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Sample records for carbon-14 urea breath

  1. Validation of ten-minute single sample carbon-14 urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabakaran, K.; Fernandes, V.; McDonald, J. [Illawarra Regional Hospital, Wollongong, NSW (Australia). Depts of Nuclear Medicine and Gastroenterology

    1996-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is traditionally diagnosed by endoscopy followed by gastric biopsy and histologic demonstration of organisms, rapid urease test and culture. The non-invasive carbon-14-urea breath test has been widely accepted now for the diagnosis of this bacterium. This study was aimed to establish and validate normal and abnormal values for an Australian population, for a single sample carbon-14-urea breath test at ten minutes. A dose of 185 kBq was used in order to achieve reasonable counting statistics. The derived values were validated with the results of the rapid urease test. This method has a high sensitivity, specificity and greater patient acceptance, and could be used in many clinical settings as the first modality for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection and for documenting response or cure after antibiotic therapy for eradication. 11 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  2. Validation of ten-minute single sample carbon-14 urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter pylori infection is traditionally diagnosed by endoscopy followed by gastric biopsy and histologic demonstration of organisms, rapid urease test and culture. The non-invasive carbon-14-urea breath test has been widely accepted now for the diagnosis of this bacterium. This study was aimed to establish and validate normal and abnormal values for an Australian population, for a single sample carbon-14-urea breath test at ten minutes. A dose of 185 kBq was used in order to achieve reasonable counting statistics. The derived values were validated with the results of the rapid urease test. This method has a high sensitivity, specificity and greater patient acceptance, and could be used in many clinical settings as the first modality for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection and for documenting response or cure after antibiotic therapy for eradication. 11 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  3. Accuracy of a rapid 10-minute carbon-14 urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urease in the human gastric mucosa is a marker for infection with Helicobacter pylori (HP), an organism which is associated with peptic ulcer disease. To detect gastric urease, we examined 184 patients (144 males, 40 females; mean age: 49.8±15.6 years) with suspected peptic ulcer disease. Fasting patients were given orally 5 μCi of carbon-14 labelled urea. For each patient only one breath sample was collected in hyamine at 10 min. The amount of 14C collected at 10 min was expressed as follows: [(DPM/mmol CO2 collected)/(DPM administered)]x100xbody weight (kg). The presence of HP colonization was determined by examination of multiple endoscopic prepyloric antral biopsy specimens subjected to culture or a rapid urease test. For the purpose of this study, HP-positive patients were defined as those with characteristic bacteria as indicated by a positive result of either the culture or the rapid urease test; HP-negative patients were defined as those with negative findings on both the culture and the rapid urease test. Of the 184 cases, 99 (53.8%) were positive for HP infection, and 85 (46.2%), negative. The sensitivity and specificity of the rapid 10 min 14C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of HP-associated peptic ulcer disease were evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with a variable cut-off value from 1.5 to 4.5. When a cut-off value of 1.5 was selected, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity, 83.5%; when a cut-off value of 4.5 was selected, the sensitivity was 54.5% and the specificity, 97.6%. (orig.)

  4. Microdose 14C urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori: a survey in Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Dowlatabadi Bazaz

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The carbon -14 urea breath test (UBTis a non-invasive and simple method for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. Attempts have been made to use lower doses of 14C-urea in the UBT in order to reduce the radiation risk of the test. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy of a microdose (1 µCi [37 KBq] 14C-UBT in Iranian population for validation of its diagnostic accuracy against gold standard methods. Eighty and two patients were subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy as well as 14C-UBT in one week. Rapid urease test and histological examinations were used as gold standard. Breath samples were collected 10, 20 and 30 minute after ingestion of 1 µCi of 14C- urea solution and their activities were measured using a scintillation counter and expressed as counts per minute (cpm and disintegration per minute (dpm. Good agreement was observed between the 14C-UBT and gold standard for samples which were collected 20 minutes after 14C-urea administration. The 14CUBT showed 100% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 95.45% positive predictive value, 100% negative predictive value and 97.50% accuracy. The results of this study showed good concordance between the 14C-UBT and invasive methods.

  5. Validation of 14 C-urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to validate the 14 C-urea breath test for use in diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. Thirty H. pylori positive patients, based on histologic test and thirty H. pylori negative patients by histology and anti-H pylori IgG entered the study. Fasting patients drank 5 uCi of 14 C-urea in 20 ml of water. Breath samples were collected at O, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 min. The difference of cpm values between the two groups was significant at all the time intervals, besides time 0 (p 14 C-urea breath test is highly accurate for Helicobacter pylori diagnosis. It is fast, simple and should be the non-invasive test used after treating Helicobacter pylori infection. (author)

  6. [14C]urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H. pylori is a potent urease producer, a characteristic that has been exploited in the development of the [14C]- and [13C]urea breath tests. The prevalence of H. pylori infection also is known to increase with advancing age; however, the individual patient's age has not routinely been considered when interpreting urea breath test results. The aim of this study was to validate a short, age-adjusted [14C]urea breath test for use in diagnosing H. pylori infections. Forty-one subjects (28 volunteers, 13 patients) underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsies. Subjects were defined as being H. pylori-positive if histology or culture was positive. In addition, all subjects completed a 120-min [14C]urea breath test. A logistic regression analysis adjusting for age was used to estimate the probability of H. pylori positivity as a function of the 14C values generated. Sixteen subjects were H. pylori-positive, and 25 were H. pylori-negative. The 14C values generated between 15 and 80 min were found to be equally predictive in identifying H. pylori-positive subjects. Advancing age was associated with a higher probability of H. pylori-positivity. By taking advantage of the statistical probabilities, older patients could be accurately diagnosed with H. pylori at lower 14C values. We found that [14C]urea breath test to be both a sensitive and specific test that can be abbreviated to a 30-min examination (total test time). Moreover, our mathematical model indicates that a patient's age should be considered in order to optimize interpretation of the [14C]urea breath test, although further observations are needed to confirm this model

  7. First-time urea breath tests performed at home by 36,629 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlerup, Søren; Andersen, Rikke Charlotte; Nielsen, Birgitte Sperling Wilms;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the current study was (1) to describe the use of a (13) C-urea breath test (UBT) that was performed by patients at their homes as a part of a test-and-treat strategy in primary care and (2) to investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in patients taking a first...

  8. 14C urea breath test kit- an evaluation of a compact, cost-effective kit for the detection of H. pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Helicobacter pylori infection of the gastric mucosa causes active chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. Carbon-14 urea breath testing has been well documented in its ability to detect the presence of H. pylori. The aims of this study were to evaluate and refine the test to substantially reduce costs and improve its simplicity, availability and accuracy. We reviewed the results of 138 patients who underwent 14C urea breath testing for the detection of H. pylori utilising a kit developed at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. Modifications to the standard technique that were assessed included the relevance of buccal cleansing, single sample v multiple sampling, use of alternative CO2 absorbers and sampling techniques. In those patients with positive biopsy results, a test sensitivity of 100% was achieved. No buccal cleansing is necessary (45% oral contamination without brushing teeth v 41% with). A single breath sample only at 15 min resulted in 100% sensitivity. Alternative cheaper and safer) CO2 absorbers such as KOH can be used. Based on these results, modifications to this well documented test have enabled us to substantially reduce costs, improve simplicity and safety and increase accuracy and availability of the test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori

  9. {sup 14}C urea breath test kit- an evaluation of a compact, cost-effective kit for the detection of H. pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellon, M.S. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA (Australia). Dept of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-03-01

    Full text: Helicobacter pylori infection of the gastric mucosa causes active chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. Carbon-14 urea breath testing has been well documented in its ability to detect the presence of H. pylori. The aims of this study were to evaluate and refine the test to substantially reduce costs and improve its simplicity, availability and accuracy. We reviewed the results of 138 patients who underwent {sup 14}C urea breath testing for the detection of H. pylori utilising a kit developed at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. Modifications to the standard technique that were assessed included the relevance of buccal cleansing, single sample v multiple sampling, use of alternative CO{sub 2} absorbers and sampling techniques. In those patients with positive biopsy results, a test sensitivity of 100% was achieved. No buccal cleansing is necessary (45% oral contamination without brushing teeth v 41% with). A single breath sample only at 15 min resulted in 100% sensitivity. Alternative (cheaper and safer) CO{sub 2} absorbers such as KOH can be used. Based on these results, modifications to this well documented test have enabled us to substantially reduce costs, improve simplicity and safety and increase accuracy and availability of the test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori.

  10. Patient risk of 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter Pylori bacteria infection is determined by activity measurement of the exhaled 14C-carbon dioxide formed from 14C-urea in stomach. About 37 kBq of capsulated 14C -urea is administered to the patient. Because 14C is a weak beta emitter, patients receive certain radiation dose. This could be the only drawback of this method. Because of that in this paper the effective dose has been determined. On that basis the patient risk has been estimated. The results show that the patient effective dose is at the level of the daily background radiation. So, from the radiation protection point of view this method is very safe. Including other excellent performances of the method like sensitivity, selectivity, noninvasivity, fastness and low costs, it could be recommended in diagnosis and eradication of Helicobacter Pylori infections. (author)

  11. 13C Urea Breath Testing to Diagnose Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Deslandres, Colette

    1999-01-01

    The causal relationship between Helicobacter pylori colonization of the gastric mucosa and gastritis has been proven. Endoscopy and subsequent histological examination of antral biopsies have been regarded as the gold standard for diagnosing H pylori gastritis. The 13C urea breath test is a noninvasive test with a high specificity and sensitivity for H pylori colonization. Increasingly, it is becoming an important tool for use in diagnosing H pylori infection in paediatric populations. This t...

  12. Validation of {sup 14} C-urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattar, Rejane; Silva, Fernando Marcuz; Alexandrino, Ana Maria; Laudanna, Antonio Atilio [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Gastroenterologia]. E-mail: shiroineko@uol.com.br

    1999-02-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the {sup 14} C-urea breath test for use in diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. Thirty H. pylori positive patients, based on histologic test and thirty H. pylori negative patients by histology and anti-H pylori IgG entered the study. Fasting patients drank 5 uCi of {sup 14} C-urea in 20 ml of water. Breath samples were collected at O, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 min. The difference of cpm values between the two groups was significant at all the time intervals, besides time 0 (p < 0.0001). At 20 min, the test gave 100% sensitivity and specificity with a cut-off value of 562 cpm. Females were higher expirers than males (p=0.005). {sup 14} C-urea breath test is highly accurate for Helicobacter pylori diagnosis. It is fast, simple and should be the non-invasive test used after treating Helicobacter pylori infection. (author)

  13. Does low dose13C-urea breath test maintain a satisfactory accuracy in diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Vaz Coelho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The standard doses of 13C-urea in 13C-urea breath test is 75 mg. OBJECTIVE: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of 13C-urea breath test containing 25 mg of 13C-urea comparing with the standard doses of 75 mg in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. METHODS: Two hundred seventy adult patients (96 males, 174 females, median age 41 years performed the standard 13C-urea breath test (75 mg 13C-urea and repeated the 13C-urea breath test using only 25 mg of 13C-urea within a 2 week interval. The test was performed using an infrared isotope analyzer. Patients were considered positive if delta over baseline was >4.0‰ at the gold standard test. RESULTS: One hundred sixty-one (59.6% patients were H. pylori negative and 109 (40.4% were positive by the gold standard test. Using receiver operating characteristic analysis we established a cut-off value of 3.4% as the best value of 25 mg 13C-urea breath test to discriminate positive and negative patients, considering the H. pylori prevalence (95% CI: 23.9-37.3 at our setting. Therefore, we obtained to 25 mg 13C-urea breath test a diagnostic accuracy of 92.9% (95% CI: 88.1-97.9, sensitivity 83.5% (95% CI: 75.4-89.3, specificity 99.4% (95% CI: 96.6-99.9, positive predictive value 98.3% (95% CI: 92.4-99.4, and negative predictive value 93.0% (95% CI: 88.6-96.1. CONCLUSIONS: Low-dose 13C-urea breath test (25 mg 13C-urea does not reach accuracy sufficient to be recommended in clinical setting where a 30% prevalence of H. pylori infection is observed. Further studies should be done to determine the diagnostic accuracy of low doses of 13C-urea in the urea breath test.

  14. Posttreatment 13C-Urea Breath Test Is Predictive of Antimicrobial Resistance to H. pylori After Failed Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Ai-Wen; Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Sheu, Bor-Shyang; Lin, Ching-Yih; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We tested whether a 13C-urea breath test can predict antimicrobial resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). METHODS Seventy patients who had failed triple eradication therapy and 108 untreated H. pylori-infected patients were given a 13C-urea breath test, endoscopy for culture of H. pylori, and assessment of clarithromycin resistance. The patients who had failed triple therapy then received 1 week of quadruple therapy to eradicate residual H. pylori. RESULTS The posttreatment value of the 13C-urea breath test expressed as excessive δ13CO2 per ml (ECR) was higher in patients with residual H. pylori with clarithromycin resistance than in those without (23.8 vs 10.6; P or≤15, the 13C-urea breath test was 88.6% sensitive and 88.9% specific in predicting clarithromycin resistance of residual H. pylori. The H. pylori eradication rate of the rescue regimen was higher for patients with a posttreatment ECR of the 13C-urea breath test ≤ 15 than for those with a value >15 (93.8% vs 73.3%; P .05). CONCLUSION The posttreatment value of the 13C-urea breath test is predictive of clarithromycin resistance in residual H. pylori after failed triple therapy and predicts efficacy of the rescue regimen. The value of the noninvasive test is promising for primary care physicians who need to select a rescue regimen without invasive H. pylori culture. PMID:15836546

  15. Accuracy of the {sup 14} C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Ana Thereza Britto [Bahia Univ., Salvador (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Coelho, Luciano Kowalsky [Faculdade de Medicina de Blumenau, SC (Brazil); Secaf, Marie [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas; Modena, Jose Luiz Pimenta; Troncon, Luiz Ernesto de Almeida; Oliveira, Ricardo Brandt de [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2002-05-01

    The development of simple, accurate and low-expense techniques for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection has great relevance. The objective was to determine the accuracy of a rapid {sup 14} C-urea breath test (UBT) employing a very simple device for breathed air collection. One hundred and thirty-seven adult patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in the Clinical Hospital. The main measurements were histology for Helicobacter pylori (HP); urease test; urea breath test (UBT). One hundred and fifteen patients were infected by HP (HP +) according to both histology and the urease test, and 22 patients were HP-negative (HP-), according to the same two tests. UBT was capable of discriminating between HP + and HP- in a way that was similar to the combination of urease test and histology. When this combination of results is taken as the 'gold standard' for HP infection, the sensitivity and specificity of UBT are both greater than 90% for a range of cut-off points and breathed air collection times. It was concluded that the rapid UBT employing a simple device for air collection has a high accuracy in determining HP infection. (author)

  16. 13C-urea breath test analyzed with infrared isotope spectrometry for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have evaluated a 13C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. The 13C-test was analyzed with isotope-selective non-dispersive infrared spectrometry and compared with a 14C-urea breath test and the urease test in gastric mucosal biopsies. 46 patients were analyzed with breath tests, 23 patients were negative and 22 patients were positive with both methods. One patients was positive with 14C-method and negative with the 13C-urea breath test. 61 patients were analyzed with the 13C-urea breath test and the urease test. 30 patients were negative and 30 patients were positive with both methods, whereas one patient with a negative urease test had a positive breath test. 13C-urea breath test analyzed with isotope-selective non-dispersive infrared spectrometry is a fast, simple, non-radioactive, non-invasive, convenient and reliable method for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  17. Analysis of 14C-Urea breath test in patients with halitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the relationship between halitosis and the infection of helicobacter pylori (HP). Methods: The results of 14C-urea breath test of 59 normal people, 50 patients with halitosis only and 56 patients infected by both halitosis and digestive diseases were analyzed. Results: It showed that the 14C content and HP positive rate in group infected by both halitosis and digestive diseases were much higher than that of halitosis only group and normal people group (P<0.05). Conclusion: The infection of Helicobacter pylori is an important factor but not only factor of halitosis. (authors)

  18. Confirmation of eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection by 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a potent urease producer, a characteristic that has been exploited in the development of the 14C-urea breath test (UBT). 14C-UBT is being used as a highly reliable test for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. There is paucity of reports on the utility of this test to confirm the H. pylori eradication after its treatment. The study was conducted to determine the utility of 14C-UBT in confirming the eradication of H. pylori

  19. An optimized 13C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of H pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To validate an optimized 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT) protocol for the diagnosis of-H pylori infection that is cost-efficient and maintains excellent diagnostic accuracy.METHODS: 70 healthy volunteers were tested with two simplified 13C-UBT protocols, with test meal (Protocol 2)and without test meal (Protocol 1). Breath samples were collected at 10, 20 and 30 min after ingestion of 50 mg 13C-urea dissolved in 10 mL of water, taken as a single swallow, followed by 200 mL of water (pH 6.0) and a circular motion around the waistline to homogenize the urea solution. Performance of both protocols was analyzed at various cut-off values. Results were validated against the European protocol.RESULTS: According to the reference protocol, 65.7% individuals were positive for H pylori infection and 34.3% were negative. There were no significant differences in the ability of both protocols to correctly identify positive and negative H pylori individuals. However, only Protocol 1 with no test meal achieved accuracy, sensitivity,specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 100%. The highest values achieved by Protocol 2 were 98.57%, 97.83%, 100%, 100% and 100%, respectively.CONCLUSION: A 10 min, 50 mg 13C-UBT with no test meal using a cut-off value of 2-2.5 is a highly accurate test for the diagnosis of H pylori infection at a reduced cost.

  20. The interest of the 13C urea breath test for the diagnostic and monitoring of chronic duodenal ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duodenal ulcer is very frequently associated with Helicobacter pylori (Hp) present in the gastric mucous membrane. Breath tests with 13C-labelled urea have been carried out for the detection of Hp; these tests could be more sensitive than gastric biopsies, because of the heterogenous distribution of the bacteria in the mucous membrane. This breath test may be used repetitively and allows for a non-intrusive monitoring of the Hp eradication after treatment. 12 refs

  1. Influence of oral and esophageal commensal microflora on 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Seventeen gastritis patients (12M: 5F; mean age: 40 y) were studied to evaluate the influence of oral and esophageal urease producing commensal microflora on the 14C-urea breath test(UBT). To determine the influence of oral bacterial on UBT, 111 kBq14C-urea in 10 ml water was given orally to 6 H.pylori negative subjects, with the instructions to expectorate the tracer after 30 sec. To evaluate the influence normal esophageal flora on UBT, the tracer was given to 11 patients (4 H.pylori-ve :7 H.pylori +ve) in the capsule and again after 6 h in water. One mmol C02 was collected before and up to 30 min. of tracer administration and 14C content measured. When given as mouth wash, 14C-urea liquid caused an immediate peak of 14C02 at 2 min (4263 ± 1024 dpm) and thereafter declined sharply reaching base line value after 10 min (208 ±62 dpm). When tracer was given in capsule, 14C02 level in H.pylori +ve patients increased significantly within 5 min and peaked at 10-15 min. (8644 ± 987 dpm at 15 min). However, when the tracer was given in liquid, 14CO2 levels were almost similar to those of 14C-urea mouth wash experiment in H.pylori -ve patients. It is therefore, concluded that normal commensal microflora present in the oropharynx and esophagus contribute significantly to 14C-UBT. For the accurate diagnosis of H.pylori infection, the tracer should therefore, be given in the capsule

  2. 13[C]-urea breath test as a novel point-of-care biomarker for tuberculosis treatment and diagnosis.

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    Mandeep S Jassal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pathogen-specific metabolic pathways may be detected by breath tests based on introduction of stable isotopically-labeled substrates and detection of labeled products in exhaled breath using portable infrared spectrometers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested whether mycobacterial urease activity could be utilized in such a breath test format as the basis of a novel biomarker and diagnostic for pulmonary TB. Sensitized New-Zealand White Rabbits underwent bronchoscopic infection with either Mycobacterium bovis or Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Rabbits were treated with 25 mg/kg of isoniazid (INH approximately 2 months after infection when significant cavitary lung pathology was present. [(13C] urea was instilled directly into the lungs of intubated rabbits at selected time points, exhaled air samples analyzed, and the kinetics of delta(13CO(2 formation were determined. Samples obtained prior to inoculation served as control samples for background (13CO(2 conversion in the rabbit model. (13CO(2, from metabolic conversion of [(13C]-urea by mycobacterial urease activity, was readily detectable in the exhaled breath of infected rabbits within 15 minutes of administration. Analyses showed a rapid increase in the rate of (13CO(2 formation both early in disease and prior to treatment with INH. Following INH treatment, all evaluable rabbits showed a decrease in the rate of (13CO(2 formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Urea breath testing may provide a useful diagnostic and biomarker assay for tuberculosis and for treatment response. Future work will test specificity for M. tuberculosis using lung-targeted dry powder inhalation formulations, combined with co-administering oral urease inhibitors together with a saturating oral dose of unlabeled urea, which would prevent the delta(13CO(2 signal from urease-positive gastrointestinal organisms.

  3. Capsule 13C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan-Jing Peng; Ping-I Hsu; Kwok-Hung Lai; Ren-Shyan Liu; Shui-Cheng Lee; Daw-Guey Tsay; Ching-Chu Lo; Huei-Hwa Tseng; Wen-Keui Huang; Gin-Ho Lo

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To compare the accuracy of capsule 13C-urea breath test (UBT) with conventional invasive methods for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.METHODS: One hundred patients received CLO test,histological examination, culture and 100- or 50-mg capsule UBT for the diagnosis of Hpyloriinfection. Hpylori infection was defined as those with positive culture or positive results from both histology and CLO test.RESULTS: Both the sensitivity and specificity of the 100-mg capsule UBT (n = 50) were 100%. The sensitivity and specificity of the 50-mg capsule UBT (n = 50) were 96.4and 100%, respectively. Taken together, the accuracy of capsule UBT (n=100) was higher than that of CLO test,histology and culture (100% vs 92%, 91% and 89%,respectively; P= 0.035, 0.018 and 0.005, respectively). Our data showed that the optimal timing of sampling for 100-and 50-mg capsule UBT was 15-30 and 6-15 min, respectively.CONCLUSION: Capsule UBT has a higher accuracy compared with biopsy-based tests. It is an ideal method for the diagnosis of Hpyloriinfection.

  4. Cost effectiveness analysis of population-based serology screening and 13C-Urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori to prevent gastric cancer: A markov model

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Feng; Luo, Nan; Lee, Hin-Peng

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To compare the costs and effectiveness of no screening and no eradication therapy, the population-based Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) serology screening with eradication therapy and 13C-Urea breath test (UBT) with eradication therapy.

  5. Dual therapy for third-line Helicobacter pylori eradication and urea breath test prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshihiro Nishizawa; Hidekazu Suzuki; Takama Maekawa; Naohiko Harada; Tatsuya Toyokawa; Toshio Kuwai; Masanori Ohara

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of a dual therapy with rabeprazole and amoxicillin (AMX) as an empiric third-line rescue therapy.In patients with failure of first-line treatment with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-AMX-clarithromycin regimen and second-line treatment with the PPI-AMX-metronidazole regimen,a third-line eradication regimen with mbeprazole (10 mg q.i.d.) and AMX (500 mg q.i.d.) was prescribed for 2 wk.Eradication was confirmed by the results of the 13C-urea breath test (UBT) at 12 wk after the therapy.A total of 46 patients were included; however,two were lost to followup.The eradication rates as determined by per-protocol and intention-to-treat analyses were 65.9% and 63.0%,respectively.The pretreatment UBT results in the subjects showing eradication failure; those patients showing successful eradication comprised 32.9 ± 28.8 permil and 14.8 ± 12.8 permil,respectively.The pretreatment UBT results in the subjects with eradication failure were significantly higher than those in the patients with successful eradication (P =0.019).A low pretreatment UBT result (≤ 28.5 permil) predicted the success of the eradication therapy with a positive predictive value of 81.3% and a sensitivity of 89.7%.Adverse effects were reported in 18.2% of the patients,mainly diarrhea and stomatitis.Dual therapy with rabeprazole and AMX appears to serve as a potential empirical third-line strategy for patients with low values on pretreatment UBT.

  6. Intragastric acidification increases the sensitivity of 14C-urea breath test in patients taking a proton pump inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate if intragastric acidification at the ingestion of 14C-urea can decrease the likelihood of false-negative (FN) results of urea breath test (UBT) in patients taking a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Methods: Twenty-three patients with positive 14C-UBT (UBT-1) results underwent an acid suppression treatment with omeprazole 40 mg/d for 14 d. On day 13, patients underwent second standard UBT (YBT-2). On day 14, patients underwent a modified UBT (UBT-3), which included consuming 200 mL of 0.1 mol/L citric acid solution 30 min before and at the administration of 14C-urea. Mean 14CO2 expiration and the number of FN results were compared for the three UBTs. Results: Omeprazole caused a significant decrease in mean 14CO2 excretion between UBT-1[(5.57 +- 3.90) Bq/mmol] and UBT-2[(1.98 +- 1.42) Bq/mmol, t=5.867, P=0.000]. Omeprazole caused 10(43.5%) FN UBT-2 results. Mean 14CO2 expiration in UBT-3 [(4.93 +- 3.77) Bq/mmol] was greater than that in UBT-2 (t=-4.538, P=0.000). UBT-3 caused only 2 FN results (8.7%, x2=6.66, P14C-urea increases 14Co2 expiration and decreases FN 14C-UBT results in patients taking PPI

  7. Increased accuracy of the carbon-14 D-xylose breath test in detecting small-intestinal bacterial overgrowth by correction with the gastric emptying rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the accuracy of 14C-D-xylose breath test for detecting bacterial overgrowth can be increased by correction with the gastric emptying rate of 14C-D-xylose. Ten culture-positive patients and ten culture-negative controls were included in the study. Small-intestinal aspirates for bacteriological culture were obtained endoscopically. A liquid-phase gastric emptying study was performed simultaneously to assess the amount of 14C-D-xylose that entered the small intestine. The results of the percentage of expired 14CO2 at 30 min were corrected with the amount of 14C-D-xylose that entered the small intestine. There were six patients in the culture-positive group with a 14CO2 concentration above the normal limit. Three out of four patients with initially negative results using the uncorrected method proved to be positive after correction. All these three patients had prolonged gastric emptying of 14C-D-xylose. When compared with cultures of small-intestine aspirates, the sensitivity and specificity of the uncorrected 14C-D-xylose breath test were 60% and 90%, respectively. In contrast, the sensitivity and specificity of the corrected 14C-D-xylose breath test improved to 90% and 100%, respectively. (orig./MG)

  8. A study on Helicobacter pylori infection in different parts of Karnataka using 14C urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non-invasive 14C Urea Breath Test (14C UBT) technique was used for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection in symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. The test utilises 14CO2 released due to the action of urease produced by H pylori. 14C UBT is found to be a simple alternative for endoscopic examinations for diagnosing H pylori infection. The test was performed on 664 subjects from various parts of Karnataka. Among them 34.9% of the subjects were found to be H pylori positive, and the infection rate varied from 16.9% to 38.6%. (author)

  9. Carbon-14 waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 occurs in nature, but is also formed in nuclear reactors. Because of its long half-life and the biological significance of carbon, releases from nuclear facilities could have a significant radiological impact. Waste management strategies for carbon-14 are therefore of current concern. Carbon-14 is present in a variety of waste streams both at reactors and at reprocessing plants. A reliable picture of the production and release of carbon-14 from various reactor systems has been built up for the purposes of this study. A possible management strategy for carbon-14 might be the reduction of nitrogen impurity levels in core materials, since the activation of 14N is usually the dominant source of carbon-14. The key problem in carbon-14 management is its retention of off-gas streams, particularly in the dissolver off-gas stream at reprocessing plants. Three alternative trapping processes that convert carbon dioxide into insoluble carbonates have been suggested. The results show that none of the options considered need be rejected on the grounds of potential radiation doses to individuals. All exposures should be as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. If, on these grounds, retention and disposal of carbon-14 is found to be beneficial, then, subject to the limitations noted, appropriate retention, immobilization and disposal technologies have been identified

  10. Turnover of carbon in the 13C-urea breath test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To obtain a standard protocol for the application of 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT) analyzed by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS) to detect helicobacter pylori infection in the population is necessary to know the behavior of the turnover of 13C during the test in different individuals. The aims of this study was to find out a pattern for the turnover of the 13C in the 13C-UBT, analyzed by IRMS, in patients infected with H. pylori, in a Brazilian population, to define a protocol test application. We found that the isotopic ratio 13C/12C in expired CO2 from patients infected with H. pylori and subjected to 13C-UBT does not follow a single pattern of behavior. However this behavior can be similar in subjects having the same maximum values following an inverse proportional relationship between the maximum value and the time of appearance in the curve. (author)

  11. Investigation of the association between glaucoma and Helicobacter pylori infection using the {sup 14}C-urea breath test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzcu, Esra Ayhan; Aydogan, Fusun; Motor, Vicdan Koksaldi; Ilhan, Ozgur; Daglioglu, Mutlu Cihan; Coskun, Mesut; Parlakfikirer, Nihan; Keskin, Ugurcan, E-mail: drayhant@hotmail.com [Medical Faculty, Mustafa Kemal University, Hatay (Turkey)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: to investigate the association between glaucoma and Helicobacter pylori infection by evaluating for the presence of H. pylori infection in patients with glaucoma using the 14C-urea breath test (14C-UBT). Methods: Using 14C-UBT, H. pylori infection positivity was compared between a group of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma and a control group with normal intraocular pressure and a normal optic disc or normal perimetry. Results: the 14C-UBT was positive in 18 (51.42%) out of 35 patients in the glaucoma group and in 15 (42.85%) out of 35 patients in the control group. H. pylori infection positivity rates were similar between the glaucoma and control groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: according to the 14C-UBT, there is no association between primary open-angle glaucoma and H. pylori infection. (author)

  12. Investigation of the association between glaucoma and Helicobacter pylori infection using the 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to investigate the association between glaucoma and Helicobacter pylori infection by evaluating for the presence of H. pylori infection in patients with glaucoma using the 14C-urea breath test (14C-UBT). Methods: Using 14C-UBT, H. pylori infection positivity was compared between a group of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma and a control group with normal intraocular pressure and a normal optic disc or normal perimetry. Results: the 14C-UBT was positive in 18 (51.42%) out of 35 patients in the glaucoma group and in 15 (42.85%) out of 35 patients in the control group. H. pylori infection positivity rates were similar between the glaucoma and control groups (p>0.05). Conclusion: according to the 14C-UBT, there is no association between primary open-angle glaucoma and H. pylori infection. (author)

  13. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori in gastric cancer in a south-east Asian population by 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter pylori is believed to play an important role in the aetiology of gastric cancer. There is a great variability in seropositivity and histological frequency of H. pylori in gastric cancer. The present prospective study investigates the prevalence of H. pylori infection in gastric cancer patients using 14C-urea breath testing. Patients with endoscopic biopsy-proven gastric cancer were fasted for 6 h prior to ingesting 18.5 x 104 Bq of 14C-urea cocktail orally. Breath samples were collected after 20 min by AS/King them to blow into a hyamine solution and measurements were read in a scintillation counter. Fifty out of 51 patients (98%) with gastric cancer were positive on the 14C-urea breath test compared to 29 patients (61%) who were positive on histology. There was no association between sex, age or tumour site, stage, differentiation, Lauren type and H. pylori status. The test was negative in one patient with cardiac tumour in which histology of the resected specimen was also negative for the bacteria. Active H. pylori infection is highly prevalent in gastric cancer in a South-East Asian population. The 14C-urea breath test is a highly sensitive method for detecting the presence of H. pylori even in gastric adenocarcinoma irrespective of the stage

  14. A simplified 13C-Urea breath test (13C-UBT) in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, T.; Bartholomeusz, F.D. L.; Bellon, M.S.; Chatterton, B.E. [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide. SA (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-06-01

    Full text: The Urea Breath Test (UBT) is an accurate, noninvasive means of assessing the presence of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. Two tests are currently available, using 13C- and 14C-labelled urea, respectively. 13C is a nonradioactive isotope, unlike 14C, but the 13C-UBT is technically more challenging. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of a simplified 13C-UBT with no test meal, using the 14C-UBT as the previously validated standard. 76 studies were performed on 72 patients; 4 patients performed the test twice. 28 patients were female, 44 male. The mean age was 51.1 years (range 23-86 years). 42 patients presented for post-eradication follow up, and 30 for initial diagnosis. All subjects underwent a 14C-UBT with a 15 minute sample. The 13C-UBT was then performed without a test meal and the breath samples obtained at baseline and 20 minutes. Of the 14C-UBT studies, 27 were positive, ranging from 1372 to 10,987 DPM (Normal <1000 DPM), and 49 were negative, range 177-946 DPM. 26 of the 13C-UBT studies were positive, with a Delta value ranging from 4.29-47.89 (Normal: Delta <3.5), and 50 were negative, range -0.20-2.80. There were 1 false-positive and 2 false-negative 13-UBT studies. This yielded a sensitivity of 92.6% and specificity of 98.0% for the simplified 13C-UBT. From these results we conclude that the simplified 13C-UBT is an accurate means of detecting the presence of Helicobacter pylori within the stomach

  15. A simplified 13C-Urea breath test (13C-UBT) in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Urea Breath Test (UBT) is an accurate, noninvasive means of assessing the presence of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. Two tests are currently available, using 13C- and 14C-labelled urea, respectively. 13C is a nonradioactive isotope, unlike 14C, but the 13C-UBT is technically more challenging. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of a simplified 13C-UBT with no test meal, using the 14C-UBT as the previously validated standard. 76 studies were performed on 72 patients; 4 patients performed the test twice. 28 patients were female, 44 male. The mean age was 51.1 years (range 23-86 years). 42 patients presented for post-eradication follow up, and 30 for initial diagnosis. All subjects underwent a 14C-UBT with a 15 minute sample. The 13C-UBT was then performed without a test meal and the breath samples obtained at baseline and 20 minutes. Of the 14C-UBT studies, 27 were positive, ranging from 1372 to 10,987 DPM (Normal <1000 DPM), and 49 were negative, range 177-946 DPM. 26 of the 13C-UBT studies were positive, with a Delta value ranging from 4.29-47.89 (Normal: Delta <3.5), and 50 were negative, range -0.20-2.80. There were 1 false-positive and 2 false-negative 13-UBT studies. This yielded a sensitivity of 92.6% and specificity of 98.0% for the simplified 13C-UBT. From these results we conclude that the simplified 13C-UBT is an accurate means of detecting the presence of Helicobacter pylori within the stomach

  16. Validity and cost comparison of "carbon urea breath test for diagnosis of H Pylori in dyspeptic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shahid Rasool; Shahab Abid; Wasim Jafri

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To validate and compare the cost of microdose 14C urea breath test (UBT) with histology and rapid urease test for the diagnosis of H Pylori.METHODS: Ninety-four consecutive patients with dyspeptic symptoms undergoing gastroscopy were enrolled. Gastric biopsies were taken for histology and rapid urease test. UBT was performed after gastroscopy by microdose "C urea capsules. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of UBT were calculated and compared with histology and rapid urease test. Cost comparison of these tests was also performed.RESULTS: H pylori was diagnosed by histology and rapid urease test in 66 (70%) and 61 (65%) patients, while 14C UBT detected infection in 63 (67%). Accuracy of UBT was 93% in comparison with histology while its positive and negative predictive values were 97% and 84%, respectively. Comparison of 14C UBT with rapid urease test gives an accuracy of 96%, with positive and negative predictive values of 95% and 97%, respectively. These results were highly reproducible with a Kappa test (P value < 0.001). Cost of histology or rapid urease test with gastroscopy was 110 USD or 95 USD respectively while the cost of UBT was 15 USD.CONCLUSION: Microdose 14C UBT was comparable to histology and rapid urease test. 14C UBT is an economical, self sufficient and suitable test to diagnose active Hpylori infection in less developed countries.

  17. Influence of citric acid solution as a test drink in the 14C-urea breath test for diagnosis of helicobactor pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different test meals are used in the 14C-urea breath test (UBT) for the detection of H.pylori infection. The purpose of using test meals is to slow gastric emptying and to maximise the distribution of the urea substrate within the stomach so as to increase the area and time of contact between bacteria and substrate. Recently, citric acid has been suggested as an improved liquid test meal. The mechanism is not known and could act by delaying gastric emptying, decreasing the pH at the site of the bacteria, or both

  18. Occult H. pylori infection partially explains ‘false-positive’ results of 13C-urea breath test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Lázaro, María J; Lario, Sergio; Sánchez-Delgado, Jordi; Montserrat, Antònia; Quílez, Elisa M; Casalots, Alex; Suarez, David; Campo, Rafel; Brullet, Enric; Junquera, Félix; Sanfeliu, Isabel; Segura, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    Background In a previous study, UBiT-100 mg, (Otsuka, Spain), a commercial 13C-urea breath test omitting citric acid pre-treatment, had a high rate of false-positive results; however, it is possible that UBiT detected low-density ‘occult’ infection missed by other routine reference tests. We aimed to validate previous results in a new cohort and to rule out the possibility that false-positive UBiT were due to an ‘occult’ infection missed by reference tests. Methods Dyspeptic patients (n = 272) were prospectively enrolled and UBiT was performed, according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. Helicobacter pylori infection was determined by combining culture, histology and rapid urease test results. We calculated UBiT sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (with 95% CI). In addition, we evaluated ‘occult’ H. pylori infection using two previously-validated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for urease A (UreA) and 16 S sequences in gastric biopsies. We included 44 patients with a false-positive UBiT, and two control groups of 25 patients each, that were positive and negative for all H. pylori tests. Results UBiT showed a false-positive rate of 17%, with a specificity of 83%. All the positive controls and 12 of 44 patients (27%) with false-positive UBiT were positive for all two PCR tests; by contrast, none of our negative controls had two positive PCR tests. Conclusions UBiT suffers from a high rate of false-positive results and sub-optimal specificity, and the protocol skipping citric acid pre-treatment should be revised; however, low-density ‘occult’ H. pylori infection that was undetectable by conventional tests accounted for around 25% of the ‘false-positive’ results. PMID:26535122

  19. Can the C-14 urea breath test reflect the extent and degree of ongoing helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The C-14 urea breath test (C-14 UBT) is the most specific noninvasive method to detect Helicobacter (H) pylori infection. We investigated if the C-14 UBT can reflect the presence and degree of H. pylori detected by gastroduodenoscopic biopsies (GBx). One hundred fifty patients (M:F=83:67,age 48.6±11.2 yrs) underwent C-14 UBT, rapid urease test (CLO test) and GBx on the same day. For the C-14 UBT, a single breath sample was collected at 10 minutes after ingestion of C-14 urea (137 KBq) capsule and counting was done in a liquid scintillation counter for 1 minute, and the results were classified as positive (≥200 dpm), intermediate ( 50 ∼ 199 dpm) or negative ( < 50 dpm). The results of CLO tests were classified as positive or negative according to color change. The results of GBx on giemsa stain were graded 0 (normal) to 4(diffuse) according to the distribution of H. pylori by the Wyatt method. We compared C-14 UBT results with GBx grade as a gold standard. In the assessment of the presence of H. pylori infection, the C-14 UBT global performance yielded sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy of 92.5%, 88.4%, 97.1%, 88.4% and 91.3%, respectively. However, the CLO test had sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy of 83.2%, 81.4%, 91.8%, 81.4% and 82.7%, respectively. The quantitative values of the C-14 UBT were 45 ± 27 dpm in grade 0, 707 ±584 dpm in grade 1, 1558±584 dpm in grade 2, 1851±604 dpm in grade 3, and 2719 ± 892 dpm in grade 4. A significant correlation (r=0.848, p<0.01) was found between C-14 UBT and the grade of distribution of H. pylori infection on GBx with giemsa stain. We conclude that the C-14 UBT is a highly accurate, simple and noninvasive method for the diagnosis of ongoing H. pylori infection and reflects the degree of bacterial distribution

  20. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Infants and Toddlers in South America: Concordance between [13C]Urea Breath Test and Monoclonal H. pylori Stool Antigen Test

    OpenAIRE

    Queiroz, Dulciene Maria Magalhães; Saito, Mayuko; Rocha, Gifone Aguiar; Rocha, Andreia Maria Camargos; de Melo, Fabrício Freire; Checkley, William; Braga, Lúcia Libanez Bessa C.; Silva, Igor Simões; Gilman, Robert H.; Crabtree, Jean E.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate noninvasive tests for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection in very young children are strongly required. We investigated the agreement between the [13C]urea breath test ([13C]UBT) and a monoclonal ELISA (HpSA) for detection of H. pylori antigen in stool. From October 2007 to July 2011, we enrolled 414 infants (123 from Brazil and 291 from Peru) of ages 6 to 30 months. Breath and stool samples were obtained at intervals of at least 3 months from Brazilian (n = 415) and Peruvian (n...

  1. Turnover of carbon in the {sup 13}C-urea breath test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Vladimir E.; Andreazzi, Mariana; Cury, Caio S.; Bassetto Junior, Carlos A.Z.; Rodrigues, Maria A.M.; Ducatti, Carlos, E-mail: vladimir@ibb.unesp.br, E-mail: ducatti@ibb.unesp.br, E-mail: mariana.andreazazi@gmail.com, E-mail: caiocury@hotmail.com, E-mail: juniorbassett@hotmail.com, E-mail: mariar@fmb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    To obtain a standard protocol for the application of {sup 13}C-urea breath test ({sup 13}C-UBT) analyzed by Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer (IRMS) to detect helicobacter pylori infection in the population is necessary to know the behavior of the turnover of {sup 13}C during the test in different individuals. The aims of this study was to find out a pattern for the turnover of the {sup 13}C in the {sup 13}C-UBT, analyzed by IRMS, in patients infected with H. pylori, in a Brazilian population, to define a protocol test application. We found that the isotopic ratio {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C in expired CO{sub 2} from patients infected with H. pylori and subjected to {sup 13}C-UBT does not follow a single pattern of behavior. However this behavior can be similar in subjects having the same maximum values following an inverse proportional relationship between the maximum value and the time of appearance in the curve. (author)

  2. Application of 13C-urea breath test in patients diagnosed as H. pylori-negative by gastroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    13C-urea breath test(13C-UBT)was used to evaluate infection rate of H. pylori(HP) and effect of HP eradication in patients diagnosed as HP-negative by histology and rapid urease test. Patiens without gastrointestinal disorders were set as control group. Within 640 patients diagnosed as HP-negative by histology and rapid urease test, there were 389 patients showed HP-positive by 13C-UBT. The positive rate of HP was 60.8%. 389 patients diagnosed as HP- positive by 13C-UBT were treated with PPI-based triple therapy, PPI-based double therapy and single PPI therapy, respectively. After treatment, the negative rate of 13C-UBT was 83.8%, 18.4% and 3.3%, respectively. The results showed significant difference between three kinds of therapy (P13C-UBT could improve the diagnostic rate of HP to patients who diagnosed as HP-negative by histology and rapid urease test. (authors)

  3. Ten years experience of isotopic breath test with special reference to Helicobacter pylori detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhas, M.; Tricht, L.Van; Verschaeren, A.; Delmotte, E.; Martin, P

    1997-12-31

    The use of the carbon 14 urea breath test by comparison with culture for campylobacter of gastric endoscopic biopsies is studied in 91 patients. They were divided into 2 groups. The first group consisted of 53 patients examined by gastric endoscopy and carbon 14 urea breath test. In this population, gastric biopsies were taken at different regions of the stomach and duodenum. The breath test was performed within 3 hours after endoscopy. The second group consisted of 38 asymptomatic patients whom 23 were parent of children with campylobacter positive gastritis. For the whole population, neither antibiotic therapy nor bismuth medication was administrated within the 15 days before the realization of the test. Results were expressed in % of injected dose/mmole of CO{sub 2} after correction of endogenous production of CO{sub 2}. In conclusion, carbon 14 urea breath test is a reliable noninvasive test for detection and follow-up of gastritis caused by a widespread microorganism. Also, the precision of both tests, {sup 14} C-UBT and {sup 13} C-UBT, are compared simultaneously in 84 adults patients. The results were expressed as % of administered dose expired in 30 minutes. A better precision is observed with the {sup 13} C-UBT

  4. Ten years experience of isotopic breath test with special reference to Helicobacter pylori detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of the carbon 14 urea breath test by comparison with culture for campylobacter of gastric endoscopic biopsies is studied in 91 patients. They were divided into 2 groups. The first group consisted of 53 patients examined by gastric endoscopy and carbon 14 urea breath test. In this population, gastric biopsies were taken at different regions of the stomach and duodenum. The breath test was performed within 3 hours after endoscopy. The second group consisted of 38 asymptomatic patients whom 23 were parent of children with campylobacter positive gastritis. For the whole population, neither antibiotic therapy nor bismuth medication was administrated within the 15 days before the realization of the test. Results were expressed in % of injected dose/mmole of CO2 after correction of endogenous production of CO2. In conclusion, carbon 14 urea breath test is a reliable noninvasive test for detection and follow-up of gastritis caused by a widespread microorganism. Also, the precision of both tests, 14 C-UBT and 13 C-UBT, are compared simultaneously in 84 adults patients. The results were expressed as % of administered dose expired in 30 minutes. A better precision is observed with the 13 C-UBT

  5. Compilation of carbon-14 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paasch, R.A.

    1985-07-08

    A review and critical analysis was made of the original sources of carbon-14 in the graphite moderator and reflector zones of the eight Hanford production reactors, the present physical and chemical state of the carbon-14, pathways (other than direct combustion) by which the carbon-14 could be released to the biosphere, and the maximum rate at which it might be released under circumstances which idealistically favor the release. Areas of uncertainty are noted and recommendations are made for obtaining additional data in three areas: (1) release rate of carbon-14 from irradiated graphite saturated with aerated water; (2) characterization of carbon-14 deposited outside the moderator and reflector zones; and (3) corrosion/release rate of carbon-14 from irradiated steel and aluminum alloys.

  6. Compilation of carbon-14 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review and critical analysis was made of the original sources of carbon-14 in the graphite moderator and reflector zones of the eight Hanford production reactors, the present physical and chemical state of the carbon-14, pathways (other than direct combustion) by which the carbon-14 could be released to the biosphere, and the maximum rate at which it might be released under circumstances which idealistically favor the release. Areas of uncertainty are noted and recommendations are made for obtaining additional data in three areas: (1) release rate of carbon-14 from irradiated graphite saturated with aerated water; (2) characterization of carbon-14 deposited outside the moderator and reflector zones; and (3) corrosion/release rate of carbon-14 from irradiated steel and aluminum alloys

  7. Biokinetics and radiation dosimetry of 14C-labelled triolein, urea, glycocholic acid and xylose in man. Studies related to nuclear medicine 'breath tests' using accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    14C-labelled substances have been used in biomedical research and clinical medicine for over 50 years. Physicians and scientists however, often hesitate to use these substances in patients and volunteers because the radiation dosimetry is unclear. In this work detailed long-term biokinetic and dosimetric estimation have been carried out for four clinically used 14C-breath tests: 14C-triolein (examination of fat malabsorption), urea (detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach), glycocholic acid and xylose (examination of bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine) by using the highly sensitive accelerator mass-spectrometry (AMS) technique. The AMS technique has been used to measure low 14C concentrations in small samples of exhaled air, urine, faeces and tissue samples and has improved the base for the estimation of the absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to man. The high sensitivity of the AMS system has also made it possible to perform 14C breath tests on patient groups which were earlier subject for restriction (e.g. small children). In summary, our results show that for adult patients - and in the case of 14C-urea breath test also for children down to 3 years of age - the dose contributions are comparatively low, both described as organ doses and as effective doses. For adults, the latter is: 14C-glycocholic acid - 0.4 mSv/MBq, 14C-triolein - 0.3 mSv/MBq, 14C-xylose - 0.1 mSv/MBq and 14C-urea - 0.04 mSv/MBq. Thus, from a radiation protection point of view there is no reason for restrictions in using any of the 14C-labelled radiopharmaceutical included in this work in the activities normally used (0.07-0.2 MBq for a 70 kg patient)

  8. Evaluation of [13C]Urea Breath Test and Helicobacter pylori Stool Antigen Test for Diagnosis of H. pylori Infection in Children from a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinali, Luciana de Carvalho Costa; Rocha, Gifone Aguiar; Rocha, Andreia Maria Camargos; de Moura, Sílvia Beleza; de Figueiredo Soares, Taciana; Esteves, Ana Maria Braz; Nogueira, Ana Margarida Miguel Ferreira; Cabral, Mônica Maria Demas Álvares; de Carvalho, Anfrisina Sales Teles; Bitencourt, Paulo; Ferreira, Alexandre; Queiroz, Dulciene Maria Magalhães

    2003-01-01

    The [13C]urea breath test (13C-UBT) and Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test (HpSA) for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection in children were validated. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 93.8, 99.1, 97.8, and 98.0%, respectively, for the 13C-UBT and 96.9, 100, 100, and 98.0%, respectively, for HpSA. Both tests are appropriate for diagnosing H. pylori infection in children. PMID:12843086

  9. Evaluation of [13C]Urea Breath Test and Helicobacter pylori Stool Antigen Test for Diagnosis of H. pylori Infection in Children from a Developing Country

    OpenAIRE

    Cardinali, Luciana de Carvalho Costa; Rocha, Gifone Aguiar; Rocha, Andreia Maria Camargos; de Moura, Sílvia Beleza; de Figueiredo Soares, Taciana; Esteves, Ana Maria Braz; Nogueira, Ana Margarida Miguel Ferreira; Cabral, Mônica Maria Demas Álvares; de Carvalho, Anfrisina Sales Teles; Bitencourt, Paulo; Ferreira, Alexandre; Queiroz, Dulciene Maria Magalhães

    2003-01-01

    The [13C]urea breath test (13C-UBT) and Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test (HpSA) for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection in children were validated. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 93.8, 99.1, 97.8, and 98.0%, respectively, for the 13C-UBT and 96.9, 100, 100, and 98.0%, respectively, for HpSA. Both tests are appropriate for diagnosing H. pylori infection in children.

  10. Comparison of the 13C-urea breath test and the endoscopic phenol red mucosal pH test in the quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection loading

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Young-Seok; Chae, Hiun-Suk; Jang, Se Na; Kim, Jin-Soo; Son, Hye Suk; Kim, Hyung-Keun; Kim, Byung-Wook; Han, Sok-Won; Choi, Kyu-Yong; Lee, Hae Kyung; Chang, Eun Deok

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aims The 13C-urea breath test (UBT) is a semiquantitative test for measuring Helicobacter pylori infection loading. H. pylori produces ammonia, which elevates the pH of the gastric mucosa and is detectable via endoscopy using a phenol red indicator. We evaluated whether this test could be used to diagnose H. pylori infection and whether phenol red staining was correlated with 13C-UBT results. Methods One hundred and twenty-three patients participated. The UBT was performed after in...

  11. Carbon 14 dating; La datation par le carbone 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laj, C.; Mazaud, A.; Duplessy, J.C. [CEA Saclay, Lab. des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2004-03-01

    In this article time dating based on carbon 14 method is reviewed, its limits are explained and recent improvements are presented. Carbon 14 is a by-product of the interactions of cosmic protons with air molecules. The fluctuations of the quantity of carbon 14 present in the atmosphere are responsible for the shift observed between the result given by the method and the real age. This shift appears for ages greater than 2000 years and is estimated to 1000 years for an age of 10.000 years. As a consequence carbon 14 dating method requires calibration by comparing with other methods like dendrochronology (till 11.000 years) and time dating of fossil corals (till 26.000 years and soon till 50.000 years). It is assumed that the fluctuations of carbon 14 in the atmosphere are due to: - the changes in the intensity and composition of cosmic radiations itself (due to the motion of the sun system through the galaxy or due to the explosion of a super-novae in the surroundings of the sun system); - the changes of the earth magnetic field that diverts cosmic rays; and - the changes in the interactions between the atmosphere and the oceans knowing that 40 tons of carbon 14 are dissolved in seas while only 1 ton belongs to the atmosphere. (A.C.)

  12. The optimization of the estimation of carbon-14 in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The urinalysis method for carbon-14 currently used by the bioassay laboratory of the Dosimetric Research Branch at CRNL has been tested and optimized for both sensitivity and efficiency. Urine is first treated with an enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of urea, the major carbon-containing component of urine; carbon dioxide is then liberated by the measured addition of excess acid and collected in 2-aminoethanol. The aminoethanol can be directly counted by the addition of a liquid scintillation cocktail. This method can be used to measure both the specific activity, (Bq/g-carbon) or the total activity of carbon-14 released from the urine sample

  13. Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the 13C-urea breath test as the primary diagnostic investigation for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection compared to invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greiner, Wolfgang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is one of the most common bacterial infections in humans. There is a risk factor for gastric or duodenal ulcers, gastric cancer and MALT (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue-Lymphomas. There are several invasive and non-invasive methods available for the diagnosis of H. pylori. The 13C-urea breath test is a non-invasive method recommended for monitoring H. pylori eradication therapy. However, this test is not yet used for primary assessment of H. pylori in Germany. Objectives: What are the clinical and health economic benefits of the 13C-urea breath test in the primary assessment of H. pylori compared to other invasive and non-invasive methods? Methods: A systematic literature search including a hand search was performed for studies investigating test criteria and cost-effectiveness of the 13C-urea breath test in comparison to other methods used in the primary assessment of H. pylori. Only studies that directly compared the 13C-urea breath test to other H. pylori-tests were included. For the medical part, biopsy-based tests were used as the gold standard. Results: 30 medical studies are included. Compared to the immunoglobulin G (IgG test, the sensitivity of the 13C-urea breath test is higher in twelve studies, lower in six studies and one study reports no differences. The specificity is higher in 13 studies, lower in three studies and two studies report no differences. Compared to the stool antigen test, the sensitivity of the 13C-urea breath test is higher in nine studies, lower in three studies and one study reports no difference. The specificity is higher in nine studies, lower in two studies and two studies report no differences. Compared to the urease test, the sensitivity of the 13C-urea breath test is higher in four studies, lower in three studies and four studies report no differences. The specificity is higher in five studies, lower in five studies and one study reports no difference. Compared

  14. Application of isotope-selective non-dispersive infrared spectrometry for the evaluation of the 13C-urea breath test: comparison with three concordant methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coelho L.G.V.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to compare the performance of isotope-selective non-dispersive infrared spectrometry (IRIS for the 13C-urea breath test with the combination of the 14C-urea breath test (14C-UBT, urease test and histologic examination for the diagnosis of H. pylori (HP infection. Fifty-three duodenal ulcer patients were studied. All patients were submitted to gastroscopy to detect HP by the urease test, histologic examination and 14C-UBT. To be included in the study the results of the 3 tests had to be concordant. Within one month after admission to the study the patients were submitted to IRIS with breath samples collected before and 30 min after the ingestion of 75 mg 13C-urea dissolved in 200 ml of orange juice. The samples were mailed and analyzed 11.5 (4-21 days after collection. Data were analyzed statistically by the chi-square and Mann-Whitney test and by the Spearman correlation coefficient. Twenty-six patients were HP positive and 27 negative. There was 100% agreement between the IRIS results and the HP status determined by the other three methods. Using a cutoff value of delta-over-baseline (DOB above 4.0 the IRIS showed a mean value of 19.38 (minimum = 4.2, maximum = 41.3, SD = 10.9 for HP-positive patients and a mean value of 0.88 (minimum = 0.10, maximum = 2.5, SD = 0.71 for negative patients. Using a cutoff value corresponding to 0.800% CO2/weight (kg, the 14C-UBT showed a mean value of 2.78 (minimum = 0.89, maximum = 5.22, SD = 1.18 in HP-positive patients. HP-negative patients showed a mean value of 0.37 (minimum = 0.13, maximum = 0.77, SD = 0.17. IRIS is a low-cost, easy to manage, highly sensitive and specific test for H. pylori detection. Storing and mailing the samples did not interfere with the performance of the test.

  15. Comparative performance of capsulated Vs non-capsulated 14C-urea breath test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventionally, 14C-urea breath test (14C-UBT) is employed as a 'gold standard' technique for the detection of active Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection, to follow up the patients after its eradication and for epidemiological evaluations. Due to high accuracy of this test and other benefits it is recommended as the best option for 'test-and-treat' strategy in primary health care centers. So far no appropriate study has been done to compare the performance of 14C-UBT using capsulated versus non-capsulated protocol. In this study, we employed a novel technique of performing capsulated 14C-UBT with simultaneous monitoring the dynamic movement of capsule and compared the results with non-capsulated protocol. (author)

  16. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori Infection in School and Pre-School Aged Children with C-14 Urea Breath Test and the Association with Familial and Environmental Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çınar, Alev; Sadıç, Murat; İkbal Atılgan, Hasan; Baskın, Aylin; Koca, Gökhan; Demirel, Koray; Korkmaz, Meliha

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection in pre-school and school age children with C-14 urea breath test, and to explore its association with age and socioeconomic factors in Turkey. Methods: Hp infection status was determined by using Urea Breath Test (UBT). Patients who had previous gastric surgery, Hp eradication treatment or equivocal UBT results were excluded. A questionnaire was administered to elicit information on gender, age, ABO/Rh blood group type, presence of gastric disease in the family, domestic animal in the household, and treatment for idiopathic Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA). Results: This retrospective study included 500 pediatric patients (179 boys, 321 girls, mean age 10.7±4.3 years) of whom 62 (12.4%) were aged ≤6 years and 438 (87.6%) were aged 7 to 16 years. Helicobacter pylori (Hp) was positive in 245 (49%) cases. In the pre-school age group, 21/62 cases (34%) had positive UBT while in the school age group 224/438 children (51%) had positive UBT. A family history of dyspepsia and pet ownership were not associated with Hp positivity. Hp positive 76 (29.8%) children were on IDA treatment but this was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The Hp infection positivity rate was 49% in the pediatric age study group. The positivity rate was significantly lower at preschool age than school age, and it increased with age. There was no association with gender, ABO/Rh blood groups, presence of domestic pets, IDA, or history of gastric disease in the family. PMID:26316471

  17. A methodological aspect of the {sup 14}C-urea breath test used in Helicobacter pylori diagnosis; Wybrany aspekt metodologiczny testu oddechowego z mocznikiem znakowanym stosowanego w diagnostyce zakazenia Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopanski, Z.; Niziol, J.; Micherdzinski, J.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.; Cienciala, A.; Lasa, J.; Witkowska, B. [Szpital Wojskowy, Cracow (Poland)]|[Institute of Physics and Nuclear Techniques, Academy of Mining and Metallurgy, Cracow (Poland)]|[Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    The main purpose of those investigations was optimisation of the performing time of the breath test with {sup 14}C-labelled urea which reveals Helicobacter pylori infection. It was analysed 117 species, preselected according to endoscopy and histopathology results, 56 of them have suffered from chronic gastritis and 61 from gastric ulcer disease. Using microbiology diagnosis (culture + IFP test) it was found that 86 species were H. pylori infected. This group of patients were next subject to investigations with the breath test with {sup 14}C-labelled urea. Measurements of radioactivity of breathe air have been carried out for 30 minutes. The obtained results allow us to maintain that the optimal time of duration of the test described above is 30 minutes. (author) 38 refs, 2 tabs, 1 fig

  18. Comparison of three stool antigen assays with the 13C- urea breath test for the primary diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection and monitoring treatment outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hooton, Carmel

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The urea breath test (UBT) is the gold-standard non-invasive test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection, however, the lack of availability of the UBT due to the high cost of the test, and in particular the need for expensive analytical instrumentation, limits the usefulness of this method. Stool antigen assays may offer an alternative non-invasive method for the diagnosis of infection. OBJECTIVE: To compare the accuracy of three stool antigen assays (HpSA, IDEIA HpStAR, and ImmunoCard STAT) against the UBT for the primary diagnosis of H. pylori infection and for monitoring treatment outcome. METHODS: A total of 102 patients attending two gastroenterology day-case clinics for the investigation of dyspepsia were included. Each patient provided breath and stool samples for analysis. Patients who tested positive for H. pylori by the validated UBT were prescribed triple therapy and invited to return for repeat breath and stool sample analysis 6 weeks post-treatment. RESULTS: Of the 102 patients tested, 48 were diagnosed with H. pylori infection by the UBT. The HpSA assay interpreted 38 of these as positive (79% sensitive). Of the 54 UBT-negative patients the HpSA assay interpreted all 54 as negative (100% specific). The IDEIA HpStAR assay correctly identified 44 patients as positive (92% sensitive) and 50 as negative (92.5% specific). The ImmunoCard STAT assay interpreted 38 patients as positive (79% sensitive) and 52 as negative (96.3% specific). CONCLUSION: The findings indicate that the IDEIA HpStAR stool antigen kit is the most accurate assay of the three assays evaluated, and possibly represents a viable alternative to the UBT for the primary diagnosis of H. pylori infection and for monitoring treatment outcome.

  19. Defense against environmental ammonia toxicity in the African lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus: Bimodal breathing, skin ammonia permeability and urea synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loong, A M; Tan, J Y L; Wong, W P; Chew, S F; Ip, Y K

    2007-11-15

    This study aimed to determine how the African lungfish Protopterus aethiopicus defended against ammonia toxicity when confronted with high concentrations (30 or 100 mmoll(-1)) of environmental ammonia. Exposure to 100 mmoll(-1) of NH(4)Cl for 1 or 6 days had no significant effect on the rate of O(2) uptake from water or from air, and the rate of total O(2) consumption. Using an Ussing-like apparatus, we report for the first time that the skin of P. aethiopicus had low permeability (1.26 x 10(-4) micromol min(-1)cm(-1)) to NH(3)in vitro. Indeed, the influx of exogenous ammonia into fish exposed to 30 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl was low (0.117 micromol min(-1) 100g(-1) fish). As a result, P. aethiopicus could afford to maintain relatively low ammonia contents in plasma, muscle, liver and brain even after 6 days of exposure to 100 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl. Surprisingly, fish exposed to 30 or 100 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl had comparable ammonia contents in the muscle and the brain in spite of the big difference (70 mmoll(-1)) in environmental ammonia concentrations. Significant increases in urea contents occurred in various tissues of fish exposed to 30 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl for 6 days, but there were no significant differences in tissue urea contents between fish exposed to 30 mmoll(-1) and 100 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl. Between days 3 and 6, the rate of urea excretion in fish exposed to 30 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl was significantly greater than that of the control. By contrast, there was no significant difference in urea excretion rates between fish exposed to 100 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl and control fish throughout the 6-day period, and such a phenomenon has not been reported before for other lungfish species. Thus, our results suggest that P. aethiopicus was capable of decreasing the NH(3) permeability of its body surface when exposed to high concentrations of environmental ammonia. Indeed, after 6 days of exposure to 100 mmoll(-1) NH(4)Cl, the NH(3) permeability constant of the skin (0.55 x 10(-4) micromol min(-1

  20. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Infants and Toddlers in South America: Concordance between [13C]Urea Breath Test and Monoclonal H. pylori Stool Antigen Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Mayuko; Rocha, Gifone Aguiar; Rocha, Andreia Maria Camargos; Melo, Fabrício Freire; Checkley, William; Braga, Lúcia Libanez Bessa C.; Silva, Igor Simões; Gilman, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate noninvasive tests for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection in very young children are strongly required. We investigated the agreement between the [13C]urea breath test ([13C]UBT) and a monoclonal ELISA (HpSA) for detection of H. pylori antigen in stool. From October 2007 to July 2011, we enrolled 414 infants (123 from Brazil and 291 from Peru) of ages 6 to 30 months. Breath and stool samples were obtained at intervals of at least 3 months from Brazilian (n = 415) and Peruvian (n = 908) infants. [13C]UBT and stool test results concurred with each other in 1,255 (94.86%) cases (kappa coefficient = 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.87 to 0.92). In the H. pylori-positive group, delta-over-baseline (DOB) and optical density (OD) values were positively correlated (r = 0.62; P < 0.001). The positivity of the tests was higher (P < 0.001; odds ratio [OR] = 6.01; 95% CI = 4.50 to 8.04) in Peru (546/878; 62.2%) than in Brazil (81/377; 21.5%) and increased with increasing age in Brazil (P = 0.02), whereas in Peru it decreased with increasing age (P < 0.001). The disagreement between the test results was associated with birth in Brazil and female gender but not with age and diarrhea. Our results suggest that both [13C]UBT and the stool monoclonal test are reliable for diagnosing H. pylori infection in very young children, which will facilitate robust epidemiological studies in infants and toddlers. PMID:24006009

  1. Comparison of a monoclonal antigen stool test (Hp StAR) with the 13C-urea breath test in monitoring Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francesco Perri; Michele Quitadamo; Rosalba Ricciardi; Ada Piepoli; Rosa Cotugno; Annamaria Gentile; Alberto Pilotto; Angelo Andriulli

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the agreement between a mAb-based stool test (HP StAR) and the urea breath test (UBT) in monitoring (H pylori) infection after eradication therapy.METHODS: Patients with discordant results on UBT and Hp StAR underwent endoscopy with biopsies for rapid urease test, culture, and histology to confirm H pylori status.RESULTS: Among 250 patients (50±14 years), 240 (96.0%) had concordant UBT and Hp StAR tests with a significant correlation between DOB and A values (R = 0.87; P<0.0001).The remaining 10 (4.0%) patients had discordant tests (positive Hp StAR and negative UBT) with the Hp StAR inaccurate in five cases (false positive) and UBT inaccurate in the other five cases (false negative). The "maximal expected" sensitivity, specificity, +PV, -PV, +LR, and -LR were 91%, 100%, 100%, 97.4%, ∞, and 8.2 respectively,for the UBT, and 100%, 97.4%, 91%, 100%, 38.8, and 0,respectively, for the Hp StAR. Overall accuracy for both tests was 98%.CONCLUSION: Both the UBT and the Hp StAR are equally accurate in monitoring H pylori infection. Nowadays,the choice of the "best" non-invasive H pylori test in the post-treatment setting should be done not only in terms of diagnostic accuracy but also in view of cost and local facilities.

  2. Comparative diagnostic value of the breath test and the urine test with 14C-urea in the detection of the Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among 92 patients with chronic gastritis we conducted a synchronous diagnosis of the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection using a culture and a serological test (IFP), in conjunction with breath and urine tests involving 14C-urea (BTU-C14 and UTU-C14). The infection was confirmed by isolation in 71 persons (77.2%), the presence of specific IgG in the blood serum was found in 75 (81.5%). In comparison, the BTU-C14 indicated a group of 77 people (83.7%) as infected, and the UTU-C14 a group of 76 (82.6%). In order to determine the diagnostic value (sensitivity, specificity and efficiency) of the latter tests, the results were compared with those of the culture and of the serological tests. It was found that the BTU-C14 test used showed a 100% sensitivity, a 89.5% specificity and a 97.9% efficiency. The UTU-C14 test showed a 100.0% sensitivity, a 94.4% specificity and a 98.9% efficiency in the detection of the H. pylori infection. (author)

  3. Pre-treatment urea breath test results predict the efficacy of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy in patients with active duodenal ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yung-Chih Lai; Jyh-Chin Yang; Shih-Hung Huang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association of pre-treatment 13C-urea breath test (UBT) results with H pyloridensity and efficacy of eradication therapy in patients with active duodenal ulcers.METHODS: One hundred and seventeen consecutive outpatients with active duodenal ulcer and H pyloriinfection were recruited. H pylori density was histologically graded according to the Sydney system. Each patient received lansoprazole (30 mg b.i.d.), clarithromycin (500 mg b.i.d.) and amoxicillin (1 g b.i.d.) for 1 week. According to pre-treatment UBT values, patients were allocated into low (<16%o),intermediate (16-35%o), and high (>35%o) UBT groups.RESULTS: A significant correlation was found between pre-treatment UBT results andHpyloridensity (P<0.001).H pylorieradication rates were 94.9%, 94.4% and 81.6%in the low, intermediate and high UBT groups, respectively (per protocol analysis, P=0.11). When patients were assigned into two groups (UBT results ≤35%o and >35%o),the eradication rates were 94.7% and 81.6%, respectively (P=0.04).CONCLUSION: The intragastric bacterial load of H pylori can be evaluated by UBT, and high pre-treatment UBT results can predict an adverse outcome of eradication therapy.

  4. Cost effectiveness analysis of population-based serology screening and 13C-Urea breath test for Helicobacter pylori to prevent gastric cancer: A markov model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xie; Nan Luo; Hin-Peng Lee

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To compare the costs and effectiveness of no screening and no eradication therapy, the populationbased Hdlicobacter pylori (H pylori) serology screening with eradication therapy and 13C-Urea breath test (UBT)with eradication therapy.METHODS: A tarkov model simulation was carried out in all 237900 Chinese males with age between 35 and 44 from the perspective of the public healthcare provider in Singapore. The main outcome measures were the costs, number of gastric cancer cases prevented, life years saved, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs)gained from screening age to death. The uncertainty surrounding the cost-effectiveness ratio was addressed by one-way sensitivity analyses.RESULTS: Compared to no screening, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was $16166 per life year saved or $13571 per QALY gained for the serology screening, and $38792 per life year saved and $32525 per QALY gained for the UBT. The ICER was $477079 per life year saved or $390337 per QALY gained for the UBT compared to the serology screening. The costeffectiveness of serology screening over the UBT was robust to most parameters in the model.CONCLUSION: The population-based serology screening for H pylori was more cost-effective than the UBT in prevention of gastric cancer in Singapore Chinese males.

  5. Validation of the string test for the recovery of Helicobacter pylori from gastric secretions and correlation of its results with urea breath test results, serology, and gastric pH levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J; Camorlinga, M; Pérez-Peréz, G; Gonzalez, G; Muñoz, O

    2001-04-01

    The efficacy of the string culture test to isolate Helicobacter pylori from gastric secretions of 28 volunteers was studied. With the urea breath test (UBT) as the "gold standard," the string culture test showed a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 100%. The results of string culture did not correlate with the UBT results, with serum antibody levels, or with the pH levels of gastric secretions.

  6. Validation of the String Test for the Recovery of Helicobacter pylori from Gastric Secretions and Correlation of Its Results with Urea Breath Test Results, Serology, and Gastric pH Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Javier; Camorlinga, Margarita; Pérez-Peréz, Guillermo; Gonzalez, Gerardo; Muñoz, Onofre

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of the string culture test to isolate Helicobacter pylori from gastric secretions of 28 volunteers was studied. With the urea breath test (UBT) as the “gold standard,” the string culture test showed a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 100%. The results of string culture did not correlate with the UBT results, with serum antibody levels, or with the pH levels of gastric secretions.

  7. Contamination by Helicobacter pylori measured by the 13C-Urea-Breath-Test and nutritional status of children with chronic diarrhoea syndrome in Havana City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diarrhoea morbidity shows a slow increasing tendency during the last 10 years in Cuba. In young children the compromise of the gastric acid barrier after a chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is discussed in pathogenic relation to gastritis, duodenal ulcer, chronic diarrhoea, short stature, malabsorption of the B-complex vitamins and malnutrition. The Hp contamination level of the population of the developing world is estimated to be considerably high. Endoscopic studies carried out in Cuban subjects with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of 60 to 100%. The current treatment of chronic diarrhoea does not include the elimination of Hp. Cuban children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of more than 60%. There are not available data on the contamination level in apparently healthy Cuban children or those with chronic diarrhoea. In March-April 2000 the prevalence of Hp infection measured in serum by chromatographic immunoassay for detection of Hp IgG antibodies was found to be 94 % in 20 infants and young children with persistent chronic diarrhoea and 100% in 11 apparently healthy children in Havana City. Children with diarrhoea showed a more evident affection of their nutritional status and a higher percentage of positive personal or familiar history of parasitism, giardiasis, gastritis, ulcer, stomatitis and glositis. The validity of the immunological tests in infants is discussed from the point of view of the antibody transference with breast milk. In a sample of 16 different children studied by the 13C-Urea-Breath-Test the contamination level was 50% of the children not affected by diarrhoea and only one of the 6 children with diarrhoea showed positive values

  8. Biokinetics and radiation dosimetry of {sup 14}C-labelled triolein, urea, glycocholic acid and xylose in man. Studies related to nuclear medicine 'breath tests' using accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunnarsson, Mikael

    2002-08-01

    {sup 14}C-labelled substances have been used in biomedical research and clinical medicine for over 50 years. Physicians and scientists however, often hesitate to use these substances in patients and volunteers because the radiation dosimetry is unclear. In this work detailed long-term biokinetic and dosimetric estimation have been carried out for four clinically used {sup 14}C-breath tests: {sup 14}C-triolein (examination of fat malabsorption), urea (detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in the stomach), glycocholic acid and xylose (examination of bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine) by using the highly sensitive accelerator mass-spectrometry (AMS) technique. The AMS technique has been used to measure low {sup 14}C concentrations in small samples of exhaled air, urine, faeces and tissue samples and has improved the base for the estimation of the absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to man. The high sensitivity of the AMS system has also made it possible to perform {sup 14}C breath tests on patient groups which were earlier subject for restriction (e.g. small children). In summary, our results show that for adult patients - and in the case of {sup 14}C-urea breath test also for children down to 3 years of age - the dose contributions are comparatively low, both described as organ doses and as effective doses. For adults, the latter is: {sup 14}C-glycocholic acid - 0.4 mSv/MBq, {sup 14}C-triolein - 0.3 mSv/MBq, {sup 14}C-xylose - 0.1 mSv/MBq and {sup 14}C-urea - 0.04 mSv/MBq. Thus, from a radiation protection point of view there is no reason for restrictions in using any of the {sup 14}C-labelled radiopharmaceutical included in this work in the activities normally used (0.07-0.2 MBq for a 70 kg patient)

  9. Comparison between the 13C-urea breath test and stool antigen test for the diagnosis of childhood Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As noninvasive tests for Helicobacter pylori infection, the 13C-urea breath test (UBT) and stool antigen test have been widely used. In children, however, there are few studies reporting which test shows superior performance. The purpose of this study was to compare the 13C-UBT and stool antigen test for their accuracy in diagnosing. H. pylori infection in children. A total of 123 Japanese children, ages 2 to 17 years (mean, 12 years) who underwent gastric biopsies for H. pylori infection were studied. The diagnoses included gastritis (n=55), gastric ulcer (n=5), duodenal ulcer (n=20), iron-deficiency anemia (n=7), and other conditions (n=36). The cutoff value of the 13C-UBT was defined to be 3.5 per mille. The stool antigen test was performed using the H. pylori stool antigen (HpSA) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (Premier Platinum HpSA). In 16 patients who received eradication therapy, the 13C-UBT and HpSA were repeated 2 months after treatment. Based on biopsy tests, 60 children were infected with H. pylori and 63 children were not. For the 13C-UBT, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 95.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86.1%-99.0%), 98.4% (95% CI, 91.5%-100%), and 96.4% (95% CI, 93.6%-99.9%), respectively. For the HpSA, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 983.% (95% CI, 90.8%-100%), 98.4% (95% CI, 91.2%-100%), and 98.3% (95% CI, 96.0%-100%), respectively. There were no significant differences between the performance of these two tests. In the assessment of H. pylori eradication, the results of 13C-UBT and HpSA agreed with those of biopsy tests. The 13C-UBT and the HpSA are equally accurate for the diagnosis of active H. pylori infection in Japanese children. (author)

  10. Carbon-14 Bomb-Pulse Dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B A

    2007-12-16

    Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons during the 1950s and early 1960s doubled the concentration of carbon-14 atmosphere and created a pulse that labeled everything alive in the past 50 years as carbon moved up the food chain. The variation in carbon-14 concentration in time is well-documented and can be used to chronologically date all biological materials since the mid-1950s.

  11. The interest of the {sup 13}C urea breath test for the diagnostic and monitoring of chronic duodenal ulcer; Interet du test respiratoire a l`uree {sup 13}C dans le diagnostic et le suivi de l`ulcere duodenal chronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau-Tsangaris, M. [INBIOMED, 69 - Lyon (France); Centarti, M.; Mion, F.; Minaire, Y. [Hopital Edouard-Herriot, 69 - Lyon (France); Brazier, J.L. [Faculte de Pharmacie, 69 - Lyon (France)

    1994-12-31

    Duodenal ulcer is very frequently associated with Helicobacter pylori (Hp) present in the gastric mucous membrane. Breath tests with {sup 13}C-labelled urea have been carried out for the detection of Hp; these tests could be more sensitive than gastric biopsies, because of the heterogenous distribution of the bacteria in the mucous membrane. This breath test may be used repetitively and allows for a non-intrusive monitoring of the Hp eradication after treatment. 12 refs.

  12. Validación de método simplificado de la prueba en aliento con urea-13C para diagnóstico de infección por Helicobacter pylori Validation of a simplified method of the 13C urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. X. Ortiz-Olvera Nayeli

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: validar un método simplificado de la prueba en aliento con urea-13C (PAU-13Cs para el diagnóstico de infección por Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, con administración simultánea de 50 mg de urea-13C y 2 g de ácido cítrico. Material y métodos: se estudiaron 88 pacientes (49 mujeres y 39 hombres; con promedio de edad 45 ± 15 años, referidos para endoscopia gastrointestinal y toma de biopsias. La PAU-13Cs se realizó en ayuno. Se recolectaron las muestras de aire espirado en tubos de cristal de 10 ml, antes y 30 minutos después de administrar simultáneamente 50 mg de urea-13C y 2 g de ácido cítrico disueltos en 200 ml de agua. Las muestras se analizaron por espectrometría de masas. El diagnóstico de infección se consideró cuando el cultivo y/o la biopsia y serología fueron positivas para H. pylori. Resultados: cincuenta y un pacientes (57,95% fueron positivos, 30 (34,10% negativos para H. pylori y 7 (7,95% casos se consideraron indeterminados. La sensibilidad, especificidad, valor predictivo positivo y negativo de PAU-13Cs fue de 90,2, 93,3, 95,8 y 84,8%, respectivamente. Con exactitud de 91,4%. Conclusión: la administración simultánea de 50 mg de urea-13C y 2 g de ácido cítrico, representa una alternativa para el diagnóstico no invasivo de infección por H. pylori, debido a que conserva la certeza diagnóstica de la PAU-13C.Objective: to validate a simplified 13C-urea breath test (13C-UBT method for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Material and methods: patients referred for gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy were included, and a 13C-UBT was performed after a 6-hour fast. Breath samples were collected in 10 ml glass tubes before and 30 min after the simultaneous administration of 50 mg of 13C-urea and 2 g of citric acid in 200 ml of water. All breath samples were analyzed using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. The diagnosis of H. pylori infection was established with a positive culture and/or positive

  13. Xylitol improves compliance of patients to 13C- urea breath test%木糖醇改善13C-尿素呼气试验患者的依从性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李园; 吴本俨

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of xylitol on the texture of reagents used in 13C- urea breath test and the value of DOB test. Methods One hundred and twenty patients were randomly divided into 0.05g or 0.10g xylitol group and non xylitol group. Texture of reagents used in 13C-urea breath test was assessed by the patients themselves in the xylitol group. DOB value was detected twice by paired test. Results The acceptable texture was significantly higher in 0.05g and 0.11g xylitol group than in non xylitol group(43.3% and 66.7% vs 20.0% and 33.3%, P<0.05) and in patients receiving 0.10g xylitol than in those receiving 0.05g xylitol(P<0.05). However, no difference was observed in DOB value between patients receiving 0.05g or 0.l0g xylitol(P>0.05). Conclusion Adding an appropriate amount of xylitol can improve the texture and compliance of patients to 13C-urea breath test. The best result can be achieved by adding 0.10g xylitol with no effect on the DOB value in 13C-urea breath test.%目的 观察木糖醇对13C-尿素呼气试验检测试剂的口感及DOB检测值的影响.方法 120例病人同时进行不添加和添加木糖醇0.05g和0.10g组,自评检测的试剂口感,并配对检验两次检测的DOB值变化.结果 木糖醇0.05g组和0.10g组,口感可接受百分比分别为43.3%和66.7%,显著高于未添加木糖醇时检测(分别为20.0%和33.3%,P<0.05),添加木糖醇0.10g口感可耐受百分比显著高于添加0.05g组(P<0.05).两种剂量木糖醇对DOB检测值均无显著性影响(P>0.05).结论 在13C-尿素呼气试验检查试剂中加入适量木糖醇可改善口感、提高病人依从性、其中添加0.10g木糖醇效果最优,对13C-尿素呼气试验的DOB值无影响.

  14. Synthesis of carbon-14 labeled doxylamine succinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doxylamine succinate, N,N-dimethyl-2-[1-phenyl-1-(2-pyridinyl)-ethoxy]ethanamine succinate is an antihistamine used primarily as a sedative. Carbon-14 labeled doxylamine succinate, required for toxicological studies, was synthesized in two steps starting from 2-benzoyl pyridine. (author)

  15. The carbon 14 and environment; Le carbone 14 et l'environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This article resume the history and the properties of the carbon 14 ({sup 14}C). We also find the different origins and the produced quantities. The carbon transfers in environment are explained and so the {sup 14}C. The biological effects and the sanitary aspects are clarified. The measurements of carbon 14 are given as well its application through the dating. The waste management is tackled. (N.C.)

  16. One-year follow-up study of Helicobacter pylori eradication rate with 13C-urea breath test after 3-d and 7-d rabeprazole-based triple therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hwang-Huei Wang; Jen-Wei Chou; Kuan-Fu Liao; Zong-Yi Lin; Hsueh-Chou Lai; Chang-Hu Hsu; Chih-Bin Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the long-term role of a 3-d rabeprazole based triple therapy in patients with Helicobacter pylori(H pylori)-infected active peptic ulcers.METHODS: We prospectively studied 115 consecutive patients with H pylori-infected active peptic ulcers. H pylori infection was confirmed if any two of H pylori DNA,histology, and rapid urease test were positive. Patients were assigned to either an open-labeled 3-d course of oral amoxicillin 1 000 mg b.i.d., clarithromycin 500 mg b.i.d.,and rabeprazole 20 mg b.i.d., or 7-d course of oral amoxicillin 1 000 mg b.i.d., clarithromycin 500 mg b.i.d.,and rabeprazole 20 mg b.i.d. Subsequently, all patients received oral rabeprazole 20 mg once daily until the 8th wk. Three months after therapy, all patients were followed-up endoscopically for the peptic ulcer, H pylori DNA, histology, and rapid urease test. One year after therapy, Hpyioriinfection was tested using the 13C-urea breath test.RESULTS: The ulcer healing rates 3 mo after therapy were 81.0% vs 75.4% for the 3-d and 7-d groups [intention-to-treat (ITT) analysis, P = 0.47] respectively,and 90.4% vs 89.6% for the 3-d and 7-d groups [perprotocol (PP) analysis, P= 0.89] respectively. The eradication rates 3 mo after therapy were 75.9% vs 73.7% for the 3-dand 7-d groups (ITT, P = 0.79) respectively, and 84.6%vs 87.5% for the 3-d and 7-d groups (PP, P = 0.68)respectively. One year after therapy, seventy-five patients returned to receive the 13C-urea breath test, and the eradication rates were 78.4% vs 81.6% in 3-d and 7-dgroups (PP, P = 0.73) respectively.CONCLUSION: Our study showed the eradication rates against H pyloriinfection 3 and 12 mo after triple therapy were not different between the 3-d and 7-d rabeprazolebased groups. Therefore, the 3-d rabeprazole-based triple therapy may be an alternative treatment for peptic ulcers with H pylori infection.

  17. A gaseous measurement system for carbon-14 dioxide and carbon-14 methane: An analytical methodology to be applied in the evaluation of the carbon-14 dioxide and carbon-14 methane produced via microbial activity in volcanic tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study were to develop a gaseous measurement system for the carbon-14 dioxide and carbon-14 methane produced via microbial activity or geochemical action on leachate in tuff; to determine the trapping efficiency of the system for carbon-14 dioxide; to determine the trapping efficiency of the system for carbon-14 methane; to apply the experimentally determined factors regarding the system's trapping efficiency for carbon-14 dioxide and carbon-14 methane to a trapping algorithm to determine the activity of the carbon-14 dioxide and carbon-14 methane in a mixed sample; to determine the minimum detectable activity of the measurement process in picocuries per liter; and to determine the lower limit or detection of the measurement process in counts per minute

  18. LDEO Carbon 14 Data from Selected Sea floor Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Carbon-14 data in this file were compiled by W.F. Ruddiman and staff at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. Data include 974 carbon-14...

  19. Stool microbiome reveals diverse bacterial ureases as confounders of oral urea breath testing for Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Bamako, Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiga, Mamoudou; Cohen, Keira; Baya, Bocar; Srikrishna, Geetha; Siddiqui, Sophia; Sanogo, Moumine; Somboro, Anou M; Diarra, Bassirou; Diallo, Mariam H; Mazumdar, Varun; Yoder, Christian; Orsega, Susan; Belson, Michael; Kassambara, Hamadoun; Goita, Drissa; Murphy, Robert L; Dao, Sounkalo; Polis, Michael; Diallo, Souleymane; Timmins, Graham S; Dodd, Lori; Earl, Ashlee M; Bishai, William R

    2016-01-01

    Detection of bacterial urease activity has been utilized successfully to diagnose Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). While Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) also possesses an active urease, it is unknown whether detection of mycobacterial urease activity by oral urease breath test (UBT) can be exploited as a rapid point of care biomarker for tuberculosis (TB) in humans. We enrolled 34 individuals newly diagnosed with pulmonary TB and 46 healthy subjects in Bamako, Mali and performed oral UBT, mycobacterial sputum culture and H. pylori testing. Oral UBT had a sensitivity and specificity (95% CI) of 70% (46-88%) and 11% (3-26%), respectively, to diagnose culture-confirmed M. tuberculosis disease among patients without H. pylori, and 100% sensitivity (69-100%) and 11% specificity (3-26%) to diagnose H. pylori among patients without pulmonary TB. Stool microbiome analysis of controls without TB or H. pylori but with positive oral UBT detected high levels of non-H. pylori urease producing organisms, which likely explains the low specificity of oral UBT in this setting and in other reports of oral UBT studies in Africa.

  20. Stool microbiome reveals diverse bacterial ureases as confounders of oral urea breath testing for Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Bamako, Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiga, Mamoudou; Cohen, Keira; Baya, Bocar; Srikrishna, Geetha; Siddiqui, Sophia; Sanogo, Moumine; Somboro, Anou M; Diarra, Bassirou; Diallo, Mariam H; Mazumdar, Varun; Yoder, Christian; Orsega, Susan; Belson, Michael; Kassambara, Hamadoun; Goita, Drissa; Murphy, Robert L; Dao, Sounkalo; Polis, Michael; Diallo, Souleymane; Timmins, Graham S; Dodd, Lori; Earl, Ashlee M; Bishai, William R

    2016-01-01

    Detection of bacterial urease activity has been utilized successfully to diagnose Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). While Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) also possesses an active urease, it is unknown whether detection of mycobacterial urease activity by oral urease breath test (UBT) can be exploited as a rapid point of care biomarker for tuberculosis (TB) in humans. We enrolled 34 individuals newly diagnosed with pulmonary TB and 46 healthy subjects in Bamako, Mali and performed oral UBT, mycobacterial sputum culture and H. pylori testing. Oral UBT had a sensitivity and specificity (95% CI) of 70% (46-88%) and 11% (3-26%), respectively, to diagnose culture-confirmed M. tuberculosis disease among patients without H. pylori, and 100% sensitivity (69-100%) and 11% specificity (3-26%) to diagnose H. pylori among patients without pulmonary TB. Stool microbiome analysis of controls without TB or H. pylori but with positive oral UBT detected high levels of non-H. pylori urease producing organisms, which likely explains the low specificity of oral UBT in this setting and in other reports of oral UBT studies in Africa. PMID:27532494

  1. Breath odor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bad breath; Halitosis ... Some disorders will produce distinct breath odors. Bad breath related to poor oral hygiene is most common and caused by release of sulphur compounds by bacteria in the mouth. A fruity odor ...

  2. Breathing Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Discuss with your respiratory therapist the benefits of breathing techniques to increase ventilation and decrease your work of breathing Discuss with your physician appropriate use of respiratory ...

  3. 口臭患者14C呼气试验检测的结果分析%Analysis of 14C-Urea Breath Test in Patients with Halitosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建中; 张旭峰; 张斌; 李黎; 童妙春; 陈驰

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between halitosis and the infection of helicobacter pylori (HP). Methods The results of l4C-urea breath test of 59 normal people, 50 patients with halitosis only and 56 patients infected by both halitosis and digestive diseases were analyzed. Results It showed that the 14C content and HP positive rate in group infected by both halitosis and digestive diseases were much higher than that of halitosis only group and normal people group (P <0.05). Conclusion The infection of Helicobacter pylori is an important factor but not only factor of halitosis.%目的 探讨口臭与幽门螺旋杆菌及其它因素的关系.方法 对59名正常组、50例单纯口臭组患者、56例口臭伴消化道疾病组患者14C 呼气试验的结果进行分析.结果 分析结果表明,口臭伴消化道疾病组14C呼气试验含量明显高于单纯口臭组和正常组(P<0.05),阳性率也明显高于单纯口臭组和正常组(P<0.05).结论 幽门螺旋杆菌感染是口臭的重要原因,但不是唯一原因.

  4. The lichens, tritium and carbon 14 integrators; Les lichens, integrateurs de tritium et de carbone 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daillant, O

    2007-07-01

    The present report concerns a research for the tritium and for the carbon 14 in lichens in a spirit of bio-indication: the first results appear in Daillant and al (2004 ) and additional results were presented to the congress B.I.O.M.A.P. in Slovenia, organized collectively by the institute Josef Stefan from Ljubljana and the international atomic energy agency from Vienna (Daillant and al 2003). (N.C.)

  5. Removal of carbon-14 from irradiated graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Smith, Tara E.

    2014-08-01

    Approximately 250,000 tonnes of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide and that quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation IV gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. This situation indicates the need for a graphite waste management strategy. On of the isotopes of great concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 (14C), with a half-life of 5730 years. Study of irradiated graphite from some nuclear reactors indicates 14C is concentrated on the outer 5 mm of the graphite structure. The aim of the research presented here is to develop a practical method by which 14C can be removed. In parallel with these efforts, the same irradiated graphite material is being characterized to identify the chemical form of 14C in irradiated graphite. A nuclear-grade graphite, NBG-18, and a high-surface-area graphite foam, POCOFoam®, were exposed to liquid nitrogen (to increase the quantity of 14C precursor) and neutron-irradiated (1013 neutrons/cm2/s). During post-irradiation thermal treatment, graphite samples were heated in the presence of an inert carrier gas (with or without the addition of an oxidant gas), which carries off gaseous products released during treatment. Graphite gasification occurs via interaction with adsorbed oxygen complexes. Experiments in argon only were performed at 900 °C and 1400 °C to evaluate the selective removal of 14C. Thermal treatment also was performed with the addition of 3 and 5 vol% oxygen at temperatures 700 °C and 1400 °C. Thermal treatment experiments were evaluated for the effective selective removal of 14C. Lower temperatures and oxygen levels correlated to more efficient 14C removal.

  6. Bad Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that get stuck between your teeth. Lots of people have bad breath at some point. Don’t worry! There are steps you can take to keep your mouth fresh and healthy. Tips for preventing bad breath: Brush your teeth ( ...

  7. Breath odor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... distinct breath odors. Bad breath related to poor oral hygiene is most common and caused by release of ... supplements? Do you smoke? What home care and oral hygiene measures have you tried? How effective are they? ...

  8. Breath sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causes of abnormal breath sounds may include: Acute bronchitis Asthma Bronchiectasis Chronic bronchitis Congestive heart failure Emphysema Interstitial lung disease Foreign body obstruction of the airway Pneumonia Pulmonary edema Tracheobronchitis

  9. Bad Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... garlic, onions, cheese, orange juice, and soda poor dental hygiene (say: HI-jeen), meaning not brushing and flossing regularly smoking and other tobacco use Poor oral hygiene leads to bad breath because when food particles ...

  10. Breathing difficulty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... getting enough air Considerations There is no standard definition for difficulty breathing. Some people feel breathless with ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  11. Evaluation of carbon-14 life cycle in reactors VVER-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is aimed at the evaluation of carbon-14 life cycle in light water reactors VVER-1000. Carbon-14 is generated as a side product in different systems of nuclear reactors and has been an issue not only in radioactive waste management but mainly in release into the environment in the form of gaseous effluents. The principal sources of this radionuclide are in primary cooling water and fuel. Considerable amount of C-14 is generated by neutron reactions with oxygen 17O and nitrogen 14N present in water coolant and fuel. The reaction likelihood and consequently volume of generated radioisotope depends on several factors, especially on the effective cross-section, concentrations of parent elements and conditions of power plant operating strategies. Due to its long half-life and high capability of integration into the environment and thus into the living species, it is very important to monitor the movement of carbon-14 in all systems of nuclear power plant and to manage its release out of NPP. The dominant forms of radioactive carbon-14 are the hydrocarbons owing to the combinations with hydrogen used for absorption of radiolytic oxygen. These organic compounds, such as formaldehyde, methyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol and formic acid can be mostly retained on ion exchange resins used in the system for purifying primary cooling water. The gaseous carbon compounds (CH4 and CO2) are released into the atmosphere via the ventilation systems of NPP. Based on the information and data obtained from different sources, it has been designed a balance model of possible carbon-14 pathways throughout the whole NPP. This model includes also mass balance model equations for each important node in system and available sampling points which will be the background for further calculations. This document is specifically not to intended to describe the best monitoring program attributes or technologies but rather to provide evaluation of obtained data and find the optimal way to upgrade

  12. How to breathe when you are short of breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursed lip breathing; COPD - pursed lip breathing; Emphysema - pursed lip breathing; Chronic bronchitis - pursed lip breathing; Pulmonary fibrosis - pursed lip breathing; Interstitial lung disease - pursed lip breathing; Hypoxia - pursed lip breathing; ...

  13. Radiative Neutron Capture on Carbon-14 in Effective Field Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Rupak, Gautam; Fernando, Lakma; Vaghani, Akshay

    2012-01-01

    The cross section for radiative capture of neutron on carbon-14 is calculated using the model-independent formalism of halo effective field theory. The dominant contribution from E1 transition is considered, and the cross section is expressed in terms of elastic scattering parameters of the effective range expansion. Contributions from both resonant and non-resonant interaction are calculated. Significant interference between these leads to a capture contribution that deviates from simple Bre...

  14. Breathing and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... related breathing difficulties. Learn some ways to control breathing and some techniques to help you reach a greater level of relaxation during your day: Diaphragmatic Breathing Minimizing Shortness of Breath Instant Relaxation Drill Meditation ...

  15. Differential monitoring of tritium and carbon-14 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gaseous sampling system was developed to differentially collect all major volatile forms of tritium and carbon-14 according to chemical class. These chemical forms include: tritiated forms of water, hydrogen and organics; as well as 14C-containing carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and organics. Sampling campaigns involving the use of this differential 3H and 14C collection system have been successfully conducted at a high level liquid waste solidification plant, at a spent fuel storage facility and in the vicinity of power reactors

  16. An application discussion of 14C urea breathing test (UBT) examination H. pylori infection in senile disease diagnosis%14C尿素呼气试验检测幽门螺杆菌感染在老年人疾病诊断中的应用探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关小红

    2005-01-01

    目的:探讨14C尿素呼气试验(urea breath test,UBT)检测幽门螺杆菌(H.pylori)感染在老年人消化道疾病、急性冠脉综合征(ACS)诊断中的意义.方法:用自身对照的方法比较30例消化道疾病患者内镜活检快速尿素酶试验H.pylori阳性与UBT阳性、血清学阳性情况,20例血清学H.pylori抗体阳性的ACS患者与UBT、内镜阳性情况.结果:消化道疾病组内镜活检H.pylori阳性者做UBT的阳性率为93%,血清学阳性95%,血清学H.pylori阳性的ACS者做UBT的阳性率为50%,不稳定心绞痛者症状消失10 d后查内镜H.pylori阳性率为42%.结论:用UBT诊断老年人与H.pylori感染有关的疾病安全可靠.

  17. Progressive extraction method applied to isotopic exchange of carbon-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic exchange in natural settings is essentially an irreversible process, so that it progresses continuously until there is complete isotopic equilibrium. In soils, this process involves interaction between isotopes in the liquid and solid phases, and complete isotopic equilibrium may take a very long time. Measurements after partial isotopic exchange have been used to characterize the labile fraction of elements in soils. We describe a method to characterize the extent of isotopic exchange, with application here to incorporation of inorganic carbon-14 (14C) into mineral carbonates and organic matter in soils. The procedure uses a continuous addition of extractant, acid, or H2O2in the examples presented here, coupled with sequential sampling. The method has been applied to demonstrate the degree of isotopic exchange in soil. The same strategy could be applied to many other elements, including plant nutrients. (author)

  18. A detective from the past called carbon 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis is carried out using Radiometry or Accelerator mass spectrometry. After the system allowing to date the age of any organic rest - whether a fossil, a wood fragment, a parchment or a seed - is an isotope called carbon-14. An atom that comes from reactions nuclear produced in the atmosphere and cosmic-ray-induced they interact with oxygen to form carbon dioxide. This element they absorb it plants in photosynthesis and then passes to the animals remained almost unchanged during the life of the organism. to the meet the initial ratio of c-14 that had been in the atmosphere before his death, the remains that are left in it determine the elapsed time. (Author)

  19. A simple breath test for fat malabsorption in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metabolic pathway of 14C-labeled oleic acid leads to the formation and the breath excretion of 14CO2. This behavior can be used for measuring lipid absorption. The simple, accurate screening test includes the ingestion of 14C-labeled triolein and the intermittent collection of breath 14CO2 in a trapping solution. The results are strongly correlated to the measurement of fecal fat. The use of carbon-14 in man should not be restricted, provided the labeled substrates are converted into rapidly excreted metabolites

  20. Breath alcohol test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcohol test - breath ... There are various brands of breath alcohol tests. Each one uses a different method to test the level of alcohol in the breath. The machine may be electronic or manual. One ...

  1. What Controls Your Breathing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To a limited degree, you can change your breathing rate, such as by breathing faster or holding your ... oxygen levels in your blood and change your breathing rate as needed. Sensors in the airways detect lung ...

  2. Urea metabolism in Barbari kids d on urea molasses diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The entry rates of urea into the body pool of urea were estimated in Barbari kids using a single injection isotope dilution technique using 14C-urea. The excretion rates of urea were calculated by estimating total urine output over 24 h and urea content. (M.G.B.)

  3. Breathing difficulty - lying down

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea; PND; Difficulty breathing while lying down; Orthopnea ... does not directly cause difficulty breathing while lying down but often worsens other conditions that lead to ...

  4. Optoacoustic 13C-breath test analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harde, Hermann; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    The composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflects the physical ability of a patient. Therefore, a breath analysis allows to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that employs a compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy. It consists of two identical photoacoustic cells containing two breath samples, one taken before and one after capturing an isotope-marked substrate, where the most common isotope 12C is replaced to a large extent by 13C. The analyzer measures simultaneously the relative CO2 isotopologue concentrations in both samples by exciting the molecules on specially selected absorption lines with a semiconductor laser operating at a wavelength of 2.744 μm. For a reliable diagnosis changes of the 13CO2 concentration of 1% in the exhaled breath have to be detected at a concentration level of this isotope in the breath of about 500 ppm.

  5. Living with urea stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laishram R Singh; Tanveer Ali Dar; Faizan Ahmad

    2009-06-01

    Intracellular organic osmolytes are present in certain organisms adapted to harsh environments. These osmolytes protect intracellular macromolecules against denaturing environmental stress. In contrast to the usually benign effects of most organic osmolytes, the waste product urea is a well-known perturbant of macromolecules. Although urea is a perturbing solute which inhibits enzyme activity and stability, it is employed by some species as a major osmolyte. The answer to this paradox was believed to be the discovery of protective osmolytes (methylamines). We review the current state of knowledge on the various ways of counteracting the harmful effects of urea in nature and the mechanisms for this. This review ends with the mechanistic idea that cellular salt (KCl/NaCl) plays a crucial role in counteracting the effects of urea, either by inducing required chaperones or methylamines, or by thermodynamic interactions with urea-destabilised proteins. We also propose future opportunities and challenges in the field.

  6. Synthesis of carbon-14 labelled indolic 5HT{sub 1} receptor agonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterhouse, Ian; Cable, K.M.; Fellows, Ian; Wipperman, M.D.; Sutherland, D.R. [Glaxo Wellcome Research and Development, Stevenage (United Kingdom). Isotope Chemistry Unit

    1996-11-01

    Syntheses of carbon-14 labelled versions of indolic 5HT{sub 1} agonists sumatriptan (GR43175), GR40370 and naratriptan (GR85548) are described. Introduction of the label via cyanation of ketoformanilides, formed by oxidative cleavage of an indole ring, ensured incorporation of carbon-14 at the metabolically stable C-2 position of the indole. (author).

  7. 13C-urea and15N2-urea : Elegant markers to define location and kinetics of in vivo release from a colon-targeted delivery device in men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, R.C.A.; Olsder, G.; Maurer, M.; Kosterink, J.; Woerdenbach, H.J.; Wutzke, K.D.; Frijlink, H.W.; Stellaard, F.

    2010-01-01

    Background:13C-urea may be a suitable marker to assess the in vivo fate of colon-targeted dosage forms given by mouth. Release in the colon would lead to fermentation of13C-urea into13CO2and excretion of13CO2in breath, release in the small intestine to detection of13C-urea in blood and urine. The di

  8. Effect of industrial fuel combustion on the carbon-14 level of atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As was previously noticed in 1953 by SUESS, the radiocarbon content of atmospheric CO2 was slightly lower in the 20th century (before the increase in the carbon-14 level due to the addition of artificial 14C) than at the time before the beginning of the industrial revolution in the 19th century. An exact knowledge of the magnitude of this effect is of interest in connection with the question of the rate of isotope exchange between atmospheric CO2 and the bicarbonates of the oceans. However, the radiocarbon level in the CO2 of the atmosphere is also subject to natural fluctuations caused by a variable cosmic-ray production rate of carbon-14. To investigate this the authors have cross-correlated sunspot numbers (as indicators of cosmic-ray activity) with the carbon-14 level in wood, and have detected a significant coherence between the two time series. The observed coherence permits an extrapolation of the natural carbon-14 values beyond the time of the beginning of artificial combustion of fossil fuel, around 1880. The results show that the observed small decrease in the carbon-14 level is somewhat affected by the increase of the production rate of carbon-14, as a consequence of relatively low solar activity during the preceding decades. The effect of industrial fuel combustion upon the carbon-14 level of the atmosphere can then be estimated for the Northern Hemisphere to be in the vicinity of -3%. (author)

  9. Use of polyurea from urea for coating of urea granules

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Panfang; Zhang, Yanfei; Jia, Cong; Li, Yufeng; Mao, Zhiquan

    2016-01-01

    A new type of controlled release fertilizers coated with polyurea was prepared. The granulated urea was firstly changed into a liquid urea by heating as the coating liquid. By spraying uniformly the urea was coated with the polyurea synthesized by the reaction of isocyanates with a liquid urea. The effects of different modifiers on N release characteristics of polyurea-coated urea (PCU) were studied. The morphology and chemical structure of PCU coating materials was investigated by SEM and FT...

  10. 14C-尿素呼吸试验检测消化专业医务人员HP感染及药物清除的观察%The Investigation of Prevalence of H. Pylori with 14 C-urea Breath Test and Therapeutic Effect in Digestive Staffs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨强; 方桢; 蔡丽; 艾津; 张克森

    2001-01-01

    目的:了解从事消化专业的医务人员HP感染情况及药物清除疗效。方法:14C-尿素呼吸试验检测天津 医大三所附属医院消化内镜工作者及相关人员25名的HP感染情况。应用法莫替丁,替硝唑,枸橼酸铋胺,三联2 周疗法对HP阳性者行根除治疗,同法检测根除疗效。结果:HP感染率为96%,高于文献报道普通人群的感染率。 14C-UBT放射活度测定值在医生组高于护技组,工作年限高于10年组高于短工作年限组。三联2周疗法HP根除 率为73.7%。结论:消化内镜工作人员对HP易感染,应注意对HP感染的预防。感染后药物根除治疗有效。%Objective:To investigate the prevalence of H. pylori (HP) and therapeutic effect in digestive staffs. Methods: The in fection of HP were detected in 25 digestive endoscopists and relative staffs using 14C-urea breath test (14 C-UBT). People with Hp positive infection were treated with famotidine, tinidazole, bismuth, and ammonium citrate for 2 weeks. Results: The rate of infection of Hp in endoseopists was 96% ,and was higher than that in regular people. The count ofdpm 14C- UBT was higher in doctor group than that in nurse and technician group,and it was higher in doctors with the experience more than 10 years than that with the experience less than 10 years. The rate of eradication against Hp with the treatment of famotidine, tinidazole,bismuth,and ammonium citrate for 2 weeks was 73.7 %. Conclusion: The endoseopists are sensitive to HP. Prevention from infection of-HP should be obtained for all endoscopists. Treatment of Hp infection with medicine is effective.

  11. What Causes Bad Breath?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth > For Teens > What Causes Bad Breath? Print A A A Text Size en español ¿Qué es lo que provoca el mal aliento? Bad breath, or halitosis , can be a major problem, especially ...

  12. Carbon-14 geochemistry at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Kimberly A.; Kaplan, Daniel I.

    2013-05-10

    Carbon-14 is among the key radionuclides driving risk at the E-Area Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Much of this calculated risk is believed to be the result of having to make conservative assumptions in risk calculations because of the lack of site-specific data. The original geochemical data package (Kaplan 2006) recommended that performance assessments and composite analyses for the SRS assume that {sup 14}C did not sorbed to sediments or cementitious materials, i.e., that C-14 K{sub d} value (solid:liquid concentration ratio) be set to 0 mL/g (Kaplan 2006). This recommendation was based primarily on the fact that no site-specific experimental work was available and the assumption that the interaction of anionic {sup 14}C as CO{sub 2}{sup 2-}) with similarly charged sediments or cementitious materials would be minimal. When used in reactive transport equations, the 0 mL/g Kd value results in {sup 14}C not interacting with the solid phase and moving quickly through the porous media at the same rate as water. The objective of this study was to quantify and understand how aqueous {sup 14}C, as dissolved carbonate, sorbs to and desorbs from SRS sediments and cementitious materials. Laboratory studies measuring the sorption of {sup 14}C, added as a carbonate, showed unequivocally that {sup 14}C-carbonate K{sub d} values were not equal to 0 mL/g for any of the solid phases tested, but they required several months to come to steady state. After six months of contact, the apparent K{sub d} values for a clayey sediment was 3,000 mL/g, for a sandy sediment was 10 mL/g, for a 36-year-old concrete was 30,000 mL/g, and for a reducing grout was 40 mL/g. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that (ad)sorption rates were appreciably faster than desorption rates, indicating that a kinetic sorption model, as opposed to the steady-state K{sub d} model, may be a more accurate description of the {sup 14}C-carbonate sorption process. A second study

  13. Report on Carbon-14 generation and release at some of the Hanford reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, G.B.

    1964-12-14

    The Hanford graphite-moderated reactors have an enclosed gas circulation system to maintain control of the composition of gas atmosphere in the graphite stack. This investigation was undertaken to answer several questions concerning the generation and release of Carbon-14 in the operation of these graphite moderated reactors. The principle question was: Will an increase in the nitrogen content of the reactor atmosphere increase the release of Carbon-14 sufficiently to create a health hazard. Other questions were: (1) What are the main sources and the main release routes. (2) How much does carbon-14 build up in the graphite in the reactor stack. and (3) Is the total release of carbon-14 to the atmosphere sufficient to enhance the /sup 14/C levels in the vegetation surrounding the reactors.

  14. Results of interagency effort to determine carbon-14 source term in low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary estimate of the risks from the shallow land disposal of low-level radioactive wastes by EPA in 1984-1985 indicated that Carbon-14 caused virtually all of the risk and that these risks were relatively high. Therefore, an informal interagency group, which included the US Department of Energy, US Geological Survey, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and US Environmental Protection Agency, formed in 1985 to obtain up-to-date information on the activity and chemical form of Carbon-14 in the different types of LLW and how Carbon-14 behaves after disposal. The EPA acted as a focal point for collating the information collected by all of the Agencies and will publish a report in Fall 1986 on the results of the Carbon-14 data collection effort. Of particular importance, the study showed that Carbon-14 activity in LLW was overestimated approximately 2000%. This paper summarizes results of the Carbon-14 data collection effort. 40 references, 1 figure, 3 tables

  15. Ethylated Urea - Ether - Modified Urea - Formaldehyde Resins,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Obichukwu EDOGA

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available First, phenol - formaldehyde (PF and urea - formaldehyde (UFII resins were separately conventionally prepared in our laboratory. Also, UF resin synthesized from the acid modified synthesis procedure was synthesized in a purely acid medium of pH 1.0, FU molar ratio of 1.0 and at 50oC (one-stage acid modified-synthesis procedure. Subsequently, the UF resin II was modified during synthesis by incorporating ethylated urea-ether (EUER (i.e. UFIII and glycerol (GLYC (i.e. UFV cured with and without acid curing agent. The structural and physicochemical analyses of the various resin samples were carried out.The results showed that the unmodified UF resin (UF II synthesized in acid medium of pH 1.0, F/U molar ratio 1.0, and at 50oC, cured in absence of acid curing catalyst, showed features in their spectra which are consistent with a tri-, and/or tetra-substituted urea in the reaction to give a 3 - dimensional network cured UF resin. Modification of the UF resin(UF II with ethylated urea-ether and glycerol to produce UF resins III and respectively V prominently increased the absorbance of methylene and ether groups in the spectra which are consistent with increased hydrophobicity and improved hydrolytic stability. For the conventional UF resin (UF I, the only clear distinction between spectra for the UF resin II and UF resins (III/V is the presence of diminished peaks for methylene groups at 2.2 ppm. The relationship between the logarithmic viscosity of cured PF resin with time showed continuos dependence of viscosity with time during cure up to 70 minutes. Similar trends were shown by UF resins (III/V, cured in absence of acid catalyst. In contrast, the conventional UF resins I and UF IV (i.e. UF II cured with NH4CL showed abrupt discontinuity in viscosity with time just after about 20 minutes of cure.

  16. Breathing difficulties - first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health conditions that may cause breathing problems are: Anemia (low red blood cell count) Asthma Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sometimes called emphysema or chronic bronchitis Heart ...

  17. Two dimensional model study of atmospheric transport using carbon-14 and strontium-90 as inert tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study tests the transport processes in the LLNL two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport model using recently reanalyzed carbon-14 and strontium-90 data. These radioactive tracers were produced bythe atmospheric nuclear bomb tests of 1952--58 and 1961--62, and they were measured at a few latitudes up to 35 kilometers over the period 1955--1970. Selected horizontal and vertical eddy diffusion coefficients were varied in the model to test their sensitivity to short and long term transpose of carbon-14. A sharp transition of Kzz and Kyy through the tropopause, as opposed to a slow transition between the same limiting values, shows a distinct improvement in the calculated carbon-14 distributions, a distinct improvement in the calculated seasonal and latitudinal distribution of ozone columns (relative to TOMS observations), and a very large difference in the calculated ozone reduction by a possible fleet of High Speed Civil Transports. Calculated northern hemisphere carbon-14 is more sensitive to variation of Kyy than are global ozone columns. Strontium-90 was used to test the LLNL tropopause height at four different latitudes. Starting with the 1960 background distribution of carbon-14, we calculate the input of carbon-14 as the sum of each nuclear test of the 1961--62 series, using two bomb-cloud rise models. With the Seitz bomb-rise formulation in the LLNL model, we find good agreement between calculated and observedcarbon-14 (with noticeable exceptions at the north polar tropopause and the short-term mid-latitude mid-stratosphere) between 1963 and 1970

  18. From breathing to respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitting, Jean-William

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of breathing remained an enigma for a long time. The Hippocratic school described breathing patterns but did not associate breathing with the lungs. Empedocles and Plato postulated that breathing was linked to the passage of air through pores of the skin. This was refuted by Aristotle who believed that the role of breathing was to cool the heart. In Alexandria, breakthroughs were accomplished in the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system. Later, Galen proposed an accurate description of the respiratory muscles and the mechanics of breathing. However, his heart-lung model was hampered by the traditional view of two non-communicating vascular systems - veins and arteries. After a period of stagnation in the Middle Ages, knowledge progressed with the discovery of pulmonary circulation. The comprehension of the purpose of breathing progressed by steps thanks to Boyle and Mayow among others, and culminated with the contribution of Priestley and the discovery of oxygen by Lavoisier. Only then was breathing recognized as fulfilling the purpose of respiration, or gas exchange. A century later, a controversy emerged concerning the active or passive transfer of oxygen from alveoli to the blood. August and Marie Krogh settled the dispute, showing that passive diffusion was sufficient to meet the oxygen needs. PMID:25532022

  19. Use of polyurea from urea for coating of urea granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Panfang; Zhang, Yanfei; Jia, Cong; Li, Yufeng; Mao, Zhiquan

    2016-01-01

    A new type of controlled release fertilizers coated with polyurea was prepared. The granulated urea was firstly changed into a liquid urea by heating as the coating liquid. By spraying uniformly the urea was coated with the polyurea synthesized by the reaction of isocyanates with a liquid urea. The effects of different modifiers on N release characteristics of polyurea-coated urea (PCU) were studied. The morphology and chemical structure of PCU coating materials was investigated by SEM and FTIR. We studied the nitrogen release characteristics of the PCU applied in both water and soil, and the biodegradability of PCU coating after buried in soil. The results showed that PCU reduced nitrogen release rate and exhibited excellent controlled release property. The PCU coating materials could biodegrade in soil. This indicated that the low cost PCU products from urea are expected to use in agricultural and horticultural applications. PMID:27119061

  20. The isotope breathe test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foundations of the breath diagnostic test, based on application of the carbon compounds, labeled with the stable (13C) or radioactive isotope are presented. The methodology for conducting the breath isotope test and the apparatuses, making it possible to determine under clinical conditions the isotope composition of the carbon, contained in the expired air, depending on the introduced tracer type, is briefly described. The safety of the method and prospects of its application are discussed. The examples of the breath isotope test practical application are presented

  1. Shortness-of-Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can lead to shortness of breath include anxiety, panic attacks, anemia and even constipation. The experience of shortness ... are used to treat patients with anxiety or panic attacks. Other commonly used drugs include bronchodilators to widen ...

  2. Take a Deep Breath

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Everyone involved in Beijing’s Olympic Games held their breath last week, not because of the city’s famously polluted air , but in anticipation of the results of an experiment that could help to clean it up.

  3. Sampling and monitoring of carbon-14 in gaseous effluents from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reviews the possibilities from sampling and monitoring C-14 in gaseous effluents from nuclear facilities. After oxidation of various forms of carbon-14 in the off-gas into CO2 three main processes for trapping are used either separately or in combination. These are sorption, freezing and chemical processes. Absorption in alkaline solutions or solids or molecular sieve adsorption are the most frequently used methods. The main counting methods used are gas proportional counting and liquid scintillation counting

  4. Carbon-14 production compared to oxygen isotope records from Camp Century, Greenland and Devon Island, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 production rate variations that are not explainable by geomagnetic changes are thought to be in antiphase with solar activity and as such should be in antiphase with paleotemperature records or proxy temperature histories such as those obtainable from oxygen isotope analyses of ice cores. Oxygen isotope records from Camp Century, Greeland and Devon Island Ice Cap are in phase with each other over thousands of years and in antiphase to the 14C production rate residuals. (Auth.)

  5. Carbon-14 immobilization via the CO2-Ba(OH)2 hydrate gas-solid reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although no restrictions have been placed on the release of carbon-14, it has been identified as a potential health hazard due to the ease in which it may be assimilated into the biosphere. The intent of the Carbon-14 Immobilization Program, funded through the Airborne Waste Program Management Office, is to develop and demonstrate a novel process for restricting off-gas releases of carbon-14 from various nuclear facilities. The process utilizes the CO2-Ba(OH)2 hydrate gas-solid reaction to directly remove and immobilize carbon-14. The reaction product, BaCO3, possesses both the thermal and chemical stability desired for long-term waste disposal. The process is capable of providing decontamination factors in excess of 1000 and reactant utilization of greater than 99% in the treatment of high volumetric, airlike (330 ppM CO2) gas streams. For the treatment of an air-based off-gas stream, the use of packed beds of Ba(OH)2.8H2O flakes to remove CO2 has been demonstrated. However, the operating conditions must be maintained between certain upper and lower limits with respect to the partial pressure of water. If the water vapor pressure in the gas is less than the dissociation vapor pressure of Ba(OH)2.8H2O, the bed will deactivate. If the vapor pressure is considerably greater, pressure drop problems will increase with increasing humidity as the particles curl and degrade. Results have indicated that when operated in the proper regime, the bulk of the increase in pressure drop results from the conversion of Ba(OH)2.8H2O to BaCO3 and not from the hydration of the commercial Ba(OH)2.8H2O (i.e. Ba(OH)2.7.50H2O) to Ba(OH)2.8H2O

  6. Breath by breath analysis of breathing pattern in health and disease: a potential outcome measure for breathing retraining?

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Wai

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of breathing pattern can quantify parameters of breathing such as rate, volume, timing and regularity/rhythmicity. This information can be useful to compare breathing patterns in those healthy and with disease, under different experiment conditions (such as rest versus activity) and to monitor changes over time. In this research, respiratory inductive plethysmography (RIP) was used to record breathing patterns in a group of healthy subjects and a group of severe asthma patients. ...

  7. Oronasal breathing during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibene, F; Mognoni, P; Lafortuna, C L; Mostardi, R

    1978-12-15

    The shift from nasal to oronasal breathing (ONBS) has been observed on 73 subjects with two independent methods. A first group of 63 subjects exercising on a bicycle ergometer at increasing work load (98--196 W) has been observed. On 35 subjects the highest value of ventilation attained with nasal breathing was 40.2 +/- 9.41 . min-1 S.D. Ten subjects breathed through the mouth at all loads, while 5 never opened the mouth. On 13 subjects it was not possible to make reliable measurements. On a second group of 10 subjects utilizing a different techniques which did not need a face mask, the ventilation at which one changes the pattern of breathing was found to be 44.2 +/- 13.51 . min-1 S.D. On the same subjects nasal resistance did not show any correlation with ONBS. It is concluded that ONBS is not solely determined by nasal resistance, though an indirect effect due to hypoventilation and hence to changes in alveolar air composition cannot be ruled out. It is likely that ONBS is also influenced by psychological factors. PMID:569826

  8. The Breath of Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josephsen, Jens

    The present preliminary text is a short thematic presentation in biological inorganic chemistry meant to illustrate general and inorganic (especially coordination) chemistry in biochemistry. The emphasis is on molecular models to explain features of the complicated mechanisms essential to breathing...

  9. Evaporation of urea at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Andreas M; Czekaj, Izabela; Elsener, Martin; Wokaun, Alexander; Kröcher, Oliver

    2011-03-31

    Aqueous urea solution is widely used as reducing agent in the selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) (SCR). Because reports of urea vapor at atmospheric pressure are rare, gaseous urea is usually neglected in computational models used for designing SCR systems. In this study, urea evaporation was investigated under flow reactor conditions, and a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum of gaseous urea was recorded at atmospheric pressure for the first time. The spectrum was compared to literature data under vacuum conditions and with theoretical spectra of monomolecular and dimeric urea in the gas phase calculated with the density functional theory (DFT) method. Comparison of the spectra indicates that urea vapor is in the monomolecular form at atmospheric pressure. The measured vapor pressure of urea agrees with the thermodynamic data obtained under vacuum reported in the literature. Our results indicate that considering gaseous urea will improve the computational modeling of urea SCR systems.

  10. Mountain scale modeling of transient, coupled gas flow, heat transfer and carbon-14 migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We simulate mountain-scale coupled heat transfer and gas flow at Yucca Mountain. A coupled rock-gas flow and heat transfer model, TGIF2, is used to simulate mountain-scale two-dimensional transient heat transfer and gas flow. The model is first verified against an analytical solution for the problem of an infinite horizontal layer of fluid heated from below. Our numerical results match very well with the analytical solution. Then, we obtain transient temperature and gas flow distributions inside the mountain. These distributions are used by a transient semianalytical particle tracker to obtain carbon-14 travel times for particles starting at different locations within the repository. Assuming that the repository is filled with 30-year-old waste at an initial areal power density of 57 kw/acre, we find that repository temperatures remain above 60 degrees C for more than 10,000 years. Carbon-14 travel times to the surface are mostly less than 1000 years, for particles starting at any time within the first 10,000 years

  11. Learn More Breathe Better

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-16

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a serious lung disease that makes breathing very difficult and can affect your quality of life. Learn the causes of COPD and what you can do to prevent it.  Created: 11/16/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adult and Community Health (NCCDPHP, DACH).   Date Released: 11/16/2011.

  12. Breath tests sustainability in hospital settings: cost analysis and reimbursement in the Italian National Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, M; Scaldaferri, F; Ojetti, V; Poscia, A

    2013-01-01

    The high demand of Breath Tests (BT) in many gastroenterological conditions in time of limited resources for health care systems, generates increased interest in cost analysis from the point of view of the delivery of services to better understand how use the money to generate value. This study aims to measure the cost of C13 Urea and other most utilized breath tests in order to describe key aspects of costs and reimbursements looking at the economic sustainability for the hospital. A hospital based cost-analysis of the main breath tests commonly delivery in an ambulatory setting is performed. Mean salary for professional nurses and gastroenterologists, drugs/preparation used and disposable materials, purchase and depreciation of the instrument and the testing time was used to estimate the cost, while reimbursements are based on the 2013 Italian National Health System ambulatory pricelist. Variables that could influence the model are considered in the sensitivity analyses. The mean cost for C13--Urea, Lactulose and Lactose BT are, respectively, Euros 30,59; 45,20 and 30,29. National reimbursement often doesn't cover the cost of the analysis, especially considering the scenario with lower number of exam. On the contrary, in high performance scenario all the reimbursement could cover the cost, except for the C13 Urea BT that is high influenced by the drugs cost. However, consideration about the difference between Italian Regional Health System ambulatory pricelist are done. Our analysis shows that while national reimbursement rates cover the costs of H2 breath testing, they do not cover sufficiently C13 BT, particularly urea breath test. The real economic strength of these non invasive tests should be considered in the overall organization of inpatient and outpatient clinic, accounting for complete diagnostic pathway for each gastrointestinal disease. PMID:24443075

  13. Anion-induced urea deprotonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiocchi, Massimo; Del Boca, Laura; Esteban-Gómez, David; Fabbrizzi, Luigi; Licchelli, Maurizio; Monzani, Enrico

    2005-05-01

    The urea-based receptor 1 (1-(7-nitrobenzo[1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)urea, L--H), interacts with X- ions in MeCN, according to two consecutive steps: 1) formation of a hydrogen-bond complex [L--H...X]-; 2) deprotonation of L--H to give L- and [HX2]-, as shown by spectrophotometric and 1H NMR titration experiments. Step 2) takes place with more basic anions (fluoride, carboxylates, dihydrogenphosphate), while less basic anions (Cl-, NO2-, NO3-) do not induce proton transfer. On crystallisation from a solution containing L--H and excess Bu4NF, the tetrabutylammonium salt of the deprotonated urea derivative (Bu4N[L]) was isolated and its crystal and molecular structure determined. PMID:15770711

  14. Breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer: comparison of free breathing gating with the breath-hold technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders N; Nøttrup, Trine Jakobi;

    2005-01-01

    , and to compare this respiratory technique with voluntary breath-hold. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 17 patients were CT-scanned during non-coached breathing manoeuvre including free breathing (FB), end-inspiration gating (IG), end-expiration gating (EG), deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and end-expiration breath...

  15. A detective from the past called carbon 14; Un detective del pasado llamado carbono 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trintan, R. M.

    2015-07-01

    The analysis is carried out using Radiometry or Accelerator mass spectrometry. After the system allowing to date the age of any organic rest - whether a fossil, a wood fragment, a parchment or a seed - is an isotope called carbon-14. An atom that comes from reactions nuclear produced in the atmosphere and cosmic-ray-induced they interact with oxygen to form carbon dioxide. This element they absorb it plants in photosynthesis and then passes to the animals remained almost unchanged during the life of the organism. to the meet the initial ratio of c-14 that had been in the atmosphere before his death, the remains that are left in it determine the elapsed time. (Author)

  16. Tritium- and carbon-14-contents of wines of different vintage from the northern and southern hemisphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon-14 and tritium radioactivity contents of up to 19 vintages of German and Southafrican wines were compared. A similar large dependence of the 14C- and of the 3H-activity in the German wine on the nuclear weapon tests of the years 1962/63 was found out. The radioactivity level is also 1977/78 still essentially higher than before 1950. The Southafrican wines have been influenced considerably less by nuclear explosions. The highest 3H-values were found in the vintage 1963 of the German wine with 5910 pCi/litre and in the vintage 1964 of the Southafrican wine with 510 pCi/litre. (orig.)

  17. Prise en compte du carbone 14 dans le modèle PASIM

    OpenAIRE

    Duclos, Etienne

    2010-01-01

    J'ai effectué mon stage de fin d'étude d'ingénieur ISIMA au sein de l'Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), dans l'Unité de Recherche sur l'Ecosystème Prairial (UREP). Mon stage a été effectué en collaboration avec l'Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN). J'ai été chargé d'ajouter la gestion du carbone 14 au sein de PaSim, modèle de simulation de prairie gérant déjà les flux de carbone et d'azote. Il m'a donc fallu faire la distinction, au...

  18. Atmospheric nuclear weapons test history narrated by carbon-14 in human teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons since 1945 caused a significant increase in the concentration of atmospheric 14C. The 14C concentration in plants that assimilate 14C directly by photosynthesis reflects the atmospheric 14C concentration. Carbon-14 is then transferred into the human body through the food chain. Based on animal experiments, the collagen in human teeth is metabolically inert after its formation. This implies that the collagen of each tooth retains the 14C concentration which reflects the 14C concentration in the blood at the time collagen metabolism ceased. The distribution of the 14C concentration in the collagen of teeth from subjects of various ages would follow a pattern similar to that shown by soft tissues. In this paper the authors elucidate the relationship between the number of nuclear weapon tests and the distribution of 14C concentration in teeth

  19. Photosynthesis and assimilate partitioning characteristics of the coconut palm as observed by carbon-14 labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique was developed on the use of carbon dioxide(carbon-14 labelled) rapid labelling of foliage and to ascertain photosynthesis and partitioning characteristics of labelled assimilate into other parts of the coconut palm. An eight-year-old Tall x Tall young coconut palm growing under field conditions at Bandirippuwa Estate and with six developing bunches , was selected for this study. The labelling was carried out on a bright sunny day and soil was at field capacity. Seventh leaf from the youngest open leaf was used for labelling with 5 mCi of sodium bi carbonate (Carbon-14 labelled). The results revealed that within 24 hours, 60% of the labelled assimilate was partitioned into other parts of the palm and at the end of the seventh day about 18% of the labelled assimilate still remained in the labelled leaf. Among the developing bunches fifth and sixth bunches from the youngest developing bunch received more labelled assimilate than young developing bunches above them. It was revealed that partitioning of assimilate into various ''sinks'' is determined by the developmental stage or activeness of the ''sink''. The proportion of C-14 labelled carbon assimilate, partitioned into developing bunches was substantially low compared to the total amount of labelled carbon fixed by the labelled leaf. Further, it was observed that partitioning of assimilated labelled carbon into the young leaves above, as well as the mature leaves below the labelled leaf. The complex vascular anatomy of the palms could be attributed to this pattern of partitioning of assimilates into upper and lower leaves from the labelled leaf

  20. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg

  1. Breath-by-breath measurement of particle deposition in the lung of spontaneously breathing rats

    OpenAIRE

    S. Karrasch; Eder, G.; Bolle, I.; Tsuda, A.; Schulz, H

    2009-01-01

    A number of deposition models for humans, as well as experimental animals, have been described. However, no breath-by-breath deposition measurement in rats has been reported to date. The objective of this study is to determine lung deposition of micrometer-sized particles as a function of breathing parameters in the adult rat lung. A new aerosol photometry system was designed to measure deposition of nonhygroscopic, 2-μm sebacate particles in anesthetized, intubated, and spontaneously breathi...

  2. Clinical utility of breath ammonia for evaluation of ammonia physiology in healthy and cirrhotic adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spacek, Lisa A; Mudalel, Matthew; Tittel, Frank; Risby, Terence H; Solga, Steven F

    2015-12-01

    Blood ammonia is routinely used in clinical settings to assess systemic ammonia in hepatic encephalopathy and urea cycle disorders. Despite its drawbacks, blood measurement is often used as a comparator in breath studies because it is a standard clinical test. We sought to evaluate sources of measurement error and potential clinical utility of breath ammonia compared to blood ammonia. We measured breath ammonia in real time by quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectrometry and blood ammonia in 10 healthy and 10 cirrhotic participants. Each participant contributed 5 breath samples and blood for ammonia measurement within 1 h. We calculated the coefficient of variation (CV) for 5 breath ammonia values, reported medians of healthy and cirrhotic participants, and used scatterplots to display breath and blood ammonia. For healthy participants, mean age was 22 years (±4), 70% were men, and body mass index (BMI) was 27 (±5). For cirrhotic participants, mean age was 61 years (±8), 60% were men, and BMI was 31 (±7). Median blood ammonia for healthy participants was within normal range, 10 μmol L(-1) (interquartile range (IQR), 3-18) versus 46 μmol L(-1) (IQR, 23-66) for cirrhotic participants. Median breath ammonia was 379 pmol mL(-1) CO2 (IQR, 265-765) for healthy versus 350 pmol mL(-1) CO2 (IQR, 180-1013) for cirrhotic participants. CV was 17  ±  6%. There remains an important unmet need in the evaluation of systemic ammonia, and breath measurement continues to demonstrate promise to fulfill this need. Given the many differences between breath and blood ammonia measurement, we examined biological explanations for our findings in healthy and cirrhotic participants. We conclude that based upon these preliminary data breath may offer clinically important information this is not provided by blood ammonia.

  3. A 20-minute breath test for helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we evaluated a simplified rapid 14C-urea breath test for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori. Fasting patients undergoing initial assessment for H. pylori drank 5 microCi of 14C-urea in 20 ml of water. Breath was collected at intervals for 30 min. Samples were counted in a beta-counter, and the results were expressed as counts per minute (cpm). In the same week, patients underwent endoscopy, and a blinded investigator examined biopsy samples of gastric mucosa by culture and histology for H. pylori. There were 49 H. pylori-negative (HP-) and 104 H. pylori-positive (HP+) patients in the study. HP+ patients expired a mean of 4398 cpm (SD 2468) per mmol CO2 in a sample taken 20 min after ingestion of the isotope. In contrast, HP--patients expired only 340 cpm (SD 196). If the mean +3 SD of HP- patients was used as a cutoff value, the 20-minute sample gave a sensitivity of 97% and a specificity of 100% for detecting H. pylori. The radiation exposure from this test is less than 1% of that received from an upper gastrointestinal series, and the short collection time makes it both convenient and cost effective

  4. FMWC Radar for Breath Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Lau Frejstrup; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    We report on the experimental demonstration of an FMCW radar operating in the 25.7 - 26.6 GHz range with a repetition rate of 500 sweeps per second. The radar is able to track the breathing rate of an adult human from a distance of 1 meter. The experiments have utilized a 50 second recording window...... to accurately track the breathing rate. The radar utilizes a saw tooth modulation format and a low latency receiver. A breath tracking radar is useful both in medical scenarios, diagnosing disorders such as sleep apnea, and for home use where the user can monitor its health. Breathing is a central part of every...... radar chip which, through the use of a simple modulation scheme, is able to measure the breathing rate of an adult human from a distance. A high frequency output makes sure that the radar cannot penetrate solid obstacles which is a wanted feature in private homes where people therefore cannot measure...

  5. Urea-Triazone N Characteristics and Uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Clapp

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Urea-triazone nitrogen (N is a stable solution resulting from a controlled reaction in aqueous medium of urea, formaldehyde, and ammonia which contains at least 25% total N. This N source contains no more than 40%, nor less than 5%, of total N from unreacted urea and not less that 40% from triazone. All other N shall be derived from water-soluble dissolved reaction products of the above reactants. It is a source of slowly available N. The rate of mineralization of urea-triazone is about 66% that of urea after 8 days when incorporated in a Munjor sandy loam. Ammonia volatilization losses of N applied as urea-triazone were about 41% of those from urea on a Cecil sandy loam in the first week after application. N leaching losses through saturated Yolo loam columns of urea-triazone were about two thirds that of urea or nitrate N. This N source has proven to be a safer and more effective material for direct application on plant foliage. Tomato growth was enhanced with foliar application of urea-triazone relative to that obtained from ammonium nitrate or urea. The stability of this N source from potential losses via ammonia volatilization and nitrate leaching when soil applied is also documented by results from university trials.

  6. Rapid shallow breathing index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A; Pillai, Lalitha V; Arabi, Yaseen M

    2016-01-01

    Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing index (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505

  7. Carbon-14 in waste packages for spent fuel in a tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 is produced naturally by cosmic ray neutrons in the upper atmosphere. It is also produced in nuclear reactors, in amounts much smaller than the global inventory. About one-third of this is released directly to the atmosphere, and the other two-thirds remains in the spent fuel. Both the Environmental Protection Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have established limits on release of the 14C in spent fuel. This is of particular concern for the proposed repository in tuff, because of the unsaturated conditions and the consequent possibility of gaseous transport of 14C as CO2. Existing measurements and calculations of the 14C inventory in spent fuel are reviewed. The physical distribution and chemical forms of the 14C are discussed. Available data on the release of 14C from spent fuel in aqueous solutions and in gaseous environments of air, nitrogen, and helium are reviewed. Projected 14C behavior in a tuff repository is described. It is concluded that 14C release measurements from spent fuel into moist air at temperatures both above and below the in situ boiling point of water as well as detailed transport calculations for the tuff geological environment will be needed to determine whether the 10CFR60 and 40CFR191 requirements can be met. 56 refs., 1 tab

  8. Carbon-14 transfer into rice plants from a continuous atmospheric source: observations and model predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 (14C) is one of the most important radionuclides from the perspective of dose estimation due to the nuclear fuel cycle. Ten years of monitoring data on 14C in airborne emissions, in atmospheric CO2 and in rice grain collected around the Tokai reprocessing plant (TRP) showed an insignificant radiological effect of the TRP-derived 14C on the public, but suggested a minor contribution of the TRP-derived 14C to atmospheric 14C concentrations, and an influence on 14C concentrations in rice grain at harvest. This paper also summarizes a modelling exercise (the so-called rice scenario of the IAEA's EMRAS program) in which 14C concentrations in air and rice predicted with various models using information on 14C discharge rates, meteorological conditions and so on were compared with observed concentrations. The modelling results showed that simple Gaussian plume models with different assumptions predict monthly averaged 14C concentrations in air well, even for near-field receptors, and also that specific activity and dynamic models were equally good for the prediction of inter-annual changes in 14C concentrations in rice grain. The scenario, however, offered little opportunity for comparing the predictive capabilities of these two types of models because the scenario involved a near-chronic release to the atmosphere. A scenario based on an episodic release and short-term, time-dependent observations is needed to establish the overall confidence in the predictions of environmental 14C models

  9. The history of ironware in Japan revealed by the AMS-carbon 14 age method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on the influence what the AMS-carbon 14 age method attains to the history of the iron in the Japanese Islands. The research team in National Museum of Japanese History makes a clear that the Yayoi period began in 10 Cen. cal BC. However, there was a problem in this. It is iron. If the Yayoi period has started in the 10th Cen. BC, it means that the ironware in Japanese Islands had spread early rather than it spreads in China. The research team reexamined the ironware excavated from Magarita site in the Fukuoka Pref. considered to be the oldest ironware in Japan. Consequently, the excavation situation was indefinite and it turned out that we cannot specify the time to belong. Furthermore, 36 ironwares in the initial and early Yayoi were also already found by that time cannot be specified except for two points. Therefore, it turned out that Japanese ironware appeared in the 3rd century of B.C. What does this mean? Although it had been thought that the beginning of agriculture in Japan and the appearance of ironware were simultaneous, it turned out that agriculture has appeared early about in 700 years. Therefore, it became clear that agriculture of Japan started at the Stone Age. (author)

  10. Almagate interference in breath test results for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Pons

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection by Helicobacter pylori is common and affects both genders at any age. The 13C-urea breath test is a widely used test for the diagnosis of this infection. However, multiple drugs used for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection symptoms have interactions with this breath test that generate false negative results. This observational study was to assess the potential interaction between almagate and the breath test. Methods: Thirty subjects on almagate therapy who underwent a breath test were included. If the result was negative, almagate was withdrawn for a month and the breath test was then repeated. Results: In general, 51.9 % of assessed subjects had a negative result after the first test, and 100 % of these also had a negative result after the second test. Conclusions: It was concluded that the use of almagate does not interfere in breath test results. These results provide a drug therapy option for the treatment of symptoms associated with Helicobacter pylori infection during the diagnostic process.

  11. Urea synthesis in patients with chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamberg, Ole; Sonne, J; Larsen, S;

    2001-01-01

    Up-regulation of urea synthesis by amino acids and dietary protein intake may be impaired in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) due to the reduced glucagon secretion. Conversely, urea synthesis may be increased as a result of the chronic inflammation. The aims of the study were to determine...... urea synthesis kinetics in CP patients in relation to glucagon secretion (study I) and during an increase in protein intake (study II)....

  12. Nutritional factors influencing milk urea in buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Proto

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Urea is the primary form in which N is excreted in ruminants. Milk urea (MU content was introduced as a means to monitor the efficiency of protein utilisation in dairy cattle (Baker et al., 1995; Roseler et al., 1993; Bertoni, 1995. In this study the effect of some nutrition factors on MU content in buffalo herds was analysed in order to examine the possibility that protein nutrition could be monitored by means of milk urea at herd level........

  13. Factors affecting carbon-14 activity of unsaturated zone CO2 and implications for groundwater dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Cameron; Cook, Peter G.; Harrington, Glenn A.; Meredith, Karina; Kipfer, Rolf

    2014-11-01

    Unsaturated zone processes may influence the carbon-14 (14C) activity of infiltrating groundwater and thus introduce error in derived groundwater residence times. However unsaturated zone 14C activities are rarely measured and there is little understanding of how they may vary spatially in a groundwater basin. In this study we measured 14C activity in unsaturated zone gas at five sites with different watertable depths (8.2-31.5 m) in the arid Ti Tree Basin, central Australia. We observed a relatively uniform decrease in 14C activity of unsaturated zone gas with depth at most sites, with variation in unsaturated zone depths leading to variation in 14C activities directly above the watertable at each site (ranging from 54 to 106 percent Modern Carbon (pMC)). Through modelling we show that the profiles are influenced by CO2 production at different depths from sources with different isotopic ratios, including production of ‘modern' CO2 in the root zone and production of ‘old' CO2 above the watertable. Scenario modelling showed that these processes are independent of recharge when recharge is low (0-10 mm y-1) but that higher recharge rates (>100 mm y-1) result in more advective transport of atmospheric CO2 to the watertable. The variation in 14C above the watertable was more sensitive to watertable depth and shallow and deep CO2 production rates. These findings offer insight into how unsaturated zone 14C activities may vary spatially and provide guidance as to when 14C depletion in unsaturated zone CO2 may become important for groundwater dating, particularly in arid settings.

  14. Urea and its formation in coelacanth liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G W; Brown, S G

    1967-02-01

    Urea occurs in liver of the coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae to the extent of about 1.7 percent by weight. It was determined quantitatively by reaction with 1-phenyl-1,2-propanedione-2-oxime (Archibald reagent) and by measurement of ammonia released upon treatment with urease. Arginase and ornithine carbamoyltransferase, enzymes instrumental in the formation of urea in typical ureotelic vertebrates, occur in homogenates of coelacanth liver. Formed in part by the ornithine-urea cycle, urea may have an osmoregulatory function in the coelacanth as it has in elasmobranchs.

  15. [Urea formation in the after operational liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savilov, P N

    2016-01-01

    The effect of resection of the left lobe of the liver (LR, 15-20% og the organ weight) on hepatic urea formation was investigated in 84 albino rats. The objects of study were the surgery left (LLP), inoperable middle (MLP) lobe of the liver, blood (aorta, v. hepatica, v. porta) and choledochal bile. They studied the urea content. Arginase activity was examined in liver homogenate. On the day 3 and day 7 after resection reduced arginase activity was detected. LR caused a decrease of urea in v. hepatica, but increased urea content in the arterial blood and v. porta. Increase in bile urea on day 7 it was replaced by a decrease observed on day 14 of the postsurgery period. The concentration of urea in the liver on the 3rd day after LR was below the norm, and on the 7th and 14th day was within it. The results indicate a violation of urea operated by hepatocytes of the liver and extrahepatic activation mechanisms of the formation of urea.

  16. 21 CFR 184.1923 - Urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Urea. 184.1923 Section 184.1923 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1923 Urea....

  17. 40 CFR 721.9892 - Alkylated urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkylated urea. 721.9892 Section 721.9892 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9892 Alkylated urea. (a) Chemical...

  18. Communicating hope with one breath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D. Edwards

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The central thesis of this article was that the phenomenon of hope involves states and stages of consciousness development, which can be enhanced through breath control, meditation, prayer and related practices that have formed the essence of various spiritual healing traditions for millennia. In particular, it was argued that breath control can provide a vital foundation for consciousness transformation and the development of hope. Whilst breath control alone may lead to a state of pure, transcendent and/or cosmic consciousness, the practical theological implications are that its effect of enhancing states and stages of consciousness may be anchored and amplified. This process can take place through further contemplative and intercessory meditation, prayer and related behaviour and will differ between people, groups, contexts, religious and/or spiritual traditions. A particular method of breath control called One Breath, which is associated with pure consciousness and the experience of hope was described. Such an experience typically leads to further spiritual practice, healing and transformation. It was concluded that such ongoing spiritual practice is crucial for improving consciousness development, healing and hope for individuals, societies, planet Earth and the cosmos.

  19. Photoacoustic sensor for VOCs: first step towards a lung cancer breath test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Marcus; Groninga, Hinrich G.; Dressler, Matthias; Harde, Hermann

    2005-08-01

    Development of new optical sensor technologies has a major impact on the progression of diagnostic methods. Specifically, the optical analysis of breath is an extraordinarily promising technique. Spectroscopic sensors for the non-invasive 13C-breath tests (the Urea Breath Test for detection of Helicobacter pylori is most prominent) are meanwhile well established. However, recent research and development go beyond gastroenterological applications. Sensitive and selective detection of certain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a patient's breath, could enable the diagnosis of diseases that are very difficult to diagnose with contemporary techniques. For instance, an appropriate VOC biomarker for early-stage bronchial carcinoma (lung cancer) is n-butane (C4H10). We present a new optical detection scheme for VOCs that employs an especially compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS). This method makes use of the transformation of absorbed modulated radiation into a sound wave. Employing a wavelength-modulated distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser and taking advantage of acoustical resonances of the sample cell, we performed very sensitive and selective measurements on butane. A detection limit for butane in air in the ppb range was achieved. In subsequent research the sensitivity will be successively improved to match the requirements of the medical application. Upon optimization, our photoacoustic sensor has the potential to enable future breath tests for early-stage lung cancer diagnostics.

  20. Breath Ketone Testing: A New Biomarker for Diagnosis and Therapeutic Monitoring of Diabetic Ketosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Qiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acetone, β-hydroxybutyric acid, and acetoacetic acid are three types of ketone body that may be found in the breath, blood, and urine. Detecting altered concentrations of ketones in the breath, blood, and urine is crucial for the diagnosis and treatment of diabetic ketosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the advantages of different detection methods for ketones, and to establish whether detection of the concentration of ketones in the breath is an effective and practical technique. Methods. We measured the concentrations of acetone in the breath using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and β-hydroxybutyrate in fingertip blood collected from 99 patients with diabetes assigned to groups 1 (−, 2 (±, 3 (+, 4 (++, or 5 (+++ according to urinary ketone concentrations. Results. There were strong relationships between fasting blood glucose, age, and diabetic ketosis. Exhaled acetone concentration significantly correlated with concentrations of fasting blood glucose, ketones in the blood and urine, LDL-C, creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen. Conclusions. Breath testing for ketones has a high sensitivity and specificity and appears to be a noninvasive, convenient, and repeatable method for the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of diabetic ketosis.

  1. Taking a deep breath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Zacharias

    2012-12-01

    be paid to language revision and reference citation. Together with its authors and readers, IJHDR contributes to the development of a kind of knowledge close to the borders of science. Therefore, to establish a valid scientific background, the articles must be clearly written, and based on sound assumptions. High-visibility for articles is a fundamental aspect desired by all authors. As an open and free access journal, IJHDR meets that condition, and we are planning to make our influence and visibility even wider. Inclusion in the major databases has paramount importance in the academic milieu, however, it should be considered as a consequence, rather than a goal. In 2013, IJHDR will chair a collaborative project with several research institutions aiming to deliver information everywhere, increasing the visibility of the published articles. Thus, now it is the time to take a deep breath, relax, and prepare you for the forthcoming work! See you in 2013!

  2. Radiobiological half-lives for carbon-14 and hydrogen-3 leucine in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo estimates of protein metabolism in many are often made by oral or intravenous administration of leucine or its ∼-ketoacid, ∼-ketoisocaproate, labeled with 14C or 3H. Previous estimates of radiation dose from such tracers have been based on the measurement of 14CO2 in breath. Using measurements of the decay of 3H or 14C leucine from plasma proteins, longer biological half-lives for these compounds were obtained. The estimated total-body radiation absorbed dose is 0.97 mrad/uCi for [1-14C]KIC (or [1-14C]leucine) and 0.11 mrad/+Ci for ]4,5-3H]leucine (or [3H]KIC). Assuming administered doses of 100 μCi each, the total-body radiation absorbed dose is still well within the limits set by the FDA for Radioactive Drug Research Committees. 12 references, 3 figures, 3 tables

  3. Ammonia volatilization from coated urea forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antonio Costa do Nascimento

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen fertilization is a major component of the cost of agricultural production, due to the high cost and low efficiency of fertilizers. In the case of urea, the low efficiency is mainly due to losses by volatilization, which are more pronounced in cultivation systems in which plant residues are left on the soil. The objective of this work was to compare the influence of urea coated with sulfur or boric acid and copper sulfate with conventional N fertilizers on N volatilization losses in sugar cane harvested after stubble burning. The sources urea, sulfur-coated urea, urea coated with boric acid and copper sulfate, as well as nitrate and ammonium sulfate, were tested at amounts containing N rates of 120 kg ha-1 N. The integration of new technologies in urea fertilization can reduce N losses by volatilization. These losses were most reduced when using nitrate and ammonium sulfate. The application of a readily acidified substance (boric acid to urea was more efficient in reducing volatilization losses and nutrient removal by sugar cane than that of a substance with gradual acidification (elemental sulfur.

  4. Dissolved Organic Carbon 14C in Southern Nevada Groundwater and Implications for Groundwater Travel Times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Ronald L.; Fereday, Wyall; Thomas, James M

    2016-08-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) carbon-14 (14C) ages must be corrected for complex chemical and physical reactions and processes that change the amount of 14C in groundwater as it flows from recharge to downgradient areas. Because of these reactions, DIC 14C can produce unrealistically old ages and long groundwater travel times that may, or may not, agree with travel times estimated by other methods. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 14C ages are often younger than DIC 14C ages because there are few chemical reactions or physical processes that change the amount of DOC 14C in groundwater. However, there are several issues that create uncertainty in DOC 14C groundwater ages including limited knowledge of the initial (A0) DOC 14C in groundwater recharge and potential changes in DOC composition as water moves through an aquifer. This study examines these issues by quantifying A0 DOC 14C in recharge areas of southern Nevada groundwater flow systems and by evaluating changes in DOC composition as water flows from recharge areas to downgradient areas. The effect of these processes on DOC 14C groundwater ages is evaluated and DOC and DIC 14C ages are then compared along several southern Nevada groundwater flow paths. Twenty-seven groundwater samples were collected from springs and wells in southern Nevada in upgradient, midgradient, and downgradient locations. DOC 14C for upgradient samples ranged from 96 to 120 percent modern carbon (pmc) with an average of 106 pmc, verifying modern DOC 14C ages in recharge areas, which decreases uncertainty in DOC 14C A0 values, groundwater ages, and travel times. The HPLC spectra of groundwater along a flow path in the Spring Mountains show the same general pattern indicating that the DOC compound composition does not change along this flow path. Although DOC concentration decreases from recharge-area to downgradient groundwater, the organic compounds are similar, indicating that DOC 14C is unaffected by other processes such as microbial

  5. Validation test for carbon-14 migration and accumulation in a Canadian shield lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This particular BIOMOVS II Technical Report is concerned with modelling the transfer of C-14 through the aquatic food chain following release to a Canadian shield lake. Model performance has been tested against field data supplied by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Carbon-14 was added in 1978 to the epilimnion of a small Canadian Shield lake to investigate primary production and carbon dynamics. Data from this experiment were used within BIOMOVS II to provide a validation test, which involved modelling the fate of the C-14 added to the lake. The nature of the spike and the subsequent monitoring allowed the investigation of both short-term processes relevant to evaluation of the impacts of accidental releases as well as longer-term processes relevant to routine release and to solid waste disposal. Four models participated in the scenario: 1) a simple mass balance model of a lake (AECL, Whiteshell Laboratories, Canada); 2) a relatively complex deterministic dynamic compartment model (QuantiSci Ltd.,UK); 3) a complex deterministic model (Studsvik Model A) and a more complex probabilistic model (Studsvik Model B; Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Sweden). Endpoints were C-14 concentrations in water, sediment and whitefish over a thirteen year period. Each model produced reasonable predictions when compared to the observed data and when uncertainty is taken into consideration. About 0.2 to 0.4% of the initial C-14 inventory to the lakes remained in the water at the end of the study, because of internal recycling of C-14 from sediments. The simple AECL model did not account for this internal recycling of C-14 and, in this respect, its predictions were not as realistic as those of the QuantiSci and Studsvik models for concentrations in water. However, the AECL model predictions for the C-14 inventory remaining in lake sediment were closest to the observed values. Overall, Studsvik Model B was the most accurate in simulating C-14 concentrations in water and in whitefish, but

  6. Multiphase Carbon-14 Transport in a Near-Field-Scale Unsaturated Column of Natural Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. T. Fox; Mitchell A. Plummer; Larry C. Hull; D. Craig Cooper

    2004-03-01

    Wastes buried at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory include activated metals that release radioactive carbon-14 (14C) as they corrode. To better understand 14C phase partitioning and transport in the SDA sediments, we conducted a series of transport experiments using 14C (radio-labeled sodium carbonate) and nonreactive gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and aqueous (bromide and tritiated water) tracers in a large (2.6-m high by 0.9-m diameter) column of sediments similar to those used as cover material at the SDA. We established steady-state unsaturated flow prior to injecting tracers into the column. Tracer migration was monitored using pore-water and pore-gas samples taken from co-located suction lysimeters and gas ports inserted at ~0.3-m intervals along the column’s length. Measurements of 14C discharged from the sediment to the atmosphere (i.e., 14CO2 flux) indicate a positive correlation between CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in the column and changes in 14CO2 flux. Though 14CO2 diffusion is expected to be independent of pCO2, changes of pCO2 affect pore water chemistry sufficiently to affect aqueous/gas phase 14C partitioning and consequently 14C2 flux. Pore-water and -gas 14C activity measurements provide an average aqueous/gas partitioning ratio, Kag, of 4.5 (±0.3). This value is consistent with that calculated using standard carbonate equilibrium expressions with measured pH, suggesting the ability to estimate Kag from carbonate equilibrium. One year after the 14C injection, the column was cored and solid-phase 14C activity was measured. The average aqueous/solid partition coefficient, Kd, (1.6 L kg-1) was consistent with those derived from small-scale and short-term batch and column experiments using SDA sediments, suggesting that bench-scale measurements are a valid means of estimating aqueous/solid partitioning at the much larger spatial scale considered in these meso-scale experiments. However

  7. Preliminary study of the impact of tritium and carbon 14 releases from the Saint-Alban nuclear power plant. CRIIRAD N.04-20 V1 Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having recalled the results of previous studies on the radioactivity in surface water and land environments, and outlined the need of an investigation of the tritium and carbon 14 contamination, this report defines the objectives of this investigation, the adopted methodology (choice of plants, tritium and carbon 14 dose measurements, and sampling to study time variations). It recalls some aspects of tritium and carbon 14 releases (production of radionuclides, origins of emissions in the environment, assessments by EDF). It reports the investigation and the assessment of tritium activity in a land environment and in rain waters about the investigated site, and the investigation and the assessment of carbon 14 activity within the same environment. It reports preliminary results concerning the aquatic environment

  8. Practice makes perfect, even for breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, Jack L.; Kam, Kaiwen; Janczewski, Wiktor A.

    2009-01-01

    Breathing relies on a respiratory rhythm generator. A study characterizes an early emerging oscillatory group of Phox2b-expressing parafacial cells that entrain and couple with the preBötzinger Complex at the onset of fetal breathing.

  9. Ammonia and urea permeability of mammalian aquaporins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Søgaard, Rikke; Zeuthen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The human aquaporins,AQP3,AQP7, AQP8,AQP9, and possibly AQP10, are permeable to ammonia, and AQP7, AQP9, and possibly AQP3, are permeable to urea. In humans, these aquaporins supplement the ammonia transport of the Rhesus (Rh) proteins and the urea transporters (UTs). The mechanism by which...... and 9 are found together with Rh proteins in cells exposed to portal blood coming from the intestine. In the kidney, AQP3 might participate in the excretion of NH(4) (+) in the collecting duct. The interplay between the ammonia-permeable aquaporins and the other types of ammonia- and urea...

  10. Effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.H. Florenzano

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates (aqueous and reversed micelles, vesicles and monolayers was investigated to obtain insights into the effect of the denaturant on structured macromolecules. Direct evidence obtained from light scattering (static and dynamic, monolayer maximum isothermal compression and ionic conductivity measurements, together with indirect evidence from fluorescence photodissociation, fluorescence suppression, and thermal reactions, strongly indicates the direct interaction mechanism of urea with the aggregates. Preferential solvation of the surfactant headgroups by urea results in an increase in the monomer dissociation degree (when applied, which leads to an increase in the area per headgroup and also in the loss of counterion affinities

  11. Effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florenzano, F H; Politi, M J

    1997-02-01

    The effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates (aqueous and reversed micelles, vesicles and monolayers) was investigated to obtain insights into the effect of the denaturant on structured macromolecules. Direct evidence obtained from light scattering (static and dynamic), monolayer maximum isothermal compression and ionic conductivity measurements, together with indirect evidence from fluorescence photodissociation, fluorescence suppression, and thermal reactions, strongly indicates the direct interaction mechanism of urea with the aggregates. Preferential solvation of the surfactant headgroups by urea results in an increase in the monomer dissociation degree (when applied), which leads to an increase in the area per headgroup and also in the loss of counterion affinities. PMID:9239302

  12. Detection of Helicobacter pylori infection by examination of human breath odor using electronic nose Bloodhound-214ST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnayder, E. P.; Moshkin, M. P.; Petrovskii, D. V.; Shevela, A. I.; Babko, A. N.; Kulikov, V. G.

    2009-05-01

    Our aim was to examine the possibility of use e-nose Bloodhound-214ST to determine presence or absence of H. pylori infection using exhalation samples of patients. Breath samples were collected twice: at baseline and after oral administration of 500 mg of urea. H. pylori status of patients was confirmed by antral biopsy. Using two approaches for the data analysis we showed the possibility to distinguish H. pylori free and infected patients.

  13. Regulation of Breathing under Different Pulmonary Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Rieger-Fackeldey, Esther

    2004-01-01

    The breathing pattern of preterm infants is immature and is associated with a variety of reflexes. In a patient on the ventilator these reflexes interfere with spontaneous breathing. A better understanding of the immature control of breathing could lead to further improvements in ventilatory techniques. This thesis concerns studies of pulmonary stretch receptor (PSR) and phrenic nerve activity as part of the regulation of breathing in an animal model. During assist/control ventilation with th...

  14. Where c-14 urea breath tests lie in nuclear medicine. The detection of H pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the early 20th century, ulcers have been believed to be caused by stress and dietary factors. Treatment had focussed on hospitalisation, bed rest, and prescription of special bland foods. Later on, gastric acid was blamed for ulcer disease. Antacids and medication that block acid production became the standard of therapy. Despite this treatment, there seemed to be a high recurrence of ulcers. In 1982 a pair of Australian physicians Robin Warren and Barry Marshall were first to identify a link between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and ulcers, concluding that bacterium, not stress or diet, causes ulcers. However, the medical community was slow to accept their findings. It was not until 1994 that a Health Consensus Development Conference concluded that there was a strong association between H. pylori and ulcer diseases also recommending ulcer patients with H. pylori infection be treated with antibiotics. The paper discusses several tests, which have become available to medical staff in the detection of H. pylori. Sensitivity, specificity, relatively inexpensive ease of use and patient compliance are factors of a good diagnostic test. Copyright (2000) ANZ Nuclear Medicine

  15. Breath hydrogen test and sucrase isomaltase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, R P; Barnes, G L

    1983-01-01

    Sucrose breath hydrogen tests were performed on 7 children with proved sucrase isomaltase deficiency. All children had raised breath hydrogen excretion. The amount of hydrogen produced and symptoms experienced increased with increasing sucrose loads. The sucrose breath hydrogen test appears to be a reliable indicator of sucrose malabsorption in sucrase isomaltase deficiency.

  16. The present status of carbon 14 analysis and projects for beryllium 10 analysis at the Tandetron 1 accelerator, Nagoya University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Toshio; Oda, Hirotaka; Ikeda, Akiko; Niu, Etsuko [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    The operation experience in 1999 of the Tandetron accelerator age estimation system, Nagoya University, is reported, after the overview and the history of the accelerator is briefly described. Total number of carbon 14 environmental samples analyzed was 8567. The project of introducing new HVEE Tandetron for C-14 analysis, and modifying the present GIC Tandetron for Be-10 analysis is presented. Ion source shall be replaced, and the heavy ion detector shall be installed. Projected geological and archaeological studies using Be-10 are enumerated. (A. Yamamoto)

  17. Release Kinetics of Urea from Polymer Coated Urea and Its Relationship with Coating Penetrability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hai-jun; WU Zhi-jie; CHEN Li-jun; LIANG Wen-ju

    2003-01-01

    Four kinds of polymer coated urea (PCU) were put in distilled water at 30C to determine the variation of coating penetrability and give a precise description of the urea release kinetics. The urea release from PCU could be divided into four stages: lag stage, swell stage, steady stage and decay stage. The release rate coefficient K, a measure of coating penetrability, was linearly increased at swell stage, but almost not variable at steady stage. At decay stage, the relation of K to time t could be described by the equation K= mtn-1(where m and n are the coefficients). When n>1, the coating penetrability was gradually increased, and the urea release from PCU was accelerated; when n=1, the coating penetrability was steady, and the urea release from PCU obeyed the first-order kinetics; and when n<1, the coating penetrability was gradually decreased,and the urea release from PCU was delayed, resulting in a significant "tailing effect".

  18. Neural mechanisms underlying breathing complexity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Hess

    Full Text Available Breathing is maintained and controlled by a network of automatic neurons in the brainstem that generate respiratory rhythm and receive regulatory inputs. Breathing complexity therefore arises from respiratory central pattern generators modulated by peripheral and supra-spinal inputs. Very little is known on the brainstem neural substrates underlying breathing complexity in humans. We used both experimental and theoretical approaches to decipher these mechanisms in healthy humans and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. COPD is the most frequent chronic lung disease in the general population mainly due to tobacco smoke. In patients, airflow obstruction associated with hyperinflation and respiratory muscles weakness are key factors contributing to load-capacity imbalance and hence increased respiratory drive. Unexpectedly, we found that the patients breathed with a higher level of complexity during inspiration and expiration than controls. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we scanned the brain of the participants to analyze the activity of two small regions involved in respiratory rhythmogenesis, the rostral ventro-lateral (VL medulla (pre-Bötzinger complex and the caudal VL pons (parafacial group. fMRI revealed in controls higher activity of the VL medulla suggesting active inspiration, while in patients higher activity of the VL pons suggesting active expiration. COPD patients reactivate the parafacial to sustain ventilation. These findings may be involved in the onset of respiratory failure when the neural network becomes overwhelmed by respiratory overload We show that central neural activity correlates with airflow complexity in healthy subjects and COPD patients, at rest and during inspiratory loading. We finally used a theoretical approach of respiratory rhythmogenesis that reproduces the kernel activity of neurons involved in the automatic breathing. The model reveals how a chaotic activity in

  19. Urea and deuterium mixtures at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, M., E-mail: m.donnelly-2@sms.ed.ac.uk; Husband, R. J.; Frantzana, A. D.; Loveday, J. S. [Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Edinburgh, Erskine Williamson Building, Peter Guthrie Tait Road, The King’s Buildings, Edinburgh EH9 3FD (United Kingdom); Bull, C. L. [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxford Harwell, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Klotz, S. [IMPMC, CNRS UMR 7590, Université P and M Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris (France)

    2015-03-28

    Urea, like many network forming compounds, has long been known to form inclusion (guest-host) compounds. Unlike other network formers like water, urea is not known to form such inclusion compounds with simple molecules like hydrogen. Such compounds if they existed would be of interest both for the fundamental insight they provide into molecular bonding and as potential gas storage systems. Urea has been proposed as a potential hydrogen storage material [T. A. Strobel et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 478, 97 (2009)]. Here, we report the results of high-pressure neutron diffraction studies of urea and D{sub 2} mixtures that indicate no inclusion compound forms up to 3.7 GPa.

  20. Surface modified silicon nanochannel for urea sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yu; Hong, Mi; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2008-01-01

    Silicon nanowires have been surface functionalized with the enzyme urease for biosensor applications to detect and quantify urea concentration. The device is nanofabricated from a silicon on insulator (SOI) wafer with a top down lithography approach. The differential conductance of silicon nanowires can be tuned for optimum performance using the source drain bias voltage, and is sensitive to urea at low concentration. The experimental results show a linear relationship between surface potential change and urea concentration in the range of 0.1 to 0.68 mM. The sensitivity of our devices shows high reproducibility with time and different measurement conditions. The nanowire urea biosensor offers the possibility of high quality, reusable enzyme sensor array integration with silicon based circuits.

  1. Effect of slow breathing training on heart rate, spontaneous respiratory rate and pattern of breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Adhana

    2016-04-01

    Results: After three months of practicing slow breathing there was statistically significant reduction in heart rate and spontaneous respiratory rate. Shifting of pattern of breathing from thoracic pattern to abdominal pattern of breathing was also very highly significant. Conclusions: The study showed that slow breathing technique causes comprehensive change in body physiology by controlling autonomic nervous system. It regularizes rate and pattern of breathing. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(4.000: 1027-1030

  2. Effect of slow breathing training on heart rate, spontaneous respiratory rate and pattern of breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Ritu Adhana; Moneet Agarwal; Rani Gupta; Jyoti Dvivedi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The study was performed to see the effect of slow breathing (6 breaths/minute) training on spontaneous respiratory rate, heart rate and pattern of breathing. Methods: Sixty subjects between the ages 20-50 years were included in the study. After the rest of 10-15 minutes in a comfortable sitting posture their baseline heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR) and pattern of breathing were recorded on digital polygraph. Then they were guided to do slow breathing maintaining rate of...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1770 - Urea nitrogen test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....1770 Urea nitrogen test system. (a) Identification. A urea nitrogen test system is a device intended to measure urea nitrogen (an end-product of nitrogen metabolism) in whole blood, serum, plasma, and urine... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urea nitrogen test system. 862.1770 Section...

  4. Metabolism of urea in kids fed different levels of urea molasses diets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urea entry rates were measured in the body pool of Barbari kids using a single injection isotope dilution technique. The kids were divided into five groups (T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5) and they were fed different levels of urea molasses viz., 10, 25, 35, 40 and 0 percent to meet their DCP requirement along with concentrate mixture and oat hay as per A.R.C. recommendation. Urea entry rate was significantly higher (P1 and the control group (T5 without urea in their diets) than that of T2, T3 and T4 which were not significantly different from each other. (author)

  5. Dissolved Organic Carbon 14C in Southern Nevada Groundwater and Implications for Groundwater Travel Times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Ronald L. [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute; Fereday, Wyall [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute; Thomas, James M [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute

    2016-08-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) carbon-14 (14C) ages must be corrected for complex chemical and physical reactions and processes that change the amount of 14C in groundwater as it flows from recharge to downgradient areas. Because of these reactions, DIC 14C can produce unrealistically old ages and long groundwater travel times that may, or may not, agree with travel times estimated by other methods. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 14C ages are often younger than DIC 14C ages because there are few chemical reactions or physical processes that change the amount of DOC 14C in groundwater. However, there are several issues that create uncertainty in DOC 14C groundwater ages including limited knowledge of the initial (A0) DOC 14C in groundwater recharge and potential changes in DOC composition as water moves through an aquifer. This study examines these issues by quantifying A0 DOC 14C in recharge areas of southern Nevada groundwater flow systems and by evaluating changes in DOC composition as water flows from recharge areas to downgradient areas. The effect of these processes on DOC 14C groundwater ages is evaluated and DOC and DIC 14C ages are then compared along several southern Nevada groundwater flow paths. Twenty-seven groundwater samples were collected from springs and wells in southern Nevada in upgradient, midgradient, and downgradient locations. DOC 14C for upgradient samples ranged from 96 to 120 percent modern carbon (pmc) with an average of 106 pmc, verifying modern DOC 14C ages in recharge areas, which decreases uncertainty in DOC 14C A0 values, groundwater ages, and travel times. The HPLC spectra of groundwater along a flow path in the Spring Mountains show the same general pattern indicating that the DOC compound composition does not change along this flow path

  6. Semiempirical model for diagnostication Helicobacter pylori infection by use of 14C labelled urea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of this study was to create a semiempirical model, helpful in estimating severity of the Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection by using the urea breath test (UBT), when urea labelled 14C has been used for diagnostics. The model consists of four compartments representing stomach (1), blood vascular system (2), lungs (3) and urinary system (4). Mathematical model is based on the balance of radioactive 14C in compartments from 1 to 4. The histological investigations were used as reference methods. Comparison of the results obtained from simulation, which yields dependence of 14C activity on time, to experimental results of UBT, made it possible to determine the ranges of coefficient HB value, which characterized each degrees of severity of H. pylori infection: degree 0 (lack of infection) - hB below 0.025; degree 1 (not large) - hB in range 0.025-0.115; degree 2 (moderate) - hB in the range 0.115-0.300; degree 3 (significant) - hB above 0.300. It was possible to estimate severity of H.pylori infection in clinical practice on the basis of comparing the 14C activity value of experimental points as obtained from the breath test, to the results of simulation with suitable value of the fitted parameter hB indicating degree of severity of infection. (author)

  7. A Proof of Concept Study to Detect Urease Producing Bacteria in Lungs Using Aerosolized 13C-Urea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Graham; Davies, Lea; Heynekamp, Theresa; Harkins, Michelle; Sharp, Zachary D.; Kelly, H. William

    2016-01-01

    This is a “proof of concept” study to determine whether inhalation of 13C-urea can be safely used to detect the presence of urease producing bacteria in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) by detecting 13CO2 in breath. This was a prospective, 2-part, open label, single-center, single-arm, single-administration, dose-escalation investigational device exemption trial. First, the safety of 20 and 50 mg inhaled 13C-urea was evaluated in 6 healthy adult participants. Then, 3 adult CF participants colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa were enrolled for each dose of inhaled 13C-urea. The safety of inhaled 13C-urea was assessed by spirometry and physical examination. 13C-urea was administered using a jet nebulizer, followed by serial spirometry (10 min and 30 min post inhalation) and collection of exhaled breath at 5, 10, and 15 min post inhalation. There was no clinical significant change in any of the spirometry values compared to baseline in healthy participants and CF patients. Mean of 13CO2/12CO2 delta over baseline (DOB) values in CF participants at 5, 10, and 15 min post inhalation was as follows: 20 mg dose 4‰ (2.2‰–4.9‰), 1‰ (1.0‰–1.4‰), and 1‰ (0.4‰–1.5‰); 50 mg dose: 10‰ (6.2‰–14.5‰), 3‰ (2.1‰–4.3‰), and 1.5‰ (0.6‰–2.3‰). Inhaled 13C-urea for detection of urease producing bacteria was safe, and preliminary data suggest that 13CO2/12CO2 DOB values may be higher in CF patients with P. aeruginosa at 5–10 min after inhalation of 13C-urea. A future direction is to investigate use of inhaled 13C-urea in young children who have difficulty producing sputum for culturing. PMID:27458537

  8. Transfer of blood urea into the goat colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transfer of blood urea to the temporarily isolated and perfused colon of conscious goats was measured. Simultaneously, total urea turnover was estimated using 14C-labelled urea. Three animals in the weight range 50-70 k were used, with appropriately placed cannulae. The entry of blood urea into the total gastrointestinal tract was estimated from the difference between total urea turnover renal urea excretion. When experimental conditions remained constant, such as the permeability of the gastrointestinal tract wall, blood urea diffusion into the colon depended on plasma urea concentration. Results of varying feeding conditions demonstrated that changes in permeability of the gastrointestinal tract will have a more pronounced influence on the amounts of blood urea entering the gastrointestinal tract than differences in plasma urea concentration

  9. The chemical neuroanatomy of breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Alheid, George F.; McCrimmon, Donald R.

    2008-01-01

    The chemical neuroanatomy of breathing must ultimately encompass all the various neuronal elements physiologically identified in brainstem respiratory circuits and their apparent aggregation into “compartments” within the medulla and pons. These functionally defined respiratory compartments in the brainstem provide the major source of input to cranial motoneurons controlling the airways, and to spinal motoneurons activating inspiratory and expiratory pump muscles. This review provides an over...

  10. Breathing Modes in Dusty Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓钢; 王爽; 潘秋惠; 刘悦; 贺明峰

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic breathing modes of dusty plasmas have been investigated in a cylindricalsystem with an axial symmetry. The linear wave solution and a "dispersion" relation were derived.It was found that in an infinite area, the mode is reduced to a "classical" dust acoustic wave inthe region away from the center. If the dusty plasma is confined in a finite region, however, thebreathing (or heart-beating) behavior would be found as observed in many experiments.

  11. Running and Breathing in Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramble, Dennis M.; Carrier, David R.

    1983-01-01

    Mechanical constraints appear to require that locomotion and breathing be synchronized in running mammals. Phase locking of limb and respiratory frequency has now been recorded during treadmill running in jackrabbits and during locomotion on solid ground in dogs, horses, and humans. Quadrupedal species normally synchronize the locomotor and respiratory cycles at a constant ratio of 1:1 (strides per breath) in both the trot and gallop. Human runners differ from quadrupeds in that while running they employ several phase-locked patterns (4:1, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1, 5:2, and 3:2), although a 2:1 coupling ratio appears to be favored. Even though the evolution of bipedal gait has reduced the mechanical constraints on respiration in man, thereby permitting greater flexibility in breathing pattern, it has seemingly not eliminated the need for the synchronization of respiration and body motion during sustained running. Flying birds have independently achieved phase-locked locomotor and respiratory cycles. This hints that strict locomotor-respiratory coupling may be a vital factor in the sustained aerobic exercise of endothermic vertebrates, especially those in which the stresses of locomotion tend to deform the thoracic complex.

  12. Hyperpolarized 13C-Urea MRI for the assessment of the urea gradient in the porcine kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søvsø Szocska Hansen, Esben; Stewart, Neil James; Wild, Jim Michael;

    the corticomedullary osmolality gradient changes using hyperpolarized 13C-urea in a healthy porcine model. A corticomedullary urea gradient was observed with an intra-medullary accumulation after 75s of hyperpolarized 13C-urea injection, while earlier time points were dominated by cortical perfusion. Furosemide...... treatment resulted in an increased urea accumulation in the cortical space. This work demonstrates intra-renal functional assessment with hyperpolarized 13C-urea MRI in multi-papillary kidneys....

  13. Winter Wheat and Maize Response to Urea Ammonium Nitrate and a New Urea Formaldehyde Polymer Fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slow release nitrogen (N) fertilizers have potential to improve yield and nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and maize (Zea mays L.). A slow release urea formaldehyde polymer (UFP) was compared with conventional aqueous urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN) [(NH2)2CO, NH4NO3]...

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Branched Poly(ester urea)s with Different Branch Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiayi; Becker, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    A new class of L-phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s (PEU) was developed that possess tunable mechanical properties, water uptake ability and degradation rates. Our preliminary data has shown that 1,6-hexanediol L - phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s possesses an elastic modulus nearly double that of poly(lactic acid). My work details the synthesis of a series of L - phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s possessing a variation in diol chain length and in branch density and shows how these subtle structural differences influence the mechanical properties and in vitro biodegradation rates. The elastic moduli span a range of values that overlap with several currently clinically available degradable polymers. Increasingly the diol chain lengths increases the amount of flexible segment in the chemical structure, which results in reduced elastic modulus values and increased values of elongation at break. Increasing the amount of branch monomer incorporated into the system reduces the molecular entanglement, which also results in decreased elastic modulus values and increased values of elongation at break. The L - phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s also exhibited a diol length dependent degradation process that varied between 1-5 % over 16 weeks. Compared with PLLA, PEUs degrade more quickly and the rate can be tuned by changing the diol chain length. PEUs absorb more water and the water uptake ability can be tuned by changing the branch density. This work was supported by Akron Functional Materials Center.

  15. Standardization of the TRUE Test imidazolidinyl urea and diazolidinyl urea patches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Björkner, B;

    2001-01-01

    The preservatives imidazolidinyl urea (IMID, Germall 115) and diazolidinyl urea (DU, Germall II) are commonly used in cosmetic products and are well-known sensitizers. The aim of the present study was to establish the optimal patch test concentration in hydrophilic dried-in vehicle (TRUE Test...

  16. Patterns of gaseous nitrogen losses from cattle slurries enriched with urea of urea ammonium nitrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, R.; Velthof, G.L.; Oenema, O.

    2000-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the potential of using mixtures of cattle slurry with cheap urea (U) or urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN). The kinetics of NH3 volatilization, nitrous oxide (N2O) emission and denitrification after the addition of U and

  17. Thoracic radiotherapy and breath control: current prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) is adversely affected by setup error and organ motion. In thoracic 3D CRT, breathing accounts for most of intra-fraction movements, thus impairing treatment quality. Breath control clearly exhibits dosimetric improvement compared to free breathing, leading to various techniques for gated treatments. We review benefits of different breath control methods -i.e. breath-holding or beam gating, with spirometric, isometric or X-ray respiration sensor- and argument the choice of expiration versus inspiration, with consideration to dosimetric concerns. All steps of 3D-CRT can be improved with breath control. Contouring of organs at risk (OAR) and target are easier and more accurate on breath controlled CT-scans. Inter- and intra-fraction target immobilisation allows smaller margins with better coverage. Lung outcome predictors (NTCP, Mean Dose, LV20, LV30) are improved with breath-control. In addition, inspiration breath control facilitates beam arrangement since it widens the distance between OAR and target, and leaves less lung normal tissue within the high dose region. Last, lung density, as of CT scan, is more accurate, improving dosimetry. Our institutions choice is to use spirometry driven, patient controlled high-inspiration breath-hold; this technique gives excellent immobilization results, with high reproducibility, yet it is easy to implement and costs little extra treatment time. Breath control, whatever technique is employed, proves superior to free breathing treatment when using 3D-CRT. Breath control should then be used whenever possible, and is probably mandatory for IMRT. (authors)

  18. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney. (paper)

  19. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Mette K.; van Vulpen, Marco; Barendrecht, Maurits M.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Intven, Martijn; Crijns, Sjoerd P. M.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2013-04-01

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney.

  20. Shoulder and hip roll differences between breathing and non-breathing conditions in front crawl swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psycharakis, Stelios G; McCabe, Carla

    2011-06-01

    The effects of breathing on body roll have been previously investigated for the roll of the whole trunk only. The purposes of this study were: to calculate separately the shoulder roll (SR) and hip roll (HR) of swimmers during front crawl for non-breathing and preferred-side breathing conditions; to assess the differences in the magnitude and temporal characteristics of these variables between non-breathing and preferred-side breathing conditions; and to examine their association with swimming performance (indicated by swimming speed). Twelve male swimmers who competed at national and international level performed two maximum 25 m front crawl trials: one non-breathing and one with breathing to their preferred side. Performance was recorded with four below and two above water synchronised cameras. SR and HR in both trials were calculated for the breathing and non-breathing sides. The timings of SR and HR peaks to each side and at the positions of neutral roll were also calculated. Swimming speed was significantly slower in the breathing trial (p rolled their shoulders and hips to the breathing side significantly more in the breathing than in the non-breathing trial (SR: p side (p < 0.01) but HR was not significantly different (p = 0.07). There was no evidence to suggest that temporal characteristics of SR or HR were associated with swimming performance.

  1. [Tritium- and carbon-14-contents of wines of different vintage from the northern and southern hemisphere (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, E; Möller, H; Rapp, A; Steffan, H

    1980-10-01

    The carbon-14 and tritium radioactivity contents of up to 19 vintages of German and South African wines were compared. A similar large dependence of the 14C- and of the 3H-activity in the German wine on the nuclear weapon tests of the years 1962/63 was found out. The radioactivity level is also 1977/78 still essential higher than before 1950. The South African wines have been influenced considerably smaller by nuclear explosions. The highest 3H-values were found in the vintage 1963 of the German wine with 5910 pCi/litre and in the vintage 1964 of the South African wine with 510 pCi/litre.

  2. Discriminating between Nasal and Mouth Breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, Kevin; Yuan, Peng; Coyle, Damian

    2010-01-01

    The recommendation to change breathing patterns from the mouth to the nose can have a significantly positive impact upon the general well being of the individual. We classify nasal and mouth breathing by using an acoustic sensor and intelligent signal processing techniques. The overall purpose is to investigate the possibility of identifying the differences in patterns between nasal and mouth breathing in order to integrate this information into a decision support system which will form the b...

  3. Sudarshan kriya yoga: Breathing for health

    OpenAIRE

    Sameer A Zope; Zope, Rakesh A

    2013-01-01

    Breathing techniques are regularly recommended for relaxation, stress management, control of psychophysiological states, and to improve organ function. Yogic breathing, defined as a manipulation of breath movement, has been shown to positively affect immune function, autonomic nervous system imbalances, and psychological or stress-related disorders. The aim of this study was to assess and provide a comprehensive review of the physiological mechanisms, the mind–body connection, and the benefit...

  4. Sleep disordered breathing in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilgay Izci Balserak

    2015-12-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB is very common during pregnancy, and is most likely explained by hormonal, physiological and physical changes. Maternal obesity, one of the major risk factors for SDB, together with physiological changes in pregnancy may predispose women to develop SDB. SDB has been associated with poor maternal and fetal outcomes. Thus, early identification, diagnosis and treatment of SDB are important in pregnancy. This article reviews the pregnancy-related changes affecting the severity of SDB, the epidemiology and the risk factors of SDB in pregnancy, the association of SDB with adverse pregnancy outcomes, and screening and management options specific for this population.

  5. Breathe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taylor Swift; 侯茂荣

    2010-01-01

    @@ I see your face in my mind as I drive away Cause none of us thought tt was gonna end that way People are people, and sometimes we change our minds But it's killing me to see you go after all this time

  6. Breathing exercises: influence on breathing patterns and thoracoabdominal motion in healthy subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Danielle S. R. Vieira; Mendes, Liliane P. S.; Nathália S. Elmiro; Marcelo Velloso; Raquel R. Britto; Verônica F. Parreira

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanisms underlying breathing exercises have not been fully elucidated. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of four on breathing exercises (diaphragmatic breathing, inspiratory sighs, sustained maximal inspiration and intercostal exercise) the on breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion in healthy subjects. METHOD: Fifteen subjects of both sexes, aged 23±1.5 years old and with normal pulmonary function tests, participated in the study. The subjects were evaluated using t...

  7. Stability of urea in solution and pharmaceutical preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyachariwat, Nattakan; Steckel, Hartwig

    2014-01-01

    The stability of urea in solution and pharmaceutical preparations was analyzed as a function of temperature (25°-60°C), pH (3.11-9.67), and initial urea concentration (2.5%-20%). This study was undertaken to (i) obtain more extensive, quantitative information relative to the degradation of urea in both aqueous and non-aqueous solutions and in pharmaceutical preparations, and (ii) test the effects of initial urea concentration, pH, buffer, and temperature values on urea degradation. The stability analysis shows that urea is more stable at the pH range of 4-8 and the stability of urea decreases by increase in temperature for all pH values. Within the experimental range of temperature and initial urea concentration values, the lowest urea degradation was found with lactate buffer pH 6.0. The urea decomposition rate in solution and pharmaceutical preparations shows the dependence of the initial urea concentrations. At higher initial urea concentrations, the rate of degradation is a decreasing function with time. This suggests that the reverse reaction is a factor in the degradation of concentrated urea solution. For non-aqueous solvents, isopropanol showed the best effort in retarding the decomposition of urea. Since the losses in urea is directly influenced by its stability at a given temperature and pH, the stability analysis of urea by the proposed model can be used to prevent the loss and optimize the operating condition for urea-containing pharmaceutical preparations.

  8. [Stahl, Leibniz, Hoffmann and breathing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvallo, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    At the beginning of the XVIII th century, Wilhelm Gottfried Leibniz and Friedrich Hoffmann criticize Georg Ernst Stahl's medical theory. They differenciate between unsound and true reasonings. Namely, they validate Stahl's definition of breath but extracting it from its animist basis and placing it in an epistemology obeying to the principle of sufficient reason and to the mechanical model. The stahlian discovery consists in understanding breath as a calorific ventilation against the ancient conception; the iatromechanists recognize its accuracy, but they try then to transpose it to a mechanical model of ventilation. Using it in a different epistemological context implies that they analyze the idea of discovery "true" in its contents, but "wrong" in its hypothesis. It impels to examine the epistemology of medical knowledge, as science and therapeutics, and in its links with the other scientific theories. Thus, if Leibniz as philosopher and Hoffmann as doctor consider Stahl's animism so important, it is because its discoveries question the fundamental principles of medicine. PMID:17153053

  9. Urea retranslocation from senescing Arabidopsis leaves is promoted by DUR3-mediated urea retrieval from leaf apoplast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, Anne; Kojima, Soichi; Hajirezaei, Mohammad; Melzer, Michael; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2015-02-01

    In plants, urea derives either from root uptake or protein degradation. Although large quantities of urea are released during senescence, urea is mainly seen as a short-lived nitrogen (N) catabolite serving urease-mediated hydrolysis to ammonium. Here, we investigated the roles of DUR3 and of urea in N remobilization. During natural leaf senescence urea concentrations and DUR3 transcript levels showed a parallel increase with senescence markers like ORE1 in a plant age- and leaf age-dependent manner. Deletion of DUR3 decreased urea accumulation in leaves, whereas the fraction of urea lost to the leaf apoplast was enhanced. Under natural and N deficiency-induced senescence DUR3 promoter activity was highest in the vasculature, but was also found in surrounding bundle sheath and mesophyll cells. An analysis of petiole exudates from wild-type leaves revealed that N from urea accounted for >13% of amino acid N. Urea export from senescent leaves further increased in ureG-2 deletion mutants lacking urease activity. In the dur3 ureG double insertion line the absence of DUR3 reduced urea export from leaf petioles. These results indicate that urea can serve as an early metabolic marker for leaf senescence, and that DUR3-mediated urea retrieval contributes to the retranslocation of N from urea during leaf senescence.

  10. Submarines, spacecraft and exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Joachim D; Hansel, Armin

    2012-03-01

    Foreword The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled breath. What may have escaped our notice is a complementary field of research that explores the creation and maintenance of artificial atmospheres practised by the submarine air monitoring and air purification (SAMAP) community. SAMAP is comprised of manufacturers, researchers and medical professionals dealing with the engineering and instrumentation to support human life in submarines and spacecraft (including shuttlecraft and manned rockets, high-altitude aircraft, and the International Space Station (ISS)). Here, the immediate concerns are short-term survival and long-term health in fairly confined environments where one cannot simply 'open the window' for fresh air. As such, one of the main concerns is air monitoring and the main sources of contamination are CO(2) and other constituents of human exhaled breath. Since the inaugural meeting in 1994 in Adelaide, Australia, SAMAP meetings have been held every two or three years alternating between the North American and European continents. The meetings are organized by Dr Wally Mazurek (a member of IABR) of the Defense Systems Technology Organization (DSTO) of Australia, and individual meetings are co-hosted by the navies of the countries in which they are held. An overriding focus at SAMAP is life support (oxygen availability and carbon dioxide removal). Certainly, other air constituents are also important; for example, the closed environment of a submarine or the ISS can build up contaminants from consumer products, cooking, refrigeration, accidental fires, propulsion and atmosphere maintenance. However, the most immediate concern is sustaining human metabolism: removing exhaled CO(2) and replacing metabolized O(2). Another

  11. Specific 13C functional pathways as diagnostic targets in gastroenterology breath-tests: tricks for a correct interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzoferrato, M; Del Zompo, F; Mangiola, F; Lopetuso, L R; Petito, V; Cammarota, G; Gasbarrini, A; Scaldaferri, F

    2013-01-01

    Breath tests are non-invasive, non-radioactive, safe, simple and effective tests able to determine significant metabolic alterations due to specific diseases or lack of specific enzymes. Carbon isotope (13)C, the stable-non radioactive isotope of carbon, is the most used substrate in breath testing, in which (13)C/(12)C ratio is measured and expressed as a delta value, a differences between readings and a fixed standard. (13)C/(12)C ratio is measured with isotope ratio mass spectrometry or non-dispersive isotope-selective infrared spectrometer and generally there is a good agreement between these techniques in the isotope ratio estimation. (13)C/(12)C ratio can be expressed as static measurement (like delta over baseline in urea breath test) or as dynamic measurement as percent dose recovery, but more dosages are necessary. (13)C Breath-tests are involved in many fields of interest within gastroenterology, such as detection of Helicobacter pylori infection, study of gastric emptying, assessment of liver and exocrine pancreatic functions, determination of oro-caecal transit time, evaluation of absorption and to a lesser extend detection of bacterial overgrowth. The use of every single test in a clinical setting is vary depending on accuracy and substrate costs. This review is meant to present (13)C the meaning of (13)C/(12)C ratio and static and dynamic measure and, finally, the instruments dedicated to its use in gastroenterology. A brief presentation of (13)C breath tests in gastroenterology is also provided. PMID:24443068

  12. Urea Decomposition Method to Synthesize Hydrotalcites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piao Ping YANG; Jian Feng YU; Tong Hao WU; Guo Zong LIU; Tae Sun CHANG; Dong Koo LEE; Deug Hee CHO

    2004-01-01

    The urea decomposition property at high temperature has been used to control the pH value in the synthesis of layer compounds. The hydrotalcites of Mg-Al and Ni-Al with high crystallinity were synthesized by using this property.

  13. COPD: When You Learn More, You'll Breathe Better

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are treatments that do help people breathe easier." Spirometry: A Simple Breathing Test Everyone at risk for ... tested for COPD with a simple breathing test. Spirometry is one of the best and most common ...

  14. Urea transporters and sweat response to uremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Raymond W; Bailey, James L; Wang, Yanhua; Klein, Janet D; Sands, Jeff M

    2016-06-01

    In humans, urea is excreted in sweat, largely through the eccrine sweat gland. The urea concentration in human sweat is elevated when compared to blood urea nitrogen. The sweat urea nitrogen (UN) of patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESRD) is increased when compared with healthy humans. The ability to produce sweat is maintained in the overwhelming majority of ESRD patients. A comprehensive literature review found no reports of sweat UN neither in healthy rodents nor in rodent models of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Therefore, this study measured sweat UN concentrations in healthy and uremic rats. Uninephrectomy followed by renal artery ligation was used to remove 5/6 of renal function. Rats were then fed a high-protein diet to induce uremia. Pilocarpine was used to induce sweating. Sweat droplets were collected under oil. Sweat UN was measured with a urease assay. Serum UN was measured using a fluorescent ortho-pthalaldehyde reaction. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was accomplished with a horseradish peroxidase and diaminobenzidine technique. Sweat UN in uremic rats was elevated greater than two times compared to healthy pair-fed controls (220 ± 17 and 91 ± 15 mmol/L, respectively). Post hoc analysis showed a significant difference between male and female uremic sweat UN (279 ± 38 and 177 ± 11 mmol/L, respectively.) IHC shows, for the first time, the presence of the urea transporters UT-B and UT-A2 in both healthy and uremic rat cutaneous structures. Future studies will use this model to elucidate how rat sweat UN and other solute excretion is altered by commonly prescribed diuretics. PMID:27273880

  15. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium nitrate-urea complex may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  16. Synergetic Effects of Nanoporous Support and Urea on Enzyme Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Chenghong; Shin, Yongsoon; Liu, Jun; Ackerman, Eric J.

    2007-02-01

    Here we report that synergetic effects of functionalized nanoporous support and urea on enzyme activity enhancement. Even in 8.0 M urea, the specific activity of GI entrapped in FMS was still higher than the highest specific activity of GI free in solution, indicating the strong tolerance of GI in FMS to the high concentration of urea.

  17. Rapid eye movement sleep in breath holders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohyama, J; Hasegawa, T; Shimohira, M; Fukumizu, M; Iwakawa, Y

    2000-07-01

    One-night polysomnography was performed on seven subjects suffering from breath-holding spells, including one whose death was suggested to be a consequence of a breath-holding spell. The fatal case showed no rapid eye movements (REMs) during REM sleep, although he exhibited REMs during wakefulness. The average numbers of both REMs and bursts of REMs in REM sleep in the other six breath holders were significantly lower than those in age-matched controls. The breath holders showed no airway obstruction, desaturation, or sleep fragmentation. Since the rapid ocular activity in REM sleep is generated in the brain stem, we hypothesized that a functional brainstem disturbance is involved in the occurrence of breath-holding spells.

  18. Discriminating between Nasal and Mouth Breathing

    CERN Document Server

    Curran, Kevin; Coyle, Damian

    2010-01-01

    The recommendation to change breathing patterns from the mouth to the nose can have a significantly positive impact upon the general well being of the individual. We classify nasal and mouth breathing by using an acoustic sensor and intelligent signal processing techniques. The overall purpose is to investigate the possibility of identifying the differences in patterns between nasal and mouth breathing in order to integrate this information into a decision support system which will form the basis of a patient monitoring and motivational feedback system to recommend the change from mouth to nasal breathing. Our findings show that the breath pattern can be discriminated in certain places of the body both by visual spectrum analysis and with a Back Propagation neural network classifier. The sound file recoded from the sensor placed on the hollow in the neck shows the most promising accuracy which is as high as 90%.

  19. Synthesis of the monosodium salt of carbon-14 labeled paclitaxel (Taxol) 2`-ethyl carbonate 7-phosphonooxymethyl ether, a potential prodrug of paclitaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dischino, D.D.; Shuhui Chen; Golik, Jerzy; Walker, D.W.; Wong, H.S.L. [Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Richard L. Gelb Center for Research and Development, Wallingford, CT (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The monosodium salt of carbon-14 labeled paclitaxel (Taxol) [N3`-{sup 14}COPh] 2`-ethyl carbonate 7-phosphonooymethyl ether, was prepared from C-14 labeled paclitaxel [N3`-{sup 14}COPh] in 5 steps. The radiochemical purity of the final product was greater than 99% and the specific activity was 25 {mu}Ci/mg. (author).

  20. Breath Testing for Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth: Should We Bother?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Mark

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen breath test is based on following breath hydrogen levels after the administration of a carbohydrate (most commonly lactulose) to a patient with suspected small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. The test is based on the interaction between the administered carbohydrate and the intestinal bacteria. The resulting fermentation produces hydrogen. A positive breath test is based on a breath hydrogen rise prior to the expected arrival time in the highly microbial cecum. Despite renewed enthusiasm for breath testing in recent years due to associations with conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, breath testing poses many challenges. In this argument against breath testing, several pitfalls that complicate breath testing will be described. PMID:26902227

  1. The indoor air we breathe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, L C; Shackleton, B W

    1998-01-01

    Increasingly recognized as a potential public health problem since the outbreak of Legionnaire's disease in Philadelphia in 1976, polluted indoor air has been associated with health problems that include asthma, sick building syndrome, multiple chemical sensitivity, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Symptoms are often nonspecific and include headache, eye and throat irritation, chest tightness and shortness of breath, and fatigue. Air-borne contaminants include commonly used chemicals, vehicular exhaust, microbial organisms, fibrous glass particles, and dust. Identified causes include defective building design and construction, aging of buildings and their ventilation systems, poor climate control, inattention to building maintenance. A major contributory factor is the explosion in the use of chemicals in building construction and furnishing materials over the past four decades. Organizational issues and psychological variables often contribute to the problem and hinder its resolution. This article describes the health problems related to poor indoor air quality and offers solutions.

  2. Time Breath of Psychological Theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tateo, Luca; Valsiner, Jaan

    2015-01-01

    Psychology as a self-aspiring, ambitious, developmental science faces the crucial limit of time—both theoretically and practically. The issue of time in constructing psychology’s theories is a major unresolved metatheoretical task. This raises several questions about generalization of knowledge......: which is the time length of breath of psychological theories? Which is the temporal dimension of psychological processes? In this article we discuss the role of different axiomatic assumptions about time in the construction of psychological theories. How could different theories include a concept...... of time—or fail to do that? How can they generalize with respect to time? The different conceptions of time often remain implicit, while shaping the concepts used in understanding psychological processes. Any preconception about time in human development will foster the generalizability of theory, as well...

  3. Submarines, spacecraft and exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Joachim D; Hansel, Armin

    2012-03-01

    Foreword The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled breath. What may have escaped our notice is a complementary field of research that explores the creation and maintenance of artificial atmospheres practised by the submarine air monitoring and air purification (SAMAP) community. SAMAP is comprised of manufacturers, researchers and medical professionals dealing with the engineering and instrumentation to support human life in submarines and spacecraft (including shuttlecraft and manned rockets, high-altitude aircraft, and the International Space Station (ISS)). Here, the immediate concerns are short-term survival and long-term health in fairly confined environments where one cannot simply 'open the window' for fresh air. As such, one of the main concerns is air monitoring and the main sources of contamination are CO(2) and other constituents of human exhaled breath. Since the inaugural meeting in 1994 in Adelaide, Australia, SAMAP meetings have been held every two or three years alternating between the North American and European continents. The meetings are organized by Dr Wally Mazurek (a member of IABR) of the Defense Systems Technology Organization (DSTO) of Australia, and individual meetings are co-hosted by the navies of the countries in which they are held. An overriding focus at SAMAP is life support (oxygen availability and carbon dioxide removal). Certainly, other air constituents are also important; for example, the closed environment of a submarine or the ISS can build up contaminants from consumer products, cooking, refrigeration, accidental fires, propulsion and atmosphere maintenance. However, the most immediate concern is sustaining human metabolism: removing exhaled CO(2) and replacing metabolized O(2). Another

  4. Reconsidering the Lack of Urea Toxicity in Dialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massy, Ziad A; Pietrement, Christine; Touré, Fatouma

    2016-09-01

    Urea is an old uremic toxin which has been used for many years as a global biomarker of CKD severity and dialysis adequacy. Old studies were not in favor of its role as a causal factor in the pathogenesis of complications associated with the uremic state. However, recent experimental and clinical evidence is compatible with both direct and indirect toxicity of urea, particularly via the deleterious actions of urea-derived carbamylated molecules. Further studies are clearly needed to explore the potential relevance of urea-related CKD complications for patient management, in particular the place of new therapeutic strategies to prevent urea toxicity.

  5. Determination of urea kinetics by isotope dilution with [C-13]urea and gas chromatography isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloppenburg, Wybe; Wolthers, BG; Stellaard, F; Elzinga, H; Tepper, T; deJong, PE; Huisman, RM

    1997-01-01

    1. Stable urea isotopes can be used to study urea kinetics in humans, The use of stable urea isotopes far studying urea kinetic parameters in humans on a large scale is hampered by the high costs of the labelled material, We devised a urea dilution for measurement of the distribution volume, product

  6. Synthesis and quality control of {sup 13}C-enriched urea for Helicobacter pylori (HP) diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sant Ana Filho, Carlos R.; Tavares, Claudineia R.O.; Ferreira, Andre V.; Prestes, Cleber V.; Bendassolli, Jose A., E-mail: jab@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was to synthesize the urea ({sup 13}CO(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}), with 99% {sup 13}C atoms, and to perform a quality analysis for the diagnosis (breath test) of Helicobacter pylori. Furthermore, the process was submitted to economic analysis. The reaction was performed in a stainless steel reactor, lined with polytetrafluoroethylene, under low pressure and temperature. The synthesis method was shown to be appropriate (2.35 g; 81.9% yield), evidenced by physico-chemical and microbiological results, according to Brazilian legislation. The production and diagnosis costs were competitive compared with national and international market values, rendering this a valuable tool in clinical medicine. (author)

  7. Utilization of labelled urea in Helicobacter pylori eradication study by Espinheira Santa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maytenus ilicifolia, Espinheira Santa, is usually used to treat some gastric diseases, in special duodenal ulcer, in agreement with the medical literature. The aim of this work was to verify the efficiency of those leaves in such disease. It was selected a group of volunteers with ulcer caused by Helicobacter pylori (Hp) confirmed by Urea Breath Test (UBT). It was administered to all patients one capsule having 300 mg of dry extract of the leaves 20 minutes before the UBT. The capsule went on being administered during a week three times a day. At the end of this period two tests were applied to evaluate the Hp eradication: one 12 hours just after the treatment and another after one month. The results indicated that the antibiotic action was not confirmed. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig

  8. Entry of blood urea into the rumen of the llama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llamas were provided with a large rumen fistula, and the transfer of blood urea into the temporarily isolated rumen, cleaned and filled with test solution was measured. Plasma urea clearance due to transfer of blood urea across the rumen wall should indicate changes in its permeability to urea. Clearance values were highest with CO2 or with high concentrations of butyric acid. Permeability was low when food was with-held and when no volatile fatty acids were present in the solution. The permeability of the rumen wall to blood urea can be altered significantly. These changes can affect blood urea transfer more extensively than changes in the plasma urea concentration within physiological ranges

  9. Transfer of blood urea into the goat colon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transfer of body urea into the temporarily isolated and perfused colon of conscious goats was measured. Simultaneously total urea turnover was estimated using 14C-urea. The transfer of urea into the total gastrointestinal tract (total turnover minus renal excretion) was four times higher with the high-energy - low-protein diet (sugar pulp plus straw) compared with control feeding (hay ad lib.). The transfer of urea into the colon was 8% of the transfer into the total GI tract during control feeding, 14% when food was withheld for 48 hours and 1% during sugar pulp feeding. The transfer into the colon depends mainly on the plasma urea concentration, whereas in the proximal part of the GI tract changes in the permeability of the GI tract wall have a more pronounced influence than plasma urea concentration. (author)

  10. Milk Urea Dynamics during its Transformation into Yogurt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Vintila

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our work was to evaluate in what measure milk urea concentration stays in processed yogurt and in what measure urea dose influences its quality. We added known amounts of urea into milk destined to yogurt processing in order to obtain probes with concentrations from 0,5 to 28 mg/ 100 ml milk. Obtained results lead us to the conclusion that milk urea decreases dramatically until the finishing of the process of milk coagulation and its transformation into yogurt. All probes which contained higher amounts of urea than 6 mg/ 100 ml milk, urea totally disappeared from yogurt before 48 hours of keeping. Milk coagulation time and its transformation to yogurt is reduced proportional with urea concentration in milk.

  11. Active breathing control (ABC): Determination and reduction of breathing-induced organ motion in the chest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Extensive radiotherapy volumes for tumors of the chest are partly caused by interfractional organ motion. We evaluated the feasibility of respiratory observation tools using the active breathing control (ABC) system and the effect on breathing cycle regularity and reproducibility. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with unresectable tumors of the chest were selected for evaluation of the ABC system. Computed tomography scans were performed at various respiratory phases starting at the same couch position without patient movement. Threshold levels were set at minimum and maximum volume during normal breathing cycles and at a volume defined as shallow breathing, reflecting the subjective maximal tolerable reduction of breath volume. To evaluate the extent of organ movement, 13 landmarks were considering using commercial software for image coregistration. In 4 patients, second examinations were performed during therapy. Results: Investigating the differences in a normal breathing cycle versus shallow breathing, a statistically significant reduction of respiratory motion in the upper, middle, and lower regions of the chest could be detected, representing potential movement reduction achieved through reduced breath volume. Evaluating interfraction reproducibility, the mean displacement ranged between 0.24 mm (chest wall/tracheal bifurcation) to 3.5 mm (diaphragm) for expiration and shallow breathing and 0.24 mm (chest wall) to 5.25 mm (diaphragm) for normal inspiration. Conclusions: By modifying regularity of the respiratory cycle through reduction of breath volume, a significant and reproducible reduction of chest and diaphragm motion is possible, enabling reduction of treatment planning margins

  12. Decreased chewing activity during mouth breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H-Y; Yamaguchi, K

    2012-08-01

    This study examined the effect of mouth breathing on the strength and duration of vertical effect on the posterior teeth using related functional parameters during 3 min of gum chewing in 39 nasal breathers. A CO(2) sensor was placed over the mouth to detect expiratory airflow. When no airflow was detected from the mouth throughout the recording period, the subject was considered a nasal breather and enrolled in the study. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded during 3 min of gum chewing. The protocol was repeated with the nostrils occluded. The strength of the vertical effect was obtained as integrated masseter muscle EMG activity, and the duration of vertical effect was also obtained as chewing stroke count, chewing cycle variation and EMG activity duration above baseline. Baseline activity was obtained from the isotonic EMG activity during jaw movement at 1.6 Hz without making tooth contact. The duration represented the percentage of the active period above baseline relative to the 3-min chewing period. Paired t-test and repeated analysis of variance were used to compare variables between nasal and mouth breathing. The integrated EMG activity and the duration of EMG activity above baseline, chewing stroke count and chewing cycle significantly decreased during mouth breathing compared with nasal breathing (Pmouth breathing was significantly greater than nasal breathing (PMouth breathing reduces the vertical effect on the posterior teeth, which can affect the vertical position of posterior teeth negatively, leading to malocclusion.

  13. An Ultrasonic Contactless Sensor for Breathing Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Arlotto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of human breathing activity during a long period has multiple fundamental applications in medicine. In breathing sleep disorders such as apnea, the diagnosis is based on events during which the person stops breathing for several periods during sleep. In polysomnography, the standard for sleep disordered breathing analysis, chest movement and airflow are used to monitor the respiratory activity. However, this method has serious drawbacks. Indeed, as the subject should sleep overnight in a laboratory and because of sensors being in direct contact with him, artifacts modifying sleep quality are often observed. This work investigates an analysis of the viability of an ultrasonic device to quantify the breathing activity, without contact and without any perception by the subject. Based on a low power ultrasonic active source and transducer, the device measures the frequency shift produced by the velocity difference between the exhaled air flow and the ambient environment, i.e., the Doppler effect. After acquisition and digitization, a specific signal processing is applied to separate the effects of breath from those due to subject movements from the Doppler signal. The distance between the source and the sensor, about 50 cm, and the use of ultrasound frequency well above audible frequencies, 40 kHz, allow monitoring the breathing activity without any perception by the subject, and therefore without any modification of the sleep quality which is very important for sleep disorders diagnostic applications. This work is patented (patent pending 2013-7-31 number FR.13/57569.

  14. Role of ureogenesis in tackling problems of ammonia toxicity during exposure to higher ambient ammonia in the air-breathing walking catfish Clarias batrachus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nirmalendu Saha; Shritapa Datta; Kuheli Biswas; Zaiba Y Kharbuli

    2003-12-01

    In the present study, the possible role of ureogenesis to avoid the accumulation of toxic ammonia to a lethal level under hyper-ammonia stress was tested in the air-breathing walking catfish Clarias batrachus by exposing the fish at 25 mM NH4Cl for 7 days. Excretion of ammonia by the NH4Cl-exposed fish was totally suppressed, which was accompanied by significant accumulation of ammonia in different body tissues. The walking catfish, which is otherwise predominantly ammoniotelic, turned totally towards ureotelism from ammoniotelism with a 5- to 6-fold increase of urea-N excretion during exposure to higher ambient ammonia. Stimulation of ureogenesis was accompanied with significant increase of some of the key urea cycle enzymes such as carbamyl phosphate synthetase (urea cycle-related), argininosuccinate synthetase and argininosuccinate lyase both in hepatic and non-hepatic tissues. Due to this unique physiological strategy of turning towards ureotelism from ammoniotelism via the induced urea cycle, this air-breathing catfish is able to survive in very high ambient ammonia, which they face in certain seasons of the year in the natural habitat.

  15. Carbon 14 dating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gives a first introduction to 14C dating as it is put into practice at the radiocarbon dating centre of Claude-Bernard university (Lyon-1 univ., Villeurbanne, France): general considerations and recalls of nuclear physics; the 14C dating method; the initial standard activity; the isotopic fractioning; the measurement of samples activity; the liquid-scintillation counters; the calibration and correction of 14C dates; the preparation of samples; the benzene synthesis; the current applications of the method. (J.S.)

  16. Fast-starting for a breath: Air breathing in Hoplosternum littorale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, John Fleng

    2012-01-01

    overlap considerably in their kinematics (turning rates and distance covered), suggesting that air breathing in this species is performed using escapelike C-start motions. This demonstrates that C-starts in fish do not need external stimulation and can be spontaneous behaviours used outside the context...... to be food-related. Little is known about C-starts being used outside the context of escaping or feeding. Here, we test the hypothesis that air-breathing fish may use C-starts when gulping air at the surface. Air breathing is a common behaviour in many fish species when exposed to hypoxia, although certain...... species perform air-breathing in normoxia to fill their swim bladders for buoyancy control and/or sound transduction. Hoplos/emum littorale is an air-breathing freshwater catfish found in South America. Field video observations reveal that their air-breathing behaviour consists of a fast air...

  17. Influence of milk urea concentration on fractional urea disappearance rate from milk to blood plasma in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spek, J W; Dijkstra, J; Bannink, A

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between milk urea nitrogen (MUN; mg of N/dL) and urinary N excretion is affected, among others, by diurnal dynamics in MUN, which in turn is largely influenced by feed intake pattern and characteristics of urea transfer from blood plasma to milk and vice versa. This study aimed to obtain insight in urea transfer characteristics within the mammary gland and from the mammary gland to blood plasma in dairy cows at various concentrations of plasma urea nitrogen (PUN; mg of N/dL) and MUN. Urea transfer from milk to blood plasma and urea transfer within the mammary gland itself was evaluated in a 4×4 Latin square design using 4 lactating multiparous Holstein-Friesian cows (milk production of 39.8±4.70kg/d and 90±3.9 d in milk). Treatments consisted of 4 primed continuous intravenous urea infusions of 0, 5, 10, and 15g of urea/h. Boluses of [(15)N(15)N]urea were injected in cistern milk at 20, 60, and 100 min before the 1700h milking. Milk was collected in portions of approximately 2 L at the 1700h milking. Milk samples were analyzed for urea and enrichment of (15)N-urea. Results from one cow were discarded because of leakage of milk from the teats after injection of boluses of [(15)N(15)N]urea. Increasing urea infusion rate linearly increased PUN from 11.4 (0g of urea/h) to 25.9mg/dL (15g of urea/h) and MUN from 10.3 (0g of urea/h) to 23.5 (15g of urea/h) mg of N/dL. The percentage of injected [(15)N(15)N]urea recovered from milk at the time of injection was not affected by urea infusion rate and varied between 65.1 and 73.0%, indicating that a substantial portion of injected [(15)N(15)N]urea was not accounted for by collected milk. The estimated fractional disappearance rate of (15)N-urea from milk to blood (Kurea; per hour) linearly increased from 0.429 (0g of urea/h) to 0.641 per hour (15g of urea/h). Cistern injected [(15)N(15)N]urea diffused within 20 min after injection toward alveoli milk. Calculations with the average Kurea estimated in this

  18. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breath nitric oxide test system. 862.3080 Section... Systems § 862.3080 Breath nitric oxide test system. (a) Identification. A breath nitric oxide test system is a device intended to measure fractional nitric oxide in human breath. Measurement of changes...

  19. Breathing exercises for adults with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is a common long-term condition that remains poorly controlled in many people despite the availability of pharmacological interventions, evidence-based treatment guidelines and care pathways.(1) There is considerable public interest in the use of non-pharmacological approaches for the treatment of asthma.(2) A survey of people with asthma reported that many have used complementary and alternative medicine, often without the knowledge of their clinical team.(3) Such interventions include breathing techniques, herbal products, homeopathy and acupuncture. The role of breathing exercises within the management of asthma has been controversial, partly because early claims of effectiveness were exaggerated.(4) UK national guidance and international guidelines on the management of asthma have included the option of breathing exercise programmes as an adjuvant to pharmacological treatment.(5,6) Here we discuss the types of breathing exercises used and review the evidence for their effectiveness. PMID:26563876

  20. An introduction to the psychophysiology of breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, R

    1994-06-01

    Breathing can be viewed as an independent variable which affects emotion, cognition, and behavior as well as a dependent variable which reflects changes in emotion, cognition, and behavior. This bidirectional interaction is basic to an appreciation of the significance of breathing in terms of its relevance in research and application. The underlying premise of the present article is that since breathing is a behavior that is under voluntary as well as reflexive control, it can be modified according to the principles of both instrumental training (operant conditioning) and Pavlovian (classical) conditioning. The implications of this premise are relevant to theory, diagnosis, and treatment of stress and anxiety-related disorders (e.g., panic disorder, phobias, test anxiety, occupational strain, and related psychosomatic disorders), and to basic and applied research in the psychophysiology of breathing.

  1. Simulation of Carbon-14 Migration Through a Thick Unsaturated Alluvial Basin Resulting from an Underground Nuclear Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martian, P.; Larentzos, J.

    2008-12-01

    Yucca Flat is one of several areas on the Nevada Test Site that was used for underground nuclear testing. Extensive testing performed in the unsaturated and saturated zones have resulted in groundwater contamination and surface subsidence craters in the vicinity of the underground test areas. Simulation of multiphase 14C transport through the thick Yucca Flat alluvial basin was performed to estimate the magnitude of radionuclide attenuation occurring within the unsaturated zone. Parameterization of the 14C transport in the multiphase flow and transport simulator (FEHM) was verified with experimental data collected from a large unsaturated soil column experiment. The experimental data included 14C as a radio-labeled bicarbonate solution, SF6 gas, and lithium bromide solution breakthroughs. Two representative simulation cases with working points located at shallow and deep depths relative to the water table were created to investigate the impact of subsidence crater-enhanced recharge, crater-playa areal extent, gas-phase partitioning, solid-phase partitioning, and a reduced permeability/porosity compressed zone created during the explosion on 14C transport. The representative shallow test had a detonation point located 175 m below land surface, and the deep test had a working point 435 m below land surface in a 500 m deep unsaturated zone. Carbon-14 transport is influenced by gas-phase diffusion and sorption within the alluvium. Gas-phase diffusion is an attenuation mechanism that transports 14C gas as 14CO2 throughout the unsaturated zone and exposes it to a large amount of soil moisture, resulting in dilute concentrations. The simulations indicated that the majority of the 14C inventory remains in the unsaturated zone over a 1,000-year time period after detonation because gas-phase diffusion moves the bulk of the 14C away from the higher recharge occurring in crater playas. Retardation also plays a role in slowing advective aqueous phase transport to the water

  2. The retrotrapezoid nucleus and breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyenet, Patrice G; Stornetta, Ruth L; Abbott, Stephen B G; Depuy, Seth D; Kanbar, Roy

    2012-01-01

    The retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) is located in the rostral medulla oblongata close to the ventral surface and consists of a bilateral cluster of glutamatergic neurons that are non-aminergic and express homeodomain transcription factor Phox2b throughout life. These neurons respond vigorously to increases in local pCO(2) via cell-autonomous and paracrine (glial) mechanisms and receive additional chemosensory information from the carotid bodies. RTN neurons exclusively innervate the regions of the brainstem that contain the respiratory pattern generator (RPG). Lesion or inhibition of RTN neurons largely attenuates the respiratory chemoreflex of adult rats whereas their activation increases respiratory rate, inspiratory amplitude and active expiration. Phox2b mutations that cause congenital central hypoventilation syndrome in humans prevent the development of RTN neurons in mice. Selective deletion of the RTN Phox2b-VGLUT2 neurons by genetic means in mice eliminates the respiratory chemoreflex in neonates.In short, RTN Phox2b-VGLUT2 neurons are a major nodal point of the CNS network that regulates pCO(2) via breathing and these cells are probable central chemoreceptors. PMID:23080151

  3. Determination of urea content in urea cream by centrifugal partition chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Qun Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to establish a centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC method for determination of the urea ingredient in urea cream. The mechanism of this method is that urea is determined by UV detector at 430 nm after being extracted from the cream and derivatized on line via Ehrlich reaction in rotor of CPC, where the reaction products dissolve in the mobile phase and the cream matrix retains in the stationary phase. The mixed solvent consisting of n-hexane, methanol, hydrochloric acid and p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde with a ratio of 1000 mL:1000 mL:18 mL:2.0 g is used for solvent system of CPC. The CPC method proposed offers good precision and convenience without complex sample pretreatment processes.

  4. Oropharyngeal origin of markers in exhaled breath

    OpenAIRE

    Marteus, Helena

    2005-01-01

    Normal NO formation in the human airways occurs primarily in the nasal airways, where it is catalyzed by inducible NO synthase (iNOS), and in the oropharyngeal tract, via as yet not fully defined pathways. This NO can be detected in exhaled breath and when inflammation is present in the airways, for example in asthma, the concentration of NO is increased. Although most studies on non-invasive measurements of airway inflammation have focused on NO in exhaled breath, there has...

  5. UREA TRANSPORT DURING GAMETOGENESIS OF THE UNICELLULAR GREEN ALGA CHLAMYDOMONAS REINHARDTII

    OpenAIRE

    Zalutskaya, Zhanneta; Lapina, Tatyana; Von, Wiren; Ermilova, Elena

    2009-01-01

    Direct urea transport mechanisms are present in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Urea uptake system(s) are repressed by ammonium and they can be induced by urea or acetamide in ammonium-starved vegetative cells. Urea transport ability of the alga is altered during gametogenesis. Unlike vegetative cells, mature gametes showed a low urea uptake. Incubation of gametes with urea or acetamide resulted in the increasing of urea uptake ability and the regaining of chemotactic activity. The data suggest a ...

  6. Breath-based biomarkers for tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolk, Arend H. J.; van Berkel, Joep J. B. N.; Claassens, Mareli M.; Walters, Elisabeth; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Dallinga, Jan W.; van Schooten, Fredrik-Jan

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the potential of breath analysis by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to discriminate between samples collected prospectively from patients with suspected tuberculosis (TB). Samples were obtained in a TB endemic setting in South Africa where 28% of the culture proven TB patients had a Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) negative sputum smear. A training set of breath samples from 50 sputum culture proven TB patients and 50 culture negative non-TB patients was analyzed by GC-MS. A classification model with 7 compounds resulted in a training set with a sensitivity of 72%, specificity of 86% and accuracy of 79% compared with culture. The classification model was validated with an independent set of breath samples from 21 TB and 50 non-TB patients. A sensitivity of 62%, specificity of 84% and accuracy of 77% was found. We conclude that the 7 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that discriminate breath samples from TB and non-TB patients in our study population are probably host-response related VOCs and are not derived from the VOCs secreted by M. tuberculosis. It is concluded that at present GC-MS breath analysis is able to differentiate between TB and non-TB breath samples even among patients with a negative ZN sputum smear but a positive culture for M. tuberculosis. Further research is required to improve the sensitivity and specificity before this method can be used in routine laboratories.

  7. Jean-François Gallotte, Joëlle Malberg, Carbone 14 le film, Les Mutins de Pangée

    OpenAIRE

    Curien, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Carbone 14 le film est un témoignage sur le mouvement des radios libres, à travers l'exemple de « Carbone 14 », « la radio active » devenue « la radio qui vous encule par les oreilles ». Filmé en 4 jours à la rentrée 1982, avec du matériel volé, le film ovni de Jean-François Galotte et Joëlle Malberg est sélectionné au Festival de Cannes en 1983. Il fait un tollé qui retombe comme une crêpe, aux oubliettes : on n'en parle plus avant... 2011, trente ans après la création de la radio culte et c...

  8. Le carbone 14 : progrès récents et limitations de la méthode de datation

    OpenAIRE

    J. C. Duplessy; Arnold, M; Bard, E.; Cortijo, E.; Labeyrie, L.; Laj, C.; Lehman, B; Mazaud, A.; M. Paterne; Tisnerat, N.; L. Vidal

    1998-01-01

    La méthode de datation par le carbone 14 a permis l'établissement d'une échelle chronologique du Quaternaire Supérieur et a contribué à la découverte de phénomènes insoupçonnés comme l'existence de variations climatiques abruptes et de grande amplitude pendant la dernière période glaciaire et la déglaciation qui l'a terminée. L'effort continu pour comparer les âges carbone 14 avec les âges calendaires a été maintenant étendu au delà de 30 000 ans, même si le nombre de mesures est encore trop ...

  9. A Multimedia System for Breath Regulation and Relaxation

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Ching Liao; Han-Hong Lin; He-Lin Ruo; Po-Hsiang Hsu

    2015-01-01

    In the hectic life today, detrimental stress has caused numerous illness. To adjust mental states, breath regulation plays a core role in multiple relaxation techniques. In this paper, we introduce a multimedia system supporting breath regulation and relaxation. Features of this system include non-contact respiration detection, bio-signal monitoring, and breath interaction. In addition to illustrating this system, we also propose a novel form of breath interaction. Through this form of breath...

  10. Clinical Applications of CO2 and H2 Breath Test

    OpenAIRE

    ZHAO Si-qian; Chen, Bao-Jun; LUO Zhi-fu

    2016-01-01

    Breath test is non-invasive, high sensitivity and high specificity. In this article, CO2 breath test, H2 breath test and their clinical applications were elaborated. The main applications of CO2 breath test include helicobacter pylori test, liver function detection, gastric emptying test, insulin resistance test, pancreatic exocrine secretion test, etc. H2 breath test can be applied in the diagnosis of lactose malabsorption and detecting small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. With further res...

  11. Nuclear graphite waste's behaviour under disposal conditions: Study of the release and repartition of organic and inorganic forms of carbon 14 and tritium in alkaline media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    23000 tons of graphite wastes will be generated during dismantling of the first generation of French reactors (9 gas cooled reactors). These wastes are classified as Long Lived Low Level wastes (LLW-LL). As requested by the law, the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra) is studying concepts of low-depth disposals.In this work we focus on carbon 14, the main long-lived radionuclide in graphite waste (5730 y), but also on tritium, which is the main contributor to the radioactivity in the short term. Carbon 14 and tritium may be released from graphite waste in many forms in gaseous phase (14CO2, HT...) or in solution (14CO32-, HTO...). Their speciation will strongly affect their migration from the disposal site to the environment. Leaching experiments, in alkaline solution (0.1 M NaOH simulating repository conditions) have been performed on irradiated graphite, from Saint-Laurent A2 and G2 reactors, in order to quantify their release and characterize their speciation. The studies show that carbon 14 exists in both gaseous and aqueous phases. In the gaseous phase, release is weak (≤0.1%) and corresponds to oxidizable species. Carbon 14 is mainly released into liquid phase, as both inorganic and organic species. 65% of released fraction is inorganic and 35% organic carbon. Two tritiated species have been identified in gaseous phase: HTO and HT/Organically Bond Tritium. More than 90% of tritium in that phase corresponds to HT/OBT. But release is weak (≤0.1%). HTO is mainly in the liquid phase. (author)

  12. Mathematical modeling of urea transport in the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Anita T

    2014-01-01

    Mathematical modeling techniques have been useful in providing insights into biological systems, including the kidney. This article considers some of the mathematical models that concern urea transport in the kidney. Modeling simulations have been conducted to investigate, in the context of urea cycling and urine concentration, the effects of hypothetical active urea secretion into pars recta. Simulation results suggest that active urea secretion induces a "urea-selective" improvement in urine concentrating ability. Mathematical models have also been built to study the implications of the highly structured organization of tubules and vessels in the renal medulla on urea sequestration and cycling. The goal of this article is to show how physiological problems can be formulated and studied mathematically, and how such models may provide insights into renal functions.

  13. Breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer: Comparison of free breathing gating with the breath-hold technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer implies a risk of late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. This is the first study to evaluate cardiopulmonary dose sparing of breathing adapted radiotherapy (BART) using free breathing gating, and to compare this respiratory technique with voluntary breath-hold. Patients and methods: 17 patients were CT-scanned during non-coached breathing manoeuvre including free breathing (FB), end-inspiration gating (IG), end-expiration gating (EG), deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and end-expiration breath-hold (EBH). The Varian Real-time Position Management system (RPMTM) was used to monitor respiratory movement and to gate the scanner. For each breathing phase, a population based internal margin (IM) was estimated based on average chest wall excursion, and incorporated into an individually optimised three-field mono-isocentric wide tangential photon field treatment plan for each scan. The target included the remaining breast, internal mammary nodes and periclavicular nodes. Results: The mean anteroposterior chest wall excursion during FB was 2.5 mm. For IG and EG, the mean excursions within gating windows were 1.1 and 0.7 mm, respectively, whereas for DIBH and EBH the excursions were 4.1 and 2.6 mm, respectively. For patients with left-sided cancer, the median heart volume receiving more than 50% of the prescription dose was reduced from 19.2% for FB to 2.8% for IG and 1.9% for DIBH, and the median left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery volume was reduced from 88.9% to 22.4% for IG and 3.6% for DIBH. Simultaneously, the median ipsilateral relative lung volume irradiated to >50% of the prescribed target dose for both right- and left-sided cancers was reduced from 45.6% for FB to 29.5% for IG and 27.7% for DIBH. For EBH and EG, both the irradiated heart, LAD and lung volumes increased compared to FB. Conclusions: This is the first study to demonstrate the dosimetric benefits

  14. Urea thermolysis and NOx reduction with and without SCR catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) has been a leading contender for removal of nitrogen oxides (deNOx) from diesel engine emissions. Despite its advantages, the SCR technology faces some critical detriments to its catalytic performance such as catalyst surface passivation (caused by deposit formation) and consequent stoichiometric imbalance of the urea consumption. Deposit formation deactivates catalytic performance by not only consuming part of the ammonia produced during urea decomposition but also degrading the structural and thermal properties of the catalyst surface. We have characterized the urea thermolysis with and without the urea-SCR catalyst using both spectroscopic (DRIFTS and Raman) and thermal techniques (thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)) to identify the deposit components and their corresponding thermal properties. Urea thermolysis exhibits two decomposition stages, involving ammonia generation and consumption, respectively. The decomposition after the second stage leads to the product of melamine complexes, (HNC=NH)x(HNCO)y, that hinder catalytic performance. The presence of catalyst accompanied with a good spray of the urea solution helps to eliminate the second stage. In this work, kinetics of the direct reduction of NOx by urea is determined and the possibility of using additives to the urea solution in order to rejuvenate the catalyst surface and improve its performance will be discussed

  15. Pengolahan Limbah Cair Pabrik Pupuk Urea Menggunakan Advanced Oxidation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmadi Darmadi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Limbah cair pabrik pupuk urea terdiri dari urea dan amonium yang masing-masing mempunyai konsentrasi berkisar antara 1500-10000 ppm dan 400-3000 ppm. Konsentrasi urea yang tinggi di dalam badan air dapat menyebabkan blooming algae dalam ekosistem tersebut yang dapat mengakibatkan kehidupan biota air lain terserang penyakit. Peristiwa ini terjadi karena kurangnya nutrisi bagi biota air dan sedikitnya sinar matahari yang dapat menembusi permukaan air. Disamping kedua hal tersebut di atas, algae juga dapat memproduksi senyawa beracun bagi biota air dan manusia. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengolah urea menggunakan oksidasi konvensional (H2O2 dan Advanced Oxidation Processes (kombinasi H2O2-Fe2+ pada pH 5 dengan parameter yang digunakan adalah variasi konsen-trasi awal H2O2  dan konsentrasi Fe2+. Hasil percobaan menunjukkan bahwa penurunan konsentrasi urea tertinggi diperoleh pada penggunaan reagen fenton (8000 ppm H2O2 dan 500 ppm Fe2+, yaitu dapat menurunkan urea dari konsentrasi awal urea 2566,145 ppm menjadi 0 ppm. Kinetika reaksi dekomposisi urea menjadi amonium dan amonium menjadi nitrit dan nitrat yang diuji mengikuti laju kinetika reaksi orde 1 (satu terhadap urea dan orde satu terhadap amonium dengan konstanta laju reaksi masing-masing k1 = 0,019 dan k2 = 0,022 min-1.

  16. Carcass characteristics of sheep fed diets with slow-release urea replacing conventional urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evanilton Moura Alves

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effects of adding slow-release urea to replace conventional urea in the diet on carcass characteristics of feedlot sheep. We used 20 Santa Ines x SRD rams, with average body weight of 21.1±1.2 kgand average age of 120 days, distributed in a completely randomized design with 5 treatments. The replacement levels used as treatments were 0, 20, 40, 60, and 80%, composing diets of about 12% crude protein, with 50 % Tifton-85 hay and 50% concentrate. There was no influence of slow release urea on weight at slaughter (35.17 kg, and on hot (16.75 kg and cold (16.24 kg carcass weight, but the yield of these carcasses showed quadratic trend, revealing lower percentages at 48.5 and 47.63% replacement levels, respectively. The weights and yields of cuts did not change, except for the posterior arm, whose values showed a cubic trend. Objective measures of carcass, loin eye area, and subjective evaluations of conformation, finishing and marbling of carcasses were not affected. The subcutaneous fat thickness decreased linearly (4.25 to2.48 mm. The inclusion of slow release urea in the diet changes the yield and reduces subcutaneous fat, however, it does not influence other carcass characteristics.

  17. Breath tests: principles, problems, and promise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breath tests rely on the measurement of gases produced in the intestine, absorbed, and expired in the breath. Carbohydrates, such as lactose and sucrose, can be administered in ysiologic doses; if malabsorbed, they will be metabolized to hydrogen by colonic bacteria. Since hydrogen is not produced by human metabolic reactions, a rise in breath hydrogen, as measured by gas chromatography, is evidence of carbohydrate malabsorption. Likewise, a rise in breath hydrogen marks the transit time of nonabsorbable carbohydrates such as lactulose through the small intestine into the colon. Simple end-expiratory interval collection into nonsiliconized vacutainer tubes has made these noninvasive tests quite convenient to perform, but various problems, including changes in stool pH intestinal motility, or metabolic rate, may influence results. Another group of breath tests uses substrates labeled with radioactive or stable isotopes of carbon. Labeled fat substrates such as trioctanoin, tripalmitin, and triolein do not produce the expected rise in labeled breath CO2 if there is fat malabsorption. Bile acid malabsorption and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth can be measured with labeled cholylglycine or cholyltaurine. Labeled drugs such as aminopyrine, methacetin, and phenacetin can be used as an indication of drug metabolism and liver function. Radioactive substrates have been used to trace metabolic pathways and can be measured by scintillation counters. The availability of nonradioactive stable isotopes has made these ideal for use in children and pregnant women, but the cost of substrates and the mass spectrometers to measure them has so far limited their use to research centers. It is hoped that new techniques of processing and measurement will allow further realization of the exciting potential breath analysis has in a growing list of clinical applications

  18. Fast-starting for a breath: Air breathing in Hoplosternum littorale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domenici, Paolo; Norin, Tommy; Bushnell, Peter G.;

    , with those of mechanically-triggered C-start escape responses. Our results show that these two behaviours overlap considerably in their kinematics (turning rates and distance covered), suggesting that air breathing in this species is performed using escapelike C-start motions. This demonstrates that C...... by the fall of a prey item on the water surface, and in tapping motions of goldfish, a behaviour that was interpreted to be food-related. Little is known about C-starts being used outside the context of escaping or feeding. Here, we test the hypothesis that air-breathing fish may use C-starts when gulping air...... at the surface. Air breathing is a common behaviour in many fish species when exposed to hypoxia, although certain species perform air-breathing in normoxia to fill their swim bladders for buoyancy control and/or sound transduction. Hoplosternum littorale is an air-breathing freshwater catfish found in South...

  19. Nitrogen Cycling and Losses Under Rice-Wheat Rotations with Coated Urea and Urea in the Taihu Lake Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Zhi; ZHU Jian-Guo; GAO Ren; H. YASUKAZU; FENG Ke

    2007-01-01

    A lysimeter experiment with undisturbed soil profiles was carried out to study nitrogen cycling and losses in a paddy soil with applications of coated urea and urea under a rice-wheat rotation system in the Taihu Lake region from 2001 to 2003. Treatments for rice and wheat included urea at conventional, 300 (rice) and 250 (wheat) kg N ha-1, and reduced levels, 150 (rice) and 125 (wheat) kg N ha-1, coated urea at two levels, 100 (rice) and 75 (wheat) kg N ha-1, and 150(rice) and 125 (wheat) kg N ha-1, and a control with no nitrogen arranged in a completely randomized design. The results under two rice-wheat rotations showed that N losses through both NH3 volatilization and runoff in the coated urea treatments were much lower than those in the urea treatments. In the urea treatments N runoff losses were significantly (P < 0.001) positively correlated (r = 0.851) with applied N. N concentration in surface water increased rapidly to maximum two days after urea application and then decreased quickly. However, if there was no heavy rain within five days of fertilizer application, the likelihood of N loss by runoff was not high. As the treatments showed little difference in N loss via percolation, nitrate N in the groundwater of the paddy fields was not directly related to N leaching. The total yieldof the two rice-wheat rotations in the treatment of coated urea at 50% conventional level was higher than that in the treatment of urea at the conventional level. Thus, coated urea was more favorable to rice production and environmental protection than urea.

  20. Quantitative assessment of urea, glucose and ammonia changes in human dental plaque and saliva following rinsing with urea and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, D L; Kleinberg, I

    1983-01-01

    The rates of three processes associated with the rise and fall in plaque pH, that normally occur following a urea rinse, were determined: (i) disappearance of urea from plaque, (ii) disappearance of urea from saliva and (iii) formation and disappearance from plaque of the ammonia produced by the plaque bacteria from the urea. Also examined were two processes associated with the fall and rise in pH following a glucose rinse: the disappearance of glucose from plaque and from saliva. Entry into plaque of either urea or glucose during rinsing was immediate; the subsequent disappearance of both from the plaque was slow and followed first-order kinetics. The ammonia formation and urea-disappearance results suggested that clearance of urea from the plaque occurred mainly by bacterial degradation and not by diffusion out of the plaque. The rate constants for ammonia formation and for its subsequent disappearance from the plaque made it clear why a rapid rise and a slow subsequent fall in the pH occurs after urea rinsing. The rate constants enabled calculation of the ammonia produced as a percentage of the urea utilized. Only 16-26 per cent of the urea was recovered as ammonia and the remainder of the urea-N was stored probably as NH2 moieties of certain amino acids. Such storage may enable the plaque bacteria to maintain the pH at an elevated level for an extended period of time by bacterial production of ammonia from these stored compounds after the urea ceases to be available as a source of substrate. PMID:6580848

  1. Ecological sounds affect breath duration more than artificial sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, Mauro; Santoro, Ilaria; Tamburini, Giorgia; Prpic, Valter; Sors, Fabrizio; Galmonte, Alessandra; Agostini, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that auditory rhythms affect both movement and physiological functions. We hypothesized that the ecological sounds of human breathing can affect breathing more than artificial sounds of breathing, varying in tones for inspiration and expiration. To address this question, we monitored the breath duration of participants exposed to three conditions: (a) ecological sounds of breathing, (b) artificial sounds of breathing having equal temporal features as the ecological sounds, (c) no sounds (control). We found that participants' breath duration variability was reduced in the ecological sound condition, more than in the artificial sound condition. We suggest that ecological sounds captured the timing of breathing better than artificial sounds, guiding as a consequence participants' breathing. We interpreted our results according to the Theory of Event Coding, providing further support to its validity, and suggesting its possible extension in the domain of physiological functions which are both consciously and unconsciously controlled. PMID:25637249

  2. The Helicobacter pylori VacA toxin is a urea permease that promotes urea diffusion across epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombola, Francesco; Morbiato, Laura; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino; Zoratti, Mario; Papini, Emanuele

    2001-01-01

    Urease and the cytotoxin VacA are two major virulence factors of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori, which is responsible for severe gastroduodenal diseases. Diffusion of urea, the substrate of urease, into the stomach is critically required for the survival of infecting H. pylori. We now show that VacA increases the transepithelial flux of urea across model epithelia by inducing an unsaturable permeation pathway. This transcellular pathway is selective, as it conducts thiourea, but not glycerol and mannitol, demonstrating that it is not due to a loosening of intercellular junctions. Experiments performed with different cell lines, grown in a nonpolarized state, confirm that VacA permeabilizes the cell plasma membrane to urea. Inhibition studies indicate that transmembrane pores formed by VacA act as passive urea transporters. Thus, their inhibition by the anion channel blocker 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid significantly decreases toxin-induced urea fluxes in both polarized and nonpolarized cells. Moreover, phloretin, a well-known inhibitor of eukaryotic urea transporters, blocks VacA-mediated urea and ion transport and the toxin’s main biologic effects. These data show that VacA behaves as a low-pH activated, passive urea transporter potentially capable of permeabilizing the gastric epithelium to urea. This opens the novel possibility that in vivo VacA may favor H. pylori infectivity by optimizing urease activity. PMID:11560962

  3. Effect of urea and urea-gamma treatments on cellulose degradation of Thai rice straw and corn stalk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellulose degradation of 20% urea treated and 20% urea-10 kGy gamma treated Thai rice straw and corn stalk showed that combination effect of urea and gamma radiation gave a higher % decrease in neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF), acid detergent lignin (ADL), cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin and cutin in comparison with urea effect only for both room temperature storage and room temperature +258 K storage. The results also indicated that cellulose degradation proceeded with time, even at 258 K. A drastic drop to less than half of the original contents in NDF, ADF, and ADL could not be obtained in this study

  4. Effect of urea and urea-gamma treatments on cellulose degradation of Thai rice straw and corn stalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchorndhevakul, Siriwattana

    2002-08-01

    Cellulose degradation of 20% urea treated and 20% urea-10 kGy gamma treated Thai rice straw and corn stalk showed that combination effect of urea and gamma radiation gave a higher % decrease in neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF), acid detergent lignin (ADL), cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin and cutin in comparison with urea effect only for both room temperature storage and room temperature +258 K storage. The results also indicated that cellulose degradation proceeded with time, even at 258 K. A drastic drop to less than half of the original contents in NDF, ADF, and ADL could not be obtained in this study.

  5. Nickel hydroxide modified electrodes for urea determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Dall´Antonia

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Nickel hydroxide films were prepared by electrodeposition from a solution Ni(NO32 0,05 mol L ?¹ on ITO electrodes (Tin oxide doped with Indium on PET-like plastic film, applying a current of - 0,1 A cm ?² during different time intervals between 1800 and 7200 s. The electrochemical behavior of the nickel hydroxide electrode was investigated through a cyclic voltammogram, in NaOH 1,0 mol L ?¹, where it was observed two peaks in the profile in 0,410 and 0,280 V, corresponding to redox couple Ni(II/Ni(III. A sensor for urea presenting a satisfactory answer can be obtained when, after the deposit of the film of Ni(OH2 on the electrode of nickel, it is immersed in a solution of NaOH 1,0 mol L ?¹ and applying a potential of + 0,435 V, where the maximum of the anodic current occurs in the cyclic voltammogram. Analyzing the results it can be observed that, for a range of analite concentration between 5 to 50 m mol L ?¹, the behavior is linear and the sensibility found was of 20,3 mA cm?² (mol L?¹?¹, presenting reproducibility confirming the nickel hydroxide electrodes utilization for the determination of urea.

  6. Sleep disordered breathing in community psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirstie N. Anderson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Sleep disturbance is prominent in many neuropsychiatric disorders and may precipitate or exacerbate a range of psychiatric conditions. Few studies have investigated sleep disordered breathing and in particular obstructive sleep apnoea in community psychiatric patients and the commonly used screening instruments have not been evaluated in patients with psychiatric disorders. The objective is to evaluate the prevalence of sleep disordered breathing in a community cohort with chronic mental illness on long term psychotropic medication, and to assess the effectiveness of commonly used screening instruments to detect abnormal sleep. Methods: 52 patients completed sleep questionnaires and 50 undertook overnight oximetry. Results: 52% (n = 26 had sleep-disordered breathing; 20% (n = 10 had moderate/severe sleep apnoea. The Epworth Sleepiness Score and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory did not predict sleep disordered breathing. Conclusions: Patients with psychiatric disorders in the community have a high rate of undiagnosed sleep disordered breathing, which is not reliably detected by established sleep disorder screening questionnaires.

  7. Sudarshan kriya yoga: Breathing for health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer A Zope

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breathing techniques are regularly recommended for relaxation, stress management, control of psychophysiological states, and to improve organ function. Yogic breathing, defined as a manipulation of breath movement, has been shown to positively affect immune function, autonomic nervous system imbalances, and psychological or stress-related disorders. The aim of this study was to assess and provide a comprehensive review of the physiological mechanisms, the mind-body connection, and the benefits of Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY in a wide range of clinical conditions. Various online databases searched were Medline, Psychinfo, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. All the results were carefully screened and articles on SKY were selected. The references from these articles were checked to find any other potentially relevant articles. SKY, a unique yogic breathing practice, involves several types of cyclical breathing patterns, ranging from slow and calming to rapid and stimulating. There is mounting evidence to suggest that SKY can be a beneficial, low-risk, low-cost adjunct to the treatment of stress, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, stress-related medical illnesses, substance abuse, and rehabilitation of criminal offenders.

  8. Sudarshan kriya yoga: Breathing for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zope, Sameer A; Zope, Rakesh A

    2013-01-01

    Breathing techniques are regularly recommended for relaxation, stress management, control of psychophysiological states, and to improve organ function. Yogic breathing, defined as a manipulation of breath movement, has been shown to positively affect immune function, autonomic nervous system imbalances, and psychological or stress-related disorders. The aim of this study was to assess and provide a comprehensive review of the physiological mechanisms, the mind-body connection, and the benefits of Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY) in a wide range of clinical conditions. Various online databases searched were Medline, Psychinfo, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. All the results were carefully screened and articles on SKY were selected. The references from these articles were checked to find any other potentially relevant articles. SKY, a unique yogic breathing practice, involves several types of cyclical breathing patterns, ranging from slow and calming to rapid and stimulating. There is mounting evidence to suggest that SKY can be a beneficial, low-risk, low-cost adjunct to the treatment of stress, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, stress-related medical illnesses, substance abuse, and rehabilitation of criminal offenders. PMID:23440614

  9. Pulse Ejection Presentation System Synchronized with Breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Ami; Sato, Junta; Ohtsu, Kaori; Bannai, Yuichi; Okada, Kenichi

    Trials on transmission of olfactory information together with audio/visual information are currently being conducted in the field of multimedia. However, continuous emission of scents in high concentration creates problems of human adaptation and remnant odors in air. To overcome such problems we developed an olfactory display in conjunction with Canon Inc. This display has high emission control in the ink-jet so that it can provide stable pulse emission of scents. Humans catch a scent when they breathe in and inhale smell molecules in air. Therefore, it is important that the timing of scent presentation is synchronized with human breathing. We also developed a breath sensor which detects human inspiration. In this study, we combined the olfactory display with the breath sensor to make a pulse ejection presentation system synchronized the breath. The experimental evaluation showed that the system had more than 90 percent of detection rate. Another evaluation was held at KEIO TECHNO-MALL 2007. From questionnaire results of the participants, we found that the system made the user feel continuous sense of smell avoiding adaptation. It is expected that our system enables olfactory information to be synchronized with audio/visual information in arbitrary duration at any time.

  10. Technologies for Clinical Diagnosis Using Expired Human Breath Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Thalakkotur Lazar; Pownraj, Prabhahari; Abdulla, Sukhananazerin; Pullithadathil, Biji

    2015-01-01

    This review elucidates the technologies in the field of exhaled breath analysis. Exhaled breath gas analysis offers an inexpensive, noninvasive and rapid method for detecting a large number of compounds under various conditions for health and disease states. There are various techniques to analyze some exhaled breath gases, including spectrometry, gas chromatography and spectroscopy. This review places emphasis on some of the critical biomarkers present in exhaled human breath, and its related effects. Additionally, various medical monitoring techniques used for breath analysis have been discussed. It also includes the current scenario of breath analysis with nanotechnology-oriented techniques. PMID:26854142

  11. Technologies for Clinical Diagnosis Using Expired Human Breath Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalakkotur Lazar Mathew

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review elucidates the technologies in the field of exhaled breath analysis. Exhaled breath gas analysis offers an inexpensive, noninvasive and rapid method for detecting a large number of compounds under various conditions for health and disease states. There are various techniques to analyze some exhaled breath gases, including spectrometry, gas chromatography and spectroscopy. This review places emphasis on some of the critical biomarkers present in exhaled human breath, and its related effects. Additionally, various medical monitoring techniques used for breath analysis have been discussed. It also includes the current scenario of breath analysis with nanotechnology-oriented techniques

  12. Sleep and Breathing at High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Himanshu; Anholm, James D.

    1999-01-01

    Sleep at high altitude is characterized by poor subjective quality, increased awakenings, frequent brief arousals, marked nocturnal hypoxemia, and periodic breathing. A change in sleep architecture with an increase in light sleep and decreasing slow-wave and REM sleep have been demonstrated. Periodic breathing with central apnea is almost universally seen amongst sojourners to high altitude, although it is far less common in long-standing high altitude dwellers. Hypobaric hypoxia in concert with periodic breathing appears to be the principal cause of sleep disruption at altitude. Increased sleep fragmentation accounts for the poor sleep quality and may account for some of the worsened daytime performance at high altitude. Hypoxic sleep disruption contributes to the symptoms of acute mountain sickness. Hypoxemia at high altitude is most severe during sleep. Acetazolamide improves sleep, AMS symptoms, and hypoxemia at high altitude. Low doses of a short acting benzodiazepine (temazepam) may also be useful in improving sleep in high altitude. PMID:11898114

  13. Effect of dietary turmeric on breath hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimouchi, Akito; Nose, Kazutoshi; Takaoka, Motoko; Hayashi, Hiroko; Kondo, Takaharu

    2009-08-01

    Turmeric is widely used in Indian cuisine. The main constituents of turmeric are curcumin and its analogues, which are well-known antioxidant compounds. In the present study, we hypothesized that turmeric in curry might increase bowel motility and activate hydrogen-producing bacterial flora in the colon, thereby increasing the concentration of breath hydrogen. Eight healthy subjects fasted for 12 h and ingested curry and rice with or without turmeric (turmeric knockout curry). Breath-hydrogen concentrations were analyzed every 15 min for 6 h by gas chromatography with a semiconductor detector. Curry with turmeric significantly increased the area under the curve of breath hydrogen and shortened small-bowel transit time, compared with curry not containing turmeric. These results suggested that dietary turmeric activated bowel motility and carbohydrate colonic fermentation. PMID:19034660

  14. 76 FR 15339 - Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... its notice of institution (75 FR 74746, December 1, 2010) were adequate and that the respondent... COMMISSION Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... orders on solid urea from Russia and Ukraine. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it...

  15. Elastic behavior of flexible polyether(urethane–urea) foam materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuur, van der Martijn; Heide, van der Evert; Feijen, Jan; Gaymans, Reinoud J.

    2004-01-01

    Polyether(urethane–urea) foams (PEUU) with varying urea contents and different polyether segments (PPO and PPO-co-PEO (93/7 w/w)) were compacted to transparent solid plaques via compression molding. The thermal, mechanical and elastic properties of the compacted PEUU materials were studied. With inc

  16. Nitrification and Anammox with urea as the energy source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sliekers, A.O.; Haaijer, S.C.M.; Schmid, M.C.; Harhangi, R.H.; Verwegen, K.; Kuenen, J.G.; Jetten, M.S.M.

    2004-01-01

    Urea is present in many ecosystems and can be used as an energy source by chemolithotrophic aerobic ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). Thus the utilization of urea in comparison to ammonia, by AOB as well as anaerobic ammonia oxidizing (Anammox) bacteria was investigated, using enrichments cultures,

  17. The use of active breathing control (ABC) to minimize breathing motion during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. Reducing the treatment margin for organ motion during breathing reduces the volume of irradiated normal tissues. This may allow a higher dose of radiation to be delivered to the target volume for thoracic and abdominal tumors. However, such margin reduction must not increase the risk of marginal misses which may lead to local failure. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of using Active Breathing Control (ABC) to temporarily immobilize the patient's breathing. Planning CT scans and radiation delivery can then be performed at identical ABC conditions such that a minimal margin for breathing motion can be prescribed safely. Methods and Materials. An active breathing control (ABC) apparatus was constructed consisting of two pairs of flow monitor and scissors valve; one each to control the inhalation and exhalation paths to the patient. The patient breathed through a mouth-piece or face mask connected to the ABC apparatus. A personal computer was used to process the respiratory signal and to display the changing lung volume in real-time. At some time after the patient achieved a stable breathing pattern, the operator activated ABC at a pre-selected point in the breathing cycle. Both valves were then closed to immobilize breathing motion. The period of active breath-hold was that which could be comfortably and repeatedly tolerated by each individual patient, as determined during a training session. The feasibility of the ABC procedure was studied by acquiring volumetric CT scans of a patient during active breath-hold. A helical CT scanner was used. These ABC scans were acquired at one-half to one-third the dose delivered with routine CT scanning. Nine patients with tumors in the thorax and abdomen were studied. Contiguous CT slices were obtained for a region which encompassed the target volume. At least 4 sets of volumetric scans were obtained; one with the patient breathing normally; two ABC scans at the same point near the end of normal inspiration

  18. Effects of nitrogen supply on inter-organ fluxes of urea-N and renal urea-N kinetics in lactating Holstein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røjen, Betina Amdisen; Theil, Peter Kappel; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2011-01-01

    The effects of decreasing ruminal urea infusion in lactating dairy cows fed a basal diet deficient in rumen degradable protein on inter-organ urea-N fluxes, epithelial urea-N extraction, and renal urea-N kinetics were investigated. Eight Danish Holstein cows fitted with a ruminal cannula...... and permanent indwelling catheters in the major splanchnic blood vessels and the gastrosplenic vein were used. The cows were randomly allocated to a triplicate incomplete 3 × 3 Latin square design with 14-d periods. Treatments were continuous ventral ruminal infusion of water, 4.1 g of feed urea/kg of dry...... matter intake, and 8.5 g of feed urea/kg of dry matter intake. Dry matter intake and milk yield decreased linearly with decreasing urea infusion. Arterial blood urea-N and ruminal ammonia concentrations decreased linearly with decreasing urea infusion. In absolute amounts, the urea-N recycling did...

  19. Medication effects on sleep and breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Gilbert; Tsai, Sheila; Lee-Chiong, Teofilo

    2014-09-01

    Sleep respiration is regulated by circadian, endocrine, mechanical and chemical factors, and characterized by diminished ventilatory drive and changes in Pao2 and Paco2 thresholds. Hypoxemia and hypercapnia are more pronounced during rapid eye movement. Breathing is influenced by sleep stage and airway muscle tone. Patient factors include medical comorbidities and body habitus. Medications partially improve obstructive sleep apnea and stabilize periodic breathing at altitude. Potential adverse consequences of medications include precipitation or worsening of disorders. Risk factors for adverse medication effects include aging, medical disorders, and use of multiple medications that affect respiration.

  20. Laboratory Experiments to Evaluate Matrix Diffusion of Dissolved Organic Carbon Carbon-14 in Southern Nevada Fractured-rock Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Ronald L. [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute; Fereday, Wyatt [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) carbon-14 (14C) is used to estimate groundwater ages by comparing the DIC 14C content in groundwater in the recharge area to the DIC 14C content in the downgradient sampling point. However, because of chemical reactions and physical processes between groundwater and aquifer rocks, the amount of DIC 14C in groundwater can change and result in 14C loss that is not because of radioactive decay. This loss of DIC 14C results in groundwater ages that are older than the actual groundwater ages. Alternatively, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 14C in groundwater does not react chemically with aquifer rocks, so DOC 14C ages are generally younger than DIC 14C ages. In addition to chemical reactions, 14C ages may also be altered by the physical process of matrix diffusion. The net effect of a continuous loss of 14C to the aquifer matrix by matrix diffusion and then radioactive decay is that groundwater appears to be older than it actually is. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure matrix diffusion coefficients for DOC 14C in volcanic and carbonate aquifer rocks from southern Nevada. Experiments were conducted using bromide (Br-) as a conservative tracer and 14C-labeled trimesic acid (TMA) as a surrogate for groundwater DOC. Outcrop samples from six volcanic aquifers and five carbonate aquifers in southern Nevada were used. The average DOC 14C matrix diffusion coefficient for volcanic rocks was 2.9 x 10-7 cm2/s, whereas the average for carbonate rocks was approximately the same at 1.7 x 10-7 cm2/s. The average Br- matrix diffusion coefficient for volcanic rocks was 10.4 x 10-7 cm2/s, whereas the average for carbonate rocks was less at 6.5 x 10-7 cm2/s. Carbonate rocks exhibited greater variability in

  1. Finger dexterity and visual discrimination following two yoga breathing practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Telles

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Practicing yoga has been shown to improve motor functions and attention. Though attention is required for fine motor and discrimination tasks, the effect of yoga breathing techniques on fine motor skills and visual discrimination has not been assessed. Aim: To study the effect of yoga breathing techniques on finger dexterity and visual discrimination. Materials and Methods: The present study consisted of one hundred and forty subjects who had enrolled for stress management. They were randomly divided into two groups, one group practiced high frequency yoga breathing while the other group practiced breath awareness. High frequency yoga breathing (kapalabhati, breath rate 1.0 Hz and breath awareness are two yoga practices which improve attention. The immediate effect of high frequency yoga breathing and breath awareness (i were assessed on the performance on the O′Connor finger dexterity task and (ii (in a shape and size discrimination task. Results: There was a significant improvement in the finger dexterity task by 19% after kapalabhati and 9% after breath awareness (P<0.001 in both cases, repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc analyses. There was a significant reduction (P<0.001 in error (41% after kapalabhati and 21% after breath awareness as well as time taken to complete the shape and size discrimination test (15% after kapalabhati and 15% after breath awareness; P<0.001 was also observed. Conclusion: Both kapalabahati and breath awareness can improve fine motor skills and visual discrimination, with a greater magnitude of change after kapalabhati.

  2. Structure and permeation mechanism of a mammalian urea transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, Elena J.; Cao, Yu; Enkavi, Giray; Quick, Matthias; Pan, Yaping; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Zhou, Ming (UIUC); (Columbia)

    2012-09-17

    As an adaptation to infrequent access to water, terrestrial mammals produce urine that is hyperosmotic to plasma. To prevent osmotic diuresis by the large quantity of urea generated by protein catabolism, the kidney epithelia contain facilitative urea transporters (UTs) that allow rapid equilibration between the urinary space and the hyperosmotic interstitium. Here we report the first X-ray crystal structure of a mammalian UT, UT-B, at a resolution of 2.36 {angstrom}. UT-B is a homotrimer and each protomer contains a urea conduction pore with a narrow selectivity filter. Structural analyses and molecular dynamics simulations showed that the selectivity filter has two urea binding sites separated by an approximately 5.0 kcal/mol energy barrier. Functional studies showed that the rate of urea conduction in UT-B is increased by hypoosmotic stress, and that the site of osmoregulation coincides with the location of the energy barrier.

  3. In vivo proton MRS of normal pancreas metabolites during breath-holding and free-breathing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, T.-H. [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, 95 Yong-An Road, Beijing (China); Jin, E.-H., E-mail: erhujin1@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, 95 Yong-An Road, Beijing (China); Shen, H. [GE China Company Ltd, Healthcare, General Electric Company, Beijing (China); Zhang, Y.; He, W. [Department of Radiology, Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University, 95 Yong-An Road, Beijing (China)

    2012-07-15

    Aim: To characterize normal pancreas metabolites using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) at 3 T under conditions of breath-holding and free-breathing. Materials and methods: The pancreases of 32 healthy volunteers were examined using {sup 1}H MRS during breath-holding and free-breathing acquisitions in a single-voxel point-resolved selective spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) technique using a 3 T MRI system. Resonances were compared between paired spectra of the two breathing modes. Furthermore, correlations between lipid (Lip) content and age, body-mass index (BMI), as well as choline (Cho) peak visibility of the normal pancreas were analysed during breath-holding. Results: Twenty-nine pairs of spectra were successfully obtained showing three major resonances, Lip, Cho, cholesterol and the unsaturated parts of the olefinic region of fatty acids (Chol + Unsat). Breath-hold spectra were generally better, with higher signal-to-noise ratios (SNR; Z=-2.646, p = 0.008) and Cho peak visible status (Z=-2.449, p = 0.014). Correlations were significant between spectra acquired by the two breathing modes, especially for Lip height, Lip area, and the area of other peaks at 1.9-4.1 ppm. However, the Lip resonance was significantly different between the spectra of the two breathing modes (p < 0.05). In the breath-holding spectra, there were significant positive correlations between Lip peak height, area, and age (r = 0.491 and 0.521, p = 0.007 and 0.004), but not between Lip peak area and BMI. There was no statistical difference in Cho resonances between males and females. The Lip peak height and area were significantly higher in the Cho peak invisible group than in the Cho peak visible group (t = 2.661 and 2.353, p = 0.030 and 0.043). Conclusion: In vivo{sup 1}H MRS of the normal pancreas at 3 T is technically feasible and can characterize several metabolites. {sup 1}H MRS during breath-holding acquisition is superior to that during free-breathing

  4. The nutritional management of urea cycle disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J V

    2001-01-01

    Diet is one of the mainstays of the treatment of patients with urea cycle disorders. The protein intake should be adjusted to take account of the inborn error and its severity and the patient's age, growth rate, and individual preferences. Currently, the widely used standards for protein intake are probably more generous than necessary, particularly for those with the more severe variants. Most patients, except those with arginase deficiency, will need supplements of arginine, but the value of other supplements including citrate and carnitine is unclear. Any patient on a low-protein diet should be monitored clinically and with appropriate laboratory tests. All should have an emergency (crisis) regimen to prevent decompensation during periods of metabolic stress.

  5. Hydrolyzable polyureas bearing hindered urea bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Hanze; Cheng, Jianjun

    2014-12-10

    Hydrolyzable polymers are widely used materials that have found numerous applications in biomedical, agricultural, plastic, and packaging industrials. They usually contain ester and other hydrolyzable bonds, such as anhydride, acetal, ketal, or imine, in their backbone structures. Here, we report the first design of hydrolyzable polyureas bearing dynamic hindered urea bonds (HUBs) that can reversibly dissociate to bulky amines and isocyanates, the latter of which can be further hydrolyzed by water, driving the equilibrium to facilitate the degradation of polyureas. Polyureas bearing 1-tert-butyl-1-ethylurea bonds that show high dynamicity (high bond dissociation rate), in the form of either linear polymers or cross-linked gels, can be completely degraded by water under mild conditions. Given the simplicity and low cost for the production of polyureas by simply mixing multifunctional bulky amines and isocyanates, the versatility of the structures, and the tunability of the degradation profiles of HUB-bearing polyureas, these materials are potentially of very broad applications.

  6. Hydrogen bonding of formamide, urea, urea monoxide and their thio-analogs with water and homodimers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Damanjit Kaur; Shweta Khanna

    2014-11-01

    Ab initio and DFT methods have been employed to study the hydrogen bonding ability of formamide, urea, urea monoxide, thioformamide, thiourea and thiourea monoxide with one water molecule and the homodimers of the selected molecules. The stabilization energies associated with themonohydrated adducts and homodimers’ formation were evaluated at B3LYP/6-311++G** and MP2/6-311++G∗∗ levels. The energies were corrected for zero-point vibrational energies and basis set superposition error using counterpoise method. Atoms in molecules study has been carried out in order to characterize the hydrogen bonds through the changes in electron density and laplacian of electron density. A natural energy decomposition and natural bond orbital analysis was performed to understand the nature of hydrogen bonding.

  7. Influence of milk urea concentration on fractional urea disappearance rate from milk to blood plasma in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, J.W.; Dijkstra, J.; Bannink, A.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between milk urea nitrogen (MUN; mg of N/dL) and urinary N excretion is affected, among others, by diurnal dynamics in MUN, which in turn is largely influenced by feed intake pattern and characteristics of urea transfer from blood plasma to milk and vice versa. This study aimed t

  8. The urea carboxylase and allophanate hydrolase activities of urea amidolyase are functionally independent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; Boese, Cody J; St Maurice, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Urea amidolyase (UAL) is a multifunctional biotin-dependent enzyme that contributes to both bacterial and fungal pathogenicity by catalyzing the ATP-dependent cleavage of urea into ammonia and CO2 . UAL is comprised of two enzymatic components: urea carboxylase (UC) and allophanate hydrolase (AH). These enzyme activities are encoded on separate but proximally related genes in prokaryotes while, in most fungi, they are encoded by a single gene that produces a fusion enzyme on a single polypeptide chain. It is unclear whether the UC and AH activities are connected through substrate channeling or other forms of direct communication. Here, we use multiple biochemical approaches to demonstrate that there is no substrate channeling or interdomain/intersubunit communication between UC and AH. Neither stable nor transient interactions can be detected between prokaryotic UC and AH and the catalytic efficiencies of UC and AH are independent of one another. Furthermore, an artificial fusion of UC and AH does not significantly alter the AH enzyme activity or catalytic efficiency. These results support the surprising functional independence of AH from UC in both the prokaryotic and fungal UAL enzymes and serve as an important reminder that the evolution of multifunctional enzymes through gene fusion events does not always correlate with enhanced catalytic function.

  9. Synthesis of aluminum nitride nanoparticles by a facile urea glass route and influence of urea/metal molar ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhifang; Wan, Yizao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Xiong, Guangyao [School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, East China Jiaotong University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330013 (China); Guo, Ruisong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Luo, Honglin, E-mail: hlluo@tju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2013-09-01

    Attention toward nanosized aluminum nitride (AlN) was rapidly increasing due to its physical and chemical characteristics. In this work, nanocrystalline AlN particles were prepared via a simple urea glass route. The effect of the urea/metal molar ratio on the crystal structure and morphology of nanocrystalline AlN particles was studied using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results revealed that the morphology and the crystal structure of AlN nanoparticles could be controlled by adjusting the urea/metal ratio. Furthermore, a mixture of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and h-AlN was detected at the urea/metal molar ratio of 4 due to the inadequate urea content. With increasing the molar ratio, the pure h-AlN was obtained. In addition, the nucleation and growth mechanisms of AlN nanocrystalline were proposed.

  10. Sleep-disordered breathing in acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L K Dzeranova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Sleep-disordered breathing is higly prevalent in acromegaly, disturbing patients quality of life and increasing the risk of acute cardiovascular compications. Presented clinical case discusses key considerations for timely diagnosis of sleep apnea syndrome and treatment planning. The case of 41 y.o. woman with newly diagnosed acromegaly and concomitant sleep apnea is typical for this disease.

  11. Coordination of breathing with nonrespiratory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Donald; Leiter, James C

    2012-04-01

    Many articles in this section of Comprehensive Physiology are concerned with the development and function of a central pattern generator (CPG) for the control of breathing in vertebrate animals. The action of the respiratory CPG is extensively modified by cortical and other descending influences as well as by feedback from peripheral sensory systems. The central nervous system also incorporates other CPGs, which orchestrate a wide variety of discrete and repetitive, voluntary and involuntary movements. The coordination of breathing with these other activities requires interaction and coordination between the respiratory CPG and those governing the nonrespiratory activities. Most of these interactions are complex and poorly understood. They seem to involve both conventional synaptic crosstalk between groups of neurons and fluid identity of neurons as belonging to one CPG or another: neurons that normally participate in breathing may be temporarily borrowed or hijacked by a competing or interrupting activity. This review explores the control of breathing as it is influenced by many activities that are generally considered to be nonrespiratory. The mechanistic detail varies greatly among topics, reflecting the wide variety of pertinent experiments.

  12. Continuous Exhaled Breath Analysis on the Icu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Lieuwe D. J.; Sterk, Peter J.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2011-09-01

    During admittance to the ICU, critically ill patients frequently develop secondary infections and/or multiple organ failure. Continuous monitoring of biological markers is very much needed. This study describes a new method to continuously monitor biomarkers in exhaled breath with an electronic nose.

  13. CONTINUOUS EXHALED BREATH ANALYSIS ON THE ICU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During admittance to the ICU, critically ill patients frequently develop secondary infections and/or multiple organ failure. Continuous monitoring of biological markers is very much needed. This study describes a new method to continuously monitor biomarkers in exhaled breath with an electronic nose.

  14. Sleep effects on breathing and respiratory diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary Sumer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand normal sleep pattern and physiological changes during sleep, sleep and breathing interaction, nomenclature and scales used in sleep study, discuss the effect of rapid eye movements and non-rapid eye movements while sleep and to review the effects of obstructive and restrictive lung disease on gas exchange during sleep and sleep architecture.

  15. Multi-layered breathing architectural envelope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Larsen, Andreas; Foged, Isak Worre; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2014-01-01

    A multi layered breathing envelope is developed as a method of natural ventilation. The two main layers consist of mineral wool and air permeable concrete. The mineral wool works as a dynamic insulation and the permeable concrete as a heat recovery system with a high thermal mass for heat storage...

  16. Sleep effects on breathing and respiratory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhary Sumer; Choudhary Sanjiw

    2009-01-01

    To understand normal sleep pattern and physiological changes during sleep, sleep and breathing interaction, nomenclature and scales used in sleep study, discuss the effect of rapid eye movements and non-rapid eye movements while sleep and to review the effects of obstructive and restrictive lung disease on gas exchange during sleep and sleep architecture.

  17. The use of active breathing control (ABC) to reduce margin for breathing motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: For tumors in the thorax and abdomen, reducing the treatment margin for organ motion due to breathing reduces the volume of normal tissues that will be irradiated. A higher dose can be delivered to the target, provided that the risk of marginal misses is not increased. To ensure safe margin reduction, we investigated the feasibility of using active breathing control (ABC) to temporarily immobilize the patient's breathing. Treatment planning and delivery can then be performed at identical ABC conditions with minimal margin for breathing motion. Methods and Materials: An ABC apparatus is constructed consisting of 2 pairs of flow monitor and scissor valve, 1 each to control the inspiration and expiration paths to the patient. The patient breathes through a mouth-piece connected to the ABC apparatus. The respiratory signal is processed continuously, using a personal computer that displays the changing lung volume in real-time. After the patient's breathing pattern becomes stable, the operator activates ABC at a preselected phase in the breathing cycle. Both valves are then closed to immobilize breathing motion. Breathing motion of 12 patients were held with ABC to examine their acceptance of the procedure. The feasibility of applying ABC for treatment was tested in 5 patients by acquiring volumetric scans with a spiral computed tomography (CT) scanner during active breath-hold. Two patients had Hodgkin's disease, 2 had metastatic liver cancer, and 1 had lung cancer. Two intrafraction ABC scans were acquired at the same respiratory phase near the end of normal or deep inspiration. An additional ABC scan near the end of normal expiration was acquired for 2 patients. The ABC scans were also repeated 1 week later for a Hodgkin's patient. In 1 liver patient, ABC scans were acquired at 7 different phases of the breathing cycle to facilitate examination of the liver motion associated with ventilation. Contours of the lungs and livers were outlined when applicable

  18. The best breathing command for abdominal PETCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the best breathing command for combined PETCT scanning on a in-line system (Discovery LS, GEMS). Material and Methods: Eight patients underwent FDG PET and CT for attenuation correction and image co-registration on a combined PETCT scanner. CT was acquired during maximum inspiration (MaxInsp) with a starting point at the level of the head. Patients kept their breath for approximately 20 seconds. Then, a CT scan was acquired during normal expiration (NormExp), which corresponded to the respiratory level reached when the patient first inhaled and then exhaled without forcing expiration. Again, CT started at the head and patients kept their breath for approximately 20 seconds. In a third run, patients performed again the NormExp breathing manoeuvre but the breathing command was given after the start of the CT scan. Using this respiration protocol, the hold on time for the patients was between 10 and 15 seconds. All PET images were corrected for attenuation using the CT-based attenuation maps acquired with these three respiration protocols and then were reconstructed using an iterative algorithm. Results: In all patients, attenuation correction of the PET image using the CT scan acquired during MaxInsp caused mis-correction, which mimicked a decrease of FDG concentration in the base of the lungs. During MaxInsp the upper abdominal organs change their position and air filling of the lower lung zone is increased, thus, causing an underestimation of correction values. Subtraction images of the CT scans acquired during MaxInsp and NormExp illustrate the range of organ movements. Subtraction images of the attenuation corrected PET scans illustrate the deterioration of the final PET image. CT acquisition during NormExp provides better PET and co-registered PET/CT images. Using the shorter breath hold time the visual image quality was good in all patients. Conclusion: CT based attenuation correction can severely deteriorate PET image quality, if the CT scan

  19. A Multimedia System for Breath Regulation and Relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ching Liao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the hectic life today, detrimental stress has caused numerous illness. To adjust mental states, breath regulation plays a core role in multiple relaxation techniques. In this paper, we introduce a multimedia system supporting breath regulation and relaxation. Features of this system include non-contact respiration detection, bio-signal monitoring, and breath interaction. In addition to illustrating this system, we also propose a novel form of breath interaction. Through this form of breath interaction, the system effectively influenced user breath such that their breathing features turned into patterns that appeared when people were relaxed. An experiment was conducted to compare the effects of three forms of regulation, the free breathing mode, the pure guiding mode, and the local-mapping mode. Experiment results show that multimedia-assisted breath interaction successfully deepened and slowed down user breath, compared with free breathing mode. Besides objective breathing feature changes, subjective feedback also showed that participants were satisfied and became relaxed after using this system.

  20. 21 CFR 868.5330 - Breathing gas mixer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breathing gas mixer. 868.5330 Section 868.5330...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5330 Breathing gas mixer. (a) Identification. A breathing gas mixer is a device intended for use in conjunction with a respiratory...

  1. Oral Breathing Challenge in Participants with Vocal Attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Fisher, Kimberly V.

    2003-01-01

    Vocal folds undergo osmotic challenge by mouth breathing during singing, exercising, and loud speaking. Just 15 min of obligatory oral breathing, to dry the vocal folds, increases phonation threshold pressure (P[subscript th]) and expiratory vocal effort in healthy speakers (M. Sivasankar & K. Fisher, 2002). We questioned whether oral breathing is…

  2. Human respiratory deposition of particles during oronasal breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, David L.; Proctor, Donald F.

    Deposition of particles in the tracheobronchial and pulmonary airways is computed as a function of particle size, correcting for deposition in the parallel nasal and oral airways with oronasal breathing. Thoracic deposition is lower at all sizes for oronasal breathing than for mouth breathing via tube, and is negligible for aerodynamic equivalent diameters of 10 μm or larger.

  3. 21 CFR 868.5240 - Anesthesia breathing circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia breathing circuit. 868.5240 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5240 Anesthesia breathing circuit. (a) Identification. An anesthesia breathing circuit is a device that is intended to administer medical gases to...

  4. Effect of slow deep breathing (6 breaths/min) on pulmonary function in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Shravya Keerthi G, Hari Krishna Bandi, Suresh M, Mallikarjuna Reddy N

    2013-01-01

    We designed this study to test the hypothesis that whether 10 minutes of slow deep breathing have any effect on pulmonary function in healthy volunteers. The main objective was to study the immediate effect of slow deep breathing on Forced vital capacity (FVC), Forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), Forced expiratory volume percent (FEV1/FVC%), Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), Forced expiratory flow 25-75%(FEF25-75%), Maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV), Slow vital capacity (SV...

  5. Diaryl Urea: A Privileged Structure in Anticancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garuti, Laura; Roberti, Marinella; Bottegoni, Giovanni; Ferraro, Mariarosaria

    2016-01-01

    The diaryl urea is an important fragment/pharmacophore in constructing anticancer molecules due to its near-perfect binding with certain acceptors. The urea NH moiety is a favorable hydrogen bond donor, while the urea oxygen atom is regarded as an excellent acceptor. Many novel compounds have been synthesized and evaluated for their antitumor activity with the successful development of sorafenib. Moreover, this structure is used to link alkylating pharmacophores with high affinity DNA binders. In addition, the diaryl urea is present in several kinase inhibitors, such as RAF, KDR and Aurora kinases. Above all, this moiety is used in the type II inhibitors: it usually forms one or two hydrogen bonds with a conserved glutamic acid and one with the backbone amide of the aspartic acid in the DFG motif. In addition, some diaryl urea derivatives act as Hedgehog (Hh) ligands, binding and inhibiting proteins involved in the homonymous Hh signaling pathway. In this review we provide some of the methodologies adopted for the synthesis of diaryl ureas and a description of the most representative antitumor agents bearing the diaryl urea moiety, focusing on their mechanisms bound to the receptors and structure-activity relationships (SAR). An increased knowledge of these derivatives could prompt the search to find new and more potent compounds. PMID:27063259

  6. Upper limb kinematic differences between breathing and non-breathing conditions in front crawl sprint swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Carla B; Sanders, Ross H; Psycharakis, Stelios G

    2015-11-26

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the breathing action in front crawl (FC) sprint swimming affects the ipsilateral upper limb kinematics relative to a non-breathing stroke cycle (SC). Ten male competitive swimmers performed two 25m FC sprints: one breathing to their preferred side (Br) and one not breathing (NBr). Both swim trials were performed through a 6.75m(3) calibrated space and recorded by six gen-locked JVC KY32 CCD cameras. A paired t-test was used to assess statistical differences between the trials, with a confidence level of pswim performance is compromised by the inclusion of taking a breath in sprint FC swimming. It was proposed that swimmers aim to orient their ipsilateral shoulder into a stronger position by stretching and rolling the shoulders more in the entry phase whilst preparing to take a breath. Swimmers should focus on lengthening the push phase by extending the elbow more and not accelerating the hand too quickly upwards when preparing to inhale.

  7. Comparative study on cardiac autonomic modulation during deep breathing test and diaphragmatic breathing in type 2 diabetes and healthy subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Subbalakshmi, Narsajjana Krishnadasa; Adhikari, Prabha; Shanmugavel Jeganathan, Punnaimuthu

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims/Introduction Diaphragmatic breathing is known to have a beneficial effect on the cardiopulmonary system, and enhances parasympathetic activation. We evaluated the influence of diaphragmatic breathing on time domain measures of heart rate variability in diabetics and healthy subjects. Materials and Methods A total of 122 type 2 diabetics and 94 healthy subjects (controls) were randomly allocated to a deep breathing test and diaphragmatic breathing (61 diabetics and 47 controls in...

  8. Urea encapsulation in modified starch matrix for nutrients retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Muhammad Yasin; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar; Ariff, Mohd. Hazwan Bin Mohd.; Ariwahjoedi, Bambang

    2014-10-01

    It has been estimated that 20-70% of the used urea goes to the environment via leaching, nitrification and volatilization which not only harms the environment but also reduces the urea efficiency. By coating the urea granules, the farmers can achieve high urea performance through controlling the excess release of nitrogen. Up until now, different materials have been tested for nutrients retention. However, most of them are either expensive or unfriendly to the environment. Being cheap and biodegradable materials, the starches may also be used to coat the urea fertilizer for controlling the nutrients release. However, the pure starches do not meet the standards set by many industrial processes due to their slow tacking and too low viscosities and should be modified for getting smooth, compact and mechanically stronger coatings. In these studies, the tapioca starch was modified by reacting it with urea and different masses of borax. The prepared solutions were used to coat the urea granules of 3.45 mm average diameter. Different volumes (1, 1.5 and 2 mL) of each solution were used to coat 30 g of urea fluidized above the minimum level of fluidization. It was noticed that the coating thickness, percent coating, dissolution rate and percent release follow an increasing trend with an increase of solution volume; however, some random results were obtained while investigating the solution volume effects on the percent release. It was seen that the nutrients percent release over time increases with an increase in solution volume from 1 to 1.5 mL and thereafter reaches to a steady state. It confirms that the 1.5 mL of solution for 30 g urea samples will give the optimized coating results.

  9. Efficacy of Dietary Urea-Impregnated Zeolite in Improving Rumen Fermentation Characteristics of Local Lamb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kardaya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A research on dietary inclusion of urea-impregnated zeolite as slow-release urea (SRU agent had been conducted to reveal its effect on ruminal fermentation characteristics in local lambs. The research used 24 heads of 7-8 mo old of local male lambs with (20.12±2.1 kg BW designed upon a randomized block design. Treatments consisted of diets contained no urea, urea, zeolite, and urea-impregnated zeolite. The collected data was analyzed with UNIANOVA and Duncan’s multiple-range test. Results indicated that feeding no urea, zeolite, or urea-impregnated zeolite ration produced lower ruminal ammonia nitrogen than feeding urea ration (P<0.05. Feeding zeolite ration produced lower ruminal pH than feeding urea ration (P<0.05. Despite total VFAs were similar across the treatments, feeding urea-impregnated zeolite ration produced lower ruminal acetate, acetate to propionate ratio, or methane production than feeding urea ration (P<0.05. Feeding urea ration produced the lowest molar proportion of branch-chained VFAs (P<0.05. Feeding urea ration produced higher plasma urea concentration than feeding no urea ration (2.75 mM vs. 2.16 mM; P<0.05. In conclusion, zeolite or urea-impregnated zeolite as slow-release ammonia or SRU agent was potential in decreasing ruminal ammonia, pH, acetate to propionate ratio, methane, and maintaining low plasma urea within its physiological range.

  10. Titanium erosion in urea strippers and emerging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High Pressure Urea Stripper is the heart of a Urea Plant. The process fluids in the high pressure streams are generally very corrosive in nature. This is basically a falling film type exchanger/ evaporator and high pressure and temperatures here make the process fluid most corrosive compared to other regions in Urea Plant. The equipment design takes into account a trade off between cost and corrosion resistance against the aggressive process media. This paper explains erosion phenomenon/ counter measures in Titanium strippers as experienced by FFC at its plants and emerging technologies to improve life and reliability of this equipment. (author)

  11. Breathing adapted radiotherapy of breast cancer: reduction of cardiac and pulmonary doses using voluntary inspiration breath-hold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders N; Korreman, Stine; Nyström, Håkan;

    2004-01-01

    anterioposterior chest wall excursion. Each patient underwent three scans: during free breathing (FB), voluntary expiration breath-hold (EBH) and voluntary deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). For each scan, an optimised treatment plan was designed with conformal tangential fields encompassing the clinical target...

  12. BREATHING PATTERNS IN PATIENTS WITH LOW BACK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka P. Ostwal

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low Back pain is common clinical condition encountered in a day to day Physiotherapy practice. Very few authors has so far documented changes in breathing patterns in low back pain while performing certain motor control tests. Purpose: The aim of the study was to observe the breathing pattern in individuals with low back pain (LBP both at rest and during motor control tasks. Material and Method: 150 patients with LBP participated in this study and they were subcategorized further in acute, sub-acute and chronic low back pain patients. The breathing pattern was evaluated at rest (standing and supine position during both relaxed breathing and deep breathing and while performing clinical motor control tasks, i.e. bent knee fall out, knee lift abdominal test and active straight leg raise. Breathing patterns in patients with LBP were assessed by therapist both visually and via palpation and observational findings were noted. Costo-diaphragmatic breathing was considered as normal breathing pattern. Result: Observational findings of this study demonstrates altered breathing pattern in patients with LBP during motor control tasks. Conclusion: At rest, no significant differences were observed in breathing patterns of LBP patients, whereas around 71% patients revealed abnormal breathing pattern during motor control tests.

  13. Metabolite content profiling of bottlenose dolphin exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, Alexander A; Yeates, Laura; Pasamontes, Alberto; Siebe, Craig; Zrodnikov, Yuriy; Simmons, Jason; McCartney, Mitchell M; Deplanque, Jean-Pierre; Wells, Randall S; Davis, Cristina E

    2014-11-01

    Changing ocean health and the potential impact on marine mammal health are gaining global attention. Direct health assessments of wild marine mammals, however, is inherently difficult. Breath analysis metabolomics is a very attractive assessment tool due to its noninvasive nature, but it is analytically challenging. It has never been attempted in cetaceans for comprehensive metabolite profiling. We have developed a method to reproducibly sample breath from small cetaceans, specifically Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). We describe the analysis workflow to profile exhaled breath metabolites and provide here a first library of volatile and nonvolatile compounds in cetacean exhaled breath. The described analytical methodology enabled us to document baseline compounds in exhaled breath of healthy animals and to study changes in metabolic content of dolphin breath with regard to a variety of factors. The method of breath analysis may provide a very valuable tool in future wildlife conservation efforts as well as deepen our understanding of marine mammals biology and physiology. PMID:25254551

  14. Monitoring Breathing via Signal Strength in Wireless Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Patwari, Neal; R., Sai Ananthanarayanan P; Kasera, Sneha K; Westenskow, Dwayne

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows experimentally that standard wireless networks which measure received signal strength (RSS) can be used to reliably detect human breathing and estimate the breathing rate, an application we call "BreathTaking". We show that although an individual link cannot reliably detect breathing, the collective spectral content of a network of devices reliably indicates the presence and rate of breathing. We present a maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) of breathing rate, amplitude, and phase, which uses the RSS data from many links simultaneously. We show experimental results which demonstrate that reliable detection and frequency estimation is possible with 30 seconds of data, within 0.3 breaths per minute (bpm) RMS error. Use of directional antennas is shown to improve robustness to motion near the network.

  15. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeyush Sahay

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS, cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS, integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS, cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS, cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS, quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS, and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS. Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis.

  16. Quantum crystallographic charge density of urea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Standard X-ray crystallography methods use free-atom models to calculate mean unit-cell charge densities. Real molecules, however, have shared charge that is not captured accurately using free-atom models. To address this limitation, a charge density model of crystalline urea was calculated using high-level quantum theory and was refined against publicly available ultra-high-resolution experimental Bragg data, including the effects of atomic displacement parameters. The resulting quantum crystallographic model was compared with models obtained using spherical atom or multipole methods. Despite using only the same number of free parameters as the spherical atom model, the agreement of the quantum model with the data is comparable to the multipole model. The static, theoretical crystalline charge density of the quantum model is distinct from the multipole model, indicating the quantum model provides substantially new information. Hydrogen thermal ellipsoids in the quantum model were very similar to those obtained using neutron crystallography, indicating that quantum crystallography can increase the accuracy of the X-ray crystallographic atomic displacement parameters. The results demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of integrating fully periodic quantum charge density calculations into ultra-high-resolution X-ray crystallographic model building and refinement. PMID:27437111

  17. Hydrolyzable polyureas bearing hindered urea bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Hanze; Cheng, Jianjun

    2014-12-10

    Hydrolyzable polymers are widely used materials that have found numerous applications in biomedical, agricultural, plastic, and packaging industrials. They usually contain ester and other hydrolyzable bonds, such as anhydride, acetal, ketal, or imine, in their backbone structures. Here, we report the first design of hydrolyzable polyureas bearing dynamic hindered urea bonds (HUBs) that can reversibly dissociate to bulky amines and isocyanates, the latter of which can be further hydrolyzed by water, driving the equilibrium to facilitate the degradation of polyureas. Polyureas bearing 1-tert-butyl-1-ethylurea bonds that show high dynamicity (high bond dissociation rate), in the form of either linear polymers or cross-linked gels, can be completely degraded by water under mild conditions. Given the simplicity and low cost for the production of polyureas by simply mixing multifunctional bulky amines and isocyanates, the versatility of the structures, and the tunability of the degradation profiles of HUB-bearing polyureas, these materials are potentially of very broad applications. PMID:25406025

  18. Deprotection of oximes using urea nitrate under microwave irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P T Perumal; M Anniyappan; D Muralidharan

    2004-08-01

    A new mild and efficient method for the cleavage of oximes to carbonyl compounds using readily available urea nitrate in acetonitrile-water (95 : 5), under microwave irradiation within 2 min, in good yields is reported.

  19. Uranium stripping from tributyl phosphate by urea solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skripchenko, S. Yu.; Titova, S. M.; Smirnov, A. L.; Rychkov, V. N.

    2016-09-01

    The process of uranium stripping from tri-n-butyl phosphate in kerosene by urea solutions was investigated at the volume ratio of the organic and aqueous phases of (1-10) : 1 in the temperature range of 20-60 °C. The stripping of uranium from a loaded organic phase increased with increasing urea content in the solution and with increasing temperature. Maximum recovery of uranium from tributyl phosphate was obtained using a solution that contained 8-12 mol/l of urea. The application of a urea solution for uranium stripping resulted in the strip product solution containing 200-240 g/L of uranium. The process of uranium stripping by dilute nitric acid was also investigated. Results of uranium stripping by the two methods are compared and discussed.

  20. Influence of Ficoll on urea induced denaturation of fibrinogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Kamatchi; Meenakshisundaram, N.

    2016-03-01

    Ficoll is a neutral, highly branched polymer used as a molecular crowder in the study of proteins. Ficoll is also part of Ficoll-Paque used in biology laboratories to separate blood to its components (erythrocytes, leukocytes etc.,). Role of Ficoll in the urea induced denaturation of protein Fibrinogen (Fg) has been analyzed using fluorescence, circular dichroism, molecular docking and interfacial studies. Fluorescence studies show that Ficoll prevents quenching of Fg in the presence of urea. From the circular dichroism spectra, Fg shows conformational transition to random coil with urea of 6 M concentration. Ficoll helps to shift this denaturation concentration to 8 M and thus constraints by shielding Fg during the process. Molecular docking studies indicate that Ficoll interacts favorably with the protein than urea. The surface tension and shear viscosity analysis shows clearly that the protein is shielded by Ficoll.

  1. Highly sensitive urea sensing with ion-irradiated polymer foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Dietmar, E-mail: fink@daad-alumni.de [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Nuclear Physics Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Munoz Hernandez, Gerardo [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, P.O. Box 55-534, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Division de Ciencias Naturales e Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Cuajimalpa, Pedro Antonio de los Santos 84, Col. Sn. Miguel Chapultepec, C.P. 11850, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Alfonta, Lital, E-mail: alfontal@bgu.ac.il [Avram and Stella Goldstein-Goren Department of Biotechnology Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2012-02-15

    Recently we prepared urea-sensors by attaching urease to the inner walls of etched ion tracks within thin polymer foil. Here, alternative track-based sensor configurations are examined where the enzyme remained in solution. The conductivities of systems consisting of two parallel irradiated polymer foils and confining different urea/urease mixtures in between were examined. The correlations between conductivity and urea concentration differed strongly for foils with unetched and etched tracks, which points at different sensing mechanisms - tentatively attributed to the adsorption of enzymatic reaction products on the latent track entrances and to the enhanced conductivity of reaction product-filled etched tracks, respectively. All examined systems enable in principle, urea sensing. They point at the possibility of sensor cascade construction for more sensitive or selective sensor systems.

  2. Urea determination using pH-enzyme electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koncki, R; Chudzik, A; Walcerz, I

    1999-10-01

    A pH-membrane electrode with n-tridodecylamine (TDDA) as the hydrogen-ion-selective ionophore was used for the construction of a potentiometric biosensor for urea determination. The electrode was enzymatically modified by covalent binding of urease molecules directly to the surface of the potentiometric membrane. Incorporation of the urea biosensor into simple double-channel flow injection analysis (FIA) system allows reproducible urea determination in a millimolar range of concentration. The utility and limitations of the presented biosensor-FIA system for analysis of various real samples has been investigated. The system can be useful for some biomedical and pharmaceutical applications such as analyses of urine, posthaemodialysis fluid and extracts from pharmaceutical ointments containing urea.

  3. Microbial urea-formaldehyde degradation involves a new enzyme, methylenediurease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahns, T; Schepp, R; Siersdorfer, C; Kaltwasser, H

    1998-01-01

    The enzymic mechanism of metabolization of urea-formaldehyde condensation products (methyleneureas; MU) and the fate of the degradation products ammonium, urea and formaldehyde were studied in bacteria isolated from garden soil, which were able to use methyleneureas as the sole source of nitrogen for growth. An organism identified as Ochrobactrum anthropi completely degraded methylenediurea (MDU) and dimethylenetriurea (DMTU) to urea, ammonia, formaldehyde and carbon dioxide. An enzyme designated as methylenediurease (methylenediurea deiminase; MDUase) was responsible for the degradation of both MDU and DMTU as well as higher polymerized MU. Growth on MU as the nitrogen source specifically induced the synthesis of this enzyme, which seems to be located in the periplasm of the bacterium. Under these growth conditions, urease as well as NAD-specific formaldehyde and formiate dehydrogenase were expressed to high levels, efficiently using the products of MU degradation, and high-affinity transport systems for urea and ammonia were synthesized scavenging the environment for these products. PMID:10526991

  4. Hydrogen production via urea electrolysis using a gel electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Rebecca L.; Botte, Gerardine G.

    2011-03-01

    A technology was demonstrated for the production of hydrogen and other valuable products (nitrogen and clean water) through the electrochemical oxidation of urea in alkaline media. In addition, this process remediates toxic nitrates and prevents gaseous ammonia emissions. Improvements to urea electrolysis were made through replacement of aqueous KOH electrolyte with a poly(acrylic acid) gel electrolyte. A small volume of poly(acrylic acid) gel electrolyte was used to accomplish the electrochemical oxidation of urea improving on the previous requirement for large amounts of aqueous potassium hydroxide. The effect of gel composition was investigated by varying polymer content and KOH concentrations within the polymer matrix in order to determine which is the most advantageous for the electrochemical oxidation of urea and production of hydrogen.

  5. Online measurement of urea concentration in spent dialysate during hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesberg, Jonathon T.; Armitage, Ben; Arnold, Mark A.; Flanigan, Michael

    2002-05-01

    We describe on-line optical measurements of urea concentration during the regular hemodialysis treatment of several patients. The spectral measurements were performed in the effluent dialysate stream after the dialysis membrane using an FTIR spectrometer equipped with a flow-through cell. Spectra were recorded across the 5000-4000 cm-1 (2.0-2.5 micrometers at 1-minute intervals. Optically determined concentrations matched concentrations obtained from standard chemical assays with a root-mean-square error of 0.29 mM for urea (0.8 mg/dl urea nitrogen), 0.03 mM for creatinine, 0.11 mM for lactate, and 0.22 mM for glucose. The observed concentration ranges were 0-11 mM for urea, 0-0.35 mM for creatinine, 0-0.75 mM for lactate, and 9-12.5 mM for glucose.

  6. Microstructured optical fiber interferometric breathing sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favero, Fernando C.; Villatoro, Joel; Pruneri, Valerio

    2012-03-01

    In this paper a simple photonic crystal fiber (PCF) interferometric breathing sensor is introduced. The interferometer consists of a section of PCF fusion spliced at the distal end of a standard telecommunications optical fiber. Two collapsed regions in the PCF caused by the splicing process allow the excitation and recombination of a core and a cladding PCF mode. As a result, the reflection spectrum of the device exhibits a sinusoidal interference pattern that instantly shifts when water molecules, present in exhaled air, are adsorbed on or desorbed from the PCF surface. The device can be used to monitor a person's breathing whatever the respiration rate. The device here proposed could be particularly important in applications where electronic sensors fail or are not recommended. It may also be useful in the evaluation of a person's health and even in the diagnosis and study of the progression of serious illnesses such as sleep apnea syndrome.

  7. An exercise in preferential unilateral breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In preparation for major thoracic surgery, physiotherapists have traditionally taught unilateral breathing exercises. There are no studies that prove that these exercises are effective This study was undertaken to demonstrate the effects of unilateral thoracic expansion exercises (TEE) using 99Tcm-Technegas Ten physiotherapists were taught unilateral TEE to increase ventilation to the right lower lobe. Each subject underwent two separate Technegas ventilation studies using a single-breath technique, one with normal deep inspiration and the other during a right TEE. Dynamic and static images were acquired in the seated position for each ventilation study. Analysis was undertaken by dividing the lungs into 6 zones of equal height and calculating the relative ventilation of each zone and each lung. Seven subjects (70%) achieved significantly increased ventilation to the right lower zone, while 9 (90%) achieved greater ventilation to the right lung. Total lung ventilation was reduced during right TEE when compared with normal deep inspiration

  8. Concomitant oxygen-18 enrichment in commercial carbon-13 labelled urea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, Katsumi; Chiyoda, Takeshi; Kajiwara, Masahiro [Meiji College of Pharmacy, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Medicinal Chemistry

    1996-12-01

    By mass spectroscopy, 50-fold oxygen-18 enrichment over natural abundance was observed in commercial {sup 13}C-urea (99 atom % {sup 13}C) synthesized from {sup 13}C-carbon monoxide that had been {sup 13}C-enriched by cryogenic distillation. In contrast, {sup 13}C-urea synthesized from {sup 13}C-potassium cyanide (a {sup 13}C-labelled compound having no oxygen atom) showed the natural abundance level of oxygen-18. (author).

  9. Urea coated with oxidized charcoal reduces ammonia volatilization

    OpenAIRE

    Diogo Mendes de Paiva; Reinaldo Bertola Cantarutti; Gelton Geraldo Fernandes Guimarães; Ivo Ribeiro da Silva

    2012-01-01

    Urea is the most consumed nitrogen fertilizer in the world. However, its agronomic and economic efficiency is reduced by the volatilization of NH3, which can reach 78 % of the applied nitrogen. The coating of urea granules with acidic compounds obtained by charcoal oxidation has the potential to reduce the volatilization, due to the acidic character, the high buffering capacity and CEC. This work aimed to evaluate the effect of HNO3-oxidized carbon on the control of NH3 volatilization. These ...

  10. Digestibility of pelleted rations containing diverse potato flour and urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Martinele

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate ruminal in situ degradability and in vitro digestibility of dry matter (DM in concentrate supplements containing diverse potato flour pelletized with urea (0%, 4%, 8%, and 12% DM. Samples of feeds were incubated for 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48h in the rumen of four fistulated sheep. Level of urea added had no significant effect (P>;0.05 on the soluble fraction (a or potentially degradable fraction (b of the pellets and ranged from 2.1% to 12.2% and 72.9% to 87.5%, respectively. Quadratic effects (P=0.03 of the rate of degradation of fraction "b" ranged from 4.75% h-1to 7.39% h-1; the estimated maximum value at 7.4% h-1was obtained when 5.9% urea was added to the pellet. Quadratic effects (P≤0.02 of the level of urea added to the pellets on the effective degradability (ED of DM were evaluated after considering rumen passage rates of 2.5% h-1and 8% h-1; the maximum values of ED calculated under these rumen passage rates were estimated at 6.3% to 7.3% urea in the pellets. The in vitro digestibility of DM of the pellets showed a quadratic effect (P=0.02 at different levels of urea, with a maximum value of 96.9% achieved when 7.9% urea was added to the pellets. Our results suggest that the addition of 6-8% urea to pelleted feed promotes an increase in the in vitro digestibility and ED of DM.

  11. The Utilization of Urea by the Lichen Cladonia sandstedei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, C; Estrella Legaz, M; Arruda, E C; Xavier Filho, L

    1984-08-01

    The production of both ribitol (which is the translocatable form of reduced carbon) and mannitol (which is the main accumulation form of carbon) by thallus samples of Cladonia sandstedei increases when exogenous urea is supplied to the lichen. In addition, the synthesis of atranorin and its precursor, methyl β-orcinol carboxylate, is also enhanced by urea. A hypothetical action of ammonia released from this nitrogen source on these metabolic processes is suggested. PMID:23194795

  12. A monitoring of breathing using a hetero-core optical fiber sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, S.; Seki, A.; Watanabe, K.

    2011-04-01

    A monitoring human breath has been seen as an important source of factor for vital status for emergency medical service. The monitoring of breathing has been tested and evaluated in a possible breath condition of a person to be monitored. A hetero-core optical fiber humidity sensor was developed for in order to monitor relative humidity in a medial mask. Elements for determent breath condition were extracted from the light intensity changing at some human breath condition, which were Breath depth, Breath cycle, Breath time and Check breathing. It is found that the elements had differences relative to normal breathing.

  13. Coordination of Mastication, Swallowing and Breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuo, Koichiro; Palmer, Jeffrey B.

    2009-01-01

    The pathways for air and food cross in the pharynx. In breathing, air may flow through either the nose or the mouth, it always flows through the pharynx. During swallowing, the pharynx changes from an airway to a food channel. The pharynx is isolated from the nasal cavity and lower airway by velopharyngeal and laryngeal closure during the pharyngeal swallow. During mastication, the food bolus accumulates in the pharynx prior to swallow initiation. The structures in the oral cavity, pharynx an...

  14. Novel Findings in Breath-Holding Spells

    OpenAIRE

    Azab, Seham F. A.; Siam, Ahmed G.; Saleh, Safaa H.; Elshafei, Mona M.; Elsaeed, Wafaa F.; Arafa, Mohamed A.; Bendary, Eman A.; Farag, Elsayed M.; Basset, Maha A.A.; Ismail, Sanaa M.; Elazouni, Osama M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The mechanism of breath-holding spells (BHS) is not fully understood and most probably multifactorial; so, this study was designed to clarify the pathophysiology of BHS through assessing some laboratory parameters and electrocardiographic (ECG) changes which might be contributing to the occurrence of the attacks. Another aim of the study was to evaluate the differences in the pathophysiology between pallid and cyanotic types of BHS. This was a prospective study performed in Zagazig U...

  15. The experimental modification of sonorous breathing.

    OpenAIRE

    Josephson, S C; Rosen, R C

    1980-01-01

    Loud snoring is a noxious habit and potential personal health risk. We are reporting the first experimental study of simple behavioral techniques for the modification of chronic snoring. Twenty-four volunteers participated in a repeated measures, randomized group design over 2 weeks of intervention and one-month follow-up. Treatment groups included a contingent-awakening and breathing retraining (self-control) condition. Both treatment groups were compared to a no-treatment control. Despite c...

  16. Breath sampling control for medical application

    OpenAIRE

    Vautz, Wolfgang; Baumbach, Jörg I.; Westhoff, Michael; Züchner, Klaus; Carstens, Eike T. H.; Perl, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    Sampling of breath under human control or automated control with sensors was combined with chemical determination of a synthetic sample using multi-capillary column ion mobility spectrometry to measure quantitative variability. Variation was 19% with an automated inlet and 33% with human control. Sensors to operate an automated inlet were also evaluated with human subjects and included carbon dioxide (CO2), flow (direction and velocity), volume (integrated from the flow rate) and humidity, al...

  17. Slow-release urea in supplement fed to beef steers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Gonçalves

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Replacing regular urea (RU by slow-release urea (SRU at two levels of non-protein nitrogen (NPN in concentrate, offered with low-quality roughage, was evaluated in beef steers on dry matter intake (DMI, ruminal fermentation parameters, plasma urea nitrogen (PUN, total tract apparent digestibility of diets and in situ degradability of nitrogen sources. Eight ruminally cannulated steers were allocated into two 4x4 Latin squares, totalizing four treatments: 40 NPN/0 SRU: 40% of concentrate crude protein (CP as NPN, resulting from 0% of SRU and 100% of RU; 40 NPN/50 SRU: 40% of concentrate CP as NPN, resulting from 50% of SRU and 50% of RU; 40 NPN/100 SRU: 40% of concentrate CP as NPN, resulting from 100% of SRU and 0% of RU; 80 NPN/100 SRU: 80% of concentrate CP as NPN, resulting from 100% of SRU and 0% of RU. Results showed that partial substitution of regular urea by slow-release urea did not alter dry matter intake, pattern of ruminal fermentation or plasma urea nitrogen concentrations and increased the total tract apparent digestibility of crude protein in steers diets. The increase in non-protein nitrogen content in crude protein of the concentrate could compromise feed intake and the efficiency of nutrient utilization in the steers fed complete diets based on low quality forage.

  18. Ultrasensitive laser spectroscopy for breath analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtas, J.; Bielecki, Z.; Stacewicz, T.; Mikołajczyk, J.; Nowakowski, M.

    2012-03-01

    At present there are many reasons for seeking new methods and technologies that aim to develop new and more perfect sensors for different chemical compounds. However, the main reasons are safety ensuring and health care. In the paper, recent advances in the human breath analysis by the use of different techniques are presented. We have selected non-invasive ones ensuring detection of pathogenic changes at a molecular level. The presence of certain molecules in the human breath is used as an indicator of a specific disease. Thus, the analysis of the human breath is very useful for health monitoring. We have shown some examples of diseases' biomarkers and various methods capable of detecting them. Described methods have been divided into non-optical and optical methods. The former ones are the following: gas chromatography, flame ionization detection, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry, proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry. In recent twenty years, the optical methods have become more popular, especially the laser techniques. They have a great potential for detection and monitoring of the components in the gas phase. These methods are characterized by high sensitivity and good selectivity. The spectroscopic sensors provide the opportunity to detect specific gases and to measure their concentration either in a sampling place or a remote one. Multipass spectroscopy, cavity ring-down spectroscopy, and photo-acoustic spectroscopy were characterised in the paper as well.

  19. Upper extremity kinematics and body roll during preferred-side breathing and breath-holding front crawl swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, C J; Bartlett, R M; Baltzopoulos, V; Coombs, R

    1999-09-01

    Front crawl swimmers often restrict the number of breaths they take during a race because of the possible adverse effects of the breathing action on resistance or stroke mechanics. The aim of this study was to determine whether differences exist in the kinematics of the trunk and upper extremity used during preferred-side breathing and breath-holding front crawl swimming. Six male swimmers performed trials at their 200 m race pace under breathing and breath-holding conditions. The underwater arm stroke was filmed from the front and side using video cameras suspended over periscope systems. Video recordings were digitized at 50 Hz and the three-dimensional coordinates of the upper extremity obtained using a direct linear transformation algorithm. Body roll angles were obtained by digitizing video recordings of a balsa wood fin attached to the swimmers' backs. The swimmers performed the breathing action without any decrement in stroke length (mean +/- s: breathing 2.24 +/- 0.27 m; breath-holding 2.15 +/- 0.22 m). Stroke widths were similar in the breathing (0.28 +/- 0.07 m) and breath-holding (0.27 +/- 0.07 m) trials, despite swimmers rolling further when taking a breath (66 +/- 5 degrees) than when not (57 +/- 4 degrees). The timing of the four underwater phases of the stroke was also unaffected by the breathing action, with swimmers rolling back towards the neutral position during the insweep phase. In conclusion, the results suggest that front crawl swimmers can perform the breathing action without it interfering with their basic stroke parameters. The insweep phase of the stroke assists body roll and not vice versa as suggested in previous studies.

  20. Determination of breath isoprene allows the identification of the expiratory fraction of the propofol breath signal during real-time propofol breath monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornuss, Cyrill; Dolch, Michael E; Janitza, Silke; Souza, Kimberly; Praun, Siegfried; Apfel, Christian C; Schelling, Gustav

    2013-10-01

    Real-time measurement of propofol in the breath may be used for routine clinical monitoring. However, this requires unequivocal identification of the expiratory phase of the respiratory propofol signal as only expiratory propofol reflects propofol blood concentrations. Determination of CO2 breath concentrations is the current gold standard for the identification of expiratory gas but usually requires additional equipment. Human breath also contains isoprene, a volatile organic compound with low inspiratory breath concentration and an expiratory concentration plateau. We investigated whether breath isoprene could be used similarly to CO2 to identify the expiratory fraction of the propofol breath signal. We investigated real-time breath data obtained from 40 study subjects during routine anesthesia. Propofol, isoprene, and CO2 breath concentrations were determined by a combined ion molecule reaction/electron impact mass spectrometry system. The expiratory propofol signal was identified according to breath CO2 and isoprene concentrations and presented as median of intervals of 30 s duration. Bland-Altman analysis was applied to detect differences (bias) in the expiratory propofol signal extracted by the two identification methods. We investigated propofol signals in a total of 3,590 observation intervals of 30 s duration in the 40 study subjects. In 51.4 % of the intervals (1,844/3,590) both methods extracted the same results for expiratory propofol signal. Overall bias between the two data extraction methods was -0.12 ppb. The lower and the upper limits of the 95 % CI were -0.69 and 0.45 ppb. Determination of isoprene breath concentrations allows the identification of the expiratory propofol signal during real-time breath monitoring.

  1. Radiopaque, iodine functionalized, phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shan; Yu, Jiayi; Wade, Mary Beth; Policastro, Gina M; Becker, Matthew L

    2015-02-01

    The synthesis and characterization of iodine-functionalized phenylalanine-based poly(ester urea)s (PEUs) are reported. 4-Iodo-L-phenylalanine and L-phenylalanine were separately reacted with 1,6-hexanediol to produce two monomers, bis-4-I-L-phenylalanine-1,6-hexanediol-diester (1-IPHE-6 monomer) and bis-L-phenylalanine-1,6-hexanediol-diester (1-PHE-6 monomer). By varying the feed ratio of the 1-IPHE-6 and 1-PHE-6 monomers, the copolymer composition was modulated resulting in a wide variation in thermal, mechanical and radiopacity properties. Microcomputed tomography (μ-CT) projections demonstrate that increasing iodine content results in greater X-ray contrast. Compression tests of dry and wet porous scaffolds indicate that the poly(1-IPHE-6)0.24-co-poly(1-PHE-6)0.76 material results in the highest compression modulus. MC3T3 cell viability and spreading studies show PEUs are nontoxic to cells. As most medical device procedures require placement verification via fluoroscopic imaging, materials that possess inherent X-ray contrast are valuable for a number of applications.

  2. Preparation of Urea Nitrogen Adsorbent of Complex Type and Adsorption Capacity of Urea Nitrogen onto the Adsorbent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The urea nitroge n adsorbent of complex type, which consists of chitosan coated dialdehyde cellulose (CDAC) and immobilized urease in gelatin membrane (IE), was prepared. The cellulose, the dialdehyde cellulose (DAC) and the CDAC were characterized by scanning electronic microscope. The results indicate that the cellulose C2-C3 bond was broken under the oxidation of periodate and it was oxidated to DAC. The DAC was coated with chitosan and the CDAC was obtained. The adsorption of urea nitrogen onto the adsorbent in Na2HPO4-NaH2PO4 buffer solution was studied in batch system. The effects of the experiment parameters, including degree of oxidation of CDAC, initial urea nitrogen concentration, pH and temperature, on the adsorption capacity of urea nitrogen onto the adsorbent at CDAC/IE weight ratio 10:1 were investigated. The results indicate that these parameters affected significantly the adsorption capacity. The adsorption capacity of urea nitrogen onto the adsorbent was 36.7 mg/g at the degree of oxidation of CDAC 88%, initial urea nitrogen concentration 600 mg/L, pH 7.4 and temperature 37 ℃.

  3. Molecular hydrogen in human breath: a new strategy for selectively diagnosing peptic ulcer disease, non-ulcerous dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Abhijit; Pal, Mithun; Maithani, Sanchi; Ghosh, Barnali; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Pradhan, Manik

    2016-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilizes molecular hydrogen (H2) as a respiratory substrate during colonization in the gastric mucosa. However, the link between molecular H2 and the pathogenesis of peptic-ulcer disease (PUD) and non-ulcerous dyspepsia (NUD) by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori still remains mostly unknown. Here we provide evidence that breath H2 excretion profiles are distinctly altered by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori for individuals with NUD and PUD. We subsequently unravelled the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of H2 in exhaled breath in association with peptic ulcers, encompassing both gastric and duodenal ulcers, along with NUD. We also established that carbon-isotopic fractionations in the acid-mediated bacterial environment regulated by bacterial urease activity cannot discriminate the actual disease state i.e. whether it is peptic ulcer or NUD. However, our findings illuminate the unusual molecular H2 in breath that can track the precise evolution of PUD and NUD, even after the eradication of H. pylori infection. This deepens our understanding of the pathophysiology of PUD and NUD, reveals non-invasively the actual disease state in real-time and thus offers a novel and robust new-generation strategy for treating peptic-ulcer disease together with non-ulcer related complications even when the existing (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) fails to diagnose. PMID:27448107

  4. Molecular hydrogen in human breath: a new strategy for selectively diagnosing peptic ulcer disease, non-ulcerous dyspepsia and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Abhijit; Pal, Mithun; Maithani, Sanchi; Ghosh, Barnali; Chaudhuri, Sujit; Pradhan, Manik

    2016-07-22

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori utilizes molecular hydrogen (H2) as a respiratory substrate during colonization in the gastric mucosa. However, the link between molecular H2 and the pathogenesis of peptic-ulcer disease (PUD) and non-ulcerous dyspepsia (NUD) by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori still remains mostly unknown. Here we provide evidence that breath H2 excretion profiles are distinctly altered by the enzymatic activity of H. pylori for individuals with NUD and PUD. We subsequently unravelled the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for the alteration of H2 in exhaled breath in association with peptic ulcers, encompassing both gastric and duodenal ulcers, along with NUD. We also established that carbon-isotopic fractionations in the acid-mediated bacterial environment regulated by bacterial urease activity cannot discriminate the actual disease state i.e. whether it is peptic ulcer or NUD. However, our findings illuminate the unusual molecular H2 in breath that can track the precise evolution of PUD and NUD, even after the eradication of H. pylori infection. This deepens our understanding of the pathophysiology of PUD and NUD, reveals non-invasively the actual disease state in real-time and thus offers a novel and robust new-generation strategy for treating peptic-ulcer disease together with non-ulcer related complications even when the existing (13)C-urea breath test ((13)C-UBT) fails to diagnose.

  5. Oxygène-18, carbone-13, carbone-14 et diatomées dans les quatre carottes du lac Huynamarca (Bolivie) : premiers résultats

    OpenAIRE

    Wirrmann, Denis; Servant Vildary, Simone; Fontes, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    L'étude de géochimie isotopique des carbonates coquilliers de quatre carottes du lac Huynamarca (Bolivie), ainsi que les datations au carbone-14 de quelques échantillons montrent qu'au cours des dix derniers millénaires le bilan hydrologique du lac Titicaca a considérablement varié. Une phase sèche, située entre 3650 et 5325 ans B.P. se traduit par une baisse du niveau du lac d'au moins dix mètres par rapport à l'actuel, avec comme corrolaire l'augmentation de la teneur en sels dissous dans l...

  6. Metabolic Induction of Lactic Acid Bacteria for Urea Removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Su-ai; BAI Yu; LI Dong-xia; CHEN Bo-li; SONG Cun-jiang; QIAO Ming-qiang; KONG De-ling; YU Yao-ting

    2009-01-01

    Objective:This study aims to induce nonpathogenic bacteria for urea removal as a potential treatment in renal failure. Methods:Lactococus lactis MG1363 was induced by repeated exposure to urea-rich culture media, the ability to remove urea from the media was evaluated. The effect of gastroenteric environment, such as low pH, bile salt and antiagonistic properties were investigated.The antimicrobial activities on pathogenic E.coli and S.aureus in the intestinal tract and the antibiotic tolerance of the induced bacteria were also studied.Results: Induced bacteria of 50 generations could decrease the urea level from 40.01 mg/dL to 32.99 mg/dL after 24 h. The bacteria could grow after treatment at pH3.0 for 2 h and in 0.1% bile salt for 6 h, and the urea removal activity was retained in such simulated gastroenteric environment. The removal of urea was significantly enhanced to 35.8% by addition of Ni2+ to the culture medium at neutral pH. It was also found that the induced bacteria could inhibit the growth of E.coli and S.aureus, and tolerate ampicillin,gentamicin,roxithromycin,tetracycline and cefradine. The safety tests were performed by feeding normal rats with either Lactococus lactis MG1363 or induced Lactococus lactis MG1363. The two materials did not cause any changes in blood cells, blood biochemical indexes and body weight. Conclusion: These results suggest that the induced Lactococus lactis MG1363 has the potential as an oral therapy for the removal of urea in patients with renal failure.

  7. Signal shape feature for automatic snore and breathing sounds classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snore analysis techniques have recently been developed for sleep studies. Most snore analysis techniques require reliable methods for the automatic classification of snore and breathing sounds in the sound recording. In this study we focus on this problem and propose an automated method to classify snore and breathing sounds based on the novel feature, ‘positive/negative amplitude ratio (PNAR)’, to measure the shape of the sound signal. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated using snore and breathing recordings (snore: 22 643 episodes and breathing: 4664 episodes) from 40 subjects. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that the proposed method achieved 0.923 sensitivity with 0.918 specificity for snore and breathing sound classification on test data. PNAR has substantial potential as a feature in the front end of a non-contact snore/breathing-based technology for sleep studies. (paper)

  8. Breath Testing and the Demand for Drunk Driving

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Saffer; Frank Chaloupka

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical investigation of the effect of a preliminary breath test law on drunk driving behavior. A preliminary breath test law reduces the procedural problems associated with obtaining evidence of drunk driving and thus increases the probability that a drunk driver will be arrested. In 1985, only 23 states had a preliminary breath test law. According to the theory of deterrence, increasing the probability of arrest for drunk driving will reduce the future occurrence of...

  9. Wearable sensors and feedback system to improve breathing technique

    OpenAIRE

    Coyle, Shirley; Mitchell, Edmond; Ward, Tomas; O'Connor, Noel E.; Diamond, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    Breathing is an important factor in our well-being as it oxygenates the body, revitalizes organs, cells and tissues. It is a unique physiological system in that it is both voluntary and involuntary. By breathing in a slow, deep and regular manner, the heartbeat become smooth and regular, blood pressure normalizes, stress hormones drop, and muscles relax. Breathing techniques are important for athletes to improve performance and reduce anxiety during competitions. Patients with respiratory ...

  10. Lung Function Measurement with Multiple-Breath-Helium Washout System

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jau-Yi; Suddards, Matt; Owers-Bradley, John; Mellor, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Multiple-breath-washout (MBW) measurements are regarded as a sensitive technique which can reflect the ventilation inhomogeneity of respiratory airways. Typically nitrogen is used as the tracer gas and is washed out by pure oxygen in multi-breath-nitrogen (MBNW) washout tests. In this work, instead of using nitrogen, helium is used as the tracer gas and a multiple-helium-breath-washout (MBHW) system has been developed for the lung function study. A commercial quartz tuning fork with a resonan...

  11. Apparatus and method for monitoring breath acetone and diabetic diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-08-26

    An apparatus and method for monitoring diabetes through breath acetone detection and quantitation employs a microplasma source in combination with a spectrometer. The microplasma source provides sufficient energy to produce excited acetone fragments from the breath gas that emit light. The emitted light is sent to the spectrometer, which generates an emission spectrum that is used to detect and quantify acetone in the breath gas.

  12. Optimization of an adaptive neural network to predict breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Martin J; Pokhrel, Damodar

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the optimal configuration and performance of an adaptive feed forward neural network filter to predict breathing in respiratory motion compensation systems for external beam radiation therapy. Method and Materials: A two-layer feed forward neural network was trained to predict future breathing amplitudes for 27 recorded breathing histories. The prediction intervals ranged from 100 to 500 ms. The optimal sampling frequency, number of input samples, training rate, and numb...

  13. Spectral characteristics of chest wall breath sounds in normal subjects.

    OpenAIRE

    Gavriely, N; Nissan, M.; Rubin, A. H.; Cugell, D. W.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--This study was carried out to establish a reliable bank of information on the spectral characteristics of chest wall breath sounds from healthy men and women, both non-smokers and smokers. METHODS--Chest wall breath sounds from 272 men and 81 women were measured using contact acoustic sensors, amplifiers, and fast Fourier transform (FFT) based spectral analysis software. Inspiratory and expiratory sounds were picked up at three standard locations on the chest wall during breathing...

  14. Evaluation of carbon-14 (C{sup 14}) levels of terrestrial and marine food products of the environment of the site of Cogema La Hague; Evaluation des niveaux de carbone-14 ({sup 14}C) des denrees alimentaires terrestres et marines de l'environnement du site de COGEMA - La Hague

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-04-15

    This evaluation has for object to inform about the levels in carbon 14 in the environment of the factories of La Hague. Two sectors were differentiated on one hand the terrestrial environment, and on the other hand the marine environment. The investigations concerned first and foremost food products stemming as the vegetable culture (vegetables) or individual breeding (milk, eggs) but also foodstuffs stemming from the local agriculture (cereal). In touch with the second sector, the marine environment, the sampling concerned the accessible products of the sea by all and those locally marketed (fishes, molluscs, shellfishes). The different results are presented in tables. (N.C.)

  15. Modeling and measurement of boiling point elevation during water vaporization from aqueous urea for SCR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan, Ho Jin; Lee, Joon Sik [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Understanding of water vaporization is the first step to anticipate the conversion process of urea into ammonia in the exhaust stream. As aqueous urea is a mixture and the urea in the mixture acts as a non-volatile solute, its colligative properties should be considered during water vaporization. The elevation of boiling point for urea water solution is measured with respect to urea mole fraction. With the boiling-point elevation relation, a model for water vaporization is proposed underlining the correction of the heat of vaporization of water in the urea water mixture due to the enthalpy of urea dissolution in water. The model is verified by the experiments of water vaporization as well. Finally, the water vaporization model is applied to the water vaporization of aqueous urea droplets. It is shown that urea decomposition can begin before water evaporation finishes due to the boiling-point elevation.

  16. Urea cycle disorders: brain MRI and neurological outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bireley, William R. [University of Colorado, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Van Hove, Johan L.K. [University of Colorado, Department of Genetics and Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Aurora, CO (United States); Gallagher, Renata C. [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Genetics and Inherited Metabolic Diseases, Aurora, CO (United States); Fenton, Laura Z. [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Urea cycle disorders encompass several enzyme deficiencies that can result in cerebral damage, with a wide clinical spectrum from asymptomatic to severe. The goal of this study was to correlate brain MRI abnormalities in urea cycle disorders with clinical neurological sequelae to evaluate whether MRI abnormalities can assist in guiding difficult treatment decisions. We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with urea cycle disorders and symptomatic hyperammonemia. Brain MRI images were reviewed for abnormalities that correlated with severity of clinical neurological sequelae. Our case series comprises six urea cycle disorder patients, five with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and one with citrullinemia type 1. The observed trend in distribution of brain MRI abnormalities as the severity of neurological sequelae increased was the peri-insular region first, extending into the frontal, parietal, temporal and, finally, the occipital lobes. There was thalamic restricted diffusion in three children with prolonged hyperammonemia. Prior to death, this site is typically reported to be spared in urea cycle disorders. The pattern and extent of brain MRI abnormalities correlate with clinical neurological outcome in our case series. This suggests that brain MRI abnormalities may assist in determining prognosis and helping clinicians with subsequent treatment decisions. (orig.)

  17. The Formation and characteristics of Acrylonitrile/Urea Inclusion Compound

    CERN Document Server

    Zou, Jun-Ting; Pang, Wen-Min; Shi, Lei; Lu, Fei

    2012-01-01

    The formation process and composition of the acrylonitrile/urea inclusion compounds (AN/UIC) with different aging times and AN/urea molar feed ratios are studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It is suggested that DSC could be one of the helpful methods to determine the guest/host ratio and the heat of decomposition. Meanwhile, the guest/host ratio and heat of deformation are obtained, which are 1.17 and 5361.53 J/mol, respectively. It is found that the formation of AN/UIC depends on the aging time. The formation process ends after enough aging time and the composition of AN/UIC becomes stable. It is suggested AN molecules included in urea canal lattice may be packed flat against each other. XRD results reveal that once AN molecules enter urea lattice, AN/UIC are formed, which possess the final structure. When AN molecules are sufficient, the content of AN/UIC increased as aging time prolonging until urea tunnels are saturated by AN.

  18. Hydrotropic Solubilization by Urea Derivatives: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Cui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrotropy is a phenomenon where the presence of a large quantity of one solute enhances the solubility of another solute. The mechanism of this phenomenon remains a topic of debate. This study employed molecular dynamics simulation to investigate the hydrotropic mechanism of a series of urea derivatives, that is, urea (UR, methylurea (MU, ethylurea (EU, and butylurea (BU. A poorly water-soluble compound, nifedipine (NF, was used as the model solute that was solubilized. Structural, dynamic, and energetic changes upon equilibration were analyzed to supply insights to the solubilization mechanism. The study demonstrated that NF and urea derivatives underwent significant nonstoichiometric molecular aggregation in the aqueous solution, a result consistent with the self-aggregation of urea derivatives under the same conditions. The analysis of hydrogen bonding and energy changes revealed that the aggregation was driven by the partial restoration of normal water structure. The energetic data also suggested that the promoted solubilization of NF is favored in the presence of urea derivatives. While the solutes aggregated to a varying degree, the systems were still in single-phase liquid state as attested by their active dynamics.

  19. Can resistive breathing injure the lung? Implications for COPD exacerbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilakopoulos T

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Theodoros Vassilakopoulos, Dimitrios Toumpanakis Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece Abstract: In obstructive lung diseases, airway inflammation leads to bronchospasm and thus resistive breathing, especially during exacerbations. This commentary discusses experimental evidence that resistive breathing per se (the mechanical stimulus in the absence of underlying airway inflammation leads to lung injury and inflammation (mechanotransduction. The potential implications of resistive breathing-induced mechanotrasduction in COPD exacerbations are presented along with the available clinical evidence. Keywords: resistive breathing, COPD, mechanotransduction, bronchoconstriction, inflammation

  20. A fibre-optic oxygen sensor for monitoring human breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and construction of a tapered-tip fibre-optic fluorescence based oxygen sensor is described. The sensor is suitable for fast and real-time monitoring of human breathing. The sensitivity and response time of the oxygen sensor were evaluated in vitro with a gas pressure chamber system, where oxygen partial pressure was rapidly changed between 5 and 15 kPa, and then in vivo in five healthy adult participants who synchronized their breathing to a metronome set at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 breaths min–1. A Datex Ultima medical gas analyser was used to monitor breathing rate as a comparator. The sensor's response time in vitro was less than 150 ms, which allows accurate continuous measurement of inspired and expired oxygen pressure. Measurements of breathing rate by means of our oxygen sensor and of the Datex Ultima were in strong agreement. The results demonstrate that the device can reliably resolve breathing rates up to 60 breaths min–1, and that it is a suitable cost-effective alternative for monitoring breathing rates and end-tidal oxygen partial pressure in the clinical setting. The rapid response time of the sensor may allow its use for monitoring rapid breathing rates as occur in children and the newborn. (note)

  1. Using acoustic sensors to discriminate between nasal and mouth breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Kevin; Yuan, Peng; Coyle, Damian

    2012-01-01

    The recommendation to change breathing patterns from the mouth to the nose can have a significantly positive impact upon the general well being of the individual. We classify nasal and mouth breathing by using an acoustic sensor and intelligent signal processing techniques. The overall purpose is to investigate the possibility of identifying the differences in patterns between nasal and mouth breathing in order to integrate this information into a decision support system which will form the basis of a patient monitoring and motivational feedback system to recommend the change from mouth to nasal breathing.

  2. Sleep disordered breathing following spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Jennum, Poul; Laub, Michael

    2009-01-01

    with SCI, especially with regard to obstructive sleep apnea. In addition, there is a correlation between the incidence of sleep disturbances and the spinal cord level injured, age, body mass index, neck circumference, abdominal girth, and use of sedating medications. Regulation of respiration is dependent......Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) commonly complain about difficulty in sleeping. Although various sleep disordered breathing definitions and indices are used that make comparisons between studies difficult, it seems evident that the frequency of sleep disorders is higher in individuals...

  3. Exhaled Breath Condensate for Proteomic Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean W. Harshman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Exhaled breath condensate (EBC has been established as a potential source of respiratory biomarkers. Compared to the numerous small molecules identified, the protein content of EBC has remained relatively unstudied due to the methodological and technical difficulties surrounding EBC analysis. In this review, we discuss the proteins identified in EBC, by mass spectrometry, focusing on the significance of those proteins identified. We will also review the limitations surrounding mass spectral EBC protein analysis emphasizing recommendations to enhance EBC protein identifications by mass spectrometry. Finally, we will provide insight into the future directions of the EBC proteomics field.

  4. Extensive Epidermoid Cyst and Breathing Difficulty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Dantas Soares

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermoid cysts are common cystic lesions in the skin, ovaries, and testicles, but their occurrence in the oral cavity is uncommon. They consist of cysts delimited by a fibrous capsule without cutaneous annexes and are lined by stratified squamous epithelium. The differential diagnosis includes ranula, dermoid cysts, and lingual thyroid. Despite their benign presentation, these cysts can cause functional limitations, requiring special clinical attention for extensive lesions located in regions that preserve vital structures. This paper aims to report a case of epidermoid cyst in patient with swallowing and breathing difficulty, highlighting the clinical and surgical planning.

  5. Electronic response to nuclear breathing mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Hendrik; Ruffini, Remo [ICRANet, P.zza della Repubblica 10, I-65122 Pescara, Italy Dipartimento di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Università di Roma P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); ICRANet, University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, 28 Av. de Valrose, 06103 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Xue, She-Sheng [ICRANet, P.zza della Repubblica 10, I-65122 Pescara, Italy Dipartimento di Fisica and ICRA, Sapienza Università di Roma P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    Based on our previous work on stationary oscillation modes of electrons around giant nuclei, we show how to treat a general driving force on the electron gas, such as the one generated by the breathing mode of the nucleus, by means of the spectral method. As an example we demonstrate this method for a system with Z = 10{sup 4} in β-equilibrium with the electrons compressed up to the nuclear radius. In this case the stationary modes can be obtained analytically, which allows for a very speedy numerical calculation of the final result.

  6. STUDY ON NOVEL SORBENT FOR REMOVAL OF UREA COMPLEX SORPTION OF UREA BY MEANS OF ALGINATE—Cu(Ⅱ) COMPLEX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAOXiaobin; HEBinglin

    1992-01-01

    Alginate-Cu(Ⅱ)complex beads or membranes were prepared for removal of urea.The mechanism of sorption of urea was identified by UV-Visible spectra,FT-IR spectra and Far-Infrared spectra.The factors affecting the urea sorption capacity were discussed in detail.Results showed that the Alginate-Cu(Ⅱ)complex sorbent can sorb about 60 my urea per gram of sorbent at 37℃ and the concentration of urea was 130mg/100ml in Na2HPO4 and NaH2PO4 buffer solution(pH=7.0).

  7. Volatile Biomarkers in Breath Associated With Liver Cirrhosis — Comparisons of Pre- and Post-liver Transplant Breath Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández del Río, R.; M.E. O'Hara; Holt, A.; Pemberton, P; Shah, T; T. Whitehouse; Mayhew, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The burden of liver disease in the UK has risen dramatically and there is a need for improved diagnostics. Aims: To determine which breath volatiles are associated with the cirrhotic liver and hence diagnostically useful. Methods: A two-stage biomarker discovery procedure was used. Alveolar breath samples of 31 patients with cirrhosis and 30 healthy controls were mass spectrometrically analysed and compared (stage 1). 12 of these patients had their breath analysed after live...

  8. Influence of alternate nostril breathing on heart rate variability in non-practitioners of yogic breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya Ghiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Long-term alternate nostril breathing (ANB has been shown to enhance autonomic control of the heart by increasing parasympathetic modulation. However, there is no information on the immediate effects of ANB on autonomic control compared to paced breathing (PB at the same rate in individuals who are inexperienced with yogic breathing. Aim: To examine cardiac autonomic modulation following ANB in comparison to that following PB in individuals who were inexperienced in ANB. Materials and Methods: Twenty healthy individuals (22.3 ± 2.9 years with no prior experience with ANB engaged in 30 min of both ANB and PB which were preceded and followed by 5 min of normal breathing (PRE, post-ANB, and post-PB, respectively. Mean arterial pressure (MAP and heart rate variability (HRV were assessed during all conditions. HRV was reported as spectral power in the total (lnTP, low-(lnLF, and high-frequency (lnHF ranges and were natural log (ln transformed. Results: Analysis of covariance revealed lnTP, lnLF and lnHF were greater during both post-ANB and post-PB compared to PRE (P<0.05. MAP and lnLF/lnHF did not significantly differ between conditions. Conclusions: These data suggest that there was an immediate increase in cardiac autonomic modulation following ANB and PB without a shift in autonomic balance in individuals inexperienced with yogic breathing. To our knowledge, this is the first investigation to investigate the autonomic effects of ANB in this population and also to compare the effects of ANB and PB at the same respiratory rate.

  9. Android integrated urea biosensor for public health awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranali P. Naik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Integration of a biosensor with a wireless network on the Android 4.2.1 (Jelly Bean platform has been demonstrated. The present study reports an android integrated user friendly Flow injection analysis-Enzyme thermistor (FIA-ET urea biosensor system. This android-integrated biosensor system will facilitate enhanced consumer health and awareness alongside abridging the gap between the food testing laboratory and the concerned higher authorities. Data received from a flow injection mode urea biosensor has been exploited as an integration point among the analyst, the food consumer and the responsible higher authorities. Using the urea biosensor as an example, an alarm system has also been demonstrated both graphically and through text message on a mobile handset. The presented sensor integrated android system will also facilitate decision making support system in various fields of food quality monitoring and clinical analysis.

  10. Biosensor Urea Berbasis Biopolimer Khitin Sebagai Matriks Immobilisasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazruddin Nazaruddin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian tentang biosensor urea menggunakan biopolimer khitin sebagai matriks immobilisasi telah dilakukan. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui kinerja biosensor yang dihasilkan yang meliputi sensitivitas, trayek pengukuran, limit deteksi, waktu respon, koefisien selektifitas, dan waktu hidup. Penelitian meliputi beberapa tahap yaitu pembuatan membran polimer khitin dan immobilisasi enzim urease, pelekatan membran khitin pada elektroda pH, dan pengukuran parameter kinerja elektroda. Hasil pengukuran menunjukkan sensitivitas biosensor urea berbasis membran khitin adalah 19,11 mV/dekade, trayek pengukuran 10-4 – 10-8 M, limit deteksi 10-8 M, waktu respon 3,10–6,02 menit, dengan urutan kekuatan ion penggangu: NH4Cl > NaCl > CH3COONa > campuran garam > KCl > CaCl2 > asam askorbat. Kata kunci: biosensor, immobilisasi, khitin, urea

  11. Patient-specific simulation of tidal breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, M.; Wells, A. K.; Jones, I. P.; Hamill, I. S.; Veeckmans, B.; Vos, W.; Lefevre, C.; Fetitia, C.

    2016-03-01

    Patient-specific simulation of air flows in lungs is now straightforward using segmented airways trees from CT scans as the basis for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations. These models generally use static geometries, which do not account for the motion of the lungs and its influence on important clinical indicators, such as airway resistance. This paper is concerned with the simulation of tidal breathing, including the dynamic motion of the lungs, and the required analysis workflow. Geometries are based on CT scans obtained at the extremes of the breathing cycle, Total Lung Capacity (TLC) and Functional Residual Capacity (FRC). It describes how topologically consistent geometries are obtained at TLC and FRC, using a `skeleton' of the network of airway branches. From this a 3D computational mesh which morphs between TLC and FRC is generated. CFD results for a number of patient-specific cases, healthy and asthmatic, are presented. Finally their potential use in evaluation of the progress of the disease is discussed, focusing on an important clinical indicator, the airway resistance.

  12. A fully integrated standalone portable cavity ringdown breath acetone analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meixiu; Jiang, Chenyu; Gong, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Chen, Zhuying; Wang, Zhennan; Kang, Meiling; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2015-09-01

    Breath analysis is a promising new technique for nonintrusive disease diagnosis and metabolic status monitoring. One challenging issue in using a breath biomarker for potential particular disease screening is to find a quantitative relationship between the concentration of the breath biomarker and clinical diagnostic parameters of the specific disease. In order to address this issue, we need a new instrument that is capable of conducting real-time, online breath analysis with high data throughput, so that a large scale of clinical test (more subjects) can be achieved in a short period of time. In this work, we report a fully integrated, standalone, portable analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique for near-real time, online breath acetone measurements. The performance of the portable analyzer in measurements of breath acetone was interrogated and validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results show that this new analyzer is useful for reliable online (online introduction of a breath sample without pre-treatment) breath acetone analysis with high sensitivity (57 ppb) and high data throughput (one data per second). Subsequently, the validated breath analyzer was employed for acetone measurements in 119 human subjects under various situations. The instrument design, packaging, specifications, and future improvements were also described. From an optical ringdown cavity operated by the lab-set electronics reported previously to this fully integrated standalone new instrument, we have enabled a new scientific tool suited for large scales of breath acetone analysis and created an instrument platform that can even be adopted for study of other breath biomarkers by using different lasers and ringdown mirrors covering corresponding spectral fingerprints.

  13. Reinvestigation of growth of urea thiosemicarbazone monohydrate crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Bikshandarkoil R.; Raghavaiah, Pallepogu; Nadkarni, V. S.

    2013-08-01

    The reaction of urea with thiosemicarbazide in 1:1 mole ratio in aqueous solution does not result in the formation of urea thiosemicarbazone monohydrate crystal, as reported by Hanumantharao, Kalainathan and Bhagavannarayana [Spectrochim. Acta A91 (2012) 345-351]. A reinvestigation of the reported reaction reveals that the crystal obtained is the starting material namely thiosemicarbazide, which has been unambiguously confirmed with the aid of infrared and 1H NMR spectra and single crystal X-ray structure determination. Analysis of 1H NMR spectrum reveals that thiosemicarbazide exhibits thione-thiol tautomerism in solution. In contrast, thiosemicarbazide exists as the thione tautomer in the solid state.

  14. IMPROVING THE EFFICIENCY OF CARBON DIOXIDE SUPPLY ON UREA SYNTHESIS

    OpenAIRE

    Лавренченко, Г. К.; Копытин, А. В.; Афанасьев, С. В.; Рощенко, О. С.

    2011-01-01

    Aggregates of urea synthesis are reconstructed with the purpose decrease in specific expenses and increase their productivity. Supply of additional quantities of carbon dioxide and ammonia is necessary to increase production volumes of urea. In most cases there is a problem with the supply of СО2, as the equipment for its compression is not any necessary reserves. Installation for supply of carbon dioxide using a pump is considered. For liquefaction of CO2 at low pressure the cold of the liqu...

  15. On-farm treatment of straws and stovers with urea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nutritional value of cereal crop residues to ruminants is constrained by low N and high fibre contents. These constraints can be alleviated by treatment with alkali, the most suitable of which, for smallholder use, is urea. However, it has not widely been used in Africa. Whilst in some areas, cost and availability of urea will be a factor, it may also be that the flexibility of the technique is not appreciated. The scope for adaptation at each stage of the procedure is reviewed, showing that the farmer does have options to develop a system suitable for a range of conditions. (author)

  16. Biodegraded and Polyurethane Drape-formed Urea Fertilizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong; LI Jian; CHEN Xiaoyao

    2005-01-01

    Natural water absorbent konjac flour participates in synthesizing biodegraded and polyurethane foamed drape, which is used to release urea slowly.The experimental results indicate that the slowly-releasing velocity of urea nitrogen and the degrading velocity of the drape can be controlled by regulating the thicknesses of drapes, the amount of konjac flour and the water content. In addition, the biodegradability of the drape was investigated by burying the specimens in earth afterwards,and results show this drape can be degraded naturally.

  17. pH-Dependent urea-induced unfolding of stem bromelain: unusual stability against urea at neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, B; Rathar, G M; Varshney, A; Khan, R H

    2009-12-01

    Equilibrium unfolding of stem bromelain (SB) with urea as a denaturant has been monitored as a function of pH using circular dichroism and fluorescence emission spectroscopy. Urea-induced denaturation studies at pH 4.5 showed that SB unfolds through a two-state mechanism and yields DeltaG (free energy difference between the fully folded and unfolded forms) of approximately 5.0 kcal/mol and C(m) (midpoint of the unfolding transition) of approximately 6.5 M at 25 degrees C. Very high concentration of urea (9.5 M) provides unusual stability to the protein with no more structural loss and transition to a completely unfolded state.

  18. A nomogram for assessment of breathing patterns during treadmill exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Naranjo, J.; Centeno, R; Galiano, D; Beaus, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the breathing patterns of trained athletes under different conditions. The hypothesis is that the breathing pattern during a progressive treadmill exercise is independent of the protocol, at least in healthy people, and can be assessed using a nomogram.

  19. Measurement of Personal Exposure Using a Breathing Thermal Manikin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik

    In this paper personal exposure measurements are performed by means of the Breathing Thermal Manikin. Contaminant concentration is measured in a number of locations in the breathing zone and in the inhaled air. Two cases are investigated: exposure to different contaminant sources in a displacement...

  20. 46 CFR 197.340 - Breathing gas supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...); and (4) Be grade A, B, or C. (h) Helium used for breathing mixtures must be grades A, B, or C produced...,000 parts per million of carbon dioxide; (ii) 20 parts per million carbon monoxide; (iii) 5 milligrams.... (f) Oxygen used for breathing mixtures must— (1) Meet the requirements of Federal Specification...

  1. [Prevalence of mouth breathing in children from an elementary school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felcar, Josiane Marques; Bueno, Izabele Rafael; Massan, Ana Carolina Silva; Torezan, Roberta Pereira; Cardoso, Jefferson Rosa

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this article is to identify the prevalence of mouth breathing in children from an elementary school. 496 questionnaires were answered by 1st and 4th grade children's parents or sponsors in order to identify mouth-breathing. There were questions about habits, sleeping, behavior, eating, personal care and breathing. Mann-Whitney and the Chi-square tests were used to compare the variables between mouth-breathing and nose-breathing among the groups. To measure the exposure effect of the explanatory variables on mouth breathing, the test of logistic regression was used and its magnitude was calculated through Odds Ratio. The statistical significance was set at 5%, and the rate of returned questionnaires was 84.5%. The prevalence of the mouthbreathing over this population was 56.8%. The average age was 7 years old (6-9). There was no significant statistical difference between genders, considering 49.1% male and 50.9% female. The final model of logistic regression identified the variables dribble, sleeps well (negative association) and snores as factors that predict the occurrence of the mouth-breathing. The prevalence of mouthbreathing was similar to related in the literature. The variables dribble, sleeps well (negative association) and snores may be factors that predict the occurrence of mouth-breathing.

  2. Health, social and economical consequences of sleep-disordered breathing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The objective direct and indirect costs of sleep-disordered breathing (snoring, sleep apnoea (SA) and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)) and the treatment are incompletely described.......The objective direct and indirect costs of sleep-disordered breathing (snoring, sleep apnoea (SA) and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)) and the treatment are incompletely described....

  3. Acute effects of cannabis on breath-holding duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Samantha G; Metrik, Jane

    2016-08-01

    Distress intolerance (an individual's perceived or actual inability to tolerate distressing psychological or physiological states) is associated with cannabis use. It is unknown whether a biobehavioral index of distress intolerance, breath-holding duration, is acutely influenced (increased or decreased) by cannabis. Such information may further inform understanding of the expression of psychological or physiological distress postcannabis use. This within-subjects study examined whether smoked marijuana with 2.7%-3.0% delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), relative to placebo, acutely changed duration of breath holding. Participants (n = 88; 65.9% male) were nontreatment-seeking frequent cannabis users who smoked placebo or active THC cigarette on two separate study days and completed a breath-holding task postsmoking. Controlling for baseline breath-holding duration and participant sex, THC produced significantly shorter breath-holding durations relative to placebo. There was a significant interaction of drug administration × frequency of cannabis use, such that THC decreased breath-holding time among less frequent but not among more frequent users. Findings indicate that cannabis may exacerbate distress intolerance (via shorter breath-holding durations). As compared to less frequent cannabis users, frequent users display tolerance to cannabis' acute effects including increased ability to tolerate respiratory distress when holding breath. Objective measures of distress intolerance are sensitive to contextual factors such as acute drug intoxication, and may inform the link between cannabis use and the expression of psychological distress. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27454678

  4. Symptoms of Sleep Disordered Breathing and Risk of Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anne Sofie; Clark, Alice; Salo, Paula;

    2013-01-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) has been associated with oxidative stress, inflammation, and altered hormonal levels, all of which could affect the risk of cancer. The aim of the study is to examine if symptoms of SDB including snoring, breathing cessations, and daytime sleepiness affect...

  5. ABA-Cloud: support for collaborative breath research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Ibrahim; Ludescher, Thomas; King, Julian; Ager, Clemens; Trosin, Michael; Senocak, Uygar; Brezany, Peter; Feilhauer, Thomas; Amann, Anton

    2013-06-01

    This paper introduces the advanced breath analysis (ABA) platform, an innovative scientific research platform for the entire breath research domain. Within the ABA project, we are investigating novel data management concepts and semantic web technologies to document breath analysis studies for the long run as well as to enable their full automatic reproducibility. We propose several concept taxonomies (a hierarchical order of terms from a glossary of terms), which can be seen as a first step toward the definition of conceptualized terms commonly used by the international community of breath researchers. They build the basis for the development of an ontology (a concept from computer science used for communication between machines and/or humans and representation and reuse of knowledge) dedicated to breath research.

  6. Synthesis and Performance of Polyurethane Coated Urea as Slow/controlled Release Fertilizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qingshan; WU Shu; RU Tiejun; WANG Limin; XING Guangzhong; WANG Jinming

    2012-01-01

    Polyurethane coated urea slow/controlled release fertilizer was prepared based on urea granules,isocyanate,polyols and paraffin.Isocyanate reacted with polyols to synthesize the polyurethane skin layer on urea granules surface.Paraffin serves as a lubricant during syntheses of polyurethane skin layers.The structure and nutrient release characteristics of the polyurethane skin layers were investigated by FTIR,SEM and TG.Urea nitrogen slow-release behavior of the polyurethane coated urea was tested.The experimental results indicated that compact and dense polyurethane skin layers with a thickness of 10-15 μm were formed on urea surface,the urea nitrogen slow-release time can reach 40-50 days.Paraffin proves to play a key role in inhibiting water to penetrate into urea,but excessive addition would decrease the polyurethane crosslinking density.

  7. Síntese e controle de qualidade da ureia enriquecida em 13C para diagnóstico da Helicobacterpylori (HP Synthesis and quality control of 13C-enriched urea for Helicobacter pylori (HP diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Sant Ana Filho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to synthesize the urea (13CO(NH22, with 99% 13C atoms, and to perform a quality analysis for the diagnosis (breath test of Helicobacter pylori. Furthermore, the process was submitted to economic analysis. The reaction was performed in a stainless steel reactor, lined with polytetrafluoroethylene, under low pressure and temperature. The synthesis method was shown to be appropriate (2.35 g; 81.9% yield, evidenced by physico-chemical and microbiological results, according to Brazilian legislation. The production and diagnosis costs were competitive compared with national and international market values, rendering this a valuable tool in clinical medicine.

  8. Aspiration tests in aqueous foam using a breathing simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-12-01

    Non-toxic aqueous foams are being developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) for use in crowd control, cell extractions, and group disturbances in the criminal justice prison systems. The potential for aspiration of aqueous foam during its use and the resulting adverse effects associated with complete immersion in aqueous foam is of major concern to the NIJ when examining the effectiveness and safety of using this technology as a Less-Than-Lethal weapon. This preliminary study was designed to evaluate the maximum quantity of foam that might be aspirated by an individual following total immersion in an SNL-developed aqueous foam. A.T.W. Reed Breathing simulator equipped with a 622 Silverman cam was used to simulate the aspiration of an ammonium laureth sulfate aqueous foam developed by SNL and generated at expansion ratios in the range of 500:1 to 1000:1. Although the natural instinct of an individual immersed in foam is to cover their nose and mouth with a hand or cloth, thus breaking the bubbles and decreasing the potential for aspiration, this study was performed to examine a worst case scenario where mouth breathing only was examined, and no attempt was made to block foam entry into the breathing port. Two breathing rates were examined: one that simulated a sedentary individual with a mean breathing rate of 6.27 breaths/minute, and one that simulated an agitated or heavily breathing individual with a mean breathing rate of 23.7 breaths/minute. The results of this study indicate that, if breathing in aqueous foam without movement, an air pocket forms around the nose and mouth within one minute of immersion.

  9. 75 FR 74746 - Solid Urea From Russia and Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ... from Russia and Ukraine (64 FR 62653). Following second five-year reviews by Commerce and the... imports of solid urea from Russia and Ukraine (71 FR 581). The Commission is now conducting third reviews... part 207), as most recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1\\ No response to this...

  10. Influence of urea and pituitrin on radiocerebral effects in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The administration of urea and pituitrin produced a directed and rapid change in a hydration profile of brain tissue which permitted to modify the severity of radiocerebral affection in rats, that is, to increase it with hypohydration and to decrease with hyperhydration of the brain

  11. Dietary management of urea cycle disorders : European practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adam, S.; Almeida, M. F.; Assoun, M.; Baruteau, J.; Bernabei, S. M.; Bigot, S.; Champion, H.; Daly, A.; Dassy, M.; Dawson, S.; Dixon, M.; Dokoupil, K.; Dubois, S.; Dunlop, C.; Evans, S.; Eyskens, F.; Faria, A.; Favre, E.; Ferguson, C.; Goncalves, C.; Gribben, J.; Heddrich-Ellerbrok, M.; Jankowski, C.; Janssen-Regelink, R.; Jouault, C.; Laguerre, C.; Le Verge, S.; Link, R.; Lowry, S.; Luyten, K.; MacDonald, A.; Maritz, C.; McDowell, S.; Meyer, U.; Micciche, A.; Robertson, L. V.; Rocha, J. C.; Rohde, C.; Saruggia, I.; Sjoqvist, E.; Stafford, J.; Terry, A.; Thom, R.; Vande Kerckhove, K.; van Rijn, M.; van Teeffelen-Heithoff, A.; van Wegberg, A.; van Wyk, K.; Vasconcelos, C.; Vestergaard, H.; Webster, D.; White, F. J.; Wildgoose, J.; Zweers, H.; Robert, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is no published data comparing dietary management of urea cycle disorders (UCD) in different countries. Methods: Cross-sectional data from 41 European Inherited Metabolic Disorder (IMD) centres (17 UK, 6 France, 5 Germany, 4 Belgium, 4 Portugal, 2 Netherlands, 1 Denmark, 1 Italy, 1

  12. Dietary management of urea cycle disorders: European practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adam, S.; Almeida, M.F.; Assoun, M.; Baruteau, J.; Bernabei, S.M.; Bigot, S.; Champion, H.; Daly, A.; Dassy, M.; Dawson, S.; Dixon, M.; Dokoupil, K.; Dubois, S.; Dunlop, C.; Evans, S.; Eyskens, F.; Faria, A.; Favre, E.; Ferguson, C.; Goncalves, C.; Gribben, J.; Heddrich-Ellerbrok, M.; Jankowski, C.; Janssen-Regelink, R.; Jouault, C.; Laguerre, C.; Verge, S. Le; Link, R.; Lowry, S.; Luyten, K.; Macdonald, A.; Maritz, C.; McDowell, S.; Meyer, U.; Micciche, A.; Robert, M.; Robertson, L.V.; Rocha, J.C.; Rohde, C.; Saruggia, I.; Sjoqvist, E.; Stafford, J.; Terry, A.; Thom, R.; nde Kerckhove, K. Va; Rijn, M. van de; Teeffelen-Heithoff, A. van; Wegberg, A.v.; Wyk, K. van; Vasconcelos, C.; Vestergaard, H.; Webster, D.; White, F.J.; Wildgoose, J.; Zweers, H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is no published data comparing dietary management of urea cycle disorders (UCD) in different countries. METHODS: Cross-sectional data from 41 European Inherited Metabolic Disorder (IMD) centres (17 UK, 6 France, 5 Germany, 4 Belgium, 4 Portugal, 2 Netherlands, 1 Denmark, 1 Italy, 1

  13. Urea Transporter Inhibitors: En Route to New Diuretics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Jeff M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A selective urea transporter UT-A1 inhibitor would be a novel type of diuretic, likely with less undesirable side-effects than conventional diureticssince it acts on the last portion of the nephron. Esteva-Font et al. (2013) develop suchan inhibitor by using a clever high-throughput screening assay, and document its selectivity. . PMID:24210002

  14. Reduction in slow intercompartmental clearance of urea during dialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowsher, D.J.; Krejcie, T.C.; Avram, M.J.; Chow, M.J.; Del Greco, F.; Atkinson, A.J. Jr.

    1985-04-01

    The kinetics of urea and inulin were analyzed in five anesthetized dogs during sequential 2-hour periods before, during, and after hemodialysis. The distribution of both compounds after simultaneous intravenous injection was characterized by three-compartment models, and the total volumes of urea (0.66 +/- 0.05 L/kg) and inulin (0.19 +/- 0.01 L/kg) distribution were similar to expected values for total body water and extravascular space, respectively. Intercompartmental clearances calculated before dialysis were used to estimate blood flows to the fast and slow equilibrating compartments. In agreement with previous results, the sum of these flows was similar to cardiac output, averaging 101% of cardiac output measured before dialysis (range 72% to 135%). Dialysis was accompanied by reductions in the slow intercompartmental clearances of urea (81%) and inulin (47%), which reflected a 90% attenuation in blood flow supplying the slow equilibrating compartments. This was estimated to result in a 10% average reduction in the efficiency with which urea was removed by dialysis (range 2.0% to 16.4%). Mean arterial pressure fell by less than 5% during dialysis, but total peripheral resistance increased by 47% and cardiac output fell by 35%. In the postdialysis period, total peripheral resistance and cardiac output returned toward predialysis values, but blood flow to the slow equilibrating peripheral compartment was still reduced by 80%. These changes parallel activation of the renin-angiotensin system, but further studies are required to establish causality.

  15. Prebiotic formation of polyamino acids in molten urea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, H.; Nomoto, S.; Terasaki, M.; Shimoyama, A.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2005-04-01

    It is important for research into the origins of life to elucidate polyamino acid formation under prebiotic conditions. Only a limited set of amino acids has been reported to polymerize thermally. In this paper we demonstrate a novel thermal polymerization mechanism in a molten urea of alkylamino acids (i.e. glycine, alanine, β-alanine, α-aminobutyric acid, valine, norvaline, leucine and norleucine), which had been thought to be incapable of undergoing thermal polymerization. Also, aspartic acid was found to polymerize in molten urea at a lower temperature than that at which aspartic acid alone had previously been thermally polymerized. Individual oligomers produced in heating experiments on urea-amino acid mixtures were analysed using a liquid chromatograph mass spectrometer. Major products in the reaction mixture were three different types of polyamino acid derivatives: N-carbamoylpolyamino acids, polyamino acids containing a hydantoin ring at the N-terminal position and unidentified derivatives with molecular weights that were greater by 78 than those of the corresponding peptide forms. The polymerization reaction occurred by taking advantage of the high polarity of molten urea as well as its dehydrating ability. Under the presumed prebiotic conditions employed here, many types of amino acids were thus revealed to undergo thermal polymerization.

  16. Urea in sugarcane-based diets for dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Magno Ferreira Santiago

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effect of adding four levels (0, 4, 8 and 12 g/kg, as fed of a mixture (9:1 of urea and ammonium sulfate (UAs to sugarcane on feed intake and digestibility, productive performance and metabolism of nitrogen compounds of dairy cows. Twelve multiparous Holstein cows (12.6±0.5 kg/d of milk, 225±90 days in milk were distributed in three 4 × 4 Latin squares, receiving diets with the same amount of nitrogen (125 g crude protein/kg of dry matter. Concentrate feed was supplied at a ratio of 1 kg for each 3 kg of milk produced. The sugarcane presented 21.9 ºBrix. The level of UAs did not affect intake, total digestibility of diet components, milk production or milk components. Increasing UAs level linearly increased concentration of plasma urea nitrogen (PUN, urinary excretion of nitrogen and contribution of non-urea nitrogen in the urinary excretion and linearly reduced milk production/urinary excretion of nitrogen ratio. In spite of the linear increase of PUN with increased urea, the maximum value observed (14.31 mg/dL was below the threshold value of 20 mg/dL, above which reproductive function may be compromised. In diets with sugarcane for dairy cows with production below 15 kg/day, the UAs level may be raised from 0 to 12 g/kg natural matter without impairing performance.

  17. Emissions of gun propellant compositions with added urea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, C.A. van; Hulst, M. van; Meuken, D.

    2011-01-01

    Addition of certain components to gun propellants may lead to a reduction of the NOx content in combustion gases. This is escribed in the literature based on small scale laboratory research. One of these components is urea. In the investigation described here, propellants have been studied which con

  18. Nucleation kinetics of urea succinic acid -ferroelectric single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhivya, R.; Vizhi, R. Ezhil; Babu, D. Rajan

    2015-06-01

    Single crystals of Urea Succinic Acid (USA) were grown by slow cooling technique. The crystalline system was confirmed by powder X-ray diffraction. The metastable zonewidth were carried out for various temperatures i.e., 35°, 40°, 45° and 50°C. The induction period is experimentally determined and various nucleation parameters have been estimated.

  19. Siloxane modified polyurea and polyurethane urea segmented copolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Regina H.

    1989-01-01

    High molecular weight polyether urea copolymers were synthesized using perfectly difunctional aromatic amine terminated polypropylene oxide (PPO) (2800 ) prepared via aluminum porphorin initiated coordination polymerization. The resulting segmented copolymer showed much higher tensile strength and better thermal stability than polyureas based on commercial PPO which contains some terminal unsaturation. This was attributed to the achievement of both higher molecular weight and t...

  20. Encapsulated Urea-Kaolinite Nanocomposite for Controlled Release Fertilizer Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siafu Ibahati Sempeho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urea controlled release fertilizer (CRF was prepared via kaolinite intercalation followed by gum arabic encapsulation in an attempt to reduce its severe losses associated with dissolution, hydrolysis, and diffusion. Following the beneficiation, the nonkaolinite fraction decreased from 39.58% to 0.36% whereas the kaolinite fraction increased from 60.42% to 99.64%. The X-ray diffractions showed that kaolinite was a major phase with FCC Bravais crystal lattice with particle sizes ranging between 14.6 nm and 92.5 nm. The particle size varied with intercalation ratios with methanol intercalated kaolinite > DMSO-kaolinite > urea-kaolinite (KPDMU. Following intercalation, SEM analysis revealed a change of order from thick compact overlapping euhedral pseudohexagonal platelets to irregular booklets which later transformed to vermiform morphology and dispersed euhedral pseudohexagonal platelets. Besides, dispersed euhedral pseudohexagonal platelets were seen to coexist with blocky-vermicular booklets. In addition, a unique brain-form agglomeration which transformed into roundish particles mart was observed after encapsulation. The nanocomposites decomposed between 48 and 600°C. Release profiles showed that 100% of urea was released in 97 hours from KPDMU while 87% was released in 150 hours from the encapsulated nanocomposite. The findings established that it is possible to use Pugu kaolinite and gum arabic biopolymer to prepare urea CRF formulations.

  1. Effect of Urea on Activity and Conformation of a Glycoprotein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Xiang; WANG Xiaoyun; ZHOU Bo; ZHOU Haimeng

    2006-01-01

    The changes of the activity and conformation of Aspergillus niger phytase in urea were detected by farultraviolet circular dichroism (CD) spectra, fluorescence spectra, and enzyme activity assays. The results show that no enzyme activity can be detected after phytase is incubated for 10 h in 3.0 mol/L urea, even though at this urea concentration, less than 20% of the tertiary and secondary structures in the native enzyme changed. The inactivation reaction kinetics is found to be a monophasic first-order reaction, but the unfolding is a biphasic process consisting of two first-order reactions. The inactivation rates of the free enzyme and the substrate-enzyme complex are much faster than the conformational changes during urea denaturation. All of the results indicate that, as a glycoprotein, phytase's activity is strongly dependent on its conformational integrity. The phytase active sites seem to be located in a limited region in the molecule and display more conformational fragility and flexibility to denaturants than enzyme molecular structure as a whole.

  2. New urea-absorbing polymers for artificial kidney machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, W. A.; Hsu, G. C.; Marsh, H. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Etherified polymer is made from modified cellulose derivative which is reacted with periodate. It will absorb 2 grams of urea per 100 grams of polymer. Indications are that polymers could be used to help remove uremic wastes in artificial kidneys, or they could be administered orally as therapy for uremia.

  3. Sleep-disordered breathing and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Latisha K; Avidan, Alon Y

    2008-01-01

    Sleep and stroke have an important and fascinating interaction. Patients with sleep-disordered breathing present with cardiovascular heart disease, cognitive decline, and increased risk of stroke. Stroke adversely affects sleep and factors such as prolonged immobilization, chronic pain, nocturnal hypoxia, and depression, which can also adversely impact sleep quality. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), one of the most common and serious sleep disturbances, manifests itself in almost 50% of all stroke patients. Sleep apnea patients who experience a stroke may be at a greater impairment in their rehabilitation potential and have increased risk of secondary stroke and mortality. Given these factors, the practicing neurologist should possess the skills to appropriately recognize, rapidly diagnose, and properly manage stroke patients with OSA.

  4. Effects of time passage and distance on distribution of carbon-14 among parts of rice during growth period at Korean CANDU plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pattern of carbon-14 (C-14) distribution among parts of rice growing in the vicinity of the Korean CANDU plant during the growth period was investigated. Six-time samplings of rice and air were performed in seven fields from rice planting to harvest, and the measurements of C-14 content were made by using liquid scintillation counter on the air and each of available parts of the rice such as root, stem, crust and ear. The results illustrated that C-14 showed a relatively even distribution among parts of rice during the growth period implying C-14 accumulation was more dependent on interactions among the parts such as transportation of nutrients than on photosynthesis occurring only in stem that has chlorophyll. Also it was observed that the difference of C-14 concentration between each part of rice and the air decreased with time indicating that the time was needed for C-14 to reach equilibrium between both sides. The radius within which C-14 released from the Wolsong plant could have a significant effect on the C-14 concentrations of the parts was observed to be about 5 km. (author)

  5. Synthesis of deleobuvir, a potent hepatitis C virus polymerase inhibitor, and its major metabolites labeled with carbon-13 and carbon-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latli, Bachir; Hrapchak, Matt; Chevliakov, Maxim; Li, Guisheng; Campbell, Scot; Busacca, Carl A; Senanayake, Chris H

    2015-05-30

    Deleobuvir, (2E)-3-(2-{1-[2-(5-bromopyrimidin-2-yl)-3-cyclopentyl-1-methyl-1H-indole-6-carboxamido]cyclobutyl}-1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-6-yl)prop-2-enoic acid (1), is a non-nucleoside, potent, and selective inhibitor of hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase. Herein, we describe the detailed synthesis of this compound labeled with carbon-13 and carbon-14. The synthesis of its three major metabolites, namely, the reduced double bond metabolite (2) and the acyl glucuronide derivatives of (1) and (2), is also reported. Aniline-(13) C6 was the starting material to prepare butyl (E)-3-(3-methylamino-4-nitrophenyl-(13) C6 )acrylate [(13) C6 ]-(11) in six steps. This intermediate was then used to obtain [(13) C6 ]-(1) and [(13) C6 ]-(2) in five and four more steps, respectively. For the radioactive synthesis, potassium cyanide-(14) C was used to prepare 1-cylobutylaminoacid [(14) C]-(23) via Buchrer-Bergs reaction. The carbonyl chloride of this acid was then used to access both [(14) C]-(1) and [(14) C]-(2) in four steps. The acyl glucuronide derivatives [(13) C6 ]-(3), [(13) C6 ]-(4) and [(14) C]-(3) were synthesized in three steps from the acids [(13) C6 ]-(1), [(13) C6 ]-(2) and [(14) C]-(1) using known procedures. PMID:25964148

  6. Performance of cellulose acetate butyrate membranes in hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wydeven, T.; Leban, M.

    1973-01-01

    Cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) membranes are shown to give high salt and urea rejection with water flux of about 3 gallons/sq ft per day at 600 psig. Membranes prepared from a formulation containing glyoxal show a significant increase in flux and decrease in salt and urea rejection with drying time. Zero drying time gives maximum urea and salt rejection and is therefore most suitable for hyperfiltration of sodium chloride and urea feed solution.

  7. Effects of slow-release urea on ruminal digesta characteristics and growth performance in beef steers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor-Edwards, C C; Hibbard, G; Kitts, S E;

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of slow urea (SRU) versus feed-grade urea on ruminal metabolite characteristics in steers and DMI, gain, and G:F in growing beef steers.......Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of slow urea (SRU) versus feed-grade urea on ruminal metabolite characteristics in steers and DMI, gain, and G:F in growing beef steers....

  8. Oral breathing: new early treatment protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Denotti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral breathing is a respiratory dysfunction that affects approximately 10-15% of child population. It is responsable of local effects and systemic effects, both immediate and long-term. They affect the growth of the subject and his physical health in many ways: pediatric, psycho-behavioral and cognitive. The etiology is multifactorial. It’s important the establishment of a vicious circle involving more areas and it is essential to stop it as soon as possible. In order to correct this anomaly, the pediatric dentist must be able to make a correct diagnosis to treat early the disfunction and to avoid the onset of cascade mechanisms. Who plays a central role is the pediatrician who first and frequently come into contact with little patients. He can identify the anomalies, and therefore collaborate with other specialists, including the dentist. The key aspect that guides us in the diagnosis, and allows us to identify the oral respirator, is the “adenoid facies”. The purpose of the study is to highlight the importance and benefits of an early and multidisciplinary intervention (pediatric, orthopedic-orthodontic-functional. A sample of 20 patients was selected with the following inclusion criteria: mouth breathing, transverse discrepancy > 4 mm, early mixed dentition, central and lateral permenent incisors, overjet increased, lip and nasal incompetence, snoring and/or sleep apnea episodes. The protocol of intervention includes the use of the following devices and procedures: a maxillary rapid expander (to correct the transverse discrepancy, to increase the amplitude of the upper respiratory airway and to reduce nasal resistances tract in association with myo-functional devices (nasal stimulator and oral obturator. They allow the reconstruction of a physiological balance between the perioral musculature and tongue, the acquisition of nasal and lips competence and the reduction of overjet. This protocol speeds up and stabilizes the results. The

  9. Respiratory pattern of diaphragmatic breathing and pilates breathing in COPD subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina M. Cancelliero-Gaiad

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diaphragmatic breathing (DB is widely used in pulmonary rehabilitation (PR of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, however it has been little studied in the scientific literature. The Pilates breathing (PB method has also been used in the rehabilitation area and has been little studied in the scientific literature and in COPD. OBJECTIVES: To compare ventilatory parameters during DB and PB in COPD patients and healthy adults. METHOD: Fifteen COPD patients (COPD group and fifteen healthy patients (healthy group performed three types of respiration: natural breathing (NB, DB, and PB, with the respiratory pattern being analyzed by respiratory inductive plethysmography. The parameters of time, volume, and thoracoabdominal coordination were evaluated. After the Shapiro-Wilk normality test, ANOVA was applied followed by Tukey's test (intragroup analysis and Student's t-test (intergroup analysis; p<0.05. RESULTS: DB promoted increase in respiratory volumes, times, and SpO2 as well as decrease in respiratory rate in both groups. PB increased respiratory volumes in healthy group, with no additional benefits of respiratory pattern in the COPD group. With respect to thoracoabdominal coordination, both groups presented higher asynchrony during DB, with a greater increase in the healthy group. CONCLUSIONS: DB showed positive effects such as increase in lung volumes, respiratory motion, and SpO2 and reduction in respiratory rate. Although there were no changes in volume and time measurements during PB in COPD, this breathing pattern increased volumes in the healthy subjects and increased oxygenation in both groups. In this context, the acute benefits of DB are emphasized as a supporting treatment in respiratory rehabilitation programs.

  10. 21 CFR 177.1900 - Urea-formaldehyde resins in molded articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Urea-formaldehyde resins in molded articles. 177...-formaldehyde resins in molded articles. Urea-formaldehyde resins may be safely used as the food-contact surface... conditions: (a) For the purpose of this section, urea-formaldehyde resins are those produced when 1 mole...

  11. Urea derivatives on the basis of 6-amino benzo-1.4-dioxan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present work is devoted to urea derivatives on the basis of 6-amino benzo-1.4-dioxan. The results of studies of condensation of 6-amino benzo-1.4-dioxan with urea and its derivatives are given. The new urea derivatives synthesized by fragment of 1.4-dioxan. (author)

  12. Comparison of amino acid oxidation and urea metabolism in haemodialysis patients during fasting and meal intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veeneman, JM; Kingma, HA; Stellaard, F; de Jong, PE; Reijngoud, DJ; Huisman, RM

    2004-01-01

    Background. The PNA (protein equivalent of nitrogen appearance) is used to calculate protein intake from urea kinetics. One of the essential assumptions in the calculation of PNA is that urea accumulation in haemodialysis (HD) patients is equivalent to amino acid oxidation. However, urea is hydrolys

  13. GC-MS DETERMINATION OF RATIOS OF STABLE-ISOTOPE LABELED TO NATURAL UREA USING [(CN2)-C-13-N-15]UREA FOR STUDYING UREA KINETICS IN SERUM AND AS A MEANS TO VALIDATE ROUTINE METHODS FOR THE QUANTITATIVE ASSAY OF UREA IN DIALYSATE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOLTHERS, BG; TEPPER, T; WITHAG, A; NAGEL, GT; DEHAAN, THY; VANLEEUWEN, JJ; STEGEMAN, CA; HUISMAN, RM

    1994-01-01

    A GC-MS determination of urea in serum or spent dialysate is described, using (CN2)-C-13-N-15-labelled urea and assaying the area ratio of labelled to natural urea by mass fragmentographic monitoring of fragments m/e 153 and 156, after its eventual conversion into the trimethylsilylether-derivative

  14. Hyperpolarized (13) C,(15) N2 -Urea MRI for assessment of the urea gradient in the porcine kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Esben S S; Stewart, Neil J; Wild, Jim M;

    2016-01-01

    function in healthy porcine kidneys resembling the human physiology. METHODS: Five healthy female Danish domestic pigs (weight 30 kg) were scanned at 3 Tesla (T) using a (13) C 3D balanced steady-state MR pulse sequence following injection of hyperpolarized (13) C,(15) N2 -urea via a femoral vein catheter...

  15. Breathing abnormalities in a female mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher M; Cui, Ningren; Zhong, Weiwei; Oginsky, Max F; Jiang, Chun

    2015-09-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a female neurodevelopmental disease with breathing abnormalities. To understand whether breathing defects occur in the early lives of a group of female Mecp2(+/-) mice, a mouse model of RTT, and what percentage of mice shows RTT-like breathing abnormality, breathing activity was measured by plethysmography in conscious mice. Breathing frequency variation and central apnea in a group of Mecp2(+/-) females displayed a distribution pattern similar to Mecp2(-/Y) males, while the rest resembled the wild-type mice. Similar results were obtained using the k-mean clustering statistics analysis. With two independent methods, about 20% of female Mecp2(+/-) mice showed RTT-like breathing abnormalities that began as early as 3 weeks of age in the Mecp2(+/-) mice, and were suppressed with 3% CO2. The finding that only a small proportion of Mecp2(+/-) mice develops RTT-like breathing abnormalities suggests incomplete allele inactivation in the RTT-model Mecp2(+/-) mice.

  16. Thinking about breathing: Effects on respiratory sinus arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortola, Jacopo P; Marghescu, Domnica; Siegrist-Johnstone, Rosemarie

    2016-03-01

    Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), the increase and decrease in instantaneous heart rate (HR) with inspiration and expiration, is commonly evaluated as function of breathing frequency f. However, to the extent that RSA plays a role in the efficiency of gas exchange, it may be expected to correlate better with HR/f ('breathing specific heart rate') than with f, because the former is a better reflection of the cardio-respiratory coupling. We measured RSA breath-by-breath in 209 young men and women during spontaneous breathing and during volitional breathing under auditory cues at vastly different f. In either case, and for both genders, RSA correlated better with HR/f than with f. As HR/f increased so did RSA, in a linear manner. When compared on the basis of HR/f, RSA did not differ significantly between spontaneous and volitional breathing. It is proposed that RSA is a central mechanism that ameliorates the matching between the quasi-continuous pulmonary blood flow and the intermittent airflow, irrespective of the type of ventilatory drive (cortical or autonomic). PMID:26724603

  17. Feasibility of Free-breathing CCTA using 256-MDCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuo; Sun, Ye; Zhang, Zhuolu; Chen, Lei; Hong, Nan

    2016-07-01

    Usually, coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is performed during breath-holding to reduce artifact caused by respiration. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of free-breathing CCTA compared to breath-holding using CT scanner with wide detector. To evaluate the feasibility of CCTA during free-breathing using a 256-MDCT. In 80 patients who underwent CCTA, 40 were performed during breath-holding (group A), and the remaining 40 during free-breathing (group B). The quality scores for coronary arteries were analyzed and defined as: 3 (excellent), 2 (good), and 1 (poor). The image noise, signal-to-noise ratio and effective radiation dose as well as the heart rate variation were compared. The noise, signal-to-noise ratio, and effective radiation dose were not significantly different between the 2 groups. The mean heart rate variation between planning and scanning for group A was 7 ± 7.6 bpm, and larger than 3 ± 2.6 bpm for group B (P = 0.012). Quality scores of the free-breathing group were better than those of the breath-holding group (group A: 2.55 ± 0.64, group B: 2.85 ± 0.36, P = 0.018). Free-breathing CCTA is feasible on wide detector CT scanner to provide acceptable image quality with reduced heart rate variation and better images for certain patients. PMID:27399104

  18. Lactose malabsorption during gastroenteritis, assessed by the hydrogen breath test.

    OpenAIRE

    Gardiner, A. J.; Tarlow, M J; Sutherland, I T; Sammons, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-eight infants and young children with gastroenteritis were investigated for lactose malabsorption. Each of them was given an oral lactose load of either 0.5 g/kg or 2 g/kg after which breath hydrogen excretion was measured, and each was observed to see if he had clinical symptoms of lactose intolerance. Only one patient, given 2 g/kg lactose, had clinical intolerance. His breath hydrogen excretion however was negative. Three of 18 patients given 0.5 g/kg lactose had positive breath hyd...

  19. Development and Evaluation of Algorithms for Breath Alcohol Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungblad, Jonas; Hök, Bertil; Ekström, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    Breath alcohol screening is important for traffic safety, access control and other areas of health promotion. A family of sensor devices useful for these purposes is being developed and evaluated. This paper is focusing on algorithms for the determination of breath alcohol concentration in diluted breath samples using carbon dioxide to compensate for the dilution. The examined algorithms make use of signal averaging, weighting and personalization to reduce estimation errors. Evaluation has been performed by using data from a previously conducted human study. It is concluded that these features in combination will significantly reduce the random error compared to the signal averaging algorithm taken alone. PMID:27043576

  20. 13CO2-breath tests as diagnostic tools in gastroenterology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic breath test in gastroenterology and hepatology uses specifically 13C-labelled substrate containing a ''target bond'' which, on enzymatic cleavage, results in the release of a functional group destined to produce labelled 13CO2 as a metabolic end product. Advantages and methodology of the 13CO2 breath tests are presented together with the calculation methods for 13C dose ratios. An example is given with the 13C-octanoic acid breath test to measure gastric emptying of solids. 2 figs., 5 refs

  1. Sleep disordered breathing at the extremes of age: infancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don S. Urquhart

    2016-03-01

    Appreciate disorders of respiratory control; Normal sleep in infancy is a time of change with alterations in sleep architecture, sleep duration, sleep patterns and respiratory control as an infant grows older. Interactions between sleep and respiration are key to the mechanisms by which infants are vulnerable to sleep disordered breathing. This review discusses normal sleep in infancy, as well as normal sleep breathing in infancy. Sleep disordered breathing (obstructive and central as well as disorders of ventilatory control and infant causes of hypoventilation are all reviewed in detail.

  2. Chelate effects in sulfate binding by amide/urea-based ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chuandong; Wang, Qi-Qiang; Begum, Rowshan Ara; Day, Victor W; Bowman-James, Kristin

    2015-07-01

    The influence of chelate and mini-chelate effects on sulfate binding was explored for six amide-, amide/amine-, urea-, and urea/amine-based ligands. Two of the urea-based hosts were selective for SO4(2-) in water-mixed DMSO-d6 systems. Results indicated that the mini-chelate effect provided by a single urea group with two NH binding sites appears to provide enhanced binding over two amide groups. Furthermore, additional urea binding sites incorporated into the host framework appeared to overcome to some extent competing hydration effects with increasing water content.

  3. Alcoholic Hepatitis Markedly Decreases the Capacity for Urea Synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Glavind

    Full Text Available Data on quantitative metabolic liver functions in the life-threatening disease alcoholic hepatitis are scarce. Urea synthesis is an essential metabolic liver function that plays a key regulatory role in nitrogen homeostasis. The urea synthesis capacity decreases in patients with compromised liver function, whereas it increases in patients with inflammation. Alcoholic hepatitis involves both mechanisms, but how these opposite effects are balanced remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate how alcoholic hepatitis affects the capacity for urea synthesis. We related these findings to another measure of metabolic liver function, the galactose elimination capacity (GEC, as well as to clinical disease severity.We included 20 patients with alcoholic hepatitis and 7 healthy controls. The urea synthesis capacity was quantified by the functional hepatic nitrogen clearance (FHNC, i.e., the slope of the linear relationship between the blood α-amino nitrogen concentration and urea nitrogen synthesis rate during alanine infusion. The GEC was determined using blood concentration decay curves after intravenous bolus injection of galactose. Clinical disease severity was assessed by the Glasgow Alcoholic Hepatitis Score and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD score.The FHNC was markedly decreased in the alcoholic hepatitis patients compared with the healthy controls (7.2±4.9 L/h vs. 37.4±6.8 L/h, P<0.01, and the largest decrease was observed in those with severe alcoholic hepatitis (4.9±3.6 L/h vs. 9.9±4.9 L/h, P<0.05. The GEC was less markedly reduced than the FHNC. A negative correlation was detected between the FHNC and MELD score (rho = -0.49, P<0.05.Alcoholic hepatitis markedly decreases the urea synthesis capacity. This decrease is associated with an increase in clinical disease severity. Thus, the metabolic failure in alcoholic hepatitis prevails such that the liver cannot adequately perform the metabolic up-regulation observed in other stressful

  4. Alcoholic Hepatitis Markedly Decreases the Capacity for Urea Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavind, Emilie; Aagaard, Niels Kristian; Grønbæk, Henning; Møller, Holger Jon; Orntoft, Nikolaj Worm; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Thomsen, Karen Louise

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim Data on quantitative metabolic liver functions in the life-threatening disease alcoholic hepatitis are scarce. Urea synthesis is an essential metabolic liver function that plays a key regulatory role in nitrogen homeostasis. The urea synthesis capacity decreases in patients with compromised liver function, whereas it increases in patients with inflammation. Alcoholic hepatitis involves both mechanisms, but how these opposite effects are balanced remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate how alcoholic hepatitis affects the capacity for urea synthesis. We related these findings to another measure of metabolic liver function, the galactose elimination capacity (GEC), as well as to clinical disease severity. Methods We included 20 patients with alcoholic hepatitis and 7 healthy controls. The urea synthesis capacity was quantified by the functional hepatic nitrogen clearance (FHNC), i.e., the slope of the linear relationship between the blood α-amino nitrogen concentration and urea nitrogen synthesis rate during alanine infusion. The GEC was determined using blood concentration decay curves after intravenous bolus injection of galactose. Clinical disease severity was assessed by the Glasgow Alcoholic Hepatitis Score and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score. Results The FHNC was markedly decreased in the alcoholic hepatitis patients compared with the healthy controls (7.2±4.9 L/h vs. 37.4±6.8 L/h, P<0.01), and the largest decrease was observed in those with severe alcoholic hepatitis (4.9±3.6 L/h vs. 9.9±4.9 L/h, P<0.05). The GEC was less markedly reduced than the FHNC. A negative correlation was detected between the FHNC and MELD score (rho = -0.49, P<0.05). Conclusions Alcoholic hepatitis markedly decreases the urea synthesis capacity. This decrease is associated with an increase in clinical disease severity. Thus, the metabolic failure in alcoholic hepatitis prevails such that the liver cannot adequately perform the metabolic up

  5. Utilization of labelled urea in Helicobacter pylori eradication study by Espinheira Santa; Utilizacao de ureia marcada no estudo da erradicacao do Helicobacter pylori pela Espinheira Santa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chausson, Yvon [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga Vaz; Passos, Maria do Carmo Friche; Andrade, Angela Almeida Magalhaes [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas; Paiva Leriza, Duilio de; Paula Castro, Luiz de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Farmacia

    1995-12-31

    Maytenus ilicifolia, Espinheira Santa, is usually used to treat some gastric diseases, in special duodenal ulcer, in agreement with the medical literature. The aim of this work was to verify the efficiency of those leaves in such disease. It was selected a group of volunteers with ulcer caused by Helicobacter pylori (Hp) confirmed by Urea Breath Test (UBT). It was administered to all patients one capsule having 300 mg of dry extract of the leaves 20 minutes before the UBT. The capsule went on being administered during a week three times a day. At the end of this period two tests were applied to evaluate the Hp eradication: one 12 hours just after the treatment and another after one month. The results indicated that the antibiotic action was not confirmed. (author). 4 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Elastic Scattering of CARBON-14 + CARBON-12, Carbon -14 + OXYGEN-16, and CARBON-14 + OXYGEN-18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterbenz, Stephen Michael

    We have carried out highly detailed studies of the elastic scattering of ^{14} C from ^{12}C, ^{16}O, and ^ {18}O, in a search for resonant phenomena in heavy-ion systems of non-zero isospin and zero spin. Angular distributions from ^{14}C+ ^{12}C and ^ {14}C+^{16}O scattering were measured at ^{14} C bombarding energies ranging from 20 to 40.3 MeV in 0.35 MeV steps. ^{14}C+ ^{18}O angular distributions were measured at ^{14}C energies from 20 to 30 MeV in 0.40 MeV steps and from 22.5 to 32.5 MeV in 2.5 MeV steps. The great variety of behavior which characterizes heavy-ion scattering is clearly illustrated by our data. The ^{14}C+^ {12}C and ^{14} C+^{16}O systems both exhibit marked gross structure in their excitation functions and deep oscillatory structure with a large backward angle rise in their angular distributions. They are in sharp contrast with the ^{14} C+^{18}O system, where structure is not apparent, and cross-sections fall steeply at larger angles and higher energies. However, only in the ^{14}C+ ^{12}C system are the excitation functions strongly fragmented by intermediate width structure. The anomalous appearance of the ^{14} C+^{12}C angular distributions near 17.5 MeV (cm) does suggest the existence of a resonant state (tentatively identified as l = 10 by phase shift analysis). In our analysis, we point out that the remarkable qualitative differences among these systems may be related to open-channel systematics. We find that general characteristics of the ^{14}C+ ^{18}O data are reproduced with a strongly absorbing optical potential model, contrary to the situation in the other two systems, where a specific mechanism, such as elastic transfer, must be invoked to account for the backward rise. We have pursued analysis with a one-step DWBA elastic transfer model which was quite successful at low energies. Its underprediction of the backward rise at higher energies provides further evidence of the importance of multi-step processes in two-nucleon transfer reactions. We have also applied recent group theoretical models of heavy-ion scattering to our data. The single -channel models involving the SO(3,2) and SO(3,1) dynamical symmetries were found to be somewhat more flexible than standard optical models, but were still not able to provide an acceptable gross description of the ^ {14}C+^{12}C and ^{14}C+^ {16}O data. However, a two-channel SO(3,1) dynamical symmetry model in which the elastic transfer amplitude is obtained as the second channel has provided very good fits to individual highly structured angular distributions and better overall reproduction of the datasets than the other models which we have studied.

  7. Data of 1H/13C NMR spectra and degree of substitution for chitosan alkyl urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The data shown in this article are related to the subject of an article in Carbohydrate Polymers, entitled “Synthesis and characterization of chitosan alkyl urea” [1]. 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra of chitosan n-octyl urea, chitosan n-dodecyl urea and chitosan cyclohexyl urea are displayed. The chemical shifts of proton and carbon of glucose skeleton in these chitosan derivatives are designated in detail. Besides, 1H NMR spectra of chitosan cyclopropyl urea, chitosan tert-butyl urea, chitosan phenyl urea and chitosan N,N-diethyl urea and the estimation of the degree of substitution are also presented. The corresponding explanations can be found in the above-mentioned article.

  8. The effect of urea pretreatment on the formaldehyde emission and properties of straw particleboard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hojat Hematabadi; Rabi Behrooz

    2012-01-01

    For manufacturing low-formaldehyde emission particleboard from wheat straw and urea-formaldehyde (UF) resins using urea treatment for indoor environments,we investigated the influence of urea treatment on the formaldehyde emission,physical and mechanical properties of the manufactured particleboard.Wheat straws were treated at three levels of urea concentration (5%,10%,15%) and 95℃ as holding temperature.Wheat straw particleboards were manufactured using hot press at 180℃ and 3 MPa with two types of UF adhesive (UF-45,UF-91).Then the formaldehyde emission values,physical properties and mechanical properties were considered.The results show that the formaldehyde emission value was decreased by increasing urea concentration.Furthermore,the results indicate that the specimens under urea treatment have better mechanical and physical properties compared with control specimens.Also specimens under urea treatment at 10% concentration and UF-91 type adhesive have the most optimum physical and mechanical strength.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of alternating poly(amide urea)s and poly(amide urethane urethane)s from ε-caprolactam, diamines, and diphenyl carbonate or ethylene carbonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubaghs, Luc; Sharma, Bhaskar; Keul, Helmut; Höcker, Hartwig; Loontjens, Ton; Benthem, Rolf van

    2003-01-01

    Alternating poly(amide urea)s from ε-caprolactam, diamines H2N-(CH2)x-NH2 (x = 2 - 4), and diphenyl carbonate were prepared in two steps. The microstructure of the poly(amide urea)s, as determined by means of 1H NMR spectroscopy, reveals a strictly alternating sequence of the building blocks. The mo

  10. Atmospheric Breathing Electric Thruster for Planetary Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This study will investigate the development of an atmosphere-breathing electric propulsion solar-powered vehicle to explore planets such as Mars. The vehicle would...

  11. Taking Her Breath Away: The Rise of COPD in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disparities Taking Her Breath Away: The Rise of COPD in Women Disparities in Lung Health Series More ... the U.S. live with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Millions more ...

  12. Hydrogen and methane breath tests for evaluation of resistant carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J

    1992-01-01

    This review considers in detail the background, principles, techniques, limitations and advantages of the hydrogen and methane breath tests. Resistant food carbohydrates, defined as dietary carbohydrates partly or totally escaping small intestinal assimilation, are fermented in the human colon. T...

  13. Training Studies with Compressed Air Breathing Apparatus – Methodology, Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buks Roberts

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The current article describes topics ranging from the respiratory physiology and the structure of compressed air breathing apparatus to the performance of practical training exercises in an unbreathable environment (hereinafter referred to as UE.

  14. COPD: When You Learn More, You'll Breathe Better

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to restrict their physical activities, be unable to work, and confine themselves to their homes. People realize too late that quality of life is directly related to quality of breathing. "This ...

  15. CO2 Washout Capability with Breathing Manikin Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The intent of this particular project was to perform the following:Provide a breathing capability to be integrated into existing EC5 Ventilation Lab Suited...

  16. Breakdown in Breathing: The Complexities of Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe A Breakdown in Breathing The Complexities of Cystic Fibrosis Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited illness that ravages the ... B. Guggino, a researcher with the Johns Hopkins Cystic Fibrosis Center. But in CF, “the mucus gets sticky, ...

  17. High and Low Affinity Urea Root Uptake: Involvement of NIP5;1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huayiu; Menz, Jochen; Häussermann, Iris; Benz, Martin; Fujiwara, Toru; Ludewig, Uwe

    2015-08-01

    Urea is the most widespread nitrogen (N) fertilizer worldwide and is rapidly degraded in soil to ammonium by urease. Ammonium is either taken up by plant roots or is further processed to nitrate by soil microorganisms. However, urea can be taken up by roots and is further degraded to ammonium by plant urease for assimilation. When urea is supplied under sterile conditions, it acts as a poor N source for seedlings or adult Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Here, the gene expression of young seedlings exposed to urea and ammonium nitrate nutrition was compared. Several primary metabolism and transport genes, including those for nitrate and urea, were differentially expressed in seedlings. However, urease and most major intrinsic proteins were not differentially expressed, with the exception of NIP6;1, a urea-permeable channel, which was repressed. Furthermore, little overlap with the gene expression with ammonium as the sole N source was observed, confirming that pure urea nutrition is not associated with the ammonium toxicity syndrome in seedlings. The direct root uptake of urea was increased under boron deficiency, in both the high and low affinity range. This activity was entirely mediated by the NIP5;1 channel, which was confirmed to transport urea when expressed in oocytes. The uptake of urea in the high and low affinity range was also determined for maize and wheat roots. The urea uptake by maize roots was only about half that of wheat, but was not stimulated by boron deficiency or N deficiency in either species. This analysis identifies novel components of the urea uptake systems in plants, which may become agronomically relevant to urea uptake and utilization, as stabilized urea fertilizers become increasingly popular.

  18. Fetal breathing movements and changes at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koos, Brian J; Rajaee, Arezoo

    2014-01-01

    The fetus, which develops within a fluid-filled amniotic sac, relies on the placenta for respiratory gas exchange rather than the lungs. While not involved in fetal oxygenation, fetal breathing movements (FBM) nevertheless have an important role in lung growth and in development of respiratory muscles and neural regulation. FBM are regulated differently in many respects than postnatal respiration, which results from the unique intrauterine environment. Prominent distinctions of FBM include its episodic nature and apnea-sensitivity to hypoxia. The latter characteristic is the basis for using FBM in the assessment of fetuses at risk for hypoxic injury. At birth, the transition to continuous postnatal respiration involves a fall in temperature, gaseous distention of the lungs, activation of the Hering-Breuer reflexes, and functional connectivity of afferent O2 chemoreceptor activity with respiratory motoneurons and arousal centers. Importantly, exposure to drugs or adverse conditions in utero not only can change patterns of FBM but also can lead to epigenetic dysregulation in postnatal respiration. Such changes, can blunt respiratory and arousal defenses against hypoxic challenges in sleep. Thus, fetal hypoxia and/or drug exposure may in later life dispose sleeping infants, children, and adults to hypertension, diabetes mellitus, brain injury, and sudden death. PMID:25015803

  19. Bathroom watching using a breath detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiura, Tomofumi; Nakajima, Masato

    2004-10-01

    Recently, domestic accidents have been increasing in Japan. These kinds of accidents occur in private areas such as bedrooms, toilets and bathrooms, and tend to be found too late. Accidents, particularly those occurring in the bathroom, can often result in death. Many systems which have been proposed or which are in use are designed to detect body motion in the bathroom, and determine that a bather has suddenly taken ill when movement ceases. However, the relaxed posture of a person bathing is actually very similar to that of a person who has passed out. It is therefore very difficult to differentiate between the two postures. We have developed a watching system for bathrooms. The new feature of this system lies in its ability to detect a person"s breathing by using an FG vision sensor. From the experiment, it was found that the false alarm rate is expected to reach less than 0.0001% when waiting time is set to 36.8 seconds.

  20. EXCRECION FRACCIONAL DE UREA BAJA EN HIPONATREMIA INDUCIDA POR HIPOTIROIDISMO

    OpenAIRE

    Musso CG; Macías Núñez JF; Imperiali N; Algranati L

    2005-01-01

    ABSTRACTHypothyroidism can cause disturbance of renal hemodinamics, kidney histology, water and electrolyte metabolism, being hyponatremia and glomerular filtration reduction their low prevalent but most significant consequences. All these changes are largely corrected by substitution of exogenous thyroid hormone.Fractional excretion of urea (FEU) is a useful index in the evaluation of hyponatremia. However, it was not still reported in the literature the FEU value in hyponatremia induced by ...

  1. Orphan drugs in development for urea cycle disorders: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häberle J

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Johannes Häberle,1 Shawn E McCandless2 1Division of Metabolism and Children's Research Center, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Center for Human Genetics, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, and Department of Genetics and Genome Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: The urea cycle disorders are caused by deficiency of one of the six hepatic enzymes or two transporters involved in detoxification of ammonia. The resulting hyperammonemia causes severe brain injury unless aggressive steps are taken to reduce the accumulation of ammonia, which is thought to be the most toxic metabolite. This review describes the current state of chronic management of urea cycle disorders, focusing on new and emerging therapies. Management strategies include the mainstay of treatment, namely dietary protein restriction and supplementation with l-arginine or l-citrulline. Several currently approved medications utilize and enhance alternative pathways of waste nitrogen excretion (sodium benzoate, sodium phenylacetate, sodium phenylbutyrate in several formulations, and glycerol phenylbutyrate, working through conjugation of the drug to either glycine (in the case of benzoate or glutamine, the products of which are excreted in the urine. Carglumic acid activates the first committed step of conversion of ammonia to urea, carbamoylphosphate synthetase, and thus effectively treats defective synthesis of the endogenous activator, N-acetylglutamate, whether due to genetic defects or biochemical inhibition of the N-acetylglutamate synthase enzyme. Approaches to neuroprotection during episodes of hyperammonemia are discussed, including the use of controlled hypothermia (brain cooling, as well as proposed, but as yet untested, pharmacologic therapies. Finally, cell-based therapies, including liver transplantation, infusion of fresh or cryopreserved hepatocytes, use of stem cells, and new approaches to gene

  2. Multiresidue HPLC methods for phenyl urea herbicides in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruberu, S R; Draper, W M; Perera, S K

    2000-09-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods for the determination of phenyl urea herbicides in water are described. The target compounds include chlortoluron, diuron, fluometuron, isoproturon, linuron, metobromuron, metoxuron, monuron, neburon, and siduron. Water was subjected to solid phase extraction (SPE) using either automated SPE with 47 mm C(18) Empore disks or on-line precolumn concentration. Herbicides were separated on a C(18) reversed phase column with an acetonitile-water gradient and were detected with either a diode array detector (DAD) or a postcolumn photolysis and derivatization (PPD) detector system. Photolysis converted the phenyl ureas to monoalkylamines that were derivatized to fluorescent isoindoles by reaction with o-phthalaldehyde and 2-mercaptoethanol. The DAD monitoring at 245 nm was linear over three decades with instrument detection limits of approximately 0.01 mg/L. SPE efficiency was between 48 and 70% in laboratory reagent water, but use of the internal standard quantitation method improved accuracy. High total dissolved solids and total organic carbon values in surface water improved recoveries relative to laboratory reagent water for all of the phenyl ureas. In Colorado River water spiked at 1 or 50 microg/L, mean recoveries ranged from 74 to 104%. Method detection limits (MDLs) ranged from 4 to 40 ng/L (parts per trillion) with the DAD instrument. PPD detection was highly specific but resulted in a slight loss in chromatographic efficiency and average MDLs approximately 5 times higher using a single set of detection conditions. The study indicates that methods based on SPE followed by HPLC with diode array or PPD detection have practical utility for trace analysis of phenyl ureas in drinking water or surface waters. PMID:10995323

  3. Reverse osmosis membrane of high urea rejection properties. [water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wydeven, T. J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Polymeric membranes suitable for use in reverse osmosis water purification because of their high urea and salt rejection properties are prepared by generating a plasma of an unsaturated hydrocarbon monomer and nitrogen gas from an electrical source. A polymeric membrane is formed by depositing a polymer of the unsaturated monomer from the plasma onto a substrate, so that nitrogen from the nitrogen gas is incorporated within the polymer in a chemically combined form.

  4. Urea sensors based on PVC membrane pH electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głab, S; Koncki, R; Kopczewska, E; Wałcerz, I; Hulanicki, A

    1994-07-01

    Several procedures of urease immobilization on the surface of the polymeric membrane pH electrode with tri-n-dodecylamine as a neutral carrier were compared. The best results were obtained for the urea sensor with covalently bound urease. The sensor characteristics including the effect of buffer, pH and concentration and the effect of stirring rate are presented. These effects are in good agreement with theoretical expectations.

  5. Encapsulated Urea-Kaolinite Nanocomposite for Controlled Release Fertilizer Formulations

    OpenAIRE

    Siafu Ibahati Sempeho; Hee Taik Kim; Egid Mubofu; Alexander Pogrebnoi; Godlisten Shao; Askwar Hilonga

    2015-01-01

    Urea controlled release fertilizer (CRF) was prepared via kaolinite intercalation followed by gum arabic encapsulation in an attempt to reduce its severe losses associated with dissolution, hydrolysis, and diffusion. Following the beneficiation, the nonkaolinite fraction decreased from 39.58% to 0.36% whereas the kaolinite fraction increased from 60.42% to 99.64%. The X-ray diffractions showed that kaolinite was a major phase with FCC Bravais crystal lattice with particle sizes ranging betwee...

  6. Mechanism of Microencapsulation with Urea-Formaldehyde Polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Rochmadi .; Agus Prasetya; Wahyu Hasokowati

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Microcapsule is one of important fine chemical products in the current chemical industries. Better understanding of microencapsulation process is useful to properly design of microcapsule with specific characteristics. The aim of this research is to study the mechanism of Urea-Formaldehyde (UF) microcapsules formation. Approach: Microcapsule was prepared in two steps. The first step was the preparation of oil in water emulsion, which was carried out by mixing of UF pre-poly...

  7. The crystal structure of urea oxalic acid (2:1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkema, S.; Bats, J.W.; Weyenberg, A.M.; Feil, D.

    1972-01-01

    The crystal structure of urea oxalic acid, 2[CO(NH2)2].(COOH)2 has been determined using three-dimensional X-ray data, collected on an automatic diffractometer. The space group is P21/c. The lattice constants are: a = 5.058 (3), b = 12.400 (3), c = 6.964 (2) A, fl= 98"13 (7) °. The number of molecul

  8. Finger dexterity and visual discrimination following two yoga breathing practices

    OpenAIRE

    Shirley Telles; Nilkamal Singh; Acharya Balkrishna

    2012-01-01

    Background: Practicing yoga has been shown to improve motor functions and attention. Though attention is required for fine motor and discrimination tasks, the effect of yoga breathing techniques on fine motor skills and visual discrimination has not been assessed. Aim: To study the effect of yoga breathing techniques on finger dexterity and visual discrimination. Materials and Methods: The present study consisted of one hundred and forty subjects who had enrolled for stress management...

  9. Non-Invasive UWB Sensing of Astronauts’ Breathing Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Baldi; Graziano Cerri; Franco Chiaraluce; Lorenzo Eusebi; Paola Russo

    2014-01-01

    The use of a UWB system for sensing breathing activity of astronauts must account for many critical issues specific to the space environment. The aim of this paper is twofold. The first concerns the definition of design constraints about the pulse amplitude and waveform to transmit, as well as the immunity requirements of the receiver. The second issue concerns the assessment of the procedures and the characteristics of the algorithms to use for signal processing to retrieve the breathing fre...

  10. Pattern of lung volumes in patients with sighing breathing.

    OpenAIRE

    Aljadeff, G.; Molho, M; I. Katz; Benzaray, S.; Yemini, Z.; Shiner, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Sighing breathing is observed in subjects suffering from anxiety with no apparent organic disease. METHODS--Lung volumes and expiratory flow rates were measured in 12 patients with a sighing pattern of breathing and in 10 normal subjects matched for age, gender, and anthropometric data. In both groups the measurements were made by spirographic and plethysmographic techniques. In normal subjects functional residual capacity (FRC) and residual volume (RV) were measured during normal...

  11. Effects of Deep Breathing Exercises after Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    Deep breathing exercises are widely used in the postoperative care to prevent or reduce pulmonary complications, but no scientific evidence for the efficacy has been found after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. The aim of the thesis was to describe postoperative pulmonary function and to evaluate the efficacy of deep breathing exercises performed with or without a blow bottle device for positive expiratory pressure (PEP) 10 cmH2O or an inspiratory resistance-positive expirator...

  12. Breathing Rate Prediction Using Finger-tip Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmanian, Holakou

    2015-01-01

    Personalized health-care is trending and individuals tend to wear sensors in order to record their own health data. As a part of this trend, any redundancy in the data captured by wearable sensors must be exploited to reduce the number of devices one may wear. In this thesis, we work with a device which senses breathing and pulse through pressure tube and pulse oximetry, respectively. Extracting the dependency between these two measurements, we approximately predict the breathing rate by firs...

  13. BREATHING PATTERNS IN PATIENTS WITH LOW BACK PAIN

    OpenAIRE

    Priyanka P. Ostwal; Wani S K

    2014-01-01

    Background: Low Back pain is common clinical condition encountered in a day to day Physiotherapy practice. Very few authors has so far documented changes in breathing patterns in low back pain while performing certain motor control tests. Purpose: The aim of the study was to observe the breathing pattern in individuals with low back pain (LBP) both at rest and during motor control tasks. Material and Method: 150 patients with LBP participated in this study and they were subcategorized ...

  14. Physiological modeling of isoprene dynamics in exhaled breath

    OpenAIRE

    King, Julian; Koc, Helin; Unterkofler, Karl; Mochalski, Paweł; Kupferthaler, Alexander; Teschl, Gerald; Teschl, Susanne; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Amann, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Human breath contains a myriad of endogenous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which are reflective of ongoing metabolic or physiological processes. While research into the diagnostic potential and general medical relevance of these trace gases is conducted on a considerable scale, little focus has been given so far to a sound analysis of the quantitative relationships between breath levels and the underlying systemic concentrations. This paper is devoted to a thorough mod...

  15. Association between halitosis and mouth breathing in children

    OpenAIRE

    Lara Jansiski Motta; Joanna Carolina Bachiega; Carolina Cardoso Guedes; Lorena Tristão Laranja; Sandra Kalil Bussadori

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there is a correlation between halitosis and mouth breathing in children. STUDY DESIGN: Fifty-five children between 3 and 14 years of age were divided into two groups (nasal and mouth breathing) for the assessment of halitosis. A descriptive analysis was conducted on the degree of halitosis in each group. The chi-square test was used for comparison between groups, with a 5% level of significance. RESULTS: There was a significantly greater number of boys with th...

  16. Metabolite Content Profiling of Bottlenose Dolphin Exhaled Breath

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander A Aksenov; Yeates, Laura; Pasamontes, Alberto; Siebe, Craig; Zrodnikov, Yuriy; Simmons, Jason; McCartney, Mitchell M.; Deplanque, Jean-Pierre; Wells, Randall S; Davis, Cristina E.

    2014-01-01

    Changing ocean health and the potential impact on marine mammal health are gaining global attention. Direct health assessments of wild marine mammals, however, is inherently difficult. Breath analysis metabolomics is a very attractive assessment tool due to its noninvasive nature, but it is analytically challenging. It has never been attempted in cetaceans for comprehensive metabolite profiling. We have developed a method to reproducibly sample breath from small cetaceans, specifically Atlant...

  17. Breath-hold CT attenuation correction for quantitative cardiac SPECT

    OpenAIRE

    Koshino, Kazuhiro; Fukushima, Kazuhito; Fukumoto, Masaji; Sasaki, Kazunari; Moriguchi, Tetsuaki; Hori, Yuki; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Nishimura, Yoshihiro; Kiso, Keisuke; Iida, Hidehiro

    2012-01-01

    Background Attenuation correction of a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) image is possible using computed tomography (CT)-based attenuation maps with hybrid SPECT/CT. CT attenuation maps acquired during breath holding can be misaligned with SPECT, generating artifacts in the reconstructed images. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of respiratory phase during breath-hold CT acquisition on attenuation correction of cardiac SPECT imaging. Methods A series o...

  18. Urochloa ruziziensis responses to sources and doses of urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João E. S. Lima

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The use of products that promote reduction of nitrogen (N losses from the urea fertilizer can contribute to increasing its use efficiency in forage grasses. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of N sources and doses on the growth of Urochloa ruziziensis. The experiment was carried out in the growing season of 2007/2008 in Santo Antônio de Goiás-GO, in a Brazilian Oxisol. A completely randomized block was used, with four replicates in a factorial scheme, corresponding to two N sources (conventional urea and urea with urease inhibitor and five N doses (0, 50, 100, 200 and 300 kg ha-1, divided into equal applications in five periods (Nov 14 to Dec 13, Dec 14 to Jan 12, Jan 13 to Feb 11 - rainy season, Mar 24 to Apr 22 and Jul 10 to Aug 08 - dry season. The effects of the treatments were evaluated for: shoot dry matter, tiller density, total N content in the leaves and relative chlorophyll content. N fertilizer sources did not affect the evaluated variables; however, N fertilization allowed linear increases in all variables with higher values during the rainy period. The relative chlorophyll content in U. ruziziensis had positive correlation with its dry matter productivity.

  19. Effect of urea on degradation of terbuthylazine in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracciolo, Anna Barra; Giuliano, Giuseppe; Grenni, Paola; Cremisini, Carlo; Ciccoli, Roberto; Ubaldi, Carla

    2005-05-01

    Pesticide and nitrate contamination of soil and groundwater from agriculture is an environmental and public health concern worldwide. The herbicide terbuthylazine (CBET) has replaced atrazine in Italy and in many other countries because the use of the latter has been banned because of its adverse environmental impacts. Unlike atrazine, knowledge about the fate of CBET in soil is still not extensive, especially regarding its transformation products, but recent monitoring data show its occurrence and that of its main metabolite, desethyl-terbuthylazine (CBAT), in groundwater above the limit of 0.1 microg/L established by European Union Directive and Italian legislation. The objective of this work was to investigate if the presence of the fertilizer urea affects CBET degradation in the soil. Laboratory CBET degradation experiments in the presence/absence of urea were performed with microbiologically active soil and sterilized soil. Terbuthylazine degradation rates under the different experimental conditions were assessed, and the formation, degradation, and transformation of the metabolite CBAT were also studied. Terbuthylazine degradation was affected by the presence of urea, in terms both of a higher disappearance time of 50% of the initial concentration and of a lower amount of CBAT formed. These findings have practical implications for the real-life assessment of the environmental fate of triazine herbicides in agricultural areas since these herbicides are frequently applied to soils receiving ureic fertilizers.

  20. Antibacterial kaolinite/urea/chlorhexidine nanocomposites: Experiment and molecular modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clay minerals are commonly used materials in pharmaceutical production both as inorganic carriers or active agents. The purpose of this study is the preparation and characterization of clay/antibacterial drug hybrids which can be further included in drug delivery systems for treatment oral infections. Novel nanocomposites with antibacterial properties were successfully prepared by ion exchange reaction from two types of kaolinite/urea intercalates and chlorhexidine diacetate. Intercalation compounds of kaolinite were prepared by reaction with solid urea in the absence of solvents (dry method) as well as with urea aqueous solution (wet method). The antibacterial activity of two prepared samples against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was evaluated by finding the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Antibacterial studies of both samples showed the lowest MIC values (0.01%, w/v) after 1 day against E. faecalis, E. coli and S. aureus. A slightly worse antibacterial activity was observed against P. aeruginosa (MIC 0.12%, w/v) after 1 day. Since samples showed very good antibacterial activity, especially after 1 day of action, this means that these samples can be used as long-acting antibacterial materials. Prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The experimental data are supported by results of molecular modelling.

  1. Antibacterial kaolinite/urea/chlorhexidine nanocomposites: Experiment and molecular modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holešová, Sylva, E-mail: sylva.holesova@vsb.cz [Nanotechnology Centre, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, 17.listopadu 15/2172, CZ-708 33 Ostrava, Poruba (Czech Republic); IT4Innovations Centre of Excellence, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, 17.listopadu 15/2172, CZ-708 33 Ostrava, Poruba (Czech Republic); Valášková, Marta; Hlaváč, Dominik [Nanotechnology Centre, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, 17.listopadu 15/2172, CZ-708 33 Ostrava, Poruba (Czech Republic); IT4Innovations Centre of Excellence, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, 17.listopadu 15/2172, CZ-708 33 Ostrava, Poruba (Czech Republic); Madejová, Jana [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, SAS, Dúbravská cesta 9, SK-845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia); Samlíková, Magda; Tokarský, Jonáš [Nanotechnology Centre, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, 17.listopadu 15/2172, CZ-708 33 Ostrava, Poruba (Czech Republic); IT4Innovations Centre of Excellence, VŠB – Technical University of Ostrava, 17.listopadu 15/2172, CZ-708 33 Ostrava, Poruba (Czech Republic); Pazdziora, Erich [Institute of Public Health Ostrava, Centre of Clinical Laboratories, Partyzánské náměstí 7, CZ-702 00 Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2014-06-01

    Clay minerals are commonly used materials in pharmaceutical production both as inorganic carriers or active agents. The purpose of this study is the preparation and characterization of clay/antibacterial drug hybrids which can be further included in drug delivery systems for treatment oral infections. Novel nanocomposites with antibacterial properties were successfully prepared by ion exchange reaction from two types of kaolinite/urea intercalates and chlorhexidine diacetate. Intercalation compounds of kaolinite were prepared by reaction with solid urea in the absence of solvents (dry method) as well as with urea aqueous solution (wet method). The antibacterial activity of two prepared samples against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was evaluated by finding the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Antibacterial studies of both samples showed the lowest MIC values (0.01%, w/v) after 1 day against E. faecalis, E. coli and S. aureus. A slightly worse antibacterial activity was observed against P. aeruginosa (MIC 0.12%, w/v) after 1 day. Since samples showed very good antibacterial activity, especially after 1 day of action, this means that these samples can be used as long-acting antibacterial materials. Prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The experimental data are supported by results of molecular modelling.

  2. Amperometric urea biosensors based on sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das G

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Gautam Das, Hyon Hee Yoon Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Gachon University, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea Abstract: An electrochemical biosensor based on sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite was developed for urea analysis. Oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of sulfonated graphene oxide was carried out by electrochemical methods in an aqueous environment. The structural properties of the nanocomposite were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The urease enzyme-immobilized sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite film showed impressive performance in the electroanalytical detection of urea with a detection limit of 0.050 mM and a sensitivity of 0.85 µA·cm-2·mM-1. The biosensor achieved a broad linear range of detection (0.12–12.3 mM with a notable response time of approximately 5 seconds. Moreover, the fabricated biosensor retained 81% of its initial activity (based on sensitivity after 15 days of storage at 4°C. The ease of fabrication coupled with the low cost and good electrochemical performance of this system holds potential for the development of solid-state biosensors for urea detection. Keywords: electrochemical deposition, sulfonated graphene oxide, urease

  3. Synthesis of dimethyl carbonate from urea and methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, M.; Kalevaru, V.N.; Martin, A. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Leibniz Institute for Catalysis; Mueller, K.; Arlt, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Strautmann, J.; Kruse, D. [Evonik Industries AG, Marl (Germany). Creavis Technologies and Innovation

    2012-07-01

    Alcoholation of urea with methanol to produce dimethyl carbonate (DMC) is an interesting approach from both the ecological and economical points of view because the urea synthesis usually occurs by the direct use of carbon dioxide. Literature survey reveals that metal oxide catalysts for instance MgO, ZnO, etc. or polyphosphoric acids are mostly used as catalysts for this reaction. In this contribution, we describe the application of ZnO, MgO, CaO, TiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2} or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts for the above mentioned reaction. The catalytic activity of different metal oxides towards DMC synthesis was checked and additionally a comparison of achieved conversions with that of predictions made by thermodynamic calculations was also carried out. The achieved conversions are in good agreement with those of calculated ones. The test results reveal that the reaction pressure and temperature have a strong influence on the formation of DMC. Higher reaction pressure improved the yield of DMC. Among different catalysts investigated, ZnO displayed the best performance. The conversion of urea in most cases is close to 100 % and methyl carbamate MC is the major product of the reaction. A part of MC is subsequently converted to DMC, which however depends upon the reaction conditions applied and nature of catalyst used. From the best case, a DMC yield of ca. 8 % could be successfully achieved over ZnO catalyst. (orig.)

  4. Differential stability of the bovine prion protein upon urea unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Olivier; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Thiessen, Angela; Graether, Steffen P; Sykes, Brian D

    2009-01-01

    Prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, are a group of infectious neurological diseases associated with the structural conversion of an endogenous protein (PrP) in the central nervous system. There are two major forms of this protein: the native and noninfectious cellular form, PrPC; and the misfolded, infectious, and proteinase K-resistant form, PrPSc. The C-terminal domain of PrPC is mainly α-helical in structure, whereas PrPSc in known to aggregate into an assembly of β-sheets, forming amyloid fibrils. To identify the regions of PrPC potentially involved in the initial steps of the conversion to the infectious conformation, we have used high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to characterize the stability and structure of bovine recombinant PrPC (residues 121 to 230) during unfolding with the denaturant urea. Analysis of the 800 MHz 1H NMR spectra reveals region-specific information about the structural changes occurring upon unfolding. Our data suggest that the dissociation of the native β-sheet of PrPC is a primary step in the urea-induced unfolding process, while strong hydrophobic interactions between helices α1 and α3, and between α2 and α3, stabilize these regions even at very high concentrations of urea. PMID:19693935

  5. Amperometric urea biosensors based on sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Gautam; Yoon, Hyon Hee

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical biosensor based on sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite was developed for urea analysis. Oxidative polymerization of aniline in the presence of sulfonated graphene oxide was carried out by electrochemical methods in an aqueous environment. The structural properties of the nanocomposite were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The urease enzyme-immobilized sulfonated graphene/polyaniline nanocomposite film showed impressive performance in the electroanalytical detection of urea with a detection limit of 0.050 mM and a sensitivity of 0.85 (μA · cm−2·mM−1. The biosensor achieved a broad linear range of detection (0.12–12.3 mM) with a notable response time of approximately 5 seconds. Moreover, the fabricated biosensor retained 81% of its initial activity (based on sensitivity) after 15 days of storage at 4°C. The ease of fabrication coupled with the low cost and good electrochemical performance of this system holds potential for the development of solid-state biosensors for urea detection. PMID:26346240

  6. Utilization of 15N-urea in laying hens. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 3 colostomized laying hens the incorporation of heavy nitrogen from urea into the amino acids of the 21 eggs laid during the 8-day experiment was determined. In these eggs the content of 15 amino acids was ascertained separately in white and yolk of the eggs and their atom-% 15N excess (15N') was determined. The heavy nitrogen could be detected in all amino acids investigated. The incorporation of 15N' into the essential amino acids of the white and yolk of eggs is very low. Of the 15N' amount of the urea applied 0.18% could be detected in the 9 essential amino acids of the white of egg and 0.12% in those of the yolk. For the 6 analyzed nonessential amino acids the rediscovery quota of 15N' in the white of egg was 0.50% and in the yolk 0.81% is that the NPN-source urea is insignificant for egg protein synthesis. (author)

  7. Determination of Carbon-14 in environmental samples by mixing 14CO{sub 2} with a liquid scintillator; Determinacion de carbono-14 en muestras ambientales por incorporacion de 14CO{sub 2} a un centelleador liquido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M. R.; Gomez, V.; Heras, M. C.; Beltran, M. A.

    1990-07-01

    A method for the determination of Carbon-14 (14CO2) in environmental samples has been developed. The method use the direct absorption of the carbon dioxide into Carbosorb, followed with incorporation of the mixture (Carbosorb-CO2) to the liquid scintillator. The results obtained to apply this method and the benzene synthesis, usual in our laboratory, are discussed and compared. The method of collection of atmospheric samples is also described. (Author) 10 refs.

  8. Classification of Asthma Based on Nonlinear Analysis of Breathing Pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Raoufy

    Full Text Available Normal human breathing exhibits complex variability in both respiratory rhythm and volume. Analyzing such nonlinear fluctuations may provide clinically relevant information in patients with complex illnesses such as asthma. We compared the cycle-by-cycle fluctuations of inter-breath interval (IBI and lung volume (LV among healthy volunteers and patients with various types of asthma. Continuous respiratory datasets were collected from forty age-matched men including 10 healthy volunteers, 10 patients with controlled atopic asthma, 10 patients with uncontrolled atopic asthma, and 10 patients with uncontrolled non-atopic asthma during 60 min spontaneous breathing. Complexity of breathing pattern was quantified by calculating detrended fluctuation analysis, largest Lyapunov exponents, sample entropy, and cross-sample entropy. The IBI as well as LV fluctuations showed decreased long-range correlation, increased regularity and reduced sensitivity to initial conditions in patients with asthma, particularly in uncontrolled state. Our results also showed a strong synchronization between the IBI and LV in patients with uncontrolled asthma. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis showed that nonlinear analysis of breathing pattern has a diagnostic value in asthma and can be used in differentiating uncontrolled from controlled and non-atopic from atopic asthma. We suggest that complexity analysis of breathing dynamics may represent a novel physiologic marker to facilitate diagnosis and management of patients with asthma. However, future studies are needed to increase the validity of the study and to improve these novel methods for better patient management.

  9. Breath acetone concentration; biological variability and the influence of diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous measurements of acetone concentrations in the exhaled breath of healthy individuals and the small amount of comparable data for individuals suffering from diabetes are briefly reviewed as a prelude to the presentation of new data on the sporadic and wide variations of breath acetone that occur in ostensibly healthy individuals. Data are also presented which show that following a ketogenic diet taken by eight healthy individuals their breath acetone concentrations increased up to five times over the subsequent 6 h. Similarly, the breath acetone increased six and nine times when a low carbohydrate diet was taken by two volunteers and remained high for the several days for which the diet was continued. These new data, together with the previous data, clearly indicate that diet and natural intra-individual biological and diurnal variability result in wide variations in breath acetone concentration. This places an uncertainty in the use of breath acetone alone to monitor blood glucose and glycaemic control, except and unless the individual acts as their own control and is cognizant of the need for dietary control. (note)

  10. Diaphragmatic Breathing Reduces Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Martarelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diaphragmatic breathing is relaxing and therapeutic, reduces stress, and is a fundamental procedure of Pranayama Yoga, Zen, transcendental meditation and other meditation practices. Analysis of oxidative stress levels in people who meditate indicated that meditation correlates with lower oxidative stress levels, lower cortisol levels and higher melatonin levels. It is known that cortisol inhibits enzymes responsible for the antioxidant activity of cells and that melatonin is a strong antioxidant; therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of diaphragmatic breathing on exercise-induced oxidative stress and the putative role of cortisol and melatonin hormones in this stress pathway. We monitored 16 athletes during an exhaustive training session. After the exercise, athletes were divided in two equivalent groups of eight subjects. Subjects of the studied group spent 1 h relaxing performing diaphragmatic breathing and concentrating on their breath in a quiet place. The other eight subjects, representing the control group, spent the same time sitting in an equivalent quite place. Results demonstrate that relaxation induced by diaphragmatic breathing increases the antioxidant defense status in athletes after exhaustive exercise. These effects correlate with the concomitant decrease in cortisol and the increase in melatonin. The consequence is a lower level of oxidative stress, which suggests that an appropriate diaphragmatic breathing could protect athletes from long-term adverse effects of free radicals.

  11. Breathe Analysis in Tuberculosis Disease Recognition in New Millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranabir Pal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available To control the tuberculosis pandemic we need rapid, inexpensive finding tool. To assess the worth of exhaled breath analysis in tuberculosis case detection. A wide-ranging exploration of documents was done in indexed literatures and website-based research reports. Thirty-eight studies were identified on more than 200 potentially relevant articles related to breath analysis on tuberculosis. A broad criterion was formed in the absence of universally accepted method by the researchers on exhaled breathe analysis, irrespective of their criteria for diagnosis of tuberculosis. Wide differences in samples, primary outcome variables, lack of uniformity in criteria for positive diagnosis, and study instruments confounded the outcome variables. These non-invasive breathe tests of tuberculosis and exploring factual and surrogate markers in primary bacterial activity as well as during interventions. Prospective utility of breath analysis by varied methods deserve their proportional weightage. The study reviewed non-judgmentally on the ongoing work in the field of breath analysis that may be worth developing and evaluating as a cost-effective entrant in diagnostic and prognostic algorithms of tuberculosis. Time has come to explore this to the fullest extent for a superior conceptual design of the factors for a futuristic model of non-invasive direct point-of-care diagnostic understanding of the factors influencing diagnosis and prognosis.

  12. Variability of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) volume and pH using a feedback regulated breathing pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is a valuable biological medium for non-invasively measuring biomarkers with the potential to reflect organ systems responses to environmental and dietary exposures and disease processes. Collection of EBC has typically been with spontaneous breat...

  13. Can audio coached 4D CT emulate free breathing during the treatment course?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. The image quality of 4DCT depends on breathing regularity. Respiratory audio coaching may improve regularity and reduce motion artefacts. We question the safety of coached planning 4DCT without coaching during treatment. We investigated the possibility of coaching to a more stable breathing without changing the breathing amplitude. The interfraction variation of the breathing cycle amplitude in free and coached breathing was studied as well as the possible impact of fatigue on longer coaching sessions. Methods. Thirteen volunteers completed respiratory audio coaching on 3 days within a 2 week period. An external marker system monitoring the motion of the thoraco-abdominal wall was used to track the respiration. On all days, free breathing and two coached breathing curves were recorded. We assumed that free versus coached breathing from day 1 (reference session) simulated breathing during an uncoached versus coached planning 4DCT, respectively, and compared the mean breathing cycle amplitude to the free versus coached breathing from day 2 and 3 simulating free versus coached breathing during treatment. Results. For most volunteers it was impossible to apply coaching without changes in breathing cycle amplitude. No significant decrease in standard deviation of breathing cycle amplitude distribution was seen. Generally it was not possible to predict the breathing cycle amplitude and its variation the following days based on the breathing in the reference session irrespective of coaching or free breathing. We found a significant tendency towards an increased breathing cycle amplitude variation with the duration of the coaching session. Conclusion. These results suggest that large interfraction variation is present in breathing amplitude irrespective of coaching, leading to the suggestion of daily image guidance for verification of respiratory pattern and tumour related motion. Until further investigated it is not recommendable to use coached 4DCT for

  14. Effect of dietary nitrogen content and intravenous urea infusion on ruminal and portal-drained visceral extraction of arterial urea in lactating Holstein cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Bastian; Storm, Adam Christian; Larsen, Mogens

    2010-01-01

    Urea extraction across ruminal and portal-drained visceral (PDV) tissues were investigated using 9 rumen-cannulated and multi-catheterized lactating dairy cows adapted to low-N (12.9% crude protein) and high-N (17.1% crude protein) diets in a crossover design. The interaction between adaptation...... to dietary treatments and blood plasma concentrations of urea was studied by dividing samplings into a 2.5-h period without urea infusion followed by a 2.5-h period with primed continuous intravenous infusion of urea (0.493 ± 0.012 mmol/kg of BW per h). Cows were sampled at 66 ± 14 and 68 ± 12 d in milk...... and produced 42 ± 1 and 36 ± 1 kg of milk/d with the high-N and low-N diets, respectively. The arterial blood urea concentration before urea infusion was 1.37 and 4.09 ± 0.18 mmol/L with low-N and high-N, respectively. Dietary treatment did not affect the urea infusion-induced increase in arterial urea...

  15. Urea coated with oxidized charcoal reduces ammonia volatilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Mendes de Paiva

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Urea is the most consumed nitrogen fertilizer in the world. However, its agronomic and economic efficiency is reduced by the volatilization of NH3, which can reach 78 % of the applied nitrogen. The coating of urea granules with acidic compounds obtained by charcoal oxidation has the potential to reduce the volatilization, due to the acidic character, the high buffering capacity and CEC. This work aimed to evaluate the effect of HNO3-oxidized carbon on the control of NH3 volatilization. These compounds were obtained by oxidation of Eucalyptus grandis charcoal, produced at charring temperatures of 350 and 450 ºC, with 4.5 mol L-1 HNO3. The charcoal was oxidized by solubilization in acidic or alkaline medium, similar to the procedure of soil organic matter fractionation (CHox350 and CHox450. CHox was characterized by C, H, O, N contents and their respective atomic relations, by the ratio E4 (absorbance 465 nm by E6 (absorbance 665 nm, and by active acidity and total acidity (CEC. The inhibitory effect of CHox on the urease activity of Canavalia ensiformis was assessed in vitro. The NH3 volatilization from urea was evaluated with and without coating of oxidized charcoal (U-CHox350 or U-CHox450 in a closed system with continuous air flow. The pH of both CHox was near 2.0, but the total acidity of CHox350 was higher, 72 % of which was attributed to carboxylic groups. The variation in the ionization constants of CHox350 was also greater. The low E4/E6 ratios characterize the high stability of the compounds in CHox. CHox did not inhibit the urease activity in vitro, although the maximum volatilization peak from U-CHox450 and U-CHox350 occurred 24 h after that observed for uncoated urea. The lowest volatilization rate was observed for U-CHox350 as well as a 43 % lower total amount of NH3 volatilized than from uncoated urea.

  16. ENSURING THE AVAILABILITY AND RELIABILITY OF UREA DOSING FOR ON-ROAD AND NON-ROAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, G; Lonsdale, B

    2003-08-24

    The purpose of this presentation is to address two important issues. The first issue is nationwide availability of urea. The second is assurance by the engine maker that the engine cannot operate without urea. In regard to the first issue, North American urea production can support SCR needs for the Heavy Duty truck industry. The existing distribution methods, pathways and technology could be utilized for urea supply with no new invention required. Urea usage and storage capacity on vehicles would support long distances between tank refills, as SCR could be initially rolled out with a limited infrastructure. The price of urea should be less than diesel fuel and urea SCR should have a fuel economy advantage over competing technologies. It can be in place by 2007. In regard to the second issue, sensor technology exists to monitor urea tank level and verify that the fluid in the tank is urea. NOx sensors are available to monitor tailpipe NOx, ensuring the entire SCR system is functioning properly, and inferring that urea is in the system. The monitoring system could be used to monitor compliance, record faults, and initiate enforcement actions as necessary. The monitoring system could initiate actions to encourage compliance.

  17. A study on the indirect urea dosing method in the Selective Catalytic Reduction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeżański, M.; Sala, R.

    2016-09-01

    This article presents the results of studies on concept solution of dosing urea in a gas phase in a selective catalytic reduction system. The idea of the concept was to heat-up and evaporate the water urea solution before introducing it into the exhaust gas stream. The aim was to enhance the processes of urea converting into ammonia, what is the target reductant for nitrogen oxides treatment. The study was conducted on a medium-duty Euro 5 diesel engine with exhaust line consisting of DOC catalyst, DPF filter and an SCR system with a changeable setup allowing to dose the urea in liquid phase (regular solution) and to dose it in a gas phase (concept solution). The main criteria was to assess the effect of physical state of urea dosed on the NOx conversion ratio in the SCR catalyst. In order to compare both urea dosing methods a special test procedure was developed which consisted of six test steps covering a wide temperature range of exhaust gas generated at steady state engine operation condition. Tests were conducted for different urea dosing quantities defined by the a equivalence ratio. Based on the obtained results, a remarkable improvement in NOx reduction was found for gas urea application in comparison to the standard liquid urea dosing. Measured results indicate a high potential to increase an efficiency of the SCR catalyst by using a gas phase urea and provide the basis for further scientific research on this type of concept.

  18. Analysis of the Stability of Urea in Dried Blood Spots Collected and Stored on Filter Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan; Mukhopadhyay, Ashok Kumar; Jailkhani, Bansi Lal

    2013-01-01

    The ability to use dry blood spots (DBSs) on filter paper for the analysis of urea levels could be an important diagnostic tool for areas that have limited access to laboratory facilities. We developed a method for the extraction and quantification of urea from DBSs that were stored on 3M Whatman filter paper and investigated the effect of long-term storage on the level of urea in DBSs. DBSs of 4.5 mm in diameter were used for our assay, and we determined the urea levels in blood using a commercially available enzymatic kit (UV GLDH-method; Randox laboratories Ltd., UK). The DBSs on filter discs were stored at 4℃ or at 37℃ for 120 days. The mean intra- and inter-assay coefficient of variance for our method of urea extraction from dried blood was 4.2% and 6.3%, respectively. We collected 75 fresh blood samples and compared the urea content of each fresh sample with the urea content of DBSs taken from corresponding fresh blood samples. Regression analysis reported a regression coefficient (r) value of 0.97 and a recovery of urea from dried spots was 102.2%. Urea concentrations in DBSs were stable for up to 120 and 90 days when stored at 4℃ and 37℃, respectively. Our results show that urea can be stored and quantitatively recovered from small volumes of blood that was collected on filter paper. PMID:23667845

  19. Enhancing the Urea-N Use Efficiency in Maize (Zea mays Cultivation on Acid Soils using Urea Amended with Zeolite and TSP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osumanu H. Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem Statement: Ammonia loss significantly reduces urea-N use efficiency in crop production. Efforts to reduce ammonia loss are laboratory oriented, as such limited in reflecting actual field conditions. This paper reports the effects of urea amended with triple superphosphate (TSP and zeolite (Clinoptilolite on soil pH, soil nitrate, soil exchangeable ammonium, dry matter production, N uptake, fresh cob production and urea-N uptake efficiency in maize (Zea mays cultivation on an acid soil in actual field conditions. Approach: The treatments evaluated were: (i Normal N, P, K application (74.34 g urea, 27.36 g TSP, 24.12 g KCl (T1, (ii Urea-TSP mixture (74.34 g urea+27.36 g TSP+24.12 g KCl (T2, (iii 74.34 g urea+27.36 g TSP+9.0 g zeolite (T3, (iv 74.34 g urea+27.36 g TSP+13.5 g zeolite (T4 and (v No fertilization (T5. Note, the same amount of 24.12 g KCl was used in T3 and T4 plots. Standard procedures were used to determine the selected chemical properties of zeolite, soil, TSP and urea. The pH of the urea, zeolite, soil and TSP were determined in a 1:2.5 soil: distilled water suspension and/or 0.01 N CaCl2 using a glass electrode. The CEC of the zeolite was determined by the CsCl method. Soil CEC was determined by leaching with 1 N ammonium acetate buffer adjusted to pH 7.0 followed by steam distillation. Soil samples at harvest were analyzed for pH using the method previously outlined. Exchangeable ammonium and nitrate at harvest were extracted from the soil samples by the method of Keeney and Nelson and the amount determined using a LACHAT Autoanalyzer. Total N of the plant tissues (stem and leaf was determined by the Micro-Kjeldhal method. Results: Urea amended with TSP and zeolite treatments and Urea only (urea without additives did not have long term effect on soil pH and accumulation of soil exchangeable ammonium and nitrate. Treatments with higher amounts of TSP and zeolite significantly increased the dry matter (stem and leaf

  20. Effect of dietary nitrogen content and intravenous urea infusion on ruminal and portal-drained visceral extraction of arterial urea in lactating Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, N B; Storm, A C; Larsen, M

    2010-06-01

    Urea extraction across ruminal and portal-drained visceral (PDV) tissues were investigated using 9 rumen-cannulated and multi-catheterized lactating dairy cows adapted to low-N (12.9% crude protein) and high-N (17.1% crude protein) diets in a crossover design. The interaction between adaptation to dietary treatments and blood plasma concentrations of urea was studied by dividing samplings into a 2.5-h period without urea infusion followed by a 2.5-h period with primed continuous intravenous infusion of urea (0.493+/-0.012 mmol/kg of BW per h). Cows were sampled at 66+/-14 and 68+/-12 d in milk and produced 42+/-1 and 36+/-1 kg of milk/d with the high-N and low-N diets, respectively. The arterial blood urea concentration before urea infusion was 1.37 and 4.09+/-0.18 mmol/L with low-N and high-N, respectively. Dietary treatment did not affect the urea infusion-induced increase in arterial urea concentration (1.91+/-0.13 mmol/L). Arterial urea extraction across the PDV and rumen increased from 2.7 to 5.4+/-0.5% and from 7.1 to 23.8+/-2.1% when cows were changed from high-N to low-N, respectively. Urea infusion did not decrease urea extractions, implying that urea transport rates were proportional to arterial urea concentrations. Urea extraction increased more across the rumen wall than across the total PDV for low-N compared with high-N, which implies that a larger proportion of total PDV uptake of arterial urea is directed toward the rumen with decreasing N intake. The ruminal vein - arterial (RA) concentration difference for ammonia increased instantly (first sampling 15 min after initiation of infusion) to the primed intravenous infusion when cows were adapted to the low-N diet. The RA difference for ammonia correlated poorly to the ventral ruminal concentration of ammonia (r=0.55). Relating the RA difference for ammonia to a function of both ruminal ammonia concentration and the RA difference for urea markedly improved the fit (r=0.85), indicating that a large

  1. Evaluation of Fermentation Dynamics and Structural Carbohydrate Degradation of Napiergrass Ensiled with Additives of Urea and Molasses

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Rong, Cheng-qun Yu 1, Zhi-hua Li, Masataka Shimojo2 and Tao Shao*

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of urea and molasses on fermentation dynamics and structural carbohydrate degradation of Napiergrass (Pennisetum purpureum Schumach), which was ensiled in laboratory silos for 3, 7, 14, and 30 days at the ambient temperature. The treatments were additions (fresh weight basis) of: no molasses or urea (control), no molasses and 0.4% urea (U), 4% molasses and 0% urea (M), 4% molasses and 0.4% urea (MU). The results showed that the control group produced an unstabl...

  2. Combined sensing platform for advanced diagnostics in exhaled mouse breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, Paula R.; Wilk, Andreas; Seichter, Felicia; Cajlakovic, Merima; Koestler, Stefan; Ribitsch, Volker; Wachter, Ulrich; Vogt, Josef; Radermacher, Peter; Carter, Chance; Raimundo, Ivo M.; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2013-03-01

    Breath analysis is an attractive non-invasive strategy for early disease recognition or diagnosis, and for therapeutic progression monitoring, as quantitative compositional analysis of breath can be related to biomarker panels provided by a specific physiological condition invoked by e.g., pulmonary diseases, lung cancer, breast cancer, and others. As exhaled breath contains comprehensive information on e.g., the metabolic state, and since in particular volatile organic constituents (VOCs) in exhaled breath may be indicative of certain disease states, analytical techniques for advanced breath diagnostics should be capable of sufficient molecular discrimination and quantification of constituents at ppm-ppb - or even lower - concentration levels. While individual analytical techniques such as e.g., mid-infrared spectroscopy may provide access to a range of relevant molecules, some IR-inactive constituents require the combination of IR sensing schemes with orthogonal analytical tools for extended molecular coverage. Combining mid-infrared hollow waveguides (HWGs) with luminescence sensors (LS) appears particularly attractive, as these complementary analytical techniques allow to simultaneously analyze total CO2 (via luminescence), the 12CO2/13CO2 tracer-to-tracee (TTR) ratio (via IR), selected VOCs (via IR) and O2 (via luminescence) in exhaled breath, yet, establishing a single diagnostic platform as both sensors simultaneously interact with the same breath sample volume. In the present study, we take advantage of a particularly compact (shoebox-size) FTIR spectrometer combined with novel substrate-integrated hollow waveguide (iHWG) recently developed by our research team, and miniaturized fiberoptic luminescence sensors for establishing a multi-constituent breath analysis tool that is ideally compatible with mouse intensive care stations (MICU). Given the low tidal volume and flow of exhaled mouse breath, the TTR is usually determined after sample collection via gas

  3. Sensors for breath testing: from nanomaterials to comprehensive disease detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konvalina, Gady; Haick, Hossam

    2014-01-21

    The analysis of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath samples represents a new frontier in medical diagnostics because it is a noninvasive and potentially inexpensive way to detect illnesses. Clinical trials with spectrometry and spectroscopy techniques, the standard volatile-compound detection methods, have shown the potential for diagnosing illnesses including cancer, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, tuberculosis, diabetes, and more via breath tests. Unfortunately, this approach requires expensive equipment and high levels of expertise to operate the necessary instruments, and the tests must be done quickly and use preconcentration techniques, all of which impede its adoption. Sensing matrices based on nanomaterials are likely to become a clinical and laboratory diagnostic tool because they are significantly smaller, easier-to-use, and less expensive than spectrometry or spectroscopy. An ideal nanomaterial-based sensor for breath testing should be sensitive at very low concentrations of volatile organic compounds, even in the presence of environmental or physiological confounding factors. It should also respond rapidly and proportionately to small changes in concentration and provide a consistent output that is specific to a given volatile organic compound. When not in contact with the volatile organic compounds, the sensor should quickly return to its baseline state or be simple and inexpensive enough to be disposable. Several reviews have focused on the methodological, biochemical, and clinical aspects of breath analysis in attempts to bring breath testing closer to practice for comprehensive disease detection. This Account pays particular attention to the technological gaps and confounding factors that impede nanomaterial-sensor-based breath testing, in the hope of directing future research and development efforts towards the best possible approaches to overcome these obstacles. We discuss breath testing as a complex process involving numerous

  4. Sleep-disordered breathing and mortality: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh M Punjabi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sleep-disordered breathing is a common condition associated with adverse health outcomes including hypertension and cardiovascular disease. The overall objective of this study was to determine whether sleep-disordered breathing and its sequelae of intermittent hypoxemia and recurrent arousals are associated with mortality in a community sample of adults aged 40 years or older. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We prospectively examined whether sleep-disordered breathing was associated with an increased risk of death from any cause in 6,441 men and women participating in the Sleep Heart Health Study. Sleep-disordered breathing was assessed with the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI based on an in-home polysomnogram. Survival analysis and proportional hazards regression models were used to calculate hazard ratios for mortality after adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking status, body mass index, and prevalent medical conditions. The average follow-up period for the cohort was 8.2 y during which 1,047 participants (587 men and 460 women died. Compared to those without sleep-disordered breathing (AHI: or=30.0 events/h sleep-disordered breathing were 0.93 (95% CI: 0.80-1.08, 1.17 (95% CI: 0.97-1.42, and 1.46 (95% CI: 1.14-1.86, respectively. Stratified analyses by sex and age showed that the increased risk of death associated with severe sleep-disordered breathing was statistically significant in men aged 40-70 y (hazard ratio: 2.09; 95% CI: 1.31-3.33. Measures of sleep-related intermittent hypoxemia, but not sleep fragmentation, were independently associated with all-cause mortality. Coronary artery disease-related mortality associated with sleep-disordered breathing showed a pattern of association similar to all-cause mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Sleep-disordered breathing is associated with all-cause mortality and specifically that due to coronary artery disease, particularly in men aged 40-70 y with severe sleep-disordered breathing. Please see later in the

  5. Novel Findings in Breath-Holding Spells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azab, Seham F.A.; Siam, Ahmed G.; Saleh, Safaa H.; Elshafei, Mona M.; Elsaeed, Wafaa F.; Arafa, Mohamed A.; Bendary, Eman A.; Farag, Elsayed M.; Basset, Maha A.A.; Ismail, Sanaa M.; Elazouni, Osama M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The mechanism of breath-holding spells (BHS) is not fully understood and most probably multifactorial; so, this study was designed to clarify the pathophysiology of BHS through assessing some laboratory parameters and electrocardiographic (ECG) changes which might be contributing to the occurrence of the attacks. Another aim of the study was to evaluate the differences in the pathophysiology between pallid and cyanotic types of BHS. This was a prospective study performed in Zagazig University Hospitals. Seventy-six children diagnosed with BHS were included as follows: 32 children with cyanotic BHS, 14 children with pallid BHS, and 30 healthy children as a control group. All children were subjected to the following: full history taking, clinical examination, and laboratory work up in the form of CBC, serum iron, ferritin, and zinc levels. Twenty-four hours ambulatory ECG (Holter) recording was also performed. No significant statistical difference was found between cyanotic and pallid groups regarding family history of BHS, severity, and precipitating factors of the attacks. Frequent runs of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) during 24 hours ECG were significantly higher in children with BHS; the frequency of RSA was significantly correlated with the frequency (severity) of the attacks. Low serum ferritin was significantly associated with BHS groups but not correlated with the severity of the attacks. Autonomic dysregulation evidenced by frequent RSA is considered to be an important cause of BHS in children and is correlated with the frequency of the attacks. Low serum ferritin is additional factor in the pathophysiology. Both pallid and cyanotic BHS are suggested to be types of the same disease sharing the same pathophysiology. PMID:26181556

  6. Reducing Ammonia Loss from Urea by Mixing with Humic and Fulvic Acids Isolated from Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameera A. Reeza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Ammonia volatilization is a major pathway for nitrogen loss from surface applied urea. While all top-dressed ammonia and ammonium based N fertilizers can volatilize, the potential loss is greatest with urea and fluids containing urea. As much as 20-50% of N applied to soils is lost through volatilization alone. Thus, the objective of this laboratory study was to reduce ammonia loss from urea via mixing with humic and fulvic acids isolated from coal. Approach: This study compared four different types of treatments which were urea without additives (T1, urea with humic acid-powdered form (T2, urea with fulvic acid-liquid form (T3 and urea with humic and fulvic acids-liquid form (T4. Comparisons were made based on ammonia loss, soil NH4 and NO3- contents as well as exchangeable cations in the treated soils. Soil samples from typic paleudults (Bekenu series were used. Humic substances were isolated using standard procedures. Daily ammonia loss from soil was measured using a modified closed-dynamic air flow system method. Results: All of the treatments with humic substances significantly reduced ammonia loss ranging between 13 and 25% compared to urea alone. The treatment with both humic and fulvic acids (T4 showed pronounced ammonia loss reduction. All treatments with humic substances significantly increased NH4+ and NO3- content in soil samples compared to urea alone except for treatment having humic acid alone (T2. Treatments with fulvic acid (T3 and T4 also showed significant increase in exchangeable K+ and Na+ compared to urea alone. The increase in the formation of NH4+ over NH3, soil exchangeable cations and temporary reduction of soil pH may had retarded urea hydrolysis in the immediate vicinity of the fertilizer. Conclusion: Surface applied urea fertilizer efficiency could be increased if applied together with humic and fulvic acids.

  7. Salivary concentrations of urea released from a chewing gum containing urea and how these affect the urea content of gel-stabilized plaques and their pH after exposure to sucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, C; Dibdin, G H

    2001-01-01

    The objectives were to: (1) determine the salivary concentrations of urea during 20 min chewing of a sugar-free gum containing 30 mg of urea; (2) measure the degree to which this urea would diffuse into a gel-stabilized plaque; (3) study the effect of the urea on the fall and subsequent rise in pH (Stephan curve) on exposure to 10% sucrose for 1 min; (4) model the measurements 2 and 3 mathematically. In point 1, the salivary urea concentration of the 12 subjects peaked at 47 mmol/l in the first 2 min of gum chewing, falling within 15 min to the unstimulated salivary concentration of 3.4 mmol/l. Recovery of urea from the saliva averaged 81.5%. 'Plaques' of 1% agarose or 67% dead bacteria in agarose accumulated urea from the saliva roughly as expected, whereas those plaques containing 8% live and 59% dead Streptococcus vestibularis showed negligible accumulation. Computer modelling showed this difference to be due to urease of live bacteria breaking down the urea as rapidly as it entered the plaque. Simulation of the effect of gum chewing subsequent to initiation of a Stephan curve in the latter type of plaque showed a rapid rise in pH but then a fall again on return to unstimulated conditions. This fall had not been seen in previous studies, with Streptococcus oralis, nor was it predicted by the computer modelling. Neither experimental simulation nor computer modelling suggested that chewing urea-containing gum before exposure to sucrose would have any effect on a subsequent Stephan curve. Thus chewing gum is only likely to inhibit caries when it is chewed after consumption of fermentable carbohydrate, rather than before.

  8. Fate of Urea Nitrogen Applied to Rape Grown on a Red Soil and Efficiency of Urea in Raising Rape Yield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAIGUI-XIN; WUYI-WEI; 等

    1995-01-01

    Fate of urea nitrogen(N) applied to rape grown on a red soil was investigated by the 15N mass balance technique.and efficiency of urea and effect of nutrients balance in raising rape yield were investigated in a field plot experiment.One hundred and thirty -eight kg N/ha,86kg N/ha as basal dressing and 52 kg N/ha as top dressing,was applied with band application technique.The experiment was conducted in the southeast of china ,near Yingtan City,Jianxi Province.Results from 15N mass balance study showed that when urea urea was applied as basal dressing the plant recovery was 44.0% of the applied N for Treatment T (with application of N,P,K,B and lime),Plant recoveries were 38.0%-40.5% for Treatments-K,-B-lime and+RS(without application of K,B or lime as well as with additional rice straw compared with Teatment T),which were not significantly different from Treatment T.In contrast ,plant recovery was only 5.1% for Treatment-P(without application of P), indicating that P was the factor limiting N uptake by rape.However,N remaining in 0-0.30 m soil was high up to 71.6% for Treatment-P,while the corresponding data were 33.0%-42.6% for the other treatments.The total recovery of applied N(including plant recovery and N remaining in 0-0.60 m soil) was 91.5% for Treatment T when urea was applied as basal dressing,while almost all the applied N was recovered when ureawas applied as top drssing,It was suggested that N loss was greatly controlled by using band application method in this experiment.Results from the field plot experiment field plot experiment showed that N supply capacity of this red soil was very low,and the efficiency of the applied N was quite high,7.1kg rape seed was increased by application of one kg N for Treatment T.Nitrogen and phosphorus were the key factors limiting rape yield,and the yield was very low when neither of them was applied.The yield in Treatment-K was significantly lower than that in Treatment T,With the former accounting for 77% of the

  9. Bacterial contamination of anesthesia machines’ internal breathing-circuit-systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spertini, Verena; Borsoi, Livia; Berger, Jutta; Blacky, Alexander; Dieb-Elschahawi, Magda; Assadian, Ojan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Bacterial contamination of anesthesia breathing machines and their potential hazard for pulmonary infection and cross-infection among anesthetized patients has been an infection control issue since the 1950s. Disposable equipment and bacterial filters have been introduced to minimize this risk. However, the machines’ internal breathing-circuit-system has been considered to be free of micro-organisms without providing adequate data supporting this view. The aim of the study was to investigate if any micro-organisms can be yielded from used internal machines’ breathing-circuit-system. Based on such results objective reprocessing intervals could be defined. Methods: The internal parts of 40 anesthesia machines’ breathing-circuit-system were investigated. Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were performed. An on-site process observation of the re-processing sequence was conducted. Results: Bacterial growth was found in 17 of 40 machines (43%). No significant difference was ascertained between the contamination and the processing intervals. The most common contaminants retrieved were coagulase negative Staphylococci, aerobe spore forming bacteria and Micrococcus species. In one breathing-circuit-system, Escherichia coli, and in one further Staphylococcus aureus were yielded. Conclusion: Considering the availability of bacterial filters installed on the outlet of the breathing-circuit-systems, the type of bacteria retrieved and the on-site process observation, we conclude that the contamination found is best explained by a lack of adherence to hygienic measures during and after re-processing of the internal breathing-circuit-system. These results support an extension of the re-processing interval of the anesthesia apparatus longer than the manufacturer’s recommendation of one week. However, the importance of adherence to standard hygienic measures during re-processing needs to be emphasized. PMID:22242095

  10. Effect of slow-release urea on soil nematode community structure in a Chinese soybean field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuekun HOU; Ruichang ZHAI

    2009-01-01

    The effect of slow-release urea on soil nematode community structure was investigated in a soybean field in northeast China.Three treatments,no urea (CK),conventional urea (U) and slow-release urea (SRU),were arranged in a completely random design.The results show that the abundance of total nematodes was significantly higher in SRU than in CK and U.Significant differences in the abundance of bacterivores with colonizer-persister (cp) values 2-3,fungivores with cp 2 and herbivores with cp 3 were found among different treatments.Forty-one genera were identified,of which Acrobeloides,Aphelenchus and Heterodera were dominant.Soil nematode guilds and genera exhibited different responses to slow-release urea.The most trophic groups and genera had greater abundances in SRU than in CK and U.Slow-release urea had a positive effect on soil nematode community structure.

  11. Effect of urea addition on giant reed ensilage and subsequent methane production by anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan; Ge, Xumeng; Liew, Lo Niee; Liu, Zhe; Li, Yebo

    2015-09-01

    The effect of urea addition on giant reed ensilage and sequential anaerobic digestion (AD) of the ensiled giant reed was evaluated. The dry matter loss during ensilage (up to 90 days) with or without urea addition was about 1%. Addition of 2% urea enhanced production of lactic acid by about 4 times, and reduced production of propionic acid by 2-8 times. Besides, urea addition reduced degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose, and increased degradation of lignin in giant reed during ensilage. Ensilage with or without urea addition had no significant effects on the enzymatic digestibility of giant reed, but ensilage with urea addition achieved a cumulative methane yield of 173 L/kg VS, which was 18% higher than that of fresh giant reed. The improved methane yield of giant reed could be attributed to the production of organic acids and ethanol during ensilage.

  12. An evaluation of twelve nested models of transperitoneal transport of urea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, J; Fugleberg, S; Joffe, P;

    1995-01-01

    Models of transperitoneal urea transport are generally based on the one-compartment assumption, i.e. that the plasma water urea concentration in the peritoneal capillary bed is equal to the plasma water urea concentration in the peripheral veins. The aim of this study was to investigate...... the mechanism(s) of transperitoneal urea transport and to test the one-compartment assumption for urea. A total of 12 nested models were formulated and validated on the basis of experimental results obtained from 23 non-diabetic patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. The validation procedure demonstrated...... that transperitoneal transport of urea probably involves diffusion, non-lymphatic convection and lymphatic convection. It was furthermore demonstrated that the inclusion of lymphatic convection changes the mass transfer area coefficient considerably. Finally, no deviation from the one-compartment assumption...

  13. Noninvasive detection of lung cancer by analysis of exhaled breath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denz Hubert

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of death in Europe and the western world. At present, diagnosis of lung cancer very often happens late in the course of the disease since inexpensive, non-invasive and sufficiently sensitive and specific screening methods are not available. Even though the CT diagnostic methods are good, it must be assured that "screening benefit outweighs risk, across all individuals screened, not only those with lung cancer". An early non-invasive diagnosis of lung cancer would improve prognosis and enlarge treatment options. Analysis of exhaled breath would be an ideal diagnostic method, since it is non-invasive and totally painless. Methods Exhaled breath and inhaled room air samples were analyzed using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS and solid phase microextraction with subsequent gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME-GCMS. For the PTR-MS measurements, 220 lung cancer patients and 441 healthy volunteers were recruited. For the GCMS measurements, we collected samples from 65 lung cancer patients and 31 healthy volunteers. Lung cancer patients were in different disease stages and under treatment with different regimes. Mixed expiratory and indoor air samples were collected in Tedlar bags, and either analyzed directly by PTR-MS or transferred to glass vials and analyzed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS. Only those measurements of compounds were considered, which showed at least a 15% higher concentration in exhaled breath than in indoor air. Compounds related to smoking behavior such as acetonitrile and benzene were not used to differentiate between lung cancer patients and healthy volunteers. Results Isoprene, acetone and methanol are compounds appearing in everybody's exhaled breath. These three main compounds of exhaled breath show slightly lower concentrations in lung cancer patients as compared to healthy volunteers (p Conclusion GCMS-SPME is a relatively

  14. Effect of breathing on the radiotherapy of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the breathing and his effect on accuracy of treatment dose delivery into treated volume. We focused on a special technique - extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy (ESRT), which is characterized by high precision of patient setup and fixation. However, since the respiration causes movements of the tumor in the range of several millimeters to centimeters, the tumor volume have to be extended by safety margins. In our work, we focused on the introduction of noninvasive respiratory control system using ExacTrac. Breathing was represented by a special marker placed on the patient's body. With 35 patients we had together 157 breathing exercises, in which we investigated the range of motion of the markers during a relaxed breathing, in a deep inspiration, and in a deep expiration. We have created a software that allows to display the movement of the markers as well as the reference values of relaxed breathing and inspiration. The patients were able to track the signal on a small screen and base on this feedback to regulate their breathing. The average reproducibility of the inspiration was 93.0 % with the feedback and 74.5 % without the feedback. For 16 patients we used dynamic CT scan to study the correlation between tumor motion and the movements of the markers (0.83 ± 0.17) and as a result we estimated the required internal margins for irradiation at shallow breathing and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) with and without feedback. In DIBH treatment situation the internal margin could be theoretically reduced by 3 mm with the feedback device. The standard deviation was rather large, and therefore the amount of margin reduction varies from patient to patient. We compared different irradiation techniques in terms of DVH and the consequent risk of complications (NTCP). Compared with the standard irradiation technique at shallow breathing, irradiation in DIBH without respiratory control reduced the volume of lung irradiated with 12 , 15 and 18 Gy and

  15. Solution Properties of Soy Protein in DMSO/Urea Solvent System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Ru; YIN Duan; JIN Xin; SUN Gang

    2008-01-01

    Solution properties of 7S globulins (7S), 11S globulins (11S) and soy protein isolates (SPI) in dimethylsulfoxide ( DMSO )/urea solvent system were studied by intrinsic viscosity and particle size distributions.The results showed that the existence of urea was the main reason for the denaturation and solubility of soy protein in the system, and the effects were more obvious with increasing of urea concentration in solutions.Suitably dissolution temperature and time contributed to the solubility of soy proteins.

  16. Effects of Urea and Copper Sulphate on Some Serum Biochemical and Meat Parameters in Broiler Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rasool, M. Tariq Javed*, Masood Akhtar1, S. Shabbir Bhatti, M. N. Shahzad and Riaz Hussain2

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analysed some of the serum enzymes, urea and creatinine to understand the pathological changes occurring in different organs of broilers due to urea and copper. The feeding for 15 days at or higher than 2% urea + 1gm copper sulphate caused significant rise in serum ALT, AST, AKP and creatinine. With further increase in time of 15 days, the levels of urea and LDH also increased significantly, this was seen even in birds fed 1% urea + 250 mg copper sulphate. We found increase in serum urea even in 1% urea fed birds and in all other groups where combination was used, however, serum creatinine increased significantly (P<0.05 only in birds fed 2% urea+1 gm copper sulphate or higher than these levels. The combined use of urea and copper sulphate resulted in changes in moisture, ash, crude protein and potassium in thigh and breast meat of broilers. The results of the present study suggest damaging effects of higher levels of urea and copper, alone or together and change in meat quality with lower protein contents and higher salt levels in meat of broilers. Thus the use of urea and copper sulphate together is not recommended in broilers, especially at 1% urea and 250mg copper sulphate or higher. The results of the study can be helpful to poultry farmers, pathologists and nutritionists who are involved in augmentation the meat quality and also to general public with special reference to people having hypertension as the meat salt levels may be higher with use of the these compounds in the broiler ration.

  17. Determing the fate of selected antibiotics during nitrogen recovery via urea-formaldehdye synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kashobwe, Lackson

    2016-01-01

    The work presented here focused on the determination of fate of four selected antibiot-ics: enrofloaxicin, oxytetracyline, sulfamethoxazole and tylosin during nitrogen recovery from source separated urine via urea formaldehyde synthesis. The experimental pH was at 2 and temperature at 25°C throughout the chemical reaction, preventing urea hydroly-sis. Five main chemical reactions: aqueous + antibiotics, Urine + formaldehyde + antibi-otics (UF synthesis experiment), urea-formaldehyde polymer +...

  18. Pengaruh Lama Penyimpanan Urea Di Bulk Storage Terhadap Kadar Ammoniak Bebas Pada PT. Pupuk Iskandar Muda

    OpenAIRE

    Agustia, Delvi

    2011-01-01

    Free ammonia is the ammonia that is not perfect react with carbon dioxide during the process of manufacture of urea in the synthesis unit. Free ammonia is not bonded directly to urea but attached to the grain. Free ammonia would be toxic to plants at certain concentrations. Therefore the content of free ammonia in the urea granules have a reference quality Indonesian National Standard (SNI-2801-1992) and Organitation International Standards (ISO), ie, 150 ppm. From the results of my research ...

  19. Intercalation of urea into kaolinite for preparation of controlled release fertilizer

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdavi Fariba; Abdul Rashid Suraya; Khanif Yusop Mohd

    2014-01-01

    In this study urea was intercalated between layers of kaolinite by dry grinding technique to be used for preparing controlled release fertilizer. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) patterns confirmed the intercalation of urea into kaolinite by the significant expansion of the basal spacing of kaolinite layers from 0.710 nm to 1.090 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) also confirmed the hydrogen bonding between urea and kaolinite. Based on CHNS ...

  20. Infrared studies on o-, m- and p-cresol-urea (1:1) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolski, J. Cz.

    1990-03-01

    Complex formation between urea and o-, m- and p-cresol in 1,2-dichloroethane solutions was investigated by i.r. spectroscopy. Analogical 1:1 urea-phenol complex was reevaluated. Those complexes are formed by CO⋯H hydrogen bonding. In solution the NH urea groups do not play any significant role. The i.r. temperature studies allowed us to determine the enthalpy and entropy of formation of 1:1 complex.