WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon-14 urea breath

  1. Validation of ten-minute single sample carbon-14 urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabakaran, K.; Fernandes, V.; McDonald, J. [Illawarra Regional Hospital, Wollongong, NSW (Australia). Depts of Nuclear Medicine and Gastroenterology

    1996-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is traditionally diagnosed by endoscopy followed by gastric biopsy and histologic demonstration of organisms, rapid urease test and culture. The non-invasive carbon-14-urea breath test has been widely accepted now for the diagnosis of this bacterium. This study was aimed to establish and validate normal and abnormal values for an Australian population, for a single sample carbon-14-urea breath test at ten minutes. A dose of 185 kBq was used in order to achieve reasonable counting statistics. The derived values were validated with the results of the rapid urease test. This method has a high sensitivity, specificity and greater patient acceptance, and could be used in many clinical settings as the first modality for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection and for documenting response or cure after antibiotic therapy for eradication. 11 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  2. Validation of ten-minute single sample carbon-14 urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter pylori infection is traditionally diagnosed by endoscopy followed by gastric biopsy and histologic demonstration of organisms, rapid urease test and culture. The non-invasive carbon-14-urea breath test has been widely accepted now for the diagnosis of this bacterium. This study was aimed to establish and validate normal and abnormal values for an Australian population, for a single sample carbon-14-urea breath test at ten minutes. A dose of 185 kBq was used in order to achieve reasonable counting statistics. The derived values were validated with the results of the rapid urease test. This method has a high sensitivity, specificity and greater patient acceptance, and could be used in many clinical settings as the first modality for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection and for documenting response or cure after antibiotic therapy for eradication. 11 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  3. Validation of a simplified carbon-14-urea breath test for routine use for detecting Helicobacter pylori noninvasively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A carbon-14 (14C) urea breath test for detecting Helicobacter pylori with multiple breath sampling was developed. Carbon-14-urea (110 kBq) administered orally to 18 normal subjects and to 82 patients with Helicobacter infection. The exhaled 14C-labeled CO2 was trapped at 10-min intervals for 90 min. The total 14C activity exhaled over 90 min was integrated and expressed in %activity of the total dose given. In normals, a mean of 0.59% +/- 0.24% was measured, resulting in an upper limit of normal of 1.07%. In 82 patients, a sensitivity of 90.2%, a specificity of 83.8%, and a positive predictive value of 90.2% was found. The single probes at intervals of 40-60 min correlated best with the integrated result, with r ranging from 0.986 to 0.990. The test's diagnostic accuracy did not change at all when reevaluated with the 40-, 50-, or 60-min sample data alone. Thus, the 14C-urea breath test can be applied routinely as a noninvasive, low-cost and one-sample test with high diagnostic accuracy in detecting Helicobacter pylori colonization

  4. Carbon-14 urea breath test for the diagnosis of Campylobacter pylori associated gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urease in the human gastric mucosa is a marker for infection with Campylobacter pylori (CP), an organism suspected of causing chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. To detect gastric urease, we examined 32 patients who were being evaluated for possible peptic ulcer disease. Fasting patients were given 10 microCi (370 kBq) of 14C-labeled urea. Breath samples were collected in hyamine at intervals between 1 and 30 min. The amount of 14C collected at these times was expressed as: body weight X (% of administered dose of 14C in sample)/(mmol of CO2 collected). The presence of C. pylori colonization was also determined by examination of multiple endoscopic gastric biopsy specimens. On average, patients who were proven to have C. pylori infection exhaled 20 times more labeled CO2 than patients who were not infected. The difference between infected patients and C. pylori negative control patients was highly significant at all time points between 2 and 30 min after ingestion of the radionuclide (p less than 0.0001). The noninvasive urea breath is less expensive than endoscopic biopsy of the stomach and more accurate than serology as a means of detecting Campylobacter pylori infection. Because the test detects actual viable CP organisms, it can be used to confirm eradication of the bacterium after antibacterial therapy

  5. Quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastritis and ulcer disease using a simple and rapid carbon-14-urea breath test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debongnie, J.C.; Pauwels, S.; Raat, A.; de Meeus, Y.; Haot, J.; Mainguet, P. (Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Louvain Medical School, Brussels (Belgium))

    1991-06-01

    Gastric urease was studied isotopically in 230 patients with biopsy-proven normal mucosa or chronic gastritis, including 59 patients with ulcer disease. Carbon-14-urea was given in 25 ml of water without substrate carrier or nutrient-dense meal, and breath samples were collected over a 60-min period. The amount of 14CO2 excreted at 10 min was independent of the rate of gastric emptying and was not quantitatively influenced by the buccal urease activity. The 10-min 14CO2 values discriminated well between Helicobacter pylori positive and negative patients (94% sensitivity, 89% specificity) and correlated with the number of organisms assessed by histology. The test was a good predictor of chronic gastritis (95% sensitivity and 96% specificity), and a quantitative relationship was observed between 14CO2 values and the severity and activity of the gastritis. In H. pylori positive patients, breath 14CO2 was found to be similar in patients with and without ulcer disease, suggesting that the number of bacteria is not a determining factor for the onset of ulceration.

  6. Quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastritis and ulcer disease using a simple and rapid carbon-14-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastric urease was studied isotopically in 230 patients with biopsy-proven normal mucosa or chronic gastritis, including 59 patients with ulcer disease. Carbon-14-urea was given in 25 ml of water without substrate carrier or nutrient-dense meal, and breath samples were collected over a 60-min period. The amount of 14CO2 excreted at 10 min was independent of the rate of gastric emptying and was not quantitatively influenced by the buccal urease activity. The 10-min 14CO2 values discriminated well between Helicobacter pylori positive and negative patients (94% sensitivity, 89% specificity) and correlated with the number of organisms assessed by histology. The test was a good predictor of chronic gastritis (95% sensitivity and 96% specificity), and a quantitative relationship was observed between 14CO2 values and the severity and activity of the gastritis. In H. pylori positive patients, breath 14CO2 was found to be similar in patients with and without ulcer disease, suggesting that the number of bacteria is not a determining factor for the onset of ulceration

  7. Accuracy of a rapid 10-minute carbon-14 urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urease in the human gastric mucosa is a marker for infection with Helicobacter pylori (HP), an organism which is associated with peptic ulcer disease. To detect gastric urease, we examined 184 patients (144 males, 40 females; mean age: 49.8±15.6 years) with suspected peptic ulcer disease. Fasting patients were given orally 5 μCi of carbon-14 labelled urea. For each patient only one breath sample was collected in hyamine at 10 min. The amount of 14C collected at 10 min was expressed as follows: [(DPM/mmol CO2 collected)/(DPM administered)]x100xbody weight (kg). The presence of HP colonization was determined by examination of multiple endoscopic prepyloric antral biopsy specimens subjected to culture or a rapid urease test. For the purpose of this study, HP-positive patients were defined as those with characteristic bacteria as indicated by a positive result of either the culture or the rapid urease test; HP-negative patients were defined as those with negative findings on both the culture and the rapid urease test. Of the 184 cases, 99 (53.8%) were positive for HP infection, and 85 (46.2%), negative. The sensitivity and specificity of the rapid 10 min 14C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of HP-associated peptic ulcer disease were evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with a variable cut-off value from 1.5 to 4.5. When a cut-off value of 1.5 was selected, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity, 83.5%; when a cut-off value of 4.5 was selected, the sensitivity was 54.5% and the specificity, 97.6%. (orig.)

  8. Accuracy of a rapid 10-minute carbon-14 urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao Chiahung (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Wang Shyhjen (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Hsu Chungyuan (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Lin Wanyu (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine); Huang Chihkua (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Gastroenterology); Chen Granhum (Taichung Veterans General Hospital (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Gastroenterology)

    1993-08-01

    Urease in the human gastric mucosa is a marker for infection with Helicobacter pylori (HP), an organism which is associated with peptic ulcer disease. To detect gastric urease, we examined 184 patients (144 males, 40 females; mean age: 49.8[+-]15.6 years) with suspected peptic ulcer disease. Fasting patients were given orally 5 [mu]Ci of carbon-14 labelled urea. For each patient only one breath sample was collected in hyamine at 10 min. The amount of [sup 14]C collected at 10 min was expressed as follows: (DPM/mmol CO[sub 2] collected)/(DPM administered)x100xbody weight (kg). The presence of HP colonization was determined by examination of multiple endoscopic prepyloric antral biopsy specimens subjected to culture or a rapid urease test. For the purpose of this study, HP-positive patients were defined as those with characteristic bacteria as indicated by a positive result of either the culture or the rapid urease test; HP-negative patients were defined as those with negative findings on both the culture and the rapid urease test. Of the 184 cases, 99 (53.8%) were positive for HP infection, and 85 (46.2%), negative. The sensitivity and specificity of the rapid 10 min [sup 14]C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of HP-associated peptic ulcer disease were evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with a variable cut-off value from 1.5 to 4.5. When a cut-off value of 1.5 was selected, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity, 83.5%; when a cut-off value of 4.5 was selected, the sensitivity was 54.5% and the specificity, 97.6%. (orig.)

  9. 10 CFR 30.21 - Radioactive drug: Capsules containing carbon-14 urea for “in vivo” diagnostic use for humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radioactive drug: Capsules containing carbon-14 urea for...: Capsules containing carbon-14 urea for “in vivo” diagnostic use for humans. (a) Except as provided in...-14 urea (allowing for nominal variation that may occur during the manufacturing process) each,...

  10. LOW DOSE CAPSULE BASED 13C-UREA BREATH TEST COMPARED WITH THE CONVENTIONAL 13C-UREA BREATH TEST AND INVASIVE TESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane MATTAR

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context One of the limitations of 13C-urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori infection diagnosis in Brazil is the substrate acquisition in capsule presentation. Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate a capsule-based 13C-urea, manipulated by the Pharmacy Division, for the clinical practice. Methods Fifty patients underwent the conventional and the capsule breath test. Samples were collected at the baseline and after 10, 20 and 30 minutes of 13C-urea ingestion. Urease and histology were used as gold standard in 83 patients. Results In a total of 50 patients, 17 were positive with the conventional 13C-urea (75 mg breath test at 10, 20 and 30 minutes. When these patients repeated breath test with capsule (50 mg, 17 were positive at 20 minutes and 15 at 10 and 30 minutes. The relative sensitivity of 13C-urea with capsule was 100% at 20 minutes and 88.24% at 10 and at 30 minutes. The relative specificity was 100% at all time intervals. Among 83 patients that underwent capsule breath test and endoscopy the capsule breath test presented 100% of sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions Capsule based breath test with 50 mg 13C-urea at twenty minutes was found highly sensitive and specific for the clinical setting. HEADINGS- Helicobacter pylori. Breath Test. Urea, analysis.

  11. Microdose 14C urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori: a survey in Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Dowlatabadi Bazaz

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The carbon -14 urea breath test (UBTis a non-invasive and simple method for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. Attempts have been made to use lower doses of 14C-urea in the UBT in order to reduce the radiation risk of the test. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of a microdose (1 µCi [37 KBq] 14C-UBT in Iranian population for validation of its diagnostic accuracy against gold standard methods. Eighty and two patients were subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy as well as 14C-UBT in one week. Rapid urease test and histological examinations were used as gold standard. Breath samples were collected 10, 20 and 30 minute after ingestion of 1 µCi of 14C- urea solution and their activities were measured using a scintillation counter and expressed as counts per minute (cpm and disintegration per minute (dpm. Good agreement was observed between the 14C-UBT and gold standard for samples which were collected 20 minutes after 14C-urea administration. The 14CUBT showed 100% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 95.45% positive predictive value, 100% negative predictive value and 97.50% accuracy. The results of this study showed good concordance between the 14C-UBT and invasive methods.

  12. The fate of ingested 14C-urea in the urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metabolic fate of the radioactive carbon in the 14C-urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori was investigated in 18 subjects. After ingestion of labelled urea, breath was sampled for 24 h, and urine was collected for 3 days. Subjects were designated high or low expirers on the basis of their breath counts, and this agreed well with H. pylori serologic analyses. When given 185 or 37 kBq of 14C-urea, 51% of the label was recovered from the breath of high expirers, and 7% from the breath of low expirers. The mean combined urinary and breath recovery for high expirers was 86%, and for low expirers it was 97%. It is concluded that the long-term retention of 14C from ingested 14C-urea is low. The results enable a more accurate estimation to be made of radiation exposure resulting from the 14C-urea breath test. 16 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  13. 14C-urea breath test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high urease activity of Helicobacter pylori can be used to detect this bacterium by noninvasive breath tests. We have developed a 14C-urea breath test which uses 5 microCi 14C with 50 mg nonradioactive urea. Breath samples are collected at baseline and every 30 min for 2 h. Our study compared the outcome of the breath test to the results of histology and culture of endoscopically obtained gastric biopsies in 84 patients. The breath test discriminated well between the 50 positive patients and the 34 patients negative for Helicobacter pylori: the calculated sensitivity was 100%, specificity 88%, positive predictive value 93%, and negative predictive value 100%. Treatment with bismuth subsalicylate and/or ampicillin resulted in lower counts of exhaled 14CO2 which correlated with histological improvement in gastritis. The 14C-urea breath test is a better gold standard for the detection of Helicobacter pylori than histology and/or culture

  14. Diagnostic value of 14C urea breath test for Hp-associated peptic ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a method of 14C urea breath test and to evaluate the accuracy of the method in clinical diagnosis. Methods: Helicobacter pylori(Hp)-positive patients were defined either by positive bacterial culture or by positive rapid urease test of endoscopic biopsy specimens. 1384 patients with suspected peptic disease were underwent 14C urea breath test. Of them, 44 patients underwent dynamic test at various intervals to determine the optimal time for expiratory air collection. Results: Dynamic breath test showed that the highest point of 14C counts was at 30 min after administration of 14C urea. When a cut-off value of 3.5 was selected, the sensitivity and specificity was of the test for detecting Hp infection 96.7% and 96.5% respectively. Hp positive rate detected by 14C urea breath test in 1092 adults and 292 children was 50.4% and 81.2%. Conclusions: This study suggests that 14C urea breath test is a simple and reliable method for detection of Hp infection and is of high sensitivity and specificity

  15. Validation of 14 C-urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to validate the 14 C-urea breath test for use in diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. Thirty H. pylori positive patients, based on histologic test and thirty H. pylori negative patients by histology and anti-H pylori IgG entered the study. Fasting patients drank 5 uCi of 14 C-urea in 20 ml of water. Breath samples were collected at O, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 min. The difference of cpm values between the two groups was significant at all the time intervals, besides time 0 (p 14 C-urea breath test is highly accurate for Helicobacter pylori diagnosis. It is fast, simple and should be the non-invasive test used after treating Helicobacter pylori infection. (author)

  16. [14C]urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H. pylori is a potent urease producer, a characteristic that has been exploited in the development of the [14C]- and [13C]urea breath tests. The prevalence of H. pylori infection also is known to increase with advancing age; however, the individual patient's age has not routinely been considered when interpreting urea breath test results. The aim of this study was to validate a short, age-adjusted [14C]urea breath test for use in diagnosing H. pylori infections. Forty-one subjects (28 volunteers, 13 patients) underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsies. Subjects were defined as being H. pylori-positive if histology or culture was positive. In addition, all subjects completed a 120-min [14C]urea breath test. A logistic regression analysis adjusting for age was used to estimate the probability of H. pylori positivity as a function of the 14C values generated. Sixteen subjects were H. pylori-positive, and 25 were H. pylori-negative. The 14C values generated between 15 and 80 min were found to be equally predictive in identifying H. pylori-positive subjects. Advancing age was associated with a higher probability of H. pylori-positivity. By taking advantage of the statistical probabilities, older patients could be accurately diagnosed with H. pylori at lower 14C values. We found that [14C]urea breath test to be both a sensitive and specific test that can be abbreviated to a 30-min examination (total test time). Moreover, our mathematical model indicates that a patient's age should be considered in order to optimize interpretation of the [14C]urea breath test, although further observations are needed to confirm this model

  17. Imaging and retention measurements of selenium 75 homocholic acid conjugated with taurine, and the carbon 14 glycochol breath test to document ileal dysfunction due to late radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess ileal dysfunction in patients with complaints after pelvic radiation therapy, retention measurements and scintigraphic imaging with selenium 75 homocholic acid conjugated with taurine (75Se-HCAT), combined with the carbon 14 clycochol breath test, were evaluated in 39 patients. In 22 patients without ileal resection the results of the 75Se-HCAT test and the breath test differentiated between a normal functioning ileum (both tests negative) and ileal dysfunction as a cause of complaints (one or both tests positive). Among the patients with ileal dysfunction, the combination of both tests permitted those with bacterial overgrowth (breath test positive, 75Se-HCAT negative) to be separated from patients with evidence of bile acid malabsorption (75Se-HCAT positive, breath test positive or negative). In 17 patients with small-bowel resection, the 75Se-HCAT test helped to estimate the severity of bile acid malabsorption with implications for therapy. In this group the breath test was false-negative in 7 cases with abnormal 75Se-HCAT. Additional systematically performed scintigraphic imaging improved the accuracy of the 75Se-HCAT test, revealing cases with prolonged colonic accumulation of the radiopharmaceutical, causing spurious retention values. In conclusion, assessment of ileal dysfunction by nuclear medicine techniques in post-irradiation conditions provides information about the aetiology and therefore the possibility of adjustment in the clinical management. (orig.)

  18. Patient risk of 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter Pylori bacteria infection is determined by activity measurement of the exhaled 14C-carbon dioxide formed from 14C-urea in stomach. About 37 kBq of capsulated 14C -urea is administered to the patient. Because 14C is a weak beta emitter, patients receive certain radiation dose. This could be the only drawback of this method. Because of that in this paper the effective dose has been determined. On that basis the patient risk has been estimated. The results show that the patient effective dose is at the level of the daily background radiation. So, from the radiation protection point of view this method is very safe. Including other excellent performances of the method like sensitivity, selectivity, noninvasivity, fastness and low costs, it could be recommended in diagnosis and eradication of Helicobacter Pylori infections. (author)

  19. A methodological aspect of the 14C-urea breath test used in Helicobacter pylori diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of those investigations was optimisation of the performing time of the breath test with 14C-labelled urea which reveals Helicobacter pylori infection. It was analysed 117 species, preselected according to endoscopy and histopathology results, 56 of them have suffered from chronic gastritis and 61 from gastric ulcer disease. Using microbiology diagnosis (culture + IFP test) it was found that 86 species were H. pylori infected. This group of patients were next subject to investigations with the breath test with 14C-labelled urea. Measurements of radioactivity of breathe air have been carried out for 30 minutes. The obtained results allow us to maintain that the optimal time of duration of the test described above is 30 minutes. (author)

  20. 14C urea breath test kit- an evaluation of a compact, cost-effective kit for the detection of H. pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Helicobacter pylori infection of the gastric mucosa causes active chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. Carbon-14 urea breath testing has been well documented in its ability to detect the presence of H. pylori. The aims of this study were to evaluate and refine the test to substantially reduce costs and improve its simplicity, availability and accuracy. We reviewed the results of 138 patients who underwent 14C urea breath testing for the detection of H. pylori utilising a kit developed at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. Modifications to the standard technique that were assessed included the relevance of buccal cleansing, single sample v multiple sampling, use of alternative CO2 absorbers and sampling techniques. In those patients with positive biopsy results, a test sensitivity of 100% was achieved. No buccal cleansing is necessary (45% oral contamination without brushing teeth v 41% with). A single breath sample only at 15 min resulted in 100% sensitivity. Alternative cheaper and safer) CO2 absorbers such as KOH can be used. Based on these results, modifications to this well documented test have enabled us to substantially reduce costs, improve simplicity and safety and increase accuracy and availability of the test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori

  1. {sup 14}C urea breath test kit- an evaluation of a compact, cost-effective kit for the detection of H. pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellon, M.S. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA (Australia). Dept of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-03-01

    Full text: Helicobacter pylori infection of the gastric mucosa causes active chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. Carbon-14 urea breath testing has been well documented in its ability to detect the presence of H. pylori. The aims of this study were to evaluate and refine the test to substantially reduce costs and improve its simplicity, availability and accuracy. We reviewed the results of 138 patients who underwent {sup 14}C urea breath testing for the detection of H. pylori utilising a kit developed at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. Modifications to the standard technique that were assessed included the relevance of buccal cleansing, single sample v multiple sampling, use of alternative CO{sub 2} absorbers and sampling techniques. In those patients with positive biopsy results, a test sensitivity of 100% was achieved. No buccal cleansing is necessary (45% oral contamination without brushing teeth v 41% with). A single breath sample only at 15 min resulted in 100% sensitivity. Alternative (cheaper and safer) CO{sub 2} absorbers such as KOH can be used. Based on these results, modifications to this well documented test have enabled us to substantially reduce costs, improve simplicity and safety and increase accuracy and availability of the test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori.

  2. The microdose rapid 14C urea breath test compares well with the original rapid 14 breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The 14C urea breath test (CUBT) is a sensitive test used in the detection of H. pylori infection. The rapid 14CUBT using 185 KBq of 14C urea showed a sensitivity of 100% when tested in 36 patients. The aim of this study was to compare the results of the 14CUBT performed following the ingestion of 37KBq microdose 14C urea capsule (Bicapsule, Trimed) with the earlier method which uses 185 KBq 14C urea. 19 patients (nine female age 21-52 yrs) were studied. All subjects first underwent a 14CUBT with the microdose capsule and a single 15 minute post ingestion sample. An hour later the test was repeated but with a dose of 185 KBq 14C urea in liquid form. A normal result was taken as 2 = 0.92). This is shown above. The Rapid 14CUBT performed following the microdose capsule whilst reducing patient radiation exposure is an accurate test for the detection of H. pylori. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  3. 14C-urea breath test in the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter pylori infection is supposed to be one of the major causes of digestive and other diseases. Among a lot of invasive and non-invasive methods for its detection, none is ideal. The aim is an assessment of the Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach using breath test and comparison to other diagnostic methods, as well as following up the effects of therapy. In 17 patients with digestive discomfort, breath test, rapid urease test and histology were performed, while in 47 patients with proven HP infection the effect of therapy was followed up using breath test and clinical findings. Breath test was performed after per oral administration of the capsule of 14C urea (37 kBq). Findings of the breath and urease tests were in accordance in 14/17 patients (83%) while breath test and histology in 16/17 patients (94%). During follow-up of the therapeutic effects, breath test and clinical findings were in accordance in 43/47 patients (98%). Breath test can be useful in diagnosis but is a method of choice in following up the patients after therapy for H. pylori infection, because it is non-invasive, fast and precise. (author)

  4. Modified 13C-urea breath test and the detection of helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT) is one of the most important non-invasive methods for detecting Helicobacter pylori infection. This examination is innocuous, simple, highly accurate. While the major drawback of 13C-UBT is the higher cost compared with other methods which hold back its widely using. The author review focuses on the most recent advances in the machines used to measure the 13C isotope and on the most important improvements about the UBT, such as the use of lower dose 13C-urea tablet or capsule, the modification of test meal, a shortened collection time of exhalation sample and so on

  5. 13C Urea Breath Testing to Diagnose Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Deslandres, Colette

    1999-01-01

    The causal relationship between Helicobacter pylori colonization of the gastric mucosa and gastritis has been proven. Endoscopy and subsequent histological examination of antral biopsies have been regarded as the gold standard for diagnosing H pylori gastritis. The 13C urea breath test is a noninvasive test with a high specificity and sensitivity for H pylori colonization. Increasingly, it is becoming an important tool for use in diagnosing H pylori infection in paediatric populations. This t...

  6. Posttreatment 13C-Urea Breath Test Is Predictive of Antimicrobial Resistance to H. pylori After Failed Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Ai-Wen; Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Sheu, Bor-Shyang; Lin, Ching-Yih; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We tested whether a 13C-urea breath test can predict antimicrobial resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). METHODS Seventy patients who had failed triple eradication therapy and 108 untreated H. pylori-infected patients were given a 13C-urea breath test, endoscopy for culture of H. pylori, and assessment of clarithromycin resistance. The patients who had failed triple therapy then received 1 week of quadruple therapy to eradicate residual H. pylori. RESULTS The posttreatment value of the 13C-urea breath test expressed as excessive δ13CO2 per ml (ECR) was higher in patients with residual H. pylori with clarithromycin resistance than in those without (23.8 vs 10.6; P or≤15, the 13C-urea breath test was 88.6% sensitive and 88.9% specific in predicting clarithromycin resistance of residual H. pylori. The H. pylori eradication rate of the rescue regimen was higher for patients with a posttreatment ECR of the 13C-urea breath test ≤ 15 than for those with a value >15 (93.8% vs 73.3%; P .05). CONCLUSION The posttreatment value of the 13C-urea breath test is predictive of clarithromycin resistance in residual H. pylori after failed triple therapy and predicts efficacy of the rescue regimen. The value of the noninvasive test is promising for primary care physicians who need to select a rescue regimen without invasive H. pylori culture. PMID:15836546

  7. Accuracy of the 14 C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of simple, accurate and low-expense techniques for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection has great relevance. The objective was to determine the accuracy of a rapid 14 C-urea breath test (UBT) employing a very simple device for breathed air collection. One hundred and thirty-seven adult patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in the Clinical Hospital. The main measurements were histology for Helicobacter pylori (HP); urease test; urea breath test (UBT). One hundred and fifteen patients were infected by HP (HP +) according to both histology and the urease test, and 22 patients were HP-negative (HP-), according to the same two tests. UBT was capable of discriminating between HP + and HP- in a way that was similar to the combination of urease test and histology. When this combination of results is taken as the 'gold standard' for HP infection, the sensitivity and specificity of UBT are both greater than 90% for a range of cut-off points and breathed air collection times. It was concluded that the rapid UBT employing a simple device for air collection has a high accuracy in determining HP infection. (author)

  8. 13C-urea breath test analyzed with infrared isotope spectrometry for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have evaluated a 13C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. The 13C-test was analyzed with isotope-selective non-dispersive infrared spectrometry and compared with a 14C-urea breath test and the urease test in gastric mucosal biopsies. 46 patients were analyzed with breath tests, 23 patients were negative and 22 patients were positive with both methods. One patients was positive with 14C-method and negative with the 13C-urea breath test. 61 patients were analyzed with the 13C-urea breath test and the urease test. 30 patients were negative and 30 patients were positive with both methods, whereas one patient with a negative urease test had a positive breath test. 13C-urea breath test analyzed with isotope-selective non-dispersive infrared spectrometry is a fast, simple, non-radioactive, non-invasive, convenient and reliable method for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  9. Analysis of 14C-Urea breath test in patients with halitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the relationship between halitosis and the infection of helicobacter pylori (HP). Methods: The results of 14C-urea breath test of 59 normal people, 50 patients with halitosis only and 56 patients infected by both halitosis and digestive diseases were analyzed. Results: It showed that the 14C content and HP positive rate in group infected by both halitosis and digestive diseases were much higher than that of halitosis only group and normal people group (P<0.05). Conclusion: The infection of Helicobacter pylori is an important factor but not only factor of halitosis. (authors)

  10. Confirmation of eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection by 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a potent urease producer, a characteristic that has been exploited in the development of the 14C-urea breath test (UBT). 14C-UBT is being used as a highly reliable test for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. There is paucity of reports on the utility of this test to confirm the H. pylori eradication after its treatment. The study was conducted to determine the utility of 14C-UBT in confirming the eradication of H. pylori

  11. A preliminary investigation of 13C background in 13C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the 13C-urea breath test which is used for diagnosis of the helicobacter pylori infection (HP), the 13C background values are measured in 495 normal donors in Beijing, Shandong, Jiangsu and Guizhou. The fluctuation is less than 0.2% for these areas and is about 0.1% within the same area. Through replacing of the individual 13C background values by the averaged values from local areas, the coincident rate for diagnosis of HP is higher than 98%

  12. An optimized 13C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of H pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To validate an optimized 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT) protocol for the diagnosis of-H pylori infection that is cost-efficient and maintains excellent diagnostic accuracy.METHODS: 70 healthy volunteers were tested with two simplified 13C-UBT protocols, with test meal (Protocol 2)and without test meal (Protocol 1). Breath samples were collected at 10, 20 and 30 min after ingestion of 50 mg 13C-urea dissolved in 10 mL of water, taken as a single swallow, followed by 200 mL of water (pH 6.0) and a circular motion around the waistline to homogenize the urea solution. Performance of both protocols was analyzed at various cut-off values. Results were validated against the European protocol.RESULTS: According to the reference protocol, 65.7% individuals were positive for H pylori infection and 34.3% were negative. There were no significant differences in the ability of both protocols to correctly identify positive and negative H pylori individuals. However, only Protocol 1 with no test meal achieved accuracy, sensitivity,specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 100%. The highest values achieved by Protocol 2 were 98.57%, 97.83%, 100%, 100% and 100%, respectively.CONCLUSION: A 10 min, 50 mg 13C-UBT with no test meal using a cut-off value of 2-2.5 is a highly accurate test for the diagnosis of H pylori infection at a reduced cost.

  13. The interest of the 13C urea breath test for the diagnostic and monitoring of chronic duodenal ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duodenal ulcer is very frequently associated with Helicobacter pylori (Hp) present in the gastric mucous membrane. Breath tests with 13C-labelled urea have been carried out for the detection of Hp; these tests could be more sensitive than gastric biopsies, because of the heterogenous distribution of the bacteria in the mucous membrane. This breath test may be used repetitively and allows for a non-intrusive monitoring of the Hp eradication after treatment. 12 refs

  14. Influence of oral and esophageal commensal microflora on 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Seventeen gastritis patients (12M: 5F; mean age: 40 y) were studied to evaluate the influence of oral and esophageal urease producing commensal microflora on the 14C-urea breath test(UBT). To determine the influence of oral bacterial on UBT, 111 kBq14C-urea in 10 ml water was given orally to 6 H.pylori negative subjects, with the instructions to expectorate the tracer after 30 sec. To evaluate the influence normal esophageal flora on UBT, the tracer was given to 11 patients (4 H.pylori-ve :7 H.pylori +ve) in the capsule and again after 6 h in water. One mmol C02 was collected before and up to 30 min. of tracer administration and 14C content measured. When given as mouth wash, 14C-urea liquid caused an immediate peak of 14C02 at 2 min (4263 ± 1024 dpm) and thereafter declined sharply reaching base line value after 10 min (208 ±62 dpm). When tracer was given in capsule, 14C02 level in H.pylori +ve patients increased significantly within 5 min and peaked at 10-15 min. (8644 ± 987 dpm at 15 min). However, when the tracer was given in liquid, 14CO2 levels were almost similar to those of 14C-urea mouth wash experiment in H.pylori -ve patients. It is therefore, concluded that normal commensal microflora present in the oropharynx and esophagus contribute significantly to 14C-UBT. For the accurate diagnosis of H.pylori infection, the tracer should therefore, be given in the capsule

  15. [BREATH TEST WITH LOCALLY PRODUCED 13С-UREA (TBILISI, GEORGIA) IN DIAGNOSTICS OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girdaladze, A; Mosidze, B; Elisabedashvili, G; Kordzaia, D

    2016-04-01

    Comparative assessment of results of detection of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection by breath tests with standard and locally produced 13С urea was done in 213 patients with gastric and duodenal pathology, including those who already were undergone the surgery. Invasive endoscopic biopsy test including rapid urease test (RUT), smear cytology and histology were also performed (tissue samples were obtained after endoscopy or surgery). RUT was carried out with the help of URE-HP test kit. Serological test for Hp antibodies was performed by IFA using kit ELISA. 13С urea breath test (UBT) was conducted for the determination of 13/12CO2 in breath samples by using of infrared spectroscope. In I group (125 patients) UBT was performed with standard 13С urea, in II group (88 patients) with locally produced 13С urea. Based on 5 different methods of Hp infection testing Hp positivity in 172 (80,8%) and Hp negativity in 41 (19,2%) patients were revealed. 13С-UBT showed the highest diagnostic value (accuracy-97,5%, sensibility-97,0%, specificity-100%) in Hp infection diagnosis. The (accuracy, sensibility and specificity of breath test with locally issued 13С urea (98,7%, 98,5% and 100% respectively) are the same as those for BT with standard 13С urea (96,7%, 96,2% and 100% respectively). These parameters are also highly credible in control of treatment efficiency (96,7%, 90,0% and 100% respectively). The correlation of index DOB‰ of breath test with results of RUT was revealed In Hp positive patients. This can serve as a marker of Hp infection rate. Preliminarily, in pre-clinical experimental study, harmless of locally issued 13С-urea from point of view of acute/sub-acute toxicity and allergy development was confirmed. The advantages (noninvasiveness, simplicity, rapidity, safety) and high diagnostic value of UBT (with both standard as well as locally produced 13С-urea) provide the opportunity to offer 13С-UBT as screening method of Hp infection diagnosis. It also

  16. 13[C]-urea breath test as a novel point-of-care biomarker for tuberculosis treatment and diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep S Jassal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pathogen-specific metabolic pathways may be detected by breath tests based on introduction of stable isotopically-labeled substrates and detection of labeled products in exhaled breath using portable infrared spectrometers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested whether mycobacterial urease activity could be utilized in such a breath test format as the basis of a novel biomarker and diagnostic for pulmonary TB. Sensitized New-Zealand White Rabbits underwent bronchoscopic infection with either Mycobacterium bovis or Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Rabbits were treated with 25 mg/kg of isoniazid (INH approximately 2 months after infection when significant cavitary lung pathology was present. [(13C] urea was instilled directly into the lungs of intubated rabbits at selected time points, exhaled air samples analyzed, and the kinetics of delta(13CO(2 formation were determined. Samples obtained prior to inoculation served as control samples for background (13CO(2 conversion in the rabbit model. (13CO(2, from metabolic conversion of [(13C]-urea by mycobacterial urease activity, was readily detectable in the exhaled breath of infected rabbits within 15 minutes of administration. Analyses showed a rapid increase in the rate of (13CO(2 formation both early in disease and prior to treatment with INH. Following INH treatment, all evaluable rabbits showed a decrease in the rate of (13CO(2 formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Urea breath testing may provide a useful diagnostic and biomarker assay for tuberculosis and for treatment response. Future work will test specificity for M. tuberculosis using lung-targeted dry powder inhalation formulations, combined with co-administering oral urease inhibitors together with a saturating oral dose of unlabeled urea, which would prevent the delta(13CO(2 signal from urease-positive gastrointestinal organisms.

  17. First-time urea breath tests performed at home by 36,629 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlerup, Søren; Andersen, Rikke Charlotte; Nielsen, Birgitte Sperling Wilms;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the current study was (1) to describe the use of a (13) C-urea breath test (UBT) that was performed by patients at their homes as a part of a test-and-treat strategy in primary care and (2) to investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in patients taking a first......, positive H. pylori declined over the time course of the study (women: 19.6% in 2003 to 17.6% in 2009, p < .01; men: 20.7% in 2003 to 16.9% in 2009, p < .001). Patients who were older than 45 years had significantly higher positive H. pylori results than younger patients. CONCLUSIONS: A test......-and-treat system was possible to implement that allowed patients to perform UBTs at their homes. The results of the first-time UBTs demonstrated that approximately one of five patients who presented with dyspepsia in the clinical setting of Danish primary care was infected with H. pylori....

  18. Cost effectiveness analysis of population-based serology screening and 13C-Urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori to prevent gastric cancer: A markov model

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Feng; Luo, Nan; Lee, Hin-Peng

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To compare the costs and effectiveness of no screening and no eradication therapy, the population-based Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) serology screening with eradication therapy and 13C-Urea breath test (UBT) with eradication therapy.

  19. Nondispersive isotope-selective infrared spectroscopy: A new analytical method for 13C-urea breath tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, stable isotope techniques in breath tests using 13C-labeled substrates are limited to a few centers equipped with expensive and complex isotope spectrometry (IRMS). Although breath samples can be mailed to these centers, widespread application of 13C-breath tests would be more feasible with a cheaper and more practicable analysis system at hand. The authors therefore tested the newly developed nondispersive isotope-selective infrared spectrometer (NDIRS) with reference to IRMS in a clinical setting, comparing the results of both techniques in 538 consecutive 13C-urea breath tests performed for the detection of helicobacter pylori infection. With NDIRS five false-positive and three false-negative results were observed; that is, the sensitivity of NDIRS was 98.3%, and the specificity was 98.6%. When running this large number of breath tests in 3 days, the NDIRS proved to be a reliable, stable, and easy-to-operate analytical tool, which is well qualified for gastroenterologic application in the diagnostic routine. Both the price and the easy handling of NDIRS will facilitate the widespread use of the noninvasive stable isotope technique for 13C breath test. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  20. Dual therapy for third-line Helicobacter pylori eradication and urea breath test prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshihiro Nishizawa; Hidekazu Suzuki; Takama Maekawa; Naohiko Harada; Tatsuya Toyokawa; Toshio Kuwai; Masanori Ohara

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of a dual therapy with rabeprazole and amoxicillin (AMX) as an empiric third-line rescue therapy.In patients with failure of first-line treatment with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-AMX-clarithromycin regimen and second-line treatment with the PPI-AMX-metronidazole regimen,a third-line eradication regimen with mbeprazole (10 mg q.i.d.) and AMX (500 mg q.i.d.) was prescribed for 2 wk.Eradication was confirmed by the results of the 13C-urea breath test (UBT) at 12 wk after the therapy.A total of 46 patients were included; however,two were lost to followup.The eradication rates as determined by per-protocol and intention-to-treat analyses were 65.9% and 63.0%,respectively.The pretreatment UBT results in the subjects showing eradication failure; those patients showing successful eradication comprised 32.9 ± 28.8 permil and 14.8 ± 12.8 permil,respectively.The pretreatment UBT results in the subjects with eradication failure were significantly higher than those in the patients with successful eradication (P =0.019).A low pretreatment UBT result (≤ 28.5 permil) predicted the success of the eradication therapy with a positive predictive value of 81.3% and a sensitivity of 89.7%.Adverse effects were reported in 18.2% of the patients,mainly diarrhea and stomatitis.Dual therapy with rabeprazole and AMX appears to serve as a potential empirical third-line strategy for patients with low values on pretreatment UBT.

  1. Intragastric acidification increases the sensitivity of 14C-urea breath test in patients taking a proton pump inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate if intragastric acidification at the ingestion of 14C-urea can decrease the likelihood of false-negative (FN) results of urea breath test (UBT) in patients taking a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Methods: Twenty-three patients with positive 14C-UBT (UBT-1) results underwent an acid suppression treatment with omeprazole 40 mg/d for 14 d. On day 13, patients underwent second standard UBT (YBT-2). On day 14, patients underwent a modified UBT (UBT-3), which included consuming 200 mL of 0.1 mol/L citric acid solution 30 min before and at the administration of 14C-urea. Mean 14CO2 expiration and the number of FN results were compared for the three UBTs. Results: Omeprazole caused a significant decrease in mean 14CO2 excretion between UBT-1[(5.57 +- 3.90) Bq/mmol] and UBT-2[(1.98 +- 1.42) Bq/mmol, t=5.867, P=0.000]. Omeprazole caused 10(43.5%) FN UBT-2 results. Mean 14CO2 expiration in UBT-3 [(4.93 +- 3.77) Bq/mmol] was greater than that in UBT-2 (t=-4.538, P=0.000). UBT-3 caused only 2 FN results (8.7%, x2=6.66, P14C-urea increases 14Co2 expiration and decreases FN 14C-UBT results in patients taking PPI

  2. A study on Helicobacter pylori infection in different parts of Karnataka using 14C urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non-invasive 14C Urea Breath Test (14C UBT) technique was used for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection in symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. The test utilises 14CO2 released due to the action of urease produced by H pylori. 14C UBT is found to be a simple alternative for endoscopic examinations for diagnosing H pylori infection. The test was performed on 664 subjects from various parts of Karnataka. Among them 34.9% of the subjects were found to be H pylori positive, and the infection rate varied from 16.9% to 38.6%. (author)

  3. Increased accuracy of the carbon-14 D-xylose breath test in detecting small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth by correction with the gastric emptying rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the accuracy of 14C-D-xylose breath test for detecting bacterial overgrowth can be increased by correction with the gastric emptying rate of 14C-D-xylose. Ten culture-positive patients and ten culture-negative controls were included in the study. Small-intestinal aspirates for bacteriological culture were obtained endoscopically. A liquid-phase gastric emptying study was performed simultaneously to assess the amount of 14C-D-xylose that entered the small intestine. The results of the percentage of expired 14CO2 at 30 min were corrected with the amount of 14C-D-xylose that entered the small intestine. There were six patients in the culture-positive group with a 14CO2 concentration above the normal limit. Three out of four patients with initially negative results using the uncorrected method proved to be positive after correction. All these three patients had prolonged gastric emptying of 14C-D-xylose. When compared with cultures of small-intestine aspirates, the sensitivity and specificity of the uncorrected 14C-D-xylose breath test were 60% and 90%, respectively. In contrast, the sensitivity and specificity of the corrected 14C-D-xylose breath test improved to 90% and 100%, respectively. (orig./MG)

  4. Increased accuracy of the carbon-14 D-xylose breath test in detecting small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth by correction with the gastric emptying rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Chisen [Div. of Gastroenterology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Chen Granhum [Div. of Gastroenterology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Kao Chiahung [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Wang Shyhjen [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Peng Shihnen [Div. of Gastroenterology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Huang Chihkuen [Div. of Gastroenterology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Poon Sekkwong [Div. of Gastroenterology, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1995-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the accuracy of {sup 14}C-D-xylose breath test for detecting bacterial overgrowth can be increased by correction with the gastric emptying rate of {sup 14}C-D-xylose. Ten culture-positive patients and ten culture-negative controls were included in the study. Small-intestinal aspirates for bacteriological culture were obtained endoscopically. A liquid-phase gastric emptying study was performed simultaneously to assess the amount of {sup 14}C-D-xylose that entered the small intestine. The results of the percentage of expired {sup 14}CO{sub 2} at 30 min were corrected with the amount of {sup 14}C-D-xylose that entered the small intestine. There were six patients in the culture-positive group with a {sup 14}CO{sub 2} concentration above the normal limit. Three out of four patients with initially negative results using the uncorrected method proved to be positive after correction. All these three patients had prolonged gastric emptying of {sup 14}C-D-xylose. When compared with cultures of small-intestine aspirates, the sensitivity and specificity of the uncorrected {sup 14}C-D-xylose breath test were 60% and 90%, respectively. In contrast, the sensitivity and specificity of the corrected {sup 14}C-D-xylose breath test improved to 90% and 100%, respectively. (orig./MG)

  5. Turnover of carbon in the 13C-urea breath test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To obtain a standard protocol for the application of 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT) analyzed by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS) to detect helicobacter pylori infection in the population is necessary to know the behavior of the turnover of 13C during the test in different individuals. The aims of this study was to find out a pattern for the turnover of the 13C in the 13C-UBT, analyzed by IRMS, in patients infected with H. pylori, in a Brazilian population, to define a protocol test application. We found that the isotopic ratio 13C/12C in expired CO2 from patients infected with H. pylori and subjected to 13C-UBT does not follow a single pattern of behavior. However this behavior can be similar in subjects having the same maximum values following an inverse proportional relationship between the maximum value and the time of appearance in the curve. (author)

  6. Investigation of the association between glaucoma and Helicobacter pylori infection using the {sup 14}C-urea breath test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzcu, Esra Ayhan; Aydogan, Fusun; Motor, Vicdan Koksaldi; Ilhan, Ozgur; Daglioglu, Mutlu Cihan; Coskun, Mesut; Parlakfikirer, Nihan; Keskin, Ugurcan, E-mail: drayhant@hotmail.com [Medical Faculty, Mustafa Kemal University, Hatay (Turkey)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: to investigate the association between glaucoma and Helicobacter pylori infection by evaluating for the presence of H. pylori infection in patients with glaucoma using the 14C-urea breath test (14C-UBT). Methods: Using 14C-UBT, H. pylori infection positivity was compared between a group of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma and a control group with normal intraocular pressure and a normal optic disc or normal perimetry. Results: the 14C-UBT was positive in 18 (51.42%) out of 35 patients in the glaucoma group and in 15 (42.85%) out of 35 patients in the control group. H. pylori infection positivity rates were similar between the glaucoma and control groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: according to the 14C-UBT, there is no association between primary open-angle glaucoma and H. pylori infection. (author)

  7. Investigation of the association between glaucoma and Helicobacter pylori infection using the 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to investigate the association between glaucoma and Helicobacter pylori infection by evaluating for the presence of H. pylori infection in patients with glaucoma using the 14C-urea breath test (14C-UBT). Methods: Using 14C-UBT, H. pylori infection positivity was compared between a group of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma and a control group with normal intraocular pressure and a normal optic disc or normal perimetry. Results: the 14C-UBT was positive in 18 (51.42%) out of 35 patients in the glaucoma group and in 15 (42.85%) out of 35 patients in the control group. H. pylori infection positivity rates were similar between the glaucoma and control groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: according to the 14C-UBT, there is no association between primary open-angle glaucoma and H. pylori infection. (author)

  8. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori in gastric cancer in a south-east Asian population by 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter pylori is believed to play an important role in the aetiology of gastric cancer. There is a great variability in seropositivity and histological frequency of H. pylori in gastric cancer. The present prospective study investigates the prevalence of H. pylori infection in gastric cancer patients using 14C-urea breath testing. Patients with endoscopic biopsy-proven gastric cancer were fasted for 6 h prior to ingesting 18.5 x 104 Bq of 14C-urea cocktail orally. Breath samples were collected after 20 min by AS/King them to blow into a hyamine solution and measurements were read in a scintillation counter. Fifty out of 51 patients (98%) with gastric cancer were positive on the 14C-urea breath test compared to 29 patients (61%) who were positive on histology. There was no association between sex, age or tumour site, stage, differentiation, Lauren type and H. pylori status. The test was negative in one patient with cardiac tumour in which histology of the resected specimen was also negative for the bacteria. Active H. pylori infection is highly prevalent in gastric cancer in a South-East Asian population. The 14C-urea breath test is a highly sensitive method for detecting the presence of H. pylori even in gastric adenocarcinoma irrespective of the stage

  9. Carbon-14 waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 occurs in nature, but is also formed in nuclear reactors. Because of its long half-life and the biological significance of carbon, releases from nuclear facilities could have a significant radiological impact. Waste management strategies for carbon-14 are therefore of current concern. Carbon-14 is present in a variety of waste streams both at reactors and at reprocessing plants. A reliable picture of the production and release of carbon-14 from various reactor systems has been built up for the purposes of this study. A possible management strategy for carbon-14 might be the reduction of nitrogen impurity levels in core materials, since the activation of 14N is usually the dominant source of carbon-14. The key problem in carbon-14 management is its retention of off-gas streams, particularly in the dissolver off-gas stream at reprocessing plants. Three alternative trapping processes that convert carbon dioxide into insoluble carbonates have been suggested. The results show that none of the options considered need be rejected on the grounds of potential radiation doses to individuals. All exposures should be as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. If, on these grounds, retention and disposal of carbon-14 is found to be beneficial, then, subject to the limitations noted, appropriate retention, immobilization and disposal technologies have been identified

  10. A simplified 13C-Urea breath test (13C-UBT) in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, T.; Bartholomeusz, F.D. L.; Bellon, M.S.; Chatterton, B.E. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide. SA (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-06-01

    Full text: The Urea Breath Test (UBT) is an accurate, noninvasive means of assessing the presence of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. Two tests are currently available, using 13C- and 14C-labelled urea, respectively. 13C is a nonradioactive isotope, unlike 14C, but the 13C-UBT is technically more challenging. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of a simplified 13C-UBT with no test meal, using the 14C-UBT as the previously validated standard. 76 studies were performed on 72 patients; 4 patients performed the test twice. 28 patients were female, 44 male. The mean age was 51.1 years (range 23-86 years). 42 patients presented for post-eradication follow up, and 30 for initial diagnosis. All subjects underwent a 14C-UBT with a 15 minute sample. The 13C-UBT was then performed without a test meal and the breath samples obtained at baseline and 20 minutes. Of the 14C-UBT studies, 27 were positive, ranging from 1372 to 10,987 DPM (Normal <1000 DPM), and 49 were negative, range 177-946 DPM. 26 of the 13C-UBT studies were positive, with a Delta value ranging from 4.29-47.89 (Normal: Delta <3.5), and 50 were negative, range -0.20-2.80. There were 1 false-positive and 2 false-negative 13-UBT studies. This yielded a sensitivity of 92.6% and specificity of 98.0% for the simplified 13C-UBT. From these results we conclude that the simplified 13C-UBT is an accurate means of detecting the presence of Helicobacter pylori within the stomach

  11. A simplified 13C-Urea breath test (13C-UBT) in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Urea Breath Test (UBT) is an accurate, noninvasive means of assessing the presence of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. Two tests are currently available, using 13C- and 14C-labelled urea, respectively. 13C is a nonradioactive isotope, unlike 14C, but the 13C-UBT is technically more challenging. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of a simplified 13C-UBT with no test meal, using the 14C-UBT as the previously validated standard. 76 studies were performed on 72 patients; 4 patients performed the test twice. 28 patients were female, 44 male. The mean age was 51.1 years (range 23-86 years). 42 patients presented for post-eradication follow up, and 30 for initial diagnosis. All subjects underwent a 14C-UBT with a 15 minute sample. The 13C-UBT was then performed without a test meal and the breath samples obtained at baseline and 20 minutes. Of the 14C-UBT studies, 27 were positive, ranging from 1372 to 10,987 DPM (Normal <1000 DPM), and 49 were negative, range 177-946 DPM. 26 of the 13C-UBT studies were positive, with a Delta value ranging from 4.29-47.89 (Normal: Delta <3.5), and 50 were negative, range -0.20-2.80. There were 1 false-positive and 2 false-negative 13-UBT studies. This yielded a sensitivity of 92.6% and specificity of 98.0% for the simplified 13C-UBT. From these results we conclude that the simplified 13C-UBT is an accurate means of detecting the presence of Helicobacter pylori within the stomach

  12. Detection of H. pylori infection by breath ammonia following urea ingestion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Penault, C.; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.

    Singapore : World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd, 2005, s. 393-399 ISBN 981-256-284-2 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : helicobacter pyroli * SIFT-MS technique * breath ammonia Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  13. Validity and cost comparison of "carbon urea breath test for diagnosis of H Pylori in dyspeptic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shahid Rasool; Shahab Abid; Wasim Jafri

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To validate and compare the cost of microdose 14C urea breath test (UBT) with histology and rapid urease test for the diagnosis of H Pylori.METHODS: Ninety-four consecutive patients with dyspeptic symptoms undergoing gastroscopy were enrolled. Gastric biopsies were taken for histology and rapid urease test. UBT was performed after gastroscopy by microdose "C urea capsules. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of UBT were calculated and compared with histology and rapid urease test. Cost comparison of these tests was also performed.RESULTS: H pylori was diagnosed by histology and rapid urease test in 66 (70%) and 61 (65%) patients, while 14C UBT detected infection in 63 (67%). Accuracy of UBT was 93% in comparison with histology while its positive and negative predictive values were 97% and 84%, respectively. Comparison of 14C UBT with rapid urease test gives an accuracy of 96%, with positive and negative predictive values of 95% and 97%, respectively. These results were highly reproducible with a Kappa test (P value < 0.001). Cost of histology or rapid urease test with gastroscopy was 110 USD or 95 USD respectively while the cost of UBT was 15 USD.CONCLUSION: Microdose 14C UBT was comparable to histology and rapid urease test. 14C UBT is an economical, self sufficient and suitable test to diagnose active Hpylori infection in less developed countries.

  14. Influence of citric acid solution as a test drink in the 14C-urea breath test for diagnosis of helicobactor pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different test meals are used in the 14C-urea breath test (UBT) for the detection of H.pylori infection. The purpose of using test meals is to slow gastric emptying and to maximise the distribution of the urea substrate within the stomach so as to increase the area and time of contact between bacteria and substrate. Recently, citric acid has been suggested as an improved liquid test meal. The mechanism is not known and could act by delaying gastric emptying, decreasing the pH at the site of the bacteria, or both

  15. Occult H. pylori infection partially explains ‘false-positive’ results of 13C-urea breath test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Lázaro, María J; Lario, Sergio; Sánchez-Delgado, Jordi; Montserrat, Antònia; Quílez, Elisa M; Casalots, Alex; Suarez, David; Campo, Rafel; Brullet, Enric; Junquera, Félix; Sanfeliu, Isabel; Segura, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    Background In a previous study, UBiT-100 mg, (Otsuka, Spain), a commercial 13C-urea breath test omitting citric acid pre-treatment, had a high rate of false-positive results; however, it is possible that UBiT detected low-density ‘occult’ infection missed by other routine reference tests. We aimed to validate previous results in a new cohort and to rule out the possibility that false-positive UBiT were due to an ‘occult’ infection missed by reference tests. Methods Dyspeptic patients (n = 272) were prospectively enrolled and UBiT was performed, according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Helicobacter pylori infection was determined by combining culture, histology and rapid urease test results. We calculated UBiT sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (with 95% CI). In addition, we evaluated ‘occult’ H. pylori infection using two previously-validated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for urease A (UreA) and 16 S sequences in gastric biopsies. We included 44 patients with a false-positive UBiT, and two control groups of 25 patients each, that were positive and negative for all H. pylori tests. Results UBiT showed a false-positive rate of 17%, with a specificity of 83%. All the positive controls and 12 of 44 patients (27%) with false-positive UBiT were positive for all two PCR tests; by contrast, none of our negative controls had two positive PCR tests. Conclusions UBiT suffers from a high rate of false-positive results and sub-optimal specificity, and the protocol skipping citric acid pre-treatment should be revised; however, low-density ‘occult’ H. pylori infection that was undetectable by conventional tests accounted for around 25% of the ‘false-positive’ results. PMID:26535122

  16. Can the C-14 urea breath test reflect the extent and degree of ongoing helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The C-14 urea breath test (C-14 UBT) is the most specific noninvasive method to detect Helicobacter (H) pylori infection. We investigated if the C-14 UBT can reflect the presence and degree of H. pylori detected by gastroduodenoscopic biopsies (GBx). One hundred fifty patients (M:F=83:67,age 48.6±11.2 yrs) underwent C-14 UBT, rapid urease test (CLO test) and GBx on the same day. For the C-14 UBT, a single breath sample was collected at 10 minutes after ingestion of C-14 urea (137 KBq) capsule and counting was done in a liquid scintillation counter for 1 minute, and the results were classified as positive (≥200 dpm), intermediate ( 50 ∼ 199 dpm) or negative ( < 50 dpm). The results of CLO tests were classified as positive or negative according to color change. The results of GBx on giemsa stain were graded 0 (normal) to 4(diffuse) according to the distribution of H. pylori by the Wyatt method. We compared C-14 UBT results with GBx grade as a gold standard. In the assessment of the presence of H. pylori infection, the C-14 UBT global performance yielded sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of 92.5%, 88.4%, 97.1%, 88.4% and 91.3%, respectively. However, the CLO test had sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of 83.2%, 81.4%, 91.8%, 81.4% and 82.7%, respectively. The quantitative values of the C-14 UBT were 45 ± 27 dpm in grade 0, 707 ±584 dpm in grade 1, 1558±584 dpm in grade 2, 1851±604 dpm in grade 3, and 2719 ± 892 dpm in grade 4. A significant correlation (r=0.848, p<0.01) was found between C-14 UBT and the grade of distribution of H. pylori infection on GBx with giemsa stain. We conclude that the C-14 UBT is a highly accurate, simple and noninvasive method for the diagnosis of ongoing H. pylori infection and reflects the degree of bacterial distribution

  17. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Infants and Toddlers in South America: Concordance between [13C]Urea Breath Test and Monoclonal H. pylori Stool Antigen Test

    OpenAIRE

    Queiroz, Dulciene Maria Magalhães; Saito, Mayuko; Rocha, Gifone Aguiar; Rocha, Andreia Maria Camargos; de Melo, Fabrício Freire; Checkley, William; Braga, Lúcia Libanez Bessa C.; Silva, Igor Simões; Gilman, Robert H.; Crabtree, Jean E.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate noninvasive tests for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection in very young children are strongly required. We investigated the agreement between the [13C]urea breath test ([13C]UBT) and a monoclonal ELISA (HpSA) for detection of H. pylori antigen in stool. From October 2007 to July 2011, we enrolled 414 infants (123 from Brazil and 291 from Peru) of ages 6 to 30 months. Breath and stool samples were obtained at intervals of at least 3 months from Brazilian (n = 415) and Peruvian (n...

  18. A citric acid solution is an optimal test drink in the 13C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    OpenAIRE

    J. E. Domínguez-Muñoz; Leodolter, A; Sauerbruch, T; Malfertheiner, P

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT) is a simple, non-invasive and reliable test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. The duration of the test, the timing of breath sampling, and the accuracy of the method vary according to the test meal used. AIM: To identify the optimal test meal or drink for rapid and accurate performance of the 13C-UBT for the detection of H pylori infection. PATIENTS: Eighty patients with dyspeptic symptoms were included. Of these, 48 patients ha...

  19. Application of 13C-urea breath test in patients diagnosed as H. pylori-negative by gastroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    13C-urea breath test(13C-UBT)was used to evaluate infection rate of H. pylori(HP) and effect of HP eradication in patients diagnosed as HP-negative by histology and rapid urease test. Patiens without gastrointestinal disorders were set as control group. Within 640 patients diagnosed as HP-negative by histology and rapid urease test, there were 389 patients showed HP-positive by 13C-UBT. The positive rate of HP was 60.8%. 389 patients diagnosed as HP- positive by 13C-UBT were treated with PPI-based triple therapy, PPI-based double therapy and single PPI therapy, respectively. After treatment, the negative rate of 13C-UBT was 83.8%, 18.4% and 3.3%, respectively. The results showed significant difference between three kinds of therapy (P13C-UBT could improve the diagnostic rate of HP to patients who diagnosed as HP-negative by histology and rapid urease test. (authors)

  20. Turnover of carbon in the {sup 13}C-urea breath test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Vladimir E.; Andreazzi, Mariana; Cury, Caio S.; Bassetto Junior, Carlos A.Z.; Rodrigues, Maria A.M.; Ducatti, Carlos, E-mail: vladimir@ibb.unesp.br, E-mail: ducatti@ibb.unesp.br, E-mail: mariana.andreazazi@gmail.com, E-mail: caiocury@hotmail.com, E-mail: juniorbassett@hotmail.com, E-mail: mariar@fmb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    To obtain a standard protocol for the application of {sup 13}C-urea breath test ({sup 13}C-UBT) analyzed by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS) to detect helicobacter pylori infection in the population is necessary to know the behavior of the turnover of {sup 13}C during the test in different individuals. The aims of this study was to find out a pattern for the turnover of the {sup 13}C in the {sup 13}C-UBT, analyzed by IRMS, in patients infected with H. pylori, in a Brazilian population, to define a protocol test application. We found that the isotopic ratio {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C in expired CO{sub 2} from patients infected with H. pylori and subjected to {sup 13}C-UBT does not follow a single pattern of behavior. However this behavior can be similar in subjects having the same maximum values following an inverse proportional relationship between the maximum value and the time of appearance in the curve. (author)

  1. "VALIDATION OF 13C-UREA BREATH TEST WITH NON DISPERSIVE ISOTOPE SELECTIVE INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION: A SURVEY IN IRANIAN POPULATION"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Davood Beiki

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The urea breath test (UBT which is carried out with 13C or 14C labeled urea is one of the most important non invasive methods for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection. Application of 13C-UBT is becoming increasingly popular because of its non radioactive nature which makes it suitable for diagnostic purposes in children and women of child bearing ages. While isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS is generally used to detect 13C in expired breath, this instrument is expensive and recently non dispersive isotope selective infrared (NDIR spectroscopy which is a lower cost technique has been employed as a reliable counterpart for IRMS in small clinics. The aim of this study was to assess the validity of NDIR spectroscopy technique in Iranian population in comparison with histological examination, rapid urease test and 14C-urea breath test as gold standard. Seventy six patients with dyspepsia were underwent 13CUBT for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. Good agreements were found between the 13C-UBT and gold standard methods. The 13C-UBT showed 100% sensitivity, 97.3% specificity, 97.56% positive predictive value, 100% negative predictive value and 98.65% accuracy. On the basis of these results it could be concluded that 13C-UBT performed with NDIR spectroscopy is a reliable, accurate and non invasive diagnostic tool for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in the Iranian population.

  2. Ten years experience of isotopic breath test with special reference to Helicobacter pylori detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhas, M.; Tricht, L.Van; Verschaeren, A.; Delmotte, E.; Martin, P

    1997-12-31

    The use of the carbon 14 urea breath test by comparison with culture for campylobacter of gastric endoscopic biopsies is studied in 91 patients. They were divided into 2 groups. The first group consisted of 53 patients examined by gastric endoscopy and carbon 14 urea breath test. In this population, gastric biopsies were taken at different regions of the stomach and duodenum. The breath test was performed within 3 hours after endoscopy. The second group consisted of 38 asymptomatic patients whom 23 were parent of children with campylobacter positive gastritis. For the whole population, neither antibiotic therapy nor bismuth medication was administrated within the 15 days before the realization of the test. Results were expressed in % of injected dose/mmole of CO{sub 2} after correction of endogenous production of CO{sub 2}. In conclusion, carbon 14 urea breath test is a reliable noninvasive test for detection and follow-up of gastritis caused by a widespread microorganism. Also, the precision of both tests, {sup 14} C-UBT and {sup 13} C-UBT, are compared simultaneously in 84 adults patients. The results were expressed as % of administered dose expired in 30 minutes. A better precision is observed with the {sup 13} C-UBT

  3. Ten years experience of isotopic breath test with special reference to Helicobacter pylori detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of the carbon 14 urea breath test by comparison with culture for campylobacter of gastric endoscopic biopsies is studied in 91 patients. They were divided into 2 groups. The first group consisted of 53 patients examined by gastric endoscopy and carbon 14 urea breath test. In this population, gastric biopsies were taken at different regions of the stomach and duodenum. The breath test was performed within 3 hours after endoscopy. The second group consisted of 38 asymptomatic patients whom 23 were parent of children with campylobacter positive gastritis. For the whole population, neither antibiotic therapy nor bismuth medication was administrated within the 15 days before the realization of the test. Results were expressed in % of injected dose/mmole of CO2 after correction of endogenous production of CO2. In conclusion, carbon 14 urea breath test is a reliable noninvasive test for detection and follow-up of gastritis caused by a widespread microorganism. Also, the precision of both tests, 14 C-UBT and 13 C-UBT, are compared simultaneously in 84 adults patients. The results were expressed as % of administered dose expired in 30 minutes. A better precision is observed with the 13 C-UBT

  4. MIN 14C UBT: A combination of gastric basal transit and 14C-urea breath test for the detection of helicobacter pylori infection in human beings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that the 14C-urea breath test (UBT) performed at different times combined with the study of the gastric basal transit, which evaluates the intragastric displacement of a labeled solution under fasting conditions, has the advantage of being representative of the whole stomach surface and constitutes a non-aggressive test for the detection of H. pylori. This test, which has been called MIN 14C UBT, is a modification of the conventional 14C UBT in which low volumes of a solution of 14C-urea together with 99mTc-sulfur colloid are administered. The 99mTc-sulfur colloid is not absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract and has the great advantage of allowing the 'visualization' of the transit of the 14C-urea within the gastrointestinal tract. This modification allows the simultaneous determination of the production of the 14CO2 and the place where this process occurs. The results show that there is a good correlation between the images obtained and the breath samples collected. We found that this test has a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 96% for H. pylori detection

  5. Biokinetics and radiation dosimetry of 14C-labelled triolein, urea, glycocholic acid and xylose in man. Studies related to nuclear medicine 'breath tests' using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    14C-labelled substances have been used in biomedical research and clinical medicine for over 50 years. Physicians and scientists however, often hesitate to use these substances in patients and volunteers because the radiation dosimetry is unclear. In this work detailed long-term biokinetic and dosimetric estimation have been carried out for four clinically used 14C-breath tests: 14C-triolein (examination of fat malabsorption), urea (detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach), glycocholic acid and xylose (examination of bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine) by using the highly sensitive accelerator mass-spectrometry (AMS) technique. The AMS technique has been used to measure low 14C concentrations in small samples of exhaled air, urine, faeces and tissue samples and has improved the base for the estimation of the absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to man. The high sensitivity of the AMS system has also made it possible to perform 14C breath tests on patient groups which were earlier subject for restriction (e.g. small children). In summary, our results show that for adult patients - and in the case of 14C-urea breath test also for children down to 3 years of age - the dose contributions are comparatively low, both described as organ doses and as effective doses. For adults, the latter is: 14C-glycocholic acid - 0.4 mSv/MBq, 14C-triolein - 0.3 mSv/MBq, 14C-xylose - 0.1 mSv/MBq and 14C-urea - 0.04 mSv/MBq. Thus, from a radiation protection point of view there is no reason for restrictions in using any of the 14C-labelled radiopharmaceutical included in this work in the activities normally used (0.07-0.2 MBq for a 70 kg patient)

  6. Evaluation of [13C]Urea Breath Test and Helicobacter pylori Stool Antigen Test for Diagnosis of H. pylori Infection in Children from a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, Luciana de Carvalho Costa; Rocha, Gifone Aguiar; Rocha, Andreia Maria Camargos; de Moura, Sílvia Beleza; de Figueiredo Soares, Taciana; Esteves, Ana Maria Braz; Nogueira, Ana Margarida Miguel Ferreira; Cabral, Mônica Maria Demas Álvares; de Carvalho, Anfrisina Sales Teles; Bitencourt, Paulo; Ferreira, Alexandre; Queiroz, Dulciene Maria Magalhães

    2003-01-01

    The [13C]urea breath test (13C-UBT) and Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test (HpSA) for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection in children were validated. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 93.8, 99.1, 97.8, and 98.0%, respectively, for the 13C-UBT and 96.9, 100, 100, and 98.0%, respectively, for HpSA. Both tests are appropriate for diagnosing H. pylori infection in children. PMID:12843086

  7. Evaluation of [13C]Urea Breath Test and Helicobacter pylori Stool Antigen Test for Diagnosis of H. pylori Infection in Children from a Developing Country

    OpenAIRE

    Cardinali, Luciana de Carvalho Costa; Rocha, Gifone Aguiar; Rocha, Andreia Maria Camargos; de Moura, Sílvia Beleza; de Figueiredo Soares, Taciana; Esteves, Ana Maria Braz; Nogueira, Ana Margarida Miguel Ferreira; Cabral, Mônica Maria Demas Álvares; de Carvalho, Anfrisina Sales Teles; Bitencourt, Paulo; Ferreira, Alexandre; Queiroz, Dulciene Maria Magalhães

    2003-01-01

    The [13C]urea breath test (13C-UBT) and Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test (HpSA) for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection in children were validated. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 93.8, 99.1, 97.8, and 98.0%, respectively, for the 13C-UBT and 96.9, 100, 100, and 98.0%, respectively, for HpSA. Both tests are appropriate for diagnosing H. pylori infection in children.

  8. Comparison of the 13C-urea breath test and the endoscopic phenol red mucosal pH test in the quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection loading

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Young-Seok; Chae, Hiun-Suk; Jang, Se Na; Kim, Jin-Soo; Son, Hye Suk; Kim, Hyung-Keun; Kim, Byung-Wook; Han, Sok-Won; Choi, Kyu-Yong; Lee, Hae Kyung; Chang, Eun Deok

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims The 13C-urea breath test (UBT) is a semiquantitative test for measuring Helicobacter pylori infection loading. H. pylori produces ammonia, which elevates the pH of the gastric mucosa and is detectable via endoscopy using a phenol red indicator. We evaluated whether this test could be used to diagnose H. pylori infection and whether phenol red staining was correlated with 13C-UBT results. Methods One hundred and twenty-three patients participated. The UBT was performed after in...

  9. Compilation of carbon-14 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review and critical analysis was made of the original sources of carbon-14 in the graphite moderator and reflector zones of the eight Hanford production reactors, the present physical and chemical state of the carbon-14, pathways (other than direct combustion) by which the carbon-14 could be released to the biosphere, and the maximum rate at which it might be released under circumstances which idealistically favor the release. Areas of uncertainty are noted and recommendations are made for obtaining additional data in three areas: (1) release rate of carbon-14 from irradiated graphite saturated with aerated water; (2) characterization of carbon-14 deposited outside the moderator and reflector zones; and (3) corrosion/release rate of carbon-14 from irradiated steel and aluminum alloys

  10. Application of isotope-selective non-dispersive infrared spectrometry for the evaluation of the 13C-urea breath test: comparison with three concordant methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coelho L.G.V.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to compare the performance of isotope-selective non-dispersive infrared spectrometry (IRIS for the 13C-urea breath test with the combination of the 14C-urea breath test (14C-UBT, urease test and histologic examination for the diagnosis of H. pylori (HP infection. Fifty-three duodenal ulcer patients were studied. All patients were submitted to gastroscopy to detect HP by the urease test, histologic examination and 14C-UBT. To be included in the study the results of the 3 tests had to be concordant. Within one month after admission to the study the patients were submitted to IRIS with breath samples collected before and 30 min after the ingestion of 75 mg 13C-urea dissolved in 200 ml of orange juice. The samples were mailed and analyzed 11.5 (4-21 days after collection. Data were analyzed statistically by the chi-square and Mann-Whitney test and by the Spearman correlation coefficient. Twenty-six patients were HP positive and 27 negative. There was 100% agreement between the IRIS results and the HP status determined by the other three methods. Using a cutoff value of delta-over-baseline (DOB above 4.0 the IRIS showed a mean value of 19.38 (minimum = 4.2, maximum = 41.3, SD = 10.9 for HP-positive patients and a mean value of 0.88 (minimum = 0.10, maximum = 2.5, SD = 0.71 for negative patients. Using a cutoff value corresponding to 0.800% CO2/weight (kg, the 14C-UBT showed a mean value of 2.78 (minimum = 0.89, maximum = 5.22, SD = 1.18 in HP-positive patients. HP-negative patients showed a mean value of 0.37 (minimum = 0.13, maximum = 0.77, SD = 0.17. IRIS is a low-cost, easy to manage, highly sensitive and specific test for H. pylori detection. Storing and mailing the samples did not interfere with the performance of the test.

  11. Comparative performance of capsulated Vs non-capsulated 14C-urea breath test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventionally, 14C-urea breath test (14C-UBT) is employed as a 'gold standard' technique for the detection of active Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection, to follow up the patients after its eradication and for epidemiological evaluations. Due to high accuracy of this test and other benefits it is recommended as the best option for 'test-and-treat' strategy in primary health care centers. So far no appropriate study has been done to compare the performance of 14C-UBT using capsulated versus non-capsulated protocol. In this study, we employed a novel technique of performing capsulated 14C-UBT with simultaneous monitoring the dynamic movement of capsule and compared the results with non-capsulated protocol. (author)

  12. The optimization of the estimation of carbon-14 in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The urinalysis method for carbon-14 currently used by the bioassay laboratory of the Dosimetric Research Branch at CRNL has been tested and optimized for both sensitivity and efficiency. Urine is first treated with an enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of urea, the major carbon-containing component of urine; carbon dioxide is then liberated by the measured addition of excess acid and collected in 2-aminoethanol. The aminoethanol can be directly counted by the addition of a liquid scintillation cocktail. This method can be used to measure both the specific activity, (Bq/g-carbon) or the total activity of carbon-14 released from the urine sample

  13. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in School and Pre-School Aged Children with C-14 Urea Breath Test and the Association with Familial and Environmental Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çınar, Alev; Sadıç, Murat; İkbal Atılgan, Hasan; Baskın, Aylin; Koca, Gökhan; Demirel, Koray; Korkmaz, Meliha

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection in pre-school and school age children with C-14 urea breath test, and to explore its association with age and socioeconomic factors in Turkey. Methods: Hp infection status was determined by using Urea Breath Test (UBT). Patients who had previous gastric surgery, Hp eradication treatment or equivocal UBT results were excluded. A questionnaire was administered to elicit information on gender, age, ABO/Rh blood group type, presence of gastric disease in the family, domestic animal in the household, and treatment for idiopathic Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA). Results: This retrospective study included 500 pediatric patients (179 boys, 321 girls, mean age 10.7±4.3 years) of whom 62 (12.4%) were aged ≤6 years and 438 (87.6%) were aged 7 to 16 years. Helicobacter pylori (Hp) was positive in 245 (49%) cases. In the pre-school age group, 21/62 cases (34%) had positive UBT while in the school age group 224/438 children (51%) had positive UBT. A family history of dyspepsia and pet ownership were not associated with Hp positivity. Hp positive 76 (29.8%) children were on IDA treatment but this was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The Hp infection positivity rate was 49% in the pediatric age study group. The positivity rate was significantly lower at preschool age than school age, and it increased with age. There was no association with gender, ABO/Rh blood groups, presence of domestic pets, IDA, or history of gastric disease in the family. PMID:26316471

  14. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in School and Pre-School Aged Children with C-14 Urea Breath Test and the Association with Familial and Environmental Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alev Çınar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp infection in pre-school and school age children with C-14 urea breath test, and to explore its association with age and socioeconomic factors in Turkey. Methods: Hp infection status was determined by using Urea Breath Test (UBT. Patients who had previous gastric surgery, Hp eradication treatment or equivocal UBT results were excluded. A questionnaire was administered to elicit information on gender, age, ABO/Rh blood group type, presence of gastric disease in the family, domestic animal in the household, and treatment for idiopathic Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA. Results: This retrospective study included 500 pediatric patients (179 boys, 321 girls, mean age 10.7±4.3 years of whom 62 (12.4% were aged ≤6 years and 438 (87.6% were aged 7 to 16 years. Helicobacter pylori (Hp was positive in 245 (49% cases. In the pre-school age group, 21/62 cases (34% had positive UBT while in the school age group 224/438 children (51% had positive UBT. A family history of dyspepsia and pet ownership were not associated with Hp positivity. Hp positive 76 (29.8% children were on IDA treatment but this was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The Hp infection positivity rate was 49% in the pediatric age study group. The positivity rate was significantly lower at preschool age than school age, and it increased with age. There was no association with gender, ABO/Rh blood groups, presence of domestic pets, IDA, or history of gastric disease in the family.

  15. Urease-positive bacteria in the stomach induce a false-positive reaction in a urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Takako; Mabe, Katsuhiro; Hanawa, Tomoko; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated the influence of urease-positive non-Helicobacter pylori bacteria on the results of a urea breath test (UBT) to evaluate the diagnostic utility of a UBT using film-coated [(13)C]urea tablets. The UBT was performed in 102 patients treated with a proton pump inhibitor and antibiotics for the eradication of H. pylori. Urease-producing bacteria other than H. pylori were isolated and identified from the oral cavity and stomach. In 4/102 patients, the UBT gave false-positive results. These false-positive results were found to be caused by the presence of urease-positive bacteria in the oral cavity and stomach. Five bacterial species with urease activity (Proteus mirabilis, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae and Staphylococcus aureus) were subsequently isolated from the oral cavity and/or stomach. As there was no correlation between the in vitro urease activity of urease-positive non-H. pylori bacteria and the UBT value, and all of the patients with a false-positive UBT result were suffering from atrophic gastritis, it is possible that the false-positive results in the UBT were a result of colonization of urease-positive bacteria and gastric hypochlorhydric conditions. Thus, for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection using a UBT, the influence of stomach bacteria must be considered when interpreting the results. PMID:18566138

  16. A methodological aspect of the {sup 14}C-urea breath test used in Helicobacter pylori diagnosis; Wybrany aspekt metodologiczny testu oddechowego z mocznikiem znakowanym stosowanego w diagnostyce zakazenia Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopanski, Z.; Niziol, J.; Micherdzinski, J.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.; Cienciala, A.; Lasa, J.; Witkowska, B. [Szpital Wojskowy, Cracow (Poland)]|[Institute of Physics and Nuclear Techniques, Academy of Mining and Metallurgy, Cracow (Poland)]|[Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    The main purpose of those investigations was optimisation of the performing time of the breath test with {sup 14}C-labelled urea which reveals Helicobacter pylori infection. It was analysed 117 species, preselected according to endoscopy and histopathology results, 56 of them have suffered from chronic gastritis and 61 from gastric ulcer disease. Using microbiology diagnosis (culture + IFP test) it was found that 86 species were H. pylori infected. This group of patients were next subject to investigations with the breath test with {sup 14}C-labelled urea. Measurements of radioactivity of breathe air have been carried out for 30 minutes. The obtained results allow us to maintain that the optimal time of duration of the test described above is 30 minutes. (author) 38 refs, 2 tabs, 1 fig

  17. Comparison of three stool antigen assays with the 13C- urea breath test for the primary diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection and monitoring treatment outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hooton, Carmel

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The urea breath test (UBT) is the gold-standard non-invasive test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection, however, the lack of availability of the UBT due to the high cost of the test, and in particular the need for expensive analytical instrumentation, limits the usefulness of this method. Stool antigen assays may offer an alternative non-invasive method for the diagnosis of infection. OBJECTIVE: To compare the accuracy of three stool antigen assays (HpSA, IDEIA HpStAR, and ImmunoCard STAT) against the UBT for the primary diagnosis of H. pylori infection and for monitoring treatment outcome. METHODS: A total of 102 patients attending two gastroenterology day-case clinics for the investigation of dyspepsia were included. Each patient provided breath and stool samples for analysis. Patients who tested positive for H. pylori by the validated UBT were prescribed triple therapy and invited to return for repeat breath and stool sample analysis 6 weeks post-treatment. RESULTS: Of the 102 patients tested, 48 were diagnosed with H. pylori infection by the UBT. The HpSA assay interpreted 38 of these as positive (79% sensitive). Of the 54 UBT-negative patients the HpSA assay interpreted all 54 as negative (100% specific). The IDEIA HpStAR assay correctly identified 44 patients as positive (92% sensitive) and 50 as negative (92.5% specific). The ImmunoCard STAT assay interpreted 38 patients as positive (79% sensitive) and 52 as negative (96.3% specific). CONCLUSION: The findings indicate that the IDEIA HpStAR stool antigen kit is the most accurate assay of the three assays evaluated, and possibly represents a viable alternative to the UBT for the primary diagnosis of H. pylori infection and for monitoring treatment outcome.

  18. Defense against environmental ammonia toxicity in the African lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus: Bimodal breathing, skin ammonia permeability and urea synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loong, A M; Tan, J Y L; Wong, W P; Chew, S F; Ip, Y K

    2007-11-15

    This study aimed to determine how the African lungfish Protopterus aethiopicus defended against ammonia toxicity when confronted with high concentrations (30 or 100 mmoll(-1)) of environmental ammonia. Exposure to 100 mmoll(-1) of NH(4)Cl for 1 or 6 days had no significant effect on the rate of O(2) uptake from water or from air, and the rate of total O(2) consumption. Using an Ussing-like apparatus, we report for the first time that the skin of P. aethiopicus had low permeability (1.26 x 10(-4) micromol min(-1)cm(-1)) to NH(3)in vitro. Indeed, the influx of exogenous ammonia into fish exposed to 30 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl was low (0.117 micromol min(-1) 100g(-1) fish). As a result, P. aethiopicus could afford to maintain relatively low ammonia contents in plasma, muscle, liver and brain even after 6 days of exposure to 100 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl. Surprisingly, fish exposed to 30 or 100 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl had comparable ammonia contents in the muscle and the brain in spite of the big difference (70 mmoll(-1)) in environmental ammonia concentrations. Significant increases in urea contents occurred in various tissues of fish exposed to 30 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl for 6 days, but there were no significant differences in tissue urea contents between fish exposed to 30 mmoll(-1) and 100 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl. Between days 3 and 6, the rate of urea excretion in fish exposed to 30 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl was significantly greater than that of the control. By contrast, there was no significant difference in urea excretion rates between fish exposed to 100 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl and control fish throughout the 6-day period, and such a phenomenon has not been reported before for other lungfish species. Thus, our results suggest that P. aethiopicus was capable of decreasing the NH(3) permeability of its body surface when exposed to high concentrations of environmental ammonia. Indeed, after 6 days of exposure to 100 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl, the NH(3) permeability constant of the skin (0.55 x 10(-4) micromol min(-1

  19. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Infants and Toddlers in South America: Concordance between [13C]Urea Breath Test and Monoclonal H. pylori Stool Antigen Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Mayuko; Rocha, Gifone Aguiar; Rocha, Andreia Maria Camargos; Melo, Fabrício Freire; Checkley, William; Braga, Lúcia Libanez Bessa C.; Silva, Igor Simões; Gilman, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate noninvasive tests for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection in very young children are strongly required. We investigated the agreement between the [13C]urea breath test ([13C]UBT) and a monoclonal ELISA (HpSA) for detection of H. pylori antigen in stool. From October 2007 to July 2011, we enrolled 414 infants (123 from Brazil and 291 from Peru) of ages 6 to 30 months. Breath and stool samples were obtained at intervals of at least 3 months from Brazilian (n = 415) and Peruvian (n = 908) infants. [13C]UBT and stool test results concurred with each other in 1,255 (94.86%) cases (kappa coefficient = 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.87 to 0.92). In the H. pylori-positive group, delta-over-baseline (DOB) and optical density (OD) values were positively correlated (r = 0.62; P < 0.001). The positivity of the tests was higher (P < 0.001; odds ratio [OR] = 6.01; 95% CI = 4.50 to 8.04) in Peru (546/878; 62.2%) than in Brazil (81/377; 21.5%) and increased with increasing age in Brazil (P = 0.02), whereas in Peru it decreased with increasing age (P < 0.001). The disagreement between the test results was associated with birth in Brazil and female gender but not with age and diarrhea. Our results suggest that both [13C]UBT and the stool monoclonal test are reliable for diagnosing H. pylori infection in very young children, which will facilitate robust epidemiological studies in infants and toddlers. PMID:24006009

  20. Comparison of a monoclonal antigen stool test (Hp StAR) with the 13C-urea breath test in monitoring Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francesco Perri; Michele Quitadamo; Rosalba Ricciardi; Ada Piepoli; Rosa Cotugno; Annamaria Gentile; Alberto Pilotto; Angelo Andriulli

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the agreement between a mAb-based stool test (HP StAR) and the urea breath test (UBT) in monitoring (H pylori) infection after eradication therapy.METHODS: Patients with discordant results on UBT and Hp StAR underwent endoscopy with biopsies for rapid urease test, culture, and histology to confirm H pylori status.RESULTS: Among 250 patients (50±14 years), 240 (96.0%) had concordant UBT and Hp StAR tests with a significant correlation between DOB and A values (R = 0.87; P<0.0001).The remaining 10 (4.0%) patients had discordant tests (positive Hp StAR and negative UBT) with the Hp StAR inaccurate in five cases (false positive) and UBT inaccurate in the other five cases (false negative). The "maximal expected" sensitivity, specificity, +PV, -PV, +LR, and -LR were 91%, 100%, 100%, 97.4%, ∞, and 8.2 respectively,for the UBT, and 100%, 97.4%, 91%, 100%, 38.8, and 0,respectively, for the Hp StAR. Overall accuracy for both tests was 98%.CONCLUSION: Both the UBT and the Hp StAR are equally accurate in monitoring H pylori infection. Nowadays,the choice of the "best" non-invasive H pylori test in the post-treatment setting should be done not only in terms of diagnostic accuracy but also in view of cost and local facilities.

  1. Cost effectiveness analysis of population-based serology screening and 13C-Urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori to prevent gastric cancer: A markov model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xie; Nan Luo; Hin-Peng Lee

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To compare the costs and effectiveness of no screening and no eradication therapy, the populationbased Hdlicobacter pylori (H pylori) serology screening with eradication therapy and 13C-Urea breath test (UBT)with eradication therapy.METHODS: A tarkov model simulation was carried out in all 237900 Chinese males with age between 35 and 44 from the perspective of the public healthcare provider in Singapore. The main outcome measures were the costs, number of gastric cancer cases prevented, life years saved, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs)gained from screening age to death. The uncertainty surrounding the cost-effectiveness ratio was addressed by one-way sensitivity analyses.RESULTS: Compared to no screening, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was $16166 per life year saved or $13571 per QALY gained for the serology screening, and $38792 per life year saved and $32525 per QALY gained for the UBT. The ICER was $477079 per life year saved or $390337 per QALY gained for the UBT compared to the serology screening. The costeffectiveness of serology screening over the UBT was robust to most parameters in the model.CONCLUSION: The population-based serology screening for H pylori was more cost-effective than the UBT in prevention of gastric cancer in Singapore Chinese males.

  2. Comparative diagnostic value of the breath test and the urine test with 14C-urea in the detection of the Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among 92 patients with chronic gastritis we conducted a synchronous diagnosis of the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection using a culture and a serological test (IFP), in conjunction with breath and urine tests involving 14C-urea (BTU-C14 and UTU-C14). The infection was confirmed by isolation in 71 persons (77.2%), the presence of specific IgG in the blood serum was found in 75 (81.5%). In comparison, the BTU-C14 indicated a group of 77 people (83.7%) as infected, and the UTU-C14 a group of 76 (82.6%). In order to determine the diagnostic value (sensitivity, specificity and efficiency) of the latter tests, the results were compared with those of the culture and of the serological tests. It was found that the BTU-C14 test used showed a 100% sensitivity, a 89.5% specificity and a 97.9% efficiency. The UTU-C14 test showed a 100.0% sensitivity, a 94.4% specificity and a 98.9% efficiency in the detection of the H. pylori infection. (author)

  3. Pre-treatment urea breath test results predict the efficacy of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy in patients with active duodenal ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yung-Chih Lai; Jyh-Chin Yang; Shih-Hung Huang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association of pre-treatment 13C-urea breath test (UBT) results with H pyloridensity and efficacy of eradication therapy in patients with active duodenal ulcers.METHODS: One hundred and seventeen consecutive outpatients with active duodenal ulcer and H pyloriinfection were recruited. H pylori density was histologically graded according to the Sydney system. Each patient received lansoprazole (30 mg b.i.d.), clarithromycin (500 mg b.i.d.) and amoxicillin (1 g b.i.d.) for 1 week. According to pre-treatment UBT values, patients were allocated into low (<16%o),intermediate (16-35%o), and high (>35%o) UBT groups.RESULTS: A significant correlation was found between pre-treatment UBT results andHpyloridensity (P<0.001).H pylorieradication rates were 94.9%, 94.4% and 81.6%in the low, intermediate and high UBT groups, respectively (per protocol analysis, P=0.11). When patients were assigned into two groups (UBT results ≤35%o and >35%o),the eradication rates were 94.7% and 81.6%, respectively (P=0.04).CONCLUSION: The intragastric bacterial load of H pylori can be evaluated by UBT, and high pre-treatment UBT results can predict an adverse outcome of eradication therapy.

  4. Validation of the String Test for the Recovery of Helicobacter pylori from Gastric Secretions and Correlation of Its Results with Urea Breath Test Results, Serology, and Gastric pH Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Javier; Camorlinga, Margarita; Pérez-Peréz, Guillermo; Gonzalez, Gerardo; Muñoz, Onofre

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of the string culture test to isolate Helicobacter pylori from gastric secretions of 28 volunteers was studied. With the urea breath test (UBT) as the “gold standard,” the string culture test showed a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 100%. The results of string culture did not correlate with the UBT results, with serum antibody levels, or with the pH levels of gastric secretions.

  5. Carbon-14 in tree rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate how reliably the carbon 14 content of tree rings reflects that of atmospheric carbon dioxide, two types of determinations were carried out: (1) carbon 14 determinations in annual rings from the beginning of this century until 1974 and (2) carbon 14 determinations in synchronous wood from the North American bristlecone pine and from European oak trees, dendrochronologically dated to have grown in the third and fourth century B.C. The first series of measurements showed that bomb-produced radiocarbon was incorporated in wood at a time when it was converted from sapwood to heartwood, whenever radiocarbon from bomb testing was present in the atmosphere. The second series showed that wood more than 2000 years old and grown on two different continents at different altitudes had, within the limits of experimental error, the same radiocarbon content. This work and other experimental evidence, obtained in part by other laboratories, show that tree rings reflect the average radiocarbon content of global atmospheric carbon dioxide accurately within several parts per mil. In rare cases, deviations of up to 10 parts per thousand may be possible. This means that a typical single radiocarbon date for wood or charcoal possesses an intrinsic uncertainty (viz., an estimated ''one-sigma error'' in addition to all the other errors) of the order of +-50 years. This intrinsic uncertainty is independent of the absolute age of the sample. More accurate dates can, in principle, be obtained by the so-called method of ''wiggle matching.''

  6. Contamination by Helicobacter pylori measured by the 13C-Urea-Breath-Test and nutritional status of children with chronic diarrhoea syndrome in Havana City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diarrhoea morbidity shows a slow increasing tendency during the last 10 years in Cuba. In young children the compromise of the gastric acid barrier after a chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is discussed in pathogenic relation to gastritis, duodenal ulcer, chronic diarrhoea, short stature, malabsorption of the B-complex vitamins and malnutrition. The Hp contamination level of the population of the developing world is estimated to be considerably high. Endoscopic studies carried out in Cuban subjects with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of 60 to 100%. The current treatment of chronic diarrhoea does not include the elimination of Hp. Cuban children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of more than 60%. There are not available data on the contamination level in apparently healthy Cuban children or those with chronic diarrhoea. In March-April 2000 the prevalence of Hp infection measured in serum by chromatographic immunoassay for detection of Hp IgG antibodies was found to be 94 % in 20 infants and young children with persistent chronic diarrhoea and 100% in 11 apparently healthy children in Havana City. Children with diarrhoea showed a more evident affection of their nutritional status and a higher percentage of positive personal or familiar history of parasitism, giardiasis, gastritis, ulcer, stomatitis and glositis. The validity of the immunological tests in infants is discussed from the point of view of the antibody transference with breast milk. In a sample of 16 different children studied by the 13C-Urea-Breath-Test the contamination level was 50% of the children not affected by diarrhoea and only one of the 6 children with diarrhoea showed positive values

  7. Biokinetics and radiation dosimetry of {sup 14}C-labelled triolein, urea, glycocholic acid and xylose in man. Studies related to nuclear medicine 'breath tests' using accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnarsson, Mikael

    2002-08-01

    {sup 14}C-labelled substances have been used in biomedical research and clinical medicine for over 50 years. Physicians and scientists however, often hesitate to use these substances in patients and volunteers because the radiation dosimetry is unclear. In this work detailed long-term biokinetic and dosimetric estimation have been carried out for four clinically used {sup 14}C-breath tests: {sup 14}C-triolein (examination of fat malabsorption), urea (detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach), glycocholic acid and xylose (examination of bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine) by using the highly sensitive accelerator mass-spectrometry (AMS) technique. The AMS technique has been used to measure low {sup 14}C concentrations in small samples of exhaled air, urine, faeces and tissue samples and has improved the base for the estimation of the absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to man. The high sensitivity of the AMS system has also made it possible to perform {sup 14}C breath tests on patient groups which were earlier subject for restriction (e.g. small children). In summary, our results show that for adult patients - and in the case of {sup 14}C-urea breath test also for children down to 3 years of age - the dose contributions are comparatively low, both described as organ doses and as effective doses. For adults, the latter is: {sup 14}C-glycocholic acid - 0.4 mSv/MBq, {sup 14}C-triolein - 0.3 mSv/MBq, {sup 14}C-xylose - 0.1 mSv/MBq and {sup 14}C-urea - 0.04 mSv/MBq. Thus, from a radiation protection point of view there is no reason for restrictions in using any of the {sup 14}C-labelled radiopharmaceutical included in this work in the activities normally used (0.07-0.2 MBq for a 70 kg patient)

  8. Comparison between the 13C-urea breath test and stool antigen test for the diagnosis of childhood Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As noninvasive tests for Helicobacter pylori infection, the 13C-urea breath test (UBT) and stool antigen test have been widely used. In children, however, there are few studies reporting which test shows superior performance. The purpose of this study was to compare the 13C-UBT and stool antigen test for their accuracy in diagnosing. H. pylori infection in children. A total of 123 Japanese children, ages 2 to 17 years (mean, 12 years) who underwent gastric biopsies for H. pylori infection were studied. The diagnoses included gastritis (n=55), gastric ulcer (n=5), duodenal ulcer (n=20), iron-deficiency anemia (n=7), and other conditions (n=36). The cutoff value of the 13C-UBT was defined to be 3.5 per mille. The stool antigen test was performed using the H. pylori stool antigen (HpSA) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (Premier Platinum HpSA). In 16 patients who received eradication therapy, the 13C-UBT and HpSA were repeated 2 months after treatment. Based on biopsy tests, 60 children were infected with H. pylori and 63 children were not. For the 13C-UBT, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 95.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86.1%-99.0%), 98.4% (95% CI, 91.5%-100%), and 96.4% (95% CI, 93.6%-99.9%), respectively. For the HpSA, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 983.% (95% CI, 90.8%-100%), 98.4% (95% CI, 91.2%-100%), and 98.3% (95% CI, 96.0%-100%), respectively. There were no significant differences between the performance of these two tests. In the assessment of H. pylori eradication, the results of 13C-UBT and HpSA agreed with those of biopsy tests. The 13C-UBT and the HpSA are equally accurate for the diagnosis of active H. pylori infection in Japanese children. (author)

  9. Chemical separation of carbon -14 in radwastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 has a long half-life of 5730 years and decays by beta emission of 156KeV to the stable nuclide, Nitrogen-14. Carbon-14 is produced mostly by the neutron activation of naturally occurring oxygen-17 in water molecules of the reactor coolant and Nitrogen-14 from nitrogen gas dissolved in the reactor coolant. Most of these carbon-14 are known to be discharged as gaseous wastes. The chemical forms of the gaseous emissions of carbon-14 from PWR stations range from 10∼26% as 14CO2 and 74∼90% as 14CH4 and other hydrocarbons, compared to about 95% as 14CO2 and 5% as 14CH4 and other hydrocarbons in BWR station gaseous emissions. Knowles reported that although the exact nature of these organic compounds was not identified, most of the carbon-14 was present as forms of organic species in a PWR primary coolant. Praudic measured the contents of the total organic and inorganic carbon-14 in waste trench leachates of New York commercial LLW disposal site and found that 74 ∼ 98% of carbon-14 was organic. In 1991, Dayal and Kirby reported that carbon-14 identified in LLW trench leachates from the Maxi Fiats site were carbonate and bicarbonate as inorganic carbon-14 and citric acid and palmitic acid as organic carbon-14. Thus concentrated Boric acid waste solutions(CB) which has generated from domestic NPP were classified into organic and inorganic carbon-14 with wet oxidation method in order to grasping a existing ratio of organic carbon-14 from total one due to affecting an environment

  10. The interest of the {sup 13}C urea breath test for the diagnostic and monitoring of chronic duodenal ulcer; Interet du test respiratoire a l`uree {sup 13}C dans le diagnostic et le suivi de l`ulcere duodenal chronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau-Tsangaris, M. [INBIOMED, 69 - Lyon (France); Centarti, M.; Mion, F.; Minaire, Y. [Hopital Edouard-Herriot, 69 - Lyon (France); Brazier, J.L. [Faculte de Pharmacie, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1994-12-31

    Duodenal ulcer is very frequently associated with Helicobacter pylori (Hp) present in the gastric mucous membrane. Breath tests with {sup 13}C-labelled urea have been carried out for the detection of Hp; these tests could be more sensitive than gastric biopsies, because of the heterogenous distribution of the bacteria in the mucous membrane. This breath test may be used repetitively and allows for a non-intrusive monitoring of the Hp eradication after treatment. 12 refs.

  11. Carbon-14 Bomb-Pulse Dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B A

    2007-12-16

    Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons during the 1950s and early 1960s doubled the concentration of carbon-14 atmosphere and created a pulse that labeled everything alive in the past 50 years as carbon moved up the food chain. The variation in carbon-14 concentration in time is well-documented and can be used to chronologically date all biological materials since the mid-1950s.

  12. Xylitol improves compliance of patients to 13C- urea breath test%木糖醇改善13C-尿素呼气试验患者的依从性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李园; 吴本俨

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of xylitol on the texture of reagents used in 13C- urea breath test and the value of DOB test. Methods One hundred and twenty patients were randomly divided into 0.05g or 0.10g xylitol group and non xylitol group. Texture of reagents used in 13C-urea breath test was assessed by the patients themselves in the xylitol group. DOB value was detected twice by paired test. Results The acceptable texture was significantly higher in 0.05g and 0.11g xylitol group than in non xylitol group(43.3% and 66.7% vs 20.0% and 33.3%, P<0.05) and in patients receiving 0.10g xylitol than in those receiving 0.05g xylitol(P<0.05). However, no difference was observed in DOB value between patients receiving 0.05g or 0.l0g xylitol(P>0.05). Conclusion Adding an appropriate amount of xylitol can improve the texture and compliance of patients to 13C-urea breath test. The best result can be achieved by adding 0.10g xylitol with no effect on the DOB value in 13C-urea breath test.%目的 观察木糖醇对13C-尿素呼气试验检测试剂的口感及DOB检测值的影响.方法 120例病人同时进行不添加和添加木糖醇0.05g和0.10g组,自评检测的试剂口感,并配对检验两次检测的DOB值变化.结果 木糖醇0.05g组和0.10g组,口感可接受百分比分别为43.3%和66.7%,显著高于未添加木糖醇时检测(分别为20.0%和33.3%,P<0.05),添加木糖醇0.10g口感可耐受百分比显著高于添加0.05g组(P<0.05).两种剂量木糖醇对DOB检测值均无显著性影响(P>0.05).结论 在13C-尿素呼气试验检查试剂中加入适量木糖醇可改善口感、提高病人依从性、其中添加0.10g木糖醇效果最优,对13C-尿素呼气试验的DOB值无影响.

  13. Carbon 14 and tritium radioactivity of alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of measuring carbon 14 radioactivity of alcohols has been perfected in order to establish the correct determination of synthetic alcohol added to fermentation alcohol. The specific carbon and tritium activity of alcohol of different origins have been determined for 1973 and 1974. The Suess effect and nuclear fall-out are observed

  14. Synthesis of carbon-14 labeled doxylamine succinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doxylamine succinate, N,N-dimethyl-2-[1-phenyl-1-(2-pyridinyl)-ethoxy]ethanamine succinate is an antihistamine used primarily as a sedative. Carbon-14 labeled doxylamine succinate, required for toxicological studies, was synthesized in two steps starting from 2-benzoyl pyridine. (author)

  15. One-year follow-up study of Helicobacter pylori eradication rate with 13C-urea breath test after 3-d and 7-d rabeprazole-based triple therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hwang-Huei Wang; Jen-Wei Chou; Kuan-Fu Liao; Zong-Yi Lin; Hsueh-Chou Lai; Chang-Hu Hsu; Chih-Bin Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the long-term role of a 3-d rabeprazole based triple therapy in patients with Helicobacter pylori(H pylori)-infected active peptic ulcers.METHODS: We prospectively studied 115 consecutive patients with H pylori-infected active peptic ulcers. H pylori infection was confirmed if any two of H pylori DNA,histology, and rapid urease test were positive. Patients were assigned to either an open-labeled 3-d course of oral amoxicillin 1 000 mg b.i.d., clarithromycin 500 mg b.i.d.,and rabeprazole 20 mg b.i.d., or 7-d course of oral amoxicillin 1 000 mg b.i.d., clarithromycin 500 mg b.i.d.,and rabeprazole 20 mg b.i.d. Subsequently, all patients received oral rabeprazole 20 mg once daily until the 8th wk. Three months after therapy, all patients were followed-up endoscopically for the peptic ulcer, H pylori DNA, histology, and rapid urease test. One year after therapy, Hpyioriinfection was tested using the 13C-urea breath test.RESULTS: The ulcer healing rates 3 mo after therapy were 81.0% vs 75.4% for the 3-d and 7-d groups [intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis, P = 0.47] respectively,and 90.4% vs 89.6% for the 3-d and 7-d groups [perprotocol (PP) analysis, P= 0.89] respectively. The eradication rates 3 mo after therapy were 75.9% vs 73.7% for the 3-dand 7-d groups (ITT, P = 0.79) respectively, and 84.6%vs 87.5% for the 3-d and 7-d groups (PP, P = 0.68)respectively. One year after therapy, seventy-five patients returned to receive the 13C-urea breath test, and the eradication rates were 78.4% vs 81.6% in 3-d and 7-dgroups (PP, P = 0.73) respectively.CONCLUSION: Our study showed the eradication rates against H pyloriinfection 3 and 12 mo after triple therapy were not different between the 3-d and 7-d rabeprazolebased groups. Therefore, the 3-d rabeprazole-based triple therapy may be an alternative treatment for peptic ulcers with H pylori infection.

  16. The carbon 14 and environment; Le carbone 14 et l'environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This article resume the history and the properties of the carbon 14 ({sup 14}C). We also find the different origins and the produced quantities. The carbon transfers in environment are explained and so the {sup 14}C. The biological effects and the sanitary aspects are clarified. The measurements of carbon 14 are given as well its application through the dating. The waste management is tackled. (N.C.)

  17. Stool microbiome reveals diverse bacterial ureases as confounders of oral urea breath testing for Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Bamako, Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiga, Mamoudou; Cohen, Keira; Baya, Bocar; Srikrishna, Geetha; Siddiqui, Sophia; Sanogo, Moumine; Somboro, Anou M; Diarra, Bassirou; Diallo, Mariam H; Mazumdar, Varun; Yoder, Christian; Orsega, Susan; Belson, Michael; Kassambara, Hamadoun; Goita, Drissa; Murphy, Robert L; Dao, Sounkalo; Polis, Michael; Diallo, Souleymane; Timmins, Graham S; Dodd, Lori; Earl, Ashlee M; Bishai, William R

    2016-01-01

    Detection of bacterial urease activity has been utilized successfully to diagnose Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). While Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) also possesses an active urease, it is unknown whether detection of mycobacterial urease activity by oral urease breath test (UBT) can be exploited as a rapid point of care biomarker for tuberculosis (TB) in humans. We enrolled 34 individuals newly diagnosed with pulmonary TB and 46 healthy subjects in Bamako, Mali and performed oral UBT, mycobacterial sputum culture and H. pylori testing. Oral UBT had a sensitivity and specificity (95% CI) of 70% (46-88%) and 11% (3-26%), respectively, to diagnose culture-confirmed M. tuberculosis disease among patients without H. pylori, and 100% sensitivity (69-100%) and 11% specificity (3-26%) to diagnose H. pylori among patients without pulmonary TB. Stool microbiome analysis of controls without TB or H. pylori but with positive oral UBT detected high levels of non-H. pylori urease producing organisms, which likely explains the low specificity of oral UBT in this setting and in other reports of oral UBT studies in Africa. PMID:27532494

  18. The lichens, tritium and carbon 14 integrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report concerns a research for the tritium and for the carbon 14 in lichens in a spirit of bio-indication: the first results appear in Daillant and al (2004 ) and additional results were presented to the congress B.I.O.M.A.P. in Slovenia, organized collectively by the institute Josef Stefan from Ljubljana and the international atomic energy agency from Vienna (Daillant and al 2003). (N.C.)

  19. LDEO Carbon 14 Data from Selected Sea floor Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Carbon-14 data in this file were compiled by W.F. Ruddiman and staff at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. Data include 974 carbon-14...

  20. A gaseous measurement system for carbon-14 dioxide and carbon-14 methane: An analytical methodology to be applied in the evaluation of the carbon-14 dioxide and carbon-14 methane produced via microbial activity in volcanic tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study were to develop a gaseous measurement system for the carbon-14 dioxide and carbon-14 methane produced via microbial activity or geochemical action on leachate in tuff; to determine the trapping efficiency of the system for carbon-14 dioxide; to determine the trapping efficiency of the system for carbon-14 methane; to apply the experimentally determined factors regarding the system's trapping efficiency for carbon-14 dioxide and carbon-14 methane to a trapping algorithm to determine the activity of the carbon-14 dioxide and carbon-14 methane in a mixed sample; to determine the minimum detectable activity of the measurement process in picocuries per liter; and to determine the lower limit or detection of the measurement process in counts per minute

  1. Concentration of carbon-14 in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon-14 survey program initiated 1960 to gather data on current levels of carbon-14 in environments. Plants essential oil and fermented alcohol were selected as sample materials. The carbon contained in these materials is fixed from atmospheric carbon dioxide by anabolism, so they well reflect the variation of carbon-14 in biosphere. Thymol; Thymol was obtained from the essential oil of Orthodon Japonicium Benth which was cultivated and harvested every year in the experimental field of NIRS and Chiba University. The methylation was carried out to eliminate the strong quenching action of the phenolic group of thymol. Eighteen grams of thymol methyl ether was used as liquid scintillator by adding 0.4% PPO and 0.01% POPOP. Menthol; Menthol was obtained from Mentha arvensis L which was cultivated in the east part of Hokkaido and prepared by Kitami Factory of Federation of Agricultural Cooperative Society of Hokkaido. The chemical conversion of menthol to p-cymene was carried out and used as liquid scintillator as same as above sample. Lemongrass oil; Lemongrass oil was obtained from Cymbopogon citratus Stapf which was cultivated in Izu Experimental Station of Medicinal Plants, National Institute of Hygienic Science located Minami-Izu, Shizuoka Pref. The p-cymene derived from Lemongrass oil was used as liquid scintillator. Alcohol; All sample of fermented alcohol were obtained from the Alcohol Factories of Ministry of Trade and Industry. Raw materials of alcohol were sweet potatos cultivated in several prefectures in Japan ''high test'' molasses and blackstrap molasses imported from several countries of Asia, South America and South Africa, crude alcohol imported from U.S.A., Argentina and Brazil. Mixed solvent of 10 ml sample alcohol and 10 ml toluene or p-xylene containing 0.8% PPO and 0.1% dimethyl POPOP was used as liquid scintillator. (author)

  2. 口臭患者14C呼气试验检测的结果分析%Analysis of 14C-Urea Breath Test in Patients with Halitosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建中; 张旭峰; 张斌; 李黎; 童妙春; 陈驰

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between halitosis and the infection of helicobacter pylori (HP). Methods The results of l4C-urea breath test of 59 normal people, 50 patients with halitosis only and 56 patients infected by both halitosis and digestive diseases were analyzed. Results It showed that the 14C content and HP positive rate in group infected by both halitosis and digestive diseases were much higher than that of halitosis only group and normal people group (P <0.05). Conclusion The infection of Helicobacter pylori is an important factor but not only factor of halitosis.%目的 探讨口臭与幽门螺旋杆菌及其它因素的关系.方法 对59名正常组、50例单纯口臭组患者、56例口臭伴消化道疾病组患者14C 呼气试验的结果进行分析.结果 分析结果表明,口臭伴消化道疾病组14C呼气试验含量明显高于单纯口臭组和正常组(P<0.05),阳性率也明显高于单纯口臭组和正常组(P<0.05).结论 幽门螺旋杆菌感染是口臭的重要原因,但不是唯一原因.

  3. Breathing Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Discuss with your respiratory therapist the benefits of breathing techniques to increase ventilation and decrease your work of breathing Discuss with your physician appropriate use of respiratory ...

  4. The lichens, tritium and carbon 14 integrators; Les lichens, integrateurs de tritium et de carbone 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daillant, O

    2007-07-01

    The present report concerns a research for the tritium and for the carbon 14 in lichens in a spirit of bio-indication: the first results appear in Daillant and al (2004 ) and additional results were presented to the congress B.I.O.M.A.P. in Slovenia, organized collectively by the institute Josef Stefan from Ljubljana and the international atomic energy agency from Vienna (Daillant and al 2003). (N.C.)

  5. Behavior of carbon-14 in the Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 released from the nuclear facilities is an important radionuclide for the safety assessment, because it tends to accumulate in environment through food chain and has a significant impact to personal dose. Carbon-14 has been monitored routinely as one of the main gaseous radionuclides exhausted from the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) since October of 1991. Furthermore, behavior of carbon-14 in TRP has been investigated through the reprocessing operation and the literature survey. This report describes the result of investigation about the behavior of carbon-14 in TRP as followings. 1. Only a very small amount of carbon-14 in the fuel was liberated into the shear off-gas and most of it was liberated into the dissolver off-gas. Part of the carbon-14 was trapped at the caustic scrubber installed in the off-gas treatment process, and untrapped carbon-14 was released into the environment from the main stack. Amount of carbon-14 released from the main stack was about 4.1∼6.5 GBq every ton of uranium reprocessed. 2. Carbon-14 trapped at the caustic scrubbers installed in the dissolver off-gas and in the vessel off-gas treatment process is transferred to the low active waste vessel. Amount of carbon-14 transferred to the low active waste vessel was about 5.4∼9.6 GBq every ton of uranium reprocessed. 3. The total amount of carbon-14 input to TRP was summed up to about 11.9∼15.5 GBq every ton of uranium reprocessed considering the released amount from the main stack and the trapped amount in the off-gas treatment devices. The amount of nitrogen impurity in the initial fuel was calculated about 15∼22ppm of uranium metal based on the measured carbon-14. 4. The solution in the low active waste vessel is concentrated at the evaporator. Most of the carbon-14 in the solution was transferred into concentrated solution. 5. Total Vitrification Demonstration Facility (TVF) started to operate in 1994. Since then, carbon-14 has been measured in the second sub stack

  6. Carbon-14 measurements in aquifers with methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of various groundwater systems indicates that methane is a common trace constituent and occasionally a major carbon species in groundwaters. Thermocatalytic methane had delta13Csub(CH4)>-45 per mille and microbially produced or biogenic methane had delta13Csub(CH4)13C values for the inorganic carbon. Thermocatalytic methane had no apparent effect on the inorganic carbon. Because methanogenesis seriously affects the carbon isotope geochemistry of groundwaters, the correction of raw 14C ages of affected groundwaters must consider these effects. Conceptual models are developed which adjust the 14C activity of the groundwater for the effects of methanogenesis and for the dilution of carbon present during infiltration by simple dissolution of rock carbonate. These preliminary models are applied to groundwaters from the Alliston sand aquifer where methanogenesis has affected most samples. In this system, methanogenic bacteria using organic matter present in the aquifer matrix as substrate have added inorganic carbon to the groundwater which has initiated further carbonate rock dissolution. These processes have diluted the inorganic carbon 14C activity. The adjusted groundwater ages can be explained in terms of the complex hydrogeology of this aquifer, but also indicate that these conceptual models must be more rigorously tested to evaluate their appropriateness. (author)

  7. Bad Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that get stuck between your teeth. Lots of people have bad breath at some point. Don’t worry! There are steps you can take to keep your mouth fresh and healthy. Tips for preventing bad breath: Brush your teeth ( ...

  8. Breathing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're not getting enough air. Sometimes mild breathing problems are from a stuffy nose or hard ... conditions such as asthma, emphysema or pneumonia cause breathing difficulties. So can problems with your trachea or ...

  9. Breath odor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... distinct breath odors. Bad breath related to poor oral hygiene is most common and caused by release of ... supplements? Do you smoke? What home care and oral hygiene measures have you tried? How effective are they? ...

  10. Denaturing Urea Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (Urea PAGE)

    OpenAIRE

    Summer, Heike; Grämer, René; Dröge, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Urea PAGE or denaturing urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis employs 6-8 M urea, which denatures secondary DNA or RNA structures and is used for their separation in a polyacrylamide gel matrix based on the molecular weight. Fragments between 2 to 500 bases, with length differences as small as a single nucleotide, can be separated using this method1. The migration of the sample is dependent on the chosen acrylamide concentration. A higher percentage of polyacrylamide resolves lower molecula...

  11. Carbon-14 dating with the 14UD accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A carbon-14 accelerator mass spectroscopy system is now in routine operation on the 14UD accelerator. It offers a modest precision of ∼ 3% for samples that are >10% modern. Its performances and some of recent applications are briefly discussed

  12. Breath sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    The lung sounds are best heard with a stethoscope. This is called auscultation. Normal lung sounds occur ... the bottom of the rib cage. Using a stethoscope, the doctor may hear normal breathing sounds, decreased ...

  13. Bad Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... garlic, onions, cheese, orange juice, and soda poor dental hygiene (say: HI-jeen), meaning not brushing and flossing regularly smoking and other tobacco use Poor oral hygiene leads to bad breath because when food particles ...

  14. Breath sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causes of abnormal breath sounds may include: Acute bronchitis Asthma Bronchiectasis Chronic bronchitis Congestive heart failure Emphysema Interstitial lung disease Foreign body obstruction of the airway Pneumonia Pulmonary edema Tracheobronchitis

  15. Breathing difficulty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... getting enough air Considerations There is no standard definition for difficulty breathing. Some people feel breathless with ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  16. Evaluation of carbon-14 life cycle in reactors VVER-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is aimed at the evaluation of carbon-14 life cycle in light water reactors VVER-1000. Carbon-14 is generated as a side product in different systems of nuclear reactors and has been an issue not only in radioactive waste management but mainly in release into the environment in the form of gaseous effluents. The principal sources of this radionuclide are in primary cooling water and fuel. Considerable amount of C-14 is generated by neutron reactions with oxygen 17O and nitrogen 14N present in water coolant and fuel. The reaction likelihood and consequently volume of generated radioisotope depends on several factors, especially on the effective cross-section, concentrations of parent elements and conditions of power plant operating strategies. Due to its long half-life and high capability of integration into the environment and thus into the living species, it is very important to monitor the movement of carbon-14 in all systems of nuclear power plant and to manage its release out of NPP. The dominant forms of radioactive carbon-14 are the hydrocarbons owing to the combinations with hydrogen used for absorption of radiolytic oxygen. These organic compounds, such as formaldehyde, methyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol and formic acid can be mostly retained on ion exchange resins used in the system for purifying primary cooling water. The gaseous carbon compounds (CH4 and CO2) are released into the atmosphere via the ventilation systems of NPP. Based on the information and data obtained from different sources, it has been designed a balance model of possible carbon-14 pathways throughout the whole NPP. This model includes also mass balance model equations for each important node in system and available sampling points which will be the background for further calculations. This document is specifically not to intended to describe the best monitoring program attributes or technologies but rather to provide evaluation of obtained data and find the optimal way to upgrade

  17. How to breathe when you are short of breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursed lip breathing; COPD - pursed lip breathing; Emphysema - pursed lip breathing; Chronic bronchitis - pursed lip breathing; Pulmonary fibrosis - pursed lip breathing; Interstitial lung disease - pursed lip breathing; Hypoxia - pursed lip breathing; ...

  18. Behaviour of carbon-14 in graphite irradiated by neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of carbon-14 extraction from graphite irradiated by neutrons based on the thermal effect to graphite in a technological vacuum or air current is a basically new approach. When irradiated graphite is heated in a technological vacuum and in an air current, extraction of carbon-14 takes place and reaches as much as 99.5%. The mass of graphite decreases approximately by 10% in every 5 hours of heating. At the same time, its substance in different units can vary in wide ranges: from 3,5 to 110 kBq/g. This can be explained in terms of both the different substance of nitrogen impurities in graphite and different fluency of thermal neutrons

  19. Radiative Neutron Capture on Carbon-14 in Effective Field Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Rupak, Gautam; Fernando, Lakma; Vaghani, Akshay

    2012-01-01

    The cross section for radiative capture of neutron on carbon-14 is calculated using the model-independent formalism of halo effective field theory. The dominant contribution from E1 transition is considered, and the cross section is expressed in terms of elastic scattering parameters of the effective range expansion. Contributions from both resonant and non-resonant interaction are calculated. Significant interference between these leads to a capture contribution that deviates from simple Bre...

  20. Molecular evolution of urea amidolyase and urea carboxylase in fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Harris Steven D; Nickerson Kenneth W; Strope Pooja K; Moriyama Etsuko N

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Urea amidolyase breaks down urea into ammonia and carbon dioxide in a two-step process, while another enzyme, urease, does this in a one step-process. Urea amidolyase has been found only in some fungal species among eukaryotes. It contains two major domains: the amidase and urea carboxylase domains. A shorter form of urea amidolyase is known as urea carboxylase and has no amidase domain. Eukaryotic urea carboxylase has been found only in several fungal species and green al...

  1. Breathing and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related breathing difficulties. Learn some ways to control breathing and some techniques to help you reach a greater level of relaxation during your day: Diaphragmatic Breathing Minimizing Shortness of Breath Instant Relaxation Drill Meditation ...

  2. Traveling with breathing problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have breathing problems and you: Are short of breath most of the time Get short of breath when you walk 150 ... or less Have been in the hospital for breathing problems recently Use oxygen at home, even if ...

  3. An application discussion of 14C urea breathing test (UBT) examination H. pylori infection in senile disease diagnosis%14C尿素呼气试验检测幽门螺杆菌感染在老年人疾病诊断中的应用探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关小红

    2005-01-01

    目的:探讨14C尿素呼气试验(urea breath test,UBT)检测幽门螺杆菌(H.pylori)感染在老年人消化道疾病、急性冠脉综合征(ACS)诊断中的意义.方法:用自身对照的方法比较30例消化道疾病患者内镜活检快速尿素酶试验H.pylori阳性与UBT阳性、血清学阳性情况,20例血清学H.pylori抗体阳性的ACS患者与UBT、内镜阳性情况.结果:消化道疾病组内镜活检H.pylori阳性者做UBT的阳性率为93%,血清学阳性95%,血清学H.pylori阳性的ACS者做UBT的阳性率为50%,不稳定心绞痛者症状消失10 d后查内镜H.pylori阳性率为42%.结论:用UBT诊断老年人与H.pylori感染有关的疾病安全可靠.

  4. Urea metabolism in Barbari kids d on urea molasses diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The entry rates of urea into the body pool of urea were estimated in Barbari kids using a single injection isotope dilution technique using 14C-urea. The excretion rates of urea were calculated by estimating total urine output over 24 h and urea content. (M.G.B.)

  5. Differential monitoring of tritium and carbon-14 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gaseous sampling system was developed to differentially collect all major volatile forms of tritium and carbon-14 according to chemical class. These chemical forms include: tritiated forms of water, hydrogen and organics; as well as 14C-containing carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and organics. Sampling campaigns involving the use of this differential 3H and 14C collection system have been successfully conducted at a high level liquid waste solidification plant, at a spent fuel storage facility and in the vicinity of power reactors

  6. Carbon-14: Some evidence of migration and experiments on immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 that is produced in nuclear reactors by reactions on C, N and O is one of the most biologically dangerous nuclides that are subject to global dispersion (H-3, 85-Kr, 129-I). It is assumed that about 20-30% of C-14 is released to atmosphere from NPPs and 80-70% remains in the fuel and will be released during reprocessing. Atmospheric dispersion of C-14 in the form of carbon dioxide cannot go without consequence for the environment, particularly for the vegetation. This influence of the carbon-14 release from a radio-chemical facility in Russia on the nearby forest is illustrated in the first part of the report by data on C-14 concentration in the barks of trees, analyzed year by year and showing yearly variation of C-14 releases. The second part of the report deals with the study of stability of portland-cement compounds and Ca, Ba and Sr carbonates to the leaching processes. Leaching tests were done on specially prepared samples of compounds, containing various (from 30% to 70%) concentrations of Ca, Sr or Ba carbonates, tagged by C-14. Distilled water was used as leaching agent. Leaching was conducted for 46 hours and C-14 concentrations and pH of resulting waters were monitored. Differential leaching rates and leaching coefficients were analyzed and general compound behavior and its dynamics has been observed

  7. Living with urea stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laishram R Singh; Tanveer Ali Dar; Faizan Ahmad

    2009-06-01

    Intracellular organic osmolytes are present in certain organisms adapted to harsh environments. These osmolytes protect intracellular macromolecules against denaturing environmental stress. In contrast to the usually benign effects of most organic osmolytes, the waste product urea is a well-known perturbant of macromolecules. Although urea is a perturbing solute which inhibits enzyme activity and stability, it is employed by some species as a major osmolyte. The answer to this paradox was believed to be the discovery of protective osmolytes (methylamines). We review the current state of knowledge on the various ways of counteracting the harmful effects of urea in nature and the mechanisms for this. This review ends with the mechanistic idea that cellular salt (KCl/NaCl) plays a crucial role in counteracting the effects of urea, either by inducing required chaperones or methylamines, or by thermodynamic interactions with urea-destabilised proteins. We also propose future opportunities and challenges in the field.

  8. Verification of the dispersion model by airborne carbon 14C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides insight in the verification of the Lagrangean dispersion model for dose calculation in the environment. The verification method was based on the measurement of the airborne carbon 14C concentration which can be slightly increased close to the nuclear power plant. The results proved that this method is sensitive enough and that the sensitivity analysis can be used for model verification or for identification of possible improvements of the used meteorological data. The Lagrangean model is used at Krsko nuclear power plant (NPP) for calculation of dispersion coefficients and dose in the environment. To show compliance with the authorized dose limits it is required to present a realistic calculation of the dose to the public. This is a numerical model designed to calculate air pollution dispersion in the area of 25km x 25km. The model uses on-line local meteorological measurements. The same model was already verified for another location around a coal- fired power plant based on emission and environmental measurements of SO2. Krsko NPP is placed near the Sava River in a semiopened basin surrounded by several hills. The region is characterized by low winds and frequent thermal inversions. This paper presents a verification of the short range dispersion model based on the fact that the airborne carbon 14C concentration can be slightly increased close to the nuclear power plant. Other radioactive effluents are not detectable in the environment and carbon 14C measurements are accurate enough to detect small deviations from natural 14C levels and to compare them with the calculated concentration based on 14C effluents. The most of airborne 14C is released during the refuelling outage. Within the pre-selected period of ten days, increased effluents of 14C in the form of CO2 were sampled from the plant ventilation. The average atmospheric dispersion parameters were calculated for two locations in the environment where CO2 sampling plates were installed

  9. A simple breath test for fat malabsorption in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metabolic pathway of 14C-labeled oleic acid leads to the formation and the breath excretion of 14CO2. This behavior can be used for measuring lipid absorption. The simple, accurate screening test includes the ingestion of 14C-labeled triolein and the intermittent collection of breath 14CO2 in a trapping solution. The results are strongly correlated to the measurement of fecal fat. The use of carbon-14 in man should not be restricted, provided the labeled substrates are converted into rapidly excreted metabolites

  10. A detective from the past called carbon 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis is carried out using Radiometry or Accelerator mass spectrometry. After the system allowing to date the age of any organic rest - whether a fossil, a wood fragment, a parchment or a seed - is an isotope called carbon-14. An atom that comes from reactions nuclear produced in the atmosphere and cosmic-ray-induced they interact with oxygen to form carbon dioxide. This element they absorb it plants in photosynthesis and then passes to the animals remained almost unchanged during the life of the organism. to the meet the initial ratio of c-14 that had been in the atmosphere before his death, the remains that are left in it determine the elapsed time. (Author)

  11. Progressive extraction method applied to isotopic exchange of carbon-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic exchange in natural settings is essentially an irreversible process, so that it progresses continuously until there is complete isotopic equilibrium. In soils, this process involves interaction between isotopes in the liquid and solid phases, and complete isotopic equilibrium may take a very long time. Measurements after partial isotopic exchange have been used to characterize the labile fraction of elements in soils. We describe a method to characterize the extent of isotopic exchange, with application here to incorporation of inorganic carbon-14 (14C) into mineral carbonates and organic matter in soils. The procedure uses a continuous addition of extractant, acid, or H2O2in the examples presented here, coupled with sequential sampling. The method has been applied to demonstrate the degree of isotopic exchange in soil. The same strategy could be applied to many other elements, including plant nutrients. (author)

  12. Measurements of carbon-14 with cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartt, A. D.; Ognibene, T.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K.

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the most sensitive method for quantitation of 14C in biological samples. This technology has been used in a variety of low dose, human health related studies over the last 20 years when very high sensitivity was needed. AMS helped pioneer these scientific methods, but its expensive facilities and requirements for highly trained technical staff have limited their proliferation. Quantification of 14C by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) offers an approach that eliminates many of the shortcomings of an accelerator-based system and would supplement the use of AMS in biomedical research. Our initial prototype, using a non-ideal wavelength laser and under suboptimal experimental conditions, has a 3.5-modern, 1- σ precision for detection of milligram-sized, carbon-14-elevated samples. These results demonstrate proof of principle and provided a starting point for the development of a spectrometer capable of biologically relevant sensitivities.

  13. Breath alcohol test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcohol test - breath ... There are various brands of breath alcohol tests. Each one uses a different method to test the level of alcohol in the breath. The machine may be electronic or manual. One ...

  14. Deep breathing after surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... way to do so is by doing deep breathing exercises. Deep breathing keeps your lungs well-inflated and healthy while ... uncomfortable. But if you do not practice deep breathing after surgery, you may develop lung problems, like ...

  15. Breathing difficulties - first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Difficulty breathing - first aid; Dyspnea - first aid; Shortness of breath - first aid ... Breathing difficulty is almost always a medical emergency. An exception is feeling slightly winded from normal activity, ...

  16. Rapid shallow breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachypnea; Breathing - rapid and shallow; Fast shallow breathing; Respiratory rate - rapid and shallow ... Shallow, rapid breathing has many possible medical causes, including: Asthma Blood clot in an artery in the lung Choking Chronic obstructive ...

  17. Breathing difficulty - lying down

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... short of breath; Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea; PND; Difficulty breathing while lying down; Orthopnea ... Heart failure Obesity (does not directly cause difficulty breathing while lying down but often worsens other conditions ...

  18. What Controls Your Breathing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To a limited degree, you can change your breathing rate, such as by breathing faster or holding your ... oxygen levels in your blood and change your breathing rate as needed. Sensors in the airways detect lung ...

  19. Study on behavior and treatment of radioiodine and carbon-14 at reprocessing of spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of dissolver Off-gas (DOG) is one of important operation in the head-end process of spent fuel reprocessing. Radioiodine, carbon-14 are contained in the DOG. Confinement of radioiodine is required and the reduction of carbon-14 will be required following ALARA principle. In the present study spent fuel dissolution and off-gas treatment tests were carried out using spent fuel with burnups of 8,000 , 29,000 and 44,000 MWd·t-1. Behavior of radioiodine and carbon-14 was investigated. In addition, several adsorbents for carbon dioxide to capture carbon-14 from the DOG were tested in a cold equipment. (author)

  20. Use of polyurea from urea for coating of urea granules

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Panfang; Zhang, Yanfei; Jia, Cong; Li, Yufeng; Mao, Zhiquan

    2016-01-01

    A new type of controlled release fertilizers coated with polyurea was prepared. The granulated urea was firstly changed into a liquid urea by heating as the coating liquid. By spraying uniformly the urea was coated with the polyurea synthesized by the reaction of isocyanates with a liquid urea. The effects of different modifiers on N release characteristics of polyurea-coated urea (PCU) were studied. The morphology and chemical structure of PCU coating materials was investigated by SEM and FT...

  1. Improved quality control of carbon-14 labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IUT Ltd is a producer of carbon-14 labelled organic compounds like benzene, methanol, phenol, formaldehyde, Na-acetates and also special ordered compounds. The quality control of these compounds is carried out by means of HPLC and GC-MS due to chemical purity. Molar activity was determined by Liquid Scintillation Counting and HPLC being equipped by a radioactivity detector. Unfortunately the accuracy of the activity determination was arrived only ±4% relatively. This error is too high because of the large dilution factors. In respect of the IUT accreditation as an analytical laboratory in Germany the accuracy had to be improved remarkably. Therefore the GC-MS-determination of molar activities of labelled compounds is used as the 14C-labelled compound. A special evaluation code is used to determine the enrichment values relative to the unlabelled molecules. Taking into account the results of GC-MS the accuracy of molar activity determination is improved to ±2%. The spectra evaluation is demonstrated and some examples are discussed

  2. Synthesis of carbon-14 labelled indolic 5HT{sub 1} receptor agonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterhouse, Ian; Cable, K.M.; Fellows, Ian; Wipperman, M.D.; Sutherland, D.R. [Glaxo Wellcome Research and Development, Stevenage (United Kingdom). Isotope Chemistry Unit

    1996-11-01

    Syntheses of carbon-14 labelled versions of indolic 5HT{sub 1} agonists sumatriptan (GR43175), GR40370 and naratriptan (GR85548) are described. Introduction of the label via cyanation of ketoformanilides, formed by oxidative cleavage of an indole ring, ensured incorporation of carbon-14 at the metabolically stable C-2 position of the indole. (author).

  3. The test of carbon 14C introducing to sugar beet plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon 14 was introduced to sugar beet plant by photosynthesis. The changes of radioactivity were investigated. It was stated that lower 25 % of carbon 14 stay in leaves, and about 75 % flow to roots in the form of sucrose 14C. (author)

  4. Ethylated Urea - Ether - Modified Urea - Formaldehyde Resins,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Obichukwu EDOGA

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available First, phenol - formaldehyde (PF and urea - formaldehyde (UFII resins were separately conventionally prepared in our laboratory. Also, UF resin synthesized from the acid modified synthesis procedure was synthesized in a purely acid medium of pH 1.0, FU molar ratio of 1.0 and at 50oC (one-stage acid modified-synthesis procedure. Subsequently, the UF resin II was modified during synthesis by incorporating ethylated urea-ether (EUER (i.e. UFIII and glycerol (GLYC (i.e. UFV cured with and without acid curing agent. The structural and physicochemical analyses of the various resin samples were carried out.The results showed that the unmodified UF resin (UF II synthesized in acid medium of pH 1.0, F/U molar ratio 1.0, and at 50oC, cured in absence of acid curing catalyst, showed features in their spectra which are consistent with a tri-, and/or tetra-substituted urea in the reaction to give a 3 - dimensional network cured UF resin. Modification of the UF resin(UF II with ethylated urea-ether and glycerol to produce UF resins III and respectively V prominently increased the absorbance of methylene and ether groups in the spectra which are consistent with increased hydrophobicity and improved hydrolytic stability. For the conventional UF resin (UF I, the only clear distinction between spectra for the UF resin II and UF resins (III/V is the presence of diminished peaks for methylene groups at 2.2 ppm. The relationship between the logarithmic viscosity of cured PF resin with time showed continuos dependence of viscosity with time during cure up to 70 minutes. Similar trends were shown by UF resins (III/V, cured in absence of acid catalyst. In contrast, the conventional UF resins I and UF IV (i.e. UF II cured with NH4CL showed abrupt discontinuity in viscosity with time just after about 20 minutes of cure.

  5. 14C-尿素呼吸试验检测消化专业医务人员HP感染及药物清除的观察%The Investigation of Prevalence of H. Pylori with 14 C-urea Breath Test and Therapeutic Effect in Digestive Staffs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨强; 方桢; 蔡丽; 艾津; 张克森

    2001-01-01

    目的:了解从事消化专业的医务人员HP感染情况及药物清除疗效。方法:14C-尿素呼吸试验检测天津 医大三所附属医院消化内镜工作者及相关人员25名的HP感染情况。应用法莫替丁,替硝唑,枸橼酸铋胺,三联2 周疗法对HP阳性者行根除治疗,同法检测根除疗效。结果:HP感染率为96%,高于文献报道普通人群的感染率。 14C-UBT放射活度测定值在医生组高于护技组,工作年限高于10年组高于短工作年限组。三联2周疗法HP根除 率为73.7%。结论:消化内镜工作人员对HP易感染,应注意对HP感染的预防。感染后药物根除治疗有效。%Objective:To investigate the prevalence of H. pylori (HP) and therapeutic effect in digestive staffs. Methods: The in fection of HP were detected in 25 digestive endoscopists and relative staffs using 14C-urea breath test (14 C-UBT). People with Hp positive infection were treated with famotidine, tinidazole, bismuth, and ammonium citrate for 2 weeks. Results: The rate of infection of Hp in endoseopists was 96% ,and was higher than that in regular people. The count ofdpm 14C- UBT was higher in doctor group than that in nurse and technician group,and it was higher in doctors with the experience more than 10 years than that with the experience less than 10 years. The rate of eradication against Hp with the treatment of famotidine, tinidazole,bismuth,and ammonium citrate for 2 weeks was 73.7 %. Conclusion: The endoseopists are sensitive to HP. Prevention from infection of-HP should be obtained for all endoscopists. Treatment of Hp infection with medicine is effective.

  6. Uptake of bomb-produced carbon-14 by the Pacific Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collection of seawater samples for carbon-14 analysis was performed from 1957 through 1972. The dissolved inorganic carbon was extracted on board the ships and returned to the laboratory for processing. Samples were analyzed for carbon-14 by gas proportional counting of acetylene prepared by conversion of carbon dioxide to acetylene via lithium carbide. Carbon-14 results are reported for 312 surface and 96 sub-surface Pacific Ocean samples and for 34 surface and 53 sub-surface Indian Ocean samples. The precision of measurements was generally from 0.5 to 1.5 percent (one-sigma). The purpose of the seawater measurements was to determine the distribution of bomb carbon-14 in the surface of the Pacific and Indian Oceans, the change in carbon-14 concentration with depth, and the rate of uptake of bomb carbon-14 by the oceans. The oceans are the largest reservoir of exchangeable carbon. The CO2 of the atmosphere exchanges with that of the sea through molecular exchange. In the surface Pacific, a strong latitudinal variation in carbon-14 concentration was found. By 1971, maxima of about 25 percent above pre-bomb levels were found at mid-latitudes of both hemispheres; this finding is attributed to relatively weak vertical mixing in the gyral circulation systems. A 1971 equatorial excess of only about 11 percent is caused by upwelling of sub-surface water and mixture of low carbon-14 Peru Current water into the equatorial system. South of the Antarctic Convergence surface radiocarbon levels rapidly decrease. To the North of the North Pacific gyre maximum, carbon-14 levels show a minimum at about 400N, apparently due to an influx of low carbon-14 water from north of Japan. Levels then rise to a maximum at 450N to 480N, before decreasing further north

  7. The management of carbon-14 in Canadian nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Canada, Derived Emission Limits (DELs) for the release of radionuclides from nuclear facilities are set to ensure that the dose to a member of a critical group from one year's release does not exceed the limit on annual dose to a member of the public set by the Atomic Energy Control Regulations. The Advisory Committee on Radiological Protection (ACRP) has expressed concerns as to whether this procedure provides adequate protection to members of the public, including future generations, for certain radionuclides such as a carbon-14 (14C), which can accumulate in the environment and which can be dispersed, through environmental processes, beyond the local region where the critical group is assumed to live. The ACRP subsequently established a Working Group to review the production, release, environmental levels, and waste management of 14C arising in CANDU power reactors. The ACRP recommendations resulting from this review can be summarized as · Given the current levels of emissions from CANDU nuclear power stations resulting from the use of a carbon dioxide annulus gas and the limitations in the calculation and use of collective dose, the ACRP sees no need for and additional collective dose limit to be applied to these sources. · The AECB should require licensees of power reactors and waste management sites to provide an annual inventory of 14C held within reactor buildings and waste management sites; to provide information on the stability of the ion exchange resins and their continuing ability to retain the 14C; to demonstrate on an ongoing basis that releases of 14C are maintained at a small fraction of the emission limits; and to report annually the critical group and local collective doses arising from releases of 14C. 61 refs., 25 tabs., 4 figs

  8. Molecular evolution of urea amidolyase and urea carboxylase in fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Steven D

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urea amidolyase breaks down urea into ammonia and carbon dioxide in a two-step process, while another enzyme, urease, does this in a one step-process. Urea amidolyase has been found only in some fungal species among eukaryotes. It contains two major domains: the amidase and urea carboxylase domains. A shorter form of urea amidolyase is known as urea carboxylase and has no amidase domain. Eukaryotic urea carboxylase has been found only in several fungal species and green algae. In order to elucidate the evolutionary origin of urea amidolyase and urea carboxylase, we studied the distribution of urea amidolyase, urea carboxylase, as well as other proteins including urease, across kingdoms. Results Among the 64 fungal species we examined, only those in two Ascomycota classes (Sordariomycetes and Saccharomycetes had the urea amidolyase sequences. Urea carboxylase was found in many but not all of the species in the phylum Basidiomycota and in the subphylum Pezizomycotina (phylum Ascomycota. It was completely absent from the class Saccharomycetes (phylum Ascomycota; subphylum Saccharomycotina. Four Sordariomycetes species we examined had both the urea carboxylase and the urea amidolyase sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these two enzymes appeared to have gone through independent evolution since their bacterial origin. The amidase domain and the urea carboxylase domain sequences from fungal urea amidolyases clustered strongly together with the amidase and urea carboxylase sequences, respectively, from a small number of beta- and gammaproteobacteria. On the other hand, fungal urea carboxylase proteins clustered together with another copy of urea carboxylases distributed broadly among bacteria. The urease proteins were found in all the fungal species examined except for those of the subphylum Saccharomycotina. Conclusions We conclude that the urea amidolyase genes currently found only in fungi are the results of a horizontal

  9. Effect of industrial fuel combustion on the carbon-14 level of atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As was previously noticed in 1953 by SUESS, the radiocarbon content of atmospheric CO2 was slightly lower in the 20th century (before the increase in the carbon-14 level due to the addition of artificial 14C) than at the time before the beginning of the industrial revolution in the 19th century. An exact knowledge of the magnitude of this effect is of interest in connection with the question of the rate of isotope exchange between atmospheric CO2 and the bicarbonates of the oceans. However, the radiocarbon level in the CO2 of the atmosphere is also subject to natural fluctuations caused by a variable cosmic-ray production rate of carbon-14. To investigate this the authors have cross-correlated sunspot numbers (as indicators of cosmic-ray activity) with the carbon-14 level in wood, and have detected a significant coherence between the two time series. The observed coherence permits an extrapolation of the natural carbon-14 values beyond the time of the beginning of artificial combustion of fossil fuel, around 1880. The results show that the observed small decrease in the carbon-14 level is somewhat affected by the increase of the production rate of carbon-14, as a consequence of relatively low solar activity during the preceding decades. The effect of industrial fuel combustion upon the carbon-14 level of the atmosphere can then be estimated for the Northern Hemisphere to be in the vicinity of -3%. (author)

  10. [Hydrogen Breath Tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häussler, Ulrich; Götz, Martin

    2016-02-01

    In the field of gastroenterology hydrogen breath test are used for the diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption and small intestine bacterial overgrowth. This paper provides information on performing a hydrogen breath test and shows potential sources of error. PMID:26886040

  11. What Causes Bad Breath?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth > For Teens > What Causes Bad Breath? Print A A A Text Size en español ¿Qué es lo que provoca el mal aliento? Bad breath, or halitosis , can be a major problem, especially ...

  12. Modelling accidental releases of carbon 14 in the environment: application as an excel spreadsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An application as an Excel spreadsheet of the simplified modelling approach of carbon 14 transfer in the environment developed by Tamponnet (2002) is presented. Based on the use of growth models of biological systems (plants, animals, etc.), the one-pool model (organic carbon) that was developed estimates the concentration of carbon 14 within the different compartments of the food chain and in fine the dose to man by ingestion in the case of a chronic or accidental release of carbon 14 in a river or the atmosphere. Data and knowledge have been implemented on Excel using the object-oriented programming language VisualBasic (Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0). The structure of the conceptual model and the Excel sheet are first briefly exposed. A numerical application of the model under a scenario of an accidental release of carbon 14 in the atmosphere is then presented. Simulation results and perspectives are discussed. (author)

  13. Carbon-14 geochemistry at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Kimberly A.; Kaplan, Daniel I.

    2013-05-10

    Carbon-14 is among the key radionuclides driving risk at the E-Area Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Much of this calculated risk is believed to be the result of having to make conservative assumptions in risk calculations because of the lack of site-specific data. The original geochemical data package (Kaplan 2006) recommended that performance assessments and composite analyses for the SRS assume that {sup 14}C did not sorbed to sediments or cementitious materials, i.e., that C-14 K{sub d} value (solid:liquid concentration ratio) be set to 0 mL/g (Kaplan 2006). This recommendation was based primarily on the fact that no site-specific experimental work was available and the assumption that the interaction of anionic {sup 14}C as CO{sub 2}{sup 2-}) with similarly charged sediments or cementitious materials would be minimal. When used in reactive transport equations, the 0 mL/g Kd value results in {sup 14}C not interacting with the solid phase and moving quickly through the porous media at the same rate as water. The objective of this study was to quantify and understand how aqueous {sup 14}C, as dissolved carbonate, sorbs to and desorbs from SRS sediments and cementitious materials. Laboratory studies measuring the sorption of {sup 14}C, added as a carbonate, showed unequivocally that {sup 14}C-carbonate K{sub d} values were not equal to 0 mL/g for any of the solid phases tested, but they required several months to come to steady state. After six months of contact, the apparent K{sub d} values for a clayey sediment was 3,000 mL/g, for a sandy sediment was 10 mL/g, for a 36-year-old concrete was 30,000 mL/g, and for a reducing grout was 40 mL/g. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that (ad)sorption rates were appreciably faster than desorption rates, indicating that a kinetic sorption model, as opposed to the steady-state K{sub d} model, may be a more accurate description of the {sup 14}C-carbonate sorption process. A second study

  14. Carbon-14 measurement using carbon dioxide absorption method - Our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    experimental standard deviation of 0.041 cpm (n=15). The mean count rate of last fifteen secondary standard samples normalised for 100 pMC and corrected for carbon-13 with reference to -25 per mille is 5.97 ± .0035 cpm with an experimental standard deviation of 0.23 cpm (n=15). All the samples were counted for 1000 min each. The last fifteen secondary standard CO2 samples were prepared from same batch of oxalic acid at different time. We participated in the IAEA 14C Intercomparison Exercise (1990) and Third International Radiocarbon Intercomparison organized by University of Glasgow, Scotland. We have analyzed a few samples using carbon dioxide absorption technique and results are very close to consensus value. We have also measured a few samples of various hydrological projects using absorption as well as benzene synthesis method and results are in good agreement. Carbon dioxide absorption technique gives reproducible result with constant level of quenching represented by Spectral Quench Parameter (SQP). This technique has been standardized to be used routinely for carbon-14 dating in Isotope Hydrology

  15. Results of interagency effort to determine carbon-14 source term in low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary estimate of the risks from the shallow land disposal of low-level radioactive wastes by EPA in 1984-1985 indicated that Carbon-14 caused virtually all of the risk and that these risks were relatively high. Therefore, an informal interagency group, which included the US Department of Energy, US Geological Survey, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and US Environmental Protection Agency, formed in 1985 to obtain up-to-date information on the activity and chemical form of Carbon-14 in the different types of LLW and how Carbon-14 behaves after disposal. The EPA acted as a focal point for collating the information collected by all of the Agencies and will publish a report in Fall 1986 on the results of the Carbon-14 data collection effort. Of particular importance, the study showed that Carbon-14 activity in LLW was overestimated approximately 2000%. This paper summarizes results of the Carbon-14 data collection effort. 40 references, 1 figure, 3 tables

  16. Use of polyurea from urea for coating of urea granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Panfang; Zhang, Yanfei; Jia, Cong; Li, Yufeng; Mao, Zhiquan

    2016-01-01

    A new type of controlled release fertilizers coated with polyurea was prepared. The granulated urea was firstly changed into a liquid urea by heating as the coating liquid. By spraying uniformly the urea was coated with the polyurea synthesized by the reaction of isocyanates with a liquid urea. The effects of different modifiers on N release characteristics of polyurea-coated urea (PCU) were studied. The morphology and chemical structure of PCU coating materials was investigated by SEM and FTIR. We studied the nitrogen release characteristics of the PCU applied in both water and soil, and the biodegradability of PCU coating after buried in soil. The results showed that PCU reduced nitrogen release rate and exhibited excellent controlled release property. The PCU coating materials could biodegrade in soil. This indicated that the low cost PCU products from urea are expected to use in agricultural and horticultural applications. PMID:27119061

  17. Breath ammonia and trimethylamine allow real-time monitoring of haemodialysis efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-invasive monitoring of breath ammonia and trimethylamine using Selected-ion-flow-tube mass spectroscopy (SIFT-MS) could provide a real-time alternative to current invasive techniques. Breath ammonia and trimethylamine were monitored by SIFT-MS before, during and after haemodialysis in 20 patients. In 15 patients (41 sessions), breath was collected hourly into Tedlar bags and analysed immediately (group A). During multiple dialyses over 8 days, five patients breathed directly into the SIFT-MS analyser every 30 min (group B). Pre- and post-dialysis direct breath concentrations were compared with urea reduction, Kt/V and creatinine concentrations. Dialysis decreased breath ammonia, but a transient increase occurred mid treatment in some patients. Trimethylamine decreased more rapidly than reported previously. Pre-dialysis breath ammonia correlated with pre-dialysis urea in group B (r2 = 0.71) and with change in urea (group A, r2 = 0.24; group B, r2 = 0.74). In group B, ammonia correlated with change in creatinine (r2 = 0.35), weight (r2 = 0.52) and Kt/V (r2 = 0.30). The ammonia reduction ratio correlated with the urea reduction ratio (URR) (r2 = 0.42) and Kt/V (r2 = 0.38). Pre-dialysis trimethylamine correlated with Kt/V (r2 = 0.21), and the trimethylamine reduction ratio with URR (r2 = 0.49) and Kt/V (r2 = 0.36). Real-time breath analysis revealed previously unmeasurable differences in clearance kinetics of ammonia and trimethylamine. Breath ammonia is potentially useful in assessment of dialysis efficacy

  18. Modelling the behaviour of carbon 14 released by nuclear power plants in rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under routine operation, French nuclear power plants of the PWR type release small amounts of carbon 14 in the environment either as airborne or liquid effluents. With the improvement of nuclear waste management, resulting in a significant reduction in corrosion products discharges, carbon 14 currently stands out as one of the main contributor to the individual dose to the public. Besides, with the decrease in military weapon tests fallout levels, nuclear reactors liquid releases are becoming the dominant artificial source of carbon 14 in rivers, downstream of power plants. To properly assess the fate of carbon 14 in rivers and to calculate individual doses to critical groups, a time-dependent food chain model was developed which considered the migration of carbon 14 in rivers and the transfer to terrestrial environments through irrigation with river water. Processes included in the model are: (1) dilution and equilibrium between the different forms of dissolved inorganic carbon in water, (2) exchange of carbon dioxide between water and atmosphere, (3) transfer to aquatic organisms, (4) transfer of irrigation water in the soil profile, (5) loss from the soil through volatilisation, (6) incorporation in plants by way of photosynthesis (7) transfer to livestock. This model is implemented on the Loire river and the modelling results are compared with the data obtained in radioecological surveys. These elements are then used to calculate doses to humans and non-human biota and assess the contribution from natural and industrial origins. (author)

  19. Assessment of carbon-14 control technology and costs for the LWR fuel cycle. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is an effort to incorporate present knowledge of carbon-14 behavior in Light Water Reactors and Fuel Reprocessing Plants into Designs compatible with present technology. The impact of radioactive effluents are considered according to the traditional measure of maximum radiation dose to individuals, summation of individual annual doses to obtain a total population dose, and the environmental dose commitment. The sources of carbon-14 in LWR's and fuel reprocessing facilities are identified. Systems for the removal of carbon-14 in existing and future plants are addressed from both a technological and economic standpoint. Existing technology indicates that caustic scrubbing is the most cost-effective alternative for concurrently removing C-14 from waste-gas streams and leaving it in a form compatible with permanent disposal conditions

  20. Urea dewaxing of naphthene oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mead, Th. C.; Wright, J. H.

    1985-03-12

    In an improved urea dewaxing process a urea/alcohol slurry chilled to 60/sup 0/ F. to 65/sup 0/ F. is added to a naphthenic distillate chilled to 60/sup 0/ F. to 65/sup 0/ F. to produce a refrigerator oil with improved low temperature properties.

  1. Two dimensional model study of atmospheric transport using carbon-14 and strontium-90 as inert tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study tests the transport processes in the LLNL two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport model using recently reanalyzed carbon-14 and strontium-90 data. These radioactive tracers were produced bythe atmospheric nuclear bomb tests of 1952--58 and 1961--62, and they were measured at a few latitudes up to 35 kilometers over the period 1955--1970. Selected horizontal and vertical eddy diffusion coefficients were varied in the model to test their sensitivity to short and long term transpose of carbon-14. A sharp transition of Kzz and Kyy through the tropopause, as opposed to a slow transition between the same limiting values, shows a distinct improvement in the calculated carbon-14 distributions, a distinct improvement in the calculated seasonal and latitudinal distribution of ozone columns (relative to TOMS observations), and a very large difference in the calculated ozone reduction by a possible fleet of High Speed Civil Transports. Calculated northern hemisphere carbon-14 is more sensitive to variation of Kyy than are global ozone columns. Strontium-90 was used to test the LLNL tropopause height at four different latitudes. Starting with the 1960 background distribution of carbon-14, we calculate the input of carbon-14 as the sum of each nuclear test of the 1961--62 series, using two bomb-cloud rise models. With the Seitz bomb-rise formulation in the LLNL model, we find good agreement between calculated and observedcarbon-14 (with noticeable exceptions at the north polar tropopause and the short-term mid-latitude mid-stratosphere) between 1963 and 1970

  2. The isotope breathe test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foundations of the breath diagnostic test, based on application of the carbon compounds, labeled with the stable (13C) or radioactive isotope are presented. The methodology for conducting the breath isotope test and the apparatuses, making it possible to determine under clinical conditions the isotope composition of the carbon, contained in the expired air, depending on the introduced tracer type, is briefly described. The safety of the method and prospects of its application are discussed. The examples of the breath isotope test practical application are presented

  3. Lithiation Chemistry of Vinyl Ureas

    OpenAIRE

    Lefranc, Julien

    2011-01-01

    The construction of tertiary alkylamines is a synthetic challenge exacerbated by the poor electrophilicity of imines. Due to the presence of this kind of building block in a large number of bioactive molecules, the development of new strategies to synthesise the quaternary carbon centre is essential.This thesis describes the work carried out on the rearrangement of lithiated vinyl ureas in order to form α-tertiary amines. The first part presents how vinyl ureas were synthesised, using the re...

  4. Shortness-of-Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can lead to shortness of breath include anxiety, panic attacks, anemia and even constipation. The experience of shortness ... are used to treat patients with anxiety or panic attacks. Other commonly used drugs include bronchodilators to widen ...

  5. Take a Deep Breath

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Everyone involved in Beijing’s Olympic Games held their breath last week, not because of the city’s famously polluted air , but in anticipation of the results of an experiment that could help to clean it up.

  6. Study of barytocalcite as a conditioning matrix for carbon 14: Comparison of several synthesis routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massoni, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.massoni@cea.fr; Rosen, Jeremy; Chartier, Myriam; Cozzika, Théodore

    2013-10-15

    Carbon-14 arising from the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing can disseminate into natural cycles and then its sequestration could be advantageous. In this study, we focus on the ceramic phase barytocalcite BaCa(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} (8.08 wt.% C) obtained from different synthesis routes. We show that several elaboration routes are possible but only two emerge ensuring a high reaction yield for a fast process. The first is a room temperature aqueous precipitation with nitrated precursors and the other is a double salt high temperature reaction with carbonated starting compounds, both of these precursors being compatible with the usual carbon-14 trapping process. The sensibility to experimental conditions of reference synthesis route and the reaction mechanisms are investigated and discussed.

  7. Immobilization of carbon 14 contained in spent fuel hulls through melting-solidification treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The melting-solidification treatment of spent nuclear fuel hulls is a potential technique to improve immobilization/stabilization of carbon-14 which is mobile in the environment due to its weakly absorbing properties. Carbon-14 can be immobilized in a solid during the treatment under an inert gas atmosphere, where carbon is not oxidized to gaseous form and remains in the solid. A series of laboratory scale experiments on retention of carbon into an alloy waste form was conducted. Metallic zirconium was melted with metallic copper (Zr/Cu=8/2 in weight) at 1200 deg C under an argon atmosphere. Almost all of the carbon remained in the resulting zirconium-copper alloy. (authors)

  8. Carbon-14 kinetic isotope effect in the decarbonylation of lactic acid [1-14C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon-14 kinetic isotope effect for the decarbonation of lactic acid[1-14C] in sulfuric acid has been measured in the temperature interval of 20-90 deg C. The experimental values of (k12C/k14C) are compared with the theoretical 14C kinetic isotope effect calculated assuming that one carbon-oxygen stretching vibration is lost in the rate-determining step. The discrepancy between experimentally observed temperature dependence of the 14C kinetic isotope effect and the theoretical one is explained by the possible side reactions wich change the apparent degrees of decarbonylation and isotopic composition of CH3CHOHCOOH[1-14C] used in experiments aiming at the determination of carbon-14 kinetic isotope effect in the decarbonylation process itself. (author) 6 refs.; 1 tab

  9. Sampling and monitoring of carbon-14 in gaseous effluents from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reviews the possibilities from sampling and monitoring C-14 in gaseous effluents from nuclear facilities. After oxidation of various forms of carbon-14 in the off-gas into CO2 three main processes for trapping are used either separately or in combination. These are sorption, freezing and chemical processes. Absorption in alkaline solutions or solids or molecular sieve adsorption are the most frequently used methods. The main counting methods used are gas proportional counting and liquid scintillation counting

  10. Carbon-14 production compared to oxygen isotope records from Camp Century, Greenland and Devon Island, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 production rate variations that are not explainable by geomagnetic changes are thought to be in antiphase with solar activity and as such should be in antiphase with paleotemperature records or proxy temperature histories such as those obtainable from oxygen isotope analyses of ice cores. Oxygen isotope records from Camp Century, Greeland and Devon Island Ice Cap are in phase with each other over thousands of years and in antiphase to the 14C production rate residuals. (Auth.)

  11. Carbon-14 immobilization via the CO2-Ba(OH)2 hydrate gas-solid reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although no restrictions have been placed on the release of carbon-14, it has been identified as a potential health hazard due to the ease in which it may be assimilated into the biosphere. The intent of the Carbon-14 Immobilization Program, funded through the Airborne Waste Program Management Office, is to develop and demonstrate a novel process for restricting off-gas releases of carbon-14 from various nuclear facilities. The process utilizes the CO2-Ba(OH)2 hydrate gas-solid reaction to directly remove and immobilize carbon-14. The reaction product, BaCO3, possesses both the thermal and chemical stability desired for long-term waste disposal. The process is capable of providing decontamination factors in excess of 1000 and reactant utilization of greater than 99% in the treatment of high volumetric, airlike (330 ppM CO2) gas streams. For the treatment of an air-based off-gas stream, the use of packed beds of Ba(OH)2.8H2O flakes to remove CO2 has been demonstrated. However, the operating conditions must be maintained between certain upper and lower limits with respect to the partial pressure of water. If the water vapor pressure in the gas is less than the dissociation vapor pressure of Ba(OH)2.8H2O, the bed will deactivate. If the vapor pressure is considerably greater, pressure drop problems will increase with increasing humidity as the particles curl and degrade. Results have indicated that when operated in the proper regime, the bulk of the increase in pressure drop results from the conversion of Ba(OH)2.8H2O to BaCO3 and not from the hydration of the commercial Ba(OH)2.8H2O (i.e. Ba(OH)2.7.50H2O) to Ba(OH)2.8H2O

  12. Determination of carbon-14 environmental samples by mixing 14CO2 with a liquid scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the determination of Carbon-14 (14CO2) in environmental samples has been developed. The method use the direct absorption of the carbon dioxide into Carbosorb, followed with incorporation of the mixture (Carbosorb-CO2) to the liquid scintillator. The results obtained to apply this method and the benzene synthesis, usual in our laboratory, are discused and compared. The method of collection of atmospheric samples is also described. (Author)

  13. Determination of Carbon-14 in environmental samples by mixing 14CO2 with a liquid scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the determination of Carbon-14 (14CO2) in environmental samples has been developed. The method use the direct absorption of the carbon dioxide into Carbosorb, followed with incorporation of the mixture (Carbosorb-CO2) to the liquid scintillator. The results obtained to apply this method and the benzene synthesis, usual in our laboratory, are discussed and compared. The method of collection of atmospheric samples is also described. (Author) 10 refs

  14. A potent IκB kinase-β inhibitor labeled with carbon-14 and deuterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latli, Bachir; Eriksson, Magnus; Hrapchak, Matt; Busacca, Carl A; Senanayake, Chris H

    2016-06-30

    3-Amino-4-(1,1-difluoro-propyl)-6-(4-methanesulfonyl-piperidin-1-yl)-thieno[2,3-b]pyridine-2-carboxylic acid amide (1) is a potent IκB Kinase-β (IKK-β) inhibitor. The efficient preparations of this compound labeled with carbon-14 and deuterium are described. The carbon-14 synthesis was accomplished in six radiochemical steps in 25% overall yield. The key transformations were the modified Guareschi-Thorpe condensation of 2-cyano-(14) C-acetamide and a keto-ester followed by chlorination to 2,6-dichloropyridine derivative in one pot. The isolated dichloropyridine was then converted in three steps in one pot to [(14) C]-(1). The carbon-14 labeled (1) was isolated with a specific activity of 54.3 mCi/mmol and radiochemical purity of 99.8%. The deuterium labeled (1) was obtained in eight steps and in 57% overall chemical yield using 4-hydroxypiperidine-2,2,3,3,4,5,5,6,6-(2) H9 . The final three steps of this synthesis were run in one pot. PMID:27073120

  15. Simulation of groundwater flow in the Voltaian (around Tamale) using carbon-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studying the process of groundwater flow in subsurface systems using numerical simulation has been widely practiced. The purpose of this study was to establish a 2D groundwater flow model for evaluating groundwater resources of the Voltaian Basin (around Tamale) in the Northern Region of Ghana. To understand the rate of abstraction of groundwater in the study area, a finite-element, steady-state groundwater flow model was used to simulate groundwater flow in the aquifer. COMSOL Multiphysics' (FEMLAB) Earth Science Module (ESM) package which is finite element analysis and solver software was used. The radioisotope used in the study was Carbon-14. Three wells were sampled for Carbon-14 concentration and used for the model verification, based on elevation. From the results, groundwater in the study area moves generally from higher to lower hydraulic head along paths perpendicular to the equipotential lines. The groundwater flow paths in the aquifer in the study area indicated that flow is predominantly regional. There was a regional groundwater flow from Kashegu to Nawuni. Kanshegu appears to be recharge area and Nawuni as discharge area. The flow rate obtained using Carbon-14 date was 2.86×10-7 m/s. The overall flow rate obtained from the model simulations was 2.66×10-7 m/s with an error margin of 6%. (author)

  16. A study of the levels and distribution of carbon-14 and iodine-129 in the Irish marine and terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sellafield nuclear fuel reprocessing plant is considered to be the largest single source of global anthropogenic carbon-14 discharge, as well as a substantial source of iodine-129. This study addresses the effects of these releases on the Irish coastal marine environment. In particular, spatial trends in the carbon-14 content of seaweed (Fucus spp.) were assessed by collecting and analysing samples from well-distributed locations around the Irish coastline. Temporal trends were studied by comparing carbon-14 concentrations in present-day samples with levels found in archive material collected at the same locations during research campaigns conducted in the mid-1980s and mid-1990s. Contamination by carbon-14 discharged from Sellafield was most evident in seaweeds from the northeastern Irish coast. This indicates that the pattern of residual currents and, in particular, the south to north transfer of water known to predominate in the Irish Sea, largely controls the spatial distribution of carbon-14 releases. Maximum carbon-14 discharge levels to the marine environment from Sellafield were mirrored by peak concentrations found in seaweed from the mid-1990s and in present-day samples. Concentrations of carbon-14 in seaweed from the west coast of Ireland correspond closely with values measured for seaweeds from the Atlantic coast of northwest Spain and do not appear to be significantly affected by Sellafield discharges

  17. NOx abatement through urea additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared with catalytic denitrification, the use of urea in thermic processes of selective, non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), when combined with primary measures, constitutes an inexpensive alternative way of abating NOx emissions by means of combustion processes and waste incineration plants. A natural-gas fired and also electrically heated flow reactor was used in a number of fast series to systematically determine the influences of retention time, reaction temperature, reductant (ammonia or urea), molar ratio, and additives (ethanol) on the process. Balancing the input and output nitrogenous substances served to describe the partial shift through addition of ethanol of the reaction towards incomplete reduction and greater N2O emission. (orig.)

  18. Breath by breath analysis of breathing pattern in health and disease: a potential outcome measure for breathing retraining?

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Wai

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of breathing pattern can quantify parameters of breathing such as rate, volume, timing and regularity/rhythmicity. This information can be useful to compare breathing patterns in those healthy and with disease, under different experiment conditions (such as rest versus activity) and to monitor changes over time. In this research, respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP) was used to record breathing patterns in a group of healthy subjects and a group of severe asthma patients. ...

  19. High plasma urea concentrations in collodion babies

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    We describe two infants born with a collodion membrane; both were treated with a product containing 10% urea and 5% lactic acid and as a consequence were found to have a raised plasma urea concentration.

  20. Application of the dose limitation system to the control of carbon-14 releases from heavy-water-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy-water-moderated reactors produce substantially more carbon-14 than light-water reactors. Applying the principles of the systems of dose limitation, the paper presents the rationale used for establishing the release limit for effluents containing this nuclide and for the decisions made regarding the effluent treatment in the third nuclear power station in Argentina. Production of carbon-14 in PHWR and the release routes are analysed in the light of the different effluent treatment possibilities. An optimization assessment is presented, taking into account effluent treatment and waste management costs, and the collective effective dose commitment due to the releases. The contribution of present carbon-14 releases to future individual doses is also analysed in the light of an upper bound for the contribution, representing a fraction of the individual dose limits. The paper presents the resulting requirements for the effluent treatment regarding carbon-14 and the corresponding regulatory aspects used in Argentina. (author)

  1. The Breath of Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josephsen, Jens

    The present preliminary text is a short thematic presentation in biological inorganic chemistry meant to illustrate general and inorganic (especially coordination) chemistry in biochemistry. The emphasis is on molecular models to explain features of the complicated mechanisms essential to breathing...

  2. Firefighter's Breathing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclaughlan, P. B.; Giorgini, E. A.; Sullivan, J. L.; Simmonds, M. R.; Beck, E. J.

    1976-01-01

    System, based on open-loop demand-type compressed air concept, is lighter and less bulky than former systems, yet still provides thirty minutes of air supply. Comfort, visibility, donning time, and breathing resistance have been improved. Apparatus is simple to recharge and maintain and is comparable in cost to previously available systems.

  3. Breathing Like a Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros J.

    2010-01-01

    Being able to dive and breathe underwater has been a challenge for thousands of years. In 1980, Fuji Systems of Tokyo developed a series of prototype gills for divers as a way of demonstrating just how good its membranes are. Even though gill technology has not yet reached the point where recipients can efficiently use implants to dive underwater,…

  4. Oronasal breathing during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibene, F; Mognoni, P; Lafortuna, C L; Mostardi, R

    1978-12-15

    The shift from nasal to oronasal breathing (ONBS) has been observed on 73 subjects with two independent methods. A first group of 63 subjects exercising on a bicycle ergometer at increasing work load (98--196 W) has been observed. On 35 subjects the highest value of ventilation attained with nasal breathing was 40.2 +/- 9.41 . min-1 S.D. Ten subjects breathed through the mouth at all loads, while 5 never opened the mouth. On 13 subjects it was not possible to make reliable measurements. On a second group of 10 subjects utilizing a different techniques which did not need a face mask, the ventilation at which one changes the pattern of breathing was found to be 44.2 +/- 13.51 . min-1 S.D. On the same subjects nasal resistance did not show any correlation with ONBS. It is concluded that ONBS is not solely determined by nasal resistance, though an indirect effect due to hypoventilation and hence to changes in alveolar air composition cannot be ruled out. It is likely that ONBS is also influenced by psychological factors. PMID:569826

  5. Urea Biosynthesis Using Liver Slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teal, A. R.

    1976-01-01

    Presented is a practical scheme to enable introductory biology students to investigate the mechanism by which urea is synthesized in the liver. The tissue-slice technique is discussed, and methods for the quantitative analysis of metabolites are presented. (Author/SL)

  6. Pembuatan Biosensor Urea Dengan Transduser Tembaga

    OpenAIRE

    Khairi

    2010-01-01

    Pada penelitian ini dilaporkan pembuatan biosensor urea dengan metode potensiometri secara elektroda selektifion (ESI). Elektroda ini disebut elektroda urea tipe kawat terlapis. Elektroda urea diimobilisasi oleh enzim urease secara entrapmen pada kawat tembaga berdiameter 0,2 mm dengan komposisi membran PVC (polivinilklorida) : THF (tetrahidrofuran) : urease = 10 mg : 1,5 mL : 200 mg. Konsentrasi urea dalam sampel ditentukan berdasarkan perubahan pH yang dihasilkan dari reaksi hidrolis...

  7. Measurements of the Water Vapour, Tritium and Carbon-14 Content of the Middle Stratosphere over Southern England

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, F; Goldsmith, P.; Green, H F; Holt, A.; Parham, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of the water vapour, tritium and carbon-14 content of the stratosphere at heights of between 80,000 and 100,000 feet, made over England during the years 1956 to 1960, are described. The tritium and carbon-14 concentrations are greater than those expected from natural production due to the cosmic radiation. The bulk of these two isotopes, at present in the stratosphere, has been injected there during the course of thermonuclear explosions. Mass spectrometric analyses show that t...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721... Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an alkylated urea (PMN P-93-1649) is subject to reporting under...

  9. A moderator ion exchange model to predict carbon-14 behaviour during operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 emissions from CANDU 6 stations are reduced through the removal of inorganic carbon ions by the ion exchange (IX) columns in the moderator purification system. A model has been developed to simulate the ion exchange behaviour of anions and cations present in the moderator. The model can be used to generate breakthrough curves for IX columns. Results from the program were compared to breakthrough curves generated by a small-scale experimental facility as well as data collected from Wolsong-3 where the IX column remained in service well past the recommended time. In both cases, the breakthrough curves were similar to the collected data. (author)

  10. Breath tests sustainability in hospital settings: cost analysis and reimbursement in the Italian National Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, M; Scaldaferri, F; Ojetti, V; Poscia, A

    2013-01-01

    The high demand of Breath Tests (BT) in many gastroenterological conditions in time of limited resources for health care systems, generates increased interest in cost analysis from the point of view of the delivery of services to better understand how use the money to generate value. This study aims to measure the cost of C13 Urea and other most utilized breath tests in order to describe key aspects of costs and reimbursements looking at the economic sustainability for the hospital. A hospital based cost-analysis of the main breath tests commonly delivery in an ambulatory setting is performed. Mean salary for professional nurses and gastroenterologists, drugs/preparation used and disposable materials, purchase and depreciation of the instrument and the testing time was used to estimate the cost, while reimbursements are based on the 2013 Italian National Health System ambulatory pricelist. Variables that could influence the model are considered in the sensitivity analyses. The mean cost for C13--Urea, Lactulose and Lactose BT are, respectively, Euros 30,59; 45,20 and 30,29. National reimbursement often doesn't cover the cost of the analysis, especially considering the scenario with lower number of exam. On the contrary, in high performance scenario all the reimbursement could cover the cost, except for the C13 Urea BT that is high influenced by the drugs cost. However, consideration about the difference between Italian Regional Health System ambulatory pricelist are done. Our analysis shows that while national reimbursement rates cover the costs of H2 breath testing, they do not cover sufficiently C13 BT, particularly urea breath test. The real economic strength of these non invasive tests should be considered in the overall organization of inpatient and outpatient clinic, accounting for complete diagnostic pathway for each gastrointestinal disease. PMID:24443075

  11. Rapid localization of carbon 14-labeled molecules in biological samples by ion mass microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here on the ability of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to provide rapid imaging of the intracellular distribution of 14C-labeled molecules. The validity of this method, using mass discrimination of carbon 14 atoms, was assessed by imaging the distribution of two molecules of well-known metabolism, [14C]-thymidine and [14C]-uridine, incorporated by human fibroblasts in culture. As expected, 14C ion images showed the presence of [14C]-thymidine in the nucleus of dividing cells, whereas [14C]-uridine was present in the cytoplasm as well as the nucleus of all cells, with a large concentration in the nucleoli. The time required to obtain the distribution images with the SMI 300 microscope was less than 6 min, whereas microautoradiography, the classical method for mapping the tissue distribution of 14C-labeled molecules, usually requires exposure times of several months. Secondary ion mass spectrometry using in situ mass discrimination is proposed here as a very sensitive method which permits rapid imaging of the subcellular distribution of molecules labeled with carbon 14

  12. Carbon-14 as an indicator of CO2 pollution in cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combustion of fossil fuels in cities, and especially in industrial areas, releases large quantities of carbon dioxide into the local atmosphere. This carbon dioxide does not contain carbon-14, with the result that the carbon-14 content of the atmospheric carbon dioxide is locally depleted. The degree of depletion provides a measure for the carbon dioxide pollution at the sampling site. Since growing plants represent a convenient average sample of the carbon dioxide in the air, the leaves of deciduous trees can be used for comparing the magnitude of local pollution in different localities during the summer growing period. A series of leaf samples collected in 1973 from Europe, North America and South Africa reveals the expected differences in the degree of pollution. Extreme instances occur in Scholven (Ruhrgebiet, Germany), where the average day-time carbon dioxide content during the summer months is found to be 8.7% above normal, and in Manhatten, New York City, where the corresponding figure is 6.4%. The technique can easily be extended to include the winter months by directly absorbing carbon dioxide in a hydroxide solution during different seasons. The proposed method is sensitive but much less time-consuming than the continuous measurement of the carbon dioxide concentration in the air. It thus lends itself to the monitoring of impact areas of pollution. (author)

  13. The use of barytocalcite for carbon 14 immobilization: One-year leaching behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent nuclear fuel reprocessing process is one of the anthropogenic sources of carbon-14, and since this element is highly mobile in the geosphere, its sequestration is necessary. Several phases and industrial solutions to immobilize this radionuclide have been studied, including the barytocalcite phase BaCa(CO3)2 at 8.08 wt.% of C, which has many advantages such as its low specific volume of carbon. Recently, different options to synthesize this phase have been reported. Here we report on the aqueous durability of barytocalcite, studied for one year with pure water at 30 °C, in order to complete the behavior studies. Unexpected leaching behavior was encountered: it had been supposed that barytocalcite would only leach slowly, but after 1 year, it was no longer present. It appears that its simple CaCO3 and BaCO3 constituents precipitated, though the overall carbon loss was low during the period studied. This research gives a new insight into the behavior of this phase regarding carbon-14 immobilization

  14. Mountain scale modeling of transient, coupled gas flow, heat transfer and carbon-14 migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We simulate mountain-scale coupled heat transfer and gas flow at Yucca Mountain. A coupled rock-gas flow and heat transfer model, TGIF2, is used to simulate mountain-scale two-dimensional transient heat transfer and gas flow. The model is first verified against an analytical solution for the problem of an infinite horizontal layer of fluid heated from below. Our numerical results match very well with the analytical solution. Then, we obtain transient temperature and gas flow distributions inside the mountain. These distributions are used by a transient semianalytical particle tracker to obtain carbon-14 travel times for particles starting at different locations within the repository. Assuming that the repository is filled with 30-year-old waste at an initial areal power density of 57 kw/acre, we find that repository temperatures remain above 60 degrees C for more than 10,000 years. Carbon-14 travel times to the surface are mostly less than 1000 years, for particles starting at any time within the first 10,000 years

  15. Measurement of the carbon 14 activity at natural level in air samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to measure the carbon 14 activity at natural level in air samples using classical methods of radiochemistry and beta counting. Three different methods have been tested in order to minimise the detection limit. In the three methods, the first step consists in trapping the atmospheric carbon 14 into NaOH (1N) using a bubbling chamber. The atmospheric carbon dioxide reacts with NaOH to form Na2CO3. In the first method the Na2CO3 solution is mixed with a liquid scintillate and is directly analysed by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The detection limit is approximately 1 Bq/m3 of air samples. The second method consists in evaporating the carbonate solution and then counting the solid residue with a proportional gas circulation counter. The detection limit obtained is lower than the first method (0.4 Bq/m3 of air samples). In the third method, Na2CO3 is precipitated into CaCO3 in presence of CaCl2. CaCO3 is then analysed by LSC. This method appear to be the most appropriate, the detection limit is 0.05 Bq/m3 of air samples. (author)

  16. Learn More Breathe Better

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-16

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a serious lung disease that makes breathing very difficult and can affect your quality of life. Learn the causes of COPD and what you can do to prevent it.  Created: 11/16/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adult and Community Health (NCCDPHP, DACH).   Date Released: 11/16/2011.

  17. Urea biosensor for hemodialysis monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.S.

    1999-01-12

    This research discloses an electrochemical sensor capable of detecting and quantifying urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures. The sensor is based upon measurement of the pH change produced in an aqueous environment by the products of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The sensor may be fabricated using methods amenable to mass fabrication, resulting in low-cost sensors and thus providing the potential for disposable use. In a typical application, the sensor could be used in treatment centers, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. The sensor can also be utilized to allow at-home testing to determine if dialysis was necessary. Such a home monitor is similar, in principle, to devices used for blood glucose testing by diabetics, and would require a blood droplet sample by using a finger prick. 9 figs.

  18. Urea biosensor for hemodialysis monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor capable of detecting and quantifying urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures. The sensor is based upon measurement of the pH change produced in an aqueous environment by the products of the enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The sensor may be fabricated using methods amenable to mass fabrication, resulting in low-cost sensors and thus providing the potential for disposable use. In a typical application, the sensor could be used in treatment centers, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. The sensor can also be utilized to allow at-home testing to determine if dialysis was necessary. Such a home monitor is similar, in principle, to devices used for blood glucose testing by diabetics, and would require a blood droplet sample by using a finger prick.

  19. Probing plasmonic breathing modes optically

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The confinement of surface plasmon modes in flat nanoparticles gives rise to plasmonic breathing modes. With a vanishing net dipole moment, breathing modes do not radiate, i.e., they are optically dark. Having thus escaped optical detection, breathing modes were only recently revealed in silver nanodisks with electron energy loss spectroscopy in an electron microscope. We show that for disk diameters >200 nm, retardation induced by oblique optical illumination relaxes the optically dark character. This makes breathing modes and thus the full plasmonic mode spectrum accessible to optical spectroscopy. The experimental spectroscopy data are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations

  20. Prise en compte du carbone 14 dans le modèle PASIM

    OpenAIRE

    Duclos, Etienne

    2010-01-01

    J'ai effectué mon stage de fin d'étude d'ingénieur ISIMA au sein de l'Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), dans l'Unité de Recherche sur l'Ecosystème Prairial (UREP). Mon stage a été effectué en collaboration avec l'Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN). J'ai été chargé d'ajouter la gestion du carbone 14 au sein de PaSim, modèle de simulation de prairie gérant déjà les flux de carbone et d'azote. Il m'a donc fallu faire la distinction, au...

  1. Atmospheric nuclear weapons test history narrated by carbon-14 in human teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons since 1945 caused a significant increase in the concentration of atmospheric 14C. The 14C concentration in plants that assimilate 14C directly by photosynthesis reflects the atmospheric 14C concentration. Carbon-14 is then transferred into the human body through the food chain. Based on animal experiments, the collagen in human teeth is metabolically inert after its formation. This implies that the collagen of each tooth retains the 14C concentration which reflects the 14C concentration in the blood at the time collagen metabolism ceased. The distribution of the 14C concentration in the collagen of teeth from subjects of various ages would follow a pattern similar to that shown by soft tissues. In this paper the authors elucidate the relationship between the number of nuclear weapon tests and the distribution of 14C concentration in teeth

  2. A detective from the past called carbon 14; Un detective del pasado llamado carbono 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trintan, R. M.

    2015-07-01

    The analysis is carried out using Radiometry or Accelerator mass spectrometry. After the system allowing to date the age of any organic rest - whether a fossil, a wood fragment, a parchment or a seed - is an isotope called carbon-14. An atom that comes from reactions nuclear produced in the atmosphere and cosmic-ray-induced they interact with oxygen to form carbon dioxide. This element they absorb it plants in photosynthesis and then passes to the animals remained almost unchanged during the life of the organism. to the meet the initial ratio of c-14 that had been in the atmosphere before his death, the remains that are left in it determine the elapsed time. (Author)

  3. Tritium- and carbon-14-contents of wines of different vintage from the northern and southern hemisphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon-14 and tritium radioactivity contents of up to 19 vintages of German and Southafrican wines were compared. A similar large dependence of the 14C- and of the 3H-activity in the German wine on the nuclear weapon tests of the years 1962/63 was found out. The radioactivity level is also 1977/78 still essentially higher than before 1950. The Southafrican wines have been influenced considerably less by nuclear explosions. The highest 3H-values were found in the vintage 1963 of the German wine with 5910 pCi/litre and in the vintage 1964 of the Southafrican wine with 510 pCi/litre. (orig.)

  4. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg

  5. Photosynthesis and assimilate partitioning characteristics of the coconut palm as observed by carbon-14 labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique was developed on the use of carbon dioxide(carbon-14 labelled) rapid labelling of foliage and to ascertain photosynthesis and partitioning characteristics of labelled assimilate into other parts of the coconut palm. An eight-year-old Tall x Tall young coconut palm growing under field conditions at Bandirippuwa Estate and with six developing bunches , was selected for this study. The labelling was carried out on a bright sunny day and soil was at field capacity. Seventh leaf from the youngest open leaf was used for labelling with 5 mCi of sodium bi carbonate (Carbon-14 labelled). The results revealed that within 24 hours, 60% of the labelled assimilate was partitioned into other parts of the palm and at the end of the seventh day about 18% of the labelled assimilate still remained in the labelled leaf. Among the developing bunches fifth and sixth bunches from the youngest developing bunch received more labelled assimilate than young developing bunches above them. It was revealed that partitioning of assimilate into various ''sinks'' is determined by the developmental stage or activeness of the ''sink''. The proportion of C-14 labelled carbon assimilate, partitioned into developing bunches was substantially low compared to the total amount of labelled carbon fixed by the labelled leaf. Further, it was observed that partitioning of assimilated labelled carbon into the young leaves above, as well as the mature leaves below the labelled leaf. The complex vascular anatomy of the palms could be attributed to this pattern of partitioning of assimilates into upper and lower leaves from the labelled leaf

  6. A 20-minute breath test for helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we evaluated a simplified rapid 14C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori. Fasting patients undergoing initial assessment for H. pylori drank 5 microCi of 14C-urea in 20 ml of water. Breath was collected at intervals for 30 min. Samples were counted in a beta-counter, and the results were expressed as counts per minute (cpm). In the same week, patients underwent endoscopy, and a blinded investigator examined biopsy samples of gastric mucosa by culture and histology for H. pylori. There were 49 H. pylori-negative (HP-) and 104 H. pylori-positive (HP+) patients in the study. HP+ patients expired a mean of 4398 cpm (SD 2468) per mmol CO2 in a sample taken 20 min after ingestion of the isotope. In contrast, HP--patients expired only 340 cpm (SD 196). If the mean +3 SD of HP- patients was used as a cutoff value, the 20-minute sample gave a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 100% for detecting H. pylori. The radiation exposure from this test is less than 1% of that received from an upper gastrointestinal series, and the short collection time makes it both convenient and cost effective

  7. Nutritional factors influencing milk urea in buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Proto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Urea is the primary form in which N is excreted in ruminants. Milk urea (MU content was introduced as a means to monitor the efficiency of protein utilisation in dairy cattle (Baker et al., 1995; Roseler et al., 1993; Bertoni, 1995. In this study the effect of some nutrition factors on MU content in buffalo herds was analysed in order to examine the possibility that protein nutrition could be monitored by means of milk urea at herd level........

  8. Urea synthesis in patients with chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamberg, Ole; Sonne, J; Larsen, S;

    2001-01-01

    Up-regulation of urea synthesis by amino acids and dietary protein intake may be impaired in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) due to the reduced glucagon secretion. Conversely, urea synthesis may be increased as a result of the chronic inflammation. The aims of the study were to determine...... urea synthesis kinetics in CP patients in relation to glucagon secretion (study I) and during an increase in protein intake (study II)....

  9. Breath-by-breath measurement of particle deposition in the lung of spontaneously breathing rats

    OpenAIRE

    S. Karrasch; Eder, G.; Bolle, I.; Tsuda, A.; Schulz, H

    2009-01-01

    A number of deposition models for humans, as well as experimental animals, have been described. However, no breath-by-breath deposition measurement in rats has been reported to date. The objective of this study is to determine lung deposition of micrometer-sized particles as a function of breathing parameters in the adult rat lung. A new aerosol photometry system was designed to measure deposition of nonhygroscopic, 2-μm sebacate particles in anesthetized, intubated, and spontaneously breathi...

  10. Urea and deuterium mixtures at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urea, like many network forming compounds, has long been known to form inclusion (guest-host) compounds. Unlike other network formers like water, urea is not known to form such inclusion compounds with simple molecules like hydrogen. Such compounds if they existed would be of interest both for the fundamental insight they provide into molecular bonding and as potential gas storage systems. Urea has been proposed as a potential hydrogen storage material [T. A. Strobel et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 478, 97 (2009)]. Here, we report the results of high-pressure neutron diffraction studies of urea and D2 mixtures that indicate no inclusion compound forms up to 3.7 GPa

  11. Clinical applications of breath testing

    OpenAIRE

    Paschke, Kelly M; Mashir, Alquam; Dweik, Raed A.

    2010-01-01

    Breath testing has the potential to benefit the medical field as a cost-effective, non-invasive diagnostic tool for diseases of the lung and beyond. With growing evidence of clinical worth, standardization of methods, and new sensor and detection technologies the stage is set for breath testing to gain considerable attention and wider application in upcoming years.

  12. Rapid shallow breathing index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A; Pillai, Lalitha V; Arabi, Yaseen M

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  13. Carbon-14 dating of a mummy from 'Caverna da Babilonia', Rio Novo Country, south of Minas Gerais (MG, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vegetable fibers of a cloth wrapping a mummy of a woman, found in 'Caverna da Babilonia' (MG, Brazil), were dated with carbon-14. There is strong evidence that it is a pre-colombian mummym since the age of the sample is 600 + - 80 years (1σ). (C.L.B.)

  14. Synthesis of carbon-14 analogue of 1,5 diaryl-5-[14C]-1,2,3-triazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two 1,2,3-triazole anticonvulsants, 1-(4-methylsulfone-phenyl)-5-(4-methyl-phenyl)-1,2,3-triazole and 1-(4-methylsulfone-phenyl)-5-phenyl-1,2,3-triazole, both labeled with carbon-14 in the 5-position were prepared from para-tolunitrile-[cyano-14C] and benzonitrile-[cyano-14C], respectively

  15. Almagate interference in breath test results for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Pons

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection by Helicobacter pylori is common and affects both genders at any age. The 13C-urea breath test is a widely used test for the diagnosis of this infection. However, multiple drugs used for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection symptoms have interactions with this breath test that generate false negative results. This observational study was to assess the potential interaction between almagate and the breath test. Methods: Thirty subjects on almagate therapy who underwent a breath test were included. If the result was negative, almagate was withdrawn for a month and the breath test was then repeated. Results: In general, 51.9 % of assessed subjects had a negative result after the first test, and 100 % of these also had a negative result after the second test. Conclusions: It was concluded that the use of almagate does not interfere in breath test results. These results provide a drug therapy option for the treatment of symptoms associated with Helicobacter pylori infection during the diagnostic process.

  16. (13)C-5-FU breath test current status and future directions: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzeldin, Hany H; Acosta, Edward P; Mattison, Lori K; Fourie, Jeanne; Modak, Anil; Diasio, Robert B

    2009-12-01

    Breath tests (BTs) represent a safe non-invasive alternative strategy that could provide valuable diagnostic information in conditions like fat malabsorption, carbohydrate (lactose and fructose) malabsorption, liver dysfunction, impaired gastric emptying, abnormal small bowel transit time, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and Helicobacter pylori infection. To date, despite the availability of a number of breath tests, only three have gained approval by the FDA for application in a clinical setting ((13)C-urea breath test for the detection of H. pylori; NO breath test for monitoring asthma and alkane breath test for heart transplant rejection). Unfortunately, none of these tests investigate cancer patients or response to cancer chemotherapy. Several years ago it was realized that the presence of a reliable non-invasive approach could assist in the detection of patients at risk of developing severe life-threatening toxicities prior to the administration of fluoropyrimidines (e.g. 5-FU) or related cancer chemotherapy. 5-FU toxicity results mainly from deficient uracil catabolism. This review discusses the development of a BT that utilizes an orally administered pyrimidine ([2-(13)C]-uracil) which is metabolized via the same catabolic pathway as 5-FU. This ([2-(13)C]-uracil) breath test could provide a valuable addition to the patients' standard of care. PMID:21386199

  17. The history of ironware in Japan revealed by the AMS-carbon 14 age method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on the influence what the AMS-carbon 14 age method attains to the history of the iron in the Japanese Islands. The research team in National Museum of Japanese History makes a clear that the Yayoi period began in 10 Cen. cal BC. However, there was a problem in this. It is iron. If the Yayoi period has started in the 10th Cen. BC, it means that the ironware in Japanese Islands had spread early rather than it spreads in China. The research team reexamined the ironware excavated from Magarita site in the Fukuoka Pref. considered to be the oldest ironware in Japan. Consequently, the excavation situation was indefinite and it turned out that we cannot specify the time to belong. Furthermore, 36 ironwares in the initial and early Yayoi were also already found by that time cannot be specified except for two points. Therefore, it turned out that Japanese ironware appeared in the 3rd century of B.C. What does this mean? Although it had been thought that the beginning of agriculture in Japan and the appearance of ironware were simultaneous, it turned out that agriculture has appeared early about in 700 years. Therefore, it became clear that agriculture of Japan started at the Stone Age. (author)

  18. Carbon-14, tritium, stable isotope and chemical measurements on thermal waters from the Tauranga region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical compositions of groundwater from the Tauranga region are affected to varying degrees by reducing conditions due to buried organic matter. The levels of some dissolved constituents are also affected by mixing with sea water contained within the rocks and by rock-water interaction. Dissolved gas compositions range from oxygen-bearing to methane-bearing reflecting the varying redox conditions. Excess air may be present but further experiments are necessary to confirm this. Apparent ages deduced from carbon-14 measurements (corrected using 12C dilution and 13C fractionation methods) range from 2-25,000 years, suggesting that some of the waters were recharged during late Pleistocene or early Holocene time. ΔD and Δ18 O values of the oldest waters are slightly more negative than those of younger samples; this may indicate recharge during a cooler climate, in agreement with the 14C ages. Very low but significantly non-zero tritium contents (TR=(0.007-0.059)+-0.007) were measured using the high tritium-enrichment facilities at INS and the very low-background counters at the University of Bern. The tritium is thought to derive from contamination or nuclear reactions in the aquifer rocks rather than from recharge water

  19. Carbon-14 in waste packages for spent fuel in a tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 is produced naturally by cosmic ray neutrons in the upper atmosphere. It is also produced in nuclear reactors, in amounts much smaller than the global inventory. About one-third of this is released directly to the atmosphere, and the other two-thirds remains in the spent fuel. Both the Environmental Protection Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have established limits on release of the 14C in spent fuel. This is of particular concern for the proposed repository in tuff, because of the unsaturated conditions and the consequent possibility of gaseous transport of 14C as CO2. Existing measurements and calculations of the 14C inventory in spent fuel are reviewed. The physical distribution and chemical forms of the 14C are discussed. Available data on the release of 14C from spent fuel in aqueous solutions and in gaseous environments of air, nitrogen, and helium are reviewed. Projected 14C behavior in a tuff repository is described. It is concluded that 14C release measurements from spent fuel into moist air at temperatures both above and below the in situ boiling point of water as well as detailed transport calculations for the tuff geological environment will be needed to determine whether the 10CFR60 and 40CFR191 requirements can be met. 56 refs., 1 tab

  20. Automatic counting and recording unit used for dating by the carbon 14 method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of the unit used by the 'Centre Scientifique de Monaco' for low-level beta counting and fitted for radioactive dating by the Carbon 14 method. Built entirely by the laboratory in 1964, on the basis of electronic techniques then recent, it has worked without failure since that time. The proportional counter, its high-voltage negative supply, and the counting chains with visual and printing records are detailed by means of 38 figures which reproduce the counter and the electronic circuits. These are contained in two standard 5 U.I structures. The low-voltage power supply of the whole unit is carried out by plus 12 volts and minus 12 volts storage batteries, buffered on a charger connected on the 110 V alternative line. The proportional counter described is filled with CO2 under one atmosphere pressure and permits the dating of carbonaceous samples with a maximum of 30.000 + 1.000 years (background 3.96 c.p.m. ) within a moderate time (72 hours). (authors)

  1. Vertical transport of carbon-14 into deep-sea food webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearcy, W. G.; Stuiver, Minze

    1983-04-01

    During the years 1973 to 1976 the carbon-14 content was higher in epipelagic and vertically migrating, upper mesopelagic animals (caught between 0 and 500 m) than in lower mesopelagic, bathypelagic, and abyssobenthic animals (500 to 5180 m) in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Only one species of deep-sea fish had a Δ14C value as high as surface-caught fish. The 14C content of most animals was higher pre-bomb levels, but the relatively low 14C content of most deep-sea animals indicates that the majority of their carbon was not derived directly from a near-surface food chain labeled with bomb carbon. A mean residence time of about 35 y was estimated for the organic carbon pool for abyssobenthic animals based on the relative increase of radiocarbon in surface-dwelling animals since 1967. The results suggest that rapidly sinking particles from surface waters, such as fecal pellets, are not the major source of organic carbon for deep-sea fishes and large benthic invertebrates.

  2. Assessment of adequacy of pancreatic enzyme replacement with the multiple-phase carbon-14-triolein test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon-14-triolein absorption test was used to investigate fat absorption and its response to pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy in 10 men with pancreatic steatorrhoea. Absorption was increased in all, from 1,14 plus minus 1,2% of the dose per hour (group mean plus minus SD) to 2,85 plus minus 2,33% (P less than 0,01) by the simultaneous administration of 8 tablets of enteric-coated pancreatic enzymes (Nutrizym; Merck). In patients with normal or high gastric acid secretion, neutralization of gastric acid with 30 ml magnesium trisilicate had no effect on absorption while the addition of an extract of gastric secretions (Enzynorm; Noristan) to the therapy of the 1 achlorhydric patient improved absorption from 2,2% to 3,81%. The 14C fat test offers a rapid and more acceptable alternative method for determining individual response to pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy than the conventional 72-hour faecal fat excretion measurement. The enteric-coated pancreatin preparation used in this study appears to be optimally effective under conditions of normal gastric acid secretion

  3. Carbon-14 transfer into rice plants from a continuous atmospheric source: observations and model predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 (14C) is one of the most important radionuclides from the perspective of dose estimation due to the nuclear fuel cycle. Ten years of monitoring data on 14C in airborne emissions, in atmospheric CO2 and in rice grain collected around the Tokai reprocessing plant (TRP) showed an insignificant radiological effect of the TRP-derived 14C on the public, but suggested a minor contribution of the TRP-derived 14C to atmospheric 14C concentrations, and an influence on 14C concentrations in rice grain at harvest. This paper also summarizes a modelling exercise (the so-called rice scenario of the IAEA's EMRAS program) in which 14C concentrations in air and rice predicted with various models using information on 14C discharge rates, meteorological conditions and so on were compared with observed concentrations. The modelling results showed that simple Gaussian plume models with different assumptions predict monthly averaged 14C concentrations in air well, even for near-field receptors, and also that specific activity and dynamic models were equally good for the prediction of inter-annual changes in 14C concentrations in rice grain. The scenario, however, offered little opportunity for comparing the predictive capabilities of these two types of models because the scenario involved a near-chronic release to the atmosphere. A scenario based on an episodic release and short-term, time-dependent observations is needed to establish the overall confidence in the predictions of environmental 14C models

  4. Ammonia volatilization from coated urea forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antonio Costa do Nascimento

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen fertilization is a major component of the cost of agricultural production, due to the high cost and low efficiency of fertilizers. In the case of urea, the low efficiency is mainly due to losses by volatilization, which are more pronounced in cultivation systems in which plant residues are left on the soil. The objective of this work was to compare the influence of urea coated with sulfur or boric acid and copper sulfate with conventional N fertilizers on N volatilization losses in sugar cane harvested after stubble burning. The sources urea, sulfur-coated urea, urea coated with boric acid and copper sulfate, as well as nitrate and ammonium sulfate, were tested at amounts containing N rates of 120 kg ha-1 N. The integration of new technologies in urea fertilization can reduce N losses by volatilization. These losses were most reduced when using nitrate and ammonium sulfate. The application of a readily acidified substance (boric acid to urea was more efficient in reducing volatilization losses and nutrient removal by sugar cane than that of a substance with gradual acidification (elemental sulfur.

  5. Visualizing Breath using Digital Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, P. R.; Reid, I. D.; Wilton, J. B.

    2013-02-01

    Artist Jayne Wilton and physicists Peter Hobson and Ivan Reid of Brunel University are collaborating at Brunel University on a project which aims to use a range of techniques to make visible the normally invisible dynamics of the breath and the verbal and non-verbal communication it facilitates. The breath is a source of a wide range of chemical, auditory and physical exchanges with the direct environment. Digital Holography is being investigated to enable a visually stimulating articulation of the physical trajectory of the breath as it leaves the mouth. Initial findings of this research are presented. Real time digital hologram replay allows the audience to move through holographs of breath-born particles.

  6. Phytotoxicity of foliar-applied urea

    OpenAIRE

    Krogmeier, Michael J.; McCarty, Gregory W.; Bremner, John M.

    1989-01-01

    Recent work in our laboratory showed that the adverse effect of urea fertilizer on seed germination and seedling growth in soil is due to ammonia produced through hydrolysis of urea by soil urease (NH2CONH2 + H2O → 2NH3 + CO2) and can be eliminated by amending the fertilizer with a small amount of a urease inhibitor such as phenylphosphorodiamidate. Because the leaf-tip necrosis often observed after foliar fertilization of plants with urea is usually attributed to ammonia formed through hydro...

  7. Synthesis of 15 N double labelled urea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthesis of double 15 N labelled urea by reacting 15 N - ammonia with elemental sulfur and carbon monoxide in a pressure vessel is presented. 15 NH3 was produced by H15 NO3 reduction with Dewarda alloy in alkaline solution, or by nitric monoxide reduction with hydrogen on metallic manganese. An average yield of 85% tacking into account 15 N - urea and 15 N ammonium sulfate, produced in the same time, and 99% urea purity (checked by I.R. spectroscopy and mass spectrometry) were obtained. (authors)

  8. Effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.H. Florenzano

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates (aqueous and reversed micelles, vesicles and monolayers was investigated to obtain insights into the effect of the denaturant on structured macromolecules. Direct evidence obtained from light scattering (static and dynamic, monolayer maximum isothermal compression and ionic conductivity measurements, together with indirect evidence from fluorescence photodissociation, fluorescence suppression, and thermal reactions, strongly indicates the direct interaction mechanism of urea with the aggregates. Preferential solvation of the surfactant headgroups by urea results in an increase in the monomer dissociation degree (when applied, which leads to an increase in the area per headgroup and also in the loss of counterion affinities

  9. Effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florenzano, F H; Politi, M J

    1997-02-01

    The effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates (aqueous and reversed micelles, vesicles and monolayers) was investigated to obtain insights into the effect of the denaturant on structured macromolecules. Direct evidence obtained from light scattering (static and dynamic), monolayer maximum isothermal compression and ionic conductivity measurements, together with indirect evidence from fluorescence photodissociation, fluorescence suppression, and thermal reactions, strongly indicates the direct interaction mechanism of urea with the aggregates. Preferential solvation of the surfactant headgroups by urea results in an increase in the monomer dissociation degree (when applied), which leads to an increase in the area per headgroup and also in the loss of counterion affinities. PMID:9239302

  10. Ontogeny of rabbit proximal tubule urea permeability

    OpenAIRE

    Quigley, Raymond; LISEC, AMBER; Baum, Michel

    2001-01-01

    Urea transport in the proximal tubule is passive and is dependent on the epithelial permeability. The present study examined the maturation of urea permeability (Purea) in in vitro perfused proximal convoluted tubules (PCT) and basolateral membrane vesicles (BLMV) from rabbit renal cortex. Urea transport was lower in neonatal than adult PCT at both 37 and 25°C. The PCT Purea was also lower in the neonates than the adults (37°C: 45.4 ± 10.8 vs. 88.5 ± 15.2 × 10−6 cm/s, P < 0.05; 25°C: 28.5 ± 6...

  11. Release Kinetics of Urea from Polymer Coated Urea and Its Relationship with Coating Penetrability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hai-jun; WU Zhi-jie; CHEN Li-jun; LIANG Wen-ju

    2003-01-01

    Four kinds of polymer coated urea (PCU) were put in distilled water at 30C to determine the variation of coating penetrability and give a precise description of the urea release kinetics. The urea release from PCU could be divided into four stages: lag stage, swell stage, steady stage and decay stage. The release rate coefficient K, a measure of coating penetrability, was linearly increased at swell stage, but almost not variable at steady stage. At decay stage, the relation of K to time t could be described by the equation K= mtn-1(where m and n are the coefficients). When n>1, the coating penetrability was gradually increased, and the urea release from PCU was accelerated; when n=1, the coating penetrability was steady, and the urea release from PCU obeyed the first-order kinetics; and when n<1, the coating penetrability was gradually decreased,and the urea release from PCU was delayed, resulting in a significant "tailing effect".

  12. Study of a method of detection for natural carbon-14 using a liquid scintillator, recent variations in the natural radio-activity due to artificial carbon-14 (1963); Etude d'une methode de detection du carrons 14 naturel, utilisant un scintillateur liquide - variations recentes de l'activite naturelle dues au carbone 14 artificiel (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leger, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-06-15

    Among the various natural isotopes of carbon, a radioactive isotope, carbon-14, is formed by the action of secondary neutrons from cosmic rays on nitrogen in the air. Until 1950, the concentration of this isotope in ordinary carbon underwent weak fluctuations of about 2-3 per cent. The exact measurement of this concentration 6 X 10{sup 12} Ci/gm of carbon, and of its fluctuations, are difficult and in the first part of this report a highly sensitive method is given using a liquid scintillator. Since 1950 this natural activity has shown large fluctuations because of the carbon-14 formed during nuclear explosions, and in the second part, the evolution in France of this specific activity of carbon in the atmosphere and biosphere is examined. In the last part is studied the local increase in carbon activity in the atmosphere around the Saclay site, an increase caused by the carbon-14 given off as C{sup 14}O{sub 2}, by the reactors cooled partially with exterior air. (author) [French] Parmi les differents isotopes naturels du carbone, un isotope radioactif, le carbone 14, est forme par l'action de neutrons secondaires due aux rayons cosmiques sir l'azote de l'air. Jusqu'en 1950, la concentration de cet isotope dans le carbone ordinaire est soumise a des fluctuations de faible amplitude, de l'ordre de 2 a 3 pour cent. Les mesures precises de cette concentration, 6. 10{sup -12} Ci/g de carbone, et de ses fluctuations sont delicates, et dans la premiere partie de ce rapport, on decrit une methode de detection a grande sensibilite utilisant un scintillateur liquide. Depuis 1950, cette activite naturelle subit des fluctuations importantes dues au carbone 14 forme lors des explosions nucleaires, et dans la seconde partie, on examine l'evolution en France de l'activite specifique du carbone de l'atmosphere et ce la biosphere. Dans la derniere partie, on etudie l'accroissement local de l'activite du carbone de l'air aux

  13. Surface modified silicon nanochannel for urea sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yu; Hong, Mi; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2008-01-01

    Silicon nanowires have been surface functionalized with the enzyme urease for biosensor applications to detect and quantify urea concentration. The device is nanofabricated from a silicon on insulator (SOI) wafer with a top down lithography approach. The differential conductance of silicon nanowires can be tuned for optimum performance using the source drain bias voltage, and is sensitive to urea at low concentration. The experimental results show a linear relationship between surface potential change and urea concentration in the range of 0.1 to 0.68 mM. The sensitivity of our devices shows high reproducibility with time and different measurement conditions. The nanowire urea biosensor offers the possibility of high quality, reusable enzyme sensor array integration with silicon based circuits.

  14. Metabolism of urea in kids fed different levels of urea molasses diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urea entry rates were measured in the body pool of Barbari kids using a single injection isotope dilution technique. The kids were divided into five groups (T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5) and they were fed different levels of urea molasses viz., 10, 25, 35, 40 and 0 percent to meet their DCP requirement along with concentrate mixture and oat hay as per A.R.C. recommendation. Urea entry rate was significantly higher (P1 and the control group (T5 without urea in their diets) than that of T2, T3 and T4 which were not significantly different from each other. (author)

  15. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section 862....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and...

  16. Standardization of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) collection using a feedback regulated breathing pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) fluid by cooling of expired breath is a potentially valuable approach for the detection of biomarkers associated with disease or exposure to xenobiotics. EBC is generally collected using unregulated breathing patterns, perceived to el...

  17. Carbon-14 labelled sucrose transportation in an Arabidopsis thaliana using an imaging plate and real time imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an approach to increased production of rape seed oil from Brassica napus L., Arabidopsis thaliana, a species from the same Brassicaceae family, was used to investigate transport behavior and distribution of matter in the plant body. In this study, sucrose, an initial metabolic product of photosynthesis, labeled with carbon-14 was used. The sucrose was applied to A. thaliana via the surface of a rosette leaf. Using the real time radioisotope imaging system we developed and an imaging plate (IP), images of whole or part of the sample were obtained. The sucrose assimilation products were accumulated in maturing tissue such as flowers and fruits, and in a joint part. From the comparison among branches and stems, it was indicated that there were different patterns of demand and distribution of sucrose assimilation products depending on the tissue and its growing stage. This might be caused by either morphological reason such as diameter and location of the sieve tube, or genetic factors such as an activity of a membrane transport protein. Because of self-absorption of carpels, it was difficult to observe the accumulation of carbon-14 in the seeds inside the fruits; however, an IP image of a frozen section of a fruit revealed that carbon-14 transport to seeds was higher than that of carpels. These methods will help us gain insight into matter transport and strategies to improve the production of rape seed oil. (author)

  18. Transfer of blood urea into the goat colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transfer of blood urea to the temporarily isolated and perfused colon of conscious goats was measured. Simultaneously, total urea turnover was estimated using 14C-labelled urea. Three animals in the weight range 50-70 k were used, with appropriately placed cannulae. The entry of blood urea into the total gastrointestinal tract was estimated from the difference between total urea turnover renal urea excretion. When experimental conditions remained constant, such as the permeability of the gastrointestinal tract wall, blood urea diffusion into the colon depended on plasma urea concentration. Results of varying feeding conditions demonstrated that changes in permeability of the gastrointestinal tract will have a more pronounced influence on the amounts of blood urea entering the gastrointestinal tract than differences in plasma urea concentration

  19. Study on the way of urea removal by baf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofilm process is a kind of efficient way for sewage with high concentration of urea. A lot of researches on removal efficiency were carried out, but there existed less research for the process of urea removal. To understand the way of urea removal by biofilm process, biological aerated filter (BAF) was used to deal with sewage with high concentration of urea from a chemical plant, by studying adsorption property of the carrier, biomass and biological activity on the carrier, and contrastive analysis between hydrolysis product of urea and theoretical value was carried out and the microbial flora of urea removal was preliminarily determined using the method of inhibiting biological activity. The results showed that, removal of urea by BAF was mainly the result of biological action, the adsorption capacity of activated carbon for urea was limited, the dominant bacterial communities for the hydrolysis of urea were heterotrophic bacteria, and parts of nitrobacteria and nitrobacteria also had a certain capacity of hydrolyzing urea. (author)

  20. FMWC Radar for Breath Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Lau Frejstrup; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    We report on the experimental demonstration of an FMCW radar operating in the 25.7 - 26.6 GHz range with a repetition rate of 500 sweeps per second. The radar is able to track the breathing rate of an adult human from a distance of 1 meter. The experiments have utilized a 50 second recording window...... to accurately track the breathing rate. The radar utilizes a saw tooth modulation format and a low latency receiver. A breath tracking radar is useful both in medical scenarios, diagnosing disorders such as sleep apnea, and for home use where the user can monitor its health. Breathing is a central part of every...... sensing as other systems rely on either measuring the airflow at the mouth and nose through a mask or with a stretchable wire around the chest. In this paper a wireless system that is able to measure the breath rate of a human from a distance is presented. The system is based on a commercially available...

  1. Where c-14 urea breath tests lie in nuclear medicine. The detection of H pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the early 20th century, ulcers have been believed to be caused by stress and dietary factors. Treatment had focussed on hospitalisation, bed rest, and prescription of special bland foods. Later on, gastric acid was blamed for ulcer disease. Antacids and medication that block acid production became the standard of therapy. Despite this treatment, there seemed to be a high recurrence of ulcers. In 1982 a pair of Australian physicians Robin Warren and Barry Marshall were first to identify a link between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and ulcers, concluding that bacterium, not stress or diet, causes ulcers. However, the medical community was slow to accept their findings. It was not until 1994 that a Health Consensus Development Conference concluded that there was a strong association between H. pylori and ulcer diseases also recommending ulcer patients with H. pylori infection be treated with antibiotics. The paper discusses several tests, which have become available to medical staff in the detection of H. pylori. Sensitivity, specificity, relatively inexpensive ease of use and patient compliance are factors of a good diagnostic test. Copyright (2000) ANZ Nuclear Medicine

  2. Optimization of liquid scintillation counting techniques for the determination of carbon-14 in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this work was to optimize the liquid scintillation counting techniques for the determination of 14C in stack effluent gases and in environmental samples such as biological and air samples. Carbon-14 activities in most environmental samples were measured with the direct CO2 absorption method. The highest figures of merit were found through the variation of Carbosorb E and Permafluor V ratio, and measurement windows. The best condition was an 1:1 volume ratio. Average 2.35 g of CO2 was reproducibly absorbed in the 20 ml mixture within 40 minutes. The counting efficiency determined by repeated analysis of NIST oxalic acid standard and the background count rate were measured to be 58.8±1.4% and 1.88±0.06 cpm, respectively, in case of saturated solution. The correction curves of counting efficiency for partially saturated solutions and for saturated solutions with quenching were prepared, respectively. The overall uncertainty of the sample specific activity for near background levels was estimated to be about 7% for 4 hours counting at 95% confidence level. Stack effluent gas samples were measured by a gel suspension counting method. After precipitation of CO2 in the form of BaCO3, 140 mg of which was mixed with 6 ml H2O and 12 ml of Instagel XF. The counting efficiency was measured to be 71.5±1.7% and the typical sensitivity of this technique was about 510 mBq/m3 for a 100 min count at a background count rate of 4.7 cpm. For the benzene counting method measurements were performed with a mixture of 3 ml benzene and 1 ml of scintillation cocktail (5 g of butyl-PBD in 100 ml of scintillation-grade toluene) in a low potassium 7 ml borosilicate glass vial. The counting efficiency and the background count rate were measured to be 64.3±1.0% and 0.51±0.05 cpm, respectively. The long-term stability of samples has been checked for all the counting techniques over a two week period, during which no apparent change in counting efficiency and background level was

  3. Chemical Characterization and Removal of Carbon-14 from Irradiated Graphite II - 13023

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 250,000 tonnes of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide and that quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation IV gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. This situation indicates the need for a graphite waste management strategy. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 (C-14), with a half-life of 5730 years. Study of irradiated graphite from some nuclear reactors indicates C-14 is concentrated on the outer 5 mm of the graphite structure. The aim of the research presented last year and updated here is to identify the chemical form of C-14 in irradiated graphite and develop a practical method by which C-14 can be removed. A nuclear-grade graphite, NBG-18, and a high-surface-area graphite foam, POCOFoamR, were exposed to liquid nitrogen (to increase the quantity of C-14 precursor) and neutron-irradiated (1013 neutrons/cm2/s). Finer grained NBG-25 was not exposed to liquid nitrogen prior to irradiation at a neutron flux on the order of 1014 /cm2/s. Characterization of pre- and post-irradiation graphite was conducted to determine the chemical environment and quantity of C-14 and its precursors via the use of surface sensitive characterization techniques. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the morphological features of graphite samples. The concentration, chemical composition, and bonding characteristics of C-14 and its precursors were determined through X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis Spectroscopy (EDX). Results of post-irradiation characterization of these materials indicate a variety of surface functional groups containing carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen. During thermal treatment, irradiated graphite samples are heated in the presence of an inert carrier gas (with or without oxidant gas), which carries off gaseous products

  4. A Study of the Effects of Breath Management Instruction on the Breathing Mode, Knowledge of Breathing, and Performance Skills of College-Level Brass Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kenneth H.; Sehmann, Karin Harfst

    1990-01-01

    Investigates the effectiveness of breathing instruction on the breath management, performance, and knowledge of breathing among college-level brass musicians. Finds that breathing instruction significantly improved the breath management and knowledge of the breathing for the experimental groups and the musical range of the trombone players in the…

  5. Semiempirical model for diagnostication Helicobacter pylori infection by use of 14C labelled urea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of this study was to create a semiempirical model, helpful in estimating severity of the Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection by using the urea breath test (UBT), when urea labelled 14C has been used for diagnostics. The model consists of four compartments representing stomach (1), blood vascular system (2), lungs (3) and urinary system (4). Mathematical model is based on the balance of radioactive 14C in compartments from 1 to 4. The histological investigations were used as reference methods. Comparison of the results obtained from simulation, which yields dependence of 14C activity on time, to experimental results of UBT, made it possible to determine the ranges of coefficient HB value, which characterized each degrees of severity of H. pylori infection: degree 0 (lack of infection) - hB below 0.025; degree 1 (not large) - hB in range 0.025-0.115; degree 2 (moderate) - hB in the range 0.115-0.300; degree 3 (significant) - hB above 0.300. It was possible to estimate severity of H.pylori infection in clinical practice on the basis of comparing the 14C activity value of experimental points as obtained from the breath test, to the results of simulation with suitable value of the fitted parameter hB indicating degree of severity of infection. (author)

  6. Photoacoustic sensor for VOCs: first step towards a lung cancer breath test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Marcus; Groninga, Hinrich G.; Dressler, Matthias; Harde, Hermann

    2005-08-01

    Development of new optical sensor technologies has a major impact on the progression of diagnostic methods. Specifically, the optical analysis of breath is an extraordinarily promising technique. Spectroscopic sensors for the non-invasive 13C-breath tests (the Urea Breath Test for detection of Helicobacter pylori is most prominent) are meanwhile well established. However, recent research and development go beyond gastroenterological applications. Sensitive and selective detection of certain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a patient's breath, could enable the diagnosis of diseases that are very difficult to diagnose with contemporary techniques. For instance, an appropriate VOC biomarker for early-stage bronchial carcinoma (lung cancer) is n-butane (C4H10). We present a new optical detection scheme for VOCs that employs an especially compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS). This method makes use of the transformation of absorbed modulated radiation into a sound wave. Employing a wavelength-modulated distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser and taking advantage of acoustical resonances of the sample cell, we performed very sensitive and selective measurements on butane. A detection limit for butane in air in the ppb range was achieved. In subsequent research the sensitivity will be successively improved to match the requirements of the medical application. Upon optimization, our photoacoustic sensor has the potential to enable future breath tests for early-stage lung cancer diagnostics.

  7. Breath Ketone Testing: A New Biomarker for Diagnosis and Therapeutic Monitoring of Diabetic Ketosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Qiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acetone, β-hydroxybutyric acid, and acetoacetic acid are three types of ketone body that may be found in the breath, blood, and urine. Detecting altered concentrations of ketones in the breath, blood, and urine is crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic ketosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the advantages of different detection methods for ketones, and to establish whether detection of the concentration of ketones in the breath is an effective and practical technique. Methods. We measured the concentrations of acetone in the breath using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and β-hydroxybutyrate in fingertip blood collected from 99 patients with diabetes assigned to groups 1 (−, 2 (±, 3 (+, 4 (++, or 5 (+++ according to urinary ketone concentrations. Results. There were strong relationships between fasting blood glucose, age, and diabetic ketosis. Exhaled acetone concentration significantly correlated with concentrations of fasting blood glucose, ketones in the blood and urine, LDL-C, creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen. Conclusions. Breath testing for ketones has a high sensitivity and specificity and appears to be a noninvasive, convenient, and repeatable method for the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of diabetic ketosis.

  8. A perfusion study of the handling of urea and urea analogues by the gills of the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias)

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, Chris M.; Hon Jung Liew; Gudrun De Boeck; Patrick J. Walsh

    2013-01-01

    The branchial mechanism of urea retention in elasmobranchs was investigated using an in vitro isolated-perfused head preparation, as well as in vivo samples, in the spiny dogfish shark. Both in vivo and in control saline perfusions containing 350 mmol L−1 urea, calculated intracellular urea concentrations in gill epithelial cells were close to extracellular concentrations. Urea efflux to the external water fell only non-significantly, and calculated gill intracellular urea concentration did n...

  9. Winter Wheat and Maize Response to Urea Ammonium Nitrate and a New Urea Formaldehyde Polymer Fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slow release nitrogen (N) fertilizers have potential to improve yield and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and maize (Zea mays L.). A slow release urea formaldehyde polymer (UFP) was compared with conventional aqueous urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN) [(NH2)2CO, NH4NO3]...

  10. Standardization of the TRUE Test imidazolidinyl urea and diazolidinyl urea patches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Björkner, B; Bruze, M; Frosch, P J; Gruvberger, B; Hoeck, U; Kreilgaard, B; Menné, T; Sommer, J

    2001-01-01

    The preservatives imidazolidinyl urea (IMID, Germall 115) and diazolidinyl urea (DU, Germall II) are commonly used in cosmetic products and are well-known sensitizers. The aim of the present study was to establish the optimal patch test concentration in hydrophilic dried-in vehicle (TRUE Test) for...

  11. Breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer: comparison of free breathing gating with the breath-hold technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders N; Nøttrup, Trine Jakobi;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer implies a risk of late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. This is the first study to evaluate cardiopulmonary dose sparing of breathing adapted radiotherapy (BART) using free breathing gating, and to...... compare this respiratory technique with voluntary breath-hold. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 17 patients were CT-scanned during non-coached breathing manoeuvre including free breathing (FB), end-inspiration gating (IG), end-expiration gating (EG), deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and end-expiration breath......-hold (EBH). The Varian Real-time Position Management system (RPM) was used to monitor respiratory movement and to gate the scanner. For each breathing phase, a population based internal margin (IM) was estimated based on average chest wall excursion, and incorporated into an individually optimised three...

  12. Detection of Helicobacter pylori infection by examination of human breath odor using electronic nose Bloodhound-214ST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnayder, E. P.; Moshkin, M. P.; Petrovskii, D. V.; Shevela, A. I.; Babko, A. N.; Kulikov, V. G.

    2009-05-01

    Our aim was to examine the possibility of use e-nose Bloodhound-214ST to determine presence or absence of H. pylori infection using exhalation samples of patients. Breath samples were collected twice: at baseline and after oral administration of 500 mg of urea. H. pylori status of patients was confirmed by antral biopsy. Using two approaches for the data analysis we showed the possibility to distinguish H. pylori free and infected patients.

  13. Taking a deep breath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Zacharias

    2012-12-01

    be paid to language revision and reference citation. Together with its authors and readers, IJHDR contributes to the development of a kind of knowledge close to the borders of science. Therefore, to establish a valid scientific background, the articles must be clearly written, and based on sound assumptions. High-visibility for articles is a fundamental aspect desired by all authors. As an open and free access journal, IJHDR meets that condition, and we are planning to make our influence and visibility even wider. Inclusion in the major databases has paramount importance in the academic milieu, however, it should be considered as a consequence, rather than a goal. In 2013, IJHDR will chair a collaborative project with several research institutions aiming to deliver information everywhere, increasing the visibility of the published articles. Thus, now it is the time to take a deep breath, relax, and prepare you for the forthcoming work! See you in 2013!

  14. Radiobiological half-lives for carbon-14 and hydrogen-3 leucine in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo estimates of protein metabolism in many are often made by oral or intravenous administration of leucine or its ∼-ketoacid, ∼-ketoisocaproate, labeled with 14C or 3H. Previous estimates of radiation dose from such tracers have been based on the measurement of 14CO2 in breath. Using measurements of the decay of 3H or 14C leucine from plasma proteins, longer biological half-lives for these compounds were obtained. The estimated total-body radiation absorbed dose is 0.97 mrad/uCi for [1-14C]KIC (or [1-14C]leucine) and 0.11 mrad/+Ci for ]4,5-3H]leucine (or [3H]KIC). Assuming administered doses of 100 μCi each, the total-body radiation absorbed dose is still well within the limits set by the FDA for Radioactive Drug Research Committees. 12 references, 3 figures, 3 tables

  15. Preliminary study of the impact of tritium and carbon 14 releases from the Saint-Alban nuclear power plant. CRIIRAD N.04-20 V1 Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having recalled the results of previous studies on the radioactivity in surface water and land environments, and outlined the need of an investigation of the tritium and carbon 14 contamination, this report defines the objectives of this investigation, the adopted methodology (choice of plants, tritium and carbon 14 dose measurements, and sampling to study time variations). It recalls some aspects of tritium and carbon 14 releases (production of radionuclides, origins of emissions in the environment, assessments by EDF). It reports the investigation and the assessment of tritium activity in a land environment and in rain waters about the investigated site, and the investigation and the assessment of carbon 14 activity within the same environment. It reports preliminary results concerning the aquatic environment

  16. Practice makes perfect, even for breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Jack L.; Kam, Kaiwen; Janczewski, Wiktor A.

    2009-01-01

    Breathing relies on a respiratory rhythm generator. A study characterizes an early emerging oscillatory group of Phox2b-expressing parafacial cells that entrain and couple with the preBötzinger Complex at the onset of fetal breathing.

  17. Measurement and analysis of Carbon-14 released from pressurized water reactor in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the amount of Carbon-14 released from pressurized water reactor (PWR) is small and its concentration is low, it is not used as a main monitored nuclide for environmental release in PWR in general. However, the dose conversion coefficient of C-14 in CO2 is relatively high, there is a possibility to overestimate public exposure dose with the assumption that all amount of C-14 is resulted from CO2. Therefore, a monitoring plan should be established to manage the effluent from PWR in safe. This plan consists of (1) specifying the chemical form of C-14 (2) evaluating its effect on environment. The majority of the C-14 released from PWR is in a gaseous form in CO2 and CH4. In order to monitor C-14 in PWR, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) devised C-14 sampling instrument which can collect CO2 and methane separately. It is composed of three main components, that is, primary CO2 sampler, a methane oxidisation assembly and a secondary CO2 sampler. The primary CO2 sampler has one water bubbler and two NaOH bubblers. The water bubbler prevents the accumulation of NaOH at other bubblers, 2M-NaOH bubblers collect all CO2 in the gas to produce sodium carbonate (Na2CO3). Then the methane oxidisation assembly convert methane and CO to CO2. The catalyst is composed of equal mixture of Alumina with Palladium coating (1.0%) and Platinum coating (0.5%). The temperature of a furnace is maintained 500 .deg. C approximately, to convert CO and methane into CO2. Retaining time of the gas in catalytic is designed to be about 25 seconds to maximize conversion. After the catalytic conversion, the gas is cooled and is passed through the NaOH solution bubblers. The concentration of CO2 and methane at main vent lines in Yonggwang Unit-3 was analyzed using Gas Chromatography in order to evaluate the optimal treatment condition for the sample and estimate the optimal operating time for this device. As a result, the concentration of CO2 was approximately 450 ppm in average and that of

  18. Validation test for carbon-14 migration and accumulation in a Canadian shield lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This particular BIOMOVS II Technical Report is concerned with modelling the transfer of C-14 through the aquatic food chain following release to a Canadian shield lake. Model performance has been tested against field data supplied by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Carbon-14 was added in 1978 to the epilimnion of a small Canadian Shield lake to investigate primary production and carbon dynamics. Data from this experiment were used within BIOMOVS II to provide a validation test, which involved modelling the fate of the C-14 added to the lake. The nature of the spike and the subsequent monitoring allowed the investigation of both short-term processes relevant to evaluation of the impacts of accidental releases as well as longer-term processes relevant to routine release and to solid waste disposal. Four models participated in the scenario: 1) a simple mass balance model of a lake (AECL, Whiteshell Laboratories, Canada); 2) a relatively complex deterministic dynamic compartment model (QuantiSci Ltd.,UK); 3) a complex deterministic model (Studsvik Model A) and a more complex probabilistic model (Studsvik Model B; Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Sweden). Endpoints were C-14 concentrations in water, sediment and whitefish over a thirteen year period. Each model produced reasonable predictions when compared to the observed data and when uncertainty is taken into consideration. About 0.2 to 0.4% of the initial C-14 inventory to the lakes remained in the water at the end of the study, because of internal recycling of C-14 from sediments. The simple AECL model did not account for this internal recycling of C-14 and, in this respect, its predictions were not as realistic as those of the QuantiSci and Studsvik models for concentrations in water. However, the AECL model predictions for the C-14 inventory remaining in lake sediment were closest to the observed values. Overall, Studsvik Model B was the most accurate in simulating C-14 concentrations in water and in whitefish, but

  19. Multiphase Carbon-14 Transport in a Near-Field-Scale Unsaturated Column of Natural Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. T. Fox; Mitchell A. Plummer; Larry C. Hull; D. Craig Cooper

    2004-03-01

    Wastes buried at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory include activated metals that release radioactive carbon-14 (14C) as they corrode. To better understand 14C phase partitioning and transport in the SDA sediments, we conducted a series of transport experiments using 14C (radio-labeled sodium carbonate) and nonreactive gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and aqueous (bromide and tritiated water) tracers in a large (2.6-m high by 0.9-m diameter) column of sediments similar to those used as cover material at the SDA. We established steady-state unsaturated flow prior to injecting tracers into the column. Tracer migration was monitored using pore-water and pore-gas samples taken from co-located suction lysimeters and gas ports inserted at ~0.3-m intervals along the column’s length. Measurements of 14C discharged from the sediment to the atmosphere (i.e., 14CO2 flux) indicate a positive correlation between CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in the column and changes in 14CO2 flux. Though 14CO2 diffusion is expected to be independent of pCO2, changes of pCO2 affect pore water chemistry sufficiently to affect aqueous/gas phase 14C partitioning and consequently 14C2 flux. Pore-water and -gas 14C activity measurements provide an average aqueous/gas partitioning ratio, Kag, of 4.5 (±0.3). This value is consistent with that calculated using standard carbonate equilibrium expressions with measured pH, suggesting the ability to estimate Kag from carbonate equilibrium. One year after the 14C injection, the column was cored and solid-phase 14C activity was measured. The average aqueous/solid partition coefficient, Kd, (1.6 L kg-1) was consistent with those derived from small-scale and short-term batch and column experiments using SDA sediments, suggesting that bench-scale measurements are a valid means of estimating aqueous/solid partitioning at the much larger spatial scale considered in these meso-scale experiments. However

  20. Regulation of Breathing under Different Pulmonary Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Rieger-Fackeldey, Esther

    2004-01-01

    The breathing pattern of preterm infants is immature and is associated with a variety of reflexes. In a patient on the ventilator these reflexes interfere with spontaneous breathing. A better understanding of the immature control of breathing could lead to further improvements in ventilatory techniques. This thesis concerns studies of pulmonary stretch receptor (PSR) and phrenic nerve activity as part of the regulation of breathing in an animal model. During assist/control ventilation with th...

  1. Submarines, Spacecraft, and Exhaled Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled b...

  2. 21 CFR 868.5620 - Breathing mouthpiece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breathing mouthpiece. 868.5620 Section 868.5620...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5620 Breathing mouthpiece. (a) Identification. A breathing mouthpiece is a rigid device that is inserted into a patient's mouth and...

  3. Breath hydrogen test and sucrase isomaltase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, R P; Barnes, G L

    1983-01-01

    Sucrose breath hydrogen tests were performed on 7 children with proved sucrase isomaltase deficiency. All children had raised breath hydrogen excretion. The amount of hydrogen produced and symptoms experienced increased with increasing sucrose loads. The sucrose breath hydrogen test appears to be a reliable indicator of sucrose malabsorption in sucrase isomaltase deficiency.

  4. The present status of carbon 14 analysis and projects for beryllium 10 analysis at the Tandetron 1 accelerator, Nagoya University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Toshio; Oda, Hirotaka; Ikeda, Akiko; Niu, Etsuko [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    The operation experience in 1999 of the Tandetron accelerator age estimation system, Nagoya University, is reported, after the overview and the history of the accelerator is briefly described. Total number of carbon 14 environmental samples analyzed was 8567. The project of introducing new HVEE Tandetron for C-14 analysis, and modifying the present GIC Tandetron for Be-10 analysis is presented. Ion source shall be replaced, and the heavy ion detector shall be installed. Projected geological and archaeological studies using Be-10 are enumerated. (A. Yamamoto)

  5. Urea recycling from the renal pelvis in sheep: A study with [14C]urea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To test the hypothesis that urea can be recycled from the renal pelvis, [14C]urea diluted in native urine (1 microCi/ml) was perfused (0.5 ml/min) into one of the pelvises of sheep fed either normal (NP) or low (LP)-protein diets. Blood samples were obtained from the ipsilateral renal vein and from the carotid artery throughout the perfusions. 14C activity determinations in urine and plasma demonstrated a flux of [14C]urea from the pelvis to renal vein blood (40,000 in NP and 130,000 disintegrations/min in LP sheep, P less than 0.01). The corresponding flux of native urea was only 1.5 times higher in NP than in LP sheep (6.8 +/- 1.1 vs. 4.7 +/- 2.9 mumol/min, not significant) despite their 8 times higher urinary concentration of urea. The fraction of filtered urea that was reabsorbed in the pelvis was larger in LP sheep (7.5 +/- 3.7 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.7% in NP sheep, P less than 0.05). A fraction of urea is thus actually recycled from the renal pelvis in sheep, and this pelvic retention is enhanced in LP animals. The importance of this phenomenon in the nitrogen economy is discussed

  6. Effect of slow breathing training on heart rate, spontaneous respiratory rate and pattern of breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Ritu Adhana; Moneet Agarwal; Rani Gupta; Jyoti Dvivedi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The study was performed to see the effect of slow breathing (6 breaths/minute) training on spontaneous respiratory rate, heart rate and pattern of breathing. Methods: Sixty subjects between the ages 20-50 years were included in the study. After the rest of 10-15 minutes in a comfortable sitting posture their baseline heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR) and pattern of breathing were recorded on digital polygraph. Then they were guided to do slow breathing maintaining rate of...

  7. Dissolved Organic Carbon 14C in Southern Nevada Groundwater and Implications for Groundwater Travel Times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Ronald L. [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute; Fereday, Wyall [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute; Thomas, James M [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute

    2016-08-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) carbon-14 (14C) ages must be corrected for complex chemical and physical reactions and processes that change the amount of 14C in groundwater as it flows from recharge to downgradient areas. Because of these reactions, DIC 14C can produce unrealistically old ages and long groundwater travel times that may, or may not, agree with travel times estimated by other methods. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 14C ages are often younger than DIC 14C ages because there are few chemical reactions or physical processes that change the amount of DOC 14C in groundwater. However, there are several issues that create uncertainty in DOC 14C groundwater ages including limited knowledge of the initial (A0) DOC 14C in groundwater recharge and potential changes in DOC composition as water moves through an aquifer. This study examines these issues by quantifying A0 DOC 14C in recharge areas of southern Nevada groundwater flow systems and by evaluating changes in DOC composition as water flows from recharge areas to downgradient areas. The effect of these processes on DOC 14C groundwater ages is evaluated and DOC and DIC 14C ages are then compared along several southern Nevada groundwater flow paths. Twenty-seven groundwater samples were collected from springs and wells in southern Nevada in upgradient, midgradient, and downgradient locations. DOC 14C for upgradient samples ranged from 96 to 120 percent modern carbon (pmc) with an average of 106 pmc, verifying modern DOC 14C ages in recharge areas, which decreases uncertainty in DOC 14C A0 values, groundwater ages, and travel times. The HPLC spectra of groundwater along a flow path in the Spring Mountains show the same general pattern indicating that the DOC compound composition does not change along this flow path

  8. Analysis of Exhaled Breath for Disease Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Anton; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen; Buszewski, Bogusław; Ligor, Tomasz; Jezierski, Tadeusz; Pleil, Joachim; Risby, Terence

    2014-06-01

    Breath analysis is a young field of research with great clinical potential. As a result of this interest, researchers have developed new analytical techniques that permit real-time analysis of exhaled breath with breath-to-breath resolution in addition to the conventional central laboratory methods using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Breath tests are based on endogenously produced volatiles, metabolites of ingested precursors, metabolites produced by bacteria in the gut or the airways, or volatiles appearing after environmental exposure. The composition of exhaled breath may contain valuable information for patients presenting with asthma, renal and liver diseases, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory lung disease, or metabolic disorders. In addition, oxidative stress status may be monitored via volatile products of lipid peroxidation. Measurement of enzyme activity provides phenotypic information important in personalized medicine, whereas breath measurements provide insight into perturbations of the human exposome and can be interpreted as preclinical signals of adverse outcome pathways.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of chitosan alkyl urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Jiang, Ji-Zhou; Chen, Wei; Bai, Zheng-Wu

    2016-07-10

    Chitosan is a versatile material employed for various purposes in many fields including the development of chiral stationary phases for enantioseparation. Chitosan alkyl urea is a kind of intermediate used to prepare enantioseparation materials. In order to synthesize the intermediates, in the present work, a new way to prepare chitosan alkyl urea has been established: chitosan was first reacted with methyl chloroformate yielding N-methoxyformylated chitosan, which was then converted to chitosan alkyl urea through amine-ester exchange reaction. With a large excess of methyl chloroformate and primary amine of low stereohindrance, the amino group in chitosan could be almost completely converted to ureido group. The as-prepared chitosan alkyl urea derivatives were characterized by IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR,(1)H-(1)H COSY and (1)H-(13)C HSQC NMR spectra. The chemical shifts of hydrogen and carbon atoms of glucose unit were assigned. It was found that the degree of substitution was obviously lower if cyclopropyl amine, aniline, tert-butyl amine and diethyl amine were used as reactants for the amine-ester exchange reaction. The reason was explained with the aid of theoretical calculations. PMID:27106154

  10. Urea transporters and sweat response to uremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Raymond W; Bailey, James L; Wang, Yanhua; Klein, Janet D; Sands, Jeff M

    2016-06-01

    In humans, urea is excreted in sweat, largely through the eccrine sweat gland. The urea concentration in human sweat is elevated when compared to blood urea nitrogen. The sweat urea nitrogen (UN) of patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESRD) is increased when compared with healthy humans. The ability to produce sweat is maintained in the overwhelming majority of ESRD patients. A comprehensive literature review found no reports of sweat UN neither in healthy rodents nor in rodent models of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Therefore, this study measured sweat UN concentrations in healthy and uremic rats. Uninephrectomy followed by renal artery ligation was used to remove 5/6 of renal function. Rats were then fed a high-protein diet to induce uremia. Pilocarpine was used to induce sweating. Sweat droplets were collected under oil. Sweat UN was measured with a urease assay. Serum UN was measured using a fluorescent ortho-pthalaldehyde reaction. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was accomplished with a horseradish peroxidase and diaminobenzidine technique. Sweat UN in uremic rats was elevated greater than two times compared to healthy pair-fed controls (220 ± 17 and 91 ± 15 mmol/L, respectively). Post hoc analysis showed a significant difference between male and female uremic sweat UN (279 ± 38 and 177 ± 11 mmol/L, respectively.) IHC shows, for the first time, the presence of the urea transporters UT-B and UT-A2 in both healthy and uremic rat cutaneous structures. Future studies will use this model to elucidate how rat sweat UN and other solute excretion is altered by commonly prescribed diuretics. PMID:27273880

  11. Breathing Modes in Dusty Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓钢; 王爽; 潘秋惠; 刘悦; 贺明峰

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic breathing modes of dusty plasmas have been investigated in a cylindricalsystem with an axial symmetry. The linear wave solution and a "dispersion" relation were derived.It was found that in an infinite area, the mode is reduced to a "classical" dust acoustic wave inthe region away from the center. If the dusty plasma is confined in a finite region, however, thebreathing (or heart-beating) behavior would be found as observed in many experiments.

  12. The chemical neuroanatomy of breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Alheid, George F.; McCrimmon, Donald R.

    2008-01-01

    The chemical neuroanatomy of breathing must ultimately encompass all the various neuronal elements physiologically identified in brainstem respiratory circuits and their apparent aggregation into “compartments” within the medulla and pons. These functionally defined respiratory compartments in the brainstem provide the major source of input to cranial motoneurons controlling the airways, and to spinal motoneurons activating inspiratory and expiratory pump muscles. This review provides an over...

  13. Early diabetic kidney maintains the corticomedullary urea and sodium gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qi, Haiyun; Nørlinger, Thomas S; Nielsen, Per M; Bertelsen, Lotte B; Mikkelsen, Emmeli; Xu, Yafang; Stødkilde Jørgensen, Hans; Laustsen, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    concomitantly with a decreased sodium and urea gradient. By using hyperpolarized (13)C urea it was possible to measure the essential intrarenal electrolyte gradients and the acute changes following furosemide treatment. No differences in either intrarenal urea or sodium gradients were observed in early diabetes...

  14. Synergetic Effects of Nanoporous Support and Urea on Enzyme Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Chenghong; Shin, Yongsoon; Liu, Jun; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2007-02-01

    Here we report that synergetic effects of functionalized nanoporous support and urea on enzyme activity enhancement. Even in 8.0 M urea, the specific activity of GI entrapped in FMS was still higher than the highest specific activity of GI free in solution, indicating the strong tolerance of GI in FMS to the high concentration of urea.

  15. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium nitrate-urea complex may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  16. Tricks for interpreting and making a good report on hydrogen and 13C breath tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, G; Di Rienzo, T A; Scaldaferri, F; Del Zompo, F; Pizzoferrato, M; Lopetuso, L R; Laterza, L; Bruno, G; Petito, V; Campanale, M C; Cesario, V; Franceschi, F; Cammarota, G; Gaetani, E; Gasbarrini, A; Ojetti, V

    2013-01-01

    Breath tests (BT) represent a valid and non-invasive diagnostic tool in many gastroenterological disorders. Their wide diffusion is due to the low cost, simplicity and reproducibility and their common indications include diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption, Helicobacter pylori infection, small bowel bacterial overgrowth, gastric emptying time and orocaecal transit time. The review deals with key points on methodology, which would influence the correct interpretation of the test and on a correct report. While a clear guideline is available for lactose and glucose breath tests, no gold standard is available for Sorbitol, Fructose or other H2 BTs. Orocaecal transit time (OCTT) defined as time between assumption of 10 g lactulose and a peak > 10 ppm over the baseline value, is a well-defined breath test. The possible value of lactulose as a diagnostic test for the diagnosis of small bowel bacterial overgrowth is still under debate. Among (13)C breath test, the best and well characterized is represented by the urea breath test. Well-defined protocols are available also for other (13)C tests, although a reimbursement for these tests is still not available. Critical points in breath testing include the patient preparation for test, type of substrate utilized, reading machines, time between when the test is performed and when the test is processed. Another crucial point involves clinical conclusions coming from each test. For example, even if lactulose could be utilized for diagnosing small bowel bacterial overgrowth, this indication should be only secondary to orocaecal transit time, and added into notes, as clinical guidelines are still uncertain. PMID:24443074

  17. Running and Breathing in Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramble, Dennis M.; Carrier, David R.

    1983-01-01

    Mechanical constraints appear to require that locomotion and breathing be synchronized in running mammals. Phase locking of limb and respiratory frequency has now been recorded during treadmill running in jackrabbits and during locomotion on solid ground in dogs, horses, and humans. Quadrupedal species normally synchronize the locomotor and respiratory cycles at a constant ratio of 1:1 (strides per breath) in both the trot and gallop. Human runners differ from quadrupeds in that while running they employ several phase-locked patterns (4:1, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1, 5:2, and 3:2), although a 2:1 coupling ratio appears to be favored. Even though the evolution of bipedal gait has reduced the mechanical constraints on respiration in man, thereby permitting greater flexibility in breathing pattern, it has seemingly not eliminated the need for the synchronization of respiration and body motion during sustained running. Flying birds have independently achieved phase-locked locomotor and respiratory cycles. This hints that strict locomotor-respiratory coupling may be a vital factor in the sustained aerobic exercise of endothermic vertebrates, especially those in which the stresses of locomotion tend to deform the thoracic complex.

  18. Air-Breathing Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine prototype in the test bay at the General Applied Science Lab facility in Ronkonkoma, New York. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  19. Thoracic radiotherapy and breath control: current prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) is adversely affected by setup error and organ motion. In thoracic 3D CRT, breathing accounts for most of intra-fraction movements, thus impairing treatment quality. Breath control clearly exhibits dosimetric improvement compared to free breathing, leading to various techniques for gated treatments. We review benefits of different breath control methods -i.e. breath-holding or beam gating, with spirometric, isometric or X-ray respiration sensor- and argument the choice of expiration versus inspiration, with consideration to dosimetric concerns. All steps of 3D-CRT can be improved with breath control. Contouring of organs at risk (OAR) and target are easier and more accurate on breath controlled CT-scans. Inter- and intra-fraction target immobilisation allows smaller margins with better coverage. Lung outcome predictors (NTCP, Mean Dose, LV20, LV30) are improved with breath-control. In addition, inspiration breath control facilitates beam arrangement since it widens the distance between OAR and target, and leaves less lung normal tissue within the high dose region. Last, lung density, as of CT scan, is more accurate, improving dosimetry. Our institutions choice is to use spirometry driven, patient controlled high-inspiration breath-hold; this technique gives excellent immobilization results, with high reproducibility, yet it is easy to implement and costs little extra treatment time. Breath control, whatever technique is employed, proves superior to free breathing treatment when using 3D-CRT. Breath control should then be used whenever possible, and is probably mandatory for IMRT. (authors)

  20. Cholestyramine-enhanced fecal elimination of carbon-14 in rats after administration of ammonium (/sup 14/C)perfluorooctanoate or potassium (/sup 14/C)perfluorooctanesulfonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.D.; Gibson, S.J.; Ober, R.E.

    1984-12-01

    After a single intravenous dose of ammonium (/sup 14/C)perfluorooctanoate (( /sup 14/C)PFO, 13.3 mg/kg) or of potassium (/sup 14/C)perfluorooctanesulfonate (( /sup 14/C)PFOS, 3.4 mg/kg) to rats, cholestyramine fed daily as a 4% mixture in feed was shown to increase the total carbon-14 eliminated via feces and to decrease liver concentration of carbon-14. Rats were fed cholestyramine in feed for 14 days after administration of (/sup 14/C)PFO and for 21 days after administration of (/sup 14/C)PFOS. Control rats were administered radiolabeled fluorochemical but were not treated with cholestyramine. Cholestyramine treatment increased mean cumulative carbon-14 elimination in feces by 9.8-fold for rats administered (/sup 14/C)PFO and by 9.5-fold for rats administered (/sup 14/C)PFOS. After (/sup 14/C)PFO, a mean of 4% of the dose of carbon-14 was in liver of cholestyramine-treated rats at 14 days versus 7.6% in control rats; after (/sup 14/C)PFOS, 11.3% of the dose was in liver at 21 days versus 40.3% in control rats. After administration of either radiolabeled compound, plasma and red blood cell carbon-14 concentrations, which were relatively lower than liver concentrations, were also significantly reduced by cholestyramine treatment.

  1. Cholestyramine-enhanced fecal elimination of carbon-14 in rats after administration of ammonium [14C]perfluorooctanoate or potassium [14C]perfluorooctanesulfonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a single intravenous dose of ammonium [14C]perfluorooctanoate [( 14C]PFO, 13.3 mg/kg) or of potassium [14C]perfluorooctanesulfonate [( 14C]PFOS, 3.4 mg/kg) to rats, cholestyramine fed daily as a 4% mixture in feed was shown to increase the total carbon-14 eliminated via feces and to decrease liver concentration of carbon-14. Rats were fed cholestyramine in feed for 14 days after administration of [14C]PFO and for 21 days after administration of [14C]PFOS. Control rats were administered radiolabeled fluorochemical but were not treated with cholestyramine. Cholestyramine treatment increased mean cumulative carbon-14 elimination in feces by 9.8-fold for rats administered [14C]PFO and by 9.5-fold for rats administered [14C]PFOS. After [14C]PFO, a mean of 4% of the dose of carbon-14 was in liver of cholestyramine-treated rats at 14 days versus 7.6% in control rats; after [14C]PFOS, 11.3% of the dose was in liver at 21 days versus 40.3% in control rats. After administration of either radiolabeled compound, plasma and red blood cell carbon-14 concentrations, which were relatively lower than liver concentrations, were also significantly reduced by cholestyramine treatment

  2. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney. (paper)

  3. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Mette K.; van Vulpen, Marco; Barendrecht, Maurits M.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Intven, Martijn; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2013-04-01

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney.

  4. Milk Urea Dynamics during its Transformation into Yogurt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Vintila

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our work was to evaluate in what measure milk urea concentration stays in processed yogurt and in what measure urea dose influences its quality. We added known amounts of urea into milk destined to yogurt processing in order to obtain probes with concentrations from 0,5 to 28 mg/ 100 ml milk. Obtained results lead us to the conclusion that milk urea decreases dramatically until the finishing of the process of milk coagulation and its transformation into yogurt. All probes which contained higher amounts of urea than 6 mg/ 100 ml milk, urea totally disappeared from yogurt before 48 hours of keeping. Milk coagulation time and its transformation to yogurt is reduced proportional with urea concentration in milk.

  5. Entry of blood urea into the rumen of the llama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llamas were provided with a large rumen fistula, and the transfer of blood urea into the temporarily isolated rumen, cleaned and filled with test solution was measured. Plasma urea clearance due to transfer of blood urea across the rumen wall should indicate changes in its permeability to urea. Clearance values were highest with CO2 or with high concentrations of butyric acid. Permeability was low when food was with-held and when no volatile fatty acids were present in the solution. The permeability of the rumen wall to blood urea can be altered significantly. These changes can affect blood urea transfer more extensively than changes in the plasma urea concentration within physiological ranges

  6. Transfer of blood urea into the goat colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transfer of body urea into the temporarily isolated and perfused colon of conscious goats was measured. Simultaneously total urea turnover was estimated using 14C-urea. The transfer of urea into the total gastrointestinal tract (total turnover minus renal excretion) was four times higher with the high-energy - low-protein diet (sugar pulp plus straw) compared with control feeding (hay ad lib.). The transfer of urea into the colon was 8% of the transfer into the total GI tract during control feeding, 14% when food was withheld for 48 hours and 1% during sugar pulp feeding. The transfer into the colon depends mainly on the plasma urea concentration, whereas in the proximal part of the GI tract changes in the permeability of the GI tract wall have a more pronounced influence than plasma urea concentration. (author)

  7. Atomic scale insights into urea-peptide interactions in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Nicola; Gillams, Richard J; Pardo, Luis Carlos; Lorenz, Christian D; McLain, Sylvia E

    2016-02-01

    The mechanism by which proteins are denatured by urea is still not well understood, especially on the atomic scale where these interactions occur in vivo. In this study, the structure of the peptide GPG has been investigated in aqueous urea solutions in order to understand the combination of roles that both urea and water play in protein unfolding. Using a combination of neutron diffraction enhanced by isotopic substitution and computer simulations, it was found, in opposition with previous simulations studies, that urea is preferred over water around polar and charged portions of the peptides. Further, it appears that while urea directly replaces water around the nitrogen groups on GPG that urea and water occupy different positions around the peptide bond carbonyl groups. This suggests that urea may in fact weaken the peptide bond, disrupting the peptide backbone, thus ultimately causing denaturation. PMID:26764567

  8. How to interpret hydrogen breath tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Uday C

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogen breath tests using various substrates like glucose, lactulose, lactose and fructose are being used more and more to diagnose small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and lactose or fructose malabsorption. Though quantitative culture of jejunal aspirate is considered as gold standard for the diagnosis of SIBO, hydrogen breath tests, in spite of their low sensitivity, are popular for their non-invasiveness. Glucose hydrogen breath test is more acceptable for the diagnosis of SIBO as conventionally accepted double-peak criterion on lactulose hydrogen breath test is very insensitive and recently described early-peak criterion is often false positive. Hydrogen breath test is useful to diagnose various types of sugar malabsorption. Technique and interpretation of different hydrogen breath tests are outlined in this review. PMID:21860825

  9. A survey of methods to immobilize tritium and carbon-14 arising from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the literature on methods to separate and immobilize tritium (3H) and carbon-14 (14C) released from U02 fuel in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. It was prepared as part of a broader review of fuel reprocessing waste management methods that might find future application in Canada. The calculated inventories of both 3H and 14C in used fuel are low; special measures to limit releases of these radionuclides from reprocessing plants are not currently in place, and may not be necessary in future. If required, however, several possible approaches to the concentration and immobilization of both radionuclides are available for development. Technology to control these radionuclides in reactor process streams is in general more highly developed than for reprocessing plant effluent, and some control methods may be adaptable to reprocessing applications

  10. Ammonia and urea permeability of mammalian aquaporins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Søgaard, Rikke; Zeuthen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    /arginine region, and an exclusively water-permeable aquaporin can be transformed into an ammonia-permeable aquaporin by single point mutations in this region. The ammonia-permeable aquaporins fall into two groups: those that are permeable (AQP3, 7, 9, 10) and those that are impermeable (AQP8) to glycerol. The two......The human aquaporins,AQP3,AQP7, AQP8,AQP9, and possibly AQP10, are permeable to ammonia, and AQP7, AQP9, and possibly AQP3, are permeable to urea. In humans, these aquaporins supplement the ammonia transport of the Rhesus (Rh) proteins and the urea transporters (UTs). The mechanism by which...... significant at alkaline pH. It is debated whether the H(+) ion passes via the aquaporin or by some external route; the investigation of this problem requires the aquaporin-expressing cell to be voltage-clamped. The ammonia-permeable aquaporins differ from other aquaporins by having a less restrictive aromatic...

  11. Discriminating between Nasal and Mouth Breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, Kevin; Yuan, Peng; Coyle, Damian

    2010-01-01

    The recommendation to change breathing patterns from the mouth to the nose can have a significantly positive impact upon the general well being of the individual. We classify nasal and mouth breathing by using an acoustic sensor and intelligent signal processing techniques. The overall purpose is to investigate the possibility of identifying the differences in patterns between nasal and mouth breathing in order to integrate this information into a decision support system which will form the b...

  12. Sudarshan kriya yoga: Breathing for health

    OpenAIRE

    Sameer A Zope; Zope, Rakesh A

    2013-01-01

    Breathing techniques are regularly recommended for relaxation, stress management, control of psychophysiological states, and to improve organ function. Yogic breathing, defined as a manipulation of breath movement, has been shown to positively affect immune function, autonomic nervous system imbalances, and psychological or stress-related disorders. The aim of this study was to assess and provide a comprehensive review of the physiological mechanisms, the mind–body connection, and the benefit...

  13. Hydrogen Breath Tests in Gastrointestinal Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Rana, Satya Vati; Malik, Aastha

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen breath tests are widely used to explore pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and carbohydrate malabsorption are disorders detected by these tests that have been proposed to be of great importance for symptoms of GI diseases. Glucose hydrogen breath test is more acceptable for diagnosis of SIBO whereas lactose and fructose hydrogen breath tests are used for detection of lactose and fructose maldigestion respectivel...

  14. How to Interpret Hydrogen Breath Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Ghoshal, Uday C

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen breath tests using various substrates like glucose, lactulose, lactose and fructose are being used more and more to diagnose small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and lactose or fructose malabsorption. Though quantitative culture of jejunal aspirate is considered as gold standard for the diagnosis of SIBO, hydrogen breath tests, in spite of their low sensitivity, are popular for their non-invasiveness. Glucose hydrogen breath test is more acceptable for the diagnosis of SIBO a...

  15. Utilization of labelled urea in Helicobacter pylori eradication study by Espinheira Santa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maytenus ilicifolia, Espinheira Santa, is usually used to treat some gastric diseases, in special duodenal ulcer, in agreement with the medical literature. The aim of this work was to verify the efficiency of those leaves in such disease. It was selected a group of volunteers with ulcer caused by Helicobacter pylori (Hp) confirmed by Urea Breath Test (UBT). It was administered to all patients one capsule having 300 mg of dry extract of the leaves 20 minutes before the UBT. The capsule went on being administered during a week three times a day. At the end of this period two tests were applied to evaluate the Hp eradication: one 12 hours just after the treatment and another after one month. The results indicated that the antibiotic action was not confirmed. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig

  16. Synthesis and quality control of {sup 13}C-enriched urea for Helicobacter pylori (HP) diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sant Ana Filho, Carlos R.; Tavares, Claudineia R.O.; Ferreira, Andre V.; Prestes, Cleber V.; Bendassolli, Jose A., E-mail: jab@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was to synthesize the urea ({sup 13}CO(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}), with 99% {sup 13}C atoms, and to perform a quality analysis for the diagnosis (breath test) of Helicobacter pylori. Furthermore, the process was submitted to economic analysis. The reaction was performed in a stainless steel reactor, lined with polytetrafluoroethylene, under low pressure and temperature. The synthesis method was shown to be appropriate (2.35 g; 81.9% yield), evidenced by physico-chemical and microbiological results, according to Brazilian legislation. The production and diagnosis costs were competitive compared with national and international market values, rendering this a valuable tool in clinical medicine. (author)

  17. Environmental contamination and breathing disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric contamination is the main component of the environmental contamination and it can be defined as the presence in the atmosphere of an or several substances in enough quantity to produce alterations of the health, it is presented in aerosol form, with its gassy and specific components, altering the quality of the population's life and the degradation of the ecosystems. The main pollutant, as much for the frequency as for the importance of its effects, is the smoke of cigarettes. The paper mentions other types of polluting agents and their effects in the breathing apparatus

  18. Sleep disordered breathing in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilgay Izci Balserak

    2015-12-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB is very common during pregnancy, and is most likely explained by hormonal, physiological and physical changes. Maternal obesity, one of the major risk factors for SDB, together with physiological changes in pregnancy may predispose women to develop SDB. SDB has been associated with poor maternal and fetal outcomes. Thus, early identification, diagnosis and treatment of SDB are important in pregnancy. This article reviews the pregnancy-related changes affecting the severity of SDB, the epidemiology and the risk factors of SDB in pregnancy, the association of SDB with adverse pregnancy outcomes, and screening and management options specific for this population.

  19. Breathing exercises: influence on breathing patterns and thoracoabdominal motion in healthy subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Danielle S. R. Vieira; Mendes, Liliane P. S.; Nathália S. Elmiro; Marcelo Velloso; Raquel R. Britto; Verônica F. Parreira

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanisms underlying breathing exercises have not been fully elucidated. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of four on breathing exercises (diaphragmatic breathing, inspiratory sighs, sustained maximal inspiration and intercostal exercise) the on breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion in healthy subjects. METHOD: Fifteen subjects of both sexes, aged 23±1.5 years old and with normal pulmonary function tests, participated in the study. The subjects were evaluated using t...

  20. 42 CFR 84.85 - Breathing bags; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing bags; minimum requirements. 84.85 Section...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.85 Breathing bags; minimum requirements. (a) Breathing bags shall have.... (b) Breathing bags shall be constructed of materials which are flexible and resistant to...

  1. 42 CFR 84.72 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. 84.72...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.72 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. Flexible breathing tubes used in conjunction with breathing apparatus shall be designed and constructed to prevent: (a)...

  2. Dose assessments related to management options for a carbon 14-contaminated environment around the former laboratory of the Isotopchim Company in Ganagobie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a presentation of the site of a laboratory which released carbon 14 into the environment, a general presentation of carbon 14, of its transfer processes to the ecosystem and of the potential exposures, this report describes the contamination of the site as it appears from measurements performed on samples in 2001 and in 2009. Then the authors discuss different possible scenarios and their consequences: burning of trees belonging to a park, grinding of composting of wastes from the park, potential exposure ways due to the soil (ingestion or inhalation)

  3. News from the Breath Analysis Summit 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, Massimo; Mutti, Antonio

    2012-05-23

    This special section highlights some of the important work presented at the Breath Analysis Summit 2011, which was held in Parma (Italy) from 11 to 14 September 2011. The meeting, which was jointly organized by the International Association for Breath Research and the University of Parma, was attended by more than 250 delegates from 33 countries, and offered 34 invited lectures and 64 unsolicited scientific contributions. The summit was organized to provide a forum to scientists, engineers and clinicians to present their latest findings and to meet industry executives and entrepreneurs to discuss key trends, future directions and technologies available for breath analysis. A major focus was on nitric oxide, exhaled breath condensate, electronic nose, mass spectrometry and newer sensor technologies. Medical applications ranged from asthma and other respiratory diseases to gastrointestinal disease, occupational diseases, critical care and cancer. Most people identify breath tests with breathalysers used by police to estimate ethanol concentration in blood. However, breath testing has far more sophisticated applications. Breath analysis is rapidly evolving as a new frontier in medical testing for disease states in the lung and beyond. Every individual has a breath fingerprint-or 'breathprint'-that can provide useful information about his or her state of health. This breathprint comprises the many thousands of molecules that are expelled with each breath we exhale. Breath research in the past few years has uncovered the scientific and molecular basis for such clinical observations. Relying on mass spectrometry, we have been able to identify many such unique substances in exhaled breath, including gases, such as nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), and a wide array of volatile organic compounds. Exhaled breath also carries aerosolized droplets that can be collected as an exhaled breath condensate that contains endogenously produced non-volatile compounds. Breath

  4. Fast-starting for a breath: Air breathing in Hoplosternum littorale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domenici, Paolo; Norin, Tommy; Bushnell, Peter G.; Johansen, Jacob; Skov, Peter Vilhelm; Steffensen, John F.; Svendsen, Morten Bo S.; Abe, Augusto

    gulping air at the surface. Air breathing is a common behaviour in many fish species when exposed to hypoxia, although certain species perform air-breathing in normoxia to fill their swim bladders for buoyancy control and/or sound transduction. Hoplosternum littorale is an air-breathing freshwater catfish...

  5. Specific 13C functional pathways as diagnostic targets in gastroenterology breath-tests: tricks for a correct interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzoferrato, M; Del Zompo, F; Mangiola, F; Lopetuso, L R; Petito, V; Cammarota, G; Gasbarrini, A; Scaldaferri, F

    2013-01-01

    Breath tests are non-invasive, non-radioactive, safe, simple and effective tests able to determine significant metabolic alterations due to specific diseases or lack of specific enzymes. Carbon isotope (13)C, the stable-non radioactive isotope of carbon, is the most used substrate in breath testing, in which (13)C/(12)C ratio is measured and expressed as a delta value, a differences between readings and a fixed standard. (13)C/(12)C ratio is measured with isotope ratio mass spectrometry or non-dispersive isotope-selective infrared spectrometer and generally there is a good agreement between these techniques in the isotope ratio estimation. (13)C/(12)C ratio can be expressed as static measurement (like delta over baseline in urea breath test) or as dynamic measurement as percent dose recovery, but more dosages are necessary. (13)C Breath-tests are involved in many fields of interest within gastroenterology, such as detection of Helicobacter pylori infection, study of gastric emptying, assessment of liver and exocrine pancreatic functions, determination of oro-caecal transit time, evaluation of absorption and to a lesser extend detection of bacterial overgrowth. The use of every single test in a clinical setting is vary depending on accuracy and substrate costs. This review is meant to present (13)C the meaning of (13)C/(12)C ratio and static and dynamic measure and, finally, the instruments dedicated to its use in gastroenterology. A brief presentation of (13)C breath tests in gastroenterology is also provided. PMID:24443068

  6. Influence of milk urea concentration on fractional urea disappearance rate from milk to blood plasma in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spek, J W; Dijkstra, J; Bannink, A

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between milk urea nitrogen (MUN; mg of N/dL) and urinary N excretion is affected, among others, by diurnal dynamics in MUN, which in turn is largely influenced by feed intake pattern and characteristics of urea transfer from blood plasma to milk and vice versa. This study aimed to obtain insight in urea transfer characteristics within the mammary gland and from the mammary gland to blood plasma in dairy cows at various concentrations of plasma urea nitrogen (PUN; mg of N/dL) and MUN. Urea transfer from milk to blood plasma and urea transfer within the mammary gland itself was evaluated in a 4×4 Latin square design using 4 lactating multiparous Holstein-Friesian cows (milk production of 39.8±4.70kg/d and 90±3.9 d in milk). Treatments consisted of 4 primed continuous intravenous urea infusions of 0, 5, 10, and 15g of urea/h. Boluses of [(15)N(15)N]urea were injected in cistern milk at 20, 60, and 100 min before the 1700h milking. Milk was collected in portions of approximately 2 L at the 1700h milking. Milk samples were analyzed for urea and enrichment of (15)N-urea. Results from one cow were discarded because of leakage of milk from the teats after injection of boluses of [(15)N(15)N]urea. Increasing urea infusion rate linearly increased PUN from 11.4 (0g of urea/h) to 25.9mg/dL (15g of urea/h) and MUN from 10.3 (0g of urea/h) to 23.5 (15g of urea/h) mg of N/dL. The percentage of injected [(15)N(15)N]urea recovered from milk at the time of injection was not affected by urea infusion rate and varied between 65.1 and 73.0%, indicating that a substantial portion of injected [(15)N(15)N]urea was not accounted for by collected milk. The estimated fractional disappearance rate of (15)N-urea from milk to blood (Kurea; per hour) linearly increased from 0.429 (0g of urea/h) to 0.641 per hour (15g of urea/h). Cistern injected [(15)N(15)N]urea diffused within 20 min after injection toward alveoli milk. Calculations with the average Kurea estimated in this

  7. Determination of urea content in urea cream by centrifugal partition chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Qun Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to establish a centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC method for determination of the urea ingredient in urea cream. The mechanism of this method is that urea is determined by UV detector at 430 nm after being extracted from the cream and derivatized on line via Ehrlich reaction in rotor of CPC, where the reaction products dissolve in the mobile phase and the cream matrix retains in the stationary phase. The mixed solvent consisting of n-hexane, methanol, hydrochloric acid and p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde with a ratio of 1000 mL:1000 mL:18 mL:2.0 g is used for solvent system of CPC. The CPC method proposed offers good precision and convenience without complex sample pretreatment processes.

  8. [Stahl, Leibniz, Hoffmann and breathing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvallo, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    At the beginning of the XVIII th century, Wilhelm Gottfried Leibniz and Friedrich Hoffmann criticize Georg Ernst Stahl's medical theory. They differenciate between unsound and true reasonings. Namely, they validate Stahl's definition of breath but extracting it from its animist basis and placing it in an epistemology obeying to the principle of sufficient reason and to the mechanical model. The stahlian discovery consists in understanding breath as a calorific ventilation against the ancient conception; the iatromechanists recognize its accuracy, but they try then to transpose it to a mechanical model of ventilation. Using it in a different epistemological context implies that they analyze the idea of discovery "true" in its contents, but "wrong" in its hypothesis. It impels to examine the epistemology of medical knowledge, as science and therapeutics, and in its links with the other scientific theories. Thus, if Leibniz as philosopher and Hoffmann as doctor consider Stahl's animism so important, it is because its discoveries question the fundamental principles of medicine. PMID:17153053

  9. Activation and killing of Dictyostelium discoideum spores with urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, D A; O'Connell, R W

    1976-12-01

    The optimal conditions for activation of Dictyostellium discoideum spores are an 8 M urea treatment for 30 min. The lag between activation and swelling is 45 min. Lower concentrations of urea do not activate entire spore populations. Incubating spores in 8 M urea for 60 min or treatment with 10 M urea for 30 min results in a lengthening of the post-activation lag and a decrease in the final percentage of germination. Urea-activated spores can be deactivated by azide, cyanide, osmotic pressure, and low-temperature incubation. Activated spores do not germinate if incubated in 1 M urea for 24 h but will complete germination upon resuspension in urea-free buffer. Shocking spores at 45 degrees C in 8 M urea or incubating spores in 4-8 M urea for 10 h at 23.5 degrees C causes inactivation. When suspended in urea-free buffer, a larger percentage of these dead spores release spheroplasts through a longitudinal split in the spore case. Sequential enzyme treatment of spheroplasts with cellulase and pronase causes them to release lysable protoplasts. The data of these experiments suggest that shedding of the outer and middle wall layers during physiological spore swelling may be a physical process rather than an enzymatic one. PMID:1034498

  10. Submarines, spacecraft and exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Joachim D; Hansel, Armin

    2012-03-01

    Foreword The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled breath. What may have escaped our notice is a complementary field of research that explores the creation and maintenance of artificial atmospheres practised by the submarine air monitoring and air purification (SAMAP) community. SAMAP is comprised of manufacturers, researchers and medical professionals dealing with the engineering and instrumentation to support human life in submarines and spacecraft (including shuttlecraft and manned rockets, high-altitude aircraft, and the International Space Station (ISS)). Here, the immediate concerns are short-term survival and long-term health in fairly confined environments where one cannot simply 'open the window' for fresh air. As such, one of the main concerns is air monitoring and the main sources of contamination are CO(2) and other constituents of human exhaled breath. Since the inaugural meeting in 1994 in Adelaide, Australia, SAMAP meetings have been held every two or three years alternating between the North American and European continents. The meetings are organized by Dr Wally Mazurek (a member of IABR) of the Defense Systems Technology Organization (DSTO) of Australia, and individual meetings are co-hosted by the navies of the countries in which they are held. An overriding focus at SAMAP is life support (oxygen availability and carbon dioxide removal). Certainly, other air constituents are also important; for example, the closed environment of a submarine or the ISS can build up contaminants from consumer products, cooking, refrigeration, accidental fires, propulsion and atmosphere maintenance. However, the most immediate concern is sustaining human metabolism: removing exhaled CO(2) and replacing metabolized O(2). Another

  11. Automatic counting and recording unit used for dating by the carbon 14 method; Ensemble de comptage et d'impression automatique utilise pour la datation par la methode du carbone 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertinoli, P.; Galliot, J.; Thommeret, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires. Centre Scientifique de Monaco, Monte Carlo

    1969-07-01

    A description is given of the unit used by the 'Centre Scientifique de Monaco' for low-level beta counting and fitted for radioactive dating by the Carbon 14 method. Built entirely by the laboratory in 1964, on the basis of electronic techniques then recent, it has worked without failure since that time. The proportional counter, its high-voltage negative supply, and the counting chains with visual and printing records are detailed by means of 38 figures which reproduce the counter and the electronic circuits. These are contained in two standard 5 U.I structures. The low-voltage power supply of the whole unit is carried out by plus 12 volts and minus 12 volts storage batteries, buffered on a charger connected on the 110 V alternative line. The proportional counter described is filled with CO{sub 2} under one atmosphere pressure and permits the dating of carbonaceous samples with a maximum of 30.000 + 1.000 years (background 3.96 c.p.m. ) within a moderate time (72 hours). (authors) [French] L'ensemble de comptage pour radioactivite beta a bas niveau, destine a la datation par la methode du carbone 14, utilise au Centre Scientifique de Monaco, est decrit. Entierement construit au laboratoire en 1964, sur la base de techniques electroniques alors recentes, il fonctionne depuis cette date sans defaillance. Le compteur proportionnel, son alimentation haute tension negative et les chaines de comptage transistorisees a affichage et impression sont detailles par 38 schemas reproduisant le compteur et les divers circuits electroniques. Ceux-ci sont contenus dans deux chassis standard 5 UI. L'alimentation basse tension de l'ensemble est obtenue par batteries plus 12 et moins 12 volts montees en tampon sur chargeur alimente par le reseau. Le compteur proportionnel decrit, rempli de CO2 sous une atmosphere, permet de dater les echantillons carbones avec un maximum de 30.000 + 1.000 ans (bruit de fond: 3,96 c.p.m. ) en un temps raisonnable (72 heures

  12. UREA TRANSPORT DURING GAMETOGENESIS OF THE UNICELLULAR GREEN ALGA CHLAMYDOMONAS REINHARDTII

    OpenAIRE

    Zalutskaya, Zhanneta; Lapina, Tatyana; Von, Wiren; Ermilova, Elena

    2009-01-01

    Direct urea transport mechanisms are present in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Urea uptake system(s) are repressed by ammonium and they can be induced by urea or acetamide in ammonium-starved vegetative cells. Urea transport ability of the alga is altered during gametogenesis. Unlike vegetative cells, mature gametes showed a low urea uptake. Incubation of gametes with urea or acetamide resulted in the increasing of urea uptake ability and the regaining of chemotactic activity. The data suggest a ...

  13. COPD: When You Learn More, You'll Breathe Better

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are treatments that do help people breathe easier." Spirometry: A Simple Breathing Test Everyone at risk for ... tested for COPD with a simple breathing test. Spirometry is one of the best and most common ...

  14. Apolo Ohno: Breathing Easier | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breathing Easier Apolo Ohno: Breathing Easier Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of Contents ... training, I started experiencing decreased exercise endurance, trouble breathing, and coughing. These symptoms affected my ability to ...

  15. Breathing Problems? Learn to Recognize the Symptoms of COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Printable Version (PDF—498 kb) Coping with Grief Breathing Problems? Breathing Problems? Learn to Recognize the Symptoms of COPD ... health care provider and ask for a simple breathing test called spirometry. Together, you can come up ...

  16. Relationships between hippocampal activity and breathing patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harper, R M; Poe, G R; Rector, D M; Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard

    1998-01-01

    Single cell discharge, EEG activity, and optical changes accompanying alterations in breathing patterns, as well as the knowledge that respiratory musculature is heavily involved in movement and other behavioral acts, implicate hippocampal regions in some aspects of breathing control. The control...

  17. Discriminating between Nasal and Mouth Breathing

    CERN Document Server

    Curran, Kevin; Coyle, Damian

    2010-01-01

    The recommendation to change breathing patterns from the mouth to the nose can have a significantly positive impact upon the general well being of the individual. We classify nasal and mouth breathing by using an acoustic sensor and intelligent signal processing techniques. The overall purpose is to investigate the possibility of identifying the differences in patterns between nasal and mouth breathing in order to integrate this information into a decision support system which will form the basis of a patient monitoring and motivational feedback system to recommend the change from mouth to nasal breathing. Our findings show that the breath pattern can be discriminated in certain places of the body both by visual spectrum analysis and with a Back Propagation neural network classifier. The sound file recoded from the sensor placed on the hollow in the neck shows the most promising accuracy which is as high as 90%.

  18. Synthesis of the monosodium salt of carbon-14 labeled paclitaxel (Taxol) 2`-ethyl carbonate 7-phosphonooxymethyl ether, a potential prodrug of paclitaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dischino, D.D.; Shuhui Chen; Golik, Jerzy; Walker, D.W.; Wong, H.S.L. [Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Richard L. Gelb Center for Research and Development, Wallingford, CT (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The monosodium salt of carbon-14 labeled paclitaxel (Taxol) [N3`-{sup 14}COPh] 2`-ethyl carbonate 7-phosphonooymethyl ether, was prepared from C-14 labeled paclitaxel [N3`-{sup 14}COPh] in 5 steps. The radiochemical purity of the final product was greater than 99% and the specific activity was 25 {mu}Ci/mg. (author).

  19. The electrophoresis of transferrins in urea/polyacrylamide gels

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, RW; Williams, J.

    1980-01-01

    The denaturation of transferrin by urea has been studied by (a) electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels incorporating a urea gradient, (b) measurements of the loss in iron-binding capacity and (c) u.v. difference spectrometry. In human serum transferrin and hen ovotransferrin the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of the iron-free protein were found to denature at different urea concentrations.

  20. Impact Behaviour of Modified Biopolymer Droplet on Urea Surface

    OpenAIRE

    S. Yon Norasyikin; K. KuZilati; Zakaria, M; S. Suriati

    2014-01-01

    The droplet impact behaviour provides the particle coating characterization during the coating process of controlled release fertiliser. To have a good coating uniformity around the urea granules, it is necessary to enhance the wettabitily properties between the coating material and urea surface. In this study, modified biopolymer is used as the coating material for the controlled release fertilizer. Various compositions of starch:urea:borate were prepared and evaluated for the wettability pr...

  1. Breath Testing for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: Should We Bother?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Mark

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen breath test is based on following breath hydrogen levels after the administration of a carbohydrate (most commonly lactulose) to a patient with suspected small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. The test is based on the interaction between the administered carbohydrate and the intestinal bacteria. The resulting fermentation produces hydrogen. A positive breath test is based on a breath hydrogen rise prior to the expected arrival time in the highly microbial cecum. Despite renewed enthusiasm for breath testing in recent years due to associations with conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, breath testing poses many challenges. In this argument against breath testing, several pitfalls that complicate breath testing will be described. PMID:26902227

  2. Role of ureogenesis in tackling problems of ammonia toxicity during exposure to higher ambient ammonia in the air-breathing walking catfish Clarias batrachus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nirmalendu Saha; Shritapa Datta; Kuheli Biswas; Zaiba Y Kharbuli

    2003-12-01

    In the present study, the possible role of ureogenesis to avoid the accumulation of toxic ammonia to a lethal level under hyper-ammonia stress was tested in the air-breathing walking catfish Clarias batrachus by exposing the fish at 25 mM NH4Cl for 7 days. Excretion of ammonia by the NH4Cl-exposed fish was totally suppressed, which was accompanied by significant accumulation of ammonia in different body tissues. The walking catfish, which is otherwise predominantly ammoniotelic, turned totally towards ureotelism from ammoniotelism with a 5- to 6-fold increase of urea-N excretion during exposure to higher ambient ammonia. Stimulation of ureogenesis was accompanied with significant increase of some of the key urea cycle enzymes such as carbamyl phosphate synthetase (urea cycle-related), argininosuccinate synthetase and argininosuccinate lyase both in hepatic and non-hepatic tissues. Due to this unique physiological strategy of turning towards ureotelism from ammoniotelism via the induced urea cycle, this air-breathing catfish is able to survive in very high ambient ammonia, which they face in certain seasons of the year in the natural habitat.

  3. Time Breath of Psychological Theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tateo, Luca; Valsiner, Jaan

    2015-01-01

    Psychology as a self-aspiring, ambitious, developmental science faces the crucial limit of time—both theoretically and practically. The issue of time in constructing psychology’s theories is a major unresolved metatheoretical task. This raises several questions about generalization of knowledge......: which is the time length of breath of psychological theories? Which is the temporal dimension of psychological processes? In this article we discuss the role of different axiomatic assumptions about time in the construction of psychological theories. How could different theories include a concept of...... time—or fail to do that? How can they generalize with respect to time? The different conceptions of time often remain implicit, while shaping the concepts used in understanding psychological processes. Any preconception about time in human development will foster the generalizability of theory, as well...

  4. Breathing synchronization in interconnected networks

    CERN Document Server

    Louzada, V H P; Andrade, J S; Herrmann, H J

    2013-01-01

    The harmony of an orchestra emerges from the individual effort of musicians towards mutual synchronization of their tempi. When the orchestra is split between two concert halls communicating via Internet, a time delay is imposed which might hinder synchronization. We describe this type of system as two interconnected networks of oscillators with a time delay and analyze its dynamics as a function of the couplings and communication lag. We discover a breathing synchronization regime, namely, for a wide range of parameters, two groups emerge in the orchestra within the same concert hall playing at different tempi. Each group has a mirror in the other hall, one group is in phase and the other in anti-phase with their mirrors. For strong couplings, a phase shift between halls might occur. The implications of our findings on several socio-technical and biological systems are discussed.

  5. Carcass characteristics of sheep fed diets with slow-release urea replacing conventional urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evanilton Moura Alves

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effects of adding slow-release urea to replace conventional urea in the diet on carcass characteristics of feedlot sheep. We used 20 Santa Ines x SRD rams, with average body weight of 21.1±1.2 kgand average age of 120 days, distributed in a completely randomized design with 5 treatments. The replacement levels used as treatments were 0, 20, 40, 60, and 80%, composing diets of about 12% crude protein, with 50 % Tifton-85 hay and 50% concentrate. There was no influence of slow release urea on weight at slaughter (35.17 kg, and on hot (16.75 kg and cold (16.24 kg carcass weight, but the yield of these carcasses showed quadratic trend, revealing lower percentages at 48.5 and 47.63% replacement levels, respectively. The weights and yields of cuts did not change, except for the posterior arm, whose values showed a cubic trend. Objective measures of carcass, loin eye area, and subjective evaluations of conformation, finishing and marbling of carcasses were not affected. The subcutaneous fat thickness decreased linearly (4.25 to2.48 mm. The inclusion of slow release urea in the diet changes the yield and reduces subcutaneous fat, however, it does not influence other carcass characteristics.

  6. The effect of urea and urea-modified halloysite on performance of PCL

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Khunová, V.; Kelnar, Ivan; Kristóf, J.; Dybal, Jiří; Kratochvíl, Jaroslav; Kaprálková, Ludmila

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 2 (2015), s. 1283-1291. ISSN 1388-6150 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-15255S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : PCL * urea * halloysite Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 2.042, year: 2014

  7. Urea thermolysis and NOx reduction with and without SCR catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) has been a leading contender for removal of nitrogen oxides (deNOx) from diesel engine emissions. Despite its advantages, the SCR technology faces some critical detriments to its catalytic performance such as catalyst surface passivation (caused by deposit formation) and consequent stoichiometric imbalance of the urea consumption. Deposit formation deactivates catalytic performance by not only consuming part of the ammonia produced during urea decomposition but also degrading the structural and thermal properties of the catalyst surface. We have characterized the urea thermolysis with and without the urea-SCR catalyst using both spectroscopic (DRIFTS and Raman) and thermal techniques (thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)) to identify the deposit components and their corresponding thermal properties. Urea thermolysis exhibits two decomposition stages, involving ammonia generation and consumption, respectively. The decomposition after the second stage leads to the product of melamine complexes, (HNC=NH)x(HNCO)y, that hinder catalytic performance. The presence of catalyst accompanied with a good spray of the urea solution helps to eliminate the second stage. In this work, kinetics of the direct reduction of NOx by urea is determined and the possibility of using additives to the urea solution in order to rejuvenate the catalyst surface and improve its performance will be discussed

  8. N-Urea Efficiency In Lowland Rice Applied With Azolla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two N-fertilizer experiments have been conducted using urea tablet and prill urea combined with Azolla application. Twelve treatments have been tested using 2 rice varieties namely Atomita-4 and IR-64. To enable the determination of N-urea efficiency 15N labelled urea was used. The experiments were conducted in the dry and wet season (DS and WS) 1994/1995 at the experimental station, pusaka negara, Subang West Java. Data obtained from the two experiments showed that the highest N-urea efficiency was found in Atomita-4 applied with urea-tablet (DS=46,1%, WS= 35,8%). Letting the Azolla grow during one lowland rice growth period could increase the N-urea prill efficiency (±5%) compared when no azolla was applied. Apparently Atomita-4 could use N-urea more efficiently compared to IR-64, showing higher grain yield (atomita-4 DS=6.2 ton ha-1 WS=5.9 ton ha-1) vs IR-64 (DS=5.8 ton ha-1, WS=5.3 ton ha-1). Decreasing the levels of TSP not influence to the urea efficiency at the DS and WS

  9. Effect of urea on the structural dynamics of water

    OpenAIRE

    Rezus, Y. L. A.; Bakker, H. J.

    2006-01-01

    We use polarization-resolved mid-infrared pump-probe spectroscopy to study the effect of urea on the structure and dynamics of water. Surprisingly, we find that, even at high concentrations of urea (8 M), the orientational dynamics of most water molecules are the same as in pure liquid water, showing that urea has a negligible effect on the hydrogen-bond dynamics of these molecules. However, a small fraction of the water molecules (approximately one water molecule per urea molecule) turns out...

  10. Pengolahan Limbah Cair Pabrik Pupuk Urea Menggunakan Advanced Oxidation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmadi Darmadi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Limbah cair pabrik pupuk urea terdiri dari urea dan amonium yang masing-masing mempunyai konsentrasi berkisar antara 1500-10000 ppm dan 400-3000 ppm. Konsentrasi urea yang tinggi di dalam badan air dapat menyebabkan blooming algae dalam ekosistem tersebut yang dapat mengakibatkan kehidupan biota air lain terserang penyakit. Peristiwa ini terjadi karena kurangnya nutrisi bagi biota air dan sedikitnya sinar matahari yang dapat menembusi permukaan air. Disamping kedua hal tersebut di atas, algae juga dapat memproduksi senyawa beracun bagi biota air dan manusia. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengolah urea menggunakan oksidasi konvensional (H2O2 dan Advanced Oxidation Processes (kombinasi H2O2-Fe2+ pada pH 5 dengan parameter yang digunakan adalah variasi konsen-trasi awal H2O2  dan konsentrasi Fe2+. Hasil percobaan menunjukkan bahwa penurunan konsentrasi urea tertinggi diperoleh pada penggunaan reagen fenton (8000 ppm H2O2 dan 500 ppm Fe2+, yaitu dapat menurunkan urea dari konsentrasi awal urea 2566,145 ppm menjadi 0 ppm. Kinetika reaksi dekomposisi urea menjadi amonium dan amonium menjadi nitrit dan nitrat yang diuji mengikuti laju kinetika reaksi orde 1 (satu terhadap urea dan orde satu terhadap amonium dengan konstanta laju reaksi masing-masing k1 = 0,019 dan k2 = 0,022 min-1.

  11. Quantitative assessment of urea, glucose and ammonia changes in human dental plaque and saliva following rinsing with urea and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, D L; Kleinberg, I

    1983-01-01

    The rates of three processes associated with the rise and fall in plaque pH, that normally occur following a urea rinse, were determined: (i) disappearance of urea from plaque, (ii) disappearance of urea from saliva and (iii) formation and disappearance from plaque of the ammonia produced by the plaque bacteria from the urea. Also examined were two processes associated with the fall and rise in pH following a glucose rinse: the disappearance of glucose from plaque and from saliva. Entry into plaque of either urea or glucose during rinsing was immediate; the subsequent disappearance of both from the plaque was slow and followed first-order kinetics. The ammonia formation and urea-disappearance results suggested that clearance of urea from the plaque occurred mainly by bacterial degradation and not by diffusion out of the plaque. The rate constants for ammonia formation and for its subsequent disappearance from the plaque made it clear why a rapid rise and a slow subsequent fall in the pH occurs after urea rinsing. The rate constants enabled calculation of the ammonia produced as a percentage of the urea utilized. Only 16-26 per cent of the urea was recovered as ammonia and the remainder of the urea-N was stored probably as NH2 moieties of certain amino acids. Such storage may enable the plaque bacteria to maintain the pH at an elevated level for an extended period of time by bacterial production of ammonia from these stored compounds after the urea ceases to be available as a source of substrate. PMID:6580848

  12. Nitrogen Cycling and Losses Under Rice-Wheat Rotations with Coated Urea and Urea in the Taihu Lake Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Zhi; ZHU Jian-Guo; GAO Ren; H. YASUKAZU; FENG Ke

    2007-01-01

    A lysimeter experiment with undisturbed soil profiles was carried out to study nitrogen cycling and losses in a paddy soil with applications of coated urea and urea under a rice-wheat rotation system in the Taihu Lake region from 2001 to 2003. Treatments for rice and wheat included urea at conventional, 300 (rice) and 250 (wheat) kg N ha-1, and reduced levels, 150 (rice) and 125 (wheat) kg N ha-1, coated urea at two levels, 100 (rice) and 75 (wheat) kg N ha-1, and 150(rice) and 125 (wheat) kg N ha-1, and a control with no nitrogen arranged in a completely randomized design. The results under two rice-wheat rotations showed that N losses through both NH3 volatilization and runoff in the coated urea treatments were much lower than those in the urea treatments. In the urea treatments N runoff losses were significantly (P < 0.001) positively correlated (r = 0.851) with applied N. N concentration in surface water increased rapidly to maximum two days after urea application and then decreased quickly. However, if there was no heavy rain within five days of fertilizer application, the likelihood of N loss by runoff was not high. As the treatments showed little difference in N loss via percolation, nitrate N in the groundwater of the paddy fields was not directly related to N leaching. The total yieldof the two rice-wheat rotations in the treatment of coated urea at 50% conventional level was higher than that in the treatment of urea at the conventional level. Thus, coated urea was more favorable to rice production and environmental protection than urea.

  13. Study on the dynamics of release of carbon-14 labelled herbicides from controlled-release formulations in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were conducted to study the processes governing the release of carbon-14 labelled butachlor and thiobencarb herbicides from two type of controlled-release (CR) formulations into water. The formulations were i) herbicides uniformly dispersed in a mixture of calcium alginate and kaolin and ii) herbicides adsorbed on corn cob granules which were then coated with a mixture of polyvinyl acetate (PVA) and polyoxyethylene glycol (POEG). Theoretical models and corresponding equations were developed and the experimental data for the release rate of the two herbicides was compared with the models. The results indicated that the release of the herbicides from the alginate formulations was governed by diffusion process; whereas, the release from the corn cob formulations was thermodynamic process. The diffusion of the herbicides from the alginate granules was inversely related to the thickness of the granule, with slower release from the larger granules and vice versa. The release of the herbicides from the corn cob granules was related to the type and composition of the polymer mixture on the surface of the granules. The study showed that the rate of release of the herbicides was faster from the corn cob formulations than the alginate formulations. (author). Abstract only

  14. Cobalt electrodeposition using urea and choline chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical behavior of Co(II) in urea-choline chloride-CoCl2 melt was investigated by cyclic voltammetry at 373 K. The results show that the reaction of Co(II) to Co is irreversible and it proceeds via a one-step two electrons transfer process. The diffusion coefficient of Co(II) was estimated to be 1.7 × 10−6 cm2 s−1 at 373 K. Electrodeposition of cobalt was studied at different cathodic potentials (-0.80 to -0.95 V) and at different temperatures (353 to 383 K) in eutectic mixture of choline chloride and urea (1:2 molar ratio). The deposits were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). SEM images show that uniform, dense, and compact deposits were obtained at -0.80 V within a temperature range of 353 K to 373 K. EDS and XRD analysis confirm that high-purity metallic Co deposits were obtained

  15. Active breathing control (ABC): Determination and reduction of breathing-induced organ motion in the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Extensive radiotherapy volumes for tumors of the chest are partly caused by interfractional organ motion. We evaluated the feasibility of respiratory observation tools using the active breathing control (ABC) system and the effect on breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with unresectable tumors of the chest were selected for evaluation of the ABC system. Computed tomography scans were performed at various respiratory phases starting at the same couch position without patient movement. Threshold levels were set at minimum and maximum volume during normal breathing cycles and at a volume defined as shallow breathing, reflecting the subjective maximal tolerable reduction of breath volume. To evaluate the extent of organ movement, 13 landmarks were considering using commercial software for image coregistration. In 4 patients, second examinations were performed during therapy. Results: Investigating the differences in a normal breathing cycle versus shallow breathing, a statistically significant reduction of respiratory motion in the upper, middle, and lower regions of the chest could be detected, representing potential movement reduction achieved through reduced breath volume. Evaluating interfraction reproducibility, the mean displacement ranged between 0.24 mm (chest wall/tracheal bifurcation) to 3.5 mm (diaphragm) for expiration and shallow breathing and 0.24 mm (chest wall) to 5.25 mm (diaphragm) for normal inspiration. Conclusions: By modifying regularity of the respiratory cycle through reduction of breath volume, a significant and reproducible reduction of chest and diaphragm motion is possible, enabling reduction of treatment planning margins

  16. Delayed feedback applied to breathing in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, N. B.; Pototsky, A.; Parkes, C.

    2013-10-01

    We studied the response of healthy volunteers to the delayed feedback generated from the breathing signals. Namely, in the freely-breathing volunteers the breathing signal was recorded, delayed by τ seconds and fed back to the same volunteer in real time in the form of a visual and auditory stimulus of low intensity, i.e. the stimulus was crucially non-intrusive. In each case volunteers were instructed to breathe in the way which was most comfortable for them, and no explanation about the kind of applied stimulus was provided to them. Each volunteer experienced 10 different delay times ranging between 10% and 100% of the average breathing period without external stimulus. It was observed that in a significant proportion of subjects (11 out of 24) breathing was slowed down in the presence of delayed feedback with moderate delay. Also, in 6 objects out of 24 the delayed feedback was able to induce transition from nearly periodic to irregular breathing. These observations are consistent with the phenomena observed in numerical simulation of the models of periodic and chaotic self-oscillations with delays, and also in experiments with simpler self-oscillating systems.

  17. An Ultrasonic Contactless Sensor for Breathing Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Arlotto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of human breathing activity during a long period has multiple fundamental applications in medicine. In breathing sleep disorders such as apnea, the diagnosis is based on events during which the person stops breathing for several periods during sleep. In polysomnography, the standard for sleep disordered breathing analysis, chest movement and airflow are used to monitor the respiratory activity. However, this method has serious drawbacks. Indeed, as the subject should sleep overnight in a laboratory and because of sensors being in direct contact with him, artifacts modifying sleep quality are often observed. This work investigates an analysis of the viability of an ultrasonic device to quantify the breathing activity, without contact and without any perception by the subject. Based on a low power ultrasonic active source and transducer, the device measures the frequency shift produced by the velocity difference between the exhaled air flow and the ambient environment, i.e., the Doppler effect. After acquisition and digitization, a specific signal processing is applied to separate the effects of breath from those due to subject movements from the Doppler signal. The distance between the source and the sensor, about 50 cm, and the use of ultrasound frequency well above audible frequencies, 40 kHz, allow monitoring the breathing activity without any perception by the subject, and therefore without any modification of the sleep quality which is very important for sleep disorders diagnostic applications. This work is patented (patent pending 2013-7-31 number FR.13/57569.

  18. Effect of urea and urea-gamma treatments on cellulose degradation of Thai rice straw and corn stalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchorndhevakul, Siriwattana

    2002-08-01

    Cellulose degradation of 20% urea treated and 20% urea-10 kGy gamma treated Thai rice straw and corn stalk showed that combination effect of urea and gamma radiation gave a higher % decrease in neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF), acid detergent lignin (ADL), cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin and cutin in comparison with urea effect only for both room temperature storage and room temperature +258 K storage. The results also indicated that cellulose degradation proceeded with time, even at 258 K. A drastic drop to less than half of the original contents in NDF, ADF, and ADL could not be obtained in this study.

  19. Effect of urea and urea-gamma treatments on cellulose degradation of Thai rice straw and corn stalk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellulose degradation of 20% urea treated and 20% urea-10 kGy gamma treated Thai rice straw and corn stalk showed that combination effect of urea and gamma radiation gave a higher % decrease in neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF), acid detergent lignin (ADL), cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin and cutin in comparison with urea effect only for both room temperature storage and room temperature +258 K storage. The results also indicated that cellulose degradation proceeded with time, even at 258 K. A drastic drop to less than half of the original contents in NDF, ADF, and ADL could not be obtained in this study

  20. Breath test to diagnose the presence of Helicobacter pylori, the causative agent of active chronic gastritis and ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Brazil almost 80% of the population presents the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, considered to be the causative agent of active chronic gastritis and ulcers. This does not mean that all of these people will suffer gastritis or ulcers, but it is highly probable. The usual diagnostic procedure used a microbiological culture in mucus biopsy specimens collected during gastroscopy, an invasive method. The problem was to find a non-invasive, easy, fast and efficient procedure to diagnose this bacterium. The nuclear technique applied was liquid scintillation, a suitable technique to measure the low energy β emission of 14C. This was the best method available at the time to develop and establish the test. In order to develop a non-invasive test to diagnose H. pylori, research was carried out with doctors from the Department of Gastroenterology at the School of Medicine of the Federal University of Minas Gerais. This research applied a radiochemical method using 14C, a radioisotope of carbon. The patient's control breath sample was obtained after a 12 hour fast. Then a standard meal was offered to delay gastric emptying, after which the patient drank a determined amount of urea labelled with 14C in water. Breath samples were collected at 10, 15, 30 and 60 minutes in a hyaline-ethanol solution with a pH (acid) indicator. If the bacteria were present, the labelled urea would be metabolized and the 14C would be eliminated as 14CO2 by exhalation; otherwise the 14C would be eliminated through the faeces. This 14C urea breath test was applied in around 5000 participants and the results were compared with results obtained through culture

  1. Carbon 14 dating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gives a first introduction to 14C dating as it is put into practice at the radiocarbon dating centre of Claude-Bernard university (Lyon-1 univ., Villeurbanne, France): general considerations and recalls of nuclear physics; the 14C dating method; the initial standard activity; the isotopic fractioning; the measurement of samples activity; the liquid-scintillation counters; the calibration and correction of 14C dates; the preparation of samples; the benzene synthesis; the current applications of the method. (J.S.)

  2. Fast-starting for a breath: Air breathing in Hoplosternum littorale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2012-01-01

    overlap considerably in their kinematics (turning rates and distance covered), suggesting that air breathing in this species is performed using escapelike C-start motions. This demonstrates that C-starts in fish do not need external stimulation and can be spontaneous behaviours used outside the context...... to be food-related. Little is known about C-starts being used outside the context of escaping or feeding. Here, we test the hypothesis that air-breathing fish may use C-starts when gulping air at the surface. Air breathing is a common behaviour in many fish species when exposed to hypoxia, although certain...... species perform air-breathing in normoxia to fill their swim bladders for buoyancy control and/or sound transduction. Hoplos/emum littorale is an air-breathing freshwater catfish found in South America. Field video observations reveal that their air-breathing behaviour consists of a fast air...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9925 - Aminoethylethylene urea methacrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aminoethylethylene urea methacrylamide... Substances § 721.9925 Aminoethylethylene urea methacrylamide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as an aminoethylethylene...

  4. 76 FR 15339 - Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... its notice of institution (75 FR 74746, December 1, 2010) were adequate and that the respondent... COMMISSION Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... orders on solid urea from Russia and Ukraine. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it...

  5. Elastic behavior of flexible polyether(urethane–urea) foam materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuur, van der Martijn; Heide, van der Evert; Feijen, Jan; Gaymans, Reinoud J.

    2004-01-01

    Polyether(urethane–urea) foams (PEUU) with varying urea contents and different polyether segments (PPO and PPO-co-PEO (93/7 w/w)) were compacted to transparent solid plaques via compression molding. The thermal, mechanical and elastic properties of the compacted PEUU materials were studied. With inc

  6. 21 CFR 868.5270 - Breathing system heater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breathing system heater. 868.5270 Section 868.5270...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5270 Breathing system heater. (a) Identification. A breathing system heater is a device that is intended to warm breathing gases before they...

  7. 46 CFR 197.456 - Breathing supply hoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing supply hoses. 197.456 Section 197.456 Shipping....456 Breathing supply hoses. (a) The diving supervisor shall insure that— (1) Each breathing supply....5 times its maximum working pressure; (2) Each breathing supply hose assembly, prior to being...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1439 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protective breathing equipment. 25.1439... Protective breathing equipment. (a) Fixed (stationary, or built in) protective breathing equipment must be installed for the use of the flightcrew, and at least one portable protective breathing equipment shall...

  9. 42 CFR 84.91 - Breathing resistance test; exhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; exhalation. 84.91...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.91 Breathing resistance test; exhalation. (a) Resistance to exhalation...-circuit apparatus with a breathing machine as described in § 84.88, and the exhalation resistance...

  10. 42 CFR 84.88 - Breathing bag test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing bag test. 84.88 Section 84.88 Public... RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.88 Breathing bag test. (a) Breathing bags will be tested in an air atmosphere saturated...

  11. 14 CFR 121.337 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protective breathing equipment. 121.337... Protective breathing equipment. (a) The certificate holder shall furnish approved protective breathing equipment (PBE) meeting the equipment, breathing gas, and communication requirements contained in...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5250 - Breathing circuit circulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breathing circuit circulator. 868.5250 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5250 Breathing circuit circulator. (a) Identification. A breathing circuit circulator is a turbine device that is attached to a closed breathing...

  13. Effects of nitrogen supply on inter-organ fluxes of urea-N and renal urea-N kinetics in lactating Holstein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røjen, Betina Amdisen; Theil, Peter Kappel; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2011-01-01

    The effects of decreasing ruminal urea infusion in lactating dairy cows fed a basal diet deficient in rumen degradable protein on inter-organ urea-N fluxes, epithelial urea-N extraction, and renal urea-N kinetics were investigated. Eight Danish Holstein cows fitted with a ruminal cannula and...... permanent indwelling catheters in the major splanchnic blood vessels and the gastrosplenic vein were used. The cows were randomly allocated to a triplicate incomplete 3 × 3 Latin square design with 14-d periods. Treatments were continuous ventral ruminal infusion of water, 4.1 g of feed urea/kg of dry...... matter intake, and 8.5 g of feed urea/kg of dry matter intake. Dry matter intake and milk yield decreased linearly with decreasing urea infusion. Arterial blood urea-N and ruminal ammonia concentrations decreased linearly with decreasing urea infusion. In absolute amounts, the urea-N recycling did not...

  14. Breathing Problems - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Breathing Problems URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/breathingproblems.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  15. Breathing exercises for adults with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is a common long-term condition that remains poorly controlled in many people despite the availability of pharmacological interventions, evidence-based treatment guidelines and care pathways.(1) There is considerable public interest in the use of non-pharmacological approaches for the treatment of asthma.(2) A survey of people with asthma reported that many have used complementary and alternative medicine, often without the knowledge of their clinical team.(3) Such interventions include breathing techniques, herbal products, homeopathy and acupuncture. The role of breathing exercises within the management of asthma has been controversial, partly because early claims of effectiveness were exaggerated.(4) UK national guidance and international guidelines on the management of asthma have included the option of breathing exercise programmes as an adjuvant to pharmacological treatment.(5,6) Here we discuss the types of breathing exercises used and review the evidence for their effectiveness. PMID:26563876

  16. The retrotrapezoid nucleus and breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyenet, Patrice G; Stornetta, Ruth L; Abbott, Stephen B G; Depuy, Seth D; Kanbar, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) is located in the rostral medulla oblongata close to the ventral surface and consists of a bilateral cluster of glutamatergic neurons that are non-aminergic and express homeodomain transcription factor Phox2b throughout life. These neurons respond vigorously to increases in local pCO(2) via cell-autonomous and paracrine (glial) mechanisms and receive additional chemosensory information from the carotid bodies. RTN neurons exclusively innervate the regions of the brainstem that contain the respiratory pattern generator (RPG). Lesion or inhibition of RTN neurons largely attenuates the respiratory chemoreflex of adult rats whereas their activation increases respiratory rate, inspiratory amplitude and active expiration. Phox2b mutations that cause congenital central hypoventilation syndrome in humans prevent the development of RTN neurons in mice. Selective deletion of the RTN Phox2b-VGLUT2 neurons by genetic means in mice eliminates the respiratory chemoreflex in neonates.In short, RTN Phox2b-VGLUT2 neurons are a major nodal point of the CNS network that regulates pCO(2) via breathing and these cells are probable central chemoreceptors. PMID:23080151

  17. Heart rate response to breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Pagh, K; Nielsen, J S;

    1987-01-01

    Heart rate responses to stepwise and periodic changes in lung volume were studied in seven young healthy males. Stepwise inspiration and expiration both resulted in an increase in heart rate followed by a rapid decrease in heart rate. The fastest heart rate was reached in 1.6 +/- 0.5 s and in 3.6...... as a measure of vagal function a number of factors have to be taken into consideration and to simplify the analysis of heart rate responses to breathing we recommend, instead, the use of the transient changes in heart rate induced by stepwise changes in lung volume.......Heart rate responses to stepwise and periodic changes in lung volume were studied in seven young healthy males. Stepwise inspiration and expiration both resulted in an increase in heart rate followed by a rapid decrease in heart rate. The fastest heart rate was reached in 1.6 +/- 0.5 s and in 3.......6 +/- 1.4 s in response to inspiration and expiration, respectively (P less than 0.01). The slowest heart rate was reached in 4.8 +/- 1.0 s and in 7.6 +/- 1.9 s in response to inspiration and expiration, respectively (P less than 0.01). Following this biphasic change the heart rate returned to a steady...

  18. Breath tests and irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rana, Satya Vati; Malik, Aastha

    2014-01-01

    Breath tests are non-invasive tests and can detect H2 and CH4 gases which are produced by bacterial fermentation of unabsorbed intestinal carbohydrate and are excreted in the breath. These tests are used in the diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and for measuring the orocecal transit time. Malabsorption of carbohydrates is a key trigger of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-type symptoms such as diarrhea and/or constipation, bloating, excess flatulence...

  19. Oropharyngeal origin of markers in exhaled breath

    OpenAIRE

    Marteus, Helena

    2005-01-01

    Normal NO formation in the human airways occurs primarily in the nasal airways, where it is catalyzed by inducible NO synthase (iNOS), and in the oropharyngeal tract, via as yet not fully defined pathways. This NO can be detected in exhaled breath and when inflammation is present in the airways, for example in asthma, the concentration of NO is increased. Although most studies on non-invasive measurements of airway inflammation have focused on NO in exhaled breath, there has...

  20. Hydrogen bonding of formamide, urea, urea monoxide and their thio-analogs with water and homodimers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Damanjit Kaur; Shweta Khanna

    2014-11-01

    Ab initio and DFT methods have been employed to study the hydrogen bonding ability of formamide, urea, urea monoxide, thioformamide, thiourea and thiourea monoxide with one water molecule and the homodimers of the selected molecules. The stabilization energies associated with themonohydrated adducts and homodimers’ formation were evaluated at B3LYP/6-311++G** and MP2/6-311++G∗∗ levels. The energies were corrected for zero-point vibrational energies and basis set superposition error using counterpoise method. Atoms in molecules study has been carried out in order to characterize the hydrogen bonds through the changes in electron density and laplacian of electron density. A natural energy decomposition and natural bond orbital analysis was performed to understand the nature of hydrogen bonding.

  1. Utilization of urea-nitrogen-15 in ruminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Merino sheep a series of experiments were carried out investigating exogenous and endogenous urea utilization. On the experimental sheep with isolated jejunum, rumen and intestine fistula, re-entral intestine cannulae, and after intra-ruminal or intra-intestinal 15N-urea administration it was found that urea-15N takes part in the nitrogen recycling, and is utilized in the nitrogen pool. In experiments with synthetic protein-free diet, low protein diet and high nitrogen diet, after the intravenous administration of 15N-urea the following findings were made: The results of experiments with synthetic diet, where the only nitrogen source was perorally (for 3-6 months) and then intravenously (for 3 months) administered urea, indicated the ability of ruminants to replace fully the nitrogen in the feed under certain conditions by increased endogenous urea recirculation. The results of the experiments with various nitrogen intakes showed that considerable amounts of urea-15N (44-96% from the given dose) were retained. Nitrogen compounds synthetized from blood urea-15N were recycled through the alimentary tract. Its secretion predominated in the forestomachs, abomasum and duodenum, and its reabsorption took place in the intestinal tract. From the 15N incorporated into the nitrogenous substances which passed through the duodenum, 73-84% was reabsorbed. The retained 15N was incorporated into the microbial and plasma proteins and its amide-N. On the basis of these results it is concluded that in addition to the rumeno-hepatal circulation, the entero-hepatal circulation of nitrogenous substances, including endogenous nitrogen, also plays an important role quantitatively and perhaps qualitatively in the process of re-utilizing the blood urea N for proteosynthesis and synthesis of other N-metabolites in ruminants. The hydrolysis of endogenous urea in the gastro-intestinal tract of ruminants and its utilization is a natural process indispensable for the maintenance of nitrogen

  2. Simulation of Carbon-14 Migration Through a Thick Unsaturated Alluvial Basin Resulting from an Underground Nuclear Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martian, P.; Larentzos, J.

    2008-12-01

    Yucca Flat is one of several areas on the Nevada Test Site that was used for underground nuclear testing. Extensive testing performed in the unsaturated and saturated zones have resulted in groundwater contamination and surface subsidence craters in the vicinity of the underground test areas. Simulation of multiphase 14C transport through the thick Yucca Flat alluvial basin was performed to estimate the magnitude of radionuclide attenuation occurring within the unsaturated zone. Parameterization of the 14C transport in the multiphase flow and transport simulator (FEHM) was verified with experimental data collected from a large unsaturated soil column experiment. The experimental data included 14C as a radio-labeled bicarbonate solution, SF6 gas, and lithium bromide solution breakthroughs. Two representative simulation cases with working points located at shallow and deep depths relative to the water table were created to investigate the impact of subsidence crater-enhanced recharge, crater-playa areal extent, gas-phase partitioning, solid-phase partitioning, and a reduced permeability/porosity compressed zone created during the explosion on 14C transport. The representative shallow test had a detonation point located 175 m below land surface, and the deep test had a working point 435 m below land surface in a 500 m deep unsaturated zone. Carbon-14 transport is influenced by gas-phase diffusion and sorption within the alluvium. Gas-phase diffusion is an attenuation mechanism that transports 14C gas as 14CO2 throughout the unsaturated zone and exposes it to a large amount of soil moisture, resulting in dilute concentrations. The simulations indicated that the majority of the 14C inventory remains in the unsaturated zone over a 1,000-year time period after detonation because gas-phase diffusion moves the bulk of the 14C away from the higher recharge occurring in crater playas. Retardation also plays a role in slowing advective aqueous phase transport to the water

  3. Hydrogen breath tests in gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Satya Vati; Malik, Aastha

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen breath tests are widely used to explore pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and carbohydrate malabsorption are disorders detected by these tests that have been proposed to be of great importance for symptoms of GI diseases. Glucose hydrogen breath test is more acceptable for diagnosis of SIBO whereas lactose and fructose hydrogen breath tests are used for detection of lactose and fructose maldigestion respectively. Lactulose hydrogen breath test is also used widely to measure the orocecal transit time for GI motility. These methods are noninvasive and inexpensive. Many patients with functional gut disorders are unaware of the relationship between diet and GI symptoms they present. In particular, patients with chronic symptoms may regard their condition as normal and may not be aware that their symptoms can be effectively managed following a proper diagnosis. Patients with symptoms of abdominal pain, bloating, flatulence and altered bowel movements (diarrhea and constipation), or with a medical diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome or celiac disease, may have undiagnosed carbohydrate malabsorption or SIBO. Hydrogen breath tests are specific and sensitive diagnostic tests that can be used to either confirm or eliminate the possibility of carbohydrate malabsorption or SIBO in such patients. Breath tests, though valuable tools, are underutilized in evaluating dyspepsia and functional bloating and diarrhea as well as suspected malabsorption. However, because of their simplicity, reproducibility and safety of procedure they are now being substituted to more uncomfortable and expensive techniques that were traditionally used in gastroenterology. PMID:25298621

  4. Breath-based biomarkers for tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolk, Arend H. J.; van Berkel, Joep J. B. N.; Claassens, Mareli M.; Walters, Elisabeth; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Dallinga, Jan W.; van Schooten, Fredrik-Jan

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the potential of breath analysis by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to discriminate between samples collected prospectively from patients with suspected tuberculosis (TB). Samples were obtained in a TB endemic setting in South Africa where 28% of the culture proven TB patients had a Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) negative sputum smear. A training set of breath samples from 50 sputum culture proven TB patients and 50 culture negative non-TB patients was analyzed by GC-MS. A classification model with 7 compounds resulted in a training set with a sensitivity of 72%, specificity of 86% and accuracy of 79% compared with culture. The classification model was validated with an independent set of breath samples from 21 TB and 50 non-TB patients. A sensitivity of 62%, specificity of 84% and accuracy of 77% was found. We conclude that the 7 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that discriminate breath samples from TB and non-TB patients in our study population are probably host-response related VOCs and are not derived from the VOCs secreted by M. tuberculosis. It is concluded that at present GC-MS breath analysis is able to differentiate between TB and non-TB breath samples even among patients with a negative ZN sputum smear but a positive culture for M. tuberculosis. Further research is required to improve the sensitivity and specificity before this method can be used in routine laboratories.

  5. A free-breathing lung motion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tianyu

    Lung cancer has been the leading cause of cancer deaths for decades in the United States. Although radiotherapy is one of the most effective treatments, side effects from error in delivery of radiation due to organ motion during breathing remain a significant issue. To compensate the breathing motion during the treatment, a free breathing lung motion model, x= x0+αv+betaf, was developed and discussed, where x is the position of a piece of tissue located at reference position x0. α is a parameter which characterizes the motion due to local air filling (motion as a function of tidal volume) and beta is the parameter that accounts for the motion due to the imbalance of dynamical stress distributions during inspiration and exhalation which cause lung motion hysteresis (motion as a function of airflow). The parameters α and beta together provide a quantitative characterization of breathing motion that inherently includes the complex hysteresis interplay. The theoretical foundation of the model was built by investigating the stress distribution inside of a lung and the biomechanical properties of the lung tissues. Accuracy of the model was investigated by using 49 free-breathing patient data sets. Applications of the model in localizing lung cancer, monitoring radiation damage and suppressing artifacts in free-breathing PET images were also discussed. This work supported in part by NIHR01CA096679 and NIHR01CA116712.

  6. A Multimedia System for Breath Regulation and Relaxation

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Ching Liao; Han-Hong Lin; He-Lin Ruo; Po-Hsiang Hsu

    2015-01-01

    In the hectic life today, detrimental stress has caused numerous illness. To adjust mental states, breath regulation plays a core role in multiple relaxation techniques. In this paper, we introduce a multimedia system supporting breath regulation and relaxation. Features of this system include non-contact respiration detection, bio-signal monitoring, and breath interaction. In addition to illustrating this system, we also propose a novel form of breath interaction. Through this form of breath...

  7. Synthesis of aluminum nitride nanoparticles by a facile urea glass route and influence of urea/metal molar ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attention toward nanosized aluminum nitride (AlN) was rapidly increasing due to its physical and chemical characteristics. In this work, nanocrystalline AlN particles were prepared via a simple urea glass route. The effect of the urea/metal molar ratio on the crystal structure and morphology of nanocrystalline AlN particles was studied using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results revealed that the morphology and the crystal structure of AlN nanoparticles could be controlled by adjusting the urea/metal ratio. Furthermore, a mixture of Al2O3 and h-AlN was detected at the urea/metal molar ratio of 4 due to the inadequate urea content. With increasing the molar ratio, the pure h-AlN was obtained. In addition, the nucleation and growth mechanisms of AlN nanocrystalline were proposed.

  8. Jean-François Gallotte, Joëlle Malberg, Carbone 14 le film, Les Mutins de Pangée

    OpenAIRE

    Curien, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Carbone 14 le film est un témoignage sur le mouvement des radios libres, à travers l'exemple de « Carbone 14 », « la radio active » devenue « la radio qui vous encule par les oreilles ». Filmé en 4 jours à la rentrée 1982, avec du matériel volé, le film ovni de Jean-François Galotte et Joëlle Malberg est sélectionné au Festival de Cannes en 1983. Il fait un tollé qui retombe comme une crêpe, aux oubliettes : on n'en parle plus avant... 2011, trente ans après la création de la radio culte et c...

  9. Le carbone 14 : progrès récents et limitations de la méthode de datation

    OpenAIRE

    J. C. Duplessy; Arnold, M; Bard, E.; Cortijo, E.; Labeyrie, L.; Laj, C.; Lehman, B; Mazaud, A.; M. Paterne; Tisnerat, N.; L. Vidal

    1998-01-01

    La méthode de datation par le carbone 14 a permis l'établissement d'une échelle chronologique du Quaternaire Supérieur et a contribué à la découverte de phénomènes insoupçonnés comme l'existence de variations climatiques abruptes et de grande amplitude pendant la dernière période glaciaire et la déglaciation qui l'a terminée. L'effort continu pour comparer les âges carbone 14 avec les âges calendaires a été maintenant étendu au delà de 30 000 ans, même si le nombre de mesures est encore trop ...

  10. Nuclear graphite waste's behaviour under disposal conditions: Study of the release and repartition of organic and inorganic forms of carbon 14 and tritium in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    23000 tons of graphite wastes will be generated during dismantling of the first generation of French reactors (9 gas cooled reactors). These wastes are classified as Long Lived Low Level wastes (LLW-LL). As requested by the law, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra) is studying concepts of low-depth disposals.In this work we focus on carbon 14, the main long-lived radionuclide in graphite waste (5730 y), but also on tritium, which is the main contributor to the radioactivity in the short term. Carbon 14 and tritium may be released from graphite waste in many forms in gaseous phase (14CO2, HT...) or in solution (14CO32-, HTO...). Their speciation will strongly affect their migration from the disposal site to the environment. Leaching experiments, in alkaline solution (0.1 M NaOH simulating repository conditions) have been performed on irradiated graphite, from Saint-Laurent A2 and G2 reactors, in order to quantify their release and characterize their speciation. The studies show that carbon 14 exists in both gaseous and aqueous phases. In the gaseous phase, release is weak (≤0.1%) and corresponds to oxidizable species. Carbon 14 is mainly released into liquid phase, as both inorganic and organic species. 65% of released fraction is inorganic and 35% organic carbon. Two tritiated species have been identified in gaseous phase: HTO and HT/Organically Bond Tritium. More than 90% of tritium in that phase corresponds to HT/OBT. But release is weak (≤0.1%). HTO is mainly in the liquid phase. (author)

  11. Measurement of specific radioactivity of tryptophan labeled with carbon-14 in plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with a synchronized accumulating radioisotope detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of specific radioactivity by a high-performance liquid chromatograph with a synchronized accumulating radioisotope detector was conducted. Accuracy of measurement for an authentic sample containing 0.2 nCi of tryptophan labeled with carbon-14 exceeded 95%. In the case of a plasma sample obtained 120 min following intravenous administration of 15 muCi of labeled tryptophan to a rat, the coefficient of variation was 7.0%

  12. In vitro slow-release urea characteristics under different molasses levels contained in rice straw based diets

    OpenAIRE

    D. Kardaya; K.G Wiryawan; A. Parakkasi; H.M. Winugroho

    2013-01-01

    Slow-release urea characteristics of zinc-urea, zeolites-urea, and zeolites-zinc-urea were examined using in vitro techniques. The objective of this experiment was to study the in vitro slow-release urea characteristics of zinc-urea, zeolites-urea, and zeolites-zinc-urea under different molasses concentrations in relation to the ruminal fermentative changes observed in different incubation time. The experimental design employed was randomized block design with a 4 x 3 factorial arrangement pl...

  13. Breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer: Comparison of free breathing gating with the breath-hold technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer implies a risk of late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. This is the first study to evaluate cardiopulmonary dose sparing of breathing adapted radiotherapy (BART) using free breathing gating, and to compare this respiratory technique with voluntary breath-hold. Patients and methods: 17 patients were CT-scanned during non-coached breathing manoeuvre including free breathing (FB), end-inspiration gating (IG), end-expiration gating (EG), deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and end-expiration breath-hold (EBH). The Varian Real-time Position Management system (RPMTM) was used to monitor respiratory movement and to gate the scanner. For each breathing phase, a population based internal margin (IM) was estimated based on average chest wall excursion, and incorporated into an individually optimised three-field mono-isocentric wide tangential photon field treatment plan for each scan. The target included the remaining breast, internal mammary nodes and periclavicular nodes. Results: The mean anteroposterior chest wall excursion during FB was 2.5 mm. For IG and EG, the mean excursions within gating windows were 1.1 and 0.7 mm, respectively, whereas for DIBH and EBH the excursions were 4.1 and 2.6 mm, respectively. For patients with left-sided cancer, the median heart volume receiving more than 50% of the prescription dose was reduced from 19.2% for FB to 2.8% for IG and 1.9% for DIBH, and the median left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery volume was reduced from 88.9% to 22.4% for IG and 3.6% for DIBH. Simultaneously, the median ipsilateral relative lung volume irradiated to >50% of the prescribed target dose for both right- and left-sided cancers was reduced from 45.6% for FB to 29.5% for IG and 27.7% for DIBH. For EBH and EG, both the irradiated heart, LAD and lung volumes increased compared to FB. Conclusions: This is the first study to demonstrate the dosimetric benefits

  14. Breath tests: principles, problems, and promise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breath tests rely on the measurement of gases produced in the intestine, absorbed, and expired in the breath. Carbohydrates, such as lactose and sucrose, can be administered in ysiologic doses; if malabsorbed, they will be metabolized to hydrogen by colonic bacteria. Since hydrogen is not produced by human metabolic reactions, a rise in breath hydrogen, as measured by gas chromatography, is evidence of carbohydrate malabsorption. Likewise, a rise in breath hydrogen marks the transit time of nonabsorbable carbohydrates such as lactulose through the small intestine into the colon. Simple end-expiratory interval collection into nonsiliconized vacutainer tubes has made these noninvasive tests quite convenient to perform, but various problems, including changes in stool pH intestinal motility, or metabolic rate, may influence results. Another group of breath tests uses substrates labeled with radioactive or stable isotopes of carbon. Labeled fat substrates such as trioctanoin, tripalmitin, and triolein do not produce the expected rise in labeled breath CO2 if there is fat malabsorption. Bile acid malabsorption and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth can be measured with labeled cholylglycine or cholyltaurine. Labeled drugs such as aminopyrine, methacetin, and phenacetin can be used as an indication of drug metabolism and liver function. Radioactive substrates have been used to trace metabolic pathways and can be measured by scintillation counters. The availability of nonradioactive stable isotopes has made these ideal for use in children and pregnant women, but the cost of substrates and the mass spectrometers to measure them has so far limited their use to research centers. It is hoped that new techniques of processing and measurement will allow further realization of the exciting potential breath analysis has in a growing list of clinical applications

  15. Urea encapsulation in modified starch matrix for nutrients retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Muhammad Yasin; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar; Ariff, Mohd. Hazwan Bin Mohd.; Ariwahjoedi, Bambang

    2014-10-01

    It has been estimated that 20-70% of the used urea goes to the environment via leaching, nitrification and volatilization which not only harms the environment but also reduces the urea efficiency. By coating the urea granules, the farmers can achieve high urea performance through controlling the excess release of nitrogen. Up until now, different materials have been tested for nutrients retention. However, most of them are either expensive or unfriendly to the environment. Being cheap and biodegradable materials, the starches may also be used to coat the urea fertilizer for controlling the nutrients release. However, the pure starches do not meet the standards set by many industrial processes due to their slow tacking and too low viscosities and should be modified for getting smooth, compact and mechanically stronger coatings. In these studies, the tapioca starch was modified by reacting it with urea and different masses of borax. The prepared solutions were used to coat the urea granules of 3.45 mm average diameter. Different volumes (1, 1.5 and 2 mL) of each solution were used to coat 30 g of urea fluidized above the minimum level of fluidization. It was noticed that the coating thickness, percent coating, dissolution rate and percent release follow an increasing trend with an increase of solution volume; however, some random results were obtained while investigating the solution volume effects on the percent release. It was seen that the nutrients percent release over time increases with an increase in solution volume from 1 to 1.5 mL and thereafter reaches to a steady state. It confirms that the 1.5 mL of solution for 30 g urea samples will give the optimized coating results.

  16. Titanium erosion in urea strippers and emerging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High Pressure Urea Stripper is the heart of a Urea Plant. The process fluids in the high pressure streams are generally very corrosive in nature. This is basically a falling film type exchanger/ evaporator and high pressure and temperatures here make the process fluid most corrosive compared to other regions in Urea Plant. The equipment design takes into account a trade off between cost and corrosion resistance against the aggressive process media. This paper explains erosion phenomenon/ counter measures in Titanium strippers as experienced by FFC at its plants and emerging technologies to improve life and reliability of this equipment. (author)

  17. Anatomy of energetic changes accompanying urea-induced protein denaturation

    OpenAIRE

    Auton, Matthew; Holthauzen, Luis Marcelo F.; Bolen, D. Wayne

    2007-01-01

    Because of its protein-denaturing ability, urea has played a pivotal role in the experimental and conceptual understanding of protein folding and unfolding. The measure of urea's ability to force a protein to unfold is given by the m value, an experimental quantity giving the free energy change for unfolding per molar urea. With the aid of Tanford's transfer model [Tanford C (1964) J Am Chem Soc 86:2050–2059], we use newly obtained group transfer free energies (GTFEs) of protein side-chain an...

  18. Fast-starting for a breath: Air breathing in Hoplosternum littorale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domenici, Paolo; Norin, Tommy; Bushnell, Peter G.;

    , with those of mechanically-triggered C-start escape responses. Our results show that these two behaviours overlap considerably in their kinematics (turning rates and distance covered), suggesting that air breathing in this species is performed using escapelike C-start motions. This demonstrates that C...... by the fall of a prey item on the water surface, and in tapping motions of goldfish, a behaviour that was interpreted to be food-related. Little is known about C-starts being used outside the context of escaping or feeding. Here, we test the hypothesis that air-breathing fish may use C-starts when gulping air...... at the surface. Air breathing is a common behaviour in many fish species when exposed to hypoxia, although certain species perform air-breathing in normoxia to fill their swim bladders for buoyancy control and/or sound transduction. Hoplosternum littorale is an air-breathing freshwater catfish found in South...

  19. Ecological sounds affect breath duration more than artificial sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, Mauro; Santoro, Ilaria; Tamburini, Giorgia; Prpic, Valter; Sors, Fabrizio; Galmonte, Alessandra; Agostini, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that auditory rhythms affect both movement and physiological functions. We hypothesized that the ecological sounds of human breathing can affect breathing more than artificial sounds of breathing, varying in tones for inspiration and expiration. To address this question, we monitored the breath duration of participants exposed to three conditions: (a) ecological sounds of breathing, (b) artificial sounds of breathing having equal temporal features as the ecological sounds, (c) no sounds (control). We found that participants' breath duration variability was reduced in the ecological sound condition, more than in the artificial sound condition. We suggest that ecological sounds captured the timing of breathing better than artificial sounds, guiding as a consequence participants' breathing. We interpreted our results according to the Theory of Event Coding, providing further support to its validity, and suggesting its possible extension in the domain of physiological functions which are both consciously and unconsciously controlled. PMID:25637249

  20. Sudarshan kriya yoga: Breathing for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zope, Sameer A; Zope, Rakesh A

    2013-01-01

    Breathing techniques are regularly recommended for relaxation, stress management, control of psychophysiological states, and to improve organ function. Yogic breathing, defined as a manipulation of breath movement, has been shown to positively affect immune function, autonomic nervous system imbalances, and psychological or stress-related disorders. The aim of this study was to assess and provide a comprehensive review of the physiological mechanisms, the mind-body connection, and the benefits of Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY) in a wide range of clinical conditions. Various online databases searched were Medline, Psychinfo, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. All the results were carefully screened and articles on SKY were selected. The references from these articles were checked to find any other potentially relevant articles. SKY, a unique yogic breathing practice, involves several types of cyclical breathing patterns, ranging from slow and calming to rapid and stimulating. There is mounting evidence to suggest that SKY can be a beneficial, low-risk, low-cost adjunct to the treatment of stress, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, stress-related medical illnesses, substance abuse, and rehabilitation of criminal offenders. PMID:23440614

  1. Sudarshan kriya yoga: Breathing for health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer A Zope

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breathing techniques are regularly recommended for relaxation, stress management, control of psychophysiological states, and to improve organ function. Yogic breathing, defined as a manipulation of breath movement, has been shown to positively affect immune function, autonomic nervous system imbalances, and psychological or stress-related disorders. The aim of this study was to assess and provide a comprehensive review of the physiological mechanisms, the mind-body connection, and the benefits of Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY in a wide range of clinical conditions. Various online databases searched were Medline, Psychinfo, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. All the results were carefully screened and articles on SKY were selected. The references from these articles were checked to find any other potentially relevant articles. SKY, a unique yogic breathing practice, involves several types of cyclical breathing patterns, ranging from slow and calming to rapid and stimulating. There is mounting evidence to suggest that SKY can be a beneficial, low-risk, low-cost adjunct to the treatment of stress, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, stress-related medical illnesses, substance abuse, and rehabilitation of criminal offenders.

  2. Hydrolyzable polyureas bearing hindered urea bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Hanze; Cheng, Jianjun

    2014-12-10

    Hydrolyzable polymers are widely used materials that have found numerous applications in biomedical, agricultural, plastic, and packaging industrials. They usually contain ester and other hydrolyzable bonds, such as anhydride, acetal, ketal, or imine, in their backbone structures. Here, we report the first design of hydrolyzable polyureas bearing dynamic hindered urea bonds (HUBs) that can reversibly dissociate to bulky amines and isocyanates, the latter of which can be further hydrolyzed by water, driving the equilibrium to facilitate the degradation of polyureas. Polyureas bearing 1-tert-butyl-1-ethylurea bonds that show high dynamicity (high bond dissociation rate), in the form of either linear polymers or cross-linked gels, can be completely degraded by water under mild conditions. Given the simplicity and low cost for the production of polyureas by simply mixing multifunctional bulky amines and isocyanates, the versatility of the structures, and the tunability of the degradation profiles of HUB-bearing polyureas, these materials are potentially of very broad applications. PMID:25406025

  3. Impact Behaviour of Modified Biopolymer Droplet on Urea Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yon Norasyikin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The droplet impact behaviour provides the particle coating characterization during the coating process of controlled release fertiliser. To have a good coating uniformity around the urea granules, it is necessary to enhance the wettabitily properties between the coating material and urea surface. In this study, modified biopolymer is used as the coating material for the controlled release fertilizer. Various compositions of starch:urea:borate were prepared and evaluated for the wettability properties. The wettability properties measured are the maximum spreading diameter, dynamic contact angle and surface tension. The high speed Charged Couple Device (CCD camera was used to capture the images of this droplet impact behaviour. From this analysis, it is indicated that a composition of starch:urea:borate (50:15:2.5 has the best wettability characteristic and thus are suitable to be used as a coating material.

  4. Hydrogen production via urea electrolysis using a gel electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Rebecca L.; Botte, Gerardine G.

    2011-03-01

    A technology was demonstrated for the production of hydrogen and other valuable products (nitrogen and clean water) through the electrochemical oxidation of urea in alkaline media. In addition, this process remediates toxic nitrates and prevents gaseous ammonia emissions. Improvements to urea electrolysis were made through replacement of aqueous KOH electrolyte with a poly(acrylic acid) gel electrolyte. A small volume of poly(acrylic acid) gel electrolyte was used to accomplish the electrochemical oxidation of urea improving on the previous requirement for large amounts of aqueous potassium hydroxide. The effect of gel composition was investigated by varying polymer content and KOH concentrations within the polymer matrix in order to determine which is the most advantageous for the electrochemical oxidation of urea and production of hydrogen.

  5. Highly sensitive urea sensing with ion-irradiated polymer foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently we prepared urea-sensors by attaching urease to the inner walls of etched ion tracks within thin polymer foil. Here, alternative track-based sensor configurations are examined where the enzyme remained in solution. The conductivities of systems consisting of two parallel irradiated polymer foils and confining different urea/urease mixtures in between were examined. The correlations between conductivity and urea concentration differed strongly for foils with unetched and etched tracks, which points at different sensing mechanisms – tentatively attributed to the adsorption of enzymatic reaction products on the latent track entrances and to the enhanced conductivity of reaction product-filled etched tracks, respectively. All examined systems enable in principle, urea sensing. They point at the possibility of sensor cascade construction for more sensitive or selective sensor systems.

  6. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF UREA (EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is conducting a peer review and public comment of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of Urea that when finalized will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  7. IRIS Toxicological Review of Urea (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Urea,, that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS Assessment Development Process. C...

  8. Microbial urea-formaldehyde degradation involves a new enzyme, methylenediurease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahns, T; Schepp, R; Siersdorfer, C; Kaltwasser, H

    1998-01-01

    The enzymic mechanism of metabolization of urea-formaldehyde condensation products (methyleneureas; MU) and the fate of the degradation products ammonium, urea and formaldehyde were studied in bacteria isolated from garden soil, which were able to use methyleneureas as the sole source of nitrogen for growth. An organism identified as Ochrobactrum anthropi completely degraded methylenediurea (MDU) and dimethylenetriurea (DMTU) to urea, ammonia, formaldehyde and carbon dioxide. An enzyme designated as methylenediurease (methylenediurea deiminase; MDUase) was responsible for the degradation of both MDU and DMTU as well as higher polymerized MU. Growth on MU as the nitrogen source specifically induced the synthesis of this enzyme, which seems to be located in the periplasm of the bacterium. Under these growth conditions, urease as well as NAD-specific formaldehyde and formiate dehydrogenase were expressed to high levels, efficiently using the products of MU degradation, and high-affinity transport systems for urea and ammonia were synthesized scavenging the environment for these products. PMID:10526991

  9. Influence of Ficoll on urea induced denaturation of fibrinogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Kamatchi; Meenakshisundaram, N.

    2016-03-01

    Ficoll is a neutral, highly branched polymer used as a molecular crowder in the study of proteins. Ficoll is also part of Ficoll-Paque used in biology laboratories to separate blood to its components (erythrocytes, leukocytes etc.,). Role of Ficoll in the urea induced denaturation of protein Fibrinogen (Fg) has been analyzed using fluorescence, circular dichroism, molecular docking and interfacial studies. Fluorescence studies show that Ficoll prevents quenching of Fg in the presence of urea. From the circular dichroism spectra, Fg shows conformational transition to random coil with urea of 6 M concentration. Ficoll helps to shift this denaturation concentration to 8 M and thus constraints by shielding Fg during the process. Molecular docking studies indicate that Ficoll interacts favorably with the protein than urea. The surface tension and shear viscosity analysis shows clearly that the protein is shielded by Ficoll.

  10. Influence of Ficoll on urea induced denaturation of fibrinogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamatchi Sankaranarayanan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ficoll is a neutral, highly branched polymer used as a molecular crowder in the study of proteins. Ficoll is also part of Ficoll-Paque used in biology laboratories to separate blood to its components (erythrocytes, leukocytes etc.,. Role of Ficoll in the urea induced denaturation of protein Fibrinogen (Fg has been analyzed using fluorescence, circular dichroism, molecular docking and interfacial studies. Fluorescence studies show that Ficoll prevents quenching of Fg in the presence of urea. From the circular dichroism spectra, Fg shows conformational transition to random coil with urea of 6 M concentration. Ficoll helps to shift this denaturation concentration to 8 M and thus constraints by shielding Fg during the process. Molecular docking studies indicate that Ficoll interacts favorably with the protein than urea. The surface tension and shear viscosity analysis shows clearly that the protein is shielded by Ficoll.

  11. Deprotection of oximes using urea nitrate under microwave irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P T Perumal; M Anniyappan; D Muralidharan

    2004-08-01

    A new mild and efficient method for the cleavage of oximes to carbonyl compounds using readily available urea nitrate in acetonitrile-water (95 : 5), under microwave irradiation within 2 min, in good yields is reported.

  12. Sleep and Breathing at High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Himanshu; Anholm, James D.

    1999-01-01

    Sleep at high altitude is characterized by poor subjective quality, increased awakenings, frequent brief arousals, marked nocturnal hypoxemia, and periodic breathing. A change in sleep architecture with an increase in light sleep and decreasing slow-wave and REM sleep have been demonstrated. Periodic breathing with central apnea is almost universally seen amongst sojourners to high altitude, although it is far less common in long-standing high altitude dwellers. Hypobaric hypoxia in concert with periodic breathing appears to be the principal cause of sleep disruption at altitude. Increased sleep fragmentation accounts for the poor sleep quality and may account for some of the worsened daytime performance at high altitude. Hypoxic sleep disruption contributes to the symptoms of acute mountain sickness. Hypoxemia at high altitude is most severe during sleep. Acetazolamide improves sleep, AMS symptoms, and hypoxemia at high altitude. Low doses of a short acting benzodiazepine (temazepam) may also be useful in improving sleep in high altitude. PMID:11898114

  13. Effect of dietary turmeric on breath hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimouchi, Akito; Nose, Kazutoshi; Takaoka, Motoko; Hayashi, Hiroko; Kondo, Takaharu

    2009-08-01

    Turmeric is widely used in Indian cuisine. The main constituents of turmeric are curcumin and its analogues, which are well-known antioxidant compounds. In the present study, we hypothesized that turmeric in curry might increase bowel motility and activate hydrogen-producing bacterial flora in the colon, thereby increasing the concentration of breath hydrogen. Eight healthy subjects fasted for 12 h and ingested curry and rice with or without turmeric (turmeric knockout curry). Breath-hydrogen concentrations were analyzed every 15 min for 6 h by gas chromatography with a semiconductor detector. Curry with turmeric significantly increased the area under the curve of breath hydrogen and shortened small-bowel transit time, compared with curry not containing turmeric. These results suggested that dietary turmeric activated bowel motility and carbohydrate colonic fermentation. PMID:19034660

  14. Urea coated with oxidized charcoal reduces ammonia volatilization

    OpenAIRE

    Diogo Mendes de Paiva; Reinaldo Bertola Cantarutti; Gelton Geraldo Fernandes Guimarães; Ivo Ribeiro da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Urea is the most consumed nitrogen fertilizer in the world. However, its agronomic and economic efficiency is reduced by the volatilization of NH3, which can reach 78 % of the applied nitrogen. The coating of urea granules with acidic compounds obtained by charcoal oxidation has the potential to reduce the volatilization, due to the acidic character, the high buffering capacity and CEC. This work aimed to evaluate the effect of HNO3-oxidized carbon on the control of NH3 volatilization. These ...

  15. Digestibility of pelleted rations containing diverse potato flour and urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Martinele

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate ruminal in situ degradability and in vitro digestibility of dry matter (DM in concentrate supplements containing diverse potato flour pelletized with urea (0%, 4%, 8%, and 12% DM. Samples of feeds were incubated for 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48h in the rumen of four fistulated sheep. Level of urea added had no significant effect (P>;0.05 on the soluble fraction (a or potentially degradable fraction (b of the pellets and ranged from 2.1% to 12.2% and 72.9% to 87.5%, respectively. Quadratic effects (P=0.03 of the rate of degradation of fraction "b" ranged from 4.75% h-1to 7.39% h-1; the estimated maximum value at 7.4% h-1was obtained when 5.9% urea was added to the pellet. Quadratic effects (P≤0.02 of the level of urea added to the pellets on the effective degradability (ED of DM were evaluated after considering rumen passage rates of 2.5% h-1and 8% h-1; the maximum values of ED calculated under these rumen passage rates were estimated at 6.3% to 7.3% urea in the pellets. The in vitro digestibility of DM of the pellets showed a quadratic effect (P=0.02 at different levels of urea, with a maximum value of 96.9% achieved when 7.9% urea was added to the pellets. Our results suggest that the addition of 6-8% urea to pelleted feed promotes an increase in the in vitro digestibility and ED of DM.

  16. Exploring the cocrystallization potential of urea and benzamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cysewski, Piotr; Przybyłek, Maciej; Ziółkowska, Dorota; Mroczyńska, Karina

    2016-05-01

    The cocrystallization landscape of benzamide and urea interacting with aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids was studied both experimentally and theoretically. Ten new cocrystals of benzamide were synthesized using an oriented samples approach via a fast dropped evaporation technique. Information about types of known bi-component cocrystals augmented with knowledge of simple binary eutectic mixtures was used for the analysis of virtual screening efficiency among 514 potential pairs involving aromatic carboxylic acids interacting with urea or benzamide. Quantification of intermolecular interaction was achieved by estimating the excess thermodynamic functions of binary liquid mixtures under supercooled conditions within a COSMO-RS framework. The smoothed histograms suggest that slightly more potential pairs of benzamide are characterized in the attractive region compared to urea. Finally, it is emphasized that prediction of cocrystals of urea is fairly direct, while it remains ambiguous for benzamide paired with carboxylic acids. The two known simple eutectics of urea are found within the first two quartiles defined by excess thermodynamic functions, and all known cocrystals are outside of this range belonging to the third or fourth quartile. On the contrary, such a simple separation of positive and negative cases of benzamide miscibility in the solid state is not observed. The difference in properties between urea and benzamide R2,2(8) heterosynthons is also documented by alterations of substituent effects. Intermolecular interactions of urea with para substituted benzoic acid analogues are stronger compared to those of benzamide. Also, the amount of charge transfer from amide to aromatic carboxylic acid and vice versa is more pronounced for urea. However, in both cases, the greater the electron withdrawing character of the substituent, the higher the binding energy, and the stronger the supermolecule polarization via the charge transfer mechanism. PMID:27052722

  17. Decompression sickness following breath-hold diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipke, J D; Gams, E; Kallweit, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Despite convincing evidence of a relationship between breath-hold diving and decompression sickness (DCS), the causal connection is only slowly being accepted. Only the more recent textbooks have acknowledged the risks of repetitive breath-hold diving. We compare four groups of breath-hold divers: (1) Japanese and Korean amas and other divers from the Pacific area, (2) instructors at naval training facilities, (3) spear fishers, and (4) free-dive athletes. While the number of amas is likely decreasing, and Scandinavian Navy training facilities recorded only a few accidents, the number of spear fishers suffering accidents is on the rise, in particular during championships or using scooters. Finally, national and international associations (e.g., International Association of Free Drives [IAFD] or Association Internationale pour Le Developpment De L'Apnee [AIDA]) promote free-diving championships including deep diving categories such as constant weight, variable weight, and no limit. A number of free-diving athletes, training for or participating in competitions, are increasingly accident prone as the world record is presently set at a depth of 171 m. This review presents data found after searching Medline and ISI Web of Science and using appropriate Internet search engines (e.g., Google). We report some 90 cases in which DCS occurred after repetitive breath-hold dives. Even today, the risk of suffering from DCS after repetitive breath-hold diving is often not acknowledged. We strongly suggest that breath-hold divers and their advisors and physicians be made aware of the possibility of DCS and of the appropriate therapeutic measures to be taken when DCS is suspected. Because the risk of suffering from DCS increases depending on depth, bottom time, rate of ascent, and duration of surface intervals, some approaches to assess the risks are presented. Regrettably, none of these approaches is widely accepted. We propose therefore the development of easily manageable

  18. The use of active breathing control (ABC) to minimize breathing motion during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. Reducing the treatment margin for organ motion during breathing reduces the volume of irradiated normal tissues. This may allow a higher dose of radiation to be delivered to the target volume for thoracic and abdominal tumors. However, such margin reduction must not increase the risk of marginal misses which may lead to local failure. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of using Active Breathing Control (ABC) to temporarily immobilize the patient's breathing. Planning CT scans and radiation delivery can then be performed at identical ABC conditions such that a minimal margin for breathing motion can be prescribed safely. Methods and Materials. An active breathing control (ABC) apparatus was constructed consisting of two pairs of flow monitor and scissors valve; one each to control the inhalation and exhalation paths to the patient. The patient breathed through a mouth-piece or face mask connected to the ABC apparatus. A personal computer was used to process the respiratory signal and to display the changing lung volume in real-time. At some time after the patient achieved a stable breathing pattern, the operator activated ABC at a pre-selected point in the breathing cycle. Both valves were then closed to immobilize breathing motion. The period of active breath-hold was that which could be comfortably and repeatedly tolerated by each individual patient, as determined during a training session. The feasibility of the ABC procedure was studied by acquiring volumetric CT scans of a patient during active breath-hold. A helical CT scanner was used. These ABC scans were acquired at one-half to one-third the dose delivered with routine CT scanning. Nine patients with tumors in the thorax and abdomen were studied. Contiguous CT slices were obtained for a region which encompassed the target volume. At least 4 sets of volumetric scans were obtained; one with the patient breathing normally; two ABC scans at the same point near the end of normal inspiration

  19. Slow-release urea in supplement fed to beef steers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Gonçalves

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Replacing regular urea (RU by slow-release urea (SRU at two levels of non-protein nitrogen (NPN in concentrate, offered with low-quality roughage, was evaluated in beef steers on dry matter intake (DMI, ruminal fermentation parameters, plasma urea nitrogen (PUN, total tract apparent digestibility of diets and in situ degradability of nitrogen sources. Eight ruminally cannulated steers were allocated into two 4x4 Latin squares, totalizing four treatments: 40 NPN/0 SRU: 40% of concentrate crude protein (CP as NPN, resulting from 0% of SRU and 100% of RU; 40 NPN/50 SRU: 40% of concentrate CP as NPN, resulting from 50% of SRU and 50% of RU; 40 NPN/100 SRU: 40% of concentrate CP as NPN, resulting from 100% of SRU and 0% of RU; 80 NPN/100 SRU: 80% of concentrate CP as NPN, resulting from 100% of SRU and 0% of RU. Results showed that partial substitution of regular urea by slow-release urea did not alter dry matter intake, pattern of ruminal fermentation or plasma urea nitrogen concentrations and increased the total tract apparent digestibility of crude protein in steers diets. The increase in non-protein nitrogen content in crude protein of the concentrate could compromise feed intake and the efficiency of nutrient utilization in the steers fed complete diets based on low quality forage.

  20. Comparison of arteriovenous fistula recirculation by thermodilution and urea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare arteriovenous fistula recirculation by thermodilution technique and urea based two needle slow flow method. Thirty one patients with end stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis through arteriovenous fistula were selected on purposive design. Hemodialysis was done on Fresenius 4008 S machines with in-built blood temperature monitoring module to measure recirculation by thermodilution method. Recirculation by the thermodilution method was calculated with the blood flow rate of 300 milliliter /minute and dialysate flow of 500ml /minute. Access recirculation by urea based method was calculated by taking three blood samples for blood urea nitrogen. Two samples were taken simultaneously from the arterial and venous ports respectively. Third sample was taken from the arterial port after slowing the blood flow pump to 50 milliliter/minute and waiting for 30 seconds. Relationship of thermodilution and urea based method was assessed by calculating Pearson correlation coefficient (r). Out of 31 patients, 18 (58.1%) were males, whereas 13 (41.9%) were females. Their mean age was 47.29 +- 13.42 years. Mean access recirculation by thermodilution method was 7.31+- 3.03 and by urea based method was 9.55 +- 6.64. Correlation coefficient (r) was 0.706 with p-value of < 0.001, which was highly significant. Arteriovenous fistula recirculation calculated by thermo-dilution technique has a strong correlation with the recirculation calculated by the two-needle urea based method. (author)

  1. Discovery of enantioselectivity of urea inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Manoj; Pillaiyar, Thanigaimalai; Boggu, PullaReddy; Venkateswararao, Eeda; Jalani, Hitesh B; Kim, Nam-Doo; Lee, Seul Ki; Jeon, Jang Su; Kim, Sang Kyum; Jung, Sang-Hun

    2016-07-19

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) hydrolyzes epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) in the metabolic pathway of arachidonic acid and has been considered as an important therapeutic target for chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes and inflammation. Although many urea derivatives are known as sEH inhibitors, the enantioselectivity of the inhibitors is not highlighted in spite of the stereoselective hydrolysis of EETs by sEH. In an effort to explore the importance of enantioselectivity in the urea scaffold, a series of enantiomers with the stereocenter adjacent to the urea nitrogen atom were prepared. The selectivity of enantiomers of 1-(α-alkyl-α-phenylmethyl)-3-(3-phenylpropyl)ureas showed wide range differences up to 125 fold with the low IC50 value up to 13 nM. The S-configuration with planar phenyl and small alkyl groups at α-position is crucial for the activity and selectivity. However, restriction of the free rotation of two α-groups with indan-1-yl or 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-1-yl moiety abolishes the selectivity between the enantiomers, despite the increase in activity up to 13 nM. The hydrophilic group like sulfonamido group at para position of 3-phenylpropyl motif of 1-(α-alkyl-α-phenylmethyl-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea improves the activity as well as enantiomeric selectivity. All these ureas are proved to be specific inhibitor of sEH without inhibition against mEH. PMID:27092411

  2. Preoperative Evaluating of Kidney Function: Urea and Creatinine Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kadkhodayi

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Surgeons require determining urea and creatinine in patients undergoing surgery routinely as these parameters allow a judgment on the function of the kidneys. It is suggested that a normal urea level of blood is always associated with a normal value of creatinine in the same patient and, therefore, determination of urea alone suffices for this judgment. This spares collection of large volumes of blood sample for manual determination of creatinine, particularly in children and newborns. In this survey we analyzed the results of urea and creatinine estimation in blood samples of 1315 persons. In 95% of persons with a blood urea level of lower than 25 mg/dl and 99.8% havinglower than 20 mg/dl, the serum creatinine level was lower than 1 mg/dl. This confirms the suggestion that a person with a normal blood urea level will have a normal creatinine level too and an estimation of both of them is an unnecessary burden for the patient and the laboratory as well.

  3. Controlled breathing protocols probe human autonomic cardiovascular rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, W. H.; Cox, J. F.; Diedrich, A. M.; Taylor, J. A.; Beightol, L. A.; Ames, J. E. 4th; Hoag, J. B.; Seidel, H.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how breathing protocols requiring varying degrees of control affect cardiovascular dynamics. We measured inspiratory volume, end-tidal CO2, R-R interval, and arterial pressure spectral power in 10 volunteers who followed the following 5 breathing protocols: 1) uncontrolled breathing for 5 min; 2) stepwise frequency breathing (at 0.3, 0.25, 0.2, 0.15, 0.1, and 0.05 Hz for 2 min each); 3) stepwise frequency breathing as above, but with prescribed tidal volumes; 4) random-frequency breathing (approximately 0.5-0.05 Hz) for 6 min; and 5) fixed-frequency breathing (0.25 Hz) for 5 min. During stepwise breathing, R-R interval and arterial pressure spectral power increased as breathing frequency decreased. Control of inspired volume reduced R-R interval spectral power during 0.1 Hz breathing (P respiration and R-R intervals and systolic pressure and R-R intervals. Random- and fixed-frequency breathing reduced end-tidal CO2 modestly (P tidal volume control attenuates low-frequency R-R interval oscillations and that fixed- and random-rate breathing may decrease CO2 chemoreceptor stimulation. We conclude that autonomic rhythms measured during different breathing protocols have much in common but that a stepwise protocol without stringent control of inspired volume may allow for the most efficient assessment of short-term respiratory-mediated autonomic oscillations.

  4. Finger dexterity and visual discrimination following two yoga breathing practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Telles

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Practicing yoga has been shown to improve motor functions and attention. Though attention is required for fine motor and discrimination tasks, the effect of yoga breathing techniques on fine motor skills and visual discrimination has not been assessed. Aim: To study the effect of yoga breathing techniques on finger dexterity and visual discrimination. Materials and Methods: The present study consisted of one hundred and forty subjects who had enrolled for stress management. They were randomly divided into two groups, one group practiced high frequency yoga breathing while the other group practiced breath awareness. High frequency yoga breathing (kapalabhati, breath rate 1.0 Hz and breath awareness are two yoga practices which improve attention. The immediate effect of high frequency yoga breathing and breath awareness (i were assessed on the performance on the O′Connor finger dexterity task and (ii (in a shape and size discrimination task. Results: There was a significant improvement in the finger dexterity task by 19% after kapalabhati and 9% after breath awareness (P<0.001 in both cases, repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc analyses. There was a significant reduction (P<0.001 in error (41% after kapalabhati and 21% after breath awareness as well as time taken to complete the shape and size discrimination test (15% after kapalabhati and 15% after breath awareness; P<0.001 was also observed. Conclusion: Both kapalabahati and breath awareness can improve fine motor skills and visual discrimination, with a greater magnitude of change after kapalabhati.

  5. In vivo proton MRS of normal pancreas metabolites during breath-holding and free-breathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, T.-H. [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, 95 Yong-An Road, Beijing (China); Jin, E.-H., E-mail: erhujin1@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, 95 Yong-An Road, Beijing (China); Shen, H. [GE China Company Ltd, Healthcare, General Electric Company, Beijing (China); Zhang, Y.; He, W. [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, 95 Yong-An Road, Beijing (China)

    2012-07-15

    Aim: To characterize normal pancreas metabolites using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) at 3 T under conditions of breath-holding and free-breathing. Materials and methods: The pancreases of 32 healthy volunteers were examined using {sup 1}H MRS during breath-holding and free-breathing acquisitions in a single-voxel point-resolved selective spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) technique using a 3 T MRI system. Resonances were compared between paired spectra of the two breathing modes. Furthermore, correlations between lipid (Lip) content and age, body-mass index (BMI), as well as choline (Cho) peak visibility of the normal pancreas were analysed during breath-holding. Results: Twenty-nine pairs of spectra were successfully obtained showing three major resonances, Lip, Cho, cholesterol and the unsaturated parts of the olefinic region of fatty acids (Chol + Unsat). Breath-hold spectra were generally better, with higher signal-to-noise ratios (SNR; Z=-2.646, p = 0.008) and Cho peak visible status (Z=-2.449, p = 0.014). Correlations were significant between spectra acquired by the two breathing modes, especially for Lip height, Lip area, and the area of other peaks at 1.9-4.1 ppm. However, the Lip resonance was significantly different between the spectra of the two breathing modes (p < 0.05). In the breath-holding spectra, there were significant positive correlations between Lip peak height, area, and age (r = 0.491 and 0.521, p = 0.007 and 0.004), but not between Lip peak area and BMI. There was no statistical difference in Cho resonances between males and females. The Lip peak height and area were significantly higher in the Cho peak invisible group than in the Cho peak visible group (t = 2.661 and 2.353, p = 0.030 and 0.043). Conclusion: In vivo{sup 1}H MRS of the normal pancreas at 3 T is technically feasible and can characterize several metabolites. {sup 1}H MRS during breath-holding acquisition is superior to that during free-breathing

  6. Laboratory Experiments to Evaluate Matrix Diffusion of Dissolved Organic Carbon Carbon-14 in Southern Nevada Fractured-rock Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Ronald L. [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute; Fereday, Wyatt [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) carbon-14 (14C) is used to estimate groundwater ages by comparing the DIC 14C content in groundwater in the recharge area to the DIC 14C content in the downgradient sampling point. However, because of chemical reactions and physical processes between groundwater and aquifer rocks, the amount of DIC 14C in groundwater can change and result in 14C loss that is not because of radioactive decay. This loss of DIC 14C results in groundwater ages that are older than the actual groundwater ages. Alternatively, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 14C in groundwater does not react chemically with aquifer rocks, so DOC 14C ages are generally younger than DIC 14C ages. In addition to chemical reactions, 14C ages may also be altered by the physical process of matrix diffusion. The net effect of a continuous loss of 14C to the aquifer matrix by matrix diffusion and then radioactive decay is that groundwater appears to be older than it actually is. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure matrix diffusion coefficients for DOC 14C in volcanic and carbonate aquifer rocks from southern Nevada. Experiments were conducted using bromide (Br-) as a conservative tracer and 14C-labeled trimesic acid (TMA) as a surrogate for groundwater DOC. Outcrop samples from six volcanic aquifers and five carbonate aquifers in southern Nevada were used. The average DOC 14C matrix diffusion coefficient for volcanic rocks was 2.9 x 10-7 cm2/s, whereas the average for carbonate rocks was approximately the same at 1.7 x 10-7 cm2/s. The average Br- matrix diffusion coefficient for volcanic rocks was 10.4 x 10-7 cm2/s, whereas the average for carbonate rocks was less at 6.5 x 10-7 cm2/s. Carbonate rocks exhibited greater variability in

  7. Synthesis, enzyme inhibition and anticancer investigation of unsymmetrical 1,3-disubstituted ureas

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Sana; Perveen Shahnaz; Khan Ajmal

    2014-01-01

    In this research work seventeen urea derivatives, including five new derivatives N-mesityl-N'-(3-methylphenyl)urea (2), N-(3-methoxyphenyl)-N'-(3-methylphenyl)urea (4), N-mesityl-N'-(4-methylphenyl)urea (6), N-(1,3-benzothiazol-2-yl)-N'-(3-methylphenyl)urea (9) and N-(2-methylphenyl)-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidinecarboxamide (15) have synthesized by reacting ortho, meta and para tolyl isocyanate with primary and secondary amines by previously reported method. We...

  8. Breath analysis to detect recent exposure to carbon monoxide

    OpenAIRE

    Cunnington, A; Hormbrey, P

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the normal range for carbon monoxide concentrations in the exhaled breath of subjects in the emergency department and to develop a protocol for the use of a breath analyser to detect abnormal carbon monoxide exposure.

  9. Preparation of Urea Nitrogen Adsorbent of Complex Type and Adsorption Capacity of Urea Nitrogen onto the Adsorbent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The urea nitroge n adsorbent of complex type, which consists of chitosan coated dialdehyde cellulose (CDAC) and immobilized urease in gelatin membrane (IE), was prepared. The cellulose, the dialdehyde cellulose (DAC) and the CDAC were characterized by scanning electronic microscope. The results indicate that the cellulose C2-C3 bond was broken under the oxidation of periodate and it was oxidated to DAC. The DAC was coated with chitosan and the CDAC was obtained. The adsorption of urea nitrogen onto the adsorbent in Na2HPO4-NaH2PO4 buffer solution was studied in batch system. The effects of the experiment parameters, including degree of oxidation of CDAC, initial urea nitrogen concentration, pH and temperature, on the adsorption capacity of urea nitrogen onto the adsorbent at CDAC/IE weight ratio 10:1 were investigated. The results indicate that these parameters affected significantly the adsorption capacity. The adsorption capacity of urea nitrogen onto the adsorbent was 36.7 mg/g at the degree of oxidation of CDAC 88%, initial urea nitrogen concentration 600 mg/L, pH 7.4 and temperature 37 ℃.

  10. On the importance of developing a new generation of breath tests for Helicobacter pylori detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushch, Ievgeniia; Korenev, Nikolai; Kamarchuk, Lyudmila; Pospelov, Alexander; Kravchenko, Andrey; Bajenov, Leonid; Kabulov, Mels; Amann, Anton; Kamarchuk, Gennadii

    2015-12-01

    State-of-the-art methods for non-invasive detection of the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection have been considered. A reported global tendency towards a non-decreasing prevalence of H. pylori worldwide could be co-influenced by the functional limitations of urea breath tests (UBTs), currently preferred for the non-invasive recognition of H. pylori in a clinical setting. Namely, the UBTs can demonstrate false-positive or false-negative results. Within this context, limitations of conventional clinically exploited H. pylori tests have been discussed to justify the existing need for the development of a new generation of breath tests for the detection of H. pylori and the differentiation of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of the bacterium. This paper presents the results of a pilot clinical study aimed at evaluating the development and diagnostic potential of a new method based on the detection of the non-urease products of H. pylori vital activity in exhaled gas. The characteristics of breath of adolescents with H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative functional dyspepsia, together with a consideration of the cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) status of H. pylori-positive subjects, have been determined for the first time using innovative point-contact nanosensor devices based on salts of the organic conductor tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). The clinical and diagnostic relevance of the response curves of the point-contact sensors was assessed. It was found that the recovery time of the point-contact sensors has a diagnostic value for differentiation of the H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease. The diagnostically significant elongation of the recovery time was even more pronounced in patients infected with CagA-positive H. pylori strains compared to the CagA-negative patients. Taking into account the operation of the point-contact sensors in the real-time mode, the obtained results are essential prerequisites for the development of a fast and

  11. Technologies for Clinical Diagnosis Using Expired Human Breath Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Thalakkotur Lazar Mathew; Prabhahari Pownraj; Sukhananazerin Abdulla; Biji Pullithadathil

    2015-01-01

    This review elucidates the technologies in the field of exhaled breath analysis. Exhaled breath gas analysis offers an inexpensive, noninvasive and rapid method for detecting a large number of compounds under various conditions for health and disease states. There are various techniques to analyze some exhaled breath gases, including spectrometry, gas chromatography and spectroscopy. This review places emphasis on some of the critical biomarkers present in exhaled human breath, and its relate...

  12. Evaluation of carbon-14 (C14) levels of terrestrial and marine food products of the environment of the site of Cogema La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This evaluation has for object to inform about the levels in carbon 14 in the environment of the factories of La Hague. Two sectors were differentiated on one hand the terrestrial environment, and on the other hand the marine environment. The investigations concerned first and foremost food products stemming as the vegetable culture (vegetables) or individual breeding (milk, eggs) but also foodstuffs stemming from the local agriculture (cereal). In touch with the second sector, the marine environment, the sampling concerned the accessible products of the sea by all and those locally marketed (fishes, molluscs, shellfishes). The different results are presented in tables. (N.C.)

  13. Application of stable isotope to breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Needles to say, radioisotopes have good characteristics as a tracer for examining biological functions. In fact, scyntigraphy is widely used over Japan. It is true, however, that there are some difficulties in applying radioisotopes to humans. Thus, greater attention began to be attracted to stable isotopes in the late 1960s, because these substances can be used for infants and pregnant women. They can be stored for a long period of time since they do not suffer damping as in the case of radioisotopes. In addition to serving as a tracer, stable isotopes can provide structural-chemical information including the position of isotope labels, and the mass and atomic composition of fragment ions. Such techniques as NMR spectroscopy is employed for this purpose. The method is currently used to perform examinations of congenital metabolic disorders. The carbon isotopes of 13C and 14C are used for breath test. Compounds labeled with these isotopes are administered and their ratio to the total CO2 in breath is measured to diagnose diseases. In the early 1970s, 13C has come into use for breath test. Similar breath test is applied to diagnosis of the bacterial overgrowth syndrome and ileal dysfunction syndrome. (Nogami, K.)

  14. The NASA firefighter's breathing system program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclaughlan, P. B.; Carson, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    The research is reported in the development of a firefighter's breathing system (FBS) to satisfy the operational requirements of fire departments while remaining within their cost constraints. System definition for the FBS is discussed, and the program status is reported. It is concluded that the most difficult problem in the FBS Program is the achievement of widespread fire department acceptance of the system.

  15. Continuous Exhaled Breath Analysis on the Icu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Lieuwe D. J.; Sterk, Peter J.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2011-09-01

    During admittance to the ICU, critically ill patients frequently develop secondary infections and/or multiple organ failure. Continuous monitoring of biological markers is very much needed. This study describes a new method to continuously monitor biomarkers in exhaled breath with an electronic nose.

  16. Sleep effects on breathing and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary Sumer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand normal sleep pattern and physiological changes during sleep, sleep and breathing interaction, nomenclature and scales used in sleep study, discuss the effect of rapid eye movements and non-rapid eye movements while sleep and to review the effects of obstructive and restrictive lung disease on gas exchange during sleep and sleep architecture.

  17. CONTINUOUS EXHALED BREATH ANALYSIS ON THE ICU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During admittance to the ICU, critically ill patients frequently develop secondary infections and/or multiple organ failure. Continuous monitoring of biological markers is very much needed. This study describes a new method to continuously monitor biomarkers in exhaled breath with an electronic nose.

  18. Understanding Lung Problems: Make Each Breath Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people include: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Pneumonia Lung cancer Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) COPD is a disease that makes it hard to breathe. There are two main types of COPD: emphysema and chronic ... Lung Cancer Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer ...

  19. Multi-layered breathing architectural envelope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Larsen, Andreas; Foged, Isak Worre; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2014-01-01

    A multi layered breathing envelope is developed as a method of natural ventilation. The two main layers consist of mineral wool and air permeable concrete. The mineral wool works as a dynamic insulation and the permeable concrete as a heat recovery system with a high thermal mass for heat storage...

  20. The use of active breathing control (ABC) to reduce margin for breathing motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: For tumors in the thorax and abdomen, reducing the treatment margin for organ motion due to breathing reduces the volume of normal tissues that will be irradiated. A higher dose can be delivered to the target, provided that the risk of marginal misses is not increased. To ensure safe margin reduction, we investigated the feasibility of using active breathing control (ABC) to temporarily immobilize the patient's breathing. Treatment planning and delivery can then be performed at identical ABC conditions with minimal margin for breathing motion. Methods and Materials: An ABC apparatus is constructed consisting of 2 pairs of flow monitor and scissor valve, 1 each to control the inspiration and expiration paths to the patient. The patient breathes through a mouth-piece connected to the ABC apparatus. The respiratory signal is processed continuously, using a personal computer that displays the changing lung volume in real-time. After the patient's breathing pattern becomes stable, the operator activates ABC at a preselected phase in the breathing cycle. Both valves are then closed to immobilize breathing motion. Breathing motion of 12 patients were held with ABC to examine their acceptance of the procedure. The feasibility of applying ABC for treatment was tested in 5 patients by acquiring volumetric scans with a spiral computed tomography (CT) scanner during active breath-hold. Two patients had Hodgkin's disease, 2 had metastatic liver cancer, and 1 had lung cancer. Two intrafraction ABC scans were acquired at the same respiratory phase near the end of normal or deep inspiration. An additional ABC scan near the end of normal expiration was acquired for 2 patients. The ABC scans were also repeated 1 week later for a Hodgkin's patient. In 1 liver patient, ABC scans were acquired at 7 different phases of the breathing cycle to facilitate examination of the liver motion associated with ventilation. Contours of the lungs and livers were outlined when applicable

  1. The best breathing command for abdominal PETCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the best breathing command for combined PETCT scanning on a in-line system (Discovery LS, GEMS). Material and Methods: Eight patients underwent FDG PET and CT for attenuation correction and image co-registration on a combined PETCT scanner. CT was acquired during maximum inspiration (MaxInsp) with a starting point at the level of the head. Patients kept their breath for approximately 20 seconds. Then, a CT scan was acquired during normal expiration (NormExp), which corresponded to the respiratory level reached when the patient first inhaled and then exhaled without forcing expiration. Again, CT started at the head and patients kept their breath for approximately 20 seconds. In a third run, patients performed again the NormExp breathing manoeuvre but the breathing command was given after the start of the CT scan. Using this respiration protocol, the hold on time for the patients was between 10 and 15 seconds. All PET images were corrected for attenuation using the CT-based attenuation maps acquired with these three respiration protocols and then were reconstructed using an iterative algorithm. Results: In all patients, attenuation correction of the PET image using the CT scan acquired during MaxInsp caused mis-correction, which mimicked a decrease of FDG concentration in the base of the lungs. During MaxInsp the upper abdominal organs change their position and air filling of the lower lung zone is increased, thus, causing an underestimation of correction values. Subtraction images of the CT scans acquired during MaxInsp and NormExp illustrate the range of organ movements. Subtraction images of the attenuation corrected PET scans illustrate the deterioration of the final PET image. CT acquisition during NormExp provides better PET and co-registered PET/CT images. Using the shorter breath hold time the visual image quality was good in all patients. Conclusion: CT based attenuation correction can severely deteriorate PET image quality, if the CT scan

  2. 21 CFR 868.5240 - Anesthesia breathing circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia breathing circuit. 868.5240 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5240 Anesthesia breathing circuit. (a) Identification. An anesthesia breathing circuit is a device that is intended to administer medical gases to...

  3. A Multimedia System for Breath Regulation and Relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ching Liao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the hectic life today, detrimental stress has caused numerous illness. To adjust mental states, breath regulation plays a core role in multiple relaxation techniques. In this paper, we introduce a multimedia system supporting breath regulation and relaxation. Features of this system include non-contact respiration detection, bio-signal monitoring, and breath interaction. In addition to illustrating this system, we also propose a novel form of breath interaction. Through this form of breath interaction, the system effectively influenced user breath such that their breathing features turned into patterns that appeared when people were relaxed. An experiment was conducted to compare the effects of three forms of regulation, the free breathing mode, the pure guiding mode, and the local-mapping mode. Experiment results show that multimedia-assisted breath interaction successfully deepened and slowed down user breath, compared with free breathing mode. Besides objective breathing feature changes, subjective feedback also showed that participants were satisfied and became relaxed after using this system.

  4. 21 CFR 868.5280 - Breathing tube support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breathing tube support. 868.5280 Section 868.5280...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5280 Breathing tube support. (a) Identification. A breathing tube support is a device that is intended to support and anchor a patient's...

  5. 46 CFR 197.312 - Breathing supply hoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing supply hoses. 197.312 Section 197.312 Shipping... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.312 Breathing supply hoses. (a) Each breathing supply hose must— (1) Have a maximum working pressure that is equal to or exceeds— (i) The...

  6. 46 CFR 108.703 - Self-contained breathing apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Self-contained breathing apparatus. 108.703 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Miscellaneous Equipment § 108.703 Self-contained breathing apparatus. (a) Each unit must be equipped with a self-contained breathing apparatus described in § 108.497(a) to use...

  7. 21 CFR 868.5330 - Breathing gas mixer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breathing gas mixer. 868.5330 Section 868.5330...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5330 Breathing gas mixer. (a) Identification. A breathing gas mixer is a device intended for use in conjunction with a respiratory...

  8. 42 CFR 84.195 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. 84.195 Section 84.195 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL... Cartridge Respirators § 84.195 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. Flexible breathing tubes used...

  9. 42 CFR 84.122 - Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. 84... Masks § 84.122 Breathing resistance test; minimum requirements. (a) Resistance to airflow will be measured in the facepiece or mouthpiece of a gas mask mounted on a breathing machine both before and...

  10. 42 CFR 84.152 - Breathing tube test; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. 84.152... Respirators § 84.152 Breathing tube test; minimum requirements. (a)(1) Type A and Type B supplied-air respirators shall employ one or two flexible breathing tubes of the nonkinking type which extend from...

  11. 42 CFR 84.172 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. 84.172... Air-Purifying Particulate Respirators § 84.172 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. Flexible breathing tubes used in conjunction with respirators shall be designed and constructed to prevent:...

  12. 42 CFR 84.1132 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. 84.1132 Section 84.1132 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL... Gas Masks § 84.1132 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. (a) Flexible breathing tubes used...

  13. 46 CFR 169.736 - Self-contained breathing apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Self-contained breathing apparatus. 169.736 Section 169... VESSELS Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.736 Self-contained breathing apparatus. Each locker or space containing self-contained breathing apparatus must be marked...

  14. 42 CFR 84.132 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. 84.132 Section 84.132 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL... Respirators § 84.132 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. Flexible breathing tubes used in conjunction...

  15. 46 CFR 108.635 - Self-contained breathing apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Self-contained breathing apparatus. 108.635 Section 108... DESIGN AND EQUIPMENT Equipment Markings and Instructions § 108.635 Self-contained breathing apparatus. Each locker or space containing self-contained breathing apparatus must be marked: “SELF...

  16. 21 CFR 868.2375 - Breathing frequency monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breathing frequency monitor. 868.2375 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2375 Breathing frequency monitor. (a) Identification. A breathing (ventilatory) frequency monitor is a device intended to measure or monitor a...

  17. 46 CFR 197.450 - Breathing gas tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing gas tests. 197.450 Section 197.450 Shipping....450 Breathing gas tests. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) The output of each air... or modification. (b) Purchased supplies of breathing mixtures supplied to a diver are checked...

  18. 42 CFR 84.90 - Breathing resistance test; inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing resistance test; inhalation. 84.90...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.90 Breathing resistance test; inhalation. (a) Resistance to inhalation airflow will be measured in the facepiece or mouthpiece while the apparatus is operated by a...

  19. 14 CFR 29.1439 - Protective breathing equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protective breathing equipment. 29.1439... Protective breathing equipment. (a) If one or more cargo or baggage compartments are to be accessible in flight, protective breathing equipment must be available for an appropriate crewmember. (b)...

  20. 42 CFR 84.115 - Breathing tubes; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. 84.115 Section 84.115 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL... § 84.115 Breathing tubes; minimum requirements. Flexible breathing tubes used in conjunction with...

  1. Metabolic Induction of Lactic Acid Bacteria for Urea Removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Su-ai; BAI Yu; LI Dong-xia; CHEN Bo-li; SONG Cun-jiang; QIAO Ming-qiang; KONG De-ling; YU Yao-ting

    2009-01-01

    Objective:This study aims to induce nonpathogenic bacteria for urea removal as a potential treatment in renal failure. Methods:Lactococus lactis MG1363 was induced by repeated exposure to urea-rich culture media, the ability to remove urea from the media was evaluated. The effect of gastroenteric environment, such as low pH, bile salt and antiagonistic properties were investigated.The antimicrobial activities on pathogenic E.coli and S.aureus in the intestinal tract and the antibiotic tolerance of the induced bacteria were also studied.Results: Induced bacteria of 50 generations could decrease the urea level from 40.01 mg/dL to 32.99 mg/dL after 24 h. The bacteria could grow after treatment at pH3.0 for 2 h and in 0.1% bile salt for 6 h, and the urea removal activity was retained in such simulated gastroenteric environment. The removal of urea was significantly enhanced to 35.8% by addition of Ni2+ to the culture medium at neutral pH. It was also found that the induced bacteria could inhibit the growth of E.coli and S.aureus, and tolerate ampicillin,gentamicin,roxithromycin,tetracycline and cefradine. The safety tests were performed by feeding normal rats with either Lactococus lactis MG1363 or induced Lactococus lactis MG1363. The two materials did not cause any changes in blood cells, blood biochemical indexes and body weight. Conclusion: These results suggest that the induced Lactococus lactis MG1363 has the potential as an oral therapy for the removal of urea in patients with renal failure.

  2. Effect of slow deep breathing (6 breaths/min) on pulmonary function in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Shravya Keerthi G, Hari Krishna Bandi, Suresh M, Mallikarjuna Reddy N

    2013-01-01

    We designed this study to test the hypothesis that whether 10 minutes of slow deep breathing have any effect on pulmonary function in healthy volunteers. The main objective was to study the immediate effect of slow deep breathing on Forced vital capacity (FVC), Forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), Forced expiratory volume percent (FEV1/FVC%), Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), Forced expiratory flow 25-75%(FEF25-75%), Maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV), Slow vital capacity (SV...

  3. Comparative study on cardiac autonomic modulation during deep breathing test and diaphragmatic breathing in type 2 diabetes and healthy subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Subbalakshmi, Narsajjana Krishnadasa; Adhikari, Prabha; Shanmugavel Jeganathan, Punnaimuthu

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims/Introduction Diaphragmatic breathing is known to have a beneficial effect on the cardiopulmonary system, and enhances parasympathetic activation. We evaluated the influence of diaphragmatic breathing on time domain measures of heart rate variability in diabetics and healthy subjects. Materials and Methods A total of 122 type 2 diabetics and 94 healthy subjects (controls) were randomly allocated to a deep breathing test and diaphragmatic breathing (61 diabetics and 47 controls in...

  4. Urea cycle disorders: brain MRI and neurological outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bireley, William R. [University of Colorado, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Van Hove, Johan L.K. [University of Colorado, Department of Genetics and Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Aurora, CO (United States); Gallagher, Renata C. [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Genetics and Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Aurora, CO (United States); Fenton, Laura Z. [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Urea cycle disorders encompass several enzyme deficiencies that can result in cerebral damage, with a wide clinical spectrum from asymptomatic to severe. The goal of this study was to correlate brain MRI abnormalities in urea cycle disorders with clinical neurological sequelae to evaluate whether MRI abnormalities can assist in guiding difficult treatment decisions. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with urea cycle disorders and symptomatic hyperammonemia. Brain MRI images were reviewed for abnormalities that correlated with severity of clinical neurological sequelae. Our case series comprises six urea cycle disorder patients, five with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and one with citrullinemia type 1. The observed trend in distribution of brain MRI abnormalities as the severity of neurological sequelae increased was the peri-insular region first, extending into the frontal, parietal, temporal and, finally, the occipital lobes. There was thalamic restricted diffusion in three children with prolonged hyperammonemia. Prior to death, this site is typically reported to be spared in urea cycle disorders. The pattern and extent of brain MRI abnormalities correlate with clinical neurological outcome in our case series. This suggests that brain MRI abnormalities may assist in determining prognosis and helping clinicians with subsequent treatment decisions. (orig.)

  5. Urease immobilized fluorescent gold nanoparticles for urea sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parashar, Upendra Kumar; Nirala, Narsingh R; Upadhyay, Chandan; Saxena, P S; Srivastava, Anchal

    2015-05-01

    We report a surfactant-free synthesis of monodispersed gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with average size of 15 nm. An approach for visual and fluorescent sensing of urea in aqueous solution based on shift in surface plasmon band (SPB) maxima as well as quench in fluorescence intensity. To enable the urea detection, we functionalized the thiol-capped gold nanoparticles with urease, the enzyme specific to urea using carbodiimide chemistry. The visible color changed of the gold colloidal solution from red to blue (or purple); this was evident from quenching in absorbance and fluorescence intensity, is the principle applied here for the sensing of urea. The solution turns blue when the urea concentration exceeds 8 mg/dL which reveals visual lower detection limit. The lower detection limits governed by the fluorescence quenching were found 5 mg/dL (R(2) = 0.99) which is highly sensitive and selective compared to shift in SPB maxima. The approach depicted here seems to be important in clinical diagnosis. PMID:25809996

  6. Analysis Method for Isotope Abundance of 13C-urea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to better control the effective content of 13C in 13C-urea reagent, the technique and the conditions for converting 13C-urea sample into the sample gas used in gas isotopic mass spectrometry detection by means of nitrite oxidation method and high temperature burning method were investigated. The results showed that the 13CO2 gas obtained from nitrite oxidation method with 2 mg 13C-urea samples and that from high temperature burning method with 1 mg 13C-urea samples can satisfy the demand of the mass spectrometer detection. The sodium nitrite reagent dosage, the reaction temperature and the reaction time of the sample gas preparation, as well as the treatment effect of copper oxide reagent etc.were sought experimentally. The high abundance 13C-urea testing was completed, the calculation and expression of the detection data were also determined, and the standard deviation were less than ±0.07%. (authors)

  7. The Formation and characteristics of Acrylonitrile/Urea Inclusion Compound

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Jun-Ting; Pang, Wen-Min; Shi, Lei; Lu, Fei

    2012-01-01

    The formation process and composition of the acrylonitrile/urea inclusion compounds (AN/UIC) with different aging times and AN/urea molar feed ratios are studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It is suggested that DSC could be one of the helpful methods to determine the guest/host ratio and the heat of decomposition. Meanwhile, the guest/host ratio and heat of deformation are obtained, which are 1.17 and 5361.53 J/mol, respectively. It is found that the formation of AN/UIC depends on the aging time. The formation process ends after enough aging time and the composition of AN/UIC becomes stable. It is suggested AN molecules included in urea canal lattice may be packed flat against each other. XRD results reveal that once AN molecules enter urea lattice, AN/UIC are formed, which possess the final structure. When AN molecules are sufficient, the content of AN/UIC increased as aging time prolonging until urea tunnels are saturated by AN.

  8. Modeling and measurement of boiling point elevation during water vaporization from aqueous urea for SCR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan, Ho Jin; Lee, Joon Sik [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Understanding of water vaporization is the first step to anticipate the conversion process of urea into ammonia in the exhaust stream. As aqueous urea is a mixture and the urea in the mixture acts as a non-volatile solute, its colligative properties should be considered during water vaporization. The elevation of boiling point for urea water solution is measured with respect to urea mole fraction. With the boiling-point elevation relation, a model for water vaporization is proposed underlining the correction of the heat of vaporization of water in the urea water mixture due to the enthalpy of urea dissolution in water. The model is verified by the experiments of water vaporization as well. Finally, the water vaporization model is applied to the water vaporization of aqueous urea droplets. It is shown that urea decomposition can begin before water evaporation finishes due to the boiling-point elevation.

  9. Evidence that the adverse effect of urea fertilizer on seed germination in soil is due to ammonia formed through hydrolysis of urea by soil urease

    OpenAIRE

    Bremner, John M.; Krogmeier, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Studies using seeds of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), rye (Secale cereale L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), and corn (Zea mays L.) indicated that the adverse effect of urea fertilizer on seed germination in soil is due to ammonia formed through hydrolysis of urea by soil urease and is not due to urea itself, to urea fertilizer impurities such as biuret, or to nitrite formed by nitrification of urea nitrogen. Support for this conclusion was obtained from (i) comparison of the effects on seed ge...

  10. BREATHING PATTERNS IN PATIENTS WITH LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka P. Ostwal

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low Back pain is common clinical condition encountered in a day to day Physiotherapy practice. Very few authors has so far documented changes in breathing patterns in low back pain while performing certain motor control tests. Purpose: The aim of the study was to observe the breathing pattern in individuals with low back pain (LBP both at rest and during motor control tasks. Material and Method: 150 patients with LBP participated in this study and they were subcategorized further in acute, sub-acute and chronic low back pain patients. The breathing pattern was evaluated at rest (standing and supine position during both relaxed breathing and deep breathing and while performing clinical motor control tasks, i.e. bent knee fall out, knee lift abdominal test and active straight leg raise. Breathing patterns in patients with LBP were assessed by therapist both visually and via palpation and observational findings were noted. Costo-diaphragmatic breathing was considered as normal breathing pattern. Result: Observational findings of this study demonstrates altered breathing pattern in patients with LBP during motor control tasks. Conclusion: At rest, no significant differences were observed in breathing patterns of LBP patients, whereas around 71% patients revealed abnormal breathing pattern during motor control tests.

  11. Metabolite content profiling of bottlenose dolphin exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, Alexander A; Yeates, Laura; Pasamontes, Alberto; Siebe, Craig; Zrodnikov, Yuriy; Simmons, Jason; McCartney, Mitchell M; Deplanque, Jean-Pierre; Wells, Randall S; Davis, Cristina E

    2014-11-01

    Changing ocean health and the potential impact on marine mammal health are gaining global attention. Direct health assessments of wild marine mammals, however, is inherently difficult. Breath analysis metabolomics is a very attractive assessment tool due to its noninvasive nature, but it is analytically challenging. It has never been attempted in cetaceans for comprehensive metabolite profiling. We have developed a method to reproducibly sample breath from small cetaceans, specifically Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). We describe the analysis workflow to profile exhaled breath metabolites and provide here a first library of volatile and nonvolatile compounds in cetacean exhaled breath. The described analytical methodology enabled us to document baseline compounds in exhaled breath of healthy animals and to study changes in metabolic content of dolphin breath with regard to a variety of factors. The method of breath analysis may provide a very valuable tool in future wildlife conservation efforts as well as deepen our understanding of marine mammals biology and physiology. PMID:25254551

  12. Monitoring Breathing via Signal Strength in Wireless Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Patwari, Neal; R., Sai Ananthanarayanan P; Kasera, Sneha K; Westenskow, Dwayne

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows experimentally that standard wireless networks which measure received signal strength (RSS) can be used to reliably detect human breathing and estimate the breathing rate, an application we call "BreathTaking". We show that although an individual link cannot reliably detect breathing, the collective spectral content of a network of devices reliably indicates the presence and rate of breathing. We present a maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) of breathing rate, amplitude, and phase, which uses the RSS data from many links simultaneously. We show experimental results which demonstrate that reliable detection and frequency estimation is possible with 30 seconds of data, within 0.3 breaths per minute (bpm) RMS error. Use of directional antennas is shown to improve robustness to motion near the network.

  13. Android integrated urea biosensor for public health awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranali P. Naik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Integration of a biosensor with a wireless network on the Android 4.2.1 (Jelly Bean platform has been demonstrated. The present study reports an android integrated user friendly Flow injection analysis-Enzyme thermistor (FIA-ET urea biosensor system. This android-integrated biosensor system will facilitate enhanced consumer health and awareness alongside abridging the gap between the food testing laboratory and the concerned higher authorities. Data received from a flow injection mode urea biosensor has been exploited as an integration point among the analyst, the food consumer and the responsible higher authorities. Using the urea biosensor as an example, an alarm system has also been demonstrated both graphically and through text message on a mobile handset. The presented sensor integrated android system will also facilitate decision making support system in various fields of food quality monitoring and clinical analysis.

  14. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeyush Sahay

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS, cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS, integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS, cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS, cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS, quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS, and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS. Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis.

  15. UNDERWATER STROKE KINEMATICS DURING BREATHING AND BREATH-HOLDING FRONT CRAWL SWIMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickos Vezos

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of breathing on the three - dimensional underwater stroke kinematics of front crawl swimming. Ten female competitive freestyle swimmers participated in the study. Each subject swam a number of front crawl trials of 25 m at a constant speed under breathing and breath-holding conditions. The underwater motion of each subject's right arm was filmed using two S-VHS cameras, operating at 60 Hz, which were positioned behind two underwater viewing windows. The spatial coordinates of selected points were calculated using the DLT procedure with 30 control points and after the digital filtering of the raw data with a cut-off frequency of 6 Hz, the hand's linear displacements and velocities were calculated. The results revealed that breathing caused significantly increases in the stroke duration (t9 = 2.764; p < 0.05, the backward hand displacement relative to the water (t9 = 2.471; p<0.05 and the lateral displacement of the hand in the X - axis during the downsweep (t9 = 2.638; p < 0.05. On the contrary, the peak backward hand velocity during the insweep (t9 = 2.368; p < 0.05 and the displacement of the hand during the push phase (t9 = -2.297; p < 0.05 were greatly reduced when breathing was involved. From the above, it was concluded that breathing action in front crawl swimming caused significant modifications in both the basic stroke parameters and the overall motor pattern were, possibly due to body roll during breathing

  16. Ammonia Volatilization from Urea Incorporation with wheat and Maize Straw on a Loamy Soil in China

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Wenxu; Hu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Yuming; Junfang, Cui

    2009-01-01

    Effects of incorporating urea with wheat or corn straw at different soil moisture levels on ammonia volatilization were measured in a field experiment using a sponge-tripping method with KCl extraction. Over a 10-day period following incubation NH3 volatilization peaked on day 3 for urea alone, while highest emission rates were observed on day 2 for urea plus wheat or corn straw. Total NH3 losses decreased in the order: urea > urea + maize straw > urea + wheat straw. Emissions of NH3 were mor...

  17. Microstructured optical fiber interferometric breathing sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favero, Fernando C.; Villatoro, Joel; Pruneri, Valerio

    2012-03-01

    In this paper a simple photonic crystal fiber (PCF) interferometric breathing sensor is introduced. The interferometer consists of a section of PCF fusion spliced at the distal end of a standard telecommunications optical fiber. Two collapsed regions in the PCF caused by the splicing process allow the excitation and recombination of a core and a cladding PCF mode. As a result, the reflection spectrum of the device exhibits a sinusoidal interference pattern that instantly shifts when water molecules, present in exhaled air, are adsorbed on or desorbed from the PCF surface. The device can be used to monitor a person's breathing whatever the respiration rate. The device here proposed could be particularly important in applications where electronic sensors fail or are not recommended. It may also be useful in the evaluation of a person's health and even in the diagnosis and study of the progression of serious illnesses such as sleep apnea syndrome.

  18. An exercise in preferential unilateral breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In preparation for major thoracic surgery, physiotherapists have traditionally taught unilateral breathing exercises. There are no studies that prove that these exercises are effective This study was undertaken to demonstrate the effects of unilateral thoracic expansion exercises (TEE) using 99Tcm-Technegas Ten physiotherapists were taught unilateral TEE to increase ventilation to the right lower lobe. Each subject underwent two separate Technegas ventilation studies using a single-breath technique, one with normal deep inspiration and the other during a right TEE. Dynamic and static images were acquired in the seated position for each ventilation study. Analysis was undertaken by dividing the lungs into 6 zones of equal height and calculating the relative ventilation of each zone and each lung. Seven subjects (70%) achieved significantly increased ventilation to the right lower zone, while 9 (90%) achieved greater ventilation to the right lung. Total lung ventilation was reduced during right TEE when compared with normal deep inspiration

  19. Retrotrapezoid nucleus, respiratory chemosensitivity and breathing automaticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyenet, Patrice G.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Fortuna, Michal G.; Abbott, Stephen B.; Depuy, Seth D.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Breathing automaticity and CO2 regulation are inseparable neural processes. The retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a group of glutamatergic neurons that express the transcription factor Phox2b, may be a crucial nodal point through which breathing automaticity is regulated to maintain CO2 constant. This review updates the analysis presented in prior publications. Additional evidence that RTN neurons have central respiratory chemoreceptor properties is presented but this is only one of many factors that determine their activity. The RTN is also regulated by powerful inputs from the carotid bodies and, at least in the adult, by many other synaptic inputs. We also analyze how RTN neurons may control the activity of the downstream central respiratory pattern generator. Specifically, we review the evidence which suggests that RTN neurons a) innervate the entire ventral respiratory column, and b) control both inspiration and expiration. Finally, we argue that the RTN neurons are the adult form of the parafacial respiratory group in neonate rats. PMID:19712903

  20. Positive pressure breathing during rest and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, E A; Heus, R

    2003-03-01

    The requirements to maintain a positive pressure with respiratory protection during heavy exercise and the effects on ventilation and feelings of discomfort were investigated. Eight male subjects participated, using the respirator system during rest and exercise at about 80% of their individual maximum power. A blower was used at maximum and medium capacity and at two pressure levels (3 and 15 mbar). Additionally, the mouth pressure was used as a feedback for the blower. The blower decreased the fraction of the breathing cycle with negative pressures from 50% (SD 4%) to 15% (SD 10%) during exercise. Negative pressures occurred at all settings of the blower during exercise. Thus, the currently available commercial blower systems do not supply a sufficient airflow to maintain a positive pressure during heavy exercise. Positive pressure breathing did not affect the ventilation and the circulation. But the oxygen consumption was higher with the blower and respirator than without. PMID:12628576

  1. A monitoring of breathing using a hetero-core optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, S.; Seki, A.; Watanabe, K.

    2011-04-01

    A monitoring human breath has been seen as an important source of factor for vital status for emergency medical service. The monitoring of breathing has been tested and evaluated in a possible breath condition of a person to be monitored. A hetero-core optical fiber humidity sensor was developed for in order to monitor relative humidity in a medial mask. Elements for determent breath condition were extracted from the light intensity changing at some human breath condition, which were Breath depth, Breath cycle, Breath time and Check breathing. It is found that the elements had differences relative to normal breathing.

  2. On-farm treatment of straws and stovers with urea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nutritional value of cereal crop residues to ruminants is constrained by low N and high fibre contents. These constraints can be alleviated by treatment with alkali, the most suitable of which, for smallholder use, is urea. However, it has not widely been used in Africa. Whilst in some areas, cost and availability of urea will be a factor, it may also be that the flexibility of the technique is not appreciated. The scope for adaptation at each stage of the procedure is reviewed, showing that the farmer does have options to develop a system suitable for a range of conditions. (author)

  3. Biodegraded and Polyurethane Drape-formed Urea Fertilizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong; LI Jian; CHEN Xiaoyao

    2005-01-01

    Natural water absorbent konjac flour participates in synthesizing biodegraded and polyurethane foamed drape, which is used to release urea slowly.The experimental results indicate that the slowly-releasing velocity of urea nitrogen and the degrading velocity of the drape can be controlled by regulating the thicknesses of drapes, the amount of konjac flour and the water content. In addition, the biodegradability of the drape was investigated by burying the specimens in earth afterwards,and results show this drape can be degraded naturally.

  4. Reinvestigation of growth of urea thiosemicarbazone monohydrate crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R.; Raghavaiah, Pallepogu; Nadkarni, V. S.

    2013-08-01

    The reaction of urea with thiosemicarbazide in 1:1 mole ratio in aqueous solution does not result in the formation of urea thiosemicarbazone monohydrate crystal, as reported by Hanumantharao, Kalainathan and Bhagavannarayana [Spectrochim. Acta A91 (2012) 345-351]. A reinvestigation of the reported reaction reveals that the crystal obtained is the starting material namely thiosemicarbazide, which has been unambiguously confirmed with the aid of infrared and 1H NMR spectra and single crystal X-ray structure determination. Analysis of 1H NMR spectrum reveals that thiosemicarbazide exhibits thione-thiol tautomerism in solution. In contrast, thiosemicarbazide exists as the thione tautomer in the solid state.

  5. IMPROVING THE EFFICIENCY OF CARBON DIOXIDE SUPPLY ON UREA SYNTHESIS

    OpenAIRE

    Лавренченко, Г. К.; Копытин, А. В.; Афанасьев, С. В.; Рощенко, О. С.

    2011-01-01

    Aggregates of urea synthesis are reconstructed with the purpose decrease in specific expenses and increase their productivity. Supply of additional quantities of carbon dioxide and ammonia is necessary to increase production volumes of urea. In most cases there is a problem with the supply of СО2, as the equipment for its compression is not any necessary reserves. Installation for supply of carbon dioxide using a pump is considered. For liquefaction of CO2 at low pressure the cold of the liqu...

  6. Novel Findings in Breath-Holding Spells

    OpenAIRE

    Azab, Seham F. A.; Siam, Ahmed G.; Saleh, Safaa H.; Elshafei, Mona M.; Elsaeed, Wafaa F.; Arafa, Mohamed A.; Bendary, Eman A.; Farag, Elsayed M.; Basset, Maha A.A.; Ismail, Sanaa M.; Elazouni, Osama M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The mechanism of breath-holding spells (BHS) is not fully understood and most probably multifactorial; so, this study was designed to clarify the pathophysiology of BHS through assessing some laboratory parameters and electrocardiographic (ECG) changes which might be contributing to the occurrence of the attacks. Another aim of the study was to evaluate the differences in the pathophysiology between pallid and cyanotic types of BHS. This was a prospective study performed in Zagazig U...

  7. Breathing air trailer acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-0251, Rev.0 and ECNs 613530 and 606113. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-104. The equipment tested is a Breathing Air Supply Trailer purchased as a design and fabrication procurement activity. The ATP was written by the Seller and was performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company witnessing portions of the test at the Seller's location

  8. Coordination of Mastication, Swallowing and Breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuo, Koichiro; Palmer, Jeffrey B.

    2009-01-01

    The pathways for air and food cross in the pharynx. In breathing, air may flow through either the nose or the mouth, it always flows through the pharynx. During swallowing, the pharynx changes from an airway to a food channel. The pharynx is isolated from the nasal cavity and lower airway by velopharyngeal and laryngeal closure during the pharyngeal swallow. During mastication, the food bolus accumulates in the pharynx prior to swallow initiation. The structures in the oral cavity, pharynx an...

  9. Breath tests and irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Satya Vati; Malik, Aastha

    2014-06-28

    Breath tests are non-invasive tests and can detect H₂ and CH₄ gases which are produced by bacterial fermentation of unabsorbed intestinal carbohydrate and are excreted in the breath. These tests are used in the diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and for measuring the orocecal transit time. Malabsorption of carbohydrates is a key trigger of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-type symptoms such as diarrhea and/or constipation, bloating, excess flatulence, headaches and lack of energy. Abdominal bloating is a common nonspecific symptom which can negatively impact quality of life. It may reflect dietary imbalance, such as excess fiber intake, or may be a manifestation of IBS. However, bloating may also represent small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Patients with persistent symptoms of abdominal bloating and distension despite dietary interventions should be referred for H₂ breath testing to determine the presence or absence of bacterial overgrowth. If bacterial overgrowth is identified, patients are typically treated with antibiotics. Evaluation of IBS generally includes testing of other disorders that cause similar symptoms. Carbohydrate malabsorption (lactose, fructose, sorbitol) can cause abdominal fullness, bloating, nausea, abdominal pain, flatulence, and diarrhea, which are similar to the symptoms of IBS. However, it is unclear if these digestive disorders contribute to or cause the symptoms of IBS. Research studies show that a proper diagnosis and effective dietary intervention significantly reduces the severity and frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in IBS. Thus, diagnosis of malabsorption of these carbohydrates in IBS using a breath test is very important to guide the clinician in the proper treatment of IBS patients. PMID:24976698

  10. The experimental modification of sonorous breathing.

    OpenAIRE

    Josephson, S C; Rosen, R C

    1980-01-01

    Loud snoring is a noxious habit and potential personal health risk. We are reporting the first experimental study of simple behavioral techniques for the modification of chronic snoring. Twenty-four volunteers participated in a repeated measures, randomized group design over 2 weeks of intervention and one-month follow-up. Treatment groups included a contingent-awakening and breathing retraining (self-control) condition. Both treatment groups were compared to a no-treatment control. Despite c...

  11. Breath sampling control for medical application

    OpenAIRE

    Vautz, Wolfgang; Baumbach, Jörg I.; Westhoff, Michael; Züchner, Klaus; Carstens, Eike T. H.; Perl, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    Sampling of breath under human control or automated control with sensors was combined with chemical determination of a synthetic sample using multi-capillary column ion mobility spectrometry to measure quantitative variability. Variation was 19% with an automated inlet and 33% with human control. Sensors to operate an automated inlet were also evaluated with human subjects and included carbon dioxide (CO2), flow (direction and velocity), volume (integrated from the flow rate) and humidity, al...

  12. Ultrasensitive laser spectroscopy for breath analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtas, J.; Bielecki, Z.; Stacewicz, T.; Mikołajczyk, J.; Nowakowski, M.

    2012-03-01

    At present there are many reasons for seeking new methods and technologies that aim to develop new and more perfect sensors for different chemical compounds. However, the main reasons are safety ensuring and health care. In the paper, recent advances in the human breath analysis by the use of different techniques are presented. We have selected non-invasive ones ensuring detection of pathogenic changes at a molecular level. The presence of certain molecules in the human breath is used as an indicator of a specific disease. Thus, the analysis of the human breath is very useful for health monitoring. We have shown some examples of diseases' biomarkers and various methods capable of detecting them. Described methods have been divided into non-optical and optical methods. The former ones are the following: gas chromatography, flame ionization detection, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry, proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry. In recent twenty years, the optical methods have become more popular, especially the laser techniques. They have a great potential for detection and monitoring of the components in the gas phase. These methods are characterized by high sensitivity and good selectivity. The spectroscopic sensors provide the opportunity to detect specific gases and to measure their concentration either in a sampling place or a remote one. Multipass spectroscopy, cavity ring-down spectroscopy, and photo-acoustic spectroscopy were characterised in the paper as well.

  13. Air-breathing Rocket Engine Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This Quick Time movie depicts the Rocketdyne static test of an air-breathing rocket. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's advanced Transportation Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  14. Sleep-disordered Breathing in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Yu Li

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Children with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB can manifesta continuum from simple snoring and upper airway resistancesyndrome to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA with secondarygrowth impairment, neurocognitive deficits, and lessoften cardiovascular sequelae. Most children who present withSDB are four to eight years old with variable clinical symptomsat different ages. In general, infants often present withnoisy breathing and disturbed nocturnal sleep, toddlers andpreschool-aged children with snoring and mouth breathing,and school-aged children with behavioral and dental problems.The pathogenesis of SDB in children remains incompletelyunderstood. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy is the leading cause ofOSA. Other risk factors include allergic rhinitis, craniofacialanomalies, cleft palate following pharyngeal flap surgery, neuromusculardiseases, laryngomalacia, and obesity.Polysomnography (PSG is the gold standard diagnostic tool. However, great variationexists in the interpretation of PSG and criteria for the definition of pediatric OSA, eventhough consensus statements have been used to standardize the scoring of summary indicesfor the disorders. Adenotonsillectomy is the cardinal treatment for pediatric SDB. Rapidmaxillary expansion is a useful approach in upper jaw contraction. Distraction osteogenesishas become an acceptable procedure in the treatment of severe maxillomandibular deficiency.Continuous positive airway pressure has been successful in treating intractable or severeOSA in children with other underlying medical disorders and has modified the indicationsfor tracheotomy in pediatric patients with craniofacial anomalies and OSA. Follow-up inchildren treated for OSA reveals that underlying structural or neuromuscular abnormalitiescan decrease the response to treatment and obesity may lead to recurrence of OSA later duringadolescence.

  15. Molecular hydrogen in human breath: a new strategy for selectively diagnosing peptic ulcer disease, non-ulcerous dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Abhijit; Pal, Mithun; Maithani, Sanchi; Ghosh, Barnali; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Pradhan, Manik

    2016-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilizes molecular hydrogen (H2) as a respiratory substrate during colonization in the gastric mucosa. However, the link between molecular H2 and the pathogenesis of peptic-ulcer disease (PUD) and non-ulcerous dyspepsia (NUD) by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori still remains mostly unknown. Here we provide evidence that breath H2 excretion profiles are distinctly altered by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori for individuals with NUD and PUD. We subsequently unravelled the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of H2 in exhaled breath in association with peptic ulcers, encompassing both gastric and duodenal ulcers, along with NUD. We also established that carbon-isotopic fractionations in the acid-mediated bacterial environment regulated by bacterial urease activity cannot discriminate the actual disease state i.e. whether it is peptic ulcer or NUD. However, our findings illuminate the unusual molecular H2 in breath that can track the precise evolution of PUD and NUD, even after the eradication of H. pylori infection. This deepens our understanding of the pathophysiology of PUD and NUD, reveals non-invasively the actual disease state in real-time and thus offers a novel and robust new-generation strategy for treating peptic-ulcer disease together with non-ulcer related complications even when the existing (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) fails to diagnose. PMID:27448107

  16. Volume, flow, and timing of each breath during positive-pressure breathing in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, B; Hirsch, J; Thursby, M

    1978-10-01

    This study is a breath-by-breath analysis of the effects of 5, 10, and 15 cmH2O positive-pressure breathing (PPB) on man's steady-state breathing pattern. Inspiratory (TI), expiratory (TE), and cycle (TT) durations, tidal volumes (VT), minute ventilation (VE), mean inspiratory flow rate (VT/TI), and mean expiratory flow rate (VT/TE) were determined from pneumotachograph and Wedge spirometer recordings before and during steady states on PPB. End-tidal CO2 was continuously recorded. Seventeen adults, seated in a full body-box, breathed quietly for 8 min through a mouthpiece on a bag-in-box. Pressure in the body-box was lowered to the desired level prior to 4 min of stress. On all pressure levels, end-expiratory volume, VT, VE, VT/TI, and VT/TE increased; end-tidal CO2, TE, and TT decreased with no consistent change in TI. Calculated alveolar ventilations indicated that the increases in VE were true hyperventilations. Each individual increased VE by using a unique combination of VT, TI, and TE. End-expiratory volume increased less and expiratory flow increased more than would occur passively. Hence, it is concluded that active reflexes account for the resistance of the systems to the passive distention, the facilitation of expiratory flow, and the shortening of TE. PMID:361664

  17. Air-breathing membraneless laminar flow-based fuel cells: Do they breathe enough oxygen?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Limiting factors of air-breathing laminar-flow based fuel cell (LFFC) is analyzed. ► A numerical model for LFFC is developed. ► Air breathing process is not a limiting factor at the present stage. ► Oxygen starvation is significant when the cell current density exceeds 200 mA cm−2. - Abstract: Laminar flow-based fuel cell (LFFC) is a relatively new type of fuel cell that does not require the use of proton exchange membrane. While the first-generation LFFC uses dissolved oxygen at the cathode, the second-generation LFFC (2G-LFFC) adopts a more advanced air-breathing design for achieving high power density. The architecture and operational mechanisms of a 2G-LFFC are more complex. In order to gain detailed understanding of the 2G-LFFC, an integrated CFD/electrochemical kinetics modeling study has been conducted to analyze the cell limiting factors and sufficiency of the oxidant supply from air. It is found that under most typical operating conditions, the 2G-LFFC free-breathing mode can supply sufficient oxygen to the electrode reactive surface for cathode half-cell reaction, indicating that the air breathing process is not a limiting factor to the cell performance. However, oxygen starvation will become a major performance limiting factor when the anode is enhanced for higher current density. The results presented in this paper provide useful design guidance for future development of LFFC

  18. Study on distribution law of modified urea-N in soil-plant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distribution law of reprocessed urea-N and urea-N in soil-plant system was studied by 15N-trace under pot culture condition of tobacco plant. The results showed that reprocessed urea increased the yield of tobacco leaf by 25.16% compared with urea treatment. As to the amounts of total nitrogen in tobacco plant, the reprocessed urea was 145.7% of that with the urea treatment. As to the amounts of nitrogen from the fertilizer, reprocessed urea treatment was 27.9% higher than that of the urea treatment. The nitrogen from soil of the reprocessed urea treatment was 58.3% more than that of urea treatment. The nitrogen utilization ratio of the reprocessed urea treatment was 10.1% higher than that of the urea treatment. These results suggest that the reason of the reprocessed urea can increase the yield of tobacco was due to its high fertilizer utilization ratio and nitrogen releasing ratio of the soil

  19. Synthesis and Performance of Polyurethane Coated Urea as Slow/controlled Release Fertilizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qingshan; WU Shu; RU Tiejun; WANG Limin; XING Guangzhong; WANG Jinming

    2012-01-01

    Polyurethane coated urea slow/controlled release fertilizer was prepared based on urea granules,isocyanate,polyols and paraffin.Isocyanate reacted with polyols to synthesize the polyurethane skin layer on urea granules surface.Paraffin serves as a lubricant during syntheses of polyurethane skin layers.The structure and nutrient release characteristics of the polyurethane skin layers were investigated by FTIR,SEM and TG.Urea nitrogen slow-release behavior of the polyurethane coated urea was tested.The experimental results indicated that compact and dense polyurethane skin layers with a thickness of 10-15 μm were formed on urea surface,the urea nitrogen slow-release time can reach 40-50 days.Paraffin proves to play a key role in inhibiting water to penetrate into urea,but excessive addition would decrease the polyurethane crosslinking density.

  20. Effect of time duration of ruminal urea infusions on ruminal ammonia concentrations and portal-drained visceral extraction of arterial urea-N in lactating Holstein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røjen, Betina Amdisen; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2012-01-01

    The effects of a 6 versus 24h ruminal urea infusion in lactating dairy cows fed a basal diet deficient in N on ruminal ammonia concentration, arterial urea-N concentration, net portal-drained viscera (PDV) urea-N flux, arterial urea-N extraction across the PDV, and renal urea-N kinetics were...... urea/kg of dry matter intake (DMI; 24-h INF), and 6-h infusion of 15g of urea/kg of DMI (6-h INF). The 6-h INF was initiated 0.5h after the afternoon feeding, and ran until 2230h. Eight sample sets of arterial, portal, and hepatic blood, ruminal fluid, and urine were obtained at 0.5h before the morning...... experimental setting plan was met (i.e., to cause changes in the daily pattern of ruminal ammonia and blood urea-N concentrations). The arterial urea-N concentration for 24-h INF and 6-h INF were greater than the arterial urea-N concentration with water INF throughout the sampling window. However, the arterial...

  1. Influence of urea and pituitrin on radiocerebral effects in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The administration of urea and pituitrin produced a directed and rapid change in a hydration profile of brain tissue which permitted to modify the severity of radiocerebral affection in rats, that is, to increase it with hypohydration and to decrease with hyperhydration of the brain

  2. Why Urea Eliminates Ammonia Rather Than Hydrolyzes in Aqueous Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandrova, Anastassia N.; Jorgensen, William L.

    2007-01-01

    A joint QM/MM and ab initio study on the decomposition of urea in the gas phase and in aqueous solution is reported. Numerous possible mechanisms of intramolecular decomposition and hydrolysis have been explored; intramolecular NH3-elimination assisted by a water molecule is found to have the lowest activation energy. The solvent effects were elucidated using the TIP4P explicit w...

  3. Urea: A Clinically Oriented Overview from Bench to Bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam J; von Grote, Erika C; Meckfessel, Matthew H

    2016-05-01

    Urea is an important hygroscopic component of the epidermis, where it participates in the maintenance of skin hydration as part of the skin's source of natural moisturizing factor (NMF) in the outer most layers. Xerotic skin, which is frequently characterized as NMF-deficient, is a unifying trait of dermatoses such as atopic dermatitis (AD), psoriasis, and ichthyosis vulgaris. The reduced hygroscopic potential of pathologically dry skin leads to unregulated transepidermal water loss (TEWL), epidermal hyperproliferation, and inhibited desquamation; all which clinically translate to hyperkeratotic and possibly pruritic skin. Common underlying etiologies link these dermatoses to aberrant expression of genes encoding epidermal structural and catalytic proteins. Intervention of dry skin pathologies with topical moisturizer formulations is a foundational management strategy. For over a century urea-containing formulations have been used in a concentration-dependent manner to restore skin hydration, thin hyperkeratosis, debride dystrophic nails, and enhance topical drug penetration. Recently, urea's role in skin hydration and repair has expanded to include regulation of epidermal genes necessary for proper barrier function. Taken together, urea's versatility in topical formulations and broad range of therapeutic mechanism highlights its utility to clinicians and benefit to patients. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(5):633-639. PMID:27168272

  4. Reduction in slow intercompartmental clearance of urea during dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of urea and inulin were analyzed in five anesthetized dogs during sequential 2-hour periods before, during, and after hemodialysis. The distribution of both compounds after simultaneous intravenous injection was characterized by three-compartment models, and the total volumes of urea (0.66 +/- 0.05 L/kg) and inulin (0.19 +/- 0.01 L/kg) distribution were similar to expected values for total body water and extravascular space, respectively. Intercompartmental clearances calculated before dialysis were used to estimate blood flows to the fast and slow equilibrating compartments. In agreement with previous results, the sum of these flows was similar to cardiac output, averaging 101% of cardiac output measured before dialysis (range 72% to 135%). Dialysis was accompanied by reductions in the slow intercompartmental clearances of urea (81%) and inulin (47%), which reflected a 90% attenuation in blood flow supplying the slow equilibrating compartments. This was estimated to result in a 10% average reduction in the efficiency with which urea was removed by dialysis (range 2.0% to 16.4%). Mean arterial pressure fell by less than 5% during dialysis, but total peripheral resistance increased by 47% and cardiac output fell by 35%. In the postdialysis period, total peripheral resistance and cardiac output returned toward predialysis values, but blood flow to the slow equilibrating peripheral compartment was still reduced by 80%. These changes parallel activation of the renin-angiotensin system, but further studies are required to establish causality

  5. Tailoring of analytical performances of urea biosensors using nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a contribution to the study of enzymatic sensors based on nanoparticles of iron oxide (FeNPs). Urease enzyme was immobilized on FeNPs using layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition method. FeNPs were first coated with polyelectrolytes (PE): Poly (allylamine hydrochloride), PAH and Poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate), PSS for enzyme immobilization and then with enzyme. It has been confirmed through zeta potential measurements of FeNPs that the enzyme is immobilized on the surface. We evaluated the sensitivity of biosensors for urea by potentiometric and capacitive measurements on silicon / silica / FeNP-LBL-urease structures. The recorded capacity-potential curves (C-V) show a significant shift of flat band potential towards negative potentials in the presence of urea, the observed values of sensitivity vary between 30 and 40 mV/p[urea]. It has been shown that the proposed method for the immobilization of urease can increase the dynamic range of urea detection (10−4M to 10−1M) compared to the immobilization of urease without FeNP (10−3.5 M to 10−2.5 M). When the number of PAH-PSS layers was increased the sensitivity of detection was modified. This effect is due to partial inhibition of the enzyme in presence of FeNPs, which was shown by measurements in homogeneous phase.

  6. IRIS Toxicological Review of Urea (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On September 28, 2010, the Toxicological Review of Urea and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House Of...

  7. Emissions of gun propellant compositions with added urea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, C.A. van; Hulst, M. van; Meuken, D.

    2011-01-01

    Addition of certain components to gun propellants may lead to a reduction of the NOx content in combustion gases. This is escribed in the literature based on small scale laboratory research. One of these components is urea. In the investigation described here, propellants have been studied which con

  8. 75 FR 74746 - Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ... from Russia and Ukraine (64 FR 62653). Following second five-year reviews by Commerce and the... imports of solid urea from Russia and Ukraine (71 FR 581). The Commission is now conducting third reviews... part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1\\ No response to this...

  9. Encapsulated Urea-Kaolinite Nanocomposite for Controlled Release Fertilizer Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siafu Ibahati Sempeho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urea controlled release fertilizer (CRF was prepared via kaolinite intercalation followed by gum arabic encapsulation in an attempt to reduce its severe losses associated with dissolution, hydrolysis, and diffusion. Following the beneficiation, the nonkaolinite fraction decreased from 39.58% to 0.36% whereas the kaolinite fraction increased from 60.42% to 99.64%. The X-ray diffractions showed that kaolinite was a major phase with FCC Bravais crystal lattice with particle sizes ranging between 14.6 nm and 92.5 nm. The particle size varied with intercalation ratios with methanol intercalated kaolinite > DMSO-kaolinite > urea-kaolinite (KPDMU. Following intercalation, SEM analysis revealed a change of order from thick compact overlapping euhedral pseudohexagonal platelets to irregular booklets which later transformed to vermiform morphology and dispersed euhedral pseudohexagonal platelets. Besides, dispersed euhedral pseudohexagonal platelets were seen to coexist with blocky-vermicular booklets. In addition, a unique brain-form agglomeration which transformed into roundish particles mart was observed after encapsulation. The nanocomposites decomposed between 48 and 600°C. Release profiles showed that 100% of urea was released in 97 hours from KPDMU while 87% was released in 150 hours from the encapsulated nanocomposite. The findings established that it is possible to use Pugu kaolinite and gum arabic biopolymer to prepare urea CRF formulations.

  10. Siloxane modified polyurea and polyurethane urea segmented copolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Regina H.

    1989-01-01

    High molecular weight polyether urea copolymers were synthesized using perfectly difunctional aromatic amine terminated polypropylene oxide (PPO) (2800 ) prepared via aluminum porphorin initiated coordination polymerization. The resulting segmented copolymer showed much higher tensile strength and better thermal stability than polyureas based on commercial PPO which contains some terminal unsaturation. This was attributed to the achievement of both higher molecular weight and t...

  11. Effect of Urea on Activity and Conformation of a Glycoprotein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Xiang; WANG Xiaoyun; ZHOU Bo; ZHOU Haimeng

    2006-01-01

    The changes of the activity and conformation of Aspergillus niger phytase in urea were detected by farultraviolet circular dichroism (CD) spectra, fluorescence spectra, and enzyme activity assays. The results show that no enzyme activity can be detected after phytase is incubated for 10 h in 3.0 mol/L urea, even though at this urea concentration, less than 20% of the tertiary and secondary structures in the native enzyme changed. The inactivation reaction kinetics is found to be a monophasic first-order reaction, but the unfolding is a biphasic process consisting of two first-order reactions. The inactivation rates of the free enzyme and the substrate-enzyme complex are much faster than the conformational changes during urea denaturation. All of the results indicate that, as a glycoprotein, phytase's activity is strongly dependent on its conformational integrity. The phytase active sites seem to be located in a limited region in the molecule and display more conformational fragility and flexibility to denaturants than enzyme molecular structure as a whole.

  12. Urea in sugarcane-based diets for dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Magno Ferreira Santiago

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effect of adding four levels (0, 4, 8 and 12 g/kg, as fed of a mixture (9:1 of urea and ammonium sulfate (UAs to sugarcane on feed intake and digestibility, productive performance and metabolism of nitrogen compounds of dairy cows. Twelve multiparous Holstein cows (12.6±0.5 kg/d of milk, 225±90 days in milk were distributed in three 4 × 4 Latin squares, receiving diets with the same amount of nitrogen (125 g crude protein/kg of dry matter. Concentrate feed was supplied at a ratio of 1 kg for each 3 kg of milk produced. The sugarcane presented 21.9 ºBrix. The level of UAs did not affect intake, total digestibility of diet components, milk production or milk components. Increasing UAs level linearly increased concentration of plasma urea nitrogen (PUN, urinary excretion of nitrogen and contribution of non-urea nitrogen in the urinary excretion and linearly reduced milk production/urinary excretion of nitrogen ratio. In spite of the linear increase of PUN with increased urea, the maximum value observed (14.31 mg/dL was below the threshold value of 20 mg/dL, above which reproductive function may be compromised. In diets with sugarcane for dairy cows with production below 15 kg/day, the UAs level may be raised from 0 to 12 g/kg natural matter without impairing performance.

  13. Peptidyl-urea based inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolases

    Science.gov (United States)

    We prepared a series of amino acid derived cyclohexyl and adamantyl ureas and tested them as inhibitors of the human soluble epoxide hydrolase, and obtained very potent compounds (K(I)=15nM) that are >10-fold more soluble than previously described sEH inhibitors. While our lead compound 2 showed low...

  14. Oxygène-18, carbone-13, carbone-14 et diatomées dans les quatre carottes du lac Huynamarca (Bolivie) : premiers résultats

    OpenAIRE

    Wirrmann, Denis; Servant Vildary, Simone; Fontes, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    L'étude de géochimie isotopique des carbonates coquilliers de quatre carottes du lac Huynamarca (Bolivie), ainsi que les datations au carbone-14 de quelques échantillons montrent qu'au cours des dix derniers millénaires le bilan hydrologique du lac Titicaca a considérablement varié. Une phase sèche, située entre 3650 et 5325 ans B.P. se traduit par une baisse du niveau du lac d'au moins dix mètres par rapport à l'actuel, avec comme corrolaire l'augmentation de la teneur en sels dissous dans l...

  15. Poetry as Breath: Teaching Student Teachers to Breathe-Out Poetry

    OpenAIRE

    Lesley Pasquin

    2010-01-01

    Poetry is a form of creative expression that exists to share a truth, an insight, or a feeling that enriches our humanity. “Teaching” poetry requires us to be readers and writers of poetry ourselves. It requires that we are saying, “Poetry matters.” I work with second-year student teachers in my Language Arts Methods class at McGill University to develop a passion for the poetic; to learn what Muriel Rukeyser refers to as breathing-in experience and breathing-out poetry. Using my own writ...

  16. Influence of glucose and urea on 125I transport across an anion exchange paper membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the influence of glucose and urea on the 125I transport across an anion exchange paper membrane, the transmembrane potential, the fluxes, and the concentrations of 125I, glucose and urea within the membrane were measured in the Na125I concentration-cell system containing glucose or urea. Glucose and urea increased the membrane/solution distribution of the iodide ion, but scarcely affected the diffusion process of iodide ion within the membrane

  17. Effects of slow-release urea on ruminal digesta characteristics and growth performance in beef steers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor-Edwards, C C; Hibbard, G; Kitts, S E;

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of slow urea (SRU) versus feed-grade urea on ruminal metabolite characteristics in steers and DMI, gain, and G:F in growing beef steers.......Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of slow urea (SRU) versus feed-grade urea on ruminal metabolite characteristics in steers and DMI, gain, and G:F in growing beef steers....

  18. Performance of cellulose acetate butyrate membranes in hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wydeven, T.; Leban, M.

    1973-01-01

    Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) membranes are shown to give high salt and urea rejection with water flux of about 3 gallons/sq ft per day at 600 psig. Membranes prepared from a formulation containing glyoxal show a significant increase in flux and decrease in salt and urea rejection with drying time. Zero drying time gives maximum urea and salt rejection and is therefore most suitable for hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution.

  19. Signal shape feature for automatic snore and breathing sounds classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snore analysis techniques have recently been developed for sleep studies. Most snore analysis techniques require reliable methods for the automatic classification of snore and breathing sounds in the sound recording. In this study we focus on this problem and propose an automated method to classify snore and breathing sounds based on the novel feature, ‘positive/negative amplitude ratio (PNAR)’, to measure the shape of the sound signal. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated using snore and breathing recordings (snore: 22 643 episodes and breathing: 4664 episodes) from 40 subjects. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that the proposed method achieved 0.923 sensitivity with 0.918 specificity for snore and breathing sound classification on test data. PNAR has substantial potential as a feature in the front end of a non-contact snore/breathing-based technology for sleep studies. (paper)

  20. 21 CFR 177.1900 - Urea-formaldehyde resins in molded articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Urea-formaldehyde resins in molded articles. 177...-formaldehyde resins in molded articles. Urea-formaldehyde resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface... conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section, urea-formaldehyde resins are those produced when 1 mole...