfolded insulin molecule. This structure also highlights how the unique size, shape, charge distribution, and exosite of the IDE catalytic chamber contribute to its high affinity ( approximately 100 nm) for insulin. In addition, this structure shows how IDE utilizes the interaction of its exosite with the N terminus of the insulin A chain as well as other properties of the catalytic chamber to guide the unfolding of insulin and allowing for the processive cleavages.

  19. Multicenter bonds, bond valence and bond charge apportion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the same way that the valence of an atom issues from the definition of bond index, we shoe here that the three-center bond index lends itself to the definition of a bond valence. Within the charge of a bond, we show that its self-charge (i.e., the amount of electron kept by the atoms involved in the bond) is parted in a such a way that the more electronegative atom tends to allot more electronic charge than the other atom. We give examples of these quantities and discuss the results for different kinds of chemical systems. We also show some results for four-center indices and report six-center indices for hexagonal rings. (author). 54 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs

  20. Size effects and strain localization in atomic-scale cleavage modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, B A M; Müller, S

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we study the adhesion and decohesion of Cu(1 0 0) surfaces using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. An upper stress to surface decohesion is obtained via the universal binding energy relation (UBER), but the model is limited to rigid separation of bulk-terminated surfaces. When structural relaxations are included, an unphysical size effect arises if decohesion is considered to occur as soon as the strain energy equals the energy of the newly formed surfaces. We employ the nudged elastic band (NEB) method to show that this size effect is opposed by a size-dependency of the energy barriers involved in the transition. Further, we find that the transition occurs via a localization of bond strain in the vicinity of the cleavage plane, which resembles the strain localization at the tip of a sharp crack that is predicted by linear elastic fracture mechanics. PMID:26219654

  1. Size effects and strain localization in atomic-scale cleavage modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we study the adhesion and decohesion of Cu(1 0 0) surfaces using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. An upper stress to surface decohesion is obtained via the universal binding energy relation (UBER), but the model is limited to rigid separation of bulk-terminated surfaces. When structural relaxations are included, an unphysical size effect arises if decohesion is considered to occur as soon as the strain energy equals the energy of the newly formed surfaces. We employ the nudged elastic band (NEB) method to show that this size effect is opposed by a size-dependency of the energy barriers involved in the transition. Further, we find that the transition occurs via a localization of bond strain in the vicinity of the cleavage plane, which resembles the strain localization at the tip of a sharp crack that is predicted by linear elastic fracture mechanics. (paper)

  2. Optimization Schemes for Selective Molecular Cleavage with Tailored Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, Kevin; Gross, E K U

    2011-01-01

    We present some approaches to the computation of ultra-fast laser pulses capable of selectively breaking molecular bonds. The calculations are based on a mixed quantum-classical description: The electrons are treated quantum mechanically (making use of time-dependent density-functional theory), whereas the nuclei are treated classically. The temporal shape of the pulses is tailored to maximise a control target functional which is designed to produce the desired molecular cleavage. The precise definition of this functional is a crucial ingredient: we explore expressions based on the forces, on the momenta and on the velocities of the nuclei. The algorithm used to find the optimum pulse is also relevant; we test both direct gradient-free algorithms, as well as schemes based on formal optimal control theory. The tests are performed both on one dimensional models of atomic chains, and on first-principles descriptions of molecules.

  3. Small molecule activators of pre-mRNA 3′ cleavage

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Kevin; Khleborodova, Asya; Pan, Jingyi; Ryan, Xiaozhou P.

    2009-01-01

    3′ Cleavage and polyadenylation are obligatory steps in the biogenesis of most mammalian pre-mRNAs. In vitro reconstitution of the 3′ cleavage reaction from human cleavage factors requires high concentrations of creatine phosphate (CP), though how CP activates cleavage is not known. Previously, we proposed that CP might work by competitively inhibiting a cleavage-suppressing serine/threonine (S/T) phosphatase. Here we show that fluoride/EDTA, a general S/T phosphatase inhibitor, activates in ...

  4. Local approach to strength mis-match effect on cleavage fracture of notched material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the strength mis-match effect on cleavage fracture of notched materials based on the local approach. The aim of the study is to verify the independence of the critical Weibull stress at fracture on the strength mis-match condition. Diffusion bonded joints were made with two materials S and H different in strength level. Two types of 3-point bend specimen were extracted. One had a notch in the lower strength material S near the bonded interface, and another in the higher strength material H. Homogeneous specimens were also made for each material. The critical CTOD value at cleavage fracture for the overmatched specimen with a notch in the material S was smaller than that of the homogeneous specimen of the material S. By contrast, the undermatched specimen with a notch in the material H showed apparently larger critical CTOD value than the homogeneous specimen of the material H. The strength mis-match effect on the CTOD results was explained in terms of the constraint effect on the near-tip stress field. Namely, the near-tip stress is elevated by strength overmatching and relaxed by strength undermatching. The Weibull stresses for the homogeneous and mis-matched specimens were evaluated in the light of the near-tip stress fields. The critical Weibull stress at fracture did not depend on the strength mis-match condition near the notch. By using the critical Weibull stress obtained for the homogeneous specimen, the strength mis-match effect on the CTOD results can be predicted. Close agreement was observed between the critical CTOD value predicted and that obtained by the experiment. (orig.)

  5. Mechanism of intramembrane cleavage of alcadeins by γ-secretase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Piao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alcadein proteins (Alcs; Alcα, Alcβand Alcγ are predominantly expressed in neurons, as is Alzheimer's β-amyloid (Aβ precursor protein (APP. Both Alcs and APP are cleaved by primary α- or β-secretase to generate membrane-associated C-terminal fragments (CTFs. Alc CTFs are further cleaved by γ-secretase to secrete p3-Alc peptide along with the release of intracellular domain fragment (Alc ICD from the membrane. In the case of APP, APP CTFβ is initially cleaved at the ε-site to release the intracellular domain fragment (AICD and consequently the γ-site is determined, by which Aβ generates. The initial ε-site is thought to define the final γ-site position, which determines whether Aβ40/43 or Aβ42 is generated. However, initial intracellular ε-cleavage sites of Alc CTF to generate Alc ICD and the molecular mechanism that final γ-site position is determined remains unclear in Alcs. METHODOLOGY: Using HEK293 cells expressing Alcs plus presenilin 1 (PS1, a catalytic unit of γ-secretase and the membrane fractions of these cells, the generation of p3-Alc possessing C-terminal γ-cleavage site and Alc ICD possessing N-terminal ε-cleavage site were analysed with MALDI-TOF/MS. We determined the initial ε-site position of all Alcα, Alcβ and Alcγ, and analyzed the relationship between the initially determined ε-site position and the final γ-cleavage position. CONCLUSIONS: The initial ε-site position does not always determine the final γ-cleavage position in Alcs, which differed from APP. No additional γ-cleavage sites are generated from artificial/non-physiological positions of ε-cleavage for Alcs, while the artificial ε-cleavage positions can influence in selection of physiological γ-site positions. Because alteration of γ-secretase activity is thought to be a pathogenesis of sporadic Alzheimer's disease, Alcs are useful and sensitive substrate to detect the altered cleavage of substrates by γ-secretase, which may

  6. Pripper: prediction of caspase cleavage sites from whole proteomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmi Jussi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caspases are a family of proteases that have central functions in programmed cell death (apoptosis and inflammation. Caspases mediate their effects through aspartate-specific cleavage of their target proteins, and at present almost 400 caspase substrates are known. There are several methods developed to predict caspase cleavage sites from individual proteins, but currently none of them can be used to predict caspase cleavage sites from multiple proteins or entire proteomes, or to use several classifiers in combination. The possibility to create a database from predicted caspase cleavage products for the whole genome could significantly aid in identifying novel caspase targets from tandem mass spectrometry based proteomic experiments. Results Three different pattern recognition classifiers were developed for predicting caspase cleavage sites from protein sequences. Evaluation of the classifiers with quality measures indicated that all of the three classifiers performed well in predicting caspase cleavage sites, and when combining different classifiers the accuracy increased further. A new tool, Pripper, was developed to utilize the classifiers and predict the caspase cut sites from an arbitrary number of input sequences. A database was constructed with the developed tool, and it was used to identify caspase target proteins from tandem mass spectrometry data from two different proteomic experiments. Both known caspase cleavage products as well as novel cleavage products were identified using the database demonstrating the usefulness of the tool. Pripper is not restricted to predicting only caspase cut sites, but it gives the possibility to scan protein sequences for any given motif(s and predict cut sites once a suitable cut site prediction model for any other protease has been developed. Pripper is freely available and can be downloaded from http://users.utu.fi/mijopi/Pripper. Conclusions We have developed Pripper, a tool for

  7. Cell-surface acceleration of urokinase-catalyzed receptor cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer-Hansen, G; Ploug, M; Behrendt, N;

    1997-01-01

    or indirectly mediated by uPA itself. In a soluble system, uPA can cleave purified uPAR, but the low efficiency of this reaction has raised doubts as to whether uPA is directly responsible for uPAR cleavage on the cells. We now report that uPA-catalyzed cleavage of uPAR on the cell surface is...... strongly favored relative to the reaction in solution. The time course of uPA-catalyzed cleavage of cell-bound uPAR was studied using U937 cells stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Only 30 min was required for 10 nM uPA to cleave 50% of the cell-bound uPAR. This uPA-catalyzed cleavage reaction...... was inhibited by a prior incubation of the cells with uPA inactivated by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, demonstrating a requirement for specific receptor binding of the active uPA to obtain the high-efficiency cleavage of cell-bound uPAR. Furthermore, amino-terminal sequence analysis revealed that u...

  8. C-Terminally modified peptides via cleavage of the HMBA linker by O-, N- or S-nucleophiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jonas; Diness, Frederik; Meldal, Morten Peter

    2016-01-01

    A large variety of C-terminally modified peptides was obtained by nucleophilic cleavage of the ester bond in solid phase linked peptide esters of 4-hydroxymethyl benzamide (HMBA). The developed methods provided peptides, C-terminally functionalized as esters, amides and thioesters, with high puri...

  9. In-plane shear strength of a carbon/carbon composite at different loading rates and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → The valid IPSS can be determined by the compression of the double-notched specimens. → The IPSS of the C/C exhibited a significant dependency on the loading rates. → The IPSS of the C/C increases with the increase of the temperature in 298-1873 K. - Abstract: The in-plane shear strength (IPSS) of a carbon/carbon composite (C/C) was measured at different loading rates and temperatures by compressing the double-notched specimen (DNS). The fracture surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that IPSS measured by loading in compressing DNS is very close to that determined by the Iosipescu method at room temperature. There is a linear relationship between IPSS and the loading rate on the log-log coordinate, as the loading rate increases from 0.005 to 2 mm/min. IPSS at 1873 K is about two times of that at room temperature. The results were caused by the degassing effect of the absorbed water, release of the thermal stress and enhancement of the fiber strength.

  10. Al current collector surface treatment and carbon nano tubes influences on Carbon / Carbon super-capacitors performances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portet, C.; Taberna, P.L.; Simon, P. [Universite Paul Sabatier, CIRIMAT-LCMIE, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2004-07-01

    Performances of 4 cm{sup 2} carbon/carbon super-capacitors cells using Al current collectors foils in organic electrolyte are presented; the improvement of electrode material has been investigated. In a first part, a surface treatment of the Al current collector is proposed in order to improve contact surface between the current collector and the active material leading to an internal resistance decrease. The process consists in an etching of the Al foil and is followed by a carbonaceous sol-gel deposit. Galvano-static cycling and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy measurements of super-capacitors all assembled with treated Al foil were tested over 10,000 cycles: an ESR of 0.5 {omega} cm{sup 2} and a capacitance of 95 F g{sup -1} of activated carbon are obtained and performances remain stable during cycling. The second part is devoted to the study of Carbon Nano Tubes (CNTs) adding into the active material on the performances of super-capacitors. A content of 15% of CNTs appears to be the best composition; the ESR is 0.4 {omega} cm{sup 2} (20% lowered as compared to a cell using activated carbon based electrode) and the capacitance remain high 93 F g{sup -1} of carbonaceous active material. (authors)

  11. Prospects in using carbon-carbon composite materials based on viscose carbon fibers for the space technology needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the unique combination of low density, high mechanical strength under elevated temperatures, high resistance to thermal shock loads and ablation resistance, carbon-carbon composite materials (CCCM) are widely used for manufacturing of highly thermally loaded structural components. The important scientific and technical difficulty is to increase and stabilize CCCM properties, reduce cost and leads to searching for new raw materials and engineering solutions. The article describes the prospects of replacing carbon fiber fills based on PAN-precursors which are traditionally used for producing CCCM by carbon fillers on the basis of viscose raw material; shows the advantages of using viscose-based carbon fibers when forming products of complex shape as well as the possibility of obtaining products with high functional characteristics. The creation of CCCM of layered reinforcement structure, in which carbon fabric layers interleave with layers of discontinuous carbon fibers, enabled to increase the overall density of carbon composites, to ensure sufficiently high level of mechanical characteristics and resistance to ablation

  12. Oxidation protection and behavior of in-situ zirconium diboride–silicon carbide coating for carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lu; Li, Hejun, E-mail: lihejun@nwpu.edu.cn; Yin, Xuemin; Chu, Yanhui; Chen, Xi; Fu, Qiangang, E-mail: fuqiangang@nwpu.edu.cn

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • ZrB{sub 2}–SiC coating was prepared on C/C composite by in-situ reaction. • A two-layered structure was obtained when the coating was oxidized at 1500 °C. • The formation and collapse of bubbles influenced the coating oxidation greatly. • The morphology evolution of oxide scale during oxidation was illuminated. - Abstract: To protect carbon/carbon (C/C) composites against oxidation, zirconium diboride–silicon carbide (ZrB{sub 2}–SiC) coating was prepared by in-situ reaction using ZrC, B{sub 4}C and Si as raw materials. The in-situ ZrB{sub 2}–SiC coated C/C presented good oxidation resistance, whose weight loss was only 0.15% after isothermal oxidation at 1500 °C for 216 h. Microstructure evolution of coating at 1500 °C was studied, revealing a two-layered structure: (1) ZrO{sub 2} (ZrSiO{sub 4}) embedded in SiO{sub 2}-rich glass, and (2) unaffected ZrB{sub 2}–SiC. The formation and collapse of bubbles influenced the coating oxidation greatly. A model based on the evolution of oxide scale was proposed to explain the failure mechanism of coating.

  13. Ablation behaviors of carbon/carbon composites with C-SiC-TaC multi-interlayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon/carbon composites with C-SiC-TaC multi-interlayers were prepared by isothermal chemical vapor infiltration. The ablation behaviors of the composites were tested with an oxyacetylene flame. The mass loss rate increases markedly in the initial 10 s, then reaches a steady state or decreases slightly in 10-40 s; while after 40 s, the mass loss rate increases remarkably. A similar trend is observed in the linear loss rate, except that it begins to increase only after 60 s. After ablation for 5 s, the composite surface consists in black carbon fibers and white ceramic oxides. After 20 s, three different regions with different ablation behaviors are observed: central, transition and border. After 100 s, the composites are severely ablated and the shape is completely destroyed. A cross-section of the composites after ablation for 20 s shows three distinct regions: a rugged oxide layer, a smooth oxide layer and the matrix. The tantalum compounds have not been able to protect efficiently the material from constant oxide evolution, possibly because of a too large pore volume fraction.

  14. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of Subsurface Defects in Reinforced Carbon-Carbon Joggles Subjected to Thermo-Mechanical Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Song, Kyongchan

    2011-01-01

    Coating spallation events have been observed along the slip-side joggle region of the Space Shuttle Orbiter wing-leading-edge panels. One potential contributor to the spallation event is a pressure build up within subsurface voids or defects due to volatiles or water vapor entrapped during fabrication, refurbishment, or normal operational use. The influence of entrapped pressure on the thermo-mechanical fracture-mechanics response of reinforced carbon-carbon with subsurface defects is studied. Plane-strain simulations with embedded subsurface defects are performed to characterize the fracture mechanics response for a given defect length when subjected to combined elevated-temperature and subsurface-defect pressure loadings to simulate the unvented defect condition. Various subsurface defect locations of a fixed-length substrate defect are examined for elevated temperature conditions. Fracture mechanics results suggest that entrapped pressure combined with local elevated temperatures have the potential to cause subsurface defect growth and possibly contribute to further material separation or even spallation. For this anomaly to occur, several unusual circumstances would be required making such an outcome unlikely but plausible.

  15. Development of carbon/carbon composite control rod for HTTR. 2. Concept, specifications and mechanical test of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concept and specifications of carbon/carbon composite (C/C) control rod were proposed, aiming at the application of the material to the HTTR. The outer diameter and length of the control rod were kept as the same as those of the present control rod, i.e., 113 mm and 3094 mm, respectively. According to the concept, the rod consists of ten units which are connected in series using bolts. Then, the stresses generated by dead loads in the control rod elements were estimated and compared with the design strengths which were derived from the results of measurements of tensile, compressive, bending and shear strengths of two candidate materials, AC250 (Across Co.) and CX-270 (Toyo Tanso Co.). Design strength was preliminarily determined as one-third or one-fifth of the mean strength. Ratio of the design strength to generated stress for the AC250 (2D) was : Tensile stress in the outer sleeve tube, 66, tensile and shear stresses in the M16 bolt, 8.8 and 8.5, shear stress in the plug support bolt M8, 2.43. These results are believed to indicate the mechanical integrity of the control rod structure. Data available on the candidate materials were also compiled in the Appendix. (author)

  16. Study of 16O(12C,α20Ne)α for the investigation of carbon-carbon fusion reaction via the Trojan Horse Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapisarda, G. G.; Spitaleri, C.; Bordeanu, C.; Hons, Z.; Kiss, G. G.; La Cognata, M.; Mrazek, J.; Nita, C.; Pantelica, D.; Petrascu, H.; Pizzone, R. G.; Romano, S.; Szücs, T.; Trache, L.; Tumino, A.; Velisa, G.

    2016-04-01

    Carbon-carbon fusion reaction represents a nuclear process of great interest in astrophysics, since the carbon burning is connected with the third phase of massive stars (M > 8 M⊙) evolution. In spite of several experimental works, carbon-carbon cross section has been measured at energy still above the Gamow window moreover data at low energy present big uncertainty. In this paper we report the results about the study of the 16O(12C,α 20Ne)α reaction as a possible three-body process to investigate 12C(12C,α)20Ne at astrophysical energy via Trojan Horse Method (THM). This study represents the first step of a program of experiments aimed to measure the 12C+12C cross section at astrophysical energy using the THM.

  17. Short RNA guides cleavage by eukaryotic RNase III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Lamontagne

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, short RNAs guide a variety of enzymatic activities that range from RNA editing to translation repression. It is hypothesized that pre-existing proteins evolved to bind and use guide RNA during evolution. However, the capacity of modern proteins to adopt new RNA guides has never been demonstrated. Here we show that Rnt1p, the yeast orthologue of the bacterial dsRNA-specific RNase III, can bind short RNA transcripts and use them as guides for sequence-specific cleavage. Target cleavage occurred at a constant distance from the Rnt1p binding site, leaving the guide RNA intact for subsequent cleavage. Our results indicate that RNase III may trigger sequence-specific RNA degradation independent of the RNAi machinery, and they open the road for a new generation of precise RNA silencing tools that do not trigger a dsRNA-mediated immune response.

  18. Analytical model for intergrain expansion and cleavage: random grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description of rigid-body grain boundary relaxation and cleavage in tungsten is performed using a pair-wise Morse interatomic potential in real and reciprocal spaces. Cleavage energies and grain boundary dilatation of random grain boundaries were formulated and computed using atomic layer interaction energies. These values were determined using a model for a relaxed random grain boundary that consists of rigid grains on either side of the boundary plane that are allowed to float to reach the equilibrium position. Expressions are given that describe in real space the energy of interatomic interaction on random grain boundaries with twist orientation. It was shown that grain-boundary expansion and cleavage energies of the most widespread random grain boundaries are mainly determined by grain boundary atomic density

  19. A new cultural cleavage in post-modern society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Erik Lane

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The attitudes towards gender and homosexuality tend to be linked at the micro level (individuals, which explains the political saliency of this newly emerging cleavage. At the macro level (country, the main finding is that the value orientations towards gender and homosexuality are strongly embedded in the basic cultural or civilisation differences among countries. As developing countries modernise and enter post-modernity, they will also experience the gender cleavage, especially when they adhere to an individualistic culture. Cultural cleavages in the post-modern society, whether in rich or developing countries, can only be properly researched by the survey method. It opens up a large area for both micro and macro analyses in the social sciences.

  20. Three-dimensional interpretation of cleavage fracture tests of cladded specimens with local approach to cleavage fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electricite de France has conducted during these last years an experimental and numerical research programme in order to evaluate fracture mechanics analyses used in nuclear reactor pressure vessels integrity assessment, regarding the risk of brittle fracture. Two cladded specimens made of ferritic steel A508 Cl3 with stainless steel cladding, and containing shallow subclad flaws, have been tested in four point bending at very low temperature to obtain cleavage failure. The crack instability was obtained in base metal by cleavage fracture, without crack arrest. The tests have been interpreted by local approach to cleavage fracture (Beremin model) using three-dimensional finite element computations. After the elastic-plastic computation of stress intensity factor KJ along the crack front, the probability of cleavage failure of each specimen is evaluated using m, σu Beremin model parameters identified on the same material. The failure of two specimens is conservatively predicted by both analyses. The elastic-plastic stress intensity factor KJ in base metal is always greater than base metal fracture toughness K1c. The calculated probabilities of cleavage failure are in agreement with experimental results. The sensitivity of Beremin model to numerical aspects is finally exposed. (orig.)

  1. Hydrogen bonded supramolecular structures

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhanting

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the advances in the studies of hydrogen-bonding-driven supramolecular systems  made over the past decade. It is divided into four parts, with the first introducing the basics of hydrogen bonding and important hydrogen bonding patterns in solution as well as in the solid state. The second part covers molecular recognition and supramolecular structures driven by hydrogen bonding. The third part introduces the formation of hollow and giant macrocycles directed by hydrogen bonding, while the last part summarizes hydrogen bonded supramolecular polymers. This book is designed to b

  2. Synthesis, antioxidant and DNA cleavage activities of novel indole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biradar, J S; Sasidhar, B S; Parveen, R

    2010-09-01

    A new series of novel indole derivatives containing barbitone moiety (5a-i) are synthesized by simple and efficient condensation of chalcones (3a-i) with barbituric acid (4). The synthesized compounds are screened for their antioxidant (free radical scavenging, total antioxidant capacity and ferric reducing antioxidant power) and DNA cleavage activities were evaluated. Among the synthesized compounds (5a), (5d) and (5g) exhibited excellent antioxidant activity and all the tested compounds in the series have exhibited promising DNA cleavage activities. The structures of the synthesized compounds are assigned on the basis of elemental analysis, IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and mass spectral data. PMID:20594623

  3. Sensitive and fast mutation detection by solid phase chemical cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise Lotte; Justesen, Just; Kruse, Torben A

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a solid phase chemical cleavage method (SpCCM) for screening large DNA fragments for mutations. All reactions can be carried out in microtiterwells from the first amplification of the patient (or test) DNA through the search for mutations. The reaction time is significantly...... reduced compared to the conventional chemical cleavage method (CCM), and even by using a uniformly labelled probe, the exact position and nature of the mutation can be revealed. The SpCCM is suitable for automatization using a workstation to carry out the reactions and a fluorescent detection-based DNA...

  4. Bonding silicones with epoxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tira, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that silicones, both room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) and millable rubber (press cured) can be successfully bonded to other materials using plasma treatment and epoxy adhesives. The plasma treatment using dry air atmosphere increases the surface energy of the silicone and thus provides a lower water contact angle. This phenomenon allows the epoxy adhesive to wet the silicone surface and ultimately bond. Bond strengths are sufficiently high to result in failures in the silicone materials rather than the adhesive bond.

  5. Australia's Bond Home Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Anil V; Umaru B. Conteh

    2014-01-01

    This paper constructs the float adjusted measure of home bias and explores the determinants of bond home bias by employing the International Monetary Fund's high quality dataset (2001 to 2009) on cross-border bond investment. The paper finds that Australian investors' prefer investing in countries with higher economic development and more developed bond markets. Exchange rate volatility appears to be an impediment for cross-border bond investment. Investors prefer investing in countries with ...

  6. Tandem Bond-Forming Reactions of 1-Alkynyl Ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minehan, Thomas G

    2016-06-21

    Electron-rich alkynes, such as ynamines, ynamides, and ynol ethers, are functional groups that possess significant potential in organic chemistry for the formation of carbon-carbon bonds. While the synthetic utility of ynamides has recently been expanded considerably, 1-alkynyl ethers, which possess many of the reactivity features of ynamides, have traditionally been far less investigated because of concerns about their stability. Like ynamides, ynol ethers are relatively unhindered to approach by functional groups present in the same or different molecules because of their linear geometry, and they can potentially form up to four new bonds in a single transformation. Ynol ethers also possess unique reactivity features that make them complementary to ynamides. Research over the past decade has shown that ynol ethers formed in situ from stable precursors engage in a variety of useful carbon-carbon bond-forming processes. Upon formation at -78 °C, allyl alkynyl ethers undergo a rapid [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement to form allyl ketene intermediates, which may be trapped with alcohol or amine nucleophiles to form γ,δ-unsaturated carboxylic acid derivatives. The process is stereospecific, takes place in minutes at cryogenic temperatures, and affords products containing (quaternary) stereogenic carbon atoms. Trapping of the intermediate allyl ketene with carbonyl compounds, epoxides, or oxetanes instead leads to complex α-functionalized β-, γ-, or δ-lactones, respectively. [3,3]-Sigmatropic rearrangement of benzyl alkynyl ethers also takes place at temperatures ranging from -78 to 60 °C to afford substituted 2-indanones via intramolecular carbocyclization of the ketene intermediate. tert-Butyl alkynyl ethers containing pendant di- and trisubstituted alkenes and enol ethers are stable to chromatographic isolation and undergo a retro-ene/[2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction upon mild thermolysis (90 °C) to afford cis-fused cyclobutanones and donor

  7. Malaysia : Bond Market Development

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund; World Bank

    2013-01-01

    This paper pertains to the bond market development in Malaysia, and provides an overview of the market scenario in the country. Malaysia has been successful in developing the capital markets, particularly bond markets, in the recent past. Now, it faces the challenge of how to improve broader access and efficiency of the bond market. A high degree of investor concentration, dominated by gov...

  8. Chemical bond fundamental aspects of chemical bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Frenking, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    This is the perfect complement to ""Chemical Bonding - Across the Periodic Table"" by the same editors, who are two of the top scientists working on this topic, each with extensive experience and important connections within the community. The resulting book is a unique overview of the different approaches used for describing a chemical bond, including molecular-orbital based, valence-bond based, ELF, AIM and density-functional based methods. It takes into account the many developments that have taken place in the field over the past few decades due to the rapid advances in quantum chemica

  9. Fe-Catalyzed Oxidative Cleavage of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spannring, P.

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids into aldehydes or carboxylic acids gives access to valuable products. The products can be used as chemical building blocks, as emulsifiers or in the paint or polymer industry. Ozonolysis is applied industrially to cleave the fatty acid oleic acid int

  10. Perceiving Social Cleavages and Inequalities: The Case of Israeli Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Yechezkel; Erhard, Rachel; Resh, Nura

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of perceptions of social cleavage and inequality among approximately 9000 Israeli eighth and ninth graders showed students accurately comprehended a multifaceted society with major social divisions. A social map with inequality was revealed in which ethnicity played the least prominent role. Personal and social traits influenced…

  11. The pattern of DNA cleavage intensity around indels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Liqing

    2015-01-01

    Indels (insertions and deletions) are the second most common form of genetic variations in the eukaryotic genomes and are responsible for a multitude of genetic diseases. Despite its significance, detailed molecular mechanisms for indel generation are still unclear. Here we examined 2,656,597 small human and mouse germline indels, 16,742 human somatic indels, 10,599 large human insertions, and 5,822 large chimpanzee insertions and systematically analyzed the patterns of DNA cleavage intensities in the 200 base pair regions surrounding these indels. Our results show that DNA cleavage intensities close to the start and end points of indels are significantly lower than other regions, for both small human germline and somatic indels and also for mouse small indels. Compared to small indels, the patterns of DNA cleavage intensity around large indels are more complex, and there are two low intensity regions near each end of the indels that are approximately 13 bp apart from each other. Detailed analyses of a subset of indels show that there is slight difference in cleavage intensity distribution between insertion indels and deletion indels that could be contributed by their respective enrichment of different repetitive elements. These results will provide new insight into indel generation mechanisms. PMID:25660536

  12. Cleavage sites within the poliovirus capsid protein precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partial amino-terminal sequence analysis was performed on radiolabeled poliovirus capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3. A computer-assisted comparison of the amino acid sequences obtained with that predicted by the nucleotide sequence of the poliovirus genome allows assignment of the amino terminus of each capsid protein to a unique position within the virus polyprotein. Sequence analysis of trypsin-digested VP4, which has a blocked amino terminus, demonstrates that VP4 is encoded at or very near to the amino terminus of the polyprotein. The gene order of the capsid proteins is VP4-VP2-VP3-VP1. Cleavage of VP0 to VP4 and VP2 is shown to occur between asparagine and serine, whereas the cleavages that separate VP2/VP3 and VP3/VP1 occur between glutamine and glycine residues. This finding supports the hypothesis that the cleavage of VP0, which occurs during virion morphogenesis, is distinct from the cleavages that separate functional regions of the polyprotein

  13. Modeling Radial Holoblastic Cleavage: A Laboratory Activity for Developmental Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Linda K.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a laboratory activity designed for an undergraduate developmental biology course. Uses Play-Doh (plastic modeling clay) to build a multicellular embryo in order to provide a 3-D demonstration of cleavage. Includes notes for the instructor and student directions. (YDS)

  14. Sequence specific inhibition of DNA restriction enzyme cleavage by PNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P.E.; Egholm, M.; Berg, R.H.;

    1993-01-01

    Plasmids containing double-stranded 10-mer PNA (peptide nucleic acid chimera) targets proximally flanked by two restriction enzyme sites were challenged with the complementary PNA or PNAs having one or two mismatches, and the effect on the restriction enzyme cleavage of the flanking sites was...

  15. SiC nanowires reinforced MAS joint of SiC coated carbon/carbon composites to LAS glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Schematic cross-section images of the samples with SiC nanowires and assembly sequence for the raw materials through the process of the hot-pressing method. Highlights: ► The SiC nanowires were firstly used as porous layer in the middle of the joint. ► The shear strength of the joint with SiC nanowires was largely improved. ► A new mode of fracture was proposed. - Abstract: In order to improve the shear strength of the joints of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites to lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glass ceramics, SiC coating and magnesium aluminum silicate (MAS) glass ceramics were used as transition layer and middle layer, respectively, and high quality SiC nanowires were applied as the reinforcement materials in MAS. The SiC nanowires reinforced MAS joint of SiC coated C/C composites to LAS glass ceramics was prepared by a three-step technique of pack cementation, CVD and hot-pressing. The microstructures of the as-prepared joints were characterized by SEM and EDS, and the shear strength of the joints was also examined. The shear strength of the SiC–MAS joint increased from 24.0 ± 2.0 MPa to 35.5 ± 5.5 MPa after adding SiC nanowires in MAS. The load decreases in step-style but not perpendicularly after the maximum value, which demonstrates good toughness of the joint with SiC nanowire porous layer.

  16. Crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, V. P.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-05-01

    In structural materials with both brittle and ductile phases, cracks often initiate within the brittle phase and propagate dynamically towards the ductile phase. The macroscale, quasistatic toughness of the material thus depends on the outcome of this microscale, dynamic process. Indeed, dynamics has been hypothesized to suppress dislocation emission, which may explain the occurrence of brittle transgranular fracture in mild steels at low temperatures (Lin et al., 1987). Here, crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions are explored using continuum mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations. The focus is on two questions: (1) whether dynamics can affect the energy barriers for dislocation emission and cleavage, and (2) what happens in the dynamic "overloaded" situation, in which both processes are energetically possible. In either case, dynamics may shift the balance between brittle cleavage and ductile blunting, thereby affecting the intrinsic ductility of the material. To explore these effects in simulation, a novel interatomic potential is used for which the intrinsic ductility is tunable, and a novel simulation technique is employed, termed as a "dynamic cleavage test", in which cracks can be run dynamically at a prescribed energy release rate into a material. Both theory and simulation reveal, however, that the intrinsic ductility of a material is unaffected by dynamics. The energy barrier to dislocation emission appears to be identical in quasi-static and dynamic conditions, and, in the overloaded situation, ductile crack tip behavior ultimately prevails since a single emission event can blunt and arrest the crack, preventing further cleavage. Thus, dynamics cannot embrittle a ductile material, and the origin of brittle failure in certain alloys (e.g., mild steels) appears unrelated to dynamic effects at the crack tip.

  17. C-H bond activation by f-block complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Polly L; McMullon, Max W; Rieb, Julia; Kühn, Fritz E

    2015-01-01

    Most homogeneous catalysis relies on the design of metal complexes to trap and convert substrates or small molecules to value-added products. Organometallic lanthanide compounds first gave a tantalizing glimpse of their potential for catalytic C-H bond transformations with the selective cleavage of one C-H bond in methane by bis(permethylcyclopentadienyl)lanthanide methyl [(η(5) -C5 Me5 )2 Ln(CH3 )] complexes some 25 years ago. Since then, numerous metal complexes from across the periodic table have been shown to selectively activate hydrocarbon C-H bonds, but the challenges of closing catalytic cycles still remain; many f-block complexes show great potential in this important area of chemistry. PMID:25384554

  18. School Desegregation and Racial Cleavage, 1954-1970: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carithers, Martha W.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews the empirical studies dealing with school desegregation and racial cleavage which have appeared since the 1954 Supreme Court decision. Focuses on patterns and consequences of interracial association, and attitude change relevant to racial cleavage. (DM)

  19. The effect of structure in a long target RNA on ribozyme cleavage efficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, T B; McDonald, C K; Hagen, M.

    1997-01-01

    Inhibition of gene expression by catalytic RNA (ribozymes) requires that ribozymes efficiently cleave specific sites within large target RNAs. However, the cleavage of long target RNAs by ribozymes is much less efficient than cleavage of short oligonucleotide substrates because of higher order structure in the long target RNA. To further study the effects of long target RNA structure on ribozyme cleavage efficiency, we determined the accessibility of seven hammerhead ribozyme cleavage sites i...

  20. Mutational analysis of a type II topoisomerase cleavage site: distinct requirements for enzyme and inhibitors.

    OpenAIRE

    Freudenreich, C H; Kreuzer, K. N.

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed the DNA sequence requirements for cleavage of a 30 bp oligonucleotide that contains a strong bacteriophage T4 type II topoisomerase site. A novel method was used to generate substrates with each of the four nucleotides at 10 positions surrounding the cleavage site, and mutant substrates were also prepared for the four internal positions of the staggered cleavage site. The substrates were tested for cleavage in the presence of several inhibitors that induce enzyme-mediated cle...

  1. Cleavage patterns and the topology of the metazoan tree of life

    OpenAIRE

    Valentine, James W.

    1997-01-01

    Several major alliances of metazoan phyla have been identified by small subunit rRNA sequence comparisons. It is possible to arrange the phyla to produce a parsimonious distribution of cleavage types, requiring only one change from a radial ancestral condition to spiral cleavage and one other to “idiosyncratic” cleavage; this arrangement is consistent with most of the recent molecular phylogenies. The cleavage shifts are correlated with changes in many of the features that once were used to d...

  2. Weak bond screening system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, S. Y.; Chang, F. H.; Bell, J. R.

    Consideration is given to the development of a weak bond screening system which is based on the utilization of a high power ultrasonic (HPU) technique. The instrumentation of the prototype bond strength screening system is described, and the adhesively bonded specimens used in the system developmental effort are detailed. Test results obtained from these specimens are presented in terms of bond strength and level of high power ultrasound irradiation. The following observations were made: (1) for Al/Al specimens, 2.6 sec of HPU irradiation will screen weak bond conditions due to improper preparation of bonding surfaces; (2) for composite/composite specimens, 2.0 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to under-cured conditions; (3) for Al honeycomb core with composite skin structure, 3.5 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive or oils contamination of bonding surfaces; and (4) for Nomex honeycomb with Al skin structure, 1.3 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive.

  3. Bond Markets in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Yibin Mu; Peter Phelps; Janet Gale Stotsky

    2013-01-01

    African bond markets have been steadily growing in recent years, but nonetheless remain undeveloped. African countries would benefit from greater access to financing and deeper financial markets. This paper compiles a unique set of data on corporate bond markets in Africa. It then applies an econometric model to analyze the key determinants of African government securities market and corporate bond market capitalization. Government securities market capitalization is directly related to bette...

  4. Build America Bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Ang; Vineer Bhansali; Yuhang Xing

    2010-01-01

    Build America Bonds (BABs) are a new form of municipal financing introduced in 2009. Investors in BAB municipal bonds receive interest payments that are taxable, but issuers receive a subsidy from the U.S. Treasury. The BAB program has succeeded in lowering the cost of funding for state and local governments with BAB issuers obtaining finance 54 basis points lower, on average, compared to issuing regular municipal bonds. For institutional investors, BAB issue yields are 116 basis points highe...

  5. Sequence specificity of DNA cleavage by Micrococcus luteus γ endonuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA fragments of defined sequence have been used to determine the sites of cleavage by γ-endonuclease activity in extracts prepared from Micrococcus luteus. End-labeled DNA restriction fragments of pBR322 DNA that had been irradiated under nitrogen in the presence of potassium iodide or t-butanol were treated with M. luteus γ endonuclease and analyzed on irradiated DNA preferentially at the positions of cytosines and thymines. DNA cleavage occurred immediately to the 3' side of pyrimidines in irradiated DNA and resulted in fragments that terminate in a 5'-phosphoryl group. These studies indicate that both altered cytosines and thymines may be important DNA lesions requiring repair after exposure to γ radiation

  6. The Bond Market's q

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Philippon

    2006-01-01

    I propose an implementation of the q-theory of investment using bond prices instead of equity prices. Credit risk makes corporate bond prices sensitive to future asset values, and q can be inferred from bond prices. The bond market's q performs much better than the usual measure in standard investment equations. With aggregate data, the fit is three times better, cash flows are driven out and the implied adjustment costs are reduced by more than an order of magnitude. The new measure also imp...

  7. Copper wire bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Zhong, ZhaoWei; Pecht, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    This critical volume provides an in-depth presentation of copper wire bonding technologies, processes and equipment, along with the economic benefits and risks.  Due to the increasing cost of materials used to make electronic components, the electronics industry has been rapidly moving from high cost gold to significantly lower cost copper as a wire bonding material.  However, copper wire bonding has several process and reliability concerns due to its material properties.  Copper Wire Bonding book lays out the challenges involved in replacing gold with copper as a wire bond material, and includes the bonding process changes—bond force, electric flame off, current and ultrasonic energy optimization, and bonding tools and equipment changes for first and second bond formation.  In addition, the bond–pad metallurgies and the use of bare and palladium-coated copper wires on aluminum are presented, and gold, nickel and palladium surface finishes are discussed.  The book also discusses best practices and re...

  8. Hydrogen bonding and anaesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sándorfy, C.

    2004-12-01

    General anaesthetics act by perturbing intermolecular associations without breaking or forming covalent bonds. These associations might be due to a variety of van der Waals interactions or hydrogen bonding. Neurotransmitters all contain OH or NH groups, which are prone to form hydrogen bonds with those of the neurotransmitter receptors. These could be perturbed by anaesthetics. Aromatic rings in amino acids can act as weak hydrogen bond acceptors. On the other hand the acidic hydrogen in halothane type anaesthetics are weak proton donors. These two facts together lead to a probable mechanism of action for all general anaesthetics.

  9. Mutagenesis of the yellow fever virus NS2B/3 cleavage site: determinants of cleavage site specificity and effects on polyprotein processing and viral replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Chambers, T J; Nestorowicz, A.; Rice, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    The determinants of cleavage site specificity of the yellow fever virus (YF) NS3 proteinase for its 2B/3 cleavage site have been studied by using site-directed mutagenesis. Mutations at residues within the GARR decreases S sequence were tested for effects on cis cleavage of an NS2B-3(181) polyprotein during cell-free translation. At the P1 position, only the conservative substitution R-->K exhibited significant levels of cleavage. Conservative and nonconservative substitutions were tolerated ...

  10. Small Molecule-Mediated Cleavage of RNA in Living Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Lirui; Disney, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) control gene expression by triggering the degradation of a mRNA via recruitment of RNase H or the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), respectively.[1] These approaches are hampered, however, by the poor cellular permeability of oligonucleotides. A small molecule approach to cleave RNA targets could obviate uptake issues. Several compounds can induce RNA cleavage in vitro,[2] however, to the best of our knowledge no small molecul...

  11. Effects of Cysteamine on Sheep Embryo Cleavage Rates

    OpenAIRE

    ENGİNLER, Sinem Ö; ÖZDAŞ, Özen B.; SANDAL, Asiye İ.; ARICI, Ramazan; GÜNDÜZ, Mehmet C.; BARAN, Alper; TEK, Çağatay; KILIÇARSLAN, Mehmet R.; Ak, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress during in vitro culture leads to defects in development of gametes and embryos. Several antioxidants such as cysteamine, L-ascorbic acid, beta mercaptoethanol, cysteine, glutathione, proteins, vitamins have been used to supplement culture media to counter the oxidative stress. This study was conducted to detect the effect of adding cysteamine to the maturation medium to subsequent cleavage rates of sheep embryos. Totally 604 ovaries were obtained by ten replica and 2060 oocyt...

  12. Interrelation between local and global characteristics of cleavage fracture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grishchenko, W.; Kotrechko, S.; Mamedov, S.; Zatsarna, O.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    Zurich : Trans Tech Publications, 2014 - (Šandera, P.), s. 221-224 ISBN 978-3-03785-934-6. ISSN 1013-9826. - (Key Engineering Materials. 592-593). [MSMF 7 - International Conference on Materials Structure and Micromechanics of Fracture /7./. Brno (CZ), 01.07.2013-03.07.2013] Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : local stress * fracture * cleavage * embrittlement * strength Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  13. Fe-Catalyzed Oxidative Cleavage of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Spannring, P.

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids into aldehydes or carboxylic acids gives access to valuable products. The products can be used as chemical building blocks, as emulsifiers or in the paint or polymer industry. Ozonolysis is applied industrially to cleave the fatty acid oleic acid into the aldehydes nonanal and 9-oxo-nonanoic acid or into pelargonic and azelaic acid. Considerable hazards, including explosion risks, are associated with the use of ozone, and alternative processes...

  14. Developing a programmed restriction endonuclease for highly specific DNA cleavage

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenschmidt, Kristin; Lanio, Thomas; Simoncsits, András; Jeltsch, Albert; Pingoud, Vera; Wende, Wolfgang; Pingoud, Alfred

    2005-01-01

    Specific cleavage of large DNA molecules at few sites, necessary for the analysis of genomic DNA or for targeting individual genes in complex genomes, requires endonucleases of extremely high specificity. Restriction endonucleases (REase) that recognize DNA sequences of 4–8 bp are not sufficiently specific for this purpose. In principle, the specificity of REases can be extended by fusion to sequence recognition modules, e.g. specific DNA-binding domains or triple-helix forming oligonucleotid...

  15. The pattern of DNA cleavage intensity around indels

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Chen; Liqing Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Indels (insertions and deletions) are the second most common form of genetic variations in the eukaryotic genomes and are responsible for a multitude of genetic diseases. Despite its significance, detailed molecular mechanisms for indel generation are still unclear. Here we examined 2,656,597 small human and mouse germline indels, 16,742 human somatic indels, 10,599 large human insertions, and 5,822 large chimpanzee insertions and systematically analyzed the patterns of DNA cleavage intensiti...

  16. Mycothiol synthesis by an anomerization reaction through endocyclic cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mycothiol is found in Gram-positive bacteria, where it helps in maintaining a reducing intracellular environment and it plays an important role in protecting the cell from toxic chemicals. The inhibition of the mycothiol biosynthesis is considered as a treatment for tuberculosis. Mycothiol contains an α-aminoglycoside, which is difficult to prepare stereoselectively by a conventional glycosylation reaction. In this study, mycothiol was synthesized by an anomerization reaction from an easily prepared β-aminoglycoside through endocyclic cleavage. PMID:26977192

  17. Centrocortin Cooperates with Centrosomin to Organize Drosophila Embryonic Cleavage Furrows

    OpenAIRE

    Kao, Ling-Rong; Timothy L Megraw

    2009-01-01

    In the Drosophila early embryo the centrosome coordinates assembly of cleavage furrows [1–3]. Currently, the molecular pathway that links the centrosome and the cortical microfilaments is unknown. In centrosomin (cnn) mutants, where the centriole forms but the centrosome pericentriolar material (PCM) fails to assemble [4, 5], actin microfilaments are not organized into furrows at the syncytial cortex [6]. While CNN is required for centrosome assembly and function [4, 6, 7], little is known of...

  18. Embryo apoptosis identification: Oocyte grade or cleavage stage?

    OpenAIRE

    Bakri, Noraina Mohd; Ibrahim, Siti Fatimah; Osman, Nurul Atikah; Hasan, Nurhaslina; Jaffar, Farah Hanan Fathihah; Rahman, Zulaiha Abdul; Osman, Khairul

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a programed cell death that is vital for tissue homeostasis. However, embryo apoptosis had been known to be related to embryo fragmentation which should be avoided in in vitro fertilization (IVF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of embryo apoptosis with the grade of immature oocytes and cleavage stage of in vitro produced (IVP) cattle embryos. This study consisted of 345 oocytes collected through ovary slicing. Immature oocytes were graded as A, B and C...

  19. Identification of the Chemical Bonding Prompting Adhesion of a-C:H Thin Films on Ferrous Alloy Intermediated by a SiCx:H Buffer Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cemin, F; Bim, L T; Leidens, L M; Morales, M; Baumvol, I J R; Alvarez, F; Figueroa, C A

    2015-07-29

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) and several related materials (DLCs) may have ultralow friction coefficients that can be used for saving-energy applications. However, poor chemical bonding of a-C/DLC films on metallic alloys is expected, due to the stability of carbon-carbon bonds. Silicon-based intermediate layers are employed to enhance the adherence of a-C:H films on ferrous alloys, although the role of such buffer layers is not yet fully understood in chemical terms. The chemical bonding of a-C:H thin films on ferrous alloy intermediated by a nanometric SiCx:H buffer layer was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The chemical profile was inspected by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES), and the chemical structure was evaluated by Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The nature of adhesion is discussed by analyzing the chemical bonding at the interfaces of the a-C:H/SiCx:H/ferrous alloy sandwich structure. The adhesion phenomenon is ascribed to specifically chemical bonding character at the buffer layer. Whereas carbon-carbon (C-C) and carbon-silicon (C-Si) bonds are formed at the outermost interface, the innermost interface is constituted mainly by silicon-iron (Si-Fe) bonds. The oxygen presence degrades the adhesion up to totally delaminate the a-C:H thin films. The SiCx:H deposition temperature determines the type of chemical bonding and the amount of oxygen contained in the buffer layer. PMID:26135943

  20. DNAzyme-Controlled Cleavage of Dimer and Trimer Origami Tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Na; Willner, Itamar

    2016-04-13

    Dimers of origami tiles are bridged by the Pb(2+)-dependent DNAzyme sequence and its substrate or by the histidine-dependent DNAzyme sequence and its substrate to yield the dimers T1-T2 and T3-T4, respectively. The dimers are cleaved to monomer tiles in the presence of Pb(2+)-ions or histidine as triggers. Similarly, trimers of origami tiles are constructed by bridging the tiles with the Pb(2+)-ion-dependent DNAzyme sequence and the histidine-dependent DNAzyme sequence and their substrates yielding the trimer T1-T5-T4. In the presence of Pb(2+)-ions and/or histidine as triggers, the programmed cleavage of trimer proceeds. Using Pb(2+) or histidine as trigger cleaves the trimer to yield T5-T4 and T1 or the dimer T1-T5 and T4, respectively. In the presence of Pb(2+)-ions and histidine as triggers, the cleavage products are the monomer tiles T1, T5, and T4. The different cleavage products are identified by labeling the tiles with 0, 1, or 2 streptavidin labels and AFM imaging. PMID:26931508

  1. Cleavage mechanoluminescence in elemental and III-V semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, B P; Gour, A S; Chandra, V K; Gupta, R K

    2003-01-01

    The present paper reports the theory of mechanoluminescence (ML) produced during cleavage of elemental and III-V semiconductors. It seems that the formation of crack-induced localized states is responsible for the ML excitation produced during the cleavage of elemental and III-V semiconductors. According to this mechanism, as the atoms are drawn away from each other in an advancing crack tip, the decreasing wave function overlap across the crack may result in localized states which is associated with increasing electron energy. If the energy of these localized states approach that of the conduction band, transition to the conduction band via tunnelling would be possible, creating minority carriers, and consequently the electron-hole recombination may give rise to mechanoluminescence. When an elemental or III-V semiconductor is cleaved, initially the ML intensity increases with time, attains a peak value I sub m at the time t sub m corresponding to completion of the cleavage of the semiconductor, and then it d...

  2. Mechanism of metabolic cleavage of a furan ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, T.; Sugihara, J.; Harigaya, S.

    1987-11-01

    We studied the mechanism of metabolic cleavage of a furan ring, using a new hypolipidemic agent, ethyl 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-(2-furyl)oxazole-4-acetate (TA-1801), as a model compound. A TA-1801 analogue labeled with deuterium at the 5-position of its furan ring was administered orally to rats. The analysis of urinary metabolites by GC/MS revealed that the deuterium of the furan was retained in the ring-opened metabolite (M3). Metabolic cleavage of furan has been generally considered to proceed by hydroxylation of the 5-position followed by tautomerism and hydrolysis of the resulting 5-hydroxyfuran derivative. However, if the cleavage proceeded by this pathway, the deuterium of the 5-position would be eliminated during hydroxylation. Therefore, we propose that the ring was cleaved directly to form an unsaturated aldehyde, considering the mechanism of oxidation by cytochrome P-450. Although this intermediate was not detected in the biological specimens, a synthetic unsaturated aldehyde was transformed to the actual urinary metabolites M2 and M3 (major ring-opened metabolites) in the isolated rat liver.

  3. Mechanism of metabolic cleavage of a furan ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the mechanism of metabolic cleavage of a furan ring, using a new hypolipidemic agent, ethyl 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-(2-furyl)oxazole-4-acetate (TA-1801), as a model compound. A TA-1801 analogue labeled with deuterium at the 5-position of its furan ring was administered orally to rats. The analysis of urinary metabolites by GC/MS revealed that the deuterium of the furan was retained in the ring-opened metabolite (M3). Metabolic cleavage of furan has been generally considered to proceed by hydroxylation of the 5-position followed by tautomerism and hydrolysis of the resulting 5-hydroxyfuran derivative. However, if the cleavage proceeded by this pathway, the deuterium of the 5-position would be eliminated during hydroxylation. Therefore, we propose that the ring was cleaved directly to form an unsaturated aldehyde, considering the mechanism of oxidation by cytochrome P-450. Although this intermediate was not detected in the biological specimens, a synthetic unsaturated aldehyde was transformed to the actual urinary metabolites M2 and M3 (major ring-opened metabolites) in the isolated rat liver

  4. Cleavage mechanoluminescence in elemental and III-V semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper reports the theory of mechanoluminescence (ML) produced during cleavage of elemental and III-V semiconductors. It seems that the formation of crack-induced localized states is responsible for the ML excitation produced during the cleavage of elemental and III-V semiconductors. According to this mechanism, as the atoms are drawn away from each other in an advancing crack tip, the decreasing wave function overlap across the crack may result in localized states which is associated with increasing electron energy. If the energy of these localized states approach that of the conduction band, transition to the conduction band via tunnelling would be possible, creating minority carriers, and consequently the electron-hole recombination may give rise to mechanoluminescence. When an elemental or III-V semiconductor is cleaved, initially the ML intensity increases with time, attains a peak value Im at the time tm corresponding to completion of the cleavage of the semiconductor, and then it decreases following power law decay. Expressions are derived for the ML intensity Im corresponding to the peak of the ML intensity versus time curve and for the total ML intensity IT. It is shown that both Im and IT should increase directly with the area of the newly created surfaces of the crystals. From the measurements of the ML intensity, the velocity of crack propagation in material can be determined by using the relation v=H/tm

  5. Demethylation and cleavage of dimethylsulfoniopropionate in marine intertidal sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, P.T.; Kiene, R.P.; Taylor, B.F.

    1994-01-01

    Demethylation and cleavage of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) was measured in three different types of,intertidal marine sediments: a cyanobacterial mat, a diatom-covered tidal flat and a carbonate sediment. Consumption rates of added DMSP were highest in cyanobacterial mat slurries (59 ?? mol DMSP l-1 slurry h-1) and lower in slurries from a diatom mat and a carbonate tidal sediment (24 and 9 ??mol DMSP l-1 h-1, respectively). Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and 3-mercaptopropionate (MPA) were produced simultaneously during DMSP consumption, indicating that cleavage and demethylation occurred at the same time. Viable counts of DMSP-utilizing bacteria revealed a population of 2 x 107 cells cm-3 sediment (90% of these cleaved DMSP to DMS, 10% demethylated DMSP to MPA) in the cyanobacterial mat, 7 x 105 cells cm-3 in the diatom mat (23% cleavers, 77% demethylators), and 9 x 104 cells cm-3 (20% cleavers and 80% demethylators) in the carbonate sediment. In slurries of the diatom mat, the rate of MPA production from added 3-methiolpropionate (MMPA) was 50% of the rate of MPA formation from DMSP. The presence of a large population of demethylating bacteria and the production of MPA from DMSP suggest that the demethylation pathway, in addition to cleavage, contributes significantly to DMSP consumption in coastal sediments.

  6. Numerical modeling of ductile tearing effects on cleavage fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies demonstrate a significant effect of specimen size, a/W ratio and prior ductile tearing on cleavage fracture toughness values (Jc) measured in the ductile-to-brittle transition region of ferritic materials. In the lower-transition region, cleavage fracture often occurs under conditions of large-scale yielding but without prior ductile crack extension. The increased toughness develops when plastic zones formed at the crack tip interact with nearby specimen surfaces which relaxes crack-tip constraint (stress triaxiality). In the mid-to-upper transition region, small amounts of ductile crack extension (often c-values. Previous work by the authors described a micromechanics fracture model to correct measured Jc-values for the mechanistic effects of large-scale yielding. This new work extends the model to also include the influence of ductile crack extension prior to cleavage. The paper explores development of the new model, provides necessary graphs and procedures for its application and demonstrates the effects of the model on fracture data sets for two pressure vessel steels (A533B and A515)

  7. Hyperphosphorylation and cleavage at D421 enhance tau secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Plouffe

    Full Text Available It is well established that tau pathology propagates in a predictable manner in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Moreover, tau accumulates in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of AD's patients. The mechanisms underlying the propagation of tau pathology and its accumulation in the CSF remain to be elucidated. Recent studies have reported that human tau was secreted by neurons and non-neuronal cells when it was overexpressed indicating that tau secretion could contribute to the spreading of tau pathology in the brain and could lead to its accumulation in the CSF. In the present study, we showed that the overexpression of human tau resulted in its secretion by Hela cells. The main form of tau secreted by these cells was cleaved at the C-terminal. Surprisingly, secreted tau was dephosphorylated at several sites in comparison to intracellular tau which presented a strong immunoreactivity to all phospho-dependent antibodies tested. Our data also revealed that phosphorylation and cleavage of tau favored its secretion by Hela cells. Indeed, the mimicking of phosphorylation at 12 sites known to be phosphorylated in AD enhanced tau secretion. A mutant form of tau truncated at D421, the preferential cleavage site of caspase-3, was also significantly more secreted than wild-type tau. Taken together, our results indicate that hyperphosphorylation and cleavage of tau by favoring its secretion could contribute to the propagation of tau pathology in the brain and its accumulation in the CSF.

  8. Sequence specificity of DNA cleavage by Micrococcus luteus gamma endonuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma irradiation induces the formation of lesions in DNA that are cleaved by an endonuclease activity in Micrococcus luteus extract. DNA fragments of defined sequence an DNA sequencing techniques were used to determine the sites of cleavage by this activity. /sup 32/P end-labelled DNA restriction fragments were gamma irradiated under N/sub 2/ and in the presence of KI (conditions which maximize the enzyme sensitive site to strand break ratio), treated with M. luteus extract, and analyzed by electrophoresis on denaturing polyacrylamide gels. Irradiated DNA was preferentially cleaved by the extract at sites of cytosine and thymine. Little or no cleavage was observed at purines. Scission of 3' end-labelled DNA at altered pyrimidines resulted in fragments that had electrophoretic mobilities similar to those of DNA fragments that were phosphorylated at the 5' terminus. The presence of a 5' phosphate was confirmed by a change in electrophoretic mobility after phosphatase treatment of the fragments. The sites of endonucleolytic cleavage by M. luteus extract were compared to those of the purified Escherichia coli endonuclease III, which has been shown to be active against x-irradiated DNA. Preliminary results from velocity sedimentation studies indicate that these two enzyme preparations differ in specificity

  9. Energy-dependent reversal of secondary isotope effects on simple cleavage reactions: tertiary amine radical cations with deuterium at remote positions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuterium substitution at remote sites gives rise to inverse secondary kinetic isotope effects on the α-cleavage of a number of tertiary amines in the ion source, but to normal isotope effects on reactions occurring in the field-free regions. The change from normal to inverse secondary isotope effects when the internal energy of the reacting ions increases is consistent with transition-state models that involve slight lowering of vibrational frequencies also for bonds well removed from the site of cleavage. The isotope effect on the reactions of ions of high internal energy is caused by the influence that even small changes of isotope-dependent frequencies have on the state sums (a statistical weight effect favouring loss of the labelled radical), whereas the behaviour of low-energy ions is determined by the zero-point energy changes which favour loss of the unlabelled fragment. (author)

  10. Comparison of Gold Bonding with Mercury Bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraka, Elfi; Filatov, Michael; Cremer, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Nine AuX molecules (X = H, O, S, Se, Te, F, Cl, Br, I), their isoelectronic HgX(+) analogues, and the corresponding neutral HgX diatomics have been investigated using NESC (Normalized Elimination of the Small Component) and B3LYP theory to determine relativistic effects for bond dissociation energie

  11. Coupled valence bond theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havenith, R.W.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this Letter, the formulation and implementation of a parallel response property code for non-orthogonal, valence bond wave-functions are described. Test calculations on benzene and cyclobutadiene show that the polarisability and magnetisability tensors obtained using valence bond theory are compa

  12. Bonded labour in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Ercelawn, Aly; Nauman, Muhammad

    2001-01-01

    Examines the continuing prevalence of debt bondage in the 1990s despite the introduction of national legislation banning the practice. Makes recommendations to the Government and the international community for actions to be taken to eliminate bonded labour and provide rehabilitation for freed workers. Includes texts of Land Reforms Regulations, 1972, the Sindh Tenancy Act, 1950 and the Bonded Labour System (Abolition) Act, 1992.

  13. The samurai bond market

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Packer; Elizabeth Reynolds

    1997-01-01

    Issuance in the samurai bond market has more than tripled over the past several years. Some observers have attributed this growth to a systematic underestimation of credit risk in the market. A detailed review of credit quality, ratings differences, and initial issue pricing in the samurai bond market, however, turns up little evidence to support this concern.

  14. Money and Nominal Bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Marchesiani, Alessandro; Senesi, Pietro

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies an economy with trading frictions, ex post heterogeneity and nominal bonds in a model à la Lagos and Wright (2005). It is shown that a strictly positive interest rate is a sufficient condition for the allocation with nominal bonds to be welfare improving. This result comes from the protection against the inflation tax.

  15. Hydrogen bonding in polyanilines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahceci, S. (Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06531 (Turkey)); Toppare, L. (Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06531 (Turkey)); Yurtsever, E. (Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Ankara 06531 (Turkey))

    1994-11-29

    Hydrogen bonding between poly(bisphenol A carbonate) (PC) and polyaniline (PAn) is analyzed using semi-empirical quantum methodology. Fully optimized AM1 molecular orbital calculations are reported for various aniline structures (monomer, dimer and trimer), the monomer of the PC and the hydrogen-bonded model of PAn-PC oligomer. ((orig.))

  16. The influences of hinge length and composition on the susceptibility of human IgA to cleavage by diverse bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Bernard W; Woof, Jenny M

    2005-06-15

    The influences of IgA hinge length and composition on its susceptibility to cleavage by bacterial IgA1 proteases were examined using a panel of IgA hinge mutants. The IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus sanguis strains SK4 and SK49, Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Haemophilus influenzae cleaved IgA2-IgA1 half hinge, an Ab featuring half of the IgA1 hinge incorporated into the equivalent site in IgA1 protease-resistant IgA2, whereas those of Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, and S. sanguis strain SK1 did not. Hinge length reduction by removal of two of the four C-terminal proline residues rendered IgA2-IgA1 half hinge resistant to all streptococcal IgA1 metalloproteinases but it remained sensitive to cleavage by the serine-type IgA1 proteases of Neisseria and Haemophilus spp. The four C-terminal proline residues could be substituted by alanine residues or transferred to the N-terminal extremity of the hinge without affect on the susceptibility of the Ab to cleavage by serine-type IgA1 proteases. However, their removal rendered the Ab resistant to cleavage by all the IgA1 proteases. We conclude that the serine-type IgA1 proteases of Neisseria and Haemophilus require the Fab and Fc regions to be separated by at least ten (or in the case of N. gonorrhoeae type I protease, nine) amino acids between Val(222) and Cys(241) (IgA1 numbering) for efficient access and cleavage. By contrast, the streptococcal IgA1 metalloproteinases require 12 or more appropriate amino acids between the Fab and Fc to maintain a minimum critical distance between the scissile bond and the start of the Fc. PMID:15944283

  17. Shape Bonding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontius, James T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method of bonding at least two surfaces together. The methods step of the present invention include applying a strip of adhesive to a first surface along a predefined outer boundary of a bond area and thereby defining a remaining open area there within. A second surface, or gusset plate, is affixed onto the adhesive before the adhesive cures. The strip of adhesive is allowed to cure and then a second amount of adhesive is applied to cover the remaining open area and substantially fill a void between said first and second surfaces about said bond area. A stencil may be used to precisely apply the strip of adhesive. When the strip cures, it acts as a dam to prevent overflow of the subsequent application of adhesive to undesired areas. The method results in a precise bond area free of undesired shapes and of a preferred profile which eliminate the drawbacks of the prior art bonds.

  18. Water's Hydrogen Bond Strength

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Water is necessary both for the evolution of life and its continuance. It possesses particular properties that cannot be found in other materials and that are required for life-giving processes. These properties are brought about by the hydrogen bonded environment particularly evident in liquid water. Each liquid water molecule is involved in about four hydrogen bonds with strengths considerably less than covalent bonds but considerably greater than the natural thermal energy. These hydrogen bonds are roughly tetrahedrally arranged such that when strongly formed the local clustering expands, decreasing the density. Such low density structuring naturally occurs at low and supercooled temperatures and gives rise to many physical and chemical properties that evidence the particular uniqueness of liquid water. If aqueous hydrogen bonds were actually somewhat stronger then water would behave similar to a glass, whereas if they were weaker then water would be a gas and only exist as a liquid at sub-zero temperature...

  19. Corporate Bonds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Corporate financing is the choice between capital generated by the corporation and capital from external investors. However, since the financial crisis shook the markets in 2007–2008, financing opportunities through the classical means of financing have decreased. As a result, corporations have...... to think in alternative ways such as issuing corporate bonds. A market for corporate bonds exists in countries such as Norway, Germany, France, the United Kingdom and the United States, while Denmark is still behind in this trend. Some large Danish corporations have instead used foreign corporate bonds...

  20. Transversely Compressed Bonded Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The load capacity of bonded joints can be increased if transverse pressure is applied at the interface. The transverse pressure is assumed to introduce a Coulomb-friction contribution to the cohesive law for the interface. Response and load capacity for a bonded single-lap joint was derived using...... non-linear fracture mechanics. The results indicated a good correlation between theory and tests. Furthermore, the model is suggested as theoretical base for determining load capacity of bonded anchorages with transverse pressure, in externally reinforced concrete structures....

  1. The Halogen Bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The halogen bond occurs when there is evidence of a net attractive interaction between an electrophilic region associated with a halogen atom in a molecular entity and a nucleophilic region in another, or the same, molecular entity. In this fairly extensive review, after a brief history of the interaction, we will provide the reader with a snapshot of where the research on the halogen bond is now, and, perhaps, where it is going. The specific advantages brought up by a design based on the use of the halogen bond will be demonstrated in quite different fields spanning from material sciences to biomolecular recognition and drug design. PMID:26812185

  2. Micelle-Vesicle Transition by Cleavage of Disulfide Spacer Chain for Gemini Surfactant in Didodecyldimethylammonium Chloride Aqueous Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuhashi, Toshinari; Asakawa, Tsuyoshi; Ohta, Akio

    2015-01-01

    We examined the "micelle-vesicle transition" through the mixing effect of single-tailed thiol surfactants produced by the cleavage of gemini surfactants, [C12H25N(CH3)2CH2CH2SSCH2CH2N(CH3)2C12H25] 2Cl (C12SSC12), which have a disulfide bond in the spacer chain. Phase diagrams of C12H25N(CH3)2CH2CH2SHCl-didodecyldimethylammonium chloride (C12SH-DDAC) and C12SSC12-DDAC were determined by conductivity and pyrene fluorescence probe methods. The aggregate diameters were evaluated by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The critical vesicle concentration (CVC) was confirmed by the abrupt increase in the intensity of light scattering with excitation at 335 nm. Vesicle formation was confined to the DDAC-rich region of the C12SSC12-DDAC system, while the vesicle formation region for the C12SH-DDAC system spread out with the addition of dithiothreitol (DTT) to C12SSC12-DDAC. This implies that single-tailed surfactants can induce a more favorable environment for molecular packing of the vesicular surface. The micelle-vesicle transition occurs with disulfide spacer chain cleavage of gemini surfactants at a particular specific concentration range. PMID:26250426

  3. The Structural Basis of [beta]-Peptide-Specific Cleavage by the Serine Protease Cyanophycinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Adrienne M.; Lai, Sandy W.S.; Tavares, John; Kimber, Matthew S.; (Guelph)

    2010-10-01

    Cyanophycin, or poly-L-Asp-multi-L-Arg, is a non-ribosomally synthesized peptidic polymer that is used for nitrogen storage by cyanobacteria and other select eubacteria. Upon synthesis, it self-associates to form insoluble granules, the degradation of which is uniquely catalyzed by a carboxy-terminal-specific protease, cyanophycinase. We have determined the structure of cyanophycinase from the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 at 1.5-{angstrom} resolution, showing that the structure is dimeric, with individual protomers resembling aspartyl dipeptidase. Kinetic characterization of the enzyme demonstrates that the enzyme displays Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a k{sub cat} of 16.5 s{sup -1} and a k{sub cat}/K{sub M} of 7.5 x 10{sup -6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirm that cyanophycinase is a serine protease and that Gln101, Asp172, Gln173, Arg178, Arg180 and Arg183, which form a conserved pocket adjacent to the catalytic Ser132, are functionally critical residues. Modeling indicates that cyanophycinase binds the {beta}-Asp-Arg dipeptide residue immediately N-terminal to the scissile bond in an extended conformation in this pocket, primarily recognizing this penultimate {beta}-Asp-Arg residue of the polymeric chain. Because binding and catalysis depend on substrate features unique to {beta}-linked aspartyl peptides, cyanophycinase is able to act within the cytosol without non-specific cleavage events disrupting essential cellular processes.

  4. Copper-dependent cleavage of DNA of bleomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA strand scission by bleomycin in the presence of Cu and Fe was further characterized. It was found that DNA degradation occurred readily upon admixture of Cu(I) or Cu(II) + dithiothreitol + bleomycin, but only where the order of addition precluded initial formation of Cu(II)-bleomycin or where sufficient time was permitted for reduction of formed Cu(II)-bleomycin to Cu(I)-bleomycin. DNA strand scission mediated by Cu + dithiothreitol + bleomycin was inhibited by the copper-selective agent bathocuproine when the experiment was carried out under conditions consistent with Cu chelation by bathocuproine on the time scale of the experiment. Remarkably, it was found that the extent of DNA degradation obtained with bleomycin in the presence of Fe and Cu was greater than that obtained with either metal ion alone. A comparison of the sequence selectivity of bleomycin in the presence of Cu and Fe using32P-end-labeled DNA duplexes as substrates revealed significant differences in sites of DNA cleavage and in the extent of cleavage at sites shared in common. For deglycobleomycin and decarbamoylbleomycin, whose metal ligation is believed to differ from that of bleomycin itself, it was found that the relative extents of DNA cleavage in the presence of Cu were not in the same order as those obtained in the presence of Fe. The results of these experiments are entirely consistent with the work of Sugiura who first demonstrate the generation of reactive oxygen species upon admixture of O2 and Cu(I)-bleomycin

  5. Synthesis and enzymatic cleavage of dual-ligand quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewell, Sarah L. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Giorgio, Todd D., E-mail: todd.d.giorgio@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2009-05-05

    Site directed therapy promises to minimize treatment-limiting systemic effects associated with cytotoxic agents that have no specificity for pathologic tissues. One general strategy is to target cell surface receptors uniquely presented on particular tissues. Highly specific in vivo targeting of an emerging neoplasm through a single molecular recognition mechanism has not generally been successful. Nonspecific binding and specific binding to non-target cells compromise the therapeutic index of small molecule, ubiquitous cancer targeting ligands. In this work, we have designed and fabricated a nanoparticle (NP) construct that could potentially overcome the current limitations of targeted in vivo delivery. Quantum dots (QDs) were functionalized with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) modified to enable specific cleavage by matrix metalloprotease-7 (MMP-7). The QDs were further functionalized with folic acid, a ligand for a cell surface receptor that is overexpressed in many tumors, but also expressed in some normal tissues. The nanomolecular construct is designed so that the PEG initially conceals the folate ligand and construct binding to cells is inhibited. MMP-7 activated peptide cleavage and subsequent unmasking of the folate ligand occurs only near tumor tissue, resulting in a proximity activated (PA) targeting system. QDs functionalized with both the MMP-7 cleavable substrate and folic acid were successfully synthesized and characterized. The proteolytic capability of the dual ligand QD construct was quantitatively assessed by fluorometric analysis and compared to a QD construct functionalized with only the PA ligand. The dual ligand PA nanoparticles studied here exhibit significant susceptibility to cleavage by MMP-7 at physiologically relevant conditions. The capacity to autonomously convert a biopassivated nanostructure to a tissue-specific targeted delivery agent in vivo represents a paradigm change for site-directed therapies.

  6. Synthesis and enzymatic cleavage of dual-ligand quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Site directed therapy promises to minimize treatment-limiting systemic effects associated with cytotoxic agents that have no specificity for pathologic tissues. One general strategy is to target cell surface receptors uniquely presented on particular tissues. Highly specific in vivo targeting of an emerging neoplasm through a single molecular recognition mechanism has not generally been successful. Nonspecific binding and specific binding to non-target cells compromise the therapeutic index of small molecule, ubiquitous cancer targeting ligands. In this work, we have designed and fabricated a nanoparticle (NP) construct that could potentially overcome the current limitations of targeted in vivo delivery. Quantum dots (QDs) were functionalized with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) modified to enable specific cleavage by matrix metalloprotease-7 (MMP-7). The QDs were further functionalized with folic acid, a ligand for a cell surface receptor that is overexpressed in many tumors, but also expressed in some normal tissues. The nanomolecular construct is designed so that the PEG initially conceals the folate ligand and construct binding to cells is inhibited. MMP-7 activated peptide cleavage and subsequent unmasking of the folate ligand occurs only near tumor tissue, resulting in a proximity activated (PA) targeting system. QDs functionalized with both the MMP-7 cleavable substrate and folic acid were successfully synthesized and characterized. The proteolytic capability of the dual ligand QD construct was quantitatively assessed by fluorometric analysis and compared to a QD construct functionalized with only the PA ligand. The dual ligand PA nanoparticles studied here exhibit significant susceptibility to cleavage by MMP-7 at physiologically relevant conditions. The capacity to autonomously convert a biopassivated nanostructure to a tissue-specific targeted delivery agent in vivo represents a paradigm change for site-directed therapies.

  7. Embryo apoptosis identification: Oocyte grade or cleavage stage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, Noraina Mohd; Ibrahim, Siti Fatimah; Osman, Nurul Atikah; Hasan, Nurhaslina; Jaffar, Farah Hanan Fathihah; Rahman, Zulaiha Abdul; Osman, Khairul

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a programed cell death that is vital for tissue homeostasis. However, embryo apoptosis had been known to be related to embryo fragmentation which should be avoided in in vitro fertilization (IVF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of embryo apoptosis with the grade of immature oocytes and cleavage stage of in vitro produced (IVP) cattle embryos. This study consisted of 345 oocytes collected through ovary slicing. Immature oocytes were graded as A, B and C. This grading was based on cumulus cell thickness and compactness. All oocytes then underwent an in vitro maturation (IVM) procedure. An IVF was done 24 h after IVM culture. Prior to staining, stage of cleaved embryos was determined and classified as either 2, 4, 8 or >8-cell embryo stage. Apoptosis status of cleaved IVP embryos was determined by using annexin V-FITC staining technique at 48 and 72 h post insemination (hpi). Apoptosis status for each embryo was classified as either early or late. The result showed that there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status among grade A, B and C embryos. All grades of oocytes showed embryo apoptosis where 1.5% late apoptosis for grade A, 4.5% and 10.4% of early and late apoptosis for grade B and grade C. Early apoptosis was not seen in grade A embryo. We also noted no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status between 2, 4, 8 and >8-cell embryo stage. Early apoptosis was also not seen in >8-cell stage. Even though there were no differences in apoptosis expression between the three classes, the cleavage rate of grade A oocytes was significantly higher (p quality and the cleavage stage of the embryo produced. PMID:26858565

  8. Molecular Basis of Catalytic Chamber-assisted Unfolding and Cleavage of Human Insulin by Human Insulin-degrading Enzyme*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolopoulou, Marika; Guo, Qing; Malito, Enrico; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-01-01

    Insulin is a hormone vital for glucose homeostasis, and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) plays a key role in its clearance. IDE exhibits a remarkable specificity to degrade insulin without breaking the disulfide bonds that hold the insulin A and B chains together. Using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry to obtain high mass accuracy, and electron capture dissociation (ECD) to selectively break the disulfide bonds in gas phase fragmentation, we determined the cleavage sites and composition of human insulin fragments generated by human IDE. Our time-dependent analysis of IDE-digested insulin fragments reveals that IDE is highly processive in its initial cleavage at the middle of both the insulin A and B chains. This ensures that IDE effectively splits insulin into inactive N- and C-terminal halves without breaking the disulfide bonds. To understand the molecular basis of the recognition and unfolding of insulin by IDE, we determined a 2.6-Å resolution insulin-bound IDE structure. Our structure reveals that IDE forms an enclosed catalytic chamber that completely engulfs and intimately interacts with a partially unfolded insulin molecule. This structure also highlights how the unique size, shape, charge distribution, and exosite of the IDE catalytic chamber contribute to its high affinity (∼100 nm) for insulin. In addition, this structure shows how IDE utilizes the interaction of its exosite with the N terminus of the insulin A chain as well as other properties of the catalytic chamber to guide the unfolding of insulin and allowing for the processive cleavages. PMID:19321446

  9. Programmable RNA recognition and cleavage by CRISPR/Cas9

    OpenAIRE

    O’Connell, Mitchell R.; Oakes, Benjamin L.; Sternberg, Samuel H.; East-Seletsky, Alexandra; Kaplan, Matias; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease that uses RNA:DNA complementarity to identify target sites for sequence-specific doublestranded DNA (dsDNA) cleavage 1-5 . In its native context, Cas9 acts on DNA substrates exclusively because both binding and catalysis require recognition of a short DNA sequence, the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM), next to and on the strand opposite the 20-nucleotide target site in dsDNA 4-7 . Cas9 has proven to be a versatile tool for g...

  10. Features of Controlled Laser Thermal Cleavage of Crystalline Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controlled laser thermal cleavage of crystalline silicon has been numerically simulated. A 3D analysis of the thermoelastic fields formed in a single-crystal silicon wafer as a result of successive laser heating and exposure to a coolant was performed for three different versions of anisotropy. The simulation was performed for laser irradiation with different wavelengths: 1.06 and 0.808 μm. The calculation results have been experimentally verified using a YAG laser. The results can be used in the electronics industry to optimize the precise separation of silicon wafers into crystals.

  11. A double bond-conjugated dimethylnitrobenzene-type photolabile nitric oxide donor with improved two-photon cross section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieda, Naoya; Hishikawa, Kazuhiro; Eto, Kei; Kitamura, Kai; Kawaguchi, Mitsuyasu; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Fukuhara, Kiyoshi; Miyata, Naoki; Furuta, Toshiaki; Nabekura, Junichi; Nakagawa, Hidehiko

    2015-08-15

    Photocontrollable NO donors enable precise spatiotemporal release of NO under physiological conditions. We designed and synthesized a novel dimethylnitrobenzene-type NO donor, Flu-DNB-DB, which contains a carbon-carbon double bond in place of the amide bond of previously reported Flu-DNB. Flu-DNB-DB releases NO in response to one-photon activation in the blue wavelength region, and shows a greatly increased two-photon cross-section (δu) at 720 nm (Flu-DNB: 0.12 GM, Flu-DNB-DB: 0.98 GM). We show that Flu-DNB-DB enables precisely controlled intracellular release of NO in response to 950 nm pulse laser irradiation for as little as 1s. This near-infrared-light-controllable NO source should be a valuable tool for studies on the biological roles of NO. PMID:26073004

  12. Bond dissociation & electronegativity equalization

    OpenAIRE

    Verstraelen, Toon; Ayers, Paul W.; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Waroquier, Michel

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that the Electrongativity Equalization Mtehod (EEM) fails to describe the charge distribution upon bond dissocation. In this presentation, the bond dissocation is studied with the Atom-Condensed Kohn-Sham DFT approximated to second order (ACKS2). After reviewing the basic equations, a two-fragment system is studied in the dissociation limit. The limiting behavior of the Coulomb interaction (1/r) and the Kohn-Sham matrix elements (exponentially decaying) are plugged into the e...

  13. Anodic bonded graphene

    OpenAIRE

    Balan, Adrian; Kumar, Rakesh; Boukhicha, Mohamed; Beyssac, Olivier; Bouillard, Jean-Claude; Taverna, Dario; Sacks, William; Marangolo, Massimiliano; Lacaze, Emmanuelle; Escoffier, Walter; Poumirol, Jean-Marie; Shukla, Abhay

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We show how to prepare graphene samples on a glass substrate with the anodic bonding method. In this method, a graphite precursor in flake form is bonded to a glass substrate with the help of an electrostatic field and then cleaved off to leave few layer graphene on the substrate. Now that several methods are available for producing graphene, the relevance of our method is in its simplicity and practicality for producing graphene samples of about 100 ?m lateral dimensions. This me...

  14. Handbook of wafer bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Ramm, Peter; Taklo, Maaike M V

    2011-01-01

    Written by an author and editor team from microsystems companies and industry-near research organizations, this handbook and reference presents dependable, first-hand information on bonding technologies.In the first part, researchers from companies and institutions around the world discuss the most reliable and reproducible technologies for the production of bonded wafers. The second part is devoted to current and emerging applications, including microresonators, biosensors and precise measuring devices.

  15. N-N Bond Forming Reductive Elimination via a Mixed-Valent Nickel(II)-Nickel(III) Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diccianni, Justin B; Hu, Chunhua; Diao, Tianning

    2016-06-20

    Natural products containing N-N bonds exhibit important biological activity. Current methods for constructing N-N bonds have limited scope. An advanced understanding of the fundamental N-N bond formation/cleavage processes occurring at the transition-metal center would facilitate the development of catalytic reactions. Herein we present an N-N bond-forming reductive elimination, which proceeds via a mixed-valent Ni(II) -Ni(III) intermediate with a Ni-Ni bond order of zero. The discrete Ni(II) -Ni(III) oxidation states contrast with the cationic dimeric Ni analogue, in which both Ni centers are equivalent with an oxidation state of 2.5. The electronic structures of these mixed-valent complexes have implications for the fundamental understanding of metal-metal bonding interactions. PMID:27144682

  16. K3[Fe(CN)6].3H2O supported on silica gel: An efficient and selective reagent for the cleavage of oximes to their corresponding carbonyl compounds in aqueous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abbas Amini Manesh; Behzad Shirmardi Shaghasemi

    2015-03-01

    K3[Fe(CN)6].3H2O supported on silica gel, a new oxidant, for efficient, simple and selective cleavage of ketoximes and aldoximes to their corresponding carbonyl compounds in aqueous medium is described. Further oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acid and formation of by-products were not observed. − unsaturated oxime was deoximated smoothly without oxidation of the double bond.

  17. Cleavage of silicon by laser-based shock waves: Interpretation by nanoscopic length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleavage along the weakest Si{1 1 1} cleavage plane is measured by impulsive fracture using surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with steep shock fronts, generated by pulsed laser irradiation and recorded with a laser probe–beam-deflection setup. The theoretical cleavage strength, obtained by ab initio calculations for perfect single-crystal silicon lattices is compared with the strength resulting from an improved Polanyi–Orowan cleavage model. The critical strength of a real silicon crystal, measured by using calibrated elastic surface pulses with shocks, was employed to extract the corresponding critical length scale characterizing the cleavage process on the basis of the modified cleavage model. The extracted length scale of 7 nm can be connected with the size of the microstructural defect initiating failure. Usually stress generating surface defects are responsible for the nucleation of brittle fracture, especially in nanoscale systems with large surface areas.

  18. Microscopic investigation of cleavage initiation in modified A508B pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microscopic study on ductile-brittle crack growth in a modified version of the A508B pressure vessel steel has been performed. Small SEN(B)-specimens tested at different temperatures in and above the transition region have been thoroughly examined with a scanning electron microscope. Focus was directed towards: amount of ductile crack growth prior to cleavage, distance from the crack front to cleavage initiation sites, and type of defect that caused the cleavage initiation. The results show, among other things, that cleavage facets are present in specimens tested at all temperatures, even on the upper shelf where no global failure by cleavage was observed. These preliminary results give an indication that the ability of the matrix material to arrest and sustain small cleavage cracks can be crucial in explaining why ferritic steels show a transition behaviour. (orig.)

  19. Study of mechanism of cleavage fracture at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. H.; Wang, G. Z.

    1992-02-01

    In this investigation, a series of crack opening displacement (COD) tests were carried out at several low temperatures for C-Mn weld steel. Some of the specimens were loaded until fracture, and the mechanical properties and microscopic parameters on fracture surfaces were measured. Other specimens were unloaded before fracture at different applied loads. The distributions of the elongated cavities and the cleavage microcracks ahead of fatigue crack tips were observed in detail. Based on the experimental results, the combined criterion of a critical strain ɛ p ≥ ɛc) for initiating a crack nucleus, a critical stress triaxiality (σ m/σ ≥ tc) for preventing it from blunting, and a critical normal stress (σ yy/σf) for the cleavage extension was proposed again, and the critical values of ɛp and σm/-σ for the C-Mn weld steel were measured. The reason why the minimum COD value could not be zero is explained. The mechanism of generation of the lower limit COD value on the lower shelf of the toughness transition curve is proposed.

  20. Drosha regulates gene expression independently of RNA cleavage function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromak, Natalia; Dienstbier, Martin; Macias, Sara;

    2013-01-01

    Drosha is the main RNase III-like enzyme involved in the process of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis in the nucleus. Using whole-genome ChIP-on-chip analysis, we demonstrate that, in addition to miRNA sequences, Drosha specifically binds promoter-proximal regions of many human genes in a transcription......-terminal protein-interaction domain, which associates with the RNA-binding protein CBP80 and RNA Polymerase II. Consequently, we uncover a previously unsuspected RNA cleavage-independent function of Drosha in the regulation of human gene expression.......Drosha is the main RNase III-like enzyme involved in the process of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis in the nucleus. Using whole-genome ChIP-on-chip analysis, we demonstrate that, in addition to miRNA sequences, Drosha specifically binds promoter-proximal regions of many human genes in a transcription......-dependent manner. This binding is not associated with miRNA production or RNA cleavage. Drosha knockdown in HeLa cells downregulated nascent gene transcription, resulting in a reduction of polyadenylated mRNA produced from these gene regions. Furthermore, we show that this function of Drosha is dependent on its N...

  1. Bond Length and Bond Order in One of the Shortest Cr-Cr Bonds

    OpenAIRE

    La Macchia, Giovanni; Aquilante, Francesco; Veryazov, Valera; Roos, Bjorn O.; Gagliardi, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Multiconfigurational quantum chemical calculations on the R-diimines dichromium compound confirm that the Cr-Cr bond, 1.80 A, is among the shortest Cr (I)-Cr (I) bonds. However, the bond between the two Cr atoms is only a quadruple bond rather than a quintuple bond. The reason why the bond is so short has to be attributed to the strain in the NCCN ligand moieties.

  2. Synthesis of Novel High Energy Polyaniline Derivative Containing S-S Bond in Six-membered Cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Lei; DENG Shi-Ren; LI Zao-Ying

    2003-01-01

    @@ A novel conducting polymer as new class of high energy storage material, [1,2] which has one six-membered cycle containing S-S bond in the moiety of aniline was synthesized. The polymer had enhanced redox progress due to an intramolecular electrocatalytic effect of polyaniline on S-S bond. The polymer has some advantages because of its high theoretical specific energy and fast kinetics when used in lithium batteries. The most promised advantage of it is that the intramolecular cleavage and recombination of the S-S bond improve the cyclicability greatly.

  3. Intracellular ribozyme-catalyzed trans-cleavage of RNA monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    OpenAIRE

    Vitiello, D; Pecchia, D B; Burke, J M

    2000-01-01

    Small catalytic RNAs like the hairpin ribozyme are proving to be useful intracellular tools; however, most attempts to demonstrate trans-cleavage of RNA by ribozymes in cells have been frustrated by rapid cellular degradation of the cleavage products. Here, we describe a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay that directly monitors cleavage of target RNA in tissue-culture cells. An oligoribonucleotide substrate was modified to inhibit cellular ribonuclease degradation without int...

  4. A pathway sensor for genome-wide screens of intracellular proteolytic cleavage

    OpenAIRE

    Ketteler, Robin; Sun, Zairen; Kovacs, Karl F; He, Wei-Wu; Seed, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Protein cleavage is a central event in many regulated biological processes. We describe a system for detecting intracellular proteolysis based on non-conventional secretion of Gaussia luciferase (GLUC). GLUC exits the cell without benefit of a secretory leader peptide, but can be anchored in the cell by fusion to \\(\\beta\\)-actin. By including protease cleavage sites between GLUC and \\(\\beta\\)-actin, proteolytic cleavage can be detected. Using this assay, we have identified regulators of autop...

  5. A real-time assay for monitoring nucleic acid cleavage by quadruplex formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kankia, Besik I.

    2006-01-01

    Direct and straightforward methods to follow nucleic acid cleavage are needed. A spectrophotometric quadruplex formation assay (QFA) was developed, which allows real-time monitoring of site-specific cleavage of nucleic acids. QFA was applied to study both protein and nucleic acid restriction enzymes, and was demonstrated to accurately determine Michaelis–Menten parameters for the cleavage reaction catalyzed by EcoRI. QFA can be used to study the mechanisms of protein–nucleic acid recognition....

  6. RNase II is important for A-site mRNA cleavage during ribosome pausing

    OpenAIRE

    Garza-Sánchez, Fernando; Shoji, Shinichiro; Fredrick, Kurt; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, translational arrest can elicit cleavage of codons within the ribosomal A site. This A-site mRNA cleavage is independent of RelE, and has been proposed to be an endonucleolytic activity of the ribosome. Here, we show that the 3′→5′ exonuclease RNase II plays an important role in RelE-independent A-site cleavage. Instead of A-site cleavage, translational pausing in ΔRNase II cells produces transcripts that are truncated +12 and +28 nucleotides downstream of the A-site codo...

  7. Hairpin DNA Sequences Bound Strongly by Bleomycin Exhibit Enhanced Double-Strand Cleavage

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Basab; Hecht, Sidney M.

    2014-01-01

    Clinically used bleomycin A5 has been employed in a study of double-strand cleavage of a library of 10 hairpin DNAs originally selected on the basis of their strong binding to bleomycin. Each of the DNAs underwent double-strand cleavage at more than one site, and all of the cleavage sites were within, or in close proximity to, an eight-base-pair region of the duplex that had been randomized to create the original library. A total of 31 double-strand cleavage sites were identified on the 10 DN...

  8. Cleavage of RseA by RseP requires a carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic amino acid following DegS cleavage

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaochun; Wang, Boyuan; Feng, Lihui; Kang, Hui; Qi, Yang; Wang, Jiawei; Shi, Yigong

    2009-01-01

    Regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) by the Site-2 protease (S2P) results in the release of a transmembrane signaling protein. Curiously, however, S2P cleavage must be preceded by the action of the Site-1 protease (S1P). To decipher the underlying mechanism, we reconstituted sequential, in vitro cleavages of the Escherichia coli transmembrane protein RseA by DegS (S1P) and RseP (S2P). After DegS cleavage, the newly exposed carboxyl-terminal residue Val-148 of RseA plays an essential role...

  9. Specific pre-cleavage and post-cleavage complexes involved in the formation of SV40 late mRNA 3' termini in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Zarkower, D; Wickens, M

    1987-01-01

    Complexes form between processing factors present in a crude nuclear extract from HeLa cells and a simian virus 40 (SV40) late pre-mRNA which spans the polyadenylation [poly(A)] site. A specific 'pre-cleavage complex' forms on the pre-mRNA before cleavage. Formation of this complex requires the highly conserved sequence AAUAAA: it is prevented by mutations in AAUAAA, and by annealing DNA oligonucleotides to that sequence. After cleavage, the 5' half-molecule is found in a distinct 'post-cleav...

  10. Effect of SiC whiskers on the oxidation protective properties of SiC coatings for carbon/carbon composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to effectively employ the unique high temperature mechanical properties of carbon/carbon composite substrates, SiC coatings reinforced by SiC whiskers were prepared by pack cementation method. The effect of SiC whiskers on the oxidation resistance properties of the single-layer coating and double-layer coating was investigated. SiC whiskers in the single-layer SiC coating have little effect on the anti-oxidation property but obviously improve the thermal shock property. The double-layer coating with inner-layer reinforced coating exhibits more perfect anti-oxidation ability than the double-layer coating with SiC inner-layer coating.

  11. Romanian government bond market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia POP

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to present the level of development reached by Romanian government bond market segment, as part of the country financial market. The analysis will be descriptive (the data series available for Romania are short, based on the secondary data offered by the official bodies involved in the process of issuing and trading the Romanian government bonds (Romanian Ministry of Public Finance, Romanian National Bank and Bucharest Stock Exchange, and also on secondary data provided by the Federation of European Stock Exchanges.To enhance the market credibility as a benchmark, a various combination of measures is necessary; among these measures are mentioned: the extension of the yield curve; the issuance calendars in order to improve transparency; increasing the disclosure of information on public debt issuance and statistics; holding regular meetings with dealers, institutional investors and rating agencies; introducing a system of primary dealers; establishing a repurchase (repo market in the government bond market. These measures will be discussed based on the evolution presented inside the paper.The paper conclude with the fact that, until now, the Romanian government bond market did not provide a benchmark for the domestic financial market and that further efforts are needed in order to increase the government bond market transparency and liquidity.

  12. Preparation and characterization of carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating for carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leilei, Zhang, E-mail: zhangleilei1121@aliyun.com; Hejun, Li; Kezhi, Li; Shouyang, Zhang; Qiangang, Fu; Yulei, Zhang; Jinhua, Lu; Wei, Li

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • CSH coatings were prepared by combination of magnetron sputter ion plating, CVD and UECD. • Na{sup +} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} were developed to co-substitute hydroxyapatite. • SiC nanowires were introduced into Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. • CSH coatings showed excellent cell activity and cell proliferation behavior. - Abstract: A carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating (CSH coating) was prepared on carbon/carbon composites using a combination method of magnetron sputter ion plating, chemical vapor deposition and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the CSH coating was consisted of three components: carbon layer, SiC nanowires and Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. The carbon layer provided a dense and uniform surface structure for the growth of SiC nanowires. The SiC nanowires exhibited a porous structure, favoring the infiltration of Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals. The Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite could infiltrate into the pores of SiC nanowires and finally cover the SiC nanowires entirely with a needle shape. The osteoblast-like MG63 cells were employed to assess the in vitro biocompatibility of the CSH coating. The MG63 cells favorably spread and grew well across the CSH coating surface with plenty of filopods and microvilli, exhibiting excellent cell activity. Moreover, the CSH coating elicited higher cell proliferation as compared to bare carbon/carbon composites. In conclusion, the CSH offers great potential as a coating material for future medical application in hard tissue replacement.

  13. Preparation and characterization of carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating for carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CSH coatings were prepared by combination of magnetron sputter ion plating, CVD and UECD. • Na+ and CO32− were developed to co-substitute hydroxyapatite. • SiC nanowires were introduced into Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. • CSH coatings showed excellent cell activity and cell proliferation behavior. - Abstract: A carbon/SiC nanowire/Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite multilayer coating (CSH coating) was prepared on carbon/carbon composites using a combination method of magnetron sputter ion plating, chemical vapor deposition and ultrasound-assisted electrochemical deposition procedure. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the CSH coating was consisted of three components: carbon layer, SiC nanowires and Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite. The carbon layer provided a dense and uniform surface structure for the growth of SiC nanowires. The SiC nanowires exhibited a porous structure, favoring the infiltration of Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals. The Na-doped carbonated hydroxyapatite could infiltrate into the pores of SiC nanowires and finally cover the SiC nanowires entirely with a needle shape. The osteoblast-like MG63 cells were employed to assess the in vitro biocompatibility of the CSH coating. The MG63 cells favorably spread and grew well across the CSH coating surface with plenty of filopods and microvilli, exhibiting excellent cell activity. Moreover, the CSH coating elicited higher cell proliferation as compared to bare carbon/carbon composites. In conclusion, the CSH offers great potential as a coating material for future medical application in hard tissue replacement

  14. Embryo apoptosis identification: Oocyte grade or cleavage stage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, Noraina Mohd; Ibrahim, Siti Fatimah; Osman, Nurul Atikah; Hasan, Nurhaslina; Jaffar, Farah Hanan Fathihah; Rahman, Zulaiha Abdul; Osman, Khairul

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a programed cell death that is vital for tissue homeostasis. However, embryo apoptosis had been known to be related to embryo fragmentation which should be avoided in in vitro fertilization (IVF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of embryo apoptosis with the grade of immature oocytes and cleavage stage of in vitro produced (IVP) cattle embryos. This study consisted of 345 oocytes collected through ovary slicing. Immature oocytes were graded as A, B and C. This grading was based on cumulus cell thickness and compactness. All oocytes then underwent an in vitro maturation (IVM) procedure. An IVF was done 24 h after IVM culture. Prior to staining, stage of cleaved embryos was determined and classified as either 2, 4, 8 or >8-cell embryo stage. Apoptosis status of cleaved IVP embryos was determined by using annexin V-FITC staining technique at 48 and 72 h post insemination (hpi). Apoptosis status for each embryo was classified as either early or late. The result showed that there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status among grade A, B and C embryos. All grades of oocytes showed embryo apoptosis where 1.5% late apoptosis for grade A, 4.5% and 10.4% of early and late apoptosis for grade B and grade C. Early apoptosis was not seen in grade A embryo. We also noted no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status between 2, 4, 8 and >8-cell embryo stage. Early apoptosis was also not seen in >8-cell stage. Even though there were no differences in apoptosis expression between the three classes, the cleavage rate of grade A oocytes was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than grade B and grade C. In conclusion, the apoptosis expression in the embryo can occur regardless of the oocyte quality and the cleavage stage of the embryo produced. PMID:26858565

  15. TEXT tf coil bonding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive bond test program was conducted prior to manufacturing and bonding the toroidal field (TF) coils for the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT). The bonding materials consisted of fiberglass cloth with pre-impregnated, 'B' staged Hexcel F-159 resin. Approximately 100 double lap bond samples were constructed to test quality, strength, and repeatability of the bonds. The variables investigated included surface machining methods, surface preparations, bond sample size (planform area), bonding pressure, bonding temperature, and the number of laminations bonded simultaneously. Double lap shear tests conducted at room temperature resulted in ultimate shear strengths for all variables in the range of 3000 to 7000 psi with an average value of 5650 psi. Fatigue tests were also conducted to demonstrate bond integrity over the anticipated cycle lifetime of the TEXT machine (10/sup 6/ cycles) under simulated worst case conditions. 2 refs

  16. Insulation bonding test system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggs, J. M.; Johnston, G. D.; Coleman, A. D.; Portwood, J. N.; Saunders, J. M.; Redmon, J. W.; Porter, A. C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and a system for testing the bonding of foam insulation attached to metal is described. The system involves the use of an impacter which has a calibrated load cell mounted on a plunger and a hammer head mounted on the end of the plunger. When the impacter strikes the insulation at a point to be tested, the load cell measures the force of the impact and the precise time interval during which the hammer head is in contact with the insulation. This information is transmitted as an electrical signal to a load cell amplifier where the signal is conditioned and then transmitted to a fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzer. The FFT analyzer produces energy spectral density curves which are displayed on a video screen. The termination frequency of the energy spectral density curve may be compared with a predetermined empirical scale to determine whether a igh quality bond, good bond, or debond is present at the point of impact.

  17. The Illiquidity of Corporate Bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Jack; Pan, Jun; Wang, Jiang

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the illiquidity of corporate bonds and its asset-pricing implications. Using transactions data from 2003 to 2009, we show that the illiquidity in corporate bonds is substantial, significantly greater than what can be explained by bid–ask spreads. We establish a strong link between bond illiquidity and bond prices. In aggregate, changes in market-level illiquidity explain a substantial part of the time variation in yield spreads of high-rated (AAA through A) bonds, overshad...

  18. Partial vapor-phase hydrolysis of peptide bonds: A method for mass spectrometric determination of O-glycosylated sites in glycopeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirgorodskaya, E; Hassan, H; Wandall, H H;

    1999-01-01

    resulting mass spectra allowed unambiguous determination of the glycosylation sites. Examples are shown with mannosyl- and mucin-type glycopeptides. Performing the hydrolysis in vapor eliminates the risk for contamination of the sample with impurities from the reagents, thus allowing analysis of the......In this study we present a method for determination of O-glycosylation sites in glycopeptides, based on partial vapor-phase acid hydrolysis in combination with mass spectrometric analysis. Pentafluoropropionic acid and hydrochloric acid were used for the hydrolysis of glycosylated peptides. The...... reaction conditions were optimized for efficient polypeptide backbone cleavages with minimal cleavage of glycosidic bonds. The glycosylated residues were identified by mass spectrometric analysis of the hydrolytic cleavage products. Although glycosidic bonds are partially cleaved under acid hydrolysis, the...

  19. Anodic bonded graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balan, Adrian; Kumar, Rakesh; Boukhicha, Mohamed; Beyssac, Olivier; Bouillard, Jean-Claude; Taverna, Dario; Sacks, William; Shukla, Abhay [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, CNRS-UMR7590, Institut de Mineralogie et de Physique des Milieux Condenses, 140 rue de Lourmel, Paris, F-75015 France (France); Marangolo, Massimiliano; Lacaze, Emanuelle; Gohler, Roger [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, CNRS-UMR7588, Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, 140 rue de Lourmel, Paris, F-75015 France (France); Escoffier, Walter; Poumirol, Jean-Marie, E-mail: abhay.shukla@upmc.f [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Intenses, INSA UPS CNRS, UPR 3228, Universite de Toulouse, 143 avenue de Rangueil, 31400 Toulouse (France)

    2010-09-22

    We show how to prepare graphene samples on a glass substrate with the anodic bonding method. In this method, a graphite precursor in flake form is bonded to a glass substrate with the help of an electrostatic field and then cleaved off to leave few layer graphene on the substrate. Now that several methods are available for producing graphene, the relevance of our method is in its simplicity and practicality for producing graphene samples of about 100 {mu}m lateral dimensions. This method is also extensible to other layered materials. We discuss some detailed aspects of the fabrication and results from Raman spectroscopy, local probe microscopy and transport measurements on these samples.

  20. The Trouble With Bonds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ In early June,global financial markets gyrated downwards in the wake of central banks'tough language on inflation.At one point bond prices reflected expectations of four rate hikes by the US Federal Reserve (Fed) in the next 12 months.As a result,the dollar firmed,oil prices stabilized,and yield curves flattened around the world.If all these inflation-fighting measures are real,the situation bodes well for bonds.But,I think otherwise.

  1. Modelling of ductile and cleavage fracture by local approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the modelling of ductile and cleavage fracture processes by local approach. It is now well known that the conventional fracture mechanics method based on single parameter criteria is not adequate to model the fracture processes. It is because of the existence of effect of size and geometry of flaw, loading type and rate on the fracture resistance behaviour of any structure. Hence, it is questionable to use same fracture resistance curves as determined from standard tests in the analysis of real life components because of existence of all the above effects. So, there is need to have a method in which the parameters used for the analysis will be true material properties, i.e. independent of geometry and size. One of the solutions to the above problem is the use of local approaches. These approaches have been extensively studied and applied to different materials (including SA33 Gr.6) in this report. Each method has been studied and reported in a separate section. This report has been divided into five sections. Section-I gives a brief review of the fundamentals of fracture process. Section-II deals with modelling of ductile fracture by locally uncoupled type of models. In this section, the critical cavity growth parameters of the different models have been determined for the primary heat transport (PHT) piping material of Indian pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR). A comparative study has been done among different models. The dependency of the critical parameters on stress triaxiality factor has also been studied. It is observed that Rice and Tracey's model is the most suitable one. But, its parameters are not fully independent of triaxiality factor. For this purpose, a modification to Rice and Tracery's model is suggested in Section-III. Section-IV deals with modelling of ductile fracture process by locally coupled type of models. Section-V deals with the modelling of cleavage fracture process by Beremins model, which is based on Weibulls

  2. Delay of HeLa cell cleavage into interphase using dihydrocytochalasin B: retention of a postmitotic spindle and telophase disc correlates with synchronous cleavage recovery

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The molecular signals that determine the position and timing of the cleavage furrow during mammalian cell cytokinesis are presently unknown. We have studied in detail the effect of dihydrocytochalasin B (DCB), a drug that interferes with actin assembly, on specific late mitotic events in synchronous HeLa cells. When cleavage furrow formation is blocked at 10 microM DCB, cells return to interphase by the criteria of reformation of nuclei with lamin borders, degradation of the cyclin B componen...

  3. SARS coronavirus nsp1 protein induces template-dependent endonucleolytic cleavage of mRNAs: viral mRNAs are resistant to nsp1-induced RNA cleavage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Huang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available SARS coronavirus (SCoV nonstructural protein (nsp 1, a potent inhibitor of host gene expression, possesses a unique mode of action: it binds to 40S ribosomes to inactivate their translation functions and induces host mRNA degradation. Our previous study demonstrated that nsp1 induces RNA modification near the 5'-end of a reporter mRNA having a short 5' untranslated region and RNA cleavage in the encephalomyocarditis virus internal ribosome entry site (IRES region of a dicistronic RNA template, but not in those IRES elements from hepatitis C or cricket paralysis viruses. By using primarily cell-free, in vitro translation systems, the present study revealed that the nsp1 induced endonucleolytic RNA cleavage mainly near the 5' untranslated region of capped mRNA templates. Experiments using dicistronic mRNAs carrying different IRESes showed that nsp1 induced endonucleolytic RNA cleavage within the ribosome loading region of type I and type II picornavirus IRES elements, but not that of classical swine fever virus IRES, which is characterized as a hepatitis C virus-like IRES. The nsp1-induced RNA cleavage of template mRNAs exhibited no apparent preference for a specific nucleotide sequence at the RNA cleavage sites. Remarkably, SCoV mRNAs, which have a 5' cap structure and 3' poly A tail like those of typical host mRNAs, were not susceptible to nsp1-mediated RNA cleavage and importantly, the presence of the 5'-end leader sequence protected the SCoV mRNAs from nsp1-induced endonucleolytic RNA cleavage. The escape of viral mRNAs from nsp1-induced RNA cleavage may be an important strategy by which the virus circumvents the action of nsp1 leading to the efficient accumulation of viral mRNAs and viral proteins during infection.

  4. Amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, Margaret R; Senior, Bernard W; Kilian, Mogens; Woof, Jenny M

    2003-03-01

    The amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by IgA1 proteases of different species of Streptococcus were investigated. Recombinant IgA1 antibodies were generated with point mutations at proline 227 and threonine 228, the residues lying on either side of the peptide bond at which all streptococcal IgA1 proteases cleave wild-type human IgA1. The amino acid substitutions produced no major effect upon the structure of the mutant IgA1 antibodies or their functional ability to bind to Fcalpha receptors. However, the substitutions had a substantial effect upon sensitivity to cleavage with some streptococcal IgA1 proteases, with, in some cases, a single point mutation rendering the antibody resistant to a particular IgA1 protease. This effect was least marked with the IgA1 protease from Streptococcus pneumoniae, which showed no absolute requirement for either proline or threonine at residues 227 to 228. By contrast, the IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus mitis had an absolute requirement for proline at 227 but not for threonine at 228, which could be replaced by valine. There was evidence in S. mitis that proteases from different strains may have different amino acid requirements for cleavage. Remarkably, some streptococcal proteases appeared able to cleave the hinge at a distant alternative site if substitution prevented efficient cleavage of the original site. Hence, this study has identified key residues required for the recognition of the IgA1 hinge as a substrate by streptococcal IgA1 proteases, and it marks a preliminary step towards development of specific enzyme inhibitors. PMID:12595464

  5. Molecular Basis for the Recognition and Cleavages of IGF-II, TGF-[alpha], and Amylin by Human Insulin-Degrading Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Qing; Manolopoulou, Marika; Bian, Yao; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen (UC); (UIC)

    2010-02-11

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is involved in the clearance of many bioactive peptide substrates, including insulin and amyloid-{beta}, peptides vital to the development of diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. IDE can also rapidly degrade hormones that are held together by intramolecular disulfide bond(s) without their reduction. Furthermore, IDE exhibits a remarkable ability to preferentially degrade structurally similar peptides such as the selective degradation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II and transforming growth factor-{alpha} (TGF-{alpha}) over IGF-I and epidermal growth factor, respectively. Here, we used high-accuracy mass spectrometry to identify the cleavage sites of human IGF-II, TGF-{alpha}, amylin, reduced amylin, and amyloid-{beta} by human IDE. We also determined the structures of human IDE-IGF-II and IDE-TGF-{alpha} at 2.3 {angstrom} and IDE-amylin at 2.9 {angstrom}. We found that IDE cleaves its substrates at multiple sites in a biased stochastic manner. Furthermore, the presence of a disulfide bond in amylin allows IDE to cut at an additional site in the middle of the peptide (amino acids 18-19). Our amylin-bound IDE structure offers insight into how the structural constraint from a disulfide bond in amylin can alter IDE cleavage sites. Together with NMR structures of amylin and the IGF and epidermal growth factor families, our work also reveals the structural basis of how the high dipole moment of substrates complements the charge distribution of the IDE catalytic chamber for the substrate selectivity. In addition, we show how the ability of substrates to properly anchor their N-terminus to the exosite of IDE and undergo a conformational switch upon binding to the catalytic chamber of IDE can also contribute to the selective degradation of structurally related growth factors.

  6. Molecular basis for the recognition and cleavages of IGF-II, TGF-α, and amylin by human insulin degrading enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; Manolopoulou, Marika; Bian, Yao; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-01-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is involved in the clearance of many bioactive peptide substrates, including insulin and amyloid-β (Aβ), peptides vital to the development of diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. IDE can also rapidly degrade hormones that are held together by intra-molecular disulfide bond(s) without their reduction. Furthermore, IDE exhibits a remarkable ability to preferentially degrade structurally similar peptides such as the selective degradation of insulin-growth factor-II (IGF-II) and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) over IGF-I and epidermal growth factor (EGF), respectively. Here, we used high accuracy mass spectrometry to identify the cleavage sites of human IGF-II, TGF-α, amylin, reduced amylin, and Aβ by human IDE. We also determined the structures of human IDE-IGF-II and IDE-TGF-α at 2.3 Å and IDE-amylin at 2.9 Å. We found that IDE cleaves its substrates at multiple sites in a biased stochastic manner. Furthermore, the presence of a disulfide bond in amylin allows IDE to cut at an additional site in the middle of the peptide (aa 18-19). Our amylin-bound IDE structure offers insight into how the structural constraint from a disulfide bond in amylin can alter IDE cleavage sites. Together with NMR structures of amylin and the IGF and EGF families, our work also reveals the structural basis of how the high dipole moment of substrates complements the charge distribution of the IDE catalytic chamber for the substrate selectivity. In addition, we show how the ability of substrates to properly anchor their N-terminus to the exosite of IDE and undergo a conformational switch upon binding to the catalytic chamber of IDE can also contribute to the selective degradation of structurally related growth factors. PMID:19896952

  7. Cleavage-based voting behavior in cross-national perspective : Evidence from six postwar democracies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooks, Clem; Nieuwbeerta, Paul; Manza, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    We investigate trends and cross-national variation in the impact of class, religious, and gender cleavages on voting behavior in six advanced capitalist democracies in the postwar period. Earlier research on cleavage voting has been criticized for utilizing outdated ‘‘two-class’’ models of class str

  8. Cleavage-based voting behavior in cross-national perspective: evidence from six postwar democracies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooks, Clem; Nieuwbeerta, Paul; Manza, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    We investigate trends and cross-national variation in the impact of class, religious, and gender cleavages on voting behavior in six advanced capitalist democracies in the postwar period. Earlier research on cleavage voting has been criticized for utilizing outdated “two-class” models of class struc

  9. Coronavirus 3CL(pro) proteinase cleavage sites: Possible relevance to SARS virus pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiemer, Lars; Lund, Ole; Brunak, Søren;

    2004-01-01

    in proteins such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator ( CFTR), transcription factors CREB-RP and OCT-I, and components of the ubiquitin pathway. Conclusions: Our prediction method NetCorona predicts coronavirus cleavage sites with high specificity and several potential cleavage...

  10. Unexpected tolerance of alpha-cleavage of the prion protein to sequence variations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José B Oliveira-Martins

    Full Text Available The cellular form of the prion protein, PrP(C, undergoes extensive proteolysis at the alpha site (109K [see text]H110. Expression of non-cleavable PrP(C mutants in transgenic mice correlates with neurotoxicity, suggesting that alpha-cleavage is important for PrP(C physiology. To gain insights into the mechanisms of alpha-cleavage, we generated a library of PrP(C mutants with mutations in the region neighbouring the alpha-cleavage site. The prevalence of C1, the carboxy adduct of alpha-cleavage, was determined for each mutant. In cell lines of disparate origin, C1 prevalence was unaffected by variations in charge and hydrophobicity of the region neighbouring the alpha-cleavage site, and by substitutions of the residues in the palindrome that flanks this site. Instead, alpha-cleavage was size-dependently impaired by deletions within the domain 106-119. Almost no cleavage was observed upon full deletion of this domain. These results suggest that alpha-cleavage is executed by an alpha-PrPase whose activity, despite surprisingly limited sequence specificity, is dependent on the size of the central region of PrP(C.

  11. Flax Fiber - Interfacial Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measured flax fiber physical and chemical properties potentially impact bonding and thus stress transfer between the matrix and fiber within composites. These first attempts at correlating flax fiber quality and biofiber composites contain the initial steps towards identifying key flax fiber charac...

  12. Bonds Between Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Alan

    The field of inquiry into how atoms are bonded together to form molecules and solids crosses the borderlines between physics and chemistry encompassing methods characteristic of both sciences. At one extreme, the inquiry is pursued with care and rigor into the simplest cases; at the other extreme, suggestions derived from the more careful inquiry…

  13. Thread bonds in molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Ivlev, B

    2015-01-01

    Unusual chemical bonds are proposed. Each bond is almost covalent but is characterized by the thread of a small radius $\\sim 0.6\\times 10^{-11}$cm, between two nuclei in a molecule. The main electron density is concentrated outside the thread as in a covalent bond. The thread is formed by the electron wave function which has a tendency to be singular on it. The singularity along the thread is cut off by electron "vibrations" due to the interaction with zero point electromagnetic oscillations. The electron energy has its typical value of (1-10)eV. Due to the small tread radius the uncertainty of the electron momentum inside the thread is large resulting in a large electron kinetic energy $\\sim 1 MeV$. This energy is compensated by formation of a potential well due to the reduction of the energy of electromagnetic zero point oscillations. This is similar to formation of a negative van der Waals potential. Thread bonds are stable and cannot be created or destructed in chemical or optical processes.

  14. Role of Austenite in Brittle Fracture of Bond Region of Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Yoshihiko; Ikeuchi, Kenji; Kuroda, Toshio

    Weld simulation of heat-affected zone (HAZ) was performed to investigate the mechanism by which austenite affects the toughness of super duplex stainless steel. Thermal cycles of various peak temperatures in the range from 1373 K to 1673 K corresponding to the HAZ were applied to SAF2507 super duplex stainless steel specimens. Charpy impact test was carried out using the specimens after the weld simulation, and the fracture surfaces were observed by SEM using three-dimensionally reconstruction technique. Austenite content decreased with increasing the peak temperature when the peak temperature exceeded 1473 K and the impact value decreased with increasing the peak temperature and decreasing the austenite content. The thermal cycle of the peak temperature of 1673 K corresponding to weld bond region caused decreasing of austenite content which was 22% lower than that of the base metal. The ductile-brittle transition temperature was measured. As a result the temperature increased rapidly in the weld bond region, the peak temperature of which exceeded 1623 K by the grain growth of ferrite matrix occurring subsequently to the completely dissolution of austenite. The morphology of the fracture surfaces after impact testing at 77 K showed cleavage fracture of ferrite. The {100} orientations of cleavage fracture facets were measured using three-dimensional images of the fracture surfaces and the results were visualized as the orientation color maps. The results showed that there were cleavage fractures consisting of a few facets parallel to each other. It was considered that a few facets existed in one ferrite grain. It was concluded that Widmanstätten austenite divided the large fracture into smaller cleavage facets in a ferrite grain and then suppressed the degradation of bond toughness of duplex stainless steel.

  15. Ultrasensitive monitoring of ribozyme cleavage product using molecular-beacon-ligation system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG XiangXian; TANG ZhiWen; WANG KeMin; TAN WeiHong; YANG XiaoHai; LI Jun; GUO QiuPing

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports a new approach to detect ribozyme cleavage product based on the molecular- beacon-ligation system. The molecular beacon, designed in such a way that one-half of its loop is complementary to ribozyme cleavage product, is used to monitor ligation process of RNA/DNA complex in a homogeneous solution and to convert directly cleavage product information into fluorescence signal. The method need not label ribozyme and ribozyme substrate, which is fast, simple and ultrasensitive for detection of cleavage product. Detection limit of the assay is 0.05 nmol/L. The cleavage product of hammerhead ribozyme against hepatitis C virus RNA (HCV-RNA) was detected perfectly based on this assay. Owing to its ultrasensitivity, excellent specificity, convenience and fidelity, this method might hold out great promise in ribozyme reaction and ribozyme gene therapy.

  16. Review and perspective on approaches of evaluating cleavage fracture toughness of pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although efforts have been made to establish cleavage fracture model in the past 30 years or so, uncertainties remain in predicting the cleavage fracture toughness behavior of reactor pressure vessel steels in the transition region. Confusions may be raised in cases such as that there are still outliers while ASME fracture toughness curve indexed to the reference temperature is generally considered as very conservative. The advantage and potentials of using Finite Element method to predict the cleavage fracture behavior of irradiated materials are obvious. However, its effectiveness depends on the rightness of the physical model and criteria established. In this paper, approaches of describing cleavage fracture toughness of pressure vessel steels in the transition region are discussed and compared. The need for focusing on the physical fundamental and criteria of cleavage fracture is addressed. (authors)

  17. Processive pectin methylesterases: the role of electrostatic potential, breathing motions and bond cleavage in the rectification of Brownian motions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Mercadante

    Full Text Available Pectin methylesterases (PMEs hydrolyze the methylester groups that are found on the homogalacturonan (HG chains of pectic polysaccharides in the plant cell wall. Plant and bacterial PMEs are especially interesting as the resulting de-methylesterified (carboxylated sugar residues are found to be arranged contiguously, indicating a so-called processive nature of these enzymes. Here we report the results of continuum electrostatics calculations performed along the molecular dynamics trajectory of a PME-HG-decasaccharide complex. In particular it was observed that, when the methylester groups of the decasaccharide were arranged in order to mimic the just-formed carboxylate product of de-methylesterification, a net unidirectional sliding of the model decasaccharide was subsequently observed along the enzyme's binding groove. The changes that occurred in the electrostatic binding energy and protein dynamics during this translocation provide insights into the mechanism by which the enzyme rectifies Brownian motions to achieve processivity. The free energy that drives these molecular motors is thus demonstrated to be incorporated endogenously in the methylesterified groups of the HG chains and is not supplied exogenously.

  18. Heterogeneous Catalysis of C–O Bond Cleavage for Cellulose Deconstruction: A Potential Pathway for Ethanol Production

    OpenAIRE

    Crews, Kristy; Reeves, Crystal; Thomas, Porsha; Abugri, Daniel; Russell, Albert; Michael L. Curry

    2014-01-01

    Due to difficulty deconstructing the linkages between lignin, hemicellulose and cellulose during the conversion of cellulose to sugar, the commercial production of cellulosic ethanol is limited. This can be overcome by using a high surface-area metal catalyst. In this study, high surface-area metal NPs were synthesized using 20 mM of chloroplatinic acid and cobalt chloride prepared in THF with 0.1 mM of generation four poly(amido)amine (PAMAM) terminated dendrimer (G4-NH2) prepared in methano...

  19. Fe-promoted cross coupling of homobenzylic methyl ethers with Grignard reagents via sp3 C-O bond cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shuang; Yu, Da-Gang; Zhu, Ru-Yi; Wang, Xin; Wang, Lei; Shi, Zhang-Jie

    2013-09-14

    The first iron-catalyzed formal cross coupling of homobenzylic methyl ethers with alkyl Grignard reagents is realized. The reaction is proposed to proceed through a sequence of dehydroalkoxylation to form the vinyl-intermediate, followed by Fe-catalyzed selective carbometalation to form a benzylic Grignard reagent. PMID:23884449

  20. Atomistic Details of the Associative Phosphodiester Cleavage in Human Ribonuclease H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During translation of the genetic information of DNA into proteins, mRNA is synthesized by RNA polymerase and after the transcription process degraded by RNase H. The endoribonuclease RNase H is a member of the nucleotidyl-transferase (NT) superfamily and is known to hydrolyze the phosphodiester bonds of RNA which is hybridized to DNA. Retroviral RNase H is part of the viral reverse transcriptase enzyme that is indispensable for the proliferation of retroviruses, such as HIV. Inhibitors of this enzyme could therefore provide new drugs against diseases like AIDS. In our study we investigated the molecular mechanism of RNA cleavage by human RNase H using a comprehensive high level DFT/B3LYP QM/MM theoretical method for the calculation of the stationary points and nudged elastic band (NEB) and free energy calculations to identify the transition state structures, the rate limiting step and the reaction barrier. Our calculations reveal that the catalytic mechanism proceeds in two steps and that the nature of the nucleophile is a water molecule. In the first step, the water attack on the scissile phosphorous is followed by a proton transfer from the water to the O2P oxygen and a trigonal bipyramidal pentacoordinated phosphorane is formed. Subsequently, in the second step the proton is shuttled to the O30 oxygen to generate the product state. During the reaction mechanism two Mg2+ ions support the formation of a stable associated in-line SN2-type phosphorane intermediate. Our calculated energy barrier of 19.3 kcal mol*1 is in excellent agreement with experimental findings (20.5 kcal mol*1). These results may contribute to the clarification and understanding of the RNase H reaction mechanism and of further enzymes from the RNase family.